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Sample records for resonance parameter evaluations

  1. Evaluation of the Chromium Resonance Parameters Including Resonance Parameter Covariance

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Derrien, Herve; Guber, Klaus H; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this work is to report the results and describe the procedures utilized to evaluate the chromium isotopes' cross sections, i.e., (50)Cr, (52)Cr, (53)Cr, and (54)Cr, for criticality safety applications. The evaluations were done in the resolved resonance region using the reduced Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. The novel aspect of this evaluation is the inclusion of new transmission and capture cross-section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) for energies below 100 keV and the extension of the (53)Cr energy region. The resonance analysis was performed with the multilevel R-matrix code, SAMMY, which utilizes the generalized least-squares technique based on the Bayes' theory. Complete sets of resonance parameters and resonance parameter covariance matrices (RPCMs) were obtained for each of the chromium isotopes from the SAMMY analysis of the experimental database.

  2. Evaluation of the Covariance Matrix of Estimated Resonance Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, B.; Capote, R.; Kopecky, S.; Massimi, C.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Sirakov, I.; Volev, K.

    2014-04-01

    In the resonance region nuclear resonance parameters are mostly obtained by a least square adjustment of a model to experimental data. Derived parameters can be mutually correlated through the adjustment procedure as well as through common experimental or model uncertainties. In this contribution we investigate four different methods to propagate the additional covariance caused by experimental or model uncertainties into the evaluation of the covariance matrix of the estimated parameters: (1) including the additional covariance into the experimental covariance matrix based on calculated or theoretical estimates of the data; (2) including the uncertainty affected parameter in the adjustment procedure; (3) evaluation of the full covariance matrix by Monte Carlo sampling of the common parameter; and (4) retroactively including the additional covariance by using the marginalization procedure of Habert et al.

  3. New Resonance Parameter Evaluation of Cl Neutron Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, R.O.; Guber, K.H.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.

    2005-05-24

    Better measurements and evaluations are needed for many elements where the existing evaluations or the underlying nuclear cross-section data are not sufficiently accurate for reliable calculation of criticality safety margins. Deficiencies in the existing ENDF/B-VI data evaluation for Cl led to our resonance parameter evaluation of Cl neutron cross sections in the resolved resonance region with the multilevel Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. Our evaluation takes advantage of recent high-resolution capture and transmission measurements at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) as well as older total cross-section measurements at Karlsruhe (KFK) to extend the resolved resonance energy range to 1.2 MeV with much more accurate representation of the data than previous evaluations.

  4. New evaluation of the{sup 232}Th resonance parameters in the energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Leal, L. C.; Larson, N. M.

    2006-07-01

    Neutron resonance parameters of {sup 232}Th were obtained from a Reich-Moore SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Linear Accelerator (ORELA) by Olsen et al. in 1981 and of high-resolution neutron capture measurements performed recently at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA (Belgium)) by Schillebeeckx et al. and at n-TOF (CERN (Switzerland)) by Aerts et al. The ORELA data were analyzed previously by Olsen using the Breit-Wigner multilevel code SIOB, and their results were used for the ENDF/B-VI evaluation. In our new analysis of the Olsen neutron transmissions using the modern computer code SAMMY, better accuracy is obtained for the resonance parameters by including recent experimental neutron capture data in the experimental data base. The experimental data base and the method of analysis are described in the report. Neutron transmissions and capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared to the experimental values. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters. The new evaluation produces a decrease in the capture resonance integral, and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks. (authors)

  5. Evaluation of Silicon Neutron Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 1800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2002-09-30

    The evaluation of the neutron cross sections of the three stable isotopes of silicon in the energy range thermal to 20 MeV was performed by Hetrick et al. for ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File). Resonance parameters were obtained in the energy range thermal to 1500 keV from a SAMMY analysis of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory experimental neutron transmission data. A new measurement of the capture cross section of natural silicon in the energy range 1 to 700 keV has recently been performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Results of this measurement were used in a SAMMY reevaluation of the resonance parameters, allowing determination of the capture width of a large number of resonances. The experimental data base is described; properties of the resonance parameters are given. For the first time the direct neutron capture component has been taken into account from the calculation by Rauscher et al. in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. Results of benchmark calculations are also given. The new evaluation is available in the ENDF/B-VI format.

  6. Evaluation of silicon neutron resonance parameters in the thermal to 1800 keV energy range.

    PubMed

    Derrien, H; Leal, L C; Guber, K H; Larson, N M

    2005-01-01

    Because silicon is a major constituent of concrete and soil, neutron and gamma ray information on silicon is important for reactor shielding and criticality safety calculations. Therefore, much effort was put into the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for the three stable isotopes of silicon. The neutron capture cross section of natural silicon was recently measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the energy range 1-700 keV. Using the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for initial values, a new evaluation of the resonance parameters was performed by adding the results of the ORELA capture measurements to the experimental database. The computer code SAMMY was used for the analysis of the experimental data; the new version of SAMMY allows accurate calculations of the self-shielding and multiple scattering effects in the capture measurements. The accuracy of the radiative capture widths of the resonances was improved by this analysis. Accurate values of the s-, p- and d-wave neutron strength functions were also obtained. Although the resonance capture component of the present evaluation is 2-3 times smaller than that in ENDF/B-VI, the total capture cross section is much larger, at least for energies >250 keV, because the direct capture component contributes values of the same order of magnitude as the resonance component. The direct component was not taken into account in the ENDF/B-VI evaluation and was calculated for the first time in the present evaluation.

  7. Evaluation of 238U Resonance Parameters from 0 to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.; Courcelle, A.; Santamarina, A.

    2005-05-24

    The neutron resonance parameters of 238U were obtained in the energy range 0 to 20 keV from a sequential SAMMY analysis of the most recent high-resolution neutron transmission and neutron capture cross-section measurements. Special care was taken in the analysis of the lowest s-wave resonances leading to resonance parameters slightly different from those of ENDF/B-VI (Moxon-Sowerby resonance parameters). The resolved-resonance range was extended to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high-resolution neutron transmission data of Harvey and neutron capture data of Macklin et al. Preliminary integral tests were performed with the new resonance parameters; thermal low-enriched benchmark calculations show an improvement of the keff prediction, mainly due to a 1.5% decrease of the capture cross section at 0.0253 eV and about a 0.4% decrease of the effective shielded resonance capture integral.

  8. Evaluation of the 235U resonance parameters to fit the standard recommended values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Luiz; Noguere, Gilles; Paradela, Carlos; Durán, Ignacio; Tassan-Got, Laurent; Danon, Yaron; Jandel, Marian

    2017-09-01

    A great deal of effort has been dedicated to the revision of the standard values in connection with the neutron interaction for some actinides. While standard data compilation are available for decades nuclear data evaluations included in existing nuclear data libraries (ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, etc.) do not follow the standard recommended values. Indeed, the majority of evaluations for major actinides do not conform to the standards whatsoever. In particular, for the n + 235U interaction the only value in agreement with the standard is the thermal fission cross section. A resonance re-evaluation of the n + 235U interaction has been performed to address the issues regarding standard values in the energy range from 10-5 eV to 2250 eV. Recently, 235U fission cross-section measurements have been performed at the CERN Neutron Time-of-Flight facility (TOF), known as n_TOF, in the energy range from 0.7 eV to 10 keV. The data were normalized according to the recommended standard of the fission integral in the energy range 7.8 eV to 11 eV. As a result, the n_TOF averaged fission cross sections above 100 eV are in good agreement with the standard recommended values. The n_TOF data were included in the 235U resonance analysis that was performed with the code SAMMY. In addition to the average standard values related to the fission cross section, standard thermal values for fission, capture, and elastic cross sections were also included in the evaluation. This paper presents the procedure used for re-evaluating the 235U resonance parameters including the recommended standard values as well as new cross section measurements.

  9. Some highlights in the evaluations of the thermal cross sections and resonance parameters of the actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Divadeenam, M.

    1981-01-01

    The resonance parameters and thermal cross sections of /sup 235/ /sup 238/U and /sup 239/ /sup 240/ /sup 241/ /sup 242/Pu are reevaluated by considering the measurements carried out since 1973. Capture, scattering, fission cross sections as well as resonance integrals are calculated from the parameters and are compared with experimental values with the objective of achieving consistency between calculations and measurements. The Dyson-Metha ..delta../sub 3/ statistical analysis was applied in order to calculate average level spacings. Calculations of average radiative widths based on systematics are carried out and are compared with experimental values as well as with Moore's and Lynn's estimates.

  10. Fascicular Ratio: A New Parameter to Evaluate Peripheral Nerve Pathology on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tagliafico, Alberto S.; Tagliafico, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the study was to define and quantitatively evaluate the fascicular ratio (FR) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with peripheral neuropathies compared with healthy controls. Forty control subjects (20 women, 20 men; age, 44.6 ± 13.4 years) and 40 patients with peripheral neuropathy (22 women, 18 men; age, 50.3 ± 10.2 years) were examined with a standard 3T MRI protocol. With customized software (with semiautomatic and automatic interface), the hypointense and hyperintense areas of the peripheral nerves corresponding to fascicular and nonfascicular tissue were examined on T1-weighted sequences. The ratio of fascicular pixels to total pixels was called FR. Correlation with FR calculated on high-resolution ultrasound was performed. The statistical analysis included the Mann–Whitney U test of controls versus patients, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, and the subgroup analysis of patients according to etiologies of neuropathy. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement was calculated based on the evaluation made by 3 readers. Finally, a complete automatic evaluation was performed. On MRI, FRs were significantly increased in patients compared with controls (FR, 76.7 ± 15.1 vs 56 ± 12.3; P < 0.0001 for the semiautomatic interface; and FR 66.3 ± 17.5 vs 47.8 ± 18.4; P < 0.0001 for the automatic interface). The increase in FR was caused mainly by an increase in the hypointense part of the nerve. This observation was valid for all causes of neuropathies. ROC analysis found an area under the curve of 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.44–0.81) for FR to discriminate neuropathy from control. The correlation coefficient between MRI and ultrasound was significant (r = 0.49; 95% confidence interval for r, 0.21–0.70; P = 0.012). With the semiautomated evaluation, the mean intraobserver agreement was good (K = 0.86). The interobserver agreements were also good (reader 1

  11. New Neutron Cross-Section Measurements from ORELA and New Resonance Parameter Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, Klaus H; Koehler, Paul; Wiarda, Dorothea; Harvey, John A; Valentine, Timothy E; Sayer, Royce O; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M; Bigelow, Tim S

    2008-01-01

    A series of new measurements has been undertaken in response to deficiencies identified in nuclear data libraries of crucial importance to the Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. New data and evaluations, including covariances, are required for several materials found in mixtures with uranium. For this purpose we performed neutron capture and total cross-section measurements on natural potassium, {sup 41}K, and manganese.

  12. Resonance Parameter Adjustment Based on Integral Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz; Arbanas, Goran; Forget, Benoit

    2016-06-02

    Our project seeks to allow coupling of differential and integral data evaluation in a continuous-energy framework and to use the generalized linear least-squares (GLLS) methodology in the TSURFER module of the SCALE code package to update the parameters of a resolved resonance region evaluation. We recognize that the GLLS methodology in TSURFER is identical to the mathematical description of a Bayesian update in SAMMY, the SAMINT code was created to use the mathematical machinery of SAMMY to update resolved resonance parameters based on integral data. Traditionally, SAMMY used differential experimental data to adjust nuclear data parameters. Integral experimental data, such as in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project, remain a tool for validation of completed nuclear data evaluations. SAMINT extracts information from integral benchmarks to aid the nuclear data evaluation process. Later, integral data can be used to resolve any remaining ambiguity between differential data sets, highlight troublesome energy regions, determine key nuclear data parameters for integral benchmark calculations, and improve the nuclear data covariance matrix evaluation. Moreover, SAMINT is not intended to bias nuclear data toward specific integral experiments but should be used to supplement the evaluation of differential experimental data. Using GLLS ensures proper weight is given to the differential data.

  13. Resonance Parameter Adjustment Based on Integral Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz; Arbanas, Goran; ...

    2016-06-02

    Our project seeks to allow coupling of differential and integral data evaluation in a continuous-energy framework and to use the generalized linear least-squares (GLLS) methodology in the TSURFER module of the SCALE code package to update the parameters of a resolved resonance region evaluation. We recognize that the GLLS methodology in TSURFER is identical to the mathematical description of a Bayesian update in SAMMY, the SAMINT code was created to use the mathematical machinery of SAMMY to update resolved resonance parameters based on integral data. Traditionally, SAMMY used differential experimental data to adjust nuclear data parameters. Integral experimental data, suchmore » as in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project, remain a tool for validation of completed nuclear data evaluations. SAMINT extracts information from integral benchmarks to aid the nuclear data evaluation process. Later, integral data can be used to resolve any remaining ambiguity between differential data sets, highlight troublesome energy regions, determine key nuclear data parameters for integral benchmark calculations, and improve the nuclear data covariance matrix evaluation. Moreover, SAMINT is not intended to bias nuclear data toward specific integral experiments but should be used to supplement the evaluation of differential experimental data. Using GLLS ensures proper weight is given to the differential data.« less

  14. Resonance Parameter Adjustment Based on Integral Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz; Arbanas, Goran; Forget, Benoit

    2016-06-02

    Our project seeks to allow coupling of differential and integral data evaluation in a continuous-energy framework and to use the generalized linear least-squares (GLLS) methodology in the TSURFER module of the SCALE code package to update the parameters of a resolved resonance region evaluation. We recognize that the GLLS methodology in TSURFER is identical to the mathematical description of a Bayesian update in SAMMY, the SAMINT code was created to use the mathematical machinery of SAMMY to update resolved resonance parameters based on integral data. Traditionally, SAMMY used differential experimental data to adjust nuclear data parameters. Integral experimental data, such as in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project, remain a tool for validation of completed nuclear data evaluations. SAMINT extracts information from integral benchmarks to aid the nuclear data evaluation process. Later, integral data can be used to resolve any remaining ambiguity between differential data sets, highlight troublesome energy regions, determine key nuclear data parameters for integral benchmark calculations, and improve the nuclear data covariance matrix evaluation. Moreover, SAMINT is not intended to bias nuclear data toward specific integral experiments but should be used to supplement the evaluation of differential experimental data. Using GLLS ensures proper weight is given to the differential data.

  15. Neutron Resonance Parameters for Cm-242 (Curium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Volume 24 `Neutron Resonance Parameters' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides the neutron resonance parameters for the isotope Cm-242 (Curium).

  16. Neutron Resonance Parameters for Np-237 (Neptunium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Volume 24 `Neutron Resonance Parameters' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides the neutron resonance parameters for the isotope Np-237 (Neptunium).

  17. Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

    1997-09-01

    Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

  18. Resonance parameter analysis with SAMMY

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.; Perey, F.G.

    1988-01-01

    The multilevel R-matrix computer code SAMMY has evolved over the past decade to become an important analysis tool for neutron data. SAMMY uses the Reich-Moore approximation to the multilevel R-matrix and includes an optional logarithmic parameterization of the external R-function. Doppler broadening is simulated either by numerical integration using the Gaussian approximation to the free gas model or by a more rigorous solution of the partial differential equation equivalent to the exact free gas model. Resolution broadening of cross sections and derivatives also has new options that more accurately represent the experimental situation. SAMMY treats constant normalization and some types of backgrounds directly and treats other normalizations and/or backgrounds with the introduction of user-generated partial derivatives. The code uses Bayes' method as an efficient alternative to least squares for fitting experimental data. SAMMY allows virtually any parameter to be varied and outputs values, uncertainties, and covariance matrix for all varied parameters. Versions of SAMMY exist for VAX, FPS, and IBM computers.

  19. Influence of resonance parameters' correlations on the resonance integral uncertainty; 55Mn case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Trkov, Andrej; Capote, Roberto; Rochman, Dimitri

    2011-03-01

    For nuclides with a large number of resonances the covariance matrix of resonance parameters can become very large and expensive to process in terms of the computation time. By converting covariance matrix of resonance parameters into covariance matrices of background cross-section in a more or less coarse group structure a considerable amount of computer time and memory can be saved. The question is how important is the information that is discarded in the process. First, the uncertainty of the 55Mn resonance integral was estimated in narrow resonance approximation for different levels of self-shielding using Bondarenko method by random sampling of resonance parameters according to their covariance matrices from two different 55Mn evaluations: one from Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG (with large uncertainties but no correlations between resonances), the other from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (with smaller uncertainties but full covariance matrix). We have found out that if all (or at least significant part of the) resonance parameters are correlated, the resonance integral uncertainty greatly depends on the level of self-shielding. Second, it was shown that the commonly used 640-group SAND-II representation cannot describe the increase of the resonance integral uncertainty. A much finer energy mesh for the background covariance matrix would have to be used to take the resonance structure into account explicitly, but then the objective of a more compact data representation is lost.

  20. Relationship between myocardial T2 values and cardiac volumetric and functional parameters in β-thalassemia patients evaluated by cardiac magnetic resonance in association with serum ferritin levels.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Carlo; Pitocco, Francesca; Di Giampietro, Ilenia; de Vivo, Aldo Eros; Schena, Emiliano; Cianciulli, Paolo; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte

    2013-09-01

    Myocardial T2 cardiovascular magnetic resonance provides a rapid and reproducible assessment of cardiac iron load in thalassemia patients. Although cardiac involvement is mainly characterized by left ventricular dysfunction caused by iron overload, little is known about right ventricular function. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between T2 value in myocardium and left-right ventricular volumetric and functional parameters and to evaluate the existing associations between left-right ventricles volumetric and functional parameter, myocardial T2 values and blood ferritin levels. A retrospective analysis of 208 patients with β-thalassemia major and thalassemia intermedia was performed (109 males and 99 females; mean age 37.7 ± 13 years; 143 thalassemia major, 65 thalassemia intermedia). Myocardial iron load was assessed by T2 measurements, and volumetric functions were analyzed using the steady state free precession sequence. A significant correlation was observed between EFLV and T2 (p=0.0001), EFRV and T2 (p=0.0279). An inverse correlation was present between DVLV and T2 (p=0.0468), SVLV and T2 (p=0.0003), SVRV and T2 (p=0.0001). There was no significant correlation between cardiac T2 and LV-RV mass indices. A significant correlation was observed between T2 and serum ferritin levels (p<0.001) and between EFLV and serum ferritin (p<0.05). Myocardial iron load assessed by T2 cardiac magnetic resonance is associated with deterioration in left-right ventricular function; this is more evident when T2 values fall below 14 ms. CMR appears to be a promising approach for cardiac risk evaluation in TM patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Correlation Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Evaluation of Extramural Vascular Invasion and Prognostic Parameters of T3 Stage Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Huang, Dong-Ya; Xu, Hui-Xin; Li, Yang; Xu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between magnetic resonance imaging-based extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) and the prognostic clinical and histological parameters of stage T3 rectal cancers. Eighty-six patients with T3 stage rectal cancer who received surgical resection without neoadjuvant therapy were included. Magnetic resonance imaging-based EMVI scores were determined. Correlations between the scores and pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen levels, tumor differentiation grade, nodal stage, and vascular endothelial growth factor expression were analyzed using Spearman rank coefficient analysis. Magnetic resonance imaging-based EMVI scores were statistically different (P = 0.001) between histological nodal stages (N0 vs N1 vs N2). Correlations were found between magnetic resonance imaging-based EMVI scores and tumor histological grade (rs = 0.227, P = 0.035), histological nodal stage (rs = 0.524, P < 0.001), and vascular endothelial growth factor expression (rs = 0.422; P = 0.016). Magnetic resonance imaging-based EMVI score is correlated with prognostic parameters of T3 stage rectal cancers and has the potential to become an imaging biomarker of tumor aggressiveness. Magnetic resonance imaging-based EMVI may be useful in helping the multidisciplinary team to stratify T3 rectal cancer patients for neoadjuvant therapies.

  2. Rho resonance parameters from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Dehua; Alexandru, Andrei; Molina, Raquel; Döring, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We perform a high-precision calculation of the phase shifts for $\\pi$-$\\pi$ scattering in the I = 1, J = 1 channel in the elastic region using elongated lattices with two mass-degenerate quark favors ($N_f = 2$). We extract the $\\rho$ resonance parameters using a Breit-Wigner fit at two different quark masses, corresponding to $m_{\\pi} = 226$MeV and $m_{\\pi} = 315$MeV, and perform an extrapolation to the physical point. The extrapolation is based on a unitarized chiral perturbation theory model that describes well the phase-shifts around the resonance for both quark masses. We find that the extrapolated value, $m_{\\rho} = 720(1)(15)$MeV, is significantly lower that the physical rho mass and we argue that this shift could be due to the absence of the strange quark in our calculation.

  3. Resonance parameter measurements and analysis of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Barry, D. P.; Trbovich, M. J.; Burke, J. A.; Drindak, N. J.; Knox, H. D.; Ballad, R. V.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.; Severnyak, L. I.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of gadolinium accurately. Gd has the highest thermal absorption cross section of any natural element. Therefore it is an important element for thermal reactor applications Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Gd samples. The liquid samples were isotopically-enriched in either {sup 155}Gd or {sup 157}Gd. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a sodium iodide detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. The multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY was used to extract resonance parameters. The results of the thermal region analysis are significant. Resonance parameters for the low energy doublet, at 0.025 and 0.032 eV, are presented. The thermal (2200 m/s) capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd has been measured to be 11% smaller than that calculated from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 8. Thermal capture cross sections and capture resonance integrals for each isotope as well as elemental gadolinium are presented. In the epithermal region, natural metal samples were measured in capture and transmission. Neutron interaction data up to 300 eV have been analyzed. Substantial improvement to the understanding of gadolinium cross sections is presented, particularly above 180 eV where the ENDF resolved region for {sup 155}Gd ends. (authors)

  4. RESONANT EXTRACTION PARAMETERS FOR THE AGS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,K.A.; CULLEN,J.; GLENN,J.W.; MAPES,M.; MARNERIS,I.; TSOUPAS,N.; SNYDSTRUP,L.; VAN ASSELT,W.

    2001-06-18

    Brookhaven's AGS Booster is the injector for the AGS. It is being modified to send resonant extracted heavy ions to a new beam line, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The design of the resonant extraction system for BAF was described in [1]. This note will give a more detailed description of the system and describe the predicted resonant beam time structure. We will describe tune space manipulations necessary to extract the resonant beam at the maximum Booster rigidity, schemes for performing resonant extraction, and describe the modifications required to perform bunched beam extraction to the BAF facility.

  5. Can multi-positional magnetic resonance imaging be used to evaluate angular parameters in cervical spine? A comparison of multi-positional MRI to dynamic plain radiograph.

    PubMed

    Paholpak, Permsak; Tamai, Koji; Shoell, Kyle; Sessumpun, Kittipong; Buser, Zorica; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2017-09-25

    To test the reliability and validity of the multi-positional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in measuring cervical angular parameter using the standard dynamic cervical X-ray as a reference. All patients who underwent both cervical dynamic plain radiograph and multi-positional MRI on the same day between 2010 and 2016 were included in this study. The C2-7 angle and the segmental angles of the C2-3 to C6-7 segments were measured in all three positions (neutral, flexion, and extension) using multi-positional MRI and dynamic radiograph. The Pearson's correlation coefficients and linear regression analysis were used for statistical analysis. 46 patients were enrolled in this study. All angular parameters showed significant positive correlation between multi-positional MRI and dynamic X-ray (p < 0.05). The angle of C2-7 showed significantly positive correlation between multi-positional MRI and X-ray (r = 0.552-0.756). All segmental angles from C2-3 to C6-7 showed moderate correlation (r = 0.401-0.636). The linear regression analysis showed that C2-7 angles and all angular parameters had significant correlation between multi-positional MRI and dynamic X-ray (p < 0.05, R (2) = 0.107-0.571). The C2-7 angle and segmental cervical angles measured by multi-positional MRI were valid, and reliability substituted the dynamic X-ray measurement within the acceptable range of error. Multi-positional MRI can be used as a reliable tool for angular parameter measurement and detection of angular instability in the cervical spine.

  6. Evaluating the Uncertainty in Exchange Parameters Determined from Off-Resonance R1ρ Relaxation Dispersion for Systems in Fast Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Bothe, Jameson R.; Stein, Zachary W.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Spin relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) is a powerful NMR technique for characterizing fast microsecond timescale exchange processes directed toward short-lived excited states in biomolecules. At the limit of fast exchange, only kex = k1 + k−1 and Φıx = pGpE(Δω)2 can be determined from R1ρ data limiting the ability to characterize the structure and energetics of the excited state conformation. Here, we use simulations to examine the uncertainty with which exchange parameters can be determined for two state systems in intermediate-to-fast exchange using off-resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion. R1ρ data computed by solving the Bloch-McConnell equations reveals small but significant asymmetry with respect to offset (R1ρ(ΔΩ) ≠ R1ρ(−ΔΩ)), which is a hallmark of slow-to-intermediate exchange, even under conditions of fast exchange for free precession chemical exchange line broadening (kex/Δω > 10). A grid search analysis combined with bootstrap and Monte-Carlo based statistical approaches for estimating uncertainty in exchange parameters reveals that both the sign and magnitude of Δω can be determined at a useful level of uncertainty for systems in fast exchange (kex/Δω < 10) but that this depends on the uncertainty in the R1ρ data and requires a thorough examination of the multidimensional variation of χ2 as a function of exchange parameters. Results from simulations are complemented by analysis of experimental R1ρ data measured in three nucleic acid systems with exchange processes occurring on the slow (kex/Δω = 0.2; pE = ~ 0.7%), fast (kex/Δω = ~10–16; pE = ~13%) and very fast (kex = 39,000 s−1) chemical shift timescales. PMID:24819426

  7. ORNL Resonance Evaluation for ENDF/B-VII.1

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Wiarda, Dorothea; Arbanas, Goran; Dunn, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Cross-section evaluations in the resonance region are performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the computer code SAMMY based on formalisms derived from the R-matrix theory. Resonance parameters (RPs) obtained in the evaluation, combined with resonance formalism, replicate a regression of the experimental data. The RPs are also used to generate cross-section data for neutron transport calculations in analyses of nuclear reactor design and nuclear criticality safety. In addition to generating RPs, the evaluation also generates the resonance parameter covariance (RPC) data. Several ORNL resonance evaluations, including RPs and RPCs, were incorporated in the recently released US-evaluated nuclear data library, ENDF/B-VII.1. A brief summary of the RPs and RPCs evaluated at ORNL is given.

  8. Fascicular ratio: a new parameter to evaluate peripheral nerve pathology on magnetic resonance imaging: a feasibility study on a 3T MRI system.

    PubMed

    Tagliafico, Alberto S; Tagliafico, Giulio

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to define and quantitatively evaluate the fascicular ratio (FR) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with peripheral neuropathies compared with healthy controls. Forty control subjects (20 women, 20 men; age, 44.6 ± 13.4 years) and 40 patients with peripheral neuropathy (22 women, 18 men; age, 50.3 ± 10.2 years) were examined with a standard 3T MRI protocol. With customized software (with semiautomatic and automatic interface), the hypointense and hyperintense areas of the peripheral nerves corresponding to fascicular and nonfascicular tissue were examined on T1-weighted sequences. The ratio of fascicular pixels to total pixels was called FR. Correlation with FR calculated on high-resolution ultrasound was performed. The statistical analysis included the Mann-Whitney U test of controls versus patients, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, and the subgroup analysis of patients according to etiologies of neuropathy. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement was calculated based on the evaluation made by 3 readers. Finally, a complete automatic evaluation was performed. On MRI, FRs were significantly increased in patients compared with controls (FR, 76.7 ± 15.1 vs 56 ± 12.3; P < 0.0001 for the semiautomatic interface; and FR 66.3 ± 17.5 vs 47.8 ± 18.4; P < 0.0001 for the automatic interface). The increase in FR was caused mainly by an increase in the hypointense part of the nerve. This observation was valid for all causes of neuropathies. ROC analysis found an area under the curve of 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.44-0.81) for FR to discriminate neuropathy from control. The correlation coefficient between MRI and ultrasound was significant (r = 0.49; 95% confidence interval for r, 0.21-0.70; P = 0.012). With the semiautomated evaluation, the mean intraobserver agreement was good (K = 0.86). The interobserver agreements were also good (reader 1 vs reader 2, k

  9. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  10. Random sampling and validation of covariance matrices of resonance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plevnik, Lucijan; Zerovnik, Gašper

    2017-09-01

    Analytically exact methods for random sampling of arbitrary correlated parameters are presented. Emphasis is given on one hand on the possible inconsistencies in the covariance data, concentrating on the positive semi-definiteness and consistent sampling of correlated inherently positive parameters, and on the other hand on optimization of the implementation of the methods itself. The methods have been applied in the program ENDSAM, written in the Fortran language, which from a file from a nuclear data library of a chosen isotope in ENDF-6 format produces an arbitrary number of new files in ENDF-6 format which contain values of random samples of resonance parameters (in accordance with corresponding covariance matrices) in places of original values. The source code for the program ENDSAM is available from the OECD/NEA Data Bank. The program works in the following steps: reads resonance parameters and their covariance data from nuclear data library, checks whether the covariance data is consistent, and produces random samples of resonance parameters. The code has been validated with both realistic and artificial data to show that the produced samples are statistically consistent. Additionally, the code was used to validate covariance data in existing nuclear data libraries. A list of inconsistencies, observed in covariance data of resonance parameters in ENDF-VII.1, JEFF-3.2 and JENDL-4.0 is presented. For now, the work has been limited to resonance parameters, however the methods presented are general and can in principle be extended to sampling and validation of any nuclear data.

  11. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, M J; Barry, D P; Slovacek, R E; Danon, Y; Block, R C; Francis, N C; Lubert, M; Burke, J A; Drindak, N J; Lienweber, G; Ballad, R

    2007-02-06

    The focus of this work is to determine the resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005 - 200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. Accurate hafnium cross sections and resonance parameters are needed in order to quantify the effects of hafnium found in zirconium, a metal commonly used in reactors. The accuracy of the cross sections and the corresponding resonance parameters used in current nuclear analysis tools are rapidly becoming the limiting factor in reducing the overall uncertainty on reactor physics calculations. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission are routinely performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC using the time-of flight technique. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m, respectively. Capture experiments were performed using a sixteen section NaI multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized several thicknesses of metallic and isotope-enriched liquid Hf samples. The liquid Hf samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analyses were performed using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. A combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005 - 200 eV. Additionally, resonance integrals were calculated, along with errors for each hafnium isotope, using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previous values. The {sup 176}Hf resonance integral, based on this work, is approximately 73% higher than the ENDF/B-VI value. This is due primarily to the changes to resonance parameters in the 8 eV resonance, the neutron width presented in this work is more than twice that of the previous value. The calculated elemental

  12. On random sampling of correlated resonance parameters with large uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Capote, Roberto; Trkov, Andrej

    2013-09-01

    Three different methods for multivariate random sampling of correlated resonance parameters are proposed: the diagonalization method, the Metropolis method, and the correlated sampling method. For small relative uncertainties (typical for s-wave resonances) and weak correlations all methods are equivalent. Differences arise under difficult conditions: large relative uncertainties of inherently positive parameters (typical for widths of higher-l-wave resonances) and/or strong correlations between a large number of parameters. The methods are tested on realistic examples; advantages and disadvantages of each method are pointed out. The correlated sampling method is the only method which produces consistent samples under any conditions. In the field of reactor physics, these methods are mostly used for the sampling of nuclear data, however, they may be used for any data with given uncertainties and correlations.

  13. 239Pu Resonance Evaluation for Thermal Benchmark System Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Noguere, G; De Saint Jean, C; Kahler, A.

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of thermal plutonium solution critical benchmark systems have indicated a deciency in the 239Pu resonance evaluation. To investigate possible solutions to this issue, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party for Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) established Subgroup 34 to focus on the reevaluation of the 239Pu resolved resonance parameters. In addition, the impacts of the prompt neutron multiplication (nubar) and the prompt neutron ssion spectrum (PFNS) have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the 239Pu resolved resonance evaluation eort.

  14. 239Pu Resonance Evaluation for Thermal Benchmark System Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, L. C.; Noguere, G.; de Saint Jean, C.; Kahler, A. C.

    2014-04-01

    Analyses of thermal plutonium solution critical benchmark systems have indicated a deficiency in the 239Pu resonance evaluation. To investigate possible solutions to this issue, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party for Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) established Subgroup 34 to focus on the reevaluation of the 239Pu resolved resonance parameters. In addition, the impacts of the prompt neutron multiplicity (νbar) and the prompt neutron fission spectrum (PFNS) have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the 239Pu resolved resonance evaluation effort.

  15. Neutron Resonance Parameters and Covariance Matrix of 239Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M

    2008-08-01

    In order to obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed or reanalyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The normalization of the fission cross section data was reconsidered by taking into account the most recent measurements of Weston et al. and Wagemans et al. A full resonance parameter covariance matrix was generated. The method used to obtain realistic uncertainties on the average cross section calculated by SAMMY or other processing codes was examined.

  16. 95Mo nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of molybdenum hexacarbonyl from density functional theory: appraisal of computational and geometrical parameters.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Jérôme; Sykina, Kateryna; Fontaine, Bruno; Le Pollès, Laurent; Pickard, Chris J; Gautier, Régis

    2011-11-21

    Solid-state (95)Mo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of molybdenum hexacarbonyl have been computed using density functional theory (DFT) based methods. Both quadrupolar coupling and chemical shift parameters were evaluated and compared with parameters of high precision determined using single-crystal (95)Mo NMR experiments. Within a molecular approach, the effects of major computational parameters, i.e. basis set, exchange-correlation functional, treatment of relativity, have been evaluated. Except for the isotropic parameter of both chemical shift and chemical shielding, computed NMR parameters are more sensitive to geometrical variations than computational details. Relativistic effects do not play a crucial part in the calculations of such parameters for the 4d transition metal, in particular isotropic chemical shift. Periodic DFT calculations were tackled to measure the influence of neighbouring molecules on the crystal structure. These effects have to be taken into account to compute accurate solid-state (95)Mo NMR parameters even for such an inorganic molecular compound.

  17. Parameter measurement of synchronous reluctance motor using LC resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Joonseon; Kim, Ki-Chan; Lee, Ju

    2006-04-01

    The motor characterizing parameters are most important factors to drive precisely, effectively, and robustly. Especially, the exact knowledge of synchronous inductance is necessary to control the torque precisely in synchronous reluctance motor (SynRM). Therefore many works have been done for the exact measurement of motor parameters. In this paper, we propose the simple method of measuring the motor parameters, especially measuring the synchronous inductance of SynRM, which can overcome the demerits of conventional methods and measure the exact values. The proposed method uses the resonance phenomenon between the phase inductance and capacitors externally connected.

  18. Integral characteristic parameters of the giant {ital M}1 resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Bastrukov, S.I.; Molodtsova, I.V.; Shilov, V.M.

    1995-08-01

    The dipole magnetization of a heavy spherical nucleus is studied with macroscopic standpoint. The semiclassical model under consideration focuses on the giant {ital M}1 resonance as a result of long wavelength oscillations of the collective magnetization current induced in the surface massive layer of finite depth. The macroscopic picture of the excited collective flow is found to be like that for the torsional elastic vibrations of the peripheral layer against the central spherical region inert with respect to external perturbation. The emphasis is placed on calculation of scaling behavior of integral characteristic parameters of magnetic dipole resonance.

  19. Evaluation of Neutron Resonance Cross Section Data at GELINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillebeeckx, P.; Becker, B.; Capote, R.; Emiliani, F.; Guber, K.; Heyse, J.; Kauwenberghs, K.; Kopecky, S.; Lampoudis, C.; Massimi, C.; Mondelaers, W.; Moxon, M.; Noguere, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Pronyaev, V.; Siegler, P.; Sirakov, I.; Trkov, A.; Volev, K.; Zerovnik, G.

    2014-05-01

    Over the last decade, the EC-JRC-IRMM, in collaboration with other institutes such as INRNE Sofia (BG), INFN Bologna (IT), ORNL (USA), CEA Cadarache (FR) and CEA Saclay (FR), has made an intense effort to improve the quality of neutron-induced cross section data in the resonance region. These improvements relate to both the infrastructure of the facility and the measurement setup, and the data reduction and analysis procedures. As a result total and reaction cross section data in the resonance region with uncertainties better than 0.5 % and 2 %, respectively, can be produced together with evaluated data files for both the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The methodology to produce full ENDF compatible files, including covariances, is illustrated by the production of resolved resonance parameter files for 241Am, Cd and W and an evaluation for 197Au in the unresolved resonance region.

  20. Determination of Resonance Parameters and their Covariances from Neutron Induced Reaction Cross Section Data

    SciTech Connect

    Schillebeeckx, P.; Becker, B.; Danon, Y.; Guber, K.; Harada, H.; Heyse, J.; Junghans, A.R.; Kopecky, S.; Massimi, C.; Moxon, M.C.; Otuka, N.; Sirakov, I.; Volev, K.

    2012-12-15

    Cross section data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region are represented by nuclear reaction formalisms using parameters which are determined by fitting them to experimental data. Therefore, the quality of evaluated cross sections in the resonance region strongly depends on the experimental data used in the adjustment process and an assessment of the experimental covariance data is of primary importance in determining the accuracy of evaluated cross section data. In this contribution, uncertainty components of experimental observables resulting from total and reaction cross section experiments are quantified by identifying the metrological parameters involved in the measurement, data reduction and analysis process. In addition, different methods that can be applied to propagate the covariance of the experimental observables (i.e. transmission and reaction yields) to the covariance of the resonance parameters are discussed and compared. The methods being discussed are: conventional uncertainty propagation, Monte Carlo sampling and marginalization. It is demonstrated that the final covariance matrix of the resonance parameters not only strongly depends on the type of experimental observables used in the adjustment process, the experimental conditions and the characteristics of the resonance structure, but also on the method that is used to propagate the covariances. Finally, a special data reduction concept and format is presented, which offers the possibility to store the full covariance information of experimental data in the EXFOR library and provides the information required to perform a full covariance evaluation.

  1. Comparison of Resonance Parameter Covariance Generation using CONRAD and SAMMY Computer Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; De Saint Jean, C; Noguere, G

    2010-01-01

    Cross section evaluations in the resolved resonance region are based on formalisms derived from the R-matrix theory. As a result, the evaluations provide a set of resonance parameters that can be used to reproduce the experimental data reasonably well. The evaluated nuclear data are used in neutron transport calculations for the analysis and design of nuclear reactor systems, nuclear criticality safety analyses, etc. To achieve the desired accuracy on the nuclear system calculations, the questions frequently asked are how well the nuclear data are known and how the uncertainty in the nuclear data can be propagated into the final nuclear system results. There have been ongoing efforts at several research centers for generating data uncertainties in the resonance and high-energy regions. The biggest issue in relation to the covariance data is how good the calculated uncertainties are or whether the calculated uncertainties are in agreement with realistic uncertainties derived from an experimental nuclear system or nuclear benchmark. In this work an attempt is made to use two distinct and independently developed computer codes, CONRAD and SAMMY, to evaluate and generate covariance data in the resonance region. The verification study has been performed in support of the U.S. Nuclear Criticality Safety program (NCSP) as the NCSP is working to provide improved nuclear data files to support criticality safety analyses. The objective is to check the procedures and the methodologies used in the resonance region for covariance generation. The studies have been carried out using the 48Ti resolved resonance parameters.

  2. Parameters optimization for magnetic resonance coupling wireless power transmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Changsheng; Zhang, He; Jiang, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    Taking maximum power transmission and power stable transmission as research objectives, optimal design for the wireless power transmission system based on magnetic resonance coupling is carried out in this paper. Firstly, based on the mutual coupling model, mathematical expressions of optimal coupling coefficients for the maximum power transmission target are deduced. Whereafter, methods of enhancing power transmission stability based on parameters optimal design are investigated. It is found that the sensitivity of the load power to the transmission parameters can be reduced and the power transmission stability can be enhanced by improving the system resonance frequency or coupling coefficient between the driving/pick-up coil and the transmission/receiving coil. Experiment results are well conformed to the theoretical analysis conclusions.

  3. Giant dipole resonance parameters with uncertainties from photonuclear cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plujko, V. A.; Capote, R.; Gorbachenko, O. M.

    2011-09-01

    Updated values and corresponding uncertainties of isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR or GDR) model parameters are presented that are obtained by the least-squares fitting of theoretical photoabsorption cross sections to experimental data. The theoretical photoabsorption cross section is taken as a sum of the components corresponding to excitation of the GDR and quasideuteron contribution to the experimental photoabsorption cross section. The present compilation covers experimental data as of January 2010.

  4. Some principles in choosing parameters of magnetic resonance tomographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volobuev, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    The problem of amplifying the signal that ensures the visualization of internal organs in the magnetic resonance tomograph due to the optimal selection of some of its parameters has been considered. The operating principle of the tomograph has been analyzed. The relation between the angle of the magnetic moment precession in hydrogen nuclei in an organism, the frequency of the ac magnetic field exciting this precession, and the constant magnetic field used has been determined using quantum-mechanical concepts. This relation makes it possible to determine the optimal parameters for tomograph operation.

  5. Induction magnetometer for the RESONANCE project - parameters analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronenko, Vira; Santolik, Ondrej; Mogilevsky, Mihail; Dudkin, Denis; Jannet, Guillaume; Kolmasova, Ivana; Lan, Radek; Uhlir, Ludek

    2013-04-01

    The RESONANCE experiment focuses on the study of the processes in the inner magnetosphere of our planet. The objectives of the project include the investigation of interactions between waves and particles, and monitoring of the large-scale changes in the magnetosphere associated with geomagnetic activity and magnetic storms. The study of magnetic fields is of prime importance for RESONANCE project, taking into account that the special appeal of this mission is that four spacecrafts will be simultaneously launched at the specially designed path - the so-called "magnetosynchronous orbit" - when all the four spacecrafts will be some enough long time within the sole magnetic line. Thanks to its unique orbital configuration and instrumental composition, the RESONANCE project gives best opportunity for study of elongated structures in the magnetosphere of the Earth. The AC magnetic field will be measured by the three-component induction coil magnetometer LEMI-606, developed for the study of magnetic field fluctuations in space conditions in the frequency band 1-20000 Hz. It is known that the plasma parameters vary rapidly in space and time, so in the case of simultaneous measurements at four points special demand of high temporal resolution and low measurement error must be provided. To this, the identity of the parameters of all four devices that will be installed and operating simultaneously on all satellites becomes the major requirement. These all requirements were taken into account at the development of the LEMI-606 magnetometers. Another feature of these magnetometers is strongly nonsymmetric construction which is due to the general satellite design. Such an arrangement of the magnetometers leads to the increase of their cross-talk and nonorthogonality. The influence of the magnetometer construction on its parameters is analyzed. A comparison of the magnetometers parameters of symmetric and nonsymmetric design is carried out and experimental results are presented.

  6. sup 56 Fe and sup 60 Ni resonance parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Perey, C.M.; Perey, F.G.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Larson, N.M.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution neutron transmission and differential elastic-scattering measurements were made for a {sup 56}Fe-enriched iron target at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). A natural iron target was used for transmission measurements below 160 keV. The data were analyzed from 5 to 850 keV. Parameters were obtained for 33 {ell} = 0 and 242 {ell} > 0 resonances. New {sup 6}Li-glass transmission data were acquired for two {sup 60}Ni-enriched sample thicknesses. The neutron width for the 2.253-keV resonance was determined to be 59.3 {plus minus} 0.6 meV and the radiation width 553 {plus minus} 50 meV. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Reevaluation and Validation of the {sup 241}Pu Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 20 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Leal, L.C.; Courcelle, A.; Santamarina, A.

    2005-05-15

    A new SAMMY analysis of the {sup 241}Pu resonance parameters from thermal to 20 eV is presented. This evaluation takes into account the trends given by integral experiments [post-irradiation experiments performed in French pressurized water reactors (PWRs)]. Compared to the previous evaluations performed by Derrien and de Saussure, the capture cross section increases especially in the 0.26-eV resonance. It is shown that the new resonance parameters proposed in this work improve the prediction of the {sup 242}Pu buildup in a PWR, which was significantly underestimated with the previous evaluations.

  8. Nonlinear Parameter Identification of a Resonant Electrostatic MEMS Actuator.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghamdi, Majed S; Alneamy, Ayman M; Park, Sangtak; Li, Beichen; Khater, Mahmoud E; Abdel-Rahman, Eihab M; Heppler, Glenn R; Yavuz, Mustafa

    2017-05-13

    We experimentally investigate the primary superharmonic of order two and subharmonic of order one-half resonances of an electrostatic MEMS actuator under direct excitation. We identify the parameters of a one degree of freedom (1-DOF) generalized Duffing oscillator model representing it. The experiments were conducted in soft vacuum to reduce squeeze-film damping, and the actuator response was measured optically using a laser vibrometer. The predictions of the identified model were found to be in close agreement with the experimental results. We also identified the noise spectral density of process (actuation voltage) and measurement noise.

  9. Evaluation and Treatment of Resonance Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kummer, Ann W.; Lee, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Resonance disorders can have a variety of causes but the appropriate evaluation includes a speech pathology evaluation and may require a videofluoroscopic speech study or nasopharyngoscopy assessment. Treatment may include surgery or the use of prosthetic devices, and usually speech therapy. An interdisciplinary approach is best. (Author/DB)

  10. Evaluation and Treatment of Resonance Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kummer, Ann W.; Lee, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Resonance disorders can have a variety of causes but the appropriate evaluation includes a speech pathology evaluation and may require a videofluoroscopic speech study or nasopharyngoscopy assessment. Treatment may include surgery or the use of prosthetic devices, and usually speech therapy. An interdisciplinary approach is best. (Author/DB)

  11. Effective parameters for periodic photonic structures of resonant elements.

    PubMed

    Tserkezis, C

    2009-04-15

    We report on the effective electromagnetic parameters of metamaterials consisting of resonant building units, through systematic full-electrodynamic calculations by the layer-multiple-scattering method on a model system: a photonic crystal of metallic nanoshells. The results obtained by the S-matrix retrieval procedure for single- and multi-layer slabs of ordered arrays of such nanoshells are analysed in conjunction with the complex band structure of the corresponding infinite crystal and the Maxwell-Garnett effective-medium approximation. We discuss conditions that must be fulfilled in order for an effective-medium description of a metamaterial to be valid and explain artefacts which often occur in numerical calculations of the effective parameters. In particular, we propose a method to resolve ambiguities in the determination of the effective refractive index, which become prominent for thick slabs, based on the complex band structure of the infinite crystal.

  12. Statistical parameters for gloss evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Juuti, Mikko

    2006-02-13

    The measurement of minute changes in local gloss has not been presented in international standards due to a lack of suitable glossmeters. The development of a diffractive-element-based glossmeter (DOG) made it possible to detect local variation of gloss from planar and complex-shaped surfaces. Hence, a demand for proper statistical gloss parameters for classifying surface quality by gloss, similar to the standardized surface roughness classification, has become necessary. In this letter, we define statistical gloss parameters and utilize them as an example in the characterization of gloss from metal surface roughness standards by the DOG.

  13. Resonance Evaluation of 48Ti Including Covariance for Criticality Safety Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea; Koehler, Paul Edward; Kahler, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we report the methodology and the results of an evaluation carried out for 48Ti in the resolved resonance region for applications in criticality safety calculations. The evaluation was performed using the computer code SAMMY with the reduced R-matrix Reich-Moore formalism. The Bayes scheme was utilized for fitting the experimental data. New transmission and capture data were essential in the evaluation process. A complete set of resonance parameters was obtained in the energy region from thermal to 400 keV. In addition to the resonance parameters, a resonance parameter covariance matrix was also obtained. The impact of the new resonance parameter evaluation in benchmark calculations, as well as the uncertainty, was verified.

  14. On the Methodology to Calculate the Covariance of Estimated Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2015-01-15

    Principles to determine resonance parameters and their covariance from experimental data are discussed. Different methods to propagate the covariance of experimental parameters are compared. A full Bayesian statistical analysis reveals that the level to which the initial uncertainty of the experimental parameters propagates, strongly depends on the experimental conditions. For high precision data the initial uncertainties of experimental parameters, like a normalization factor, has almost no impact on the covariance of the parameters in case of thick sample measurements and conventional uncertainty propagation or full Bayesian analysis. The covariances derived from a full Bayesian analysis and least-squares fit are derived under the condition that the model describing the experimental observables is perfect. When the quality of the model can not be verified a more conservative method based on a renormalization of the covariance matrix is recommended to propagate fully the uncertainty of experimental systematic effects. Finally, neutron resonance transmission analysis is proposed as an accurate method to validate evaluated data libraries in the resolved resonance region.

  15. Comments on extracting the resonance strength parameter from yield data

    DOE PAGES

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea

    2015-06-23

    The F(α,n) reaction is the focus of on-going research in part because it is an important source of neutrons in the nuclear fuel cycle which can be exploited to assay nuclear materials, especially uranium in the form of UF6. At the present time there remains some considerable uncertainty (of the order of ± 20%) in the thick target integrated over angle (α,n) yield from 19F (100% natural abundance) and its compounds as discussed. An important thin target cross-section measurement is that of Wrean and Kavanagh who explore the region from below threshold (2.36 MeV) to approximately 3.1 MeV with finemore » energy resolution. Integration of their cross-section data over the slowing down history of a stopping α-particle allows the thick target yield to be calculated for incident energies up to 3.1 MeV. This trend can then be combined with data from other sources to obtain a thick target yield curve over the wider range of interest to the fuel cycle (roughly threshold to 10 MeV to include all relevant α-emitters). To estimate the thickness of the CaF2 target they used, Wrean and Kavanagh separately measured the integrated yield of the 6.129 MeV γ-rays from the resonance at 340.5 keV (laboratory α-particle kinetic energy) in the 19F(p,αγ) reaction. To interpret the data they adopted a resonance strength parameter of (22.3 ± 0.8) eV based on a determination by Becker et al. The value and its uncertainty directly affects the thickness estimate and the extracted (α,n) cross-section values. In their citation to Becker et al's work, Wrean and Kavanagh comment that they did not make use of an alternative value of (23.7±1.0) eV reported by Croft because they were unable to reproduce the value from the data given in that paper. The value they calculated for the resonance strength from the thick target yield given by Croft was 21.4 eV. The purpose of this communication is to revisit the paper by Croft published in this journal and specifically to explain the origin of

  16. Comments on extracting the resonance strength parameter from yield data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The F(α,n) reaction is the focus of on-going research in part because it is an important source of neutrons in the nuclear fuel cycle which can be exploited to assay nuclear materials, especially uranium in the form of UF6 [1,2]. At the present time there remains some considerable uncertainty (of the order of ±20%) in the thick target integrated over angle (α,n) yield from 19F (100% natural abundance) and its compounds as discussed in [3,4]. An important thin target cross-section measurement is that of Wrean and Kavanagh [5] who explore the region from below threshold (2.36 MeV) to approximately 3.1 MeV with fine energy resolution. Integration of their cross-section data over the slowing down history of a stopping α-particle allows the thick target yield to be calculated for incident energies up to 3.1 MeV. This trend can then be combined with data from other sources to obtain a thick target yield curve over the wider range of interest to the fuel cycle (roughly threshold to 10 MeV to include all relevant α-emitters). To estimate the thickness of the CaF2 target they used, Wrean and Kavanagh separately measured the integrated yield of the 6.129 MeV γ-rays from the resonance at 340.5 keV (laboratory α-particle kinetic energy) in the 19F(p,αγ) reaction. To interpret the data they adopted a resonance strength parameter of (22.3±0.8) eV based on a determination by Becker et al [6]. The value and its uncertainty directly affects the thickness estimate and the extracted (α,n) cross-section values. In their citation to Becker et al's work, Wrean and Kavanagh comment that they did not make use of an alternative value of (23.7±1.0) eV reported by Croft [7] because they were unable to reproduce the value from the data given in that paper. The value they calculated for the resonance strength from the thick target yield given by Croft was 21.4 eV. The purpose of this communication is to revisit the paper by Croft published in this journal and specifically to

  17. Comments on extracting the resonance strength parameter from yield data

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea

    2015-06-23

    The F(α,n) reaction is the focus of on-going research in part because it is an important source of neutrons in the nuclear fuel cycle which can be exploited to assay nuclear materials, especially uranium in the form of UF6. At the present time there remains some considerable uncertainty (of the order of ± 20%) in the thick target integrated over angle (α,n) yield from 19F (100% natural abundance) and its compounds as discussed. An important thin target cross-section measurement is that of Wrean and Kavanagh who explore the region from below threshold (2.36 MeV) to approximately 3.1 MeV with fine energy resolution. Integration of their cross-section data over the slowing down history of a stopping α-particle allows the thick target yield to be calculated for incident energies up to 3.1 MeV. This trend can then be combined with data from other sources to obtain a thick target yield curve over the wider range of interest to the fuel cycle (roughly threshold to 10 MeV to include all relevant α-emitters). To estimate the thickness of the CaF2 target they used, Wrean and Kavanagh separately measured the integrated yield of the 6.129 MeV γ-rays from the resonance at 340.5 keV (laboratory α-particle kinetic energy) in the 19F(p,αγ) reaction. To interpret the data they adopted a resonance strength parameter of (22.3 ± 0.8) eV based on a determination by Becker et al. The value and its uncertainty directly affects the thickness estimate and the extracted (α,n) cross-section values. In their citation to Becker et al's work, Wrean and Kavanagh comment that they did not make use of an alternative value of (23.7±1.0) eV reported by Croft because they were unable to reproduce the value from the data given in that paper. The value they calculated for the resonance strength from the thick target yield given by Croft was 21.4 eV. The purpose of this communication is to revisit the paper by Croft published in this journal and

  18. n+235U resonance parameters and neutron multiplicities in the energy region below 100 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigni, Marco T.; Capote, Roberto; Trkov, Andrej; Pronyaev, Vladimir G.

    2017-09-01

    In August 2016, following the recent effort within the Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organization (CIELO) pilot project to improve the neutron cross sections of 235U, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) collaborated with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to release a resonance parameter evaluation. This evaluation restores the performance of the evaluated cross sections for the thermal- and above-thermal-solution benchmarks on the basis of newly evaluated thermal neutron constants (TNCs) and thermal prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS). Performed with support from the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) in an effort to provide the highest fidelity general purpose nuclear database for nuclear criticality applications, the resonance parameter evaluation was submitted as an ENDF-compatible file to be part of the next release of the ENDF/B-VIII.0 nuclear data library. The resonance parameter evaluation methodology used the Reich-Moore approximation of the R-matrix formalism implemented in the code SAMMY to fit the available time-of-flight (TOF) measured data for the thermal induced cross section of n+235U up to 100 eV. While maintaining reasonably good agreement with the experimental data, the validation analysis focused on restoring the benchmark performance for 235U solutions by combining changes to the resonance parameters and to the prompt resonance

  19. Resonance Parameters of the Rho-Meson from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Dru Renner

    2011-05-01

    We perform a non-perturbative lattice calculation of the P-wave pion-pion scattering phase in the rho-meson decay channel using two flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions at pion masses ranging from 480 MeV to 290 MeV. Making use of finite-size methods, we evaluate the pion-pion scattering phase in the center-of-mass frame and two moving frames. Applying an effective range formula, we find a good description of our results for the scattering phase as a function of the energy covering the resonance region. This allows us to extract the rho-meson mass and decay width and to study their quark mass dependence.

  20. Compound piezoelectric cylindrical resonators as sensors of the rheological parameters of viscoelastic media.

    PubMed

    Kiełczyński, Piotr; Szalewski, Marek

    2007-06-01

    The electro-elastic behavior of a viscoelastically loaded layered cylindrical resonator (sensor) comprising two coupled hollow cylinders is presented. The inner cylinder is a piezoelectric ceramic tube. The outer cylinder is a non-piezoelectric (passive) metallic cylinder. An analytical formula for the electrical admittance of a compound layered cylindrical resonator loaded with a viscoelastic liquid is established. Admittance (conductance) diagrams were obtained using a continuum electromechanical model. The established analytical formulas enable the determination of the influence of the liquid viscosity, material, and geometrical parameters of a compound cylindrical resonator on the response characteristics of the compound sensor. In the paper, the sensor implications resulting from the performed analysis are described. Moreover, the algorithm of the method developed by the authors to evaluate the rheological parameters of a viscoelastic liquid is presented. Good agreement between the theoretical results and experimental data is shown. The analysis presented in this paper can be utilized for the design and construction of cylindrical piezoelectric viscosity sensors, annular accelerometers, filters, transducers, and multilayer resonators.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    PubMed Central

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Volpe, Gustavo Jardim; Trad, Henrique Simão; Schmidt, André

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. Objective To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Methods Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Results Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). Conclusion CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility. PMID:23887734

  2. The impact of variation in the pulse sequence parameters on image uniformity in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Amin, Naima; Afzal, Mohammad

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the practical impact of alteration of key imaging parameters of Magnetic Resonance Imaging on image quality and effectiveness provided by widely available fast imaging pulse sequences. A tissue equivalent material for Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI) has been produced from a polysaccharide gel, agros, containing gadolinium chloride chelated to Ethylene Diamine Tetra- Acetic acid (EDTA) with a sort of T1 and T2 values. Experimental variations in key parameters included echo time (TE) and repetition time TR. Quantitative analysis consisted of image nonuniformity. In T2 weighted images; any change in TE played a critical role in the signal homogeneity in all pulse sequences. The percentage of nonuniformity was incredibly high in T2 weighted image but the change of TR was insignificant in T2-weighted study. Involving T1 weighted images, percentage of nonuniformity was high in gradient recalled echo (GRE), also noticeable in fast fluid attenuated recovery (FLAIR) but quite acceptable in fast spin echo (FSE) and conventional spin echo (CSE). Selection of parameters relatively simple in CSE both in T1, T2-weighted study that maintains image uniformity and quality as well. GRE is a very sensitive pulse sequence for any variation in parameters and loose signal uniformity rapidly.

  3. Resonance in a weakly nonlinear system with slowly varying parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.

    1980-02-01

    Multiple-variable expansion procedures appropriate for nonlinear systems in resonance are surveyed by the use of the model of two coupled weakly nonlinear oscillators with either constant or slowly varying frequencies. In the autonomous problem it is shown that an n-variable expansion (where n depends on the order of accuracy desired) yields uniformly valid results. The problem of passage through resonance for the nonautonomous problem is also considered and the solution is described by constructing a sequence of three expansions. The solution before resonance is developed as a generalized multiple-variable expansion and is matched with an inner expansion valid during resonance. This latter is then matched with a postresonance solution and determines it completely. Numerical integrations are used to substantiate the theoretical results. The dominant effect of passage through resonance is shown to be the excitation of a higher-order oscillation beyond resonance. Contrary to the claim in a recent work, the total action of the system does not remain constant if one accounts for the leading perturbation terms in the postresonance solution. Instead, the total action goes from one constant value to another.

  4. R-MATRIX RESONANCE ANALYSIS AND STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE RESONANCE PARAMETERS OF 233U IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY RANGE FROM THERMAL TO 600 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    2001-02-27

    The R-matrix resonance analysis of experimental neutron transmission and cross sections of {sup 233}U, with the Reich-Moore Bayesian code SAMMY, was extended up to the neutron energy of 600 eV by taking advantage of new high resolution neutron transmission and fission cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). The experimental data base is described. In addition to the microscopic data (time-of-flight measurements of transmission and cross sections), some experimental and evaluated integral quantities were included in the data base. Tabulated and graphical comparisons between the experimental data and the SAMMY calculated cross sections are given. The ability of the calculated cross sections to reproduce the effective multiplication factors k{sub eff} for various thermal, intermediate, and fast systems was tested. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters were examined and recommended values of the average s-wave resonance parameters are given.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Olivot, Jean Marc; Marks, Michael P

    2008-10-01

    The ability to use physiologic imaging with either magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography to help define irreversibly injured brain (the infarct core) and tissue at risk of infarct (reversible ischemic penumbra) holds great promise in the future treatment of stroke. The physiologic principles and concepts underlying the evaluation for mismatch between injured tissue and tissue at risk are similar for the 2 imaging techniques. Multimodal MR imaging (diffusion-weighted imaging/perfusion-weighted imaging/MR angiography) provides a validated penumbral selection criteria based on the results of 2 clinical trials (diffusion and perfusion imaging evaluation for understanding stroke evolution and echoplanar imaging thrombolysis evaluation). Computed tomographic perfusion parameters have also been calculated to optimize final infarct prediction. Both techniques await further study to prove their capability of selecting cases for short-term recanalization/reperfusion therapy.

  6. Resonant transmission in one-dimensional quantum mechanics with two independent point interactions: Full parameter analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Kohkichi; Nagasawa, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Rohta

    2017-10-01

    We discuss the scattering of a quantum particle by two independent successive point interactions in one dimension. The parameter space for two point interactions is given by U(2) × U(2) , which is described by eight real parameters. We perform an analysis of perfect resonant transmission on the whole parameter space. By investigating the effects of the two point interactions on the scattering matrix of plane wave, we find the condition under which perfect resonant transmission occurs. We also provide the physical interpretation of the resonance condition.

  7. Effects of relevant parameters on the bandgaps of acoustic metamaterials with multi-resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Rongqi; Lin, Jieqiong

    2016-04-01

    Locally resonant acoustic metamaterials with multi-resonators are generally regarded as a fine trend for managing the bandgaps, the different effects of relevant structural parameters on the bandgaps, which will be numerically investigated in this paper. A two-step homogenization method is extended to achieve the effective mass of multi-resonators metamaterial in the lattice system. As comparison, the dispersive wave propagation in lattice system and continuum model is studied. Then, the different effects of relevant parameters on the center frequencies and bandwidth of bandgaps are perfectly revealed, and the steady-state responses in the continuum models with purposed relevant parameters are additionally clarified. The related results can well confirm that the bandgaps exist around the undamped natural frequencies of internal resonators, and also their bandwidth can be efficiently controlled with the ensured center frequencies. Moreover, the design of purposed multi-resonators acoustic metamaterial in vibration control is presented and discussed by an example.

  8. A Comsol analysis of packaging structures and parameters of quartz crystal resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Li, Lin; Ma, Tingfeng; Du, Jianke; Huang, Bin; Shen, Julian; Chao, Min-Chiang

    2017-09-01

    By nature, acoustic wave resonators are structurally dynamic components undergoing constant vibrations in the vicinity of resonant frequency at their functioning mode, which is definitely adversary with other components used in the same board and product. One particular concern in the design and packaging of acoustic wave resonators is that all packaging parameters and structures will cause changes of device performance in terms of frequency, circuit parameters, and thermal sensitivity, among others. We start with a complete finite element analysis model of a quartz crystal resonator with the consideration of structural complications including packaging, while the quartz crystal blank is analyzed with the Mindlin plate equations of five vibration modes for coupled thickness-shear vibrations. Other parts of structure are formulated with the three-dimensional theory of elasticity from Comsol. With this finite element model, many of the key features and parameters of the quartz crystal resonator are considered and a practical model and design process is established.

  9. Evaluation of Tungsten Neutron Cross Sections in the Resolved Resonance Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Pigni, Marco T; Leal, Luiz C; Dunn, Michael E; Guber, Klaus H; Emiliani, F.; Kopecky, S.; Lampoudis, C.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-01-01

    We generated a preliminary set of resonance parameters for 182-184,186W in the neutron energy range of thermal up to several keV. The evaluation methodology uses the Reich-Moore approximation to t, with the R-matrix code SAMMY, the high-resolution measurements performed in 2010 and 2012 at the GEel LINear Accelerator (GELINA) facility. Particularly for 183W, the transmission data and the capture cross sections calculated with the set of resonance parameters are compared with the experimental values, and some of the average properties of the resonance parameters are discussed. In the analyzed energy range, this work almost doubles the existing resolved resonance evaluations in the ENDF/B-VII.1 library. The analysis of the performance of the calculated cross sections based on criticality benchmarks is still in progress and it is only briefly discussed.

  10. Aperiodic signals processing via parameter-tuning stochastic resonance in a photorefractive ring cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuefeng; Cao, Guangzhan; Liu, Hongjun

    2014-04-15

    Based on solving numerically the generalized nonlinear Langevin equation describing the nonlinear dynamics of stochastic resonance by Fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, an aperiodic stochastic resonance based on an optical bistable system is numerically investigated. The numerical results show that a parameter-tuning stochastic resonance system can be realized by choosing the appropriate optical bistable parameters, which performs well in reconstructing aperiodic signals from a very high level of noise background. The influences of optical bistable parameters on the stochastic resonance effect are numerically analyzed via cross-correlation, and a maximum cross-correlation gain of 8 is obtained by optimizing optical bistable parameters. This provides a prospective method for reconstructing noise-hidden weak signals in all-optical signal processing systems.

  11. SAMDIST: A Computer Code for Calculating Statistical Distributions for R-Matrix Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    1995-01-01

    The: SAMDIST computer code has been developed to calculate distribution of resonance parameters of the Reich-Moore R-matrix type. The program assumes the parameters are in the format compatible with that of the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY. SAMDIST calculates the energy-level spacing distribution, the resonance width distribution, and the long-range correlation of the energy levels. Results of these calculations are presented in both graphic and tabular forms.

  12. {sup 12}O resonant structure evaluated by the two-proton emission process

    SciTech Connect

    Leite, T. N.; Teruya, N.; Dimarco, A.; Duarte, S. B.; Tavares, O. A. P.

    2009-07-15

    The characteristics of the {sup 12}O resonant ground state are investigated through the analysis of the experimental data for the two-proton decay process. The sequential and simultaneous two-proton emission decay modes have been considered in a statistical calculation of the decay energy distribution. The resonant structures of {sup 11}N have been employed as intermediate states for the sequential mode, having their parameters determined by considering the structure of single particle resonance in quantum scattering problem. The width of the {sup 12}O resonant ground state has been extracted from a best fit to the experimental data. The contributions from the different channels to the decay energy distribution have been evaluated, and width and peak location parameters of the {sup 12}O resonant ground state are compared with results of other works for the sequential and simultaneous two-proton decay modes.

  13. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Bass, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR.

  14. An information theory approach to minimise correlated systematic uncertainty in modelling resonance parameters.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P T Krishna; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    Covariance matrix elements depict the statistical and systematic uncertainties in reactor parameter measurements. All the efforts have so far been devoted only to minimise the statistical uncertainty by repeated measurements but the dominant systematic uncertainty has either been neglected or randomized. In recent years efforts has been devoted to simulate the resonance parameter uncertainty information through covariance matrices in code SAMMY. But, the code does not have any provision to check the reliability of the simulated covariance data. We propose a new approach called entropy based information theory to reduce the systematic uncertainty in the correlation matrix element so that resonance parameters with minimum systematic uncertainty can be modelled. We apply our information theory approach in generating the resonance parameters of (156)Gd with reduced systematic uncertainty and demonstrate the superiority of our technique over the principal component analysis method.

  15. Resonance Analysis and Evaluation of the Uranium -235 Neutron-Induced Cross-Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Luiz Carlos

    Neutron cross sections of fissile nuclei are of considerable interest for the understanding of parameters such as resonance absorption, resonance escape probability, resonance self-shielding, and the dependence of the reactivity on temperature. In the present study, new techniques for the evaluation of the ^{235}U neutron cross sections are described. The Reich-Moore formalism of the Bayesian computer code SAMMY was used to perform consistent R-matrix multilevel analyses of the selected neutron cross-section data. The Delta_3 -statistics of Dyson and Mehta, along with high -resolution data and the spin-separated fission cross-section data, have provided the possibility of developing a new methodology for the analysis and evaluation of neutron -nucleus cross-sections. The result of the analysis consists of a set of resonance parameters which describe the ^{235}U neutron cross sections up to 500 eV. The set of resonance parameters obtained through a R-matrix analysis are expected to satisfy statistical properties which lead to information on the nuclear structure. The resonance parameters were tested and showed good agreement with the theory. It is expected that the parametrization of the ^{235}U neutron cross sections obtained in this dissertation represents the current state of art in data as well as in theory and, therefore, can be of direct use in reactor calculations.

  16. Neutron Capture and Transmission Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Samarium

    SciTech Connect

    G. Leinweber; J.A. Burke; H.D. Knox; N.J. Drindak; D.W. Mesh; W.T. Haines; R.V. Ballad; R.C. Block; R.E. Slovacek; C.J. Werner; M.J. Trbovich; D.P. Barry; T. Sato

    2001-07-16

    The purpose of the present work is to accurately measure the neutron cross sections of samarium. The most significant isotope is {sup 149}Sm, which has a large neutron absorption cross section at thermal energies and is a {sup 235}U fission product with a 1% yield. Its cross sections are thus of concern to reactor neutronics. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic institute (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Sm samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25 meter flight station with a multiplicity-type capture detector, and the transmission total cross-section measurements were performed at 15- and 25-meter flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. Resonance parameters were determined by a combined analysis of six experiments (three capture and three transmission) using the multi-level R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M2. The significant features of this work are as follows. Dilute samples of samarium nitrate in deuterated water (D{sub 2}O) were prepared to measure the strong resonances at 0.1 and 8 eV without saturation. Disk-shaped spectroscopic quartz cells were obtained with parallel inner surfaces to provide a uniform thickness of solution. The diluent feature of the SAMMY program was used to analyze these data. The SAMMY program also includes multiple scattering corrections to capture yield data and resolution functions specific to the RPI facility. Resonance parameters for all stable isotopes of samarium were deduced for all resonances up to 30 eV. Thermal capture cross-section and capture resonance integral calculations were made using the resultant resonance parameters and were compared to results obtained using resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 3. Extending the definition of the capture resonance integral to include the strong 0.1 eV resonance in {sup 149}Sm, present measurements agree within estimated

  17. Vibroacoustic test plan evaluation: Parameter variation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, C. V.; Gongloef, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Statistical decision models are shown to provide a viable method of evaluating the cost effectiveness of alternate vibroacoustic test plans and the associated test levels. The methodology developed provides a major step toward the development of a realistic tool to quantitatively tailor test programs to specific payloads. Testing is considered at the no test, component, subassembly, or system level of assembly. Component redundancy and partial loss of flight data are considered. Most and probabilistic costs are considered, and incipient failures resulting from ground tests are treated. Optimums defining both component and assembly test levels are indicated for the modified test plans considered. modeling simplifications must be considered in interpreting the results relative to a particular payload. New parameters introduced were a no test option, flight by flight failure probabilities, and a cost to design components for higher vibration requirements. Parameters varied were the shuttle payload bay internal acoustic environment, the STS launch cost, the component retest/repair cost, and the amount of redundancy in the housekeeping section of the payload reliability model.

  18. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  19. Functional magnetic resonance in the evaluation of oesophageal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Covotta, Francesco; Piretta, Luca; Badiali, Danilo; Laghi, Andrea; Biondi, Tommaso; Corazziari, Enrico S; Panebianco, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been recently proposed for the evaluation of the esophagus. Our aim is to assess the role of fMRI as a technique to assess morphological and functional parameters of the esophagus in patients with esophageal motor disorders and in healthy controls. Subsequently, we assessed the diagnostic efficiency of fMRI in comparison to videofluoroscopic and manometric findings in the investigation of patients with esophageal motor disorders. Considering that fMRI was shown to offer valuable information on bolus transit and on the caliber of the esophagus, variations of these two parameters in the different types of esophageal motor alterations have been assessed. fMRI, compared to manometry and videofluoroscopy, showed that a deranged or absent peristalsis is significantly associated with slower transit time and with increased esophageal diameter. Although further studies are needed, fMRI represents a promising noninvasive technique for the integrated functional and morphological evaluation of esophageal motility disorders.

  20. Functional Magnetic Resonance in the Evaluation of Oesophageal Motility Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Covotta, Francesco; Piretta, Luca; Badiali, Danilo; Laghi, Andrea; Biondi, Tommaso; Corazziari, Enrico S.; Panebianco, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been recently proposed for the evaluation of the esophagus. Our aim is to assess the role of fMRI as a technique to assess morphological and functional parameters of the esophagus in patients with esophageal motor disorders and in healthy controls. Subsequently, we assessed the diagnostic efficiency of fMRI in comparison to videofluoroscopic and manometric findings in the investigation of patients with esophageal motor disorders. Considering that fMRI was shown to offer valuable information on bolus transit and on the caliber of the esophagus, variations of these two parameters in the different types of esophageal motor alterations have been assessed. fMRI, compared to manometry and videofluoroscopy, showed that a deranged or absent peristalsis is significantly associated with slower transit time and with increased esophageal diameter. Although further studies are needed, fMRI represents a promising noninvasive technique for the integrated functional and morphological evaluation of esophageal motility disorders. PMID:21904543

  1. The determination of electrical parameters of quartz crystal resonators with the consideration of dissipation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wenhua; Du, Jianke

    2006-12-22

    Recently, as the dissipation of quartz crystal through material viscosity is being considered in vibrations of piezoelectric plates, we have the opportunity to obtain electrical parameters from vibration solutions of a crystal plate representing an ideal resonator. Since the solutions are readily available with complex elastic constants from Mindlin plate equations for thickness-shear vibrations, the calculation of resistance and other parameters related to both mechanical deformation and electrical potential is straightforward. We start with the first-order Mindlin plate equations of a piezoelectric plate for the thickness-shear vibration analysis of a simple resonator model. The electrical parameters are derived with emphasis on the resistance that is related to the imaginary part of complex elastic constants, or the viscosity. All the electrical parameters are frequency dependent, enabling the study of the frequency behavior of crystal resonators with a direct formulation. Through the full consideration of complications like partial electrodes and supporting structures, we should be able obtain electrical parameters for practical applications in resonator design.

  2. Magnetic resonance urography in evaluation of duplicated renal collecting systems.

    PubMed

    Adeb, Melkamu; Darge, Kassa; Dillman, Jonathan R; Carr, Michael; Epelman, Monica

    2013-11-01

    Duplex renal collecting systems are common congenital anomalies of the upper urinary tract. In most cases they are incidental findings and not associated with additional pathologies. They demonstrate, however, higher incidences of hydroureteronephrosis, ureteroceles, and ectopic ureters. The most comprehensive morphologic and functional evaluation of duplex systems can be achieved using magnetic resonance urography. Functional magnetic resonance urography allows better separation of the renal poles, thus more accurate calculation of the differential renal functions compared with renal scintigraphy. Magnetic resonance urography is the study of choice when upper urinary tract anatomy is complex or when functional evaluation is needed.

  3. Comprehensive Amm242 neutron-induced reaction cross sections and resonance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Wimer, N.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2017-06-01

    The 242Am metastable isomer's neutron-induced destruction mechanisms were studied at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter. New Amm242 neutron-capture cross sections were determined from 100 meV to 10 keV, and the absolute scale was set with respect to a concurrent measurement of the well-known Amm242 neutron-induced-fission cross section. The new fission cross section spans an energy range from 100 meV to 1 MeV and was normalized to the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluated cross section to set the absolute scale. Our Amm242(n ,f ) cross section agrees well with the cross section of Browne et al. [Phys. Rev. C 29, 2188 (1984)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.29.2188 over this large energy interval. The new neutron-capture cross section measurement complements and agrees well with our recent results reported below 1 eV in Buckner et al. [Phys. Rev. C 95, 024610 (2017)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.95.024610. This new work comprises the most comprehensive study of Amm242(n ,γ ) above thermal energy. Neutron-induced resonance energies and parameters were deduced with the sammy R -matrix code for incident neutron energies up to 45 eV, and the new average Γγ is 13 % higher than the evaluated average γ width.

  4. Very Broad X(4260) and the Resonance Parameters of the ψ(3D) Vector Charmonium State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beveren, Eef; Rupp, George; Segovia, J.

    2010-09-01

    We argue that the X(4260) enhancement contains a wealth of information on 1-- cc¯ spectroscopy. We discuss the shape of the X(4260) observed in the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-forbidden process e+e-→π+π-J/ψ, in particular, at and near vector charmonium resonances as well as open-charm threshold enhancements. The resulting very broad X(4260) structure does not seem to classify itself as a 1-- cc¯ resonance, but its detailed shape allows us to identify new vector charmonium states with higher statistics than in open-charm decay. Here, we estimate the resonance parameters of the ψ(3D). Our approach also provides an explanation for the odd dip in the π+π-J/ψ data precisely at the ψ(4415) resonance.

  5. Very Broad X(4260) and the Resonance Parameters of the {psi}(3D) Vector Charmonium State

    SciTech Connect

    Beveren, Eef van; Rupp, George; Segovia, J.

    2010-09-03

    We argue that the X(4260) enhancement contains a wealth of information on 1{sup --} cc spectroscopy. We discuss the shape of the X(4260) observed in the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-forbidden process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}J/{psi}, in particular, at and near vector charmonium resonances as well as open-charm threshold enhancements. The resulting very broad X(4260) structure does not seem to classify itself as a 1{sup --} cc resonance, but its detailed shape allows us to identify new vector charmonium states with higher statistics than in open-charm decay. Here, we estimate the resonance parameters of the {psi}(3D). Our approach also provides an explanation for the odd dip in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}J/{psi} data precisely at the {psi}(4415) resonance.

  6. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63Cu and 65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Forget, Benoit; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-01-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63Cu and 65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at ORELA and one from MITR, and two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identied for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope was based on the identied resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) were determined to match the dierential thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Double dierential elastic scattering cross sections were calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  7. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63,65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobes, V.; Leal, L. C.; Guber, K.; Forget, B.; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-04-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63,65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation is based on three experimental transmission data sets: two measured at ORELA and one at MITR, plus two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identified for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope is based on the identified resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) have been determined to match the thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Differential elastic scattering cross sections have been calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks.

  8. Requirements for accurate estimation of anisotropic material parameters by magnetic resonance elastography: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Tweten, D J; Okamoto, R J; Bayly, P V

    2017-01-17

    To establish the essential requirements for characterization of a transversely isotropic material by magnetic resonance elastography (MRE). Three methods for characterizing nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) materials were used to analyze data from closed-form expressions for traveling waves, finite-element (FE) simulations of waves in homogeneous ITI material, and FE simulations of waves in heterogeneous material. Key properties are the complex shear modulus μ2 , shear anisotropy ϕ=μ1/μ2-1, and tensile anisotropy ζ=E1/E2-1. Each method provided good estimates of ITI parameters when both slow and fast shear waves with multiple propagation directions were present. No method gave accurate estimates when the displacement field contained only slow shear waves, only fast shear waves, or waves with only a single propagation direction. Methods based on directional filtering are robust to noise and include explicit checks of propagation and polarization. Curl-based methods led to more accurate estimates in low noise conditions. Parameter estimation in heterogeneous materials is challenging for all methods. Multiple shear waves, both slow and fast, with different propagation directions, must be present in the displacement field for accurate parameter estimates in ITI materials. Experimental design and data analysis can ensure that these requirements are met. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Simulation of parameter scaling in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas using the GEM code

    SciTech Connect

    Cluggish, B.; Zhao, L.; Kim, J. S.

    2010-02-15

    Although heating power and gas pressure are two of the two of primary experimental ''knobs'' available to users of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, there is still no clear understanding of how they interact in order to provide optimal plasma conditions. FAR-TECH, Inc. has performed a series of simulations with its generalized electron cyclotron resonance ion source model in which the power and pressure were varied over a wide range. Analysis of the numerical data produces scaling laws that predict the plasma parameters as a function of the power and pressure. These scaling laws are in general agreement with experimental data.

  10. Dependence of radial thermal diffusivity on parameters of toroidal plasma affected by resonant magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Ryutaro; Nunami, Masanori; Satake, Shinsuke; Takamaru, Hisanori; Okamoto, Masao

    2013-06-01

    We investigate how the neoclassical thermal diffusivity of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma is modified by the effect of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), using a drift-kinetic simulation code for calculating the radial thermal diffusivity of ion in the perturbed region under an assumption of zero electric field. Here, the perturbed region is assumed to be generated on and near the resonance surfaces, and is wedged in between the regular closed magnetic surfaces. We find that the dependence of the radial thermal diffusivity on parameters of the toroidal plasma is represented as \\chi_r=\\chi_r^{(0)} \\{1+ c_0\\,(\\omega_b/\

  11. Stochastic Parameter Resonance of Road-Vehicle Systems and Related Bifurcation Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedig, Walter V.

    The paper investigates stochastic dynamics of road-vehicle systems and related bifurcation problems. The ride on rough roads generates vertical car vibrations whose root-mean-squares are resonant for critical car speeds and vanish when the car velocity is increasing, infinitely. These investigations are extended to wheel suspensions with progressive spring characteristics. For weak but still positive damping, the car vibrations become unstable when the velocity reaches the parameter resonance near twice the critical speed bifurcating into stochastic chaos of larger non-stationary car vibrations.

  12. Methodological aspects in the calculation of parity-violating effects in nuclear magnetic resonance parameters.

    PubMed

    Weijo, Ville; Bast, Radovan; Manninen, Pekka; Saue, Trond; Vaara, Juha

    2007-02-21

    We examine the quantum chemical calculation of parity-violating (PV) electroweak contributions to the spectral parameters of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from a methodological point of view. Nuclear magnetic shielding and indirect spin-spin coupling constants are considered and evaluated for three chiral molecules, H2O2, H2S2, and H2Se2. The effects of the choice of a one-particle basis set and the treatment of electron correlation, as well as the effects of special relativity, are studied. All of them are found to be relevant. The basis-set dependence is very pronounced, especially at the electron correlated ab initio levels of theory. Coupled-cluster and density-functional theory (DFT) results for PV contributions differ significantly from the Hartree-Fock data. DFT overestimates the PV effects, particularly with nonhybrid exchange-correlation functionals. Beginning from third-row elements, special relativity is of importance for the PV NMR properties, shown here by comparing perturbational one-component and various four-component calculations. In contrast to what is found for nuclear magnetic shielding, the choice of the model for nuclear charge distribution--point charge or extended (Gaussian)--has a significant impact on the PV contribution to the spin-spin coupling constants.

  13. Trojan resonant dynamics, stability, and chaotic diffusion, for parameters relevant to exoplanetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páez, Rocío Isabel; Efthymiopoulos, Christos

    2015-02-01

    The possibility that giant extrasolar planets could have small Trojan co-orbital companions has been examined in the literature from both viewpoints of the origin and dynamical stability of such a configuration. Here we aim to investigate the dynamics of hypothetical small Trojan exoplanets in domains of secondary resonances embedded within the tadpole domain of motion. To this end, we consider the limit of a massless Trojan companion of a giant planet. Without other planets, this is a case of the elliptic restricted three body problem (ERTBP). The presence of additional planets (hereafter referred to as the restricted multi-planet problem, RMPP) induces new direct and indirect secular effects on the dynamics of the Trojan body. The paper contains a theoretical and a numerical part. In the theoretical part, we develop a Hamiltonian formalism in action-angle variables, which allows us to treat in a unified way resonant dynamics and secular effects on the Trojan body in both the ERTBP or the RMPP. In both cases, our formalism leads to a decomposition of the Hamiltonian in two parts, . , called the basic model, describes resonant dynamics in the short-period (epicyclic) and synodic (libration) degrees of freedom, while contains only terms depending trigonometrically on slow (secular) angles. is formally identical in the ERTBP and the RMPP, apart from a re-definition of some angular variables. An important physical consequence of this analysis is that the slow chaotic diffusion along resonances proceeds in both the ERTBP and the RMPP by a qualitatively similar dynamical mechanism. We found that this is best approximated by the paradigm of `modulational diffusion'. In the paper's numerical part, we then focus on the ERTBP in order to make a detailed numerical demonstration of the chaotic diffusion process along resonances. Using color stability maps, we first provide a survey of the resonant web for characteristic mass parameter values of the primary, in which the

  14. Pumping test evaluation of stream depletion parameters.

    PubMed

    Lough, Hilary K; Hunt, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions are given of a pumping test and a corresponding analysis that permit calculation of all five hydrogeological parameters appearing in the Hunt (2003) solution for stream depletion caused by ground water abstraction from a well beside a stream. This solution assumes that flow in the pumped aquifer is horizontal, flow in the overlying aquitard or system of aquitards is vertical, and the free surface in the top aquitard is allowed to draw down. The definition of an aquitard in this paper is any layer with a vertical hydraulic conductivity much lower than the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the pumped aquifer. These "aquitards" may be reasonably permeable layers but are distinguished from the pumped aquifer by their hydraulic conductivity contrast. The pumping test requires a complete set of drawdown measurements from at least one observation well. This well must be deep enough to penetrate the pumped aquifer, and pumping must continue for a sufficient time to ensure that depleted streamflow becomes a significant portion of the well abstraction rate. Furthermore, two of the five parameters characterize an aquitard that overlies the pumped aquifer, and values for these parameters are seen to be dependent upon the initial water table elevation in the aquitard. The field test analyzed herein used a total of eight observation wells screened in the pumped aquifer, and measurements from these wells gave eight sets of parameters that are used in a sensitivity analysis to determine the relative importance of each parameter in the stream depletion calculations.

  15. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-15

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N{sup 2}) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  16. Evaluation of Control Parameters for the Activated Sludge Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stall, T. Ray; Sherrard, Josephy H.

    1978-01-01

    An evaluation of the use of the parameters currently being used to design and operate the activated sludge process is presented. The advantages and disadvantages for the use of each parameter are discussed. (MR)

  17. Evaluation Parameters for Computer-Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiadou, Elisabeth; Triantafillou, Evangelos; Economides, Anastasios A.

    2006-01-01

    With the proliferation of computers in test delivery today, adaptive testing has become quite popular, especially when examinees must be classified into two categories (passfail, master nonmaster). Several well-established organisations have provided standards and guidelines for the design and evaluation of educational and psychological testing.…

  18. A parameter study of mode conversion at ion-ion hybrid resonances for ICRF-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alava, M. J.; Heikkinen, J. A.

    1992-04-01

    By solving the wave equation for the radial electric field with constant poloidal electric field around the resonance layer of the fast Alfvén wave, various complex characteristics of mode conversion physics can be elucidated and analyzed for ion cyclotron heating of tokamaks. The validity of the Budden and tunnelling model [Ngan, Y. C. and Swanson, D. G., Phys. Fluids 20, 1920 (1977)] for the conversion studies is explored, and the conversion coefficient for the ion-ion hybrid resonance in the presence of cyclotron damping is found in closed form. The analytical results are compared with the numerical solution of the full wave equations expanded to second order in ion Larmor radius. It is found that the standard tunnelling solutions can be erroneous, not only in the case of strong damping, but also when the linearization of the plasma parameters around the resonance, peculiar to the tunnelling model, becomes inaccurate. The effects of the damping and cavity resonances on the conversion are separated in the derived analytical estimates, and the limits of the local theory of conversion are determined.

  19. Large scale integration of CVD-graphene based NEMS with narrow distribution of resonance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmandi-Tash, Hadi; Allain, Adrien; (Vitto Han, Zheng; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel method for the fabrication of the arrays of suspended micron-sized membranes, based on monolayer pulsed-CVD graphene. Such devices are the source of an efficient integration of graphene nano-electro-mechanical resonators, compatible with production at the wafer scale using standard photolithography and processing tools. As the graphene surface is continuously protected by the same polymer layer during the whole process, suspended graphene membranes are clean and free of imperfections such as deposits, wrinkles and tears. Batch fabrication of 100 μm-long multi-connected suspended ribbons is presented. At room temperature, mechanical resonance of electrostatically-actuated devices show narrow distribution of their characteristic parameters with high quality factor and low effective mass and resonance frequencies, as expected for low stress and adsorbate-free membranes. Upon cooling, a sharp increase of both resonant frequency and quality factor is observed, enabling to extract the thermal expansion coefficient of CVD graphene. Comparison with state-of-the-art graphene NEMS is presented.

  20. Use of Magnetic Resonance in the Evaluation of Cranial Trauma.

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, Wilson; Steven, Andrew; Gutierrez, Juan

    2016-05-01

    MR imaging is an extremely useful tool in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury in the emergency department. Although CT still plays the dominant role in urgent patient triage, MR imaging's impact on traumatic brain injury imaging continues to expand. MR imaging has shown superiority to CT for certain traumatic processes, such as diffuse axonal injury, cerebral contusion, and infarction. Magnetic resonance angiography and magnetic resonance venography allow emergent vascular imaging for patients that should avoid ionizing radiation or intravenous contrast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of dual wavelength composite output of solid state laser based on adjustment of resonator parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Nie, Jinsong; Wang, Xi; Hu, Yuze

    2016-10-01

    The 1064nm fundamental wave (FW) and the 532nm second harmonic wave (SHW) of Nd:YAG laser have been widely applied in many fields. In some military applications requiring interference in both visible and near-infrared spectrum range, the de-identification interference technology based on the dual wavelength composite output of FW and SHW offers an effective way of making the device or equipment miniaturized and low cost. In this paper, the application of 1064nm and 532nm dual-wavelength composite output technology in military electro-optical countermeasure is studied. A certain resonator configuration that can achieve composite laser output with high power, high beam quality and high repetition rate is proposed. Considering the thermal lens effect, the stability of this certain resonator is analyzed based on the theory of cavity transfer matrix. It shows that with the increase of thermal effect, the intracavity fundamental mode volume decreased, resulting the peak fluctuation of cavity stability parameter. To explore the impact the resonator parameters does to characteristics and output ratio of composite laser, the solid-state laser's dual-wavelength composite output models in both continuous and pulsed condition are established by theory of steady state equation and rate equation. Throughout theoretical simulation and analysis, the optimal KTP length and best FW transmissivity are obtained. The experiment is then carried out to verify the correctness of theoretical calculation result.

  2. Virtual Acoustics: Evaluation of Psychoacoustic Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current virtual acoustic displays for teleconferencing and virtual reality are usually limited to very simple or non-existent renderings of reverberation, a fundamental part of the acoustic environmental context that is encountered in day-to-day hearing. Several research efforts have produced results that suggest that environmental cues dramatically improve perceptual performance within virtual acoustic displays, and that is possible to manipulate signal processing parameters to effectively reproduce important aspects of virtual acoustic perception in real-time. However, the computational resources for rendering reverberation remain formidable. Our efforts at NASA Ames have been focused using a several perceptual threshold metrics, to determine how various "trade-offs" might be made in real-time acoustic rendering. This includes both original work and confirmation of existing data that was obtained in real rather than virtual environments. The talk will consider the importance of using individualized versus generalized pinnae cues (the "Head-Related Transfer Function"); the use of head movement cues; threshold data for early reflections and late reverberation; and consideration of the necessary accuracy for measuring and rendering octave-band absorption characteristics of various wall surfaces. In addition, a consideration of the analysis-synthesis of the reverberation within "everyday spaces" (offices, conference rooms) will be contrasted to the commonly used paradigm of concert hall spaces.

  3. Virtual Acoustics: Evaluation of Psychoacoustic Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current virtual acoustic displays for teleconferencing and virtual reality are usually limited to very simple or non-existent renderings of reverberation, a fundamental part of the acoustic environmental context that is encountered in day-to-day hearing. Several research efforts have produced results that suggest that environmental cues dramatically improve perceptual performance within virtual acoustic displays, and that is possible to manipulate signal processing parameters to effectively reproduce important aspects of virtual acoustic perception in real-time. However, the computational resources for rendering reverberation remain formidable. Our efforts at NASA Ames have been focused using a several perceptual threshold metrics, to determine how various "trade-offs" might be made in real-time acoustic rendering. This includes both original work and confirmation of existing data that was obtained in real rather than virtual environments. The talk will consider the importance of using individualized versus generalized pinnae cues (the "Head-Related Transfer Function"); the use of head movement cues; threshold data for early reflections and late reverberation; and consideration of the necessary accuracy for measuring and rendering octave-band absorption characteristics of various wall surfaces. In addition, a consideration of the analysis-synthesis of the reverberation within "everyday spaces" (offices, conference rooms) will be contrasted to the commonly used paradigm of concert hall spaces.

  4. Note: Modified π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator with precise two-port Y-parameter characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Hong, Yan; Goh, Wang Ling; Mu, Xiaojing

    2016-10-01

    Dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator has become a powerful component for clock reference and sensing applications, enabling efficient compensations of temperature effects, concurrent measurements of multiple environmental parameters, etc. An equivalent circuit model for the dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator is indispensable as it provides a means as well as being an effective tool for evaluating device characteristics and to aid the designing of circuitry for the resonators. This could be the first time ever that an efficient equivalent-circuit model, i.e., modified π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for dual-mode Lamb-wave resonators is reported. Evaluated by experiments, this model attains noteworthy agreements on both the magnitudes and phases of Y11 and Y21 of the measurement results. Compared to literature, the proposed model is capable of modeling the dual resonances efficiently. Moreover, this work also proves more accurate when viewing the Y-parameters across a wide frequency range. The gained features of this model are most beneficial for the analysis of the dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator and also for the designing of circuits.

  5. Note: Modified π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator with precise two-port Y-parameter characterizations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Hong, Yan; Goh, Wang Ling; Mu, Xiaojing

    2016-10-01

    Dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator has become a powerful component for clock reference and sensing applications, enabling efficient compensations of temperature effects, concurrent measurements of multiple environmental parameters, etc. An equivalent circuit model for the dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator is indispensable as it provides a means as well as being an effective tool for evaluating device characteristics and to aid the designing of circuitry for the resonators. This could be the first time ever that an efficient equivalent-circuit model, i.e., modified π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for dual-mode Lamb-wave resonators is reported. Evaluated by experiments, this model attains noteworthy agreements on both the magnitudes and phases of Y11 and Y21 of the measurement results. Compared to literature, the proposed model is capable of modeling the dual resonances efficiently. Moreover, this work also proves more accurate when viewing the Y-parameters across a wide frequency range. The gained features of this model are most beneficial for the analysis of the dual-mode Lamb-wave resonator and also for the designing of circuits.

  6. Practice Parameter for Child and Adolescent Forensic Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This Parameter addresses the key concepts that differentiate the forensic evaluation of children and adolescents from a clinical assessment. There are ethical issues unique to the forensic evaluation, because the forensic evaluator's duty is to the person, court, or agency requesting the evaluation, rather than to the patient. The forensic…

  7. Practice Parameter for Child and Adolescent Forensic Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This Parameter addresses the key concepts that differentiate the forensic evaluation of children and adolescents from a clinical assessment. There are ethical issues unique to the forensic evaluation, because the forensic evaluator's duty is to the person, court, or agency requesting the evaluation, rather than to the patient. The forensic…

  8. Parameter optimization analysis to minimize the polarization error in a localized thermal tunable fiber ring resonator gyro.

    PubMed

    Bobbili, Prasada Rao; Nayak, Jagannath; Pinnoji, Prerana Dabral; Rama Koti Reddy, D V

    2016-03-10

    The accuracy of the resonant frequency servo loop is a major concern for the high-performance operation of a resonant fiber optic gyro. For instance, a bias error as large as tens or even hundreds of degrees/hour has been observed at the demodulated output of the resonant frequency servo loop. The traditional frequency servo mechanism is not an efficient tool to address this problem. In our previous work, we proposed a novel method to minimize the laser frequency noise to the level of the shot noise by refractive index modulation by a thermally tunable resonator. In this paper, we performed the parameter optimization for the resonator coil, multifunction integrated-optics chip, and couplers by the transition matrix using the Jones matrix methodology to minimize the polarization error. With the optimized parameter values, we achieved the bias value of the resonator fiber optic gyro to 1.924°/h.

  9. Parameter allocation of parallel array bistable stochastic resonance and its application in communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, You-Guo; Zhai, Qi-Qing; Liu, Jin

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a parameter allocation scheme in a parallel array bistable stochastic resonance-based communication system (P-BSR-CS) to improve the performance of weak binary pulse amplitude modulated (BPAM) signal transmissions. The optimal parameter allocation policy of the P-BSR-CS is provided to minimize the bit error rate (BER) and maximize the channel capacity (CC) under the adiabatic approximation condition. On this basis, we further derive the best parameter selection theorem in realistic communication scenarios via variable transformation. Specifically, the P-BSR structure design not only brings the robustness of parameter selection optimization, where the optimal parameter pair is not fixed but variable in quite a wide range, but also produces outstanding system performance. Theoretical analysis and simulation results indicate that in the P-BSR-CS the proposed parameter allocation scheme yields considerable performance improvement, particularly in very low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) environments. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61179027), the Qinglan Project of Jiangsu Province of China (Grant No. QL06212006), and the University Postgraduate Research and Innovation Project of Jiangsu Province (Grant Nos. KYLX15_0829, KYLX15_0831).

  10. Determination of acoustic nonlinearity parameter (β) using nonlinear resonance ultrasound spectroscopy: Theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    The present article investigates the possibility of using nonlinear resonance ultrasound spectroscopy to determine the acoustic nonlinearity parameter (β) and third order elastic constant by developing an inverse problem. A theoretical framework was developed for nonlinear forced vibration of a cantilever beam using material nonlinearity (stress-strain nonlinearity). The resulting nonlinear equation was solved using method of multiple time scales to obtain the nonlinear frequency shifts. The present works focuses only on classical nonlinearity and, therefore, a diverse group of intact, classic nonlinear materials were chosen. The samples were tested using nonlinear resonance ultrasound spectroscopy, and the developed theory was used to invert the experimental frequency shifts to obtain the nonlinearity parameters. The third order elastic constants and β were calculated using their analytical relationship with the nonlinearity parameter. The experimentally determined C111 and β values for all various materials agree well with literature values. In addition to determining β, determination of the sign, or phase of β was also explored theoretically and experimentally.

  11. RIPL-Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R.; Herman, M.; Capote,R.; Herman,M.; Oblozinsky,P.; Young,P.G.; Goriely,S.; Belgy,T.; Ignatyuk,A.V.; Koning,A.J.; Hilaire,S.; Pljko,V.A.; Avrigeanu,M.; Bersillon,O.; Chadwick,M.B.; Fukahori,T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han,Yinl,; Kailas,S.; Kopecky,J.; Maslov,V.M.; Reffo,G.; Sin,M.; Soukhovitskii,E.Sh.; Talou,P

    2009-12-01

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/. This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and {gamma}-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  12. RIPL - Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R. , E-Mail: r.capotenoy@iaea.org; Herman, M.; Oblozinsky, P.; Young, P.G.; Goriely, S.; Belgya, T.; Ignatyuk, A.V.; Koning, A.J.; Hilaire, S.; Plujko, V.A.; Avrigeanu, M.; Bersillon, O.; Chadwick, M.B.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han, Yinlu; Kailas, S.; Kopecky, J.; Maslov, V.M.; Reffo, G.

    2009-12-15

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through (http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/). This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and {gamma}-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  13. RIPL - Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capote, R.; Herman, M.; Obložinský, P.; Young, P. G.; Goriely, S.; Belgya, T.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Koning, A. J.; Hilaire, S.; Plujko, V. A.; Avrigeanu, M.; Bersillon, O.; Chadwick, M. B.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han, Yinlu; Kailas, S.; Kopecky, J.; Maslov, V. M.; Reffo, G.; Sin, M.; Soukhovitskii, E. Sh.; Talou, P.

    2009-12-01

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/. This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and γ-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  14. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu; Tesfa, Teklu; Ruby Leung, L.

    2016-05-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) represents physical, chemical, and biological processes of the terrestrial ecosystems that interact with climate across a range of spatial and temporal scales. As CLM includes numerous sub-models and associated parameters, the high-dimensional parameter space presents a formidable challenge for quantifying uncertainty and improving Earth system predictions needed to assess environmental changes and risks. This study aims to evaluate the potential of transferring hydrologic model parameters in CLM through sensitivity analyses and classification across watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) in the United States. The sensitivity of CLM-simulated water and energy fluxes to hydrological parameters across 431 MOPEX basins are first examined using an efficient stochastic sampling-based sensitivity analysis approach. Linear, interaction, and high-order nonlinear impacts are all identified via statistical tests and stepwise backward removal parameter screening. The basins are then classified according to their parameter sensitivity patterns (internal attributes), as well as their hydrologic indices/attributes (external hydrologic factors) separately, using Principal component analysis (PCA) and expectation-maximization (EM) - based clustering approach. Similarities and differences among the parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class), the hydrologic indices-based classification (H-Class), and the Koppen climate classification systems (K-Class) are discussed. Within each parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class) with similar parameter sensitivity characteristics, similar inversion modeling setups can be used for parameter calibration, and the parameters and their contribution or significance to water and energy cycling may also be more transferrable. This classification study provides guidance on identifiable parameters, and on parameterization and inverse model design for CLM but the

  15. Symmetric Resonance Charge Exchange Cross Section Based on Impact Parameter Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, Kazem; Murphy, Kendrah; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Using a two-state impact parameter approximation, a calculation has been carried out to obtain symmetric resonance charge transfer cross sections between nine ions and their parent atoms or molecules. Calculation is based on a two-dimensional numerical integration. The method is mostly suited for hydrogenic and some closed shell atoms. Good agreement has been obtained with the results of laboratory measurements for the ion-atom pairs H+-H, He+-He, and Ar+-Ar. Several approximations in a similar published calculation have been eliminated.

  16. Exact two-component relativistic theory for nuclear magnetic resonance parameters.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiming; Liu, Wenjian; Xiao, Yunlong; Cheng, Lan

    2009-08-28

    An exact two-component (X2C) relativistic theory for nuclear magnetic resonance parameters is obtained by first a single block-diagonalization of the matrix representation of the Dirac operator in a magnetic-field-dependent basis and then a magnetic perturbation expansion of the resultant two-component Hamiltonian and transformation matrices. Such a matrix formulation is not only simple but also general in the sense that the various ways of incorporating the field dependence can be treated in a unified manner. The X2C dia- and paramagnetic terms agree individually with the corresponding four-component ones up to machine accuracy for any basis.

  17. Longitudinal NMR parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit during the growing process using a mobile magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geya, Yuto; Kimura, Takeshi; Fujisaki, Hirotaka; Terada, Yasuhiko; Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Gemma, Hiroshi; Sekozawa, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai, Kosui) were performed using an electrically mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a 0.2 T and 16 cm gap permanent magnet. To measure the relaxation times and apparent diffusion coefficients of the pear fruit in relation to their weight, seven pear fruits were harvested almost every week during the cell enlargement period and measured in a research orchard. To evaluate the in situ relaxation times, six pear fruits were longitudinally measured for about two months during the same period. The measurements for the harvested samples showed good agreement with the in situ measurements. From the measurements of the harvested samples, it is clear that the relaxation rates of the pear fruits linearly change with the inverse of the linear dimension of the fruits, demonstrating that the relaxation mechanism is a surface relaxation. We therefore conclude that the mobile MRI system is a useful device for measuring the NMR parameters of outdoor living plants.

  18. Relationships between nuclear magnetic resonance parameters used to characterize weathering spilled oil and soil toxicity in central Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Stella Maris; Barquin, Mercedes; Katusich, Ofelia; Nudelman, Norma

    2014-01-01

    Oil spill in the Central Patagonian zone was studied to evaluate if any relationship exists between the parameters used to characterize weathering spilled oil and soil toxicity for two plant species and to evaluate if the phytotoxicity to local species would be a good index for the soil contamination. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural indexes and column chromatography compositional indexes were determined to characterize the oil spill in the soil samples. Bioassays were also carried out using Lactuca sativa L (reference) and Atriplex lampa (native species) as test organisms. Measurements of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) and the electrical conductivity (EC) of the soil were carried out to evaluate the effect on the bioassays. The principal components analysis of the parameters determined by NMR, compositional indexes, EC, TPH, and toxicology data shows that the first three principal components accounted for the 78% of the total variance (40%, 25%, and 13% for the first, second, and third PC, respectively). A good agreement was found between information obtained by compositional indexes and NMR structural indexes. Soil toxicity increases with the increase of EC and TPH. Other factors, such as, the presence of branched and aromatic hydrocarbons is also significant. The statistical evaluation showed that the Euclidean distances (3D) between the background and each one of the samples might be a better indicator of the soil contamination, compared with chemical criterion of TPH.

  19. A magnetic resonance imaging study on the articulatory and acoustic speech parameters of Malay vowels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The phonetic properties of six Malay vowels are investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the vocal tract in order to obtain dynamic articulatory parameters during speech production. To resolve image blurring due to the tongue movement during the scanning process, a method based on active contour extraction is used to track tongue contours. The proposed method efficiently tracks tongue contours despite the partial blurring of MRI images. Consequently, the articulatory parameters that are effectively measured as tongue movement is observed, and the specific shape of the tongue and its position for all six uttered Malay vowels are determined. Speech rehabilitation procedure demands some kind of visual perceivable prototype of speech articulation. To investigate the validity of the measured articulatory parameters based on acoustic theory of speech production, an acoustic analysis based on the uttered vowels by subjects has been performed. As the acoustic speech and articulatory parameters of uttered speech were examined, a correlation between formant frequencies and articulatory parameters was observed. The experiments reported a positive correlation between the constriction location of the tongue body and the first formant frequency, as well as a negative correlation between the constriction location of the tongue tip and the second formant frequency. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is an effective tool for the dynamic study of speech production. PMID:25060583

  20. A magnetic resonance imaging study on the articulatory and acoustic speech parameters of Malay vowels.

    PubMed

    Zourmand, Alireza; Mirhassani, Seyed Mostafa; Ting, Hua-Nong; Bux, Shaik Ismail; Ng, Kwan Hoong; Bilgen, Mehmet; Jalaludin, Mohd Amin

    2014-07-25

    The phonetic properties of six Malay vowels are investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the vocal tract in order to obtain dynamic articulatory parameters during speech production. To resolve image blurring due to the tongue movement during the scanning process, a method based on active contour extraction is used to track tongue contours. The proposed method efficiently tracks tongue contours despite the partial blurring of MRI images. Consequently, the articulatory parameters that are effectively measured as tongue movement is observed, and the specific shape of the tongue and its position for all six uttered Malay vowels are determined.Speech rehabilitation procedure demands some kind of visual perceivable prototype of speech articulation. To investigate the validity of the measured articulatory parameters based on acoustic theory of speech production, an acoustic analysis based on the uttered vowels by subjects has been performed. As the acoustic speech and articulatory parameters of uttered speech were examined, a correlation between formant frequencies and articulatory parameters was observed. The experiments reported a positive correlation between the constriction location of the tongue body and the first formant frequency, as well as a negative correlation between the constriction location of the tongue tip and the second formant frequency. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is an effective tool for the dynamic study of speech production.

  1. The Resonator Impedance Model of Surface Roughness Applied to the LCLS Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF

    1999-03-19

    The resonator impedance model of surface roughness in a cylindrical beam tube, derived in Ref. 1, is compared to the inductive impedance model of Ref. 2. It is shown that for long, smooth bunches the two models both give an inductive response, that the effective inductance per length is proportional to the corrugation depth over the beam pipe radius, and that the absolute results also are comparable. For a non-smooth bunch shape, such as is found in the undulator region of the LCLS, however, the inductive impedance model is no longer valid; and the resonator model gives a non-inductive response, with the induced energy spread decreasing much more slowly with increasing bunch length than for a smooth distribution. When applied to the actual bunch shape and parameters in the LCLS, the resonator model predicts that, to remain within tolerances for induced energy spread, the beam tube roughness must be kept to ~10 nm. Further calculations suggest, however, that if the period-to-depth aspect ratio of the surface features is large, (as has been found in recent measurements of polished beam tube surfaces), then the wake field effect may be greatly suppressed, and the roughness tolerance greatly increased.

  2. The Resonator Impedance Model of Surface Roughness Applied to the LCLS Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF.

    1999-03-19

    The resonator impedance model of surface roughness in a cylindrical beam tube, derived in Ref. 1, is compared to the inductive impedance model of Ref. 2. It is shown that for long, smooth bunches the two models both give an inductive response, that the effective inductance per length is proportional to the corrugation depth over the beam pipe radius, and that the absolute results also are comparable. For a non-smooth bunch shape, such as is found in the undulator region of the LCLS, however, the inductive impedance model is no longer valid; and the resonator model gives a non-inductive response, with the induced energy spread decreasing much more slowly with increasing bunch length than for a smooth distribution. When applied to the actual bunch shape and parameters in the LCLS, the resonator model predicts that, to remain within tolerances for induced energy spread, the beam tube roughness must be kept to 10 nm. Further calculations suggest, however, that if the period-to-depth aspect ratio of the surface features is large, (as has been found in recent measurements of polished beam tube surfaces), then the wake field effect may be greatly suppressed, and the roughness tolerance greatly increased.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of congestive cardiac failure.

    PubMed

    Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2012-07-01

    Congestive cardiac failure is the end-result of various cardiac disorders, and is a major contributor to morbidity, mortality, and financial burden throughout the world. Due to advances in the knowledge of the disease and scanner technology, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is playing an increasingly important role in the evaluation of cardiac failure, including in establishing diagnosis, problem solving, risk stratification, and monitoring of therapy. This review discusses and illustrates the role of MRI in the assessment of congestive cardiac failure.

  4. Theoretical calculations of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance parameters of liquid phase Orotic acid radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikaya, Ebru Karakaş; Dereli, Ömer

    2017-02-01

    To obtain liquid phase molecular structure, conformational analysis of Orotic acid was performed and six conformers were determined. For these conformations, eight possible radicals were modelled by using Density Functional Theory computations with respect to molecular structure. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance parameters of these model radicals were calculated and then they were compared with the experimental ones. Geometry optimizations of the molecule and modeled radicals were performed using Becke's three-parameter hybrid-exchange functional combined with the Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional of Density Functional Theory and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets in p-dioxane solution. Because Orotic acid can be mutagenic in mammalian somatic cells and it is also mutagenic for bacteria and yeast, it has been studied.

  5. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Enhancement of the efficiency and control of emission parameters of an unstable-resonator chemical oxygen—iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreisho, A. S.; Lobachev, V. V.; Savin, A. V.; Strakhov, S. Yu; Trilis, A. V.

    2007-07-01

    The outlook is considered for the development of a high-power supersonic flowing chemical oxygen—iodine laser operating as an amplifier and controlled by radiation from a master oscillator by using an unstable resonator with a hole-coupled mirror. The influence of the seed radiation intensity, the coupling-hole diameter, the active-medium length, and the magnification factor on the parameters of laser radiation is analysed. It is shown that the use of such resonators is most advisable in medium-power oxygen—iodine lasers for which classical unstable resonators are inefficient because of their low magnification factors. The use of unstable resonators with a hole-coupled mirror and injection provides the control of radiation parameters and a considerable increase in the output power and brightness of laser radiation.

  6. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pancreatic Cancer: Characteristics and Correlation With Histopathologic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wanling; Li, Na; Zhao, Weiwei; Ren, Jing; Wei, Mengqi; Yang, Yong; Wang, Yingmei; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Zhuoli; Larson, Andrew C; Huan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify diffusion and perfusion abnormalities and evaluate correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), MR perfusion and histopathologic parameters of pancreatic cancer (PC). Eighteen patients with PC underwent diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Parameters of DCE-MRI and ADC of cancer and non-cancerous tissue were compared. Correlation between the rate constant that represents transfer of contrast agent from the arterial blood into the extravascular extracellular space (K, volume of the extravascular extracellular space per unit volume of tissue (Ve), and ADC of PC and histopathologic parameters were analyzed. The rate constant that represents transfer of contrast agent from the extravascular extracellular space into blood plasma, K, tissue volume fraction occupied by vascular space, and ADC of PC were significantly lower than nontumoral pancreases. Ve of PC was significantly higher than that of nontumoral pancreas. Apparent diffusion coefficient and K values of PC were negatively correlated to fibrosis content and fibroblast activation protein staining score. Fibrosis content was positively correlated to Ve. Apparent diffusion coefficient values and parameters of DCE-MRI can differentiate PC from nontumoral pancreases. There are correlations between ADC, K, Ve, and fibrosis content of PC. Fibroblast activation protein staining score of PC is negatively correlated to ADC and K. Apparent diffusion coefficient, K, and Ve may be feasible to predict prognosis of PC.

  7. JUPITER PROJECT - JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) project builds on the technology of two widely used codes for sensitivity analysis, data assessment, calibration, and uncertainty analysis of environmental models: PEST and UCODE.

  8. JUPITER PROJECT - JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) project builds on the technology of two widely used codes for sensitivity analysis, data assessment, calibration, and uncertainty analysis of environmental models: PEST and UCODE.

  9. Practice parameter for child and adolescent forensic evaluations.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Louis J; Thomas, Christopher R; Bukstein, Oscar G; Walter, Heather J; Benson, R Scott; Chrisman, Allan; Farchione, Tiffany R; Hamilton, John; Keable, Helene; Kinlan, Joan; Schoettle, Ulrich; Siegel, Matthew; Stock, Saundra; Ptakowski, Kristin Kroeger; Medicus, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    This Parameter addresses the key concepts that differentiate the forensic evaluation of children and adolescents from a clinical assessment. There are ethical issues unique to the forensic evaluation, because the forensic evaluator's duty is to the person, court, or agency requesting the evaluation, rather than to the patient. The forensic evaluator clarifies the legal questions to be answered and structures the evaluation to address those issues. The forensic examination may include a review of collateral information, interviews and other assessments of the child or adolescent, and interviews with other relevant informants. The principles in this Parameter suggest the general approach to the forensic evaluation of children and adolescents and are relevant to delinquency, child custody, child maltreatment, personal injury, and other court-ordered and noncourt-ordered evaluations.

  10. Study and Optimization of CPT Resonance Parameters in 87 Rb/Ar/Ne Microcells Aimed for Application in Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masian, Y.; Sivak, A.; Sevostianov, D.; Vassiliev, V.; Velichansky, V.

    The paper shows the presents results of studies of small-size rubidium cells with argon and neon buffer gases, produced by a patent pended technique of laser welding [Fishman et al. (2014)]. Cells were designed for miniature frequency standard. Temperature dependence of the frequency of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance was measured and used to optimize the ratio of partial pressures of buffer gases. The influence of duration and regime of annealing on the CPT-resonance frequency drift was investigated. The parameters of the FM modulation of laser current for two cases which correspond to the highest amplitude of CPT resonance and to the smallest light shifts of the resonance frequency were determined. The temperature dependences of the CPT resonance frequency were found to be surprisingly different in the two cases. A non-linear dependence of CPT resonance frequency on the temperature of the cell with the two extremes was revealed for one of these cases.

  11. Prediction of hydraulic parameters from block joint inversion of magnetic resonance and vertical electric soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, T.; Müller-Petke, M.

    2012-04-01

    For assessing the impact of climate changes on salinity of coastal aquifers, numerical modelling needs to be done. As input, the spatial distribution of the parameters porosity, hydraulic conductivity and salt concentrations is needed. Airborne resistivity data are available that gives hints to fluid conductivity. Magnetic resonance soundings (MRS) can provide free water content directly yielding porosity, which in turn is needed for fluid conductivities and thus TDS concentrations. Furthermore, hydraulic conductivities can be retrieved by empirical relations using porosity and decay times. For having a unique model with all three primary parameters, vertical electrical and magnetic resonance soundings are inverted jointly using a block discretization. The MRS data were preprocessed using noise cancellation, despiking and a new gate integration scheme. Data errors were derived from fitting and include the effect of gating. Since the resistivity model affects the MRS inversion but demands an extensive kernel calculation, resistivity is updated only once. After inversion, a systematic model variation is done in order to retrieve confidence intervals of the primary and secondary parameters. We apply the methodology to several soundings at the North Sea Island Borkum, where the dynamics of the fresh/salt water interface is currently investigated. All soundings exhibit a very good data quality. One sounding close to a research borehole verifies the approach qualitatively. Another sounding was done to calibrate the petrophysical parameters using a pumping test. Finally, it is applied to a sounding in the flooding area. Whereas single MRS and VES data can be explained by a 3-layer and 4-layer model, respectively, a 5-layer model is needed to find a comprehensive model. Even though porosities are fairly constant, we can distinguish lithology and salinity due to the combination of resistivity and decay time. This case shows two fresh/salt water interfaces separated by a

  12. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions

    PubMed Central

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  13. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions.

    PubMed

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-04-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  14. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu; Tesfa, Teklu K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2016-02-27

    The Community Land Model (CLM) represents physical, chemical, and biological processes of the terrestrial ecosystems that interact with climate across a range of spatial and temporal scales. As CLM includes numerous sub-models and associated parameters, the high-dimensional parameter space presents a formidable challenge for quantifying uncertainty and improving Earth system predictions needed to assess environmental changes and risks. This study aims to evaluate the potential of transferring hydrologic model parameters in CLM through sensitivity analyses and classification across watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) in the United States. The sensitivity of CLM-simulated water and energy fluxes to hydrological parameters across 431 MOPEX basins are first examined using an efficient stochastic sampling-based sensitivity analysis approach. Linear, interaction, and high-order nonlinear impacts are all identified via statistical tests and stepwise backward removal parameter screening. The basins are then classified accordingly to their parameter sensitivity patterns (internal attributes), as well as their hydrologic indices/attributes (external hydrologic factors) separately, using a Principal component analyses (PCA) and expectation-maximization (EM) –based clustering approach. Similarities and differences among the parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class), the hydrologic indices-based classification (H-Class), and the Koppen climate classification systems (K-Class) are discussed. Within each S-class with similar parameter sensitivity characteristics, similar inversion modeling setups can be used for parameter calibration, and the parameters and their contribution or significance to water and energy cycling may also be more transferrable. This classification study provides guidance on identifiable parameters, and on parameterization and inverse model design for CLM but the methodology is applicable to other models

  15. [Fetal magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia].

    PubMed

    Sebastià, C; Garcia, R; Gomez, O; Paño, B; Nicolau, C

    2014-01-01

    A diaphragmatic hernia is defined as the protrusion of abdominal viscera into the thoracic cavity through a normal or pathological orifice. The herniated viscera compress the lungs, resulting in pulmonary hypoplasia and secondary pulmonary hypertension, which are the leading causes of neonatal death in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is diagnosed by sonography in routine prenatal screening. Although magnetic resonance imaging is fundamentally used to determine whether the liver is located within the abdomen or has herniated into the thorax, it also can provide useful information about other herniated structures and the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia. The aim of this article is to review the fetal magnetic resonance findings for congenital diaphragmatic hernia and the signs that enable us to establish the neonatal prognosis when evaluating pulmonary hypoplasia.

  16. Evaluation of resonances above the proton threshold in 26Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipps, K. A.

    2016-09-01

    26Al remains an intriguing target for observational gamma-ray astronomy, thanks to its characteristic decay. The 25Al(p, γ)26Si reaction is the crucial link in a sequence that bypasses the production of the observable 26Alg . s . in favor of the isomeric state, and as such has been the focus of many studies. Considerable confusion in this regard has arisen from the use of outdated excitation energies and masses in reaction studies and rate evaluations. Recalibration of existing data from the literature has resulted in updated excitation and resonance energies, but open questions remain, particularly with regard to spin assignments and partial widths/resonance strengths. A discussion of the levels just above the proton threshold in 26Si relevant to the astrophysical 25Al(p, γ)26Si reaction rate will be presented. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics.

  17. Are metric parameters sufficient alone in evaluation of the patellar instability? New angular measuring parameters.

    PubMed

    Deveci, Alper; Cankaya, Deniz; Yilmaz, Serdar; Celen, Ersin; Sakman, Bulent; Bozkurt, Murat

    2017-01-01

    When the evaluation of patellar instability is examined from the aspect of the conical-cylindrical anatomy of the tibia, metric measurement parameters such as the tuberositas tibia (TT)-trochlear groove (TG) and patellar tendon (PT) insertion-trochlear groove (TG) distances are not sufficient. We asked whether defined angular parameters reveal the rotational movement of the tuberositas tibia on the tibia shaft, additional to the metric parameters and there is a correlation between the metric and angular parameters. 19 patients with patellar instability and 22 patients without patellar instability were evaluated. For all patients, two angle and three length parameters were evaluated on the slices taken. Evaluations were made of the TT-TG, the midpoint of the PT insertion-TG distances, the anatomic midpoint of the dome of the TT-TG, the TG-PT angle, and the TG-dome angle (DA). The Pearson correlation test was used for the statistical analysis of correlations between groups. A statistically significant increase was determined in the patellar instability group in the TG-DA and TG-PT angle values compared to the group without patellar instability ( p < 0.05). In both groups, a positive and strong correlation was determined between the TT-TG and the TG-PT and dome of the TT-TG distances, but no statistically significant correlation was determined between the tuberositas TT-TG and TG-PT angle and TG-DA. Metric parameters may not be sufficient alone in the evaluation of patellar instability. Metric parameters should be supported by additional angular parameters which reveal the rotational movement of the TT on the tibia shaft.

  18. The application of multiobjective genetic algorithm to the parameter optimization of single-well potential stochastic resonance algorithm aimed at simultaneous determination of multiple weak chromatographic peaks.

    PubMed

    Deng, Haishan; Xie, Shaofei; Xiang, Bingren; Zhan, Ying; Li, Wei; Li, Xiaohua; Jiang, Caiyun; Wu, Xiaohong; Liu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous determination of multiple weak chromatographic peaks via stochastic resonance algorithm attracts much attention in recent years. However, the optimization of the parameters is complicated and time consuming, although the single-well potential stochastic resonance algorithm (SSRA) has already reduced the number of parameters to only one and simplified the process significantly. Even worse, it is often difficult to keep amplified peaks with beautiful peak shape. Therefore, multiobjective genetic algorithm was employed to optimize the parameter of SSRA for multiple optimization objectives (i.e., S/N and peak shape) and multiple chromatographic peaks. The applicability of the proposed method was evaluated with an experimental data set of Sudan dyes, and the results showed an excellent quantitative relationship between different concentrations and responses.

  19. Tuning near-field thermal radiative properties by quantifying sensitivity of Mie resonance-based metamaterial design parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Spencer J.; Basu, Soumyadipta; Raeymaekers, Bart; Francoeur, Mathieu

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of engineering near-field thermal radiative properties is investigated by adjusting design parameters of Mie resonance-based metamaterials. The sensitivities of surface polariton resonance frequencies, in both transverse magnetic and transverse electric polarizations, to parameters such as host medium relative permittivity and particle size and spacing (volume filling fraction) is determined. The sensitivity analysis is performed using a design of experiments method in combination with Mie resonance calculations and Clausius-Mossotti mixing relations. Particle size has the greatest effect on the resonance frequencies, while the volume filling fraction has the least. Based on the results from the sensitivity analysis, three metamaterials are selected for further analysis. The physics of these metamaterials is explored by calculating local density of electromagnetic states and surface polariton dispersion relation. As predicted by the sensitivity analysis, the local density of electromagnetic states and dispersion relation calculations show that Mie resonance-based metamaterials can be tuned to exhibit surface polariton resonance in the near-infrared spectrum. Energy density calculations show that surface polariton resonance in the near-infrared can be activated at temperatures as low as 800 K. Finally, a pathway to implementation of these metamaterials into macroscale engineering applications is proposed. Such metamaterials, with near-infrared surface polariton resonance, will significantly impact the development of nanoscale-gap thermophotovoltaic power generators for recycling waste heat into electricity.

  20. Parameter analysis for a nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope based on 133Cs-129Xe/131Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-Wei; Xu, Zheng-Yi; Zhou, Min; Xu, Xin-Ye

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically investigate several parameters for the nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope based on 133Cs-129Xe/131Xe. For a cell containing a mixture of 133Cs at saturated pressure, we investigate the optimal quenching gas (N2) pressure and the corresponding pump laser intensity to achieve 30% 133Cs polarization at the center of the cell when the static magnetic field B 0 is 5 {{μ }}{{T}} with different 129Xe/131Xe pressure. The effective field produced by spin-exchange polarized 129Xe or 131Xe sensed by 133Cs can also be discussed in different 129Xe/131Xe pressure conditions. Furthermore, the relationship between the detected signal and the probe laser frequency is researched. We obtain the optimum probe laser detuning from the D2 (6{}2{{S}}1/2\\to 6{}2{{P}}3/2) resonance with different 129Xe/131Xe pressure owing to the pressure broadening. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA123401), the National Key Basic Research and Development Program of China (Grant Nos. 2016YFA0302103 and 2012CB821302), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant 11134003), and Shanghai Excellent Academic Leaders Program of China (Grant No. 12XD1402400).

  1. Determination of molecular spectroscopic parameters and energy-transfer rates by double-resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.; Foy, B.; Hetzler, J.; Flannery, C.; Klaassen, J.; Mizugai, Y.; Coy, S.

    1990-05-01

    The spectroscopy of small to medium-size polyatomic molecules can be extremely complex, especially in higher-lying overtone and combination vibrational levels. The high density of levels also complicates the understanding of inelastic collision processes, which is required to model energy transfer and collision broadening of spectral lines. Both of these problems can be addressed by double-resonance spectroscopy, i.e., time-resolved pump-probe measurements using microwave, infrared, near-infrared, and visible-wavelength sources. Information on excited-state spectroscopy, transition moments, inelastic energy transfer rates and propensity rules, and pressure-broadening parameters may be obtained from such experiments. Examples are given for several species of importance in planetary atmospheres, including ozone, silane, ethane, and ammonia.

  2. Neutron capture on Zr94: Resonance parameters and Maxwellian-averaged cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliente, G.; Milazzo, P. M.; Fujii, K.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Bisterzo, S.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Furman, W.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2011-07-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the Zr isotopes play an important role in nucleosynthesis studies. The s-process reaction flow between the Fe seed and the heavier isotopes passes through the neutron magic nucleus Zr90 and through Zr91,92,93,94, but only part of the flow extends to Zr96 because of the branching point at Zr95. Apart from their effect on the s-process flow, the comparably small isotopic (n,γ) cross sections make Zr also an interesting structural material for nuclear reactors. The Zr94 (n,γ) cross section has been measured with high resolution at the spallation neutron source n_TOF at CERN and resonance parameters are reported up to 60 keV neutron energy.

  3. Determination of molecular spectroscopic parameters and energy-transfer rates by double-resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.; Foy, B.; Hetzler, J.; Flannery, C.; Klaassen, J.; Mizugai, Y.; Coy, S.

    1990-01-01

    The spectroscopy of small to medium-size polyatomic molecules can be extremely complex, especially in higher-lying overtone and combination vibrational levels. The high density of levels also complicates the understanding of inelastic collision processes, which is required to model energy transfer and collision broadening of spectral lines. Both of these problems can be addressed by double-resonance spectroscopy, i.e., time-resolved pump-probe measurements using microwave, infrared, near-infrared, and visible-wavelength sources. Information on excited-state spectroscopy, transition moments, inelastic energy transfer rates and propensity rules, and pressure-broadening parameters may be obtained from such experiments. Examples are given for several species of importance in planetary atmospheres, including ozone, silane, ethane, and ammonia.

  4. Evaluation of Focal Ablation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Defined Prostate Cancer Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Controlled Transurethral Ultrasound Therapy with Prostatectomy as the Reference Standard.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Elizabeth; Mougenot, Charles; Staruch, Robert; Boyes, Aaron; Kazem, Mohammad; Bronskill, Michael; Foster, Harry; Sugar, Linda; Haider, Masoom; Klotz, Laurence; Chopra, Rajiv

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated magnetic resonance imaging controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy as a treatment for magnetic resonance imaging defined focal prostate cancer using subsequent prostatectomy and histology as the reference standard. Five men completed this pilot study, which was approved by the institutional review board. Prior to radical prostatectomy focal tumors identified by magnetic resonance imaging were treated by coagulating targeted subtotal 3-dimensional volumes of prostate tissue using magnetic resonance imaging controlled transurethral focused ultrasound. Treatment was performed with a 3 Tesla clinical magnetic resonance imaging unit combined with modified clinical planning software for high intensity focused ultrasound therapy. After prostatectomy whole mount histological sections parallel to the magnetic resonance imaging treatment planes were used to compare magnetic resonance imaging measurements with thermal damage at the cellular level and, thus, evaluate treatment and target accuracy. Three-dimensional target volumes of 4 to 20 cc and with radii up to 35 mm from the urethra were treated successfully. Mean ± SD temperature control accuracy at the target boundary was -1.6 ± 4.8C and the mean spatial targeting accuracy achieved was -1.5 ± 2.8 mm. Mean treatment accuracy with respect to histology was -0.4 ± 1.7 mm with all index tumors falling inside the histological outer limit of thermal injury. Magnetic resonance imaging guided transurethral ultrasound therapy is capable of generating thermal coagulation and tumor destruction in targeted 3-dimensional angular sectors out to the prostate capsule for prostate glands up to 70 cc in volume. Ultrasound parameters needed to achieve ablation at the prostate capsule were determined, providing a foundation for future studies. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of pericardial disease

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Muhammad; Watkin, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Pericardial diseases are commonly encountered in clinical practice and may present as an isolated process or in association with various systemic conditions. Traditionally transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) has been the method of choice for the evaluation of suspected pericardial disease but increasingly computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are also being used as part of a rational multi-modality imaging approach tailored to the specific clinical scenario. This paper reviews the role of CT and MRI across the spectrum of pericardial diseases. PMID:27429911

  6. Thoracic magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Hwang, Hye Jeon; Kim, Eun Young; Oh, Sang Young; Kim, Ji-Eun

    2013-05-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a pathologic condition characterized by permanently enlarged airspaces distal to the terminal bronchiole with destruction of the alveolar walls. Functional information of the lungs is important to understand the pathophysiology of emphysema and that of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. With the recent developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, functional MRI with variable MR sequences can be used for the evaluation of different physiological and anatomic changes seen in cases of pulmonary emphysema. In this review article, we will focus on a brief description of each method, results of some of the most recent work, and the clinical application of such knowledge.

  7. Contributions of structural connectivity and cerebrovascular parameters to functional magnetic resonance imaging signals in mice at rest and during sensory paw stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Aileen; Grandjean, Joanes; Schlegel, Felix; Saab, Bechara J; Rudin, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we reported widespread bilateral increases in stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging signals in mouse brain to unilateral sensory paw stimulation. We attributed the pattern to arousal-related cardiovascular changes overruling cerebral autoregulation thereby masking specific signal changes elicited by local neuronal activity. To rule out the possibility that interhemispheric neuronal communication might contribute to bilateral functional magnetic resonance imaging responses, we compared stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging responses to unilateral hindpaw stimulation in acallosal I/LnJ, C57BL/6, and BALB/c mice. We found bilateral blood-oxygenation-level dependent signal changes in all three strains, ruling out a dominant contribution of transcallosal communication as reason for bilaterality. Analysis of functional connectivity derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, revealed that bilateral cortical functional connectivity is largely abolished in I/LnJ animals. Cortical functional connectivity in all strains correlated with structural connectivity in corpus callosum as revealed by diffusion tensor imaging. Given the profound influence of systemic hemodynamics on stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging outcomes, we evaluated whether functional connectivity data might be affected by cerebrovascular parameters, i.e. baseline cerebral blood volume, vascular reactivity, and reserve. We found that effects of cerebral hemodynamics on functional connectivity are largely outweighed by dominating contributions of structural connectivity. In contrast, contributions of transcallosal interhemispheric communication to the occurrence of ipsilateral functional magnetic resonance imaging response of equal amplitude to unilateral stimuli seem negligible.

  8. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu; Tesfa, Teklu; Ruby Leung, L.

    2016-05-01

    Effective uncertainty quantification approaches are needed to identify important parameters or factors that affect complex Earth system models that composed of multi-phase multi-component phenomena and multiple biogeophysical-biogeochemical processes. In this study, the impacts of 10 hydrologic parameters in Community Land Model (CLM) simulations of runoff and latent heat flux in a watershed are evaluated. Simple residual statistics, the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient, and log mean square error are used as alternative measures of the deviations between the simulated and field observed values. The effects of the input parameters on the deviations are evaluated quantitatively using analysis of variance (ANOVA) based on the generalized linear model (GLM), and using generalized cross validation (GCV) based on the multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) model. These analyses 1) help identify how to adjust parameter values and therefore the calibration of the CLM parameters and to improve the model’s simulations, and 2) can approximately predict the model calibration performance. The convergence behavior of the sensitivity analysis with number of sampling points for both ANOVA and GCV is also examined relative to different combinations of input parameters and output response variables and their metrics.

  9. Elbow magnetic resonance imaging: imaging anatomy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, Jennifer; English, Collette; Murphy, Darra

    2015-04-01

    The elbow is a complex joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often the imaging modality of choice in the workup of elbow pain, especially in sports injuries and younger patients who often have either a history of a chronic repetitive strain such as the throwing athlete or a distinct traumatic injury. Traumatic injuries and alternative musculoskeletal pathologies can affect the ligaments, musculotendinous, cartilaginous, and osseous structures of the elbow as well as the 3 main nerves to the upper limb, and these structures are best assessed with MRI.Knowledge of the complex anatomy of the elbow joint as well as patterns of injury and disease is important for the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis in the setting of elbow pain. This chapter will outline elbow anatomy, basic imaging parameters, compartmental pathology, and finally applications of some novel MRI techniques.

  10. Diagnostics of recombining laser plasma parameters based on He-like ion resonance lines intensity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazantsev, S. N.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Faenov, A. Ya; Pikuz, T. A.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Pikuz, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    While the plasma created by powerful laser expands from the target surface it becomes overcooled, i.e. recombining one. Improving of diagnostic methods applicable for such plasma is rather important problem in laboratory astrophysics nowadays because laser produced jets are fully scalable to young stellar objects. Such scaling is possible because of the plasma hydrodynamic equations invariance under some transformations. In this paper it is shown that relative intensities of the resonance transitions in He-like ions can be used to measure the parameters of recombining plasma. Intensity of the spectral lines corresponding to these transitions is sensitive to the density in the range of 1016-1020 cm-3 while the temperature ranges from 10 to 100 eV for ions with nuclear charge Zn ∼ 10. Calculations were carried out for F VIII ion and allowed to determine parameters of plasma jets created by nanosecond laser system ELFIE (Ecole Polytechnique, France) for astrophysical phenomenon modelling. Obtained dependencies are quite universal and can be used for any recombining plasma containing He-like fluorine ions.

  11. Density functional theory computation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance parameters in light and heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Kiplangat

    This thesis illustrates the utilization of Density functional theory (DFT) in calculations of gas and solution phase Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) properties of light and heavy nuclei. Computing NMR properties is still a challenge and there are many unknown factors that are still being explored. For instance, influence of hydrogen-bonding; thermal motion; vibration; rotation and solvent effects. In one of the theoretical studies of 195Pt NMR chemical shift in cisplatin and its derivatives illustrated in Chapter 2 and 3 of this thesis. The importance of representing explicit solvent molecules explicitly around the Pt center in cisplatin complexes was outlined. In the same complexes, solvent effect contributed about half of the J(Pt-N) coupling constant. Indicating the significance of considering the surrounding solvent molecules in elucidating the NMR measurements of cisplatin binding to DNA. In chapter 4, we explore the Spin-Orbit (SO) effects on the 29Si and 13C chemical shifts induced by surrounding metal and ligands. The unusual Ni, Pd, Pt trends in SO effects to the 29Si in metallasilatrane complexes X-Si-(mu-mt)4-M-Y was interpreted based on electronic and relativistic effects rather than by structural differences between the complexes. In addition, we develop a non-linear model for predicting NMR SO effects in a series of organics bonded to heavy nuclei halides. In chapter 5, we extend the idea of "Chemist's orbitals" LMO analysis to the quantum chemical proton NMR computation of systems with internal resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds. Consequently, we explicitly link the relationship between the NMR parameters related to H-bonded systems and intuitive picture of a chemical bond from quantum calculations. The analysis shows how NMR signatures characteristic of H-bond can be explained by local bonding and electron delocalization concepts. One shortcoming of some of the anti-cancer agents like cisplatin is that they are toxic and researchers are looking for

  12. Evaluation of muscle injury using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A. D.; Jaweed, M.; Evans, H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate spin echo T2 relaxation time changes in thigh muscles after intense eccentric exercise in healthy men. Spin echo and calculated T2 relaxation time images of the thighs were obtained on several occasions after exercise of one limb; the contralateral limb served as control. Muscle damage was verified by elevated levels of serum creatine kinase (CK). Thirty percent of the time no exercise effect was discernible on the magnetic resonance (MR) images. In all positive MR images (70%) the semitendinosus muscle was positive, while the biceps femoris, short head, and gracilis muscles were also positive in 50% and 25% of the total cases, respectively. The peak T2 relaxation time and serum CK were correlated (r = 0.94, p<0.01); temporal changes in muscle T2 relaxation time and serum CK were similar, although T2 relaxation time remained positive after serum CK returned to background levels. We conclude that magnetic resonance imaging can serve as a useful tool in the evaluation of eccentric exercise muscle damage by providing a quantitative indicator of damage and its resolution as well as the specific areas and muscles.

  13. Evaluation of muscle injury using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A. D.; Jaweed, M.; Evans, H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate spin echo T2 relaxation time changes in thigh muscles after intense eccentric exercise in healthy men. Spin echo and calculated T2 relaxation time images of the thighs were obtained on several occasions after exercise of one limb; the contralateral limb served as control. Muscle damage was verified by elevated levels of serum creatine kinase (CK). Thirty percent of the time no exercise effect was discernible on the magnetic resonance (MR) images. In all positive MR images (70%) the semitendinosus muscle was positive, while the biceps femoris, short head, and gracilis muscles were also positive in 50% and 25% of the total cases, respectively. The peak T2 relaxation time and serum CK were correlated (r = 0.94, p<0.01); temporal changes in muscle T2 relaxation time and serum CK were similar, although T2 relaxation time remained positive after serum CK returned to background levels. We conclude that magnetic resonance imaging can serve as a useful tool in the evaluation of eccentric exercise muscle damage by providing a quantitative indicator of damage and its resolution as well as the specific areas and muscles.

  14. Treatment time reduction through parameter optimization in magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, Joshua

    Magnetic Resonance guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) treatments are a promising modality for cancer treatments in which a focused beam of ultrasound energy is used to kill tumor tissue. However, obstacles still exist to its widespread clinical implementation, including long treatment times. This research demonstrates reductions in treatment times through intelligent selection of the user-controllable parameters, including: the focal zone treatment path, focal zone size, focal zone spacing, and whether to treat one or several focal zone locations at any given time. Several treatments using various combinations of these parameters were simulated using a finite difference method to solve the Pennes bio-heat transfer equation for an ultrasonically heated tissue region with a wide range of acoustic, thermal, geometric, and tumor properties. The total treatment time was iteratively optimized using either a heuristic method or routines included in the Matlab software package, with constraints imposed for patient safety and treatment efficacy. The results demonstrate that large reductions in treatment time are possible through the intelligent selection of user-controllable treatment parameters. For the treatment path, treatment times are reduced by as much as an order of magnitude if the focal zones are arranged into stacks along the axial direction and a middle-front-back ordering is followed. For situations where normal tissue heating constraints are less stringent, these focal zones should have high levels of adjacency to further decrease treatment times; however, adjacency should be reduced in some cases where normal tissue constraints are more stringent. Also, the use of smaller, more concentrated focal zones produces shorter treatment times than larger, more diluted focal zones, a result verified in an agar phantom model. Further, focal zones should be packed using only a small amount of overlap in the axial direction and with a small gap in the

  15. Evaluation of hail suppression programme effectiveness using radar derived parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Satyanarayana; Paulitsch, Helmut; Teschl, Reinhard; Süsser-Rechberger, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is evaluating "the operational hail suppression programme" in the province of Styria, Austria "for the year 2015". For the evaluation purpose the HAILSYS software tool was developed by integrating single polarization C-band weather radar data, aircraft trajectory, radiosonde freezing level data, hail events and crop damages information from the ground. The hail related radar derived parameters are: hail mass aloft, hail mass flux, probability of hail, vertical integrated hail mass, hail kinetic energy flux, and storm severity index. The spatial maps of hail kinetic energy and hail mass were developed to evaluate the seeding effect. The time history plots of vertical integrated hail mass, hail mass aloft and the probability of hail are drawn over an entire cell lifetime. The sensitivity and variation of radar hail parameters over time and associated changes due to cloud seeding will be presented.

  16. Can the electron magnetic resonance (EMR) techniques measure the crystal (ligand) field parameters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz, C.; Sung, H. W. F.

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, the question posed in the title is critically examined on the basis of the available literature evidence implying the positive answer. The distinction between, on the one hand, the actual crystal field (CF) or equivalently ligand field (LF) related quantities and, on the other hand, the actual zero-field splitting (ZFS) or equivalently fine structure (FS) quantities, is elucidated. The origin and possible roots of the incorrect terminology consisting in mixing up the two physically distinct quantities at different levels are examined. Aspects concerning Hamiltonians, parameters, energy level splitting, and nature of the operators involved are taken into account. Problems with the various notations for the operators and parameters used in the electron magnetic resonance (EMR) area are also identified and reviewed. A large number of cases of incorrect terminology and other inconsistencies identified in the course of a comprehensive literature survey are analyzed and systematically classified. Implications of the confusion in question, which go beyond the simple semantic issues, are discussed. The results of the survey reveal that the two most serious categories of this confusion lead to misinterpretation of the experimental EMR data. Several examples of serious misinterpretations found in the books, reviews, and original papers are discussed. The incorrect terminology contributes also to misleading keyword classifications of papers in journals as well as references in scientific literature databases. Thus, the database searches may produce unreliable outcomes. Examples of such outcomes are also shown. It is concluded that, in order to prevent further proliferation of the incorrect terminology and thus to increase reliability of the published EMR data, a concerted effort within the EMR community is indispensable. Various ways in this regard at the international level are suggested.

  17. Assessment of Abdominal Fat Using High-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Anthropometric and Biochemical Parameters.

    PubMed

    Al-Radaideh, Ali; Tayyem, Reema; Al-Fayomi, Kholoud; Nimer, Nisreen; Malkawi, Amer; Al-Zu Bi, Rana; Agraib, Lana; Athamneh, Imad; Hijjawi, Nawal

    2016-12-01

    To measure the abdominal subcutaneous fat (SF) and visceral fat (VF) volumes using high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to investigate their association with selected anthropometric and biochemical parameters among obese and nonobese apparently healthy participants. A cross-sectional study was conducted by recruiting 167 healthy participants. Abdominal scans were acquired at 3T MRI, and the SF and VF were segmented and their volumes were calculated. Selected anthropometric and biochemical measurements were also determined. A significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed between normal body weight and overweight and obese participants for SF and VF, total abdominal fat volumes, leptin, resistin, adiponectin and waist circumference. Waist circumferences were measured by tape and MRI. Findings revealed that MRI-measured fat volumes were different between males and females and had a significant (P < 0.01) strong positive correlation with body mass index, leptin, resistin and WC and had a negative correlation with adiponectin level. MRI-measured fat volumes were found to correlate moderately with interleukin-6 and weakly with cholesterol, serum triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein. Except for cholesterol, all measured biochemical variables and abdominal fat volumes in the current study were significantly associated with body mass index. All anthropometric and biochemical parameters showed weak-to-strong associations with the MRI-measured fat volumes. Abdominal fat distribution was different between males and females and their correlations with some lipid profiles were found to be sex dependent. These findings revealed that MRI can be used as an alternative tool for obesity assessment. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Crossing resonance of wave fields in a medium with an inhomogeneous coupling parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatchenko, V. A.; Polukhin, D. S.

    2013-11-01

    The dynamic susceptibilities (Green's functions) of the system of two coupled wave fields of different physical natures in a medium with an arbitrary relation between the mean value ɛ and rms fluctuation Δɛ of the coupling parameter have been examined. The self-consistent approximation involving all diagrams with noncrossing correlation lines has been developed for the case where the initial Green's function of the homogeneous medium describes the system of coupled wave fields. The analysis has been performed for spin and elastic waves. Expressions have been obtained for the diagonal elements G mm and G uu of the matrix Green's function, which describe spin and elastic waves in the case of magnetic and elastic excitations, and for the off-diagonal elements G mu and G um , which describe these waves in the case of cross excitation. Change in the forms of these elements has been numerically studied for the case of one-dimensional inhomogeneities with an increase in Δɛ and with a decrease in ɛ under the condition that the sum of the squares of these quantities is conserved: two peaks in the frequency dependences of imaginary parts of G mm and G uu are broadened and then joined into one broad peak; a fine structure appears in the form of narrow resonance at the vertex of the Green's function of one wave field and narrow antiresonance at the vertex of the Green's function of the other field; peaks of the fine structure are broadened and then disappear with an increase in the correlation wavenumber of the inhomogeneities of the coupling parameter; and the amplitudes of the off-diagonal elements vanish in the limit ɛ → 0.

  19. Crossing resonance of wave fields in a medium with an inhomogeneous coupling parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatchenko, V. A. Polukhin, D. S.

    2013-11-15

    The dynamic susceptibilities (Green functions) of the system of two coupled wave fields of different physical natures in a medium with an arbitrary relation between the mean value ε and rms fluctuation Δε of the coupling parameter have been examined. The self-consistent approximation involving all diagrams with noncrossing correlation lines has been developed for the case where the initial Green’s function of the homogeneous medium describes the system of coupled wave fields. The analysis has been performed for spin and elastic waves. Expressions have been obtained for the diagonal elements G{sub mm} and G{sub uu} of the matrix Green’s function, which describe spin and elastic waves in the case of magnetic and elastic excitations, and for the off-diagonal elements G{sub mu} and G{sub um}, which describe these waves in the case of cross excitation. Change in the forms of these elements has been numerically studied for the case of one-dimensional inhomogeneities with an increase in Δε and with a decrease in ε under the condition that the sum of the squares of these quantities is conserved: two peaks in the frequency dependences of imaginary parts of G{sub mm} and G{sub uu} are broadened and then joined into one broad peak; a fine structure appears in the form of narrow resonance at the vertex of the Green’s function of one wave field and narrow antiresonance at the vertex of the Green function of the other field; peaks of the fine structure are broadened and then disappear with an increase in the correlation wavenumber of the inhomogeneities of the coupling parameter; and the amplitudes of the off-diagonal elements vanish in the limit ε → 0.

  20. Variability of Schumann resonance parameters observed at low latitude stations in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, X.-Y.; Xiao, Z.; Hao, Y.-Q.; Zhang, D.-H.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the Schumann resonance (SR) parameters observed at low latitude stations in China for the first time. Variations of SR peak frequency and intensity on different timescales (from minutes to years) are analyzed in detail. Diurnal and seasonal variations are shown and the source-observer distance is calculated to confirm the contributions of lightning activity. Differences in the profiles of SR intensity between the NS and EW components are due to the effects of the source-observer distance and the relative position of the observer to the sources. Diurnal frequency variations are more complicated and cannot be directly linked with the three thunderstorm centers. Seasonal variations are clear for intensity but not for frequency. The differences in the diurnal and seasonal variations between the SR intensity and frequency show that the greatest contributor to SR intensity is global lightning activity, while the SR frequency is not affected solely by lightning, as certain other factors involving ionosphere properties may play non-negligible roles. We also emphasize that our observations do not show a distinct day-night change in the SR parameters, and that the SR intensity does not show abrupt changes across terminators. This observation is consistent with previous simulations. Finally, the response of the SR to a solar flare is discussed. The flare leads to a sudden increase of about 0.2 Hz relative to the 2σ level of the SR frequencies in the first three modes, which is in agreement with other works in the literature. This frequency enhancement is explained using theoretical calculations.

  1. Dacryocystorhinostomy ostium: parameters to evaluate and DCR ostium scoring

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohammad Javed; Psaltis, Alkis James; Wormald, Peter John

    2014-01-01

    Aim This study aims to provide a systematic protocol for the evaluation of a dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) ostium and to propose a scoring system to standardize the assessment. Methods Retrospective evaluation of 125 consecutive lacrimal ostia post-DCR was performed. Medical records were screened, and photographs and videos were assessed to note the details of various ostial parameters. The major time points in evaluation were 4 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months post-DCR. The ostia were defined and parameters like shape, size, location, and evolution of ostium were noted. Evaluation parameters were defined for internal common opening (ICO), ostium stents, and ostium granulomas. Ostium cicatrix and synechiae were graded based on their significance. Surgical success rates were computed and ostium characteristics in failed cases were studied. Results A total of 125 ostia were evaluated on the aforementioned ostium parameters. Because five ostia showed a complete cicatricial closure with no recognizable features, the remaining 120 ostia were studied. The ostium location was anterior to the axilla of middle turbinate in 85.8% (103/120) of the cases. Moreover, 76.6% (92/120) of the ostia were circular to oval in shape, with a shallow base. The ostium size was >8×5 mm in 78.3% (94/120) of the cases. The ICO was found to be located in the central or paracentral basal area in 75.8% (91/120). The anatomical and functional success rates achieved were 96% and 93.6%, respectively. All the five cases with anatomical failures showed a complete cicatrization and the ICO movements were poor in all the three cases of functional failure. Conclusion The article attempts to standardize the postoperative evaluation of a DCR ostium and provides a systematic protocol and scoring system for possible use by surgeons and researchers alike. PMID:25525327

  2. Measurement of Resonance Parameters of Orbitally Excited Narrow B^0 Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, : T.

    2008-09-01

    The authors report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L = 1) narrow B{sup 0} mesons in decays to B{sup (*)+}{pi}{sup -} using 1.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} state are measured to be m(B*{sub 2}{sup 0}) = 5740.2{sub -1.8}{sup +1.7}(stat.){sub -0.8}{sup +0.9}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}(B*{sub 2}{sup 0}) = 22.7{sub -3.2}{sup +3.8}(stat.){sub -10.2}{sup +3.2}(syst.) MeV/c{sub 2}. The mass difference between the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} and B{sub 1}{sup 0} states is measured to be 14.9{sub -2.5}{sup +2.2}(stat.){sub -1.4}{sup +1.2}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}, resulting in a B{sub 1}{sup 0} mass of 5725.3{sub -2.2}{sup +1.6}(stat.){sub -1.5}{sup +1.4}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} width.

  3. A Mathematical Assessment of the Precision of Parameters in Measuring Resonance Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, Elke M.; Golding, Raymund M.

    1998-12-01

    The accurate interpretation ofin vivomagnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) spectra requires a complete understanding of the associated noise-induced errors. In this paper, we address the effect of complex correlated noise patterns on the measurement of a set ofpeakparameters. This is examined initially at the level of a single spectral analysis followed by addressing the noise-induced errors associated with determining thesignalparameters from thepeakparameters. We describe a relatively simple method for calculating these errors for any correlated noise pattern in terms of the noise standard deviation and correlation length. The results are presented in such a way that an estimate of the errors may be made from a single MRS spectrum. We also explore how, under certain circumstances, the lineshape of the signal may be determined. We then apply these results to reexamine a set ofin vivo31P MRS spectra obtained from rat brain prior to and following moderate fluid percussion injury. The approach outlined in this paper will demonstrate how meaningful results may be obtained from spectra where the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is quite small and where knowledge of the precise shape of the signal and the detail of the noise pattern is unknown. In essence, we show how to determine the expected errors in the spectral parameters from an estimate of the SNR from a single spectrum, thereby allowing a more discriminative interpretation of the data.

  4. Measurement of resonance parameters of orbitally excited narrow B0 mesons.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-03-13

    We report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L=1) narrow B0 mesons in decays to B;{(*)+}pi;{-} using 1.7 fb;{-1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B_{2};{*0} state are measured to be m(B_{2};{*0})=5740.2_{-1.8};{+1.7}(stat)-0.8+0.9(syst) MeV/c;{2} and Gamma(B_{2};{*0})=22.7_{-3.2};{+3.8}(stat)-10.2+3.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}. The mass difference between the B_{2};{*0} and B10 states is measured to be 14.9_{-2.5};{+2.2}(stat)-1.4+1.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}, resulting in a B10 mass of 5725.3_{-2.2};{+1.6}(stat)-1.5+1.4(syst) MeV/c;{2}. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B_{2};{*0} width.

  5. Measurement of Resonance Parameters of Orbitally Excited Narrow B0 Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlok, J.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Griso, S. Pagan; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Wynne, S. M.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-03-01

    We report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L=1) narrow B0 mesons in decays to B(*)+π- using 1.7fb-1 of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B2*0 state are measured to be m(B2*0)=5740.2-1.8+1.7(stat)-0.8+0.9(syst)MeV/c2 and Γ(B2*0)=22.7-3.2+3.8(stat)-10.2+3.2(syst)MeV/c2. The mass difference between the B2*0 and B10 states is measured to be 14.9-2.5+2.2(stat)-1.4+1.2(syst)MeV/c2, resulting in a B10 mass of 5725.3-2.2+1.6(stat)-1.5+1.4(syst)MeV/c2. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B2*0 width.

  6. Blade resonance parameter identification based on tip-timing method without the once-per revolution sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haotian; Duan, Fajie; Zhang, Jilong

    2016-01-01

    Blade tip-timing is the most effective method for blade vibration online measurement of turbomachinery. In this article a synchronous resonance vibration measurement method of blade based on tip-timing is presented. This method requires no once-per revolution sensor which makes it more generally applicable in the condition where this sensor is difficult to install, especially for the high-pressure rotors of dual-rotor engines. Only three casing mounted probes are required to identify the engine order, amplitude, natural frequency and the damping coefficient of the blade. A method is developed to identify the blade which a tip-timing data belongs to without once-per revolution sensor. Theoretical analyses of resonance parameter measurement are presented. Theoretic error of the method is investigated and corrected. Experiments are conducted and the results indicate that blade resonance parameter identification is achieved without once-per revolution sensor.

  7. Traditional and innovative echocardiographic parameters for the analysis of right ventricular performance in comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Focardi, Marta; Cameli, Matteo; Carbone, Salvatore Francesco; Massoni, Alberto; De Vito, Raffaella; Lisi, Matteo; Mondillo, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Right ventricle fractional area change (RVFAC), tissue Doppler and M-mode measurements of tricuspid systolic motion [tricuspid Sm and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE)], and 3D echocardiography are the current non-invasive methods for the quantification of RV systolic function; RV deformation analysis by speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) has recently allowed the analysis of RV performance. Using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) as the reference standard, this study aimed at exploring the correlation between the traditional (fractional shortening, s'RV, TAPSE) and innovative (strain) echocardiographic parameters and RV ejection fraction (RVEF) measured by CMR. CMR and transthoracic echo-Doppler were performed in 63 patients referred for clinical assessment. Twenty-one presented the suspicion of myocarditis, 8 presented idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, 10 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 10 arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD), 5 infiltrative cardiomyopathy, and 9 other reasons. RVEF was measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). RVFAC, tricuspid S', and TAPSE were calculated in all patients. RV longitudinal strain (RVLS) by STE was assessed by averaging RV free-wall segments (free-wall RVLS) and by averaging all segments (global RVLS). The ROC analysis was applied for the assessment of diagnostic accuracy. Good correlations were found for TAPSE, tricuspid S', and global RVLS with RVEF (r = 0.45, r = 0.52, and r = -0.71, respectively; P = 0.01 for all). Close correlations between free-wall RVLS and RVFAC with RVEF were found (r = -0.86 and r = 0.77, respectively; P < 0.0001 for both). Furthermore, free-wall RVLS demonstrated the highest diagnostic accuracy [area under curve (AUC) 0.92] and good sensitivity and specificity of 96 and 93%, respectively, to predict reduced RVEF <45%, using a cut-off value of less than -17.0%. In a heterogeneous group of patients referred to CMR evaluation, conventional (TAPSE, FAC, and tricuspid S

  8. A laboratory study to estimate pore geometric parameters of sandstones using complex conductivity and nuclear magnetic resonance for permeability prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Gordon; Keating, Kristina; Binley, Andrew; Slater, Lee

    2016-06-01

    We estimate parameters from the Katz and Thompson permeability model using laboratory complex electrical conductivity (CC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data to build permeability models parameterized with geophysical measurements. We use the Katz and Thompson model based on the characteristic hydraulic length scale, determined from mercury injection capillary pressure estimates of pore throat size, and the intrinsic formation factor, determined from multisalinity conductivity measurements, for this purpose. Two new permeability models are tested, one based on CC data and another that incorporates CC and NMR data. From measurements made on forty-five sandstone cores collected from fifteen different formations, we evaluate how well the CC relaxation time and the NMR transverse relaxation times compare to the characteristic hydraulic length scale and how well the formation factor estimated from CC parameters compares to the intrinsic formation factor. We find: (1) the NMR transverse relaxation time models the characteristic hydraulic length scale more accurately than the CC relaxation time (R2 of 0.69 and 0.33 and normalized root mean square errors (NRMSE) of 0.16 and 0.21, respectively); (2) the CC estimated formation factor is well correlated with the intrinsic formation factor (NRMSE=0.23). We demonstrate that that permeability estimates from the joint-NMR-CC model (NRMSE=0.13) compare favorably to estimates from the Katz and Thompson model (NRMSE=0.074). This model advances the capability of the Katz and Thompson model by employing parameters measureable in the field giving it the potential to more accurately estimate permeability using geophysical measurements than are currently possible.

  9. Beef assessments using functional magnetic resonance imaging and sensory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tapp, W N; Davis, T H; Paniukov, D; Brooks, J C; Brashears, M M; Miller, M F

    2017-04-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used to unveil how some foods and basic rewards are processed in the human brain. This study evaluated how resting state functional connectivity in regions of the human brain changed after differing qualities of beef steaks were consumed. Functional images of participants (n=8) were collected after eating high or low quality beef steaks on separate days, after consumption a sensory ballot was administered to evaluate consumers' perceptions of tenderness, juiciness, flavor, and overall liking. Imaging data showed that high quality steak samples resulted in greater functional connectivity to the striatum, medial orbitofrontal cortex, and insular cortex at various stages after consumption (P≤0.05). Furthermore, high quality steaks elicited higher sensory ballot scores for each palatability trait (P≤0.01). Together, these results suggest that resting state fMRI may be a useful tool for evaluating the neural process that follows positive sensory experiences such as the enjoyment of high quality beef steaks. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Blind Source Parameters for Performance Evaluation of Despeckling Filters

    PubMed Central

    Biradar, Nagashettappa; Dewal, M. L.; Rohit, ManojKumar; Gowre, Sanjaykumar; Gundge, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    The speckle noise is inherent to transthoracic echocardiographic images. A standard noise-free reference echocardiographic image does not exist. The evaluation of filters based on the traditional parameters such as peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean square error, and structural similarity index may not reflect the true filter performance on echocardiographic images. Therefore, the performance of despeckling can be evaluated using blind assessment metrics like the speckle suppression index, speckle suppression and mean preservation index (SMPI), and beta metric. The need for noise-free reference image is overcome using these three parameters. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of eleven types of despeckling filters for echocardiographic images in terms of blind and traditional performance parameters along with clinical validation. The noise is effectively suppressed using the logarithmic neighborhood shrinkage (NeighShrink) embedded with Stein's unbiased risk estimation (SURE). The SMPI is three times more effective compared to the wavelet based generalized likelihood estimation approach. The quantitative evaluation and clinical validation reveal that the filters such as the nonlocal mean, posterior sampling based Bayesian estimation, hybrid median, and probabilistic patch based filters are acceptable whereas median, anisotropic diffusion, fuzzy, and Ripplet nonlinear approximation filters have limited applications for echocardiographic images. PMID:27298618

  11. Brain tumor response to nimotuzumab treatment evaluated on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dalmau, Evelio Rafael González; Cabal Mirabal, Carlos; Martínez, Giselle Saurez; Dávila, Agustín Lage; Suárez, José Carlos Ugarte; Cabanas Armada, Ricardo; Rodriguez Cruz, Gretel; Darias Zayas, Daniel; Castillo, Martha Ríos; Valle Garrido, Luis; Sotolongo, Luis Quevedo; Fernández, Mercedes Monzón

    2014-02-01

    Nimotuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody anti-epidermal growth factor receptor, has been shown to improve survival and quality of life in patients with pediatric malignant brain tumor. It is necessary, however, to increase the objective response criteria to define the optimal therapeutic schedule. The aim of this study was to obtain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) quantitative information related to dimensions and morphology, molecular mobility and metabolic activity of the lesion and surroundings in order to evaluate any changes through time. Fourteen pediatric patients treated with nimotuzumab were evaluated on MRI and MRS for >2 years. Each patient was their own control. The MRI/MRS pulse sequence parameters were standardized to ensure experimental reproducibility. A total of 71.4% of patients had stable disease; 21.4% had objective response and 7.1% had progression of disease during the >2 year evaluation period. MRI/MRS data with clinical information provide a clearer picture of treatment response and confirm once again that nimotuzumab is effective in the treatment of pediatric brain tumor. These imaging procedures can be a useful tool for the clinical evaluation of study protocol in clinical practice. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  12. Performance Evaluation and Parameter Identification on DROID III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, Julianna J.

    2011-01-01

    The DROID III project consisted of two main parts. The former, performance evaluation, focused on the performance characteristics of the aircraft such as lift to drag ratio, thrust required for level flight, and rate of climb. The latter, parameter identification, focused on finding the aerodynamic coefficients for the aircraft using a system that creates a mathematical model to match the flight data of doublet maneuvers and the aircraft s response. Both portions of the project called for flight testing and that data is now available on account of this project. The conclusion of the project is that the performance evaluation data is well-within desired standards but could be improved with a thrust model, and that parameter identification is still in need of more data processing but seems to produce reasonable results thus far.

  13. High-performance lighting evaluated by photobiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Rebec, Katja Malovrh; Gunde, Marta Klanjšek

    2014-08-10

    The human reception of light includes image-forming and non-image-forming effects which are triggered by spectral distribution and intensity of light. Ideal lighting is similar to daylight, which could be evaluated by spectral or chromaticity match. LED-based and CFL-based lighting were analyzed here, proposed according to spectral and chromaticity match, respectively. The photobiological effects were expressed by effectiveness for blue light hazard, cirtopic activity, and photopic vision. Good spectral match provides light with more similar effects to those obtained by the chromaticity match. The new parameters are useful for better evaluation of complex human responses caused by lighting.

  14. Analytic evaluation of four-particle integrals with complex parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotev, V. S.; Rebane, T. K.

    2002-06-01

    The method for analytic evaluation of four-particle integrals, proposed by Fromm and Hill, is generalized to include complex exponential parameters. An original procedure of numerical branch tracking for multiple valued functions is developed. It allows high precision variational solution of the Coulomb four-body problem in a basis of exponential-trigonometric functions of interparticle separations. Numerical results demonstrate high efficiency and versatility of this method.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of the common bile duct.

    PubMed

    Musella, M; Barbalace, G; Capparelli, G; Carrano, A; Castaldo, P; Tamburrini, O; Musella, S

    1998-01-01

    The ideal method for evaluation of the common bile duct (CBD) before or during cholecystectomy remains controversial. Magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) is a new, promising technique. A prospective evaluation is reported. Sixty-one patients (45 women) were studied by MRC. There were 29 patients with symptomatic gallstone disease and without clinical, biochemical or ultrasonographic evidence of CBD stones (group 1); 28 of them also underwent intraoperative cholangiography (IOC). In addition, there were 21 patients with symptomatic gallstone disease, with mild biochemical and ultrasonographic signs of CBD involvement (group 2), of whom 19 underwent IOC, and 11 patients with symptomatic CBD stones (group 3), nine of whom had preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) following MRC. MRC showed that no patient in group 1 and three patients in group 2 had CBD stones. Three patients (one in group 1, two in group 2) did not undergo IOC because of technical or clinical problems. In group 3, ERCP confirmed the results of MRC in nine patients. Two patients underwent open surgery because of ultrasonographic, MRC and radiographic signs of pancreatic malignancy. MRC could replace IOC and ERCP for identification of asymptomatic CBD stones. In symptomatic patients MRC combined with other non-invasive imaging techniques can direct the surgeon to appropriate management.

  16. Nuclear magnetic and nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of β-carboline derivatives calculated using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadinejad, Neda; Tari, Mostafa Talebi

    2017-04-01

    A density functional theory (DFT) calculations using B3LYP/6-311++G( d,p) method were carried out to investigate the relative stability of the molecules of β-carboline derivatives such as harmaline, harmine, harmalol, harmane and norharmane. Calculated nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) parameters were used to determine the 14N nuclear quadrupole coupling constant χ, asymmetry parameter η and EFG tensor ( q zz ). For better understanding of the electronic structure of β-carboline derivatives, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, isotropic and anisotropic NMR chemical shieldings were calculated for 14N nuclei using GIAO method for the optimized structures. The NBO analysis shows that pyrrole ring nitrogen (N9) atom has greater tendency than pyridine ring nitrogen (N2) atom to participate in resonance interactions and aromaticity development in the all of these structures. The NMR and NQR parameters were studied in order to find the correlations between electronic structure and the structural stability of the studied molecules.

  17. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 55Mn from Reich-Moore Analysis of Recent Experimental Neutron Transmission and Capture Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M; Guber, Klaus H; Wiarda, Dorothea; Arbanas, Goran

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution neutron capture cross section measurements of 55Mn were recently performed at GELINA by Schillebeeckx et al. (2005) and at ORELA by Guber et al. (2007). The analysis of the experimental data was performed with the computer code SAMMY using the Bayesian approach in the resonance parameters representation of the cross sections. The neutron transmission data taken in 1988 by Harvey et al. (2007) and not analyzed before were added to the SAMMY experimental data base. More than 95% of the s-wave resonances and more than 85% of the p-wave resonances were identified in the energy range up to 125 keV, leading to the neutron strength functions S0 = (3.90 0.78) x 10-4 and S1 = (0.45 0.08) x 10-4. About 25% of the d-wave resonances were identified with a possible strength function of S2 = 1.0 x 10-4. The capture cross section calculated at 0.0253 eV is 13.27 b, and the capture resonance integral is 13.52 0.30 b. In the energy range 15 to 120 keV, the average capture cross section is 12% lower than Lerigoleur value and 25% smaller than Macklin value. GELINA and ORELA experimental capture cross sections show a background cross section not described by the Reich-Moore resonance parameters. Part of this background could be due to a direct capture component and/or to the missing d-wave resonances. The uncertainty of 10% on the average capture cross section above 20 keV is mainly due to the inaccuracy in the calculation of the background components.

  18. Quick evaluation of kinase inhibitors by surface plasmon resonance using single-site specifically biotinylated kinases.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Daisuke; Gouda, Masaki; Kirii, Yasuyuki

    2014-03-01

    In evaluating kinase inhibitors, kinetic parameters such as association/dissociation rate constants are valuable information, as are equilibrium parameters KD and IC50 values. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique to investigate these parameters. However, results are often complicated because of impaired conformations by inappropriate conditions required for protein immobilization and/or heterogeneity of the orientation of immobilization. In addition, conventional SPR experiments are generally time-consuming. Here we introduce the use of single-site specifically biotinylated kinases combined with a multichannel SPR device to improve such problems. Kinetic parameters of four compounds-staurosporine, dasatinib, sunitinib, and lapatinib-against six kinases were determined by the ProteOn XPR36 system. The very slow off-rate of lapatinib from the epidermal growth factor receptor and dasatinib from Bruton's tyrosine kinase and colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) were confirmed. Furthermore, IC50 values were determined by an activity-based assay. Evaluating both physicochemical and biochemical properties would help to understand the detailed character of the compound.

  19. Analytical modeling of Schumann resonance and ELF propagation parameters on Mars with a multi-layered ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozakiewicz, Joanna; Kulak, Andrzej; Mlynarczyk, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    Two electrically conductive planetary spheres, the ionosphere and the ground, form a spherical waveguide. Within such a planetary cavity a phenomenon called Schumann resonance (SR) can occur. It is a resonance of extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves. The resonance parameters are strongly related to the electromagnetic properties of the cavity. On Mars, as there is no liquid water at the planetary surface, the ground has a low conductivity. In such a situation, ELF waves penetrate into the planetary subsurface up to many kilometers depth. To examine the influence of low-conductivity grounds on ELF propagation, we have introduced a recently developed analytical method, which enables to estimate the propagation parameters and explicate their dependence of the ground properties. Since the presented model is fully analytical, it is computationally efficient and can be very useful in finding inverse solutions. To demonstrate the potential of the method, we present the relationship between individual ground properties and the parameters of Schumann resonance. The obtained results indicate that Martian exploration performed by one ELF station located at the planetary surface can reveal, along with the properties of the ionosphere, the existence of liquid water under the Martian surface.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of atomic xenon dissolved in Gay-Berne model liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Lintuvuori, Juho; Straka, Michal; Vaara, Juha

    2007-03-01

    We present constant-pressure Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral parameters, nuclear magnetic shielding relative to the free atom as well as nuclear quadrupole coupling, for atomic xenon dissolved in a model thermotropic liquid crystal. The solvent is described by Gay-Berne (GB) molecules with parametrization kappa=4.4, kappa{'}=20.0 , and mu=nu=1 . The reduced pressure of P{*}=2.0 is used. Previous simulations of a pure GB system with this parametrization have shown that upon lowering the temperature, the model exhibits isotropic, nematic, smectic- A , and smectic- B /molecular crystal phases. We introduce spherical xenon solutes and adjust the energy and length scales of the GB-Xe interaction to those of the GB-GB interaction. This is done through first principles quantum chemical calculations carried out for a dimer of model mesogens as well as the mesogen-xenon complex. We preparametrize quantum chemically the Xe nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling tensors when interacting with the model mesogen, and use the parametrization in a pairwise additive fashion in the analysis of the simulation. We present the temperature evolution of {129/131}Xe shielding and 131Xe quadrupole coupling in the different phases of the GB model. From the simulations, separate isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the experimentally available total shielding can be obtained. At the experimentally relevant concentration, the presence of the xenon atoms does not significantly affect the phase behavior as compared to the pure GB model. The simulations reproduce many of the characteristic experimental features of Xe NMR in real thermotropic LCs: Discontinuity in the value or trends of the shielding and quadrupole coupling at the nematic-isotropic and smectic-A-nematic phase transitions, nonlinear shift evolution in the nematic phase reflecting the behavior of the orientational order parameter, and decreasing shift in the smectic-A phase. The last

  1. Evaluating Iron Content and Tissue Microstructure with Off-Resonance Saturation MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmy, Sherif R.

    We present three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, each focused on applying off-resonance saturation (ORS) imaging to a different context or application. Particularly, we are interested in using ORS to evaluate the uptake of superparamagnetic MRI contrast agents in biological tissue, and to evaluate endogenous iron content. This relies on ORS being applied at low off-resonance frequency offsets where most of the negative contrast is due to signal loss from direct saturation of the water content of the sample. Additionally, we wish to combine this information with magnetization transfer contrast, which is obtained by applying ORS at offsets that are far from the resonance frequency, where magnetization transfer (MT) becomes the dominant effect rather than direct saturation (DS). In the first study, we observed the uptake of ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles in a simple model system by imaging the uptake in healthy murine liver in vivo, and by testing different metrics to quantify the uptake. Through this process, we discovered an approach that provides high sensitivity and specificity in low-signal scenarios. In the second study, we evaluated image contrast between brain regions in healthy human adults, and related these to the expected iron content in different regions based on age. Images were evaluated based on different MRI contrast mechanisms including quantitative transverse relaxation rates, as well as parameters obtained from ORS imaging. We also performed a field inhomogeneity adjustment on low-offset ORS data using the information obtained from the coarsely sampled ORS spectrum, and this was sufficient to correct for the inhomogeneities. In the third study, we used transverse relaxation, DS - which is strongly dependent on iron content, and MT contrast, in order to classify ex vivo brain samples having Alzheimer's disease pathology and normal controls, and were able to find strong classifiers. The three studies helped

  2. Photoionization using the xchem approach: Total and partial cross sections of Ne and resonance parameters above the 2 s22 p5 threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marante, Carlos; Klinker, Markus; Kjellsson, Tor; Lindroth, Eva; González-Vázquez, Jesús; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    The XCHEM approach interfaces well established quantum chemistry packages with scattering numerical methods in order to describe single-ionization processes in atoms and molecules. This should allow one to describe electron correlation in the continuum at the same level of accuracy as quantum chemistry methods do for bound states. Here we have applied this method to study multichannel photoionization of Ne in the vicinity of the autoionizing states lying between the 2 s22 p5 and 2 s 2 p6 ionization thresholds. The calculated total photoionization cross sections are in very good agreement with the absolute measurement of Samson et al. [J. Electron Spectrosc. Relat. Phenom. 123, 265 (2002), 10.1016/S0368-2048(02)00026-9], and with independent benchmark calculations performed at the same level of theory. From these cross sections, we have extracted resonance positions, total autoionization widths, Fano profile parameters, and correlation parameters for the lowest three autoionizing states. The values of these parameters are in good agreement with those reported in earlier theoretical and experimental work. We have also evaluated β asymmetry parameter and partial photoionization cross sections and, from the latter, partial autoionization widths and Starace parameters for the same resonances, not yet available in the literature. Resonant features in the calculated β parameter are in good agreement with the experimental observations. We have found that the three lowest resonances preferentially decay into the 2 p-1ɛ d continuum rather than into the 2 p-1ɛ s one [Phys. Rev. A 89, 043415 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.89.043415], in agreement with previous expectations, and that in the vicinity of the resonances the partial 2 p-1ɛ s cross section can be larger than the 2 p-1ɛ d one, in contrast with the accepted idea that the latter should amply dominate in the whole energy range. These results show the potential of the XCHEM approach to describe highly correlated process

  3. Predicting Collateral Status With Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Parameters: Probabilistic Approach With a Tmax-Derived Prediction Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Ji; Son, Jeong Pyo; Kim, Suk Jae; Ryoo, Sookyung; Woo, Sook-Young; Cha, Jihoon; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bang, Oh Young

    2015-10-01

    Good collateral flow is an important predictor for favorable responses to recanalization therapy and successful outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. Magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted imaging (MRP) is widely used in patients with stroke. However, it is unclear whether the perfusion parameters and thresholds would predict collateral status. The present study evaluated the relationship between hypoperfusion severity and collateral status to develop a predictive model for good collaterals using MRP parameters. Patients who were eligible for recanalization therapy that underwent both serial diffusion-weighted imaging and serial MRP were enrolled into the study. A collateral flow map derived from MRP source data was generated through automatic postprocessing. Hypoperfusion severity, presented as proportions of every 2-s Tmax strata to the entire hypoperfusion volume (Tmax≥2 s), was compared between patients with good and poor collaterals. Prediction models for good collaterals were developed with each Tmax strata proportion and cerebral blood volumes. Among 66 patients, 53 showed good collaterals based on MRP-based collateral grading. Although no difference was noted in delays within 16 s, more severe Tmax delays (Tmax16-18 s, Tmax18-22 s, Tmax22-24 s, and Tmax>24 s) were associated with poor collaterals. The probability equation model using Tmax strata proportion demonstrated high predictive power in a receiver operating characteristic analysis (area under the curve=0.9303; 95% confidence interval, 0.8682-0.9924). The probability score was negatively correlated with the volume of infarct growth (P=0.030). Collateral status is associated with more severe Tmax delays than previously defined. The present Tmax severity-weighted model can determine good collaterals and subsequent infarct growth. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. A cochlear implant phantom for evaluating CT acquisition parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravorti, Srijata; Bussey, Brian J.; Zhao, Yiyuan; Dawant, Benoit M.; Labadie, Robert F.; Noble, Jack H.

    2017-03-01

    Cochlear Implants (CIs) are surgically implantable neural prosthetic devices used to treat profound hearing loss. Recent literature indicates that there is a correlation between the positioning of the electrode array within the cochlea and the ultimate hearing outcome of the patient, indicating that further studies aimed at better understanding the relationship between electrode position and outcomes could have significant implications for future surgical techniques, array design, and processor programming methods. Post-implantation high resolution CT imaging is the best modality for localizing electrodes and provides the resolution necessary to visually identify electrode position, albeit with an unknown degree of accuracy depending on image acquisition parameters, like the HU range of reconstruction, radiation dose, and resolution of the image. In this paper, we report on the development of a phantom that will both permit studying which CT acquisition parameters are best for accurately identifying electrode position and serve as a ground truth for evaluating how different electrode localization methods perform when using different CT scanners and acquisition parameters. We conclude based on our tests that image resolution and HU range of reconstruction strongly affect how accurately the true position of the electrode array can be found by both experts and automatic analysis techniques. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that our phantom is a versatile tool for assessing how CT acquisition parameters affect the localization of CIs.

  5. Critical evaluation of resonance integrals for activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-08-01

    Resonance Integrals are used to calculate neutron reaction rates in the epithermal neutron energy region. Values for the standard capture reactions in gold, cobalt and manganese have been reviewed and recommended resonance integrals are presented. Recommended values for various reactions are presented relative to the capture standards.

  6. Vibration evaluation and parameter optimization of hydraulic thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yong; Zhang, Haokun

    2017-01-01

    Two difficult problems which are drilling string vibration and drilling pressure control exist in the process of drilling large displacement horizontal well. Using hydraulic thruster can not only improve the mechanical drilling speed and increase the horizontal section of footage displacement but also obtain better drill string dynamic characteristics and reduce vibration of drilling tool and prolong the life of the bottom hole assembly. By using the spring-damping model of drill string, the dynamic response of the different excitation of the drill bit is analyzed, so as to evaluate the effect of vibration reduction of hydraulic thruster. Use the three factors four levels orthogonal test method to optimize the key design parameters of hydraulic thruster. The analysis shows that the different drilling mud density should be used in the hydraulic thruster with different key parameters, in order to display its superiority.

  7. TRITOX: a multiple parameter evaluation of tritium toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Carsten, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The increased use of nuclear reactors for power generation will lead to the introduction of tritium into the environment. The need for assessing possible immediate and long-term effects of exposure to this tritium led to the development of a broad program directed towards evaluating the possible somatic and genetic effects of continuous exposure to tritiated water (HTO). Among the parameters measured are the genetic, cytogenetic, reproductive efficiency, growth, nonspecific lifetime shortening, bone marrow cellularity and stem cell content, relative biological effectiveness as compared to /sup 137/Cesium gamma exposure, and related biochemical and microdosimetric evaluations. These parameters have been evaluated on animals maintained on HTO at 10 to 100 times the maximum permissible concentration (0.03 - 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml) for HTO. Dominant lethal mutations, chromosome aberrations in regenerating liver, increased sister chromatid exchanges in bone marrow and reduction in bone marrow stem cell content have been observed at the higher concentrations. The relative biological effectiveness for HTO ingestion as compared to external /sup 137/Cesium gamma exposures has been found to be between 1 and 2.

  8. Advanced Quantification of Plutonium Ionization Potential to Support Nuclear Forensic Evaluations by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    QUANTIFICATION OF PLUTONIUM IONIZATION POTENTIAL TO SUPPORT NUCLEAR FORENSIC EVALUATIONS BY RESONANCE IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY by Craig T...PLUTONIUM IONIZATION POTENTIAL TO SUPPORT NUCLEAR FORENSIC EVALUATIONS BY RESONANCE IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S...mass spectrometry (RIMS) to problems related to nuclear forensics and, in particular, to the analysis and quantification of the debris from nuclear

  9. Evaluation of sub-microsecond recovery resonators for In Vivo Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    F, Hyodo; S, Subramanian; N, Devasahayam; R, Murugesan; K, Matsumoto; JB, Mitchell; MC, Krishna

    2008-01-01

    Time-domain (TD) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging at 300 MHz for in vivo applications requires resonators with recovery times less than 1 microsecond after pulsed excitation to reliably capture the rapidly decaying free induction decay (FID). In this study, we tested the suitability of the Litz foil coil resonator (LCR), commonly used in MRI, for in vivo EPR/EPRI applications in the TD mode and compared with parallel coil resonator (PCR). In TD mode, the sensitivity of LCR was lower than that of the PCR. However, in continuous wave (CW) mode, the LCR showed better sensitivity. The RF homogeneity was similar in both the resonators. The axis of the RF magnetic field is transverse to the cylindrical axis of the LCR, making the resonator and the magnet co-axial. Therefore, the loading of animals, and placing of the anesthesia nose cone and temperature monitors was more convenient in the LCR compared to the PCR whose axis is perpendicular to the magnet axis. PMID:18042414

  10. Evaluation of haematological, biochemical and histopathological parameters of transgenic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jurcik, R; Suvegova, K; Hanusova, E; Massanyi, P; Ryban, L; Chrenek, P

    2007-11-01

    The aim of our study was to compare the hFVIII mRNA expression in different organs, pathological changes and selected haematological and biochemical blood parameters between transgenic and non-transgenic rabbits from F3 generation. Selected physiological parameters of 3- to 4-month-old transgenic rabbits from F3 generation carrying human factor VIII gene (hFVIII) were analysed and compared with those of non-transgenic ones. Before slaughtering, the blood for haematological and biochemical analysis was taken from the central ear artery. Pathological and histological examination of vital organs and RT-PCR analysis of several tissue organs of transgenic and non-transgenic animals were performed after slaughtering. Except for the mammary gland tissue, slight hfVIII mRNA expression in the spleen, lung and brain and none expression in the liver, kidney, skeletal muscle and heart of rabbits were recorded. pathological examination of vital organs showed some pathological changes in both transgenic and non-transgenic rabbits which were confirmed by histological qualitative evaluations. Statistically significant lower values of blood haemoglobin in blood of transgenic (11.86+/-0.86) animals compared with non-transgenic (12.41+/-1.02, P<0.05) ones and lower parameters of HCT (39.22+/-2.44 versus 40.89+/-2.26, P<0.01) in blood of transgenic rabbits were observed. Parameters of WBC, RBC and PLT showed no significant differences between the analysed groups. All biochemical serum parameters of transgenic rabbits were higher in comparison with non-transgenic ones. Significant differences were found in the concentration of the urea, AST and GMT between transgenic and non-transgenic animals (P<0.001) and in the total protein content, the difference was significant at P<0.05. In conclusion, our results showed that no considerable impact on the general health was found in transgenic rabbits.

  11. Parameter Validation for Evaluation of Spaceflight Hardware Reusability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childress-Thompson, Rhonda; Thomas, L. Dale; Farrington, Phillip

    2017-01-01

    Within recent years, there has been an influx of companies around the world pursuing reusable systems for space flight. Much like NASA, many of these new entrants are learning that reusable systems are complex and difficult to acheive. For instance, in its first attempts to retrieve spaceflight hardware for future reuse, SpaceX unsuccessfully tried to land on a barge at sea, resulting in a crash-landing. As this new generation of launch developers continues to develop concepts for reusable systems, having a systematic approach for determining the most effective systems for reuse is paramount. Three factors that influence the effective implementation of reusability are cost, operability and reliability. Therefore, a method that integrates these factors into the decision-making process must be utilized to adequately determine whether hardware used in space flight should be reused or discarded. Previous research has identified seven features that contribute to the successful implementation of reusability for space flight applications, defined reusability for space flight applications, highlighted the importance of reusability, and presented areas that hinder successful implementation of reusability. The next step is to ensure that the list of reusability parameters previously identified is comprehensive, and any duplication is either removed or consolidated. The characteristics to judge the seven features as good indicators for successful reuse are identified and then assessed using multiattribute decision making. Next, discriminators in the form of metrics or descriptors are assigned to each parameter. This paper explains the approach used to evaluate these parameters, define the Measures of Effectiveness (MOE) for reusability, and quantify these parameters. Using the MOEs, each parameter is assessed for its contribution to the reusability of the hardware. Potential data sources needed to validate the approach will be identified.

  12. Relation of functional echocardiographic parameters to infarct scar transmurality by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Rost, Christian; Rost, Marie-Charlotte; Breithardt, Ole A; Schmid, Michael; Klinghammer, Lutz; Stumpf, Christian; Daniel, Werner G; Flachskampf, Frank A

    2014-07-01

    Identification of viable but dysfunctional myocardium after myocardial infarction is important for management, including the decision for revascularization. Assessment of infarct transmurality (TRM) by late contrast enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used for this task but has several limitations, particularly its availability. The goal of this study was to compare the value of several simple echocardiographic parameters measured at rest at the bedside for the identification of three degrees of infarct TRM, with contrast-enhanced MRI as the gold standard. In a prospective, single-center study, 41 patients (33 men; mean age, 62 ± 10 years; 32 with ST-segment elevation infarctions) underwent resting echocardiography and contrast-enhanced MRI <5 days after infarction. Wall motion score, preejection velocity by tissue Doppler, and longitudinal, circumferential, and radial peak systolic strain by speckle-tracking-based strain imaging were assessed, and the findings were compared with infarct TRM stratified by contrast-enhanced MRI (no scar, 0% TRM; nontransmural scar, 1%-50% TRM; and transmural scar, 51%-100% TRM). Four hundred segments showed no scar, 125 showed nontransmural scar, and 213 showed transmural scar on contrast-enhanced MRI. The sensitivity and specificity of visual wall motion scoring to detect any scar versus no scar were 71% and 81%, respectively, similar to values for circumferential strain (sensitivity and specificity both 81% with a cutoff of -14.5%). Longitudinal and radial strain performed less well, and the presence of preejection velocity performed distinctly worse (45% and 90%, respectively). The sensitivity and specificity for identifying nontransmural versus transmural infarction was better for circumferential strain (78% and 75%, respectively, with a cutoff of -10.5%) than for the other strain types, preejection velocity (52% and 67%, respectively), or visual wall motion scoring (50% and 81%, respectively, for a

  13. Calculation of supercritical Dirac resonance parameters for heavy-ion systems from a coupled-differential-equation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Marsman, A.; Horbatsch, M.

    2011-09-15

    Previous work [E. Ackad and M. Horbatsch, Phys. Rev. A 78, 062711 (2008)] on supercritical Dirac resonance parameters from extrapolated analytic continuation, obtained with a Fourier grid method, is generalized by numerically solving the coupled Dirac radial equations to a high precision. The equations, which contain the multipole decomposition of the two-center potential, are augmented by a complex absorbing potential and truncated at various orders in the partial wave expansion to demonstrate convergence of the resonance parameters in the limit of vanishing absorber. The convergence of the partial-wave spinor and of the multipole potential expansions is demonstrated in the supercritical regime. The comparison of critical distances with literature values shows that the work provides benchmark results for future two-center calculations without multipole expansion.

  14. Neutron Cross Section Processing Methods for Improved Integral Benchmarking of Unresolved Resonance Region Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Jonathan A.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord S.; Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we describe the development and application of computational methods for processing neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance region (URR). These methods are integrated with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code, thereby enabling their use in high-fidelity analyses. Enhanced understanding of the effects of URR evaluation representations on calculated results is then obtained through utilization of the methods in Monte Carlo integral benchmark simulations of fast spectrum critical assemblies. First, we present a so-called on-the-fly (OTF) method for calculating and Doppler broadening URR cross sections. This method proceeds directly from ENDF-6 average unresolved resonance parameters and, thus, eliminates any need for a probability table generation pre-processing step in which tables are constructed at several energies for all desired temperatures. Significant memory reduction may be realized with the OTF method relative to a probability table treatment if many temperatures are needed. Next, we examine the effects of using a multi-level resonance formalism for resonance reconstruction in the URR. A comparison of results obtained by using the same stochastically-generated realization of resonance parameters in both the single-level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) and multi-level Breit-Wigner (MLBW) formalisms allows for the quantification of level-level interference effects on integrated tallies such as keff and energy group reaction rates. Though, as is well-known, cross section values at any given incident energy may differ significantly between single-level and multi-level formulations, the observed effects on integral results are minimal in this investigation. Finally, we demonstrate the calculation of true expected values, and the statistical spread of those values, through independent Monte Carlo simulations, each using an independent realization of URR cross section structure throughout. It is observed that both probability table

  15. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman

    2016-02-28

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2,5/2,7/2, and 9/2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Furthermore, applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  16. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Nondestructive Evaluation of Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-09

    Pat. Appl. EP 26265, 8 Apr 1981, 13 pp. (1981). 9. A. N. Garroway , J. Baum, M. G. Munowitz, and A. Pines, NMR Imaging in Solids by Multiple-Quantum...Resonance, J. Magn. Reson. 60(2), 337-41 (1984). 10. J. Baum, A. N. Garroway , M. Munowitz, and A. Pines, Multiple-Quantum NMR in Solids: Application to... Garroway , NMR Images of Solids, J. Magn. Reson. 66(3), 530-5 (1986). 28. J. B. Miller and A. N. Garroway , Removal of Static Field Inhomogeneity and

  18. Evaluating the Correlation between Overjet and Skeletal Parameters Using DVT

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Luca; Sgarbanti, Chiara; Guarneri, Antonio; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the degree of correlation between a dental parameter of immediate clinical relevance (overjet) with skeletal (ANB angle) and dentoskeletal parameters such as the IMPA angle and upper incisor-bispinal angle. Materials and Methods. A sample of 42 subjects, all in complete permanent dentition and without a history of orthodontic treatment or systemic pathologies, was subdivided into 2 groups: group 1 consisted of 25 subjects with ANB angle 0°–4° (skeletal class I), and group 2 was made up of 17 subjects with ANB angle >4° (skeletal class II). Each subject underwent cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). For each right and left CBCT, the following parameters were measured: (1) ANB, (2) OJ (overjet), (3) IMPA angle, and (4) upper incisor-bispinal angle (U1/ANS-PNS). Results. Analysis of the entire sample revealed that both right and left overjets were correlated in a statistically significant fashion (P < 0.001) with ANB. No correlation between overjet and IMPA emerged, while a weak correlation between overjet and the left U1-bispinal plane was ascertained. Conclusions. Overjet may be a reliable predictor of ANB, and to a lesser extent the U1-bispinal plane, particularly in skeletal class II. PMID:22899932

  19. Evaluating the Correlation between Overjet and Skeletal Parameters Using DVT.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Luca; Sgarbanti, Chiara; Guarneri, Antonio; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the degree of correlation between a dental parameter of immediate clinical relevance (overjet) with skeletal (ANB angle) and dentoskeletal parameters such as the IMPA angle and upper incisor-bispinal angle. Materials and Methods. A sample of 42 subjects, all in complete permanent dentition and without a history of orthodontic treatment or systemic pathologies, was subdivided into 2 groups: group 1 consisted of 25 subjects with ANB angle 0°-4° (skeletal class I), and group 2 was made up of 17 subjects with ANB angle >4° (skeletal class II). Each subject underwent cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). For each right and left CBCT, the following parameters were measured: (1) ANB, (2) OJ (overjet), (3) IMPA angle, and (4) upper incisor-bispinal angle (U1/ANS-PNS). Results. Analysis of the entire sample revealed that both right and left overjets were correlated in a statistically significant fashion (P < 0.001) with ANB. No correlation between overjet and IMPA emerged, while a weak correlation between overjet and the left U1-bispinal plane was ascertained. Conclusions. Overjet may be a reliable predictor of ANB, and to a lesser extent the U1-bispinal plane, particularly in skeletal class II.

  20. Parameters affecting genome simulation for evaluating genomic selection method.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Motohide; Satoh, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated the parameter settings for obtaining a simulated genome at steady state of allele frequency (mutation-drift equilibrium) and linkage disequilibrium (LD), and evaluated the impact of whether or not the simulated genome reached steady state of allele frequency and LD on the accuracy of genomic estimated breeding values (GEBVs). After 500 to 50,000 historical generations, the base population and subsequent seven generations were generated as recent populations. The allele frequency distribution of the last generations of the historical population and LD in the base population were calculated when varying the values of five parameters: initial minor allele frequency, mutation rate, effective population size, number of markers and chromosome length. The accuracies of GEBVs in the last generation of the recent population were calculated by genomic best linear unbiased prediction. The number of historical generations required to reach mutation-drift equilibrium depended on the initial allele frequency and mutation rate. Regardless of the parameters, LD reached a steady state before allele frequency distribution reached mutation-drift equilibrium. The accuracies of GEBVs largely reflect the extent of linkage disequilibrium with the exception of varying chromosome length, although there were no associations between the accuracies of GEBVs and allele frequency distribution. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  1. Quantitative evaluation on the performance and feature enhancement of stochastic resonance for bearing fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoying; Li, Jimeng; Wang, Shibin; Chen, Xuefeng

    2016-12-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) has been widely applied in the field of weak signal detection by virtue of its characteristic of utilizing noise to amplify useful signal instead of eliminating noise in nonlinear dynamical systems. How to quantitatively evaluate the performance of SR, including the enhancement effect and the degree of waveform distortion, and how to accurately extract signal amplitude have become two important issues in the research on SR. In this paper, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the main component to the residual in the SR output is constructed to quantitatively measure the enhancement effect of the SR method. And two indices are constructed to quantitatively measure the degree of waveform distortion of the SR output, including the correlation coefficient between the main component in the SR output and the original signal, and the zero-crossing ratio. These quantitative indices are combined to provide a comprehensive quantitative index for adaptive parameter selection of the SR method, and eventually the adaptive SR method can be effective in enhancing the weak component hidden in the original signal. Fast Fourier Transform and Fourier Transform (FFT+FT) spectrum correction technology can extract the signal amplitude from the original signal and effectively reduce the difficulty of extracting signal amplitude from the distorted resonance output. The application in vibration analysis for bearing fault diagnosis verifies that the proposed quantitative evaluation method for adaptive SR can effectively detect weak fault feature of the vibration signal during the incipient stage of bearing fault.

  2. A high-fidelity Monte Carlo evaluation of CANDU-6 safety parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Hartanto, D.

    2012-07-01

    Important safety parameters such as the fuel temperature coefficient (FTC) and the power coefficient of reactivity (PCR) of the CANDU-6 (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor have been evaluated by using a modified MCNPX code. For accurate analysis of the parameters, the DBRC (Doppler Broadening Rejection Correction) scheme was implemented in MCNPX in order to account for the thermal motion of the heavy uranium nucleus in the neutron-U scattering reactions. In this work, a standard fuel lattice has been modeled and the fuel is depleted by using the MCNPX and the FTC value is evaluated for several burnup points including the mid-burnup representing a near-equilibrium core. The Doppler effect has been evaluated by using several cross section libraries such as ENDF/B-VI, ENDF/B-VII, JEFF, JENDLE. The PCR value is also evaluated at mid-burnup conditions to characterize safety features of equilibrium CANDU-6 reactor. To improve the reliability of the Monte Carlo calculations, huge number of neutron histories are considered in this work and the standard deviation of the k-inf values is only 0.5{approx}1 pcm. It has been found that the FTC is significantly enhanced by accounting for the Doppler broadening of scattering resonance and the PCR are clearly improved. (authors)

  3. Comprehensive evaluation of fracture parameters by dual laterolog data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboorian-Jooybari, Hadi; Dejam, Morteza; Chen, Zhangxin; Pourafshary, Peyman

    2016-08-01

    Reservoir quality and productivity of tight formations depend heavily on the degree of fracture development. In fact, hard and dense carbonate formations may not be considered as net pay without the presence of fractures that convey fluids towards the wellbore. The evaluation of fractures is key to effective reservoir characterization for purposes like well drilling and completion as well as development and simulation of fractured reservoirs. Although imaging technologies such as Formation Micro-Scanners and Imagers (FMS and FMI) provide useful information about fracture properties (i.e., dip angle, porosity, aperture, and permeability), they are very expensive and may not be available in all wells. In this work, fracture parameters are estimated using conventional dual laterolog (DLL) resistivity which includes shallow (LLS) and deep (LLD) responses. This technique is based on electrical resistivity anomalies resulting from the separation of shallow and deep laterolog curves. Fracture parameters that can be calculated by DLL include dip angle, aperture, porosity, permeability, and cementation factor. The accuracy of the parameters calculated using DLL data is validated by the results of FMI in a well in one of the Iranian fractured reservoirs. Contrary to the image logs, the conventional DLL is run routinely in all drilled wells. Therefore, if a reservoir has limited and insufficient data of image logs, as it is often the case, the DLLs can be used as a reliable replacement in the construction of fracture models. Furthermore, DLL has an advantage of deeper evaluation of fractures in comparison with the immediate borehole investigation of image logs.

  4. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 238U and the Calculated Cross Sections from the Reich-Moore Analysis of Experimental Data in the Neutron Energy Range from 0 keV to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H

    2005-12-05

    The neutron resonance parameters of {sup 238}U were obtained from a SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements and high-resolution capture cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the years 1970-1990, and from more recent transmission and capture cross section measurements performed at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA). Compared with previous evaluations, the energy range for this resonance analysis was extended from 10 to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high resolution of the most recent ORELA transmission measurements. The experimental database and the method of analysis are described in this report. The neutron transmissions and the capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared with the experimental data. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters and of the recommended values of the average parameters. The new evaluation results in a slight decrease of the effective capture resonance integral and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks by 70 pcm to 200 pcm.

  5. Parameters of Instrumental Swallowing Evaluations: Describing a Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Pisegna, Jessica M; Langmore, Susan E

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare selected parameters of two swallow evaluations: fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and the modified barium swallow (MBS) study. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. Fifty-five clinicians were asked to watch video recordings of swallow evaluations of 2 patients that were done using fluoroscopy and endoscopy simultaneously. In a randomized order, clinicians viewed 4 edited videos from simultaneous evaluations: the FEES and MBS videos of patient 1 and 2 each taking one swallow of 5 mL applesauce. Clinicians filled out a questionnaire that asked (1) which anatomical sites they could visualize on each video, (2) where they saw pharyngeal residue after a swallow, (3) their overall clinical impression of the pharyngeal residue, and (4) their opinions of the evaluation styles. Clinicians reported a significant difference in the visualization of anatomical sites, 11 of the 15 sites were reported as better-visualized on the FEES than on the MBS video (p < 0.05). Clinicians also rated residue to be present in more locations on the FEES than on the MBS. Clinicians' overall impressions of the severity of residue on the same exact swallow were significantly different depending on the evaluation type (FEES vs. MBS for patient 1 χ(2) = 20.05, p < 0.0001; patient 2 χ(2) = 7.52, p = 0.006), with FEES videos rated more severely. FEES advantages were: more visualization of pharyngeal and laryngeal swallowing anatomy and residue. However, as a result, clinicians provided more severe impressions of residue amount on FEES. On one hand, this suggests that FEES is a more sensitive tool than MBS studies, but on the other hand, clinicians might provide more severe interpretations on FEES.

  6. Researching on resonance characteristics influenced by the structure parameters of 1-3-2 piezocomposites plate.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Qin, Lei; Wang, Li-Kun; Wan, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Bai-Sheng

    2008-05-01

    The 1-3-2 composite is made of 1-3 composite and ceramic base. Its effective properties are calculated based on the linear piezoelectric theory and uniform field theory. The influence of piezoelectric phase volume fraction and composite aspect (thickness/width) on resonance characteristic of square 1-3-2 piezoelectric composite plate has been researched. In addition, some 1-3-2 composite samples were fabricated by dice-fill technology. The resonance frequency of samples was investigated. The results show that the experiment agrees well with the calculation. The pure thickness resonance mode of 1-3-2 composite will be gained when the volume fraction of ceramic bottom is less than 30%; that of ceramic rods is in the range of 30 approximately 80% and the ratio of thickness to width is less than 0.35.

  7. Fetal cystic lung lesions: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Peng; Chen, Chih-Ping; Shih, Shin-Lin; Chen, Yi-Fang; Yang, Fei-Shih; Chen, Su-Chiu

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the diagnosis of fetal cystic lung lesions found on routine prenatal ultrasound (US). Experienced radiologists retrospectively reviewed 34 fetal MRI studies performed in 20 fetuses (from 20 to 35 gestational weeks; including 14 repeat studies 10 weeks after the initial MRI), focusing on shape, signal characteristics, feeding artery, volume change, and location of the cystic lesions. Diagnoses were confirmed after birth by postnatal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and/or surgery. Bronchopulmonary sequestration (BPS) in the second trimester appeared as a well-defined, homogeneous, hyperintense mass (pure BPS) in eight cases or as a lobulated, inhomogeneous hyperintense mass (BPS mixed with congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM)) in three cases. The feeding artery was visible in all 11 cases in the initial MRI, and regression of the mass was seen in 7 cases. As the mass regressed in the third trimester, the signal intensity decreased, becoming inhomogeneous, and the margins became lobulated. The mean initial ratio of the volume of the BPS lesion to the ipsilateral lung in lesions with partial regression was 82%; the mean initial ratio in lesions with nearly complete regression was 61%. CCAM (6) cases also appeared as a hyperintense lobulated mass, and as the lesions regressed, they decreased in size and signal intensity. As with BPS, the larger the lesion on initial MRI, the less likely it was to regress completely. Congenital lobar fluid overload in three cases appeared as a hyperintense, homogeneous lobe with stretched hilar vessels. Prenatal MRI is useful as a diagnostic tool complementary to US for evaluating fetal cystic lung lesions. Smaller lung lesions (<60%) may regress completely.

  8. Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choon Sung; Kim, Nam Heun; Noh, Hyun Min; Lee, Mi Young; Yoon, So Jung; Lee, Dong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of neural axis abnormalities and the relevant risk factors in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Overview of Literature The use of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess the whole spine in patients with idiopathic scoliosis is controversial, and indications for such MRI evaluations have not been definitively established. However, we routinely use whole-spine MRI in patients with scoliosis who are scheduled to undergo surgical correction. Methods A total of 378 consecutive patients with presumed AIS who were admitted for spinal surgery were examined for neural axis abnormalities using MRI. To differentiate patients with normal and abnormal MRI findings, the following clinical parameters were evaluated: age, sex, menarcheal status, rotation angle (using a scoliometer), coronal balance, shoulder height difference, and low back pain. We radiographically evaluated curve type, thoracic or thoracolumbar curve direction, curve magnitude and flexibility, apical vertebral rotation, curve length, coronal balance, sagittal balance, shoulder height difference, thoracic kyphosis, and the Risser sign. Results Neural axis abnormalities were detected in 24 patients (6.3%). Abnormal MRI findings were significantly more common in males than in females and were associated with increased thoracic kyphosis. However, there were no significant differences in terms of the other measured parameters. Conclusions Among the patients with presumed AIS who received preoperative whole-spine MRI, 6.3% had neural axis abnormalities. Males and patients with increased thoracic kyphosis were at a higher risk. PMID:28243367

  9. Far-field beam quality evaluation of high-power unstable resonators TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruhai; Chen, Ning; Shi, Kui; Wang, Bing

    2013-05-01

    High average power pulsed TEA CO2 lasers have many important applications, such as laser manufacturing, military applications, but there rarely have reports about the theoretical and experimental studies on the virtual confocus resonator of pulsed TEA CO2 laser, especially its far field optical quality. Based on the real date of the unstable resonator modified by the stable resonator of high power TEA CO2, three common theoretical evaluations and analyzes were conducted and compared with the measured results of far field light intensity distribution with 2 kW designed unstable resonator laser with the block ratio is ɛ=0.404. The results show that the unstable resonator can obtain near diffraction limitation and high optical quality beam. The β factor is smaller than 4 times than the stable resonator. Furthermore, the smaller block factor can make higher power in bucket for the unstable resonator. The comprehensive prediction and evaluation of designed unstable resonator need to synthetically use these three theoretical methods of the evaluations. The simulation results, with considering the optical aberration, heat distortion and atmospheric effect, agree well with the real recording image by the infrared imaging system in the distance of 300m. The research of this paper has very important reference value for evaluating the tactical effectiveness and optimization design of high power TEA CO2 laser system with different unstable resonators.

  10. Evaluated 182,183,184,186W Neutron Cross Sections and Covariances in the Resolved Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Pigni, Marco T; Leal, Luiz C

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently completed the resonance parameter evaluation of four tungsten isotopes, i.e., 182,183,184,186W, in the neutron energy range of thermal up to several keV. This nuclear data work was performed with support from the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) in an effort to provide improved tungsten cross section and covariance data for criticality safety analyses. The evaluation methodology uses the Reich-Moore approximation of the R-matrix formalism of the code SAMMY to fit high-resolution measurements performed in 2010 and 2012 at the Geel linear accelerator facility (GELINA), as well as other experimental data sets on natural tungsten available in the EXFOR library. In the analyzed energy range, this work nearly doubles the resolved resonance region (RRR) present in the latest US nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.1. In view of the interest in tungsten for distinct types of nuclear applications and the relatively homogeneous distribution of the isotopic tungsten—namely, 182W(26.5%), 183W(14.31%), 184W(30.64%), and 186W(28.43%) - the completion of these four evaluations represents a significant contribution to the improvement of the ENDF library. This paper presents an overview of the evaluated resonance parameters and related covariances for total and capture cross sections on the four tungsten isotopes.

  11. Evaluation of the IRT Parameter Invariance Property for the MCAT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelkar, Vinaya; Wightman, Linda F.; Luecht, Richard M.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the viability of the property of parameter invariance for the one-parameter (1P), two-parameter (2P), and three-parameter (3P) item response theory (IRT) models for the Medical College Admissions Tests (MCAT). Invariance of item parameters across different gender, ethnic, and language groups and the…

  12. Use of microcirculatory parameters to evaluate chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Virgini-Magalhães, Carlos Eduardo; Porto, Carmen Lascasas; Fernandes, Fabiano F A; Dorigo, David M; Bottino, Daniel Alexandre; Bouskela, Eliete

    2006-05-01

    Microcirculatory impairment caused by chronic venous hypertension is usually not taken into account in chronic venous insufficiency, probably due to lack of practical means to observe it. The objective of this work was to use a new noninvasive technique to access quantitatively the cutaneous microangiopathy in female patients classified according to CEAP from C1 to C5 and matched with healthy controls. Forty-four patients and 13 healthy subjects (112 lower limbs), with a mean age +/- SD of 48 +/- 8 years, were evaluated by using orthogonal polarization spectral (OPS) imaging. Films of the internal perimaleolar region were analyzed by the CapImage software. The microcirculatory parameters evaluated were functional capillary density (number of capillaries with flowing red blood cells/mm), capillary morphology (percentage of abnormal capillaries), diameter (microm) of dermal papilla to quantify edema, diameter of capillary bulk (microm) to assess the degree of change, and diameter capillary limb to detect enlargement. A microcirculatory index combining these five parameters was proposed with I, II, and III stages, indicating normal microcirculation, and moderate and severe microangiopathy, respectively. These microcirculatory parameters were significantly different (P < .05) from control values (C): capillary diameter and capillary morphology from C2 to C5, 8.1 +/- 0.8, 3.6 +/- 5.5 (C), and 9.7 +/- 1.3, 27.5 +/- 17.7 (C2); diameter of dermal papilla and diameter of capillary bulk from C3 to C5, 111.4 +/- 13.5, 52.8 +/- 8.8 (C), and 150.5 +/- 31.7, 87.8 +/- 26.9 (C3); and functional capillary density only from C4 to C5, 20.9 +/- 6.1 (C) and 14.5 +/- 4.5 (C4). The microcirculatory index showed good correlation to CEAP classification. It was possible to quantify the microangiopathy using OPS imaging and to compare the microcirculatory changes of chronic venous insufficiency patients with healthy controls. Two parameters seemed more important to identify the differences

  13. Markov Chain Monte Carlo Used in Parameter Inference of Magnetic Resonance Spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Hock, Kiel; Earle, Keith

    2016-02-06

    In this paper, we use Boltzmann statistics and the maximum likelihood distribution derived from Bayes’ Theorem to infer parameter values for a Pake Doublet Spectrum, a lineshape of historical significance and contemporary relevance for determining distances between interacting magnetic dipoles. A Metropolis Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm is implemented and designed to find the optimum parameter set and to estimate parameter uncertainties. In conclusion, the posterior distribution allows us to define a metric on parameter space that induces a geometry with negative curvature that affects the parameter uncertainty estimates, particularly for spectra with low signal to noise.

  14. Markov Chain Monte Carlo Used in Parameter Inference of Magnetic Resonance Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Hock, Kiel; Earle, Keith

    2016-02-06

    In this paper, we use Boltzmann statistics and the maximum likelihood distribution derived from Bayes’ Theorem to infer parameter values for a Pake Doublet Spectrum, a lineshape of historical significance and contemporary relevance for determining distances between interacting magnetic dipoles. A Metropolis Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm is implemented and designed to find the optimum parameter set and to estimate parameter uncertainties. In conclusion, the posterior distribution allows us to define a metric on parameter space that induces a geometry with negative curvature that affects the parameter uncertainty estimates, particularly for spectra with low signal to noise.

  15. Analysis of clinical parameters and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging as predictors of outcome in pediatric myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Shagun; Song, Xiaoyan; Dham, Niti; Heath, Deneen M; DeBiasi, Roberta L

    2015-02-15

    Myocarditis causes significant morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients, with potential adverse outcomes including heart failure, transplantation requirement, and/or death. The objective of this study was to determine predictors of early and late poor outcomes, defined as requirement for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, ventricular assist device, transplantation, or death in pediatric myocarditis patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate pediatric myocarditis presenting over a 5-year period at a pediatric institution. Patients were identified using an institutional heart failure database and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, discharge diagnosis codes for myocarditis and confirmed by review of medical records. Data extraction included epidemiologic factors, the presenting ejection fraction (EF), initial and peak troponin levels, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level, pathogen identification, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and outcomes. Univariate and multivariate regression was performed to identify variables predictive of outcomes. Because published pediatric cardiac MRI data are sparse, whether late enhancement was associated with specific clinical variables or predictive of outcomes was also evaluated. Fifty-eight patients were identified. The mean age was 10.5 years, 64% were male, 62% were Caucasian, 15% were African-American, and 23% were Hispanic or Asian. Eighty-one percent presented at the institution <1 week after symptom onset. Presenting EFs were normal (>50%) or mildly decreased (40% to 50%) in 48%, moderately decreased (30% to 40%) in 9%, and severely decreased (<30%) in 42%. Thirty patients (52%) underwent viral studies; 17 of these (56%) had acute viral origins of myocarditis identified, including 8 with parvovirus (2 with influenza coinfection), 7 with enterovirus, 1 with Epstein-Barr virus, and 1 with cytomegalovirus. Twenty-eight percent had poor outcomes. Univariate analysis

  16. Evaluation of Handwriting Movement Kinematics: From an Ecological to a Magnetic Resonance Environment

    PubMed Central

    Bisio, Ambra; Pedullà, Ludovico; Bonzano, Laura; Ruggeri, Piero; Brichetto, Giampaolo; Bove, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Writing is a means of communication which requires complex motor, perceptual, and cognitive skills. If one of these abilities gets lost following traumatic events or due to neurological diseases, handwriting could deteriorate. Occupational therapy practitioners provide rehabilitation services for people with impaired handwriting. However, to determine the effectiveness of handwriting interventions no studies assessed whether the proposed treatments improved the kinematics of writing movement or had an effect at the level of the central nervous system. There is need to find new quantitative methodologies able to describe the behavioral and the neural outcomes of the rehabilitative interventions for handwriting. In the present study we proposed a combined approach that allowed evaluating the kinematic parameters of handwriting movements, acquired by means of a magnetic resonance-compatible tablet, and their neural correlates obtained simultaneously from a functional magnetic resonance imaging examination. Results showed that the system was reliable in term of reproducibility of the kinematic data during a test/re-test procedure. Further, despite the modifications with respect to an ecological writing movement condition, the kinematic parameters acquired inside the MR-environment were descriptive of individuals’ movement features. At last, the imaging protocol succeeded to show the activation of the cerebral regions associated with the production of writing movement in healthy people. From these findings, this methodology seems to be promising to evaluate the handwriting movement deficits and the potential alterations in the neural activity in those individuals who have handwriting difficulties. Finally, it would provide a mean to quantitatively assess the effect of a rehabilitative treatment. PMID:27746727

  17. Upstream processes in antibody production: evaluation of critical parameters.

    PubMed

    Jain, Era; Kumar, Ashok

    2008-01-01

    The demand for monoclonal antibody for therapeutic and diagnostic applications is rising constantly which puts up a need to bring down the cost of its production. In this context it becomes a prerequisite to improve the efficiency of the existing processes used for monoclonal antibody production. This review describes various upstream processes used for monoclonal antibody production and evaluates critical parameters and efforts which are being made to enhance the efficiency of the process. The upstream technology has tremendously been upgraded from host cells used for manufacturing to bioreactors type and capacity. The host cells used range from microbial, mammalian to plant cells with mammalian cells dominating the scenario. Disposable bioreactors are being promoted for small scale production due to easy adaptation to process validation and flexibility, though they are limited by the scale of production. In this respect Wave bioreactors for suspension culture have been introduced recently. A novel bioreactor for immobilized cells is described which permits an economical and easy alternative to hollow fiber bioreactor at lab scale production. Modification of the cellular machinery to alter their metabolic characteristics has further added to robustness of cells and perks up cell specific productivity. The process parameters including feeding strategies and environmental parameters are being improved and efforts to validate them to get reproducible results are becoming a trend. Online monitoring of the process and product characterization is increasingly gaining importance. In total the advancement of upstream processes have led to the increase in volumetric productivity by 100-fold over last decade and make the monoclonal antibody production more economical and realistic option for therapeutic applications.

  18. Evaluating parasite densities and estimation of parameters in transmission systems.

    PubMed

    Heinzmann, D; Torgerson, P R

    2008-09-01

    Mathematical modelling of parasite transmission systems can provide useful information about host parasite interactions and biology and parasite population dynamics. In addition good predictive models may assist in designing control programmes to reduce the burden of human and animal disease. Model building is only the first part of the process. These models then need to be confronted with data to obtain parameter estimates and the accuracy of these estimates has to be evaluated. Estimation of parasite densities is central to this. Parasite density estimates can include the proportion of hosts infected with parasites (prevalence) or estimates of the parasite biomass within the host population (abundance or intensity estimates). Parasite density estimation is often complicated by highly aggregated distributions of parasites within the hosts. This causes additional challenges when calculating transmission parameters. Using Echinococcus spp. as a model organism, this manuscript gives a brief overview of the types of descriptors of parasite densities, how to estimate them and on the use of these estimates in a transmission model.

  19. Variable-Rate Pumping Test Analysis for Aquifer Parameter Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsell, K. H.; Mishra, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    The most common method to infer aquifer properties is based on analysis of drawdown and/or recovery data recorded from pumping tests. The analysis is frequently based on fitting observed pressure responses to appropriate analytical solutions for radial flow towards the pumping well. For mathematical simplicity, analytical solutions are commonly derived for constant-rate pumping conditions. However, often times the pumping rate during the test is varied either intentionally or due to technical difficulties during the test. Using principles of superposition, the constant-rate analytical solutions are frequently applied to analyze pumping tests that are conducted with variable pumping rates. In this study, we propose a novel methodology that approximates a time-varying pumping history as a series of segments with linearly varying pumping rates, and use it to evaluate the effects of pumping variation on aquifer parameter estimation. Our approach is demonstrated using existing analytical solutions for confined aquifers (Mishra and Neuman 2011), but it is also applicable to unconfined and/or leaky aquifers. The methodology is validated using a synthetic pumping test. We also apply our methodology to analyze the pumping test data by inversely estimating the apparent aquifer parameters using the code MADS (http://ees.lanl.gov/staff/monty/codes/mads).

  20. Evaluation of Neonatal Hemolytic Jaundice: Clinical and Laboratory Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Cherepnalkovski, Anet Papazovska; Krzelj, Vjekoslav; Zafirovska-Ivanovska, Beti; Gruev, Todor; Markic, Josko; Aluloska, Natasa; Zdraveska, Nikolina; Piperkovska, Katica

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neonatal jaundice that occurs in ABO or Rhesus issoimunisation has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for development of severe hyperbilirubinemia and bilirubin neurotoxicity. AIM: Aim of our study was to investigate clinical and laboratory parameters associated with hemolytic jaundice due to Rh and ABO incompatibility and compare results with the group of unspecific jaundice. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred sixty seven (167) neonatal hyperbilirubinemia cases were included in the study, 24.6% of which presented with ABO/Rhesus type hemolytic jaundice, and the rest with unspecific jaundice. Evaluation included: blood count, reticulocites, serum bilirubin, aminotransferases, blood grouping, and Coombs test, also the day of bilirubin peak, duration of the hyperbilirubinemia, and additional bilirubin measurements. RESULTS: We showed significantly lower mean values of hemoglobin, erythrocytes and hematocrit and significantly higher values of reticulocytes in the group of ABO/Rh incompatibility compared to the group of jaundice of unspecific etiology; also an earlier presentation and a higher-grade jaundice in this group. CONCLUSIONS: The laboratory profile in ABO/Rh isoimmunisation cases depicts hemolytic mechanism of jaundice. These cases carry a significant risk for early and severe hyperbilirubinemia and are eligible for neurodevelopmental follow-up. Hematological parameters and blood grouping are simple diagnostic methods that assist the etiological diagnosis of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:27275310

  1. Spinopelvic parameters evaluation in a Brazilian population sample.

    PubMed

    Jacob, C J; Cardoso, I M; Batista, J L J; Maia, T C; Roncaglio, B

    2015-07-01

    The morphology of the spine is variable within a population, and its maintenance in appropriate values implies a decrease in the energy expended. We need to know their normal values in population. This study aims to carry out a literature review and evaluate published papers on spinopelvic parameters in a Brazilian population sample. Eleven potentially eligible papers were initially identified for inclusion in this review: three papers from PubMed and eight from Medicine. Out of these, only five papers contained methodology and relevant significance level, and therefore, they were included in the final analytical run. According to a Brazilian study, Pratali mentions no significant difference in the average values of spinopelvic balance in the Brazilian population and those found in the literature; there was also no significant difference comparing Brazilian and Korean population; however, a difference was found in comparison with European population regarding PI parameters and SS, but the latter with higher values. According to Kulcheski (Column/Columna 12:224-227, 2013), the values of pelvic tilt in the Brazilian population evaluated in his research were 19° (10°-35°) and the sacral inclination was 38° (30°-55°), presenting similar values concerning the European population. In another Brazilian paper, Oliveira (Rev Bras Ort 49:189-193, 2014) reports that the research population had PI average of 45° (41.9°-48.1°). The values obtained are relatively minor when compared to the European population. However, all of these are within the normal margin considered in the worldwide literature.

  2. Generalized Parameter-Adjusted Stochastic Resonance of Duffing Oscillator and Its Application to Weak-Signal Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhi-Hui; Leng, Yong-Gang

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional Duffing oscillator which can produce stochastic resonance (SR) is studied in this paper. We introduce its SR mechanism and present a generalized parameter-adjusted SR (GPASR) model of this oscillator for the necessity of parameter adjustments. The Kramers rate is chosen as the theoretical basis to establish a judgmental function for judging the occurrence of SR in this model; and to analyze and summarize the parameter-adjusted rules under unmatched signal amplitude, frequency, and/or noise-intensity. Furthermore, we propose the weak-signal detection approach based on this GPASR model. Finally, we employ two practical examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach in practical engineering application. PMID:26343671

  3. Generalized Parameter-Adjusted Stochastic Resonance of Duffing Oscillator and Its Application to Weak-Signal Detection.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhi-Hui; Leng, Yong-Gang

    2015-08-28

    A two-dimensional Duffing oscillator which can produce stochastic resonance (SR) is studied in this paper. We introduce its SR mechanism and present a generalized parameter-adjusted SR (GPASR) model of this oscillator for the necessity of parameter adjustments. The Kramers rate is chosen as the theoretical basis to establish a judgmental function for judging the occurrence of SR in this model; and to analyze and summarize the parameter-adjusted rules under unmatched signal amplitude, frequency, and/or noise-intensity. Furthermore, we propose the weak-signal detection approach based on this GPASR model. Finally, we employ two practical examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach in practical engineering application.

  4. Structural parameter effect of porous material on sound absorption performance of double-resonance material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, C.; Tian, Y.; Wang, Z. Q.; Nie, J. K.; Wang, G. K.; Liu, X. S.

    2017-06-01

    In view of the noise feature and service environment of urban power substations, this paper explores the idea of compound impedance, fills some porous sound-absorption material in the first resonance cavity of the double-resonance sound-absorption material, and designs a new-type of composite acoustic board. We conduct some acoustic characterizations according to the standard test of impedance tube, and research on the influence of assembly order, the thickness and area density of the filling material, and back cavity on material sound-absorption performance. The results show that the new-type of acoustic board consisting of aluminum fibrous material as inner structure, micro-porous board as outer structure, and polyester-filled space between them, has good sound-absorption performance for low frequency and full frequency noise. When the thickness, area density of filling material and thickness of back cavity increase, the sound absorption coefficient curve peak will move toward low frequency.

  5. Design parameters of a resonant infrared photoconductor with unity quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept of a resonant infrared photoconductor that has characteristics of 100 percent quantum efficiency, high photoconductive gain, and very low noise equivalent power. Central to this concept is an establishment of a high-finesse absorption cavity internal to the detector element. A theoretical analysis is carried out, demonstrating this concept and providing some design guidelines. A Ge:Ga FIR detector is presently being fabricated using this approach.

  6. Design parameters of a resonant infrared photoconductor with unity quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept of a resonant infrared photoconductor that has characteristics of 100 percent quantum efficiency, high photoconductive gain, and very low noise equivalent power. Central to this concept is an establishment of a high-finesse absorption cavity internal to the detector element. A theoretical analysis is carried out, demonstrating this concept and providing some design guidelines. A Ge:Ga FIR detector is presently being fabricated using this approach.

  7. Approximate Schumann resonance parameters for a two-scale-height ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    An isotropic, spherically symmetric two-scale-height ionosphere's transverse magnetic mode eigenfrequencies, as well as the height and angular profiles of its electric and magnetic fields, are presently addressed by an approximate solution. The electromagnetic energy in the eigenmodes is equally partitioned between the electric and magnetic fields, allowing a simple expression of the relative degrees of dissipation within the radial and tangential dissipation layers. The results obtained may be relevant to interpretations of the temporal variations in the Schumann resonances.

  8. Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) neurography for evaluation of peripheral nerves and plexus injuries

    PubMed Central

    Barousse, Rafael; Socolovsky, Mariano; Luna, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic conditions of peripheral nerves and plexus have been classically evaluated by morphological imaging techniques and electrophysiological tests. New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies based on 3D fat-suppressed techniques are providing high accuracy for peripheral nerve injury evaluation from a qualitative point of view. However, these techniques do not provide quantitative information. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are functional MRI techniques that are able to evaluate and quantify the movement of water molecules within different biological structures. These techniques have been successfully applied in other anatomical areas, especially in the assessment of central nervous system, and now are being imported, with promising results for peripheral nerve and plexus evaluation. DWI and DTI allow performing a qualitative and quantitative peripheral nerve analysis, providing valuable pathophysiological information about functional integrity of these structures. In the field of trauma and peripheral nerve or plexus injury, several derived parameters from DWI and DTI studies such as apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) or fractional anisotropy (FA) among others, can be used as potential biomarkers of neural damage providing information about fiber organization, axonal flow or myelin integrity. A proper knowledge of physical basis of these techniques and their limitations is important for an optimal interpretation of the imaging findings and derived data. In this paper, a comprehensive review of the potential applications of DWI and DTI neurographic studies is performed with a focus on traumatic conditions, including main nerve entrapment syndromes in both peripheral nerves and brachial or lumbar plexus. PMID:28932698

  9. Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) neurography for evaluation of peripheral nerves and plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Martín Noguerol, Teodoro; Barousse, Rafael; Socolovsky, Mariano; Luna, Antonio

    2017-08-01

    Traumatic conditions of peripheral nerves and plexus have been classically evaluated by morphological imaging techniques and electrophysiological tests. New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies based on 3D fat-suppressed techniques are providing high accuracy for peripheral nerve injury evaluation from a qualitative point of view. However, these techniques do not provide quantitative information. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are functional MRI techniques that are able to evaluate and quantify the movement of water molecules within different biological structures. These techniques have been successfully applied in other anatomical areas, especially in the assessment of central nervous system, and now are being imported, with promising results for peripheral nerve and plexus evaluation. DWI and DTI allow performing a qualitative and quantitative peripheral nerve analysis, providing valuable pathophysiological information about functional integrity of these structures. In the field of trauma and peripheral nerve or plexus injury, several derived parameters from DWI and DTI studies such as apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) or fractional anisotropy (FA) among others, can be used as potential biomarkers of neural damage providing information about fiber organization, axonal flow or myelin integrity. A proper knowledge of physical basis of these techniques and their limitations is important for an optimal interpretation of the imaging findings and derived data. In this paper, a comprehensive review of the potential applications of DWI and DTI neurographic studies is performed with a focus on traumatic conditions, including main nerve entrapment syndromes in both peripheral nerves and brachial or lumbar plexus.

  10. Mechanical design parameters for detection of nuclear signals by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.J.; Hanlon, J.A.; Lamartine, B.; Hawley, M.; Solem, J.C.; Signer, S.; Jarmer, J.J.; Penttila, S.; Sillerud, L.O.; Pryputniewicz, R.J.

    1993-10-01

    Recent theoretical work has shown that mechanical detection of magnetic resonance from a single nuclear spin is in principle possible. This theory has recently been experimentally validated by the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance signals using microscale cantilevers. Currently we are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are three orders of magnitude lower in intensity than electron signals. In order to achieve the needed thousand-fold improvement in sensitivity we have undertaken the development of optimized mechanical cantilevers and highly polarized samples. Finite element modeling is used as a tool to simulate cantilever beam dynamics and to optimize the mechanical properties including Q, resonant frequency, amplitude of vibration and spring constant. Simulations are compared to experiments using heterodyne hologram interferometry. Nanofabrication of optimized cantilevers via ion milling will be directed by the outcome of these simulations and experiments. Highly polarized samples are developed using a three-fold approach: (1) high magnetic field strength (2.5T), (2) low temperature (1K), and (3) use of samples polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization. Our recent experiments have demonstrated nuclear polarizations in excess of 50% in molecules of toulene.

  11. γ+ index: A new evaluation parameter for quantitative quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Stathakis, Sotirios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Shi, Chengyu; Xu, Jun; Kauweloa, Kevin I; Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2014-04-01

    The accuracy of dose delivery and the evaluation of differences between calculated and delivered dose distributions, has been studied by several groups. The aim of this investigation is to extend the gamma index by including radiobiological information and to propose a new index that we will here forth refer to as the gamma plus (γ+). Furthermore, to validate the robustness of this new index in performing a quality control analysis of an IMRT treatment plan using pure radiobiological measures such as the biologically effective uniform dose (D) and complication-free tumor control probability (P+). A new quality assurance index, the (γ+), is proposed based on the theoretical concept of gamma index presented by Low et al. (1998). In this study, the dose difference, including the radiobiological dose information (biological effective dose, BED) is used instead of just the physical dose difference when performing the γ+ calculation. An in-house software was developed to compare different dose distributions based on the γ+ concept. A test pattern for a two-dimensional dose comparison was built using the in-house software platform. The γ+ index was tested using planar dose distributions (exported from the treatment planning system) and delivered (film) dose distributions acquired in a solid water phantom using a test pattern and a theoretical clinical case. Furthermore, a lung cancer case for a patient treated with IMRT was also selected for the analysis. The respective planar dose distributions from the treatment plan and the film were compared based on the γ+ index and were evaluated using the radiobiological measures of P+ and D. The results for the test pattern analysis indicate that the γ+ index distributions differ from those of the gamma index since the former considers radiobiological parameters that may affect treatment outcome. For the theoretical clinical case, it is observed that the γ+ index varies for different treatment parameters (e.g. dose per

  12. Surface Plasmon Resonance Evaluation of Colloidal Metal Aerogel Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Cronise, Raymond J.; Noever, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging has in the past been applied to the characterization of thin films. In this study we apply the surface plasmon technique not to determine macroscopic spatial variations but rather to determine average microscopic information. Specifically, we deduce the dielectric properties of the surrounding gel matrix and information concerning the dynamics of the gelation process from the visible absorption characteristics of colloidal metal nanoparticles contained in aerogel pores. We have fabricated aerogels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Because the dielectric constant of the metal particles is linked to that of the host matrix at the surface plasmon resonance, any change 'in the dielectric constant of the material surrounding the metal nanoparticles results in a shift in the surface plasmon wavelength. During gelation the surface plasmon resonance shifts to the red as the average or effective dielectric constant of the matrix increases. Conversely, formation of an aerogel or xerogel through supercritical extraction or evaporation of the solvent produces a blue shift in the resonance indicating a decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix. From the magnitude of this shift we deduce the average fraction of air and of silica in contact with the metal particles. The surface area of metal available for catalytic gas reaction may thus be determined.

  13. Surface Plasmon Resonance Evaluation of Colloidal Metal Aerogel Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Cronise, Raymond J.; Noever, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging has in the past been applied to the characterization of thin films. In this study we apply the surface plasmon technique not to determine macroscopic spatial variations but rather to determine average microscopic information. Specifically, we deduce the dielectric properties of the surrounding gel matrix and information concerning the dynamics of the gelation process from the visible absorption characteristics of colloidal metal nanoparticles contained in aerogel pores. We have fabricated aerogels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Because the dielectric constant of the metal particles is linked to that of the host matrix at the surface plasmon resonance, any change 'in the dielectric constant of the material surrounding the metal nanoparticles results in a shift in the surface plasmon wavelength. During gelation the surface plasmon resonance shifts to the red as the average or effective dielectric constant of the matrix increases. Conversely, formation of an aerogel or xerogel through supercritical extraction or evaporation of the solvent produces a blue shift in the resonance indicating a decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix. From the magnitude of this shift we deduce the average fraction of air and of silica in contact with the metal particles. The surface area of metal available for catalytic gas reaction may thus be determined.

  14. Referencing strategy for the direct comparison of nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics motional parameters in RNA.

    PubMed

    Musselman, Catherine; Zhang, Qi; Al-Hashimi, Hashim; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2010-01-21

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are both techniques that can be used to characterize the structural dynamics of biomolecules and their underlying time scales. Comparison of relaxation parameters obtained through each methodology allows for cross validation of techniques and for complementarity in the analysis of dynamics. Here we present a combined NMR/MD study of the dynamics of HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA. We compute relaxation constants (R(1), R(2), and NOE) and model-free parameters (S(2) and tau) from a 65 ns molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory and compare them with the respective parameters measured in a domain-elongation NMR experiment. Using the elongated domain as the frame of reference for all computed parameters allows for a direct comparison between experiment and simulation. We see good agreement for many parameters and gain further insight into the nature of the local and global dynamics of TAR, which are found to be quite complex, spanning multiple time scales. For the few cases where agreement is poor, comparison of the dynamical parameters provides insight into the limits of each technique. We suggest a frequency-matching procedure that yields an upper bound for the time scale of dynamics to which the NMR relaxation experiment is sensitive.

  15. Comparison between 2D ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging for assessing brain and spine parameters in fetuses with spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Araujo Júnior, Edward; Nakano, Mayra Lemos; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Haratz, Karina Krajden; Oliveira, Patrícia Soares; Martins, Wellington P; Ajzen, Sérgio Aron; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2013-05-01

    To compare two-dimensional ultrasonography (2DUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing brain and spine parameters in fetuses with spina bifida. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 15 fetuses with spina bifida (one with encephalocele, four with rachischisis and 10 with myelomeningocele). The size of the atrium of the lateral ventricle, percentage shortening of the cerebellum, degree of compromising of the first vertebra and total number of vertebras affected by herniation were assessed. The MRI examination was performed not more than 7 days after the 2DUS. To compare and correlate the parameters from the two techniques, the paired Student's t test and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used. To assess the correlations of atrium measurements from 2DUS and MRI with other parameters, Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) was used. No significant difference was observed in any of the means of the parameters assessed using the two techniques (p > 0.05). Both 2DUS and MRI seemed to present satisfactory reliability in measurements on the size of the atrium of the lateral ventricle and the first vertebra affected (ICC = 0.88 and 0.75, respectively). Measurements on the atrium of the lateral ventricle from 2DUS correlated better with the other parameters than did measurements from MRI. In fetuses with spina bifida, 2DUS and MRI present similar results, but measurements on the atrium of the lateral ventricle from 2DUS correlated better with the other parameters.

  16. Strenuous resistance exercise effects on magnetic resonance diffusion parameters and muscle-tendon function in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Osamu; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2011-10-01

    To assess the effects of strenuous exercise on magnetic resonance diffusion parameters and muscle-tendon complex function in skeletal muscle. Six men performed ankle plantar flexion exercises with eccentric contraction. The fractional anisotropy (FA), λ(1) , λ(2) , λ(3) , mean diffusivity (MD), and T(2) values in the triceps surae muscles were measured by magnetic resonance diffusion tensor and spin-echo imaging. Passive torque of plantar flexors, maximal voluntary isometric plantar flexion torques (MVIP), and Achilles tendon stiffness during MVIP were measured by combined ultrasonography and dynamometry. Plasma creatine kinase and muscle soreness were also assessed. These parameters were measured before and 1-8 days postexercise. The medial gastrocnemius exhibited significantly decreased FA 2-5 days after, increased λ(2) 3 days after, and increased λ(3) 2 and 3 days after exercise. This muscle also showed significantly increased MD and T(2) values 3 days postexercise. MVIP significantly decreased 2 and 3 days postexercise, while passive torque significantly increased 2 days postexercise. Creatine kinase and muscle soreness increased 3-5 days and 1-5 days postexercise, respectively. Exercise-induced muscle damage manifested as significant changes in muscle diffusion parameters with muscle-tendon complex dysfunction and delayed-onset muscle soreness. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. A new method of evaluating tight gas sands pore structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Liang; Mao, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Xiu-hong

    2016-04-01

    Tight gas sands always display such characteristics of ultra-low porosity, permeability, high irreducible water, low resistivity contrast, complicated pore structure and strong heterogeneity, these make that the conventional methods are invalid. Many effective gas bearing formations are considered as dry zones or water saturated layers, and cannot be identified and exploited. To improve tight gas sands evaluation, the best method is quantitative characterizing rock pore structure. The mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves are advantageous in predicting formation pore structure. However, the MICP experimental measurements are limited due to the environment and economy factors, this leads formation pore structure cannot be consecutively evaluated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs are considered to be promising in evaluating rock pore structure. Generally, to consecutively quantitatively evaluate tight gas sands pore structure, the best method is constructing pseudo Pc curves from NMR logs. In this paper, based on the analysis of lab experimental results for 20 core samples, which were drilled from tight gas sandstone reservoirs of Sichuan basin, and simultaneously applied for lab MICP and NMR measurements, the relationships of piecewise power function between nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation T2 time and pore-throat radius Rc are established. A novel method, which is used to transform NMR reverse cumulative curve as pseudo capillary pressure (Pc) curve is proposed, and the corresponding model is established based on formation classification. By using this model, formation pseudo Pc curves can be consecutively synthesized. The pore throat radius distribution, and pore structure evaluation parameters, such as the average pore throat radius (Rm), the threshold pressure (Pd), the maximum pore throat radius (Rmax) and so on, can also be precisely extracted. After this method is extended into field applications, several tight gas

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations: Parameter evaluation, application and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a theoretical technique for investigating the physical properties of a wide variety of molecules. This dissertation contains my studies on three important parts of the MD simulation: evaluation of parameters in empirical energy functions widely used in MD simulations, application of MD simulation on experimentally interested biological molecules and development of new methods for constraint dynamics simulations. All the work in this thesis made use of CHARMM as an MD simulation tool. The MD simulation uses empirical energy functions parameterized by a set of parameters. These parameters play an important role in the quality of the simulations. I evaluated nine parameter sets from Harvard University and Molecular Simulations, Inc. for protein simulations by the MD simulations of hydrated form of carboxy- myoglobin and interleukin-1/beta, which are rich in two typical protein structure motifs, helix and β sheet structures respectively. It is found that some sets are good at representing helical structure proteins while others are good at β sheet proteins. But all of them need improvement on representing motions at low temperature. Experimental evidence indicates that the 1A coiled-coil domains of the Intermediate Filament (IF) proteins consisting of coiled human keratins 1 and 10 (K1 and K10) are 'hot spots' for substitutional mutations. Some of these mutations are correlated to the human skin diseases-epidermolytic hyperkeratiosis (EH) and epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS). The MD simulation technique is used here for the first time to model and simulate these proteins to elucidate the molecular-level effects of these mutations. Lacking the experimental crystal structures, the initial structure of 1A domain of the wild type Intermediate Filament protein and its mutants were modeled from scratch to reproduce the well- known properties of the proteins of this kind followed by identical MD simulations. The important result is

  19. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2, and 9/2. These results may be used to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Heavy Element Chemistry program.

  20. An Analysis Method for Superconducting Resonator Parameter Extraction with Complex Baseline Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    A new semi-empirical model is proposed for extracting the quality (Q) factors of arrays of superconducting microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The determination of the total internal and coupling Q factors enables the computation of the loss in the superconducting transmission lines. The method used allows the simultaneous analysis of multiple interacting discrete resonators with the presence of a complex spectral baseline arising from reflections in the system. The baseline removal allows an unbiased estimate of the device response as measured in a cryogenic instrumentation setting.

  1. Recent Cross-Section Evaluations in the Resonance Region at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.; Guber, K.H.; Sayer, R.; Larson, N.M.

    2005-05-24

    The intent of this work is to present the results and to describe the procedures utilized to evaluate 233U and 19F for criticality safety applications. The evaluation was done in the resolved resonance region using the reduced Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. The resonance analysis was performed with the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY, which utilizes the generalized least-squares technique based on Bayes theory.

  2. Approaches to real-time tsunami wave parameters evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentyev, Mikhail; Titov, Vasily; Romanenko, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    Timely prediction of tsunami wave parameters is still among actual problems for tsunami risk mitigation. After the Great East Japan Earthquake (Mach 11, 2011) it takes only 20 minutes for tsunami wave to approach the cost of Japan after the quake. Existing models and software applications allow experts to simulate tsunami wave propagation rather fast. However, all the models require knowledge about initial see-face disturbance at tsunami source. Seismic data, available right after the event, provide the information about earthquake magnitude and epicenter location. There are a number of approaches to evaluate the initial see-face disturbance (using knowledge about the trench geo structure, satellite imaging, etc.). One of perspective approaches is to recalculate tsunami wave profiles, recorded by deep-ocean stations like DART buoys or GPS equipment, in terms of initial sea surface displacement. The so-called preliminary calculation strategy suggests that the targeted subduction zone is covered by a number rectangular "unit sources" 50x100 km. Wave propagation from each unit source, caused by the unified shape (typical for the given subduction zone), is calculated in advance other the entire aquatoria. After real event the wave profile, measure at certain sensor, is approximated as linear combination of model signals from the above unit sources, calculated at the same point. Method was proved to be rather accurate. However, it takes valuable time to recover initial displacement at tsunami source in case of larger zone of disturbance (e.g. about 20 minutes for processing tsunami epicenter covered with six unit-sources). We suggest new algorithm for above mentioned model. This is based on Fourier theory and involves orthogonal decomposition of simulated profiles, calculated from the unit sources. It takes only about 1 second to recover tsunami source of twenty unit-sources. This allows one to speak about possibility to develop real-time system for evaluating tsunami.

  3. Evaluation of electrocardiographic parameters in patients with diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Ferhat; Kepez, Alper; Ay, Seyit Ahmet; Ergogan, Okan; Baskoy, Kamil; Guncıkan, Mustafa Nuri; Dogan, Zekeriya; Yonem, Arif

    2015-11-01

    There is limited data regarding the effect of altered serum osmolality on cardiac electrical activity. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the electrocardiographic (ECG) effects of diabetes insipidus (DI) and any related hyperosmolality in a population of young patients with DI and without any known cardiovascular disease or risk factors. Twelve-lead ECG's of 44 consecutive untreated young male patients (age: 21.8 ± 2.9 years) who had been referred to endocrinology clinic and diagnosed as DI based on water deprivation test were retrospectively evaluated. A total of 30 age-matched (21.9 ± 2.4 years) healthy males were selected as control group and ECG's of these controls were obtained for comparison with ECG's of DI patients. All ECG parameters were measured and compared. Duration of QRS complex was significantly shorter in patients with DI compared with controls (85.2 ± 12.0 vs. 94.0 ± 10.6 ms, p: 0.001). P wave dispersion (PWD) of patients with DI was significantly higher compared with controls (31.9 ± 9.9 vs. 26.5 ± 10.6 ms, p: 0.03) and it was significantly correlated with serum osmolality and serum sodium level (r = - 0.36, p: 0.02 and r: - 0.35, p: 0.02, respectively). DI patients without any cardiovascular disease or risk factors displayed significantly shorter QRS duration and increased p wave dispersion compared with controls.

  4. Rapid Scan Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Opens New Avenues for Imaging Physiologically Important Parameters In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Biller, Joshua R; Mitchell, Deborah G; Tseytlin, Mark; Elajaili, Hanan; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2016-09-26

    We demonstrate a superior method of 2D spectral-spatial imaging of stable radical reporter molecules at 250 MHz using rapid-scan electron-paramagnetic-resonance (RS-EPR), which can provide quantitative information under in vivo conditions on oxygen concentration, pH, redox status and concentration of signaling molecules (i.e., OH(•), NO(•)). The RS-EPR technique has a higher sensitivity, improved spatial resolution (1 mm), and shorter acquisition time in comparison to the standard continuous wave (CW) technique. A variety of phantom configurations have been tested, with spatial resolution varying from 1 to 6 mm, and spectral width of the reporter molecules ranging from 16 µT (160 mG) to 5 mT (50 G). A cross-loop bimodal resonator decouples excitation and detection, reducing the noise, while the rapid scan effect allows more power to be input to the spin system before saturation, increasing the EPR signal. This leads to a substantially higher signal-to-noise ratio than in conventional CW EPR experiments.

  5. Evaluation of Elution Parameters for Cesium Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Burgeson, Ingrid E.; Deschane, Jaquetta R.; Cook, Bryan J.; Blanchard, David L.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2006-08-28

    Cesium ion exchange is one of the planned processes for treating and disposing of waste at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. Radioactive supernatant liquids from the waste tanks will undergo ultrafiltration, followed by cesium ion exchange using a regenerable organic ion exchange resin. Two resins, SuperLig?644 and a Resorcinol-formaldehyde resin are being evaluated for cesium removal and cesium elution characteristics. The main purpose of this study is to optimize the cesium elution to provide a resin which after undergoing elution would meet the U.S. Department of Energy/Office of River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant processing and resin disposal criteria. Columns of each resin type were loaded to greater or equal to 90% breakthrough with a Hanford waste stimulant and eluted with nitric acid. The temperature, flow rate and nitric acid concentration were varied to determine the optimal elution conditions. Temperature and eluant flow rate were the most important elution parameters. As would be predicted based upon kinetic consideration alone, decreasing the eluant flow rate and increasing the temperature provided the optimal elution conditions. Varying the nitric acid concentration did not have a significant effect on the elution; however, elutions performed using both high acid concentration (1M) and elevated temperature (45 C) resulted in resin degradation, causing gas generation and resin bed disruption.

  6. Assessment of Gate Width Size on Lifetime-Based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Parameter Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sez-Jade; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) enables the observation of interactions at the nanoscale level through the use of fluorescence optical imaging techniques. In FRET, fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used to quantify the fluorescence lifetime changes of the donor molecule, which are associated with proximity between acceptor and donor molecules. Among the FRET parameters derived from fluorescence lifetime imaging, the percentage of donor that interacts with the acceptor (in proximity) can be estimated via model-based fitting. However, estimation of the lifetime parameters can be affected by the acquisition parameters such as the temporal characteristics of the imaging system. Herein, we investigate the effect of various gate widths on the accuracy of estimation of FRET parameters with focus on the near-infrared spectral window. Experiments were performed in silico, in vitro, and in vivo with gate width sizes ranging from 300 ps to 1000 ps in intervals of 100 ps. For all cases, the FRET parameters were retrieved accurately and the imaging acquisition time was decreased three-fold. These results indicate that increasing the gate width up to 1000 ps still allows for accurate quantification of FRET interactions even in the case of short lifetimes such as those encountered with near-infrared FRET pairs. PMID:26557647

  7. Fully self-consistent study of charge-exchange resonances and the impact on the symmetry energy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Cao, Li-Gang; Colò, G.; Sagawa, H.

    2016-10-01

    We have examined within a fully self-consistent theoretical framework the energy difference between the anti-analog giant dipole resonance (AGDR) and the isobaric analog state (IAS), EAGDR-EIAS , as an indicator of the neutron skin and of the density behavior of the symmetry energy. We have improved two specific points in our HF+RPA calculations: (1) the exchange term of the two-body Coulomb interaction is treated exactly without Slater approximation; and (2) the two-parameters spin-orbit interaction is treated in a consistent way within the energy density functional theory. The estimated values for the neutron skin in 208Pb and the slope parameter of symmetry energy are compared with previous analysis available in the literature.

  8. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging has limited additional yield in cryptogenic stroke evaluation after transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Ava L; Kalani, Rizwan E; Aw-Zoretic, Jessie; Sondag, Matthew; Daruwalla, Vistasp J; Mitter, Sumeet S; Bernstein, Richard; Collins, Jeremy D; Prabhakaran, Shyam

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is increasing, but its role in the diagnostic work-up following ischemic stroke has received limited study. We aimed to explore the added yield of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to identify cardio-aortic sources not detected by transesophageal echocardiography among patients with cryptogenic stroke. Methods A retrospective single-center cohort study was performed from 01 January 2009 to 01 March 2013. Consecutive patients who had both a stroke protocol cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and a transesophageal echocardiography preformed during a single hospitalization were included. All cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies underwent independent, blinded review by two investigators. We applied the causative classification system for ischemic stroke to all patients, first blinded to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging results; we then reapplied the causative classification system using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Standard statistical tests to evaluate stroke subtype reclassification rates were used. Results Ninety-three patients were included in the final analysis; 68.8% were classified as cryptogenic stroke after initial diagnostic evaluation. Among patients with cryptogenic stroke, five (7.8%) were reclassified due to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging findings: one was reclassified as "cardio-aortic embolism evident" due to the presence of a patent foramen ovale and focal cardiac infarct and four were reclassified as "cardio-aortic embolism possible" due to mitral valve thickening (n = 1) or hypertensive cardiomyopathy (n = 3). Overall, findings on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging reduced the percentage of patients with cryptogenic stroke by slightly more than 1%. Conclusion Our stroke subtype reclassification rate after the addition of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging results to a diagnostic work-up which includes transesophageal echocardiography was very low. Prospective studies

  9. Effects of two successive parity-invariant point interactions on one-dimensional quantum transmission: Resonance conditions for the parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, Kohkichi Nagasawa, Tomoaki Takahashi, Rohta

    2016-12-15

    We consider the scattering of a quantum particle by two independent, successive parity-invariant point interactions in one dimension. The parameter space for the two point interactions is given by the direct product of two tori, which is described by four parameters. By investigating the effects of the two point interactions on the transmission probability of plane wave, we obtain the conditions for the parameter space under which perfect resonant transmission occur. The resonance conditions are found to be described by symmetric and anti-symmetric relations between the parameters.

  10. Harvesting rockfall hazard evaluation parameters from Google Earth Street View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Agioutantis, Zacharias; Tripolitsiotis, Achilles; Steiakakis, Chrysanthos; Mertikas, Stelios

    2015-04-01

    Rockfall incidents along highways and railways prove extremely dangerous for properties, infrastructures and human lives. Several qualitative metrics such as the Rockfall Hazard Rating System (RHRS) and the Colorado Rockfall Hazard Rating System (CRHRS) have been established to estimate rockfall potential and provide risk maps in order to control and monitor rockfall incidents. The implementation of such metrics for efficient and reliable risk modeling require accurate knowledge of multi-parametric attributes such as the geological, geotechnical, topographic parameters of the study area. The Missouri Rockfall Hazard Rating System (MORH RS) identifies the most potentially problematic areas using digital video logging for the determination of parameters like slope height and angle, face irregularities, etc. This study aims to harvest in a semi-automated approach geometric and qualitative measures through open source platforms that may provide 3-dimensional views of the areas of interest. More specifically, the Street View platform from Google Maps, is hereby used to provide essential information that can be used towards 3-dimensional reconstruction of slopes along highways. The potential of image capturing along a programmable virtual route to provide the input data for photogrammetric processing is also evaluated. Moreover, qualitative characterization of the geological and geotechnical status, based on the Street View images, is performed. These attributes are then integrated to deliver a GIS-based rockfall hazard map. The 3-dimensional models are compared to actual photogrammetric measures in a rockfall prone area in Crete, Greece while in-situ geotechnical characterization is also used to compare and validate the hazard risk. This work is considered as the first step towards the exploitation of open source platforms to improve road safety and the development of an operational system where authorized agencies (i.e., civil protection) will be able to acquire near

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-derived Flow Parameters for the Analysis of Cardiovascular Diseases and Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Michael, Dada O; Bamidele, Awojoyogbe O; Adewale, Adesola O; Karem, Boubaker

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) allows for fast, accurate and noninvasive measurement of fluid flow in restricted and non-restricted media. The results of such measurements may be possible for a very small B 0 field and can be enhanced through detailed examination of generating functions that may arise from polynomial solutions of NMR flow equations in terms of Legendre polynomials and Boubaker polynomials. The generating functions of these polynomials can present an array of interesting possibilities that may be useful for understanding the basic physics of extracting relevant NMR flow information from which various hemodynamic problems can be carefully studied. Specifically, these results may be used to develop effective drugs for cardiovascular-related diseases.

  12. Reevaluation of 58Ni and 60Ni Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Wiarda, Dorothea; Arbanas, Goran

    2009-01-01

    The previous 58Ni and 60Ni set of resonance parameters (ENDF/B-VII-0, JEFF-3, etc.) was based on the SAMMY analysis of Oak Ridge National Laboratory neutron transmission, scattering cross section and capture cross section measurements by C. M. Perey et al. The present results were obtained by adding to the SAMMY experimental data base the capture cross sections measured recently at the Oak Ridge Linear Electron Accelerator by Guber et al. and the Geel Electron Linear Accelerator very high-resolution neutron transmission measurements performed by Brusegan et al. A complete resonance parameter covariance matrix (RPCM) was obtained from the SAMMY analysis of the experimental database. The data sets were made consistent, when needed, by adjusting the neutron energy scales, the normalization coefficients, and the background corrections. The RPCM allows the calculation of the cross section uncertainties due mainly to statistical errors in the experimental data. The systematic uncertainties of the experimental data, estimated from the preliminary analyses of the experimental database, were taken into account in the cross section covariance matrix (CSCM) for total, scattering, and capture cross sections. The diagonal elements of the CSCM were obtained by quadratic combination of the different components of the uncertainties. Because of a lack of experimental information, the energy correlations were not obtained, and a value of 0.5 was arbitrarily taken for all the CSCM nondiagonal elements.

  13. Evaluation of Linking Methods for Placing Three-Parameter Logistic Item Parameter Estimates onto a One-Parameter Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karkee, Thakur B.; Wright, Karen R.

    2004-01-01

    Different item response theory (IRT) models may be employed for item calibration. Change of testing vendors, for example, may result in the adoption of a different model than that previously used with a testing program. To provide scale continuity and preserve cut score integrity, item parameter estimates from the new model must be linked to the…

  14. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance for Evaluating Catheter Related FDG Avidity

    PubMed Central

    Gage, Kenneth L.; Berman, Claudia G.; Montilla-Soler, Jaime L.

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old female with a history of metastatic left arm melanoma presented for F(18) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) which showed a moderately FDG avid focus at her port catheter tip near the cavoatrial junction. Although catheter tip related FDG avidity has previously been suggested to be bland thrombus or infection, melanoma can metastasize to unusual locations including the superior vena cava. In addition, the patient had an elevated risk of anticoagulation due to a history of hemorrhagic brain metastases. Therefore, confirmatory cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) was obtained and findings were consistent with bland catheter-related thrombus. PMID:27867676

  15. US-Based Drug Cost Parameter Estimation for Economic Evaluations.

    PubMed

    Levy, Joseph F; Meek, Patrick D; Rosenberg, Marjorie A

    2015-07-01

    In the United States, more than 10% of national health expenditures are for prescription drugs. Assessing drug costs in US economic evaluation studies is not consistent, as the true acquisition cost of a drug is not known by decision modelers. Current US practice focuses on identifying one reasonable drug cost and imposing some distributional assumption to assess uncertainty. We propose a set of Rules based on current pharmacy practice that account for the heterogeneity of drug product costs. The set of products derived from our Rules, and their associated costs, form an empirical distribution that can be used for more realistic sensitivity analyses and create transparency in drug cost parameter computation. The Rules specify an algorithmic process to select clinically equivalent drug products that reduce pill burden, use an appropriate package size, and assume uniform weighting of substitutable products. Three diverse examples show derived empirical distributions and are compared with previously reported cost estimates. The shapes of the empirical distributions among the 3 drugs differ dramatically, including multiple modes and different variation. Previously published estimates differed from the means of the empirical distributions. Published ranges for sensitivity analyses did not cover the ranges of the empirical distributions. In one example using lisinopril, the empirical mean cost of substitutable products was $444 (range = $23-$953) as compared with a published estimate of $305 (range = $51-$523). Our Rules create a simple and transparent approach to creating cost estimates of drug products and assessing their variability. The approach is easily modified to include a subset of, or different weighting for, substitutable products. The derived empirical distribution is easily incorporated into 1-way or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Anomalous Solute Transport in Saturated Porous Media: Linking Transport Model Parameters to Electrical and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, R. D.; Binley, A. M.; Keating, K.; France, S.; Osterman, G. K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2013-12-01

    The advection-dispersion equation fails to describe non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models. The dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) model partitions the total porosity into mobile and less-mobile domains with solute exchange between the domains; consequently, the DDMT model can produce a better fit to breakthrough curves (BTCs) in systems defined by more- and less-mobile components. However, direct experimental estimation of DDMT model parameters such as rate of exchange and the mobile and less-mobile porosities remains elusive. Consequently, model parameters are often calculated purely as a model fitting exercise. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can offer some insight into the pore space geometrical arrangement, particularly if such techniques can be extended to the field scale. Here, we interpret static direct-current (DC) resistivity, complex resistivity (CR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) geophysical measurements in the characterization of mass transfer parameters. We use two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material shown to demonstrate solute mass transfer due to a significant intragranular porosity, along with glass beads as a control. We explore the relation between geophysical and DDMT parameters in conjunction with supporting material characterization methods. Our results reveal how these geophysical measurements can offer some insight into the pore structures controlling the observed anomalous transport behavior.

  17. High-throughput physical organic chemistry--Hammett parameter evaluation.

    PubMed

    Portal, Christophe F; Bradley, Mark

    2006-07-15

    High-throughput analysis techniques were developed to allow the rapid assessment of a range of Hammett parameters utilizing positive electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI+ -MS) as the sole quantitative tool, with the core of the approach being a so-called "analytical construct". Hammett substituent parameters were determined for a range of meta- and para-substituted anilines by high-throughput (HT) assessment of relative reaction rates for competitive amide bond formation reaction with up to five parameters determined in a single pot reaction. Sensitivity of the reaction to substituents' effects (materialized by Hammett's rho parameter) was determined in the first instance, with HT Hammett's sigma substituent parameter assessment then carried out successfully for over 30 anilines, with excellent correlation observed between the HT ESI+ -MS method of determination and literature values.

  18. Decimative Subspace-Based Parameter Estimation Techniques Applied to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    DESE : another decimative subspace-based parameter estimation algorithm, recently proposed as Decimative Spectral Estimation [3]. In what follows...Sponsoring/Monitoring Agency Name(s) and Address(es) US Army Research , Development & Standardization Group (UK) PSC 802 Box 15 FPO AE 09499-1500 Sponsor...1DXstackX∗stack. (12) C. DESE This algorithm was presented very recently [3]. Like HTLS, DESE also makes use of the SVD of a Hankel ma- trix and the

  19. Determination of Electron Spin Resonance Static and Dynamic Parameters by Automated Fitting of the Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chachaty, Claude; Soulié, Edgar J.

    1995-12-01

    When measurements on single crystals are not feasible, approximate values of the static spin Hamiltonian parameters are in many cases obtained from the ESR spectra of randomly oriented paramagnetic species. The accuracy of such determinations is considerably improved by optimizing these parameters by means of automated simulation programs resorting to the nonlinear least squares fit of experimental spectra. The principles of the simplex method of Nelder and Mead and of the method of Levenberg-Marquardt, generally used for that purpose, are reported. Examples are given of the applications of the latter, which has the advantage of converging rapidly, to S = 1/2 paramagnetic species in rigid matrices. Optimization procedures based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, are extended to the determination of dynamic parameters of nitroxide spin-probes, namely their tumbling correlation times in fluid and viscous isotropic media as well as in liquid crystalline phases or their exchange rates between inequivalent sites. Lastly, it is shown on the example of a nitroxide biradical, that similar methods can be applied to the study of the dynamics of multiple conformational changes in a paramagnetic flexible molecule.

  20. A Multi-Institutional Comparison of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Parameter Calculations.

    PubMed

    Ger, Rachel B; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Awan, Musaddiq J; Ding, Yao; Li, Kimberly; Fave, Xenia J; Beers, Andrew L; Driscoll, Brandon; Elhalawani, Hesham; Hormuth, David A; Houdt, Petra J van; He, Renjie; Zhou, Shouhao; Mathieu, Kelsey B; Li, Heng; Coolens, Catherine; Chung, Caroline; Bankson, James A; Huang, Wei; Wang, Jihong; Sandulache, Vlad C; Lai, Stephen Y; Howell, Rebecca M; Stafford, R Jason; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Heide, Uulke A van der; Frank, Steven J; Barboriak, Daniel P; Hazle, John D; Court, Laurence E; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Fuller, Clifton D

    2017-09-11

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) provides quantitative metrics (e.g. K(trans), ve) via pharmacokinetic models. We tested inter-algorithm variability in these quantitative metrics with 11 published DCE-MRI algorithms, all implementing Tofts-Kermode or extended Tofts pharmacokinetic models. Digital reference objects (DROs) with known K(trans) and ve values were used to assess performance at varying noise levels. Additionally, DCE-MRI data from 15 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients over 3 time-points during chemoradiotherapy were used to ascertain K(trans) and ve kinetic trends across algorithms. Algorithms performed well (less than 3% average error) when no noise was present in the DRO. With noise, 87% of K(trans) and 84% of ve algorithm-DRO combinations were generally in the correct order. Low Krippendorff's alpha values showed that algorithms could not consistently classify patients as above or below the median for a given algorithm at each time point or for differences in values between time points. A majority of the algorithms produced a significant Spearman correlation in ve of the primary gross tumor volume with time. Algorithmic differences in K(trans) and ve values over time indicate limitations in combining/comparing data from distinct DCE-MRI model implementations. Careful cross-algorithm quality-assurance must be utilized as DCE-MRI results may not be interpretable using differing software.

  1. Determination of GLUT1 Oligomerization Parameters using Bioluminescent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Looyenga, Brendan; VanOpstall, Calvin; Lee, Zion; Bell, Jed; Lodge, Evans; Wrobel, Katherine; Arnoys, Eric; Louters, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The facilitated glucose transporter GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is an important mediator of glucose homeostasis in humans. Though it is found in most cell types to some extent, the level of GLUT1 expression across different cell types can vary dramatically. Prior studies in erythrocytes—which express particularly high levels of GLUT1—have suggested that GLUT1 is able to form tetrameric complexes with enhanced transport activity. Whether dynamic aggregation of GLUT1 also occurs in cell types with more modest expression of GLUT1, however, is unclear. To address this question, we developed a genetically encoded bioluminescent Förster resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using the luminescent donor Nanoluciferase and fluorescent acceptor mCherry. By tethering these proteins to the N-terminus of GLUT1 and performing saturation BRET analysis, we were able to demonstrate the formation of multimeric complexes in live cells. Parallel use of flow cytometry and immunoblotting further enabled us to estimate the density of GLUT1 proteins required for spontaneous oligomerization. These data provide new insights into the physiological relevance of GLUT1 multimerization as well as a new variant of BRET assay that is useful for measuring the interactions among other cell membrane proteins in live cells. PMID:27357903

  2. Determination of GLUT1 Oligomerization Parameters using Bioluminescent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Looyenga, Brendan; VanOpstall, Calvin; Lee, Zion; Bell, Jed; Lodge, Evans; Wrobel, Katherine; Arnoys, Eric; Louters, Larry

    2016-06-30

    The facilitated glucose transporter GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is an important mediator of glucose homeostasis in humans. Though it is found in most cell types to some extent, the level of GLUT1 expression across different cell types can vary dramatically. Prior studies in erythrocytes-which express particularly high levels of GLUT1-have suggested that GLUT1 is able to form tetrameric complexes with enhanced transport activity. Whether dynamic aggregation of GLUT1 also occurs in cell types with more modest expression of GLUT1, however, is unclear. To address this question, we developed a genetically encoded bioluminescent Förster resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using the luminescent donor Nanoluciferase and fluorescent acceptor mCherry. By tethering these proteins to the N-terminus of GLUT1 and performing saturation BRET analysis, we were able to demonstrate the formation of multimeric complexes in live cells. Parallel use of flow cytometry and immunoblotting further enabled us to estimate the density of GLUT1 proteins required for spontaneous oligomerization. These data provide new insights into the physiological relevance of GLUT1 multimerization as well as a new variant of BRET assay that is useful for measuring the interactions among other cell membrane proteins in live cells.

  3. Magnetic resonance for evaluation of neurologic disease in 12 horses.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Eric A; Gavin, Patrick R; Tucker, Russell L; Sellon, Debra C; Hines, Melissa T

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was used as a neurodiagnostic modality in the assessment of 12 horses with neurologic disease localized cranial to the foramen magnum. This retrospective study included a mixed population of horse breeds and consisted of three foals and nine adult horses. MR sequences of the head and central nervous system of each horse were acquired. Routine MR sequences included transverse T1 weighted (T1wt), T2 weighted (T2wt), and proton density images. Additional imaging sequences were obtained on a patient-dependent basis. Eight neurologic related diseases were diagnosed. MRI imaging of the horse head is a feasible and valuable neurodiagnostic modality in the assessment of equine neurologic diseases.

  4. Magnetic resonance evaluation of hydronephrosis in the dog

    SciTech Connect

    Thickman, D.; Kundel, H.; Biery, D.

    1984-07-01

    The ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to detect and distinguish various stages of obstruction in the canine kidney was investigated. MR images were obtained at acute, subacute, and chronic stages of experimentally produced hydronephrosis. The renal cortex was distinguished from the renal medulla in the normal dog and in the acute and subacute stages of hydronephrosis. T1 relaxation times of the renal cortex and medulla were measured in vitro in 14 normal and nine experimental animals. These values were used to compute the amount of tissue contrast between the cortex and medulla and were compared with the degree of corticomedullary differentiation seen in the image. A relationship was noted between increasing T1 values and increasing water content. Corticomedullary contrast decreased with obstruction. The variation in corticomedullary image contracts may be useful for assessing the duration of hydronephrosis.

  5. Evaluation of experiments for estimation of dynamical crop model parameters.

    PubMed

    Ioslovich, Ilya; Gutman, Per-Olof

    2007-07-01

    Planned experiments are usually expected to provide maximal benefits within limited costs. However, there are known difficulties in optimal design of experiments. They are related to the case when only limited number of parameters could be estimated, because available experiments are noninformative. The useful method for this case is considered based on the dominant parameters selection procedure (DPS). The methodology is illustrated here with data from five planned experiments related to the NICOLET lettuce growth model. The maximal number and the list of estimated parameters are determined while the conditional number of the information Fisher matrix (modified E-criterion) is kept below a given upper constraint.

  6. Evaluation of the storage function model parameter characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Hironobu; Kadoya, Mutsumi; Nagai, Akihiro; Lansey, Kevin

    1997-04-01

    The storage function hydrograph model is one of the most commonly used models for flood runoff analysis in Japan. This paper studies the generality of the approach and its application to Japanese basins. Through a comparison of the basic equations for the models, the storage function model parameters, K, P, and T1, are shown to be related to the terms, k and p, in the kinematic wave model. This analysis showed that P and p are identical and K and T1 can be related to k, the basin area and its land use. To apply the storage function model throughout Japan, regional parameter relationships for K and T1 were developed for different land-use conditions using data from 22 watersheds and 91 flood events. These relationships combine the kinematic wave parameters with general topographic information using Hack's Law. The sensitivity of the parameters and their physical significance are also described.

  7. Evaluation of Personnel Parameters in Software Cost Estimating Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    ACAP , 1.42; all other parameters would be set to the nominal value of one. The effort multiplier will be a fixed value if the model uses linear...data. The calculated multiplier values were the 45 Table 8. COSTAR Trials For Multiplier Calculation Run ACAP PCAP PCON APEX PLEX LTEX Effort...impact. Table 9. COCOMO II Personnel Parameters Effort Multipliers Driver Lowest Nominal Highest Analyst Capability ( ACAP ) 1.42 1.00 0.71

  8. Correlation among Magnetic Resonance Imaging Parameters of Brain in Preterm Neonates at Term Equivalent Age.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Umamaheswari; Amboiram, Prakash; Ninan, Binu; Chandrasekar, Anupama; Rangasami, Rajeswaran

    2017-01-01

    To assess the spectrum of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) abnormalities among preterm babies at term equivalent age using objective scoring and to study the association among MRI variables. Ninety-four preterm babies born at ≤32 wk of gestation and / or birth weight ≤ 1500 g at term equivalent age who underwent cranial MRI between April 2011 and August 2012 and the MRI interpreted by experienced radiologists were studied. In 2014, the MRI was retrospectively re-interpreted by the same radiologists using an objective scoring system described by Kidokoro. Spectrum of MRI abnormalities, their association with perinatal variables and correlation among white matter (WM), grey matter and cerebellar scores were analyzed. MRI abnormalities observed were WM signal abnormality (24 %), lateral ventricular dilatation (16 %), WM cystic abnormality (13 %), deep grey matter signal abnormality (9 %), cerebellar volume reduction (9 %) and deep grey matter volume reduction (8 %). Sepsis was significantly associated with occurrence of WM and cerebellar abnormalities (p < 0.05). WM scores did not show significant correlation with cortical grey matter and deep grey matter scores while cerebellar scores showed a weak positive correlation with WM (r = 0.33), cortical grey matter (r = 0.27) and deep grey matter scores (r = 0.22). MRI abnormalities are common in preterm infants, with 60 % showing some abnormality at term equivalent age. Among perinatal characteristics, sepsis was identified as risk factor for WM and cerebellar injury. Grey matter abnormality occurs independent of WM abnormality. Cerebellar abnormalities appear to coexist with either WM or grey matter changes.

  9. Interrogating the origin and behavior of magnetic resonance diffusion tensor scalar parameters in the myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Osama Mahmoud

    Myocardial microstructure plays an important role in sustaining the orchestrated beating motion of the heart. Several microstructural components, including myocytes and auxiliary cells, extracellular space, and blood vessels provide the infrastructure for normal heart function, including excitation propagation, myocyte contraction, delivery of oxygen and nutrients, and removing byproduct wastes. Cardiac diseases cause deleterious changes to some or all of these microstructural components in the detrimental process of cardiac remodeling. Since heart failure is among the leading causes of death in the world, new and novel tools to noninvasively characterize heart microstructure are needed for monitoring and staging of cardiac disease. In this regards, diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a promising framework to probe and quantify tissue microstructure without the need for exogenous contrast agent. As diffusion in 3-dimensional space is characterized by the diffusion tensor, MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is being used to noninvasively measure anisotropic diffusion, and thus the magnitude and spatial orientation of microstructural organization of tissues, including the heart. However, even though in vivo cardiac DTI has become more clinically available, to date the origin and behavior of different microstructural components on the measured DTI signal remain to be explicitly specified. The presented studies in this work demonstrate that DTI can be used as a noninvasive and contrast-free imaging modality to characterize myocyte size and density, extracellular collagen content, and the directional magnitude of blood flow. The identified applications are expected to provide metrics to enable physicians to detect, quantify, and stage different microstructural components during progression of cardiac disease.

  10. Electron-paramagnetic-resonance parameters of molybdenum(V) in sulphite oxidase from chicken liver.

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, M T; Gutteridge, S; Bary, R C

    1980-01-01

    A study has been made of e.p.r. signals due to Mo(V) in reduced sulphite oxidase (EC 1.8.3.1) from chicken liver. Reduction by SO3(2-), or photochemically in the presence of a deazaflavin derivative, produces spectra indistinguishable from one another. Three types of spectra from the enzyme were distingusihed and shown to correspond to single chemical species, since they could be simulated at both 9 and 35 GHz by using the same parameters. These were the low-pH form of the enzyme, with gav. 1.9805, the high-pH form, with gav. 1.9681 and a phosphate complex, with gav. 1.9741. The low-H form shows interaction with a single exchangeable proton, with A(1H)av. (hyperfine coupling constant) = 0.98 mT, probably in the form of an MoOH group. Parameters of the signals are compared with those for signals from xanthine oxidase and nitrate reductase. The signal from the phosphate complex of sulphite oxidase in unique among anion complexes of Mo-containing enzymes in showing no hyperfine coupling to protons. There is no evidence for additional weakly coupled protons or nitrogen nuclei in the sulphite oxidase signals. The possibility is considered that the enzymic mechanism involves abstraction of a proton and two electrons from HSO3- by a Mo = O group in the enzyme. PMID:6249254

  11. Evaluation of a microwave resonator for predicting grain moisture independent of bulk density

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This work evaluated the ability of a planar whispering mode resonator to predict moisture considering moisture and densities expected in an on-harvester application. A calibration model was developed to accurately predict moisture over the moisture, density and temperature ranges evaluated. This mod...

  12. Anomalous solute transport in saturated porous media: Relating transport model parameters to electrical and nuclear magnetic resonance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; France, Samantha; Osterman, Gordon; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Singha, Kamini

    2015-02-01

    The advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fails to describe commonly observed non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models such as the dual-domain mass-transfer (DDMT) model. DDMT model parameters are commonly calibrated via curve fitting, providing little insight into the relation between effective parameters and physical properties of the medium. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can provide insight into the geometry and connectedness of pore spaces related to transport model parameters. Here, we consider proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), direct-current (DC) resistivity, and complex conductivity (CC) measurements for this purpose, and assess these methods using glass beads as a control and two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material that demonstrates non-Fickian transport due to intragranular porosity. We estimate DDMT parameters via calibration of a transport model to column-scale solute tracer tests, and compare NMR, DC resistivity, CC results, which reveal that grain size alone does not control transport properties and measured geophysical parameters; rather, volume and arrangement of the pore space play important roles. NMR cannot provide estimates of more-mobile and less-mobile pore volumes in the absence of tracer tests because these estimates depend critically on the selection of a material-dependent and flow-dependent cutoff time. Increased electrical connectedness from DC resistivity measurements are associated with greater mobile pore space determined from transport model calibration. CC was hypothesized to be related to length scales of mass transfer, but the CC response is unrelated to DDMT.

  13. Two statistics for evaluating parameter identifiability and error reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, John; Hunt, Randall J.

    2009-01-01

    Two statistics are presented that can be used to rank input parameters utilized by a model in terms of their relative identifiability based on a given or possible future calibration dataset. Identifiability is defined here as the capability of model calibration to constrain parameters used by a model. Both statistics require that the sensitivity of each model parameter be calculated for each model output for which there are actual or presumed field measurements. Singular value decomposition (SVD) of the weighted sensitivity matrix is then undertaken to quantify the relation between the parameters and observations that, in turn, allows selection of calibration solution and null spaces spanned by unit orthogonal vectors. The first statistic presented, "parameter identifiability", is quantitatively defined as the direction cosine between a parameter and its projection onto the calibration solution space. This varies between zero and one, with zero indicating complete non-identifiability and one indicating complete identifiability. The second statistic, "relative error reduction", indicates the extent to which the calibration process reduces error in estimation of a parameter from its pre-calibration level where its value must be assigned purely on the basis of prior expert knowledge. This is more sophisticated than identifiability, in that it takes greater account of the noise associated with the calibration dataset. Like identifiability, it has a maximum value of one (which can only be achieved if there is no measurement noise). Conceptually it can fall to zero; and even below zero if a calibration problem is poorly posed. An example, based on a coupled groundwater/surface-water model, is included that demonstrates the utility of the statistics. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Evaluation of Multi-parameter Test Statistics for Multiple Imputation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Enders, Craig K

    2017-01-01

    In Ordinary Least Square regression, researchers often are interested in knowing whether a set of parameters is different from zero. With complete data, this could be achieved using the gain in prediction test, hierarchical multiple regression, or an omnibus F test. However, in substantive research scenarios, missing data often exist. In the context of multiple imputation, one of the current state-of-art missing data strategies, there are several different analogous multi-parameter tests of the joint significance of a set of parameters, and these multi-parameter test statistics can be referenced to various distributions to make statistical inferences. However, little is known about the performance of these tests, and virtually no research study has compared the Type 1 error rates and statistical power of these tests in scenarios that are typical of behavioral science data (e.g., small to moderate samples, etc.). This paper uses Monte Carlo simulation techniques to examine the performance of these multi-parameter test statistics for multiple imputation under a variety of realistic conditions. We provide a number of practical recommendations for substantive researchers based on the simulation results, and illustrate the calculation of these test statistics with an empirical example.

  15. Experimental investigations of tuned liquid damper-structure interactions in resonance considering multiple parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashasi-Sorkhabi, Ali; Malekghasemi, Hadi; Ghaemmaghami, Amirreza; Mercan, Oya

    2017-02-01

    As structures are constructed more slender and taller, their vibrational response and its mitigation become challenging design considerations. Tuned liquid dampers (TLDs) are cost effective and low maintenance vibration absorbers that can be used to suppress structural vibrations. A TLD dissipates energy through liquid boundary layer friction, free surface contamination, and wave breaking. The dynamic characteristics of the TLD and its interaction with the structure is quite complex. In this paper, using a state-of-the-art experimental testing method, namely real-time hybrid simulation (RTHS), a comprehensive parametric study is conducted to investigate the effectiveness of TLDs. During RTHS the TLD response is obtained experimentally while the structure is modeled in a computer, thus capturing the TLD-structure interaction in real-time. By keeping the structure as the analytical model, RTHS offers a unique flexibility in which a wide range of influential parameters can be investigated without modifying the experimental setup. The parameters considered in this study with a wide range of variation include TLD/structure mass ratio, TLD/structure frequency ratio, and structural damping ratio. Additionally, the accuracy of FVM/FEM method that couples the finite volume and finite element approaches to model the liquid and solid domains to capture TLD- structure interaction is assessed experimentally. Results obtained in this study, will not only lead to a better understanding of TLDs and their interaction with the structures but also, contribute to the enhanced design of these devices which will in turn result in their wide-spread application.

  16. Active Plasma Resonance Spectroscopy: Evaluation of a fluiddynamic-model of the planar multipole resonance probe using functional analytic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, Michael; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Oberrath, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Measuring plasma parameters, e.g. electron density and electron temperature, is an important procedure to verify the stability and behavior of a plasma process. For this purpose the multipole resonance probe (MRP) represents a satisfying solution to measure the electron density. However the influence of the probe on the plasma through its physical presence makes it unattractive for some processes in industrial application. A solution to combine the benefits of the spherical MRP with the ability to integrate the probe into the plasma reactor is introduced by the planar model of the MRP. By coupling the model of the cold plasma with the maxwell equations for electrostatics an analytical model for the admittance of the plasma is derivated, adjusted to cylindrical geometry and solved analytically for the planar MRP using functional analytic methods.

  17. Effect of constructional parameters on the performance of a surface plasmon resonance sensor based on a multimode polymer optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Gasior, Katarzyna; Martynkien, Tadeusz; Urbanczyk, Waclaw

    2014-12-10

    We experimentally studied the influence of different constructional parameters on the performance of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors based on a commercially available polymer step-index multimode fiber. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we experimentally investigated the influence of polishing depth on the characteristics of SPR sensors based on a straight multimode fiber. We also examined the impact of sensing length on the spectral position and strength of the SPR in side-polished straight fibers. To clarify literature contradictions concerning the effect of fiber bending on SPR, we experimentally investigated the performance of U-bent SPR sensing probes based on multimode fibers. We have shown that the SPR can be significantly amplified by bending the polymer fiber with stripped cladding. We also demonstrated that the side-polishing of U-bent sensing probes has little impact on their performance.

  18. Approximating large resonance parameter covariance matrices with group-wise covariance matrices for advanced nuclear fuel cycle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Michael E; Leal, Luiz C; Wiarda, Dorothea; Arbanas, Goran

    2008-01-01

    The large size of resonance parameter covariance matrices (RPCM) in the actinide region often renders them impractical for dissemination via ENDF. Therefore, a method of approximating the RPCM by a much smaller group-wise covariance matrix (GWCM) is described, implemented, and examined. In this work, 233U RPCM is used to generate GWCM's for the 44 group AMPX, 100 group GE, 171 group VITAMIN-C, and 240 group CSWEG. Each of these GWCM's is then used to compute group-wise uncertainties for the groups of the remaining group structures. The group-wise uncertainties thus obtained are compared with those obtained from a full RPCM, i.e. without the approximation. A systematic comparison of group-wise uncertainties based on GWCM's vs. RPCM, for a variety of group structures, will shed light on the validity of this approximation and may suggest which group structure(s) yield a GWCM that could be used in lieu of the RPCM.

  19. The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectrum of the SiH radical and determination of ground state parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. M.; Curl, R. F.; Evenson, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectrum of the SiH radical in the v = O level of its X2Pi state has been recorded. The signals are rather weak. The molecules were generated in the reaction between fluorine atoms and SiH4. Rotational transitions have been detected in both 2Pi1/2 and 2Pi3/2 spin components but no fine structure transitions between the spin components were observed. Proton hyperfine splittings were resolved on some lines. The measurements have been analyzed, subjected to a least-squares fit using an effective Hamiltonian, and the appropriate molecular parameters determined. The weakness of the spectrum and the failure of attempts to power saturate favorable lines are both consistent with a small value for the electric dipole moment for SiH.

  20. Evaluation of performance parameters of indigenously developed roots pumping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqsood, M.; Usman, A.; Bodla, M. F.; Ali, J.

    2016-08-01

    Roots pumping systems are widely used in industries to generate vacuum with high pumping speed. In the present work, the performance parameters of indigenously developed Roots pumping system have been studied. The performance parameters being studied are the ultimate pressure, working temperature, compression ratio and pumping speed. Ultimate pressure of the Roots pump after continuous running of eight hours is found to be 1.1x10-3 mbar. The most important parameter of the roots pump is the zero-gas flow compression Ratio (Ko) which is found to be 18 for the pumping system under study. Efficiency of Roots pump is found to be 76% which is in good agreement as reported in the literature.

  1. CD performance evaluation according to advanced marking parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Suk-Ky; Kim, Seung-Yun; Yeon, Kyoeong-Mee; Lim, Chan; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Lee-Ju; Cho, Young-Rok; Kim, Hong-Seok

    2009-04-01

    There is no objection that Mean to Target (MTT) and Uniformity of CD (Critical Dimension) are the most important parameters to confirm the quality of mask. So process engineer try to improve these value and metrology engineer have been struggled to provide the accurate and repeatable CD information. One of method for this goal is auto-measurement with job from pattern design. Auto-measurement helps to remove error from human and improve reproducibility of CD. The recent tools are capable to interface with marking generation program so we can measure with auto-marked job without any manual measurement. However, the enhancement design rule of lithography requests the smaller CD size and more complicated pattern layout. These worst factors can be brought about inaccurate CD result due to wrong measurement job from auto-marking program. Therefore metrology engineer have to consider more optimized auto-measurement methodology as well as to use the most advanced measurement tool. In this paper, we are focused on the CD measurement methodology which is the optimized measurement condition according to pattern shape by using the advanced marking parameter when generate auto-measurement job. In order to find the best condition, we designed test patterns containing OPC (Optical Proximity Correction) and printed on the plate. And we made two types of auto-measurement jobs. One is applied with the advanced marking parameters and the other is applied with the normal marking parameters. We measured the plate with these two jobs for each test item on LWM9000. Finally, we compared results from advanced and normal parameter and calculate how much CD can be different for each test item. Through the test result, we can find the best measurement parameter for each kinds of pattern and get more accurate CD result.

  2. Using 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-operative evaluation of tongue carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moreno, K F; Cornelius, R S; Lucas, F V; Meinzen-Derr, J; Patil, Y J

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the role of 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in predicting tongue tumour thickness via direct and reconstructed measures, and their correlations with corresponding histological measures, nodal metastasis and extracapsular spread. A prospective study was conducted of 25 patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and pre-operative 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging from 2009 to 2012. Correlations between 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging and histological measures of tongue tumour thickness were assessed using the Pearson correlation coefficient: r values were 0.84 (p < 0.0001) and 0.81 (p < 0.0001) for direct and reconstructed measurements, respectively. For magnetic resonance imaging, direct measures of tumour thickness (mean ± standard deviation, 18.2 ± 7.3 mm) did not significantly differ from the reconstructed measures (mean ± standard deviation, 17.9 ± 7.2 mm; r = 0.879). Moreover, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging had 83 per cent sensitivity, 82 per cent specificity, 82 per cent accuracy and a 90 per cent negative predictive value for detecting cervical lymph node metastasis. In this cohort, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging measures of tumour thickness correlated highly with the corresponding histological measures. Further, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging was an effective method of detecting malignant adenopathy with extracapsular spread.

  3. Preliminary resolved resonance region evaluation of copper-63 from 0 to 300 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, V.; Forget, B.; Leal, L.; Guber, K.

    2012-07-01

    A new preliminary evaluation of Cu-63 was done in the energy region from 0 to 300 keV extending the resolved resonance region of the previous, ENDF/B-VII.0, evaluation three-fold. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) and one from the Massachusetts Inst. of Technology Nuclear Reactor (MITR). A total of 275 new resonances were identified and a corresponding set of external resonances was approximated to mock up the external levels. The negative external levels (bound level) were modified to match the thermal cross section values. A preliminary benchmarking calculation was made using 11 ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. (authors)

  4. Extraction of Resonance Parameters and Role of the Final State Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strakovsky, Igor I.; Briscoe, William J.; Kudryavtsev, Alexander E.; Tarasov, Vladimir E.

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the SAID group effort to analyze new γn → π-p cross sections vs. the world database to get new multipoles and determine neutron electromagnetic couplings. The differential cross section for the processes γn → π-p was extracted from new measurements at CLAS and MAMI-B accounting for Fermi motion effects in the impulse approximation (IA) as well as NN- and πN-FSI effects beyond the IA. We evaluated results of several pion photoproduction analyses and compared πN PWA results as a constraint for analyses of pion photoproduction data (Watson's theorem).

  5. Sexual dimorphism in tooth morphometrics: An evaluation of the parameters

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Abhishek; Kamath, Venkatesh V.; Satelur, Krishnanand; Rajkumar, Komali; Sundaram, Lavanya

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Sexual dimorphism refers to the variations in tooth size and shape between the sexes. The consistency of these variations is valuable in the identification of the sex of an individual in times of mass disaster when whole body parts get destroyed or are unavailable. There exist differences in the expression of these variables across races and regions. This study aims to tabulate and identify the variations in tooth measurements using standarized reference points in an attempt to establish parameters of sexual dimorphism. Materials and Methods: 100 individuals (50 of each sex) in the age group 19-23 years were assessed for standard morphometric parameters of the maxillary central incisor, canine, premolar and molar. Odontometric measurements of established parameters were recorded from impression casts of the maxillary jaws. The mesiodistal width (MDW), the bucco-ligual width (BLW), the crown length (CL) and the cervical angle (CA) were charted among the teeth. The consistency of the variations was statistically analyzed and a logistic regression table was prepared to identify the sex of the individual from the tooth measurements. Results and Conclusions: The BLW, MDW and CL reflected significant variations among all the teeth to be effective in establishing sexual dimorphism. CA as a parameter was inadequate across all the teeth. The permanent maxillary canine was the most important tooth to be reflective of the gender and statistically significant to be utilized for gender determination. PMID:27051219

  6. The Evaluation of the Parameters in the van Deemter Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Harvey W.

    1982-01-01

    Describes experiment expanding on principles behind measuring efficiency of chromatographic columns and allowing calculation of parameters in the van Deemter equation. Easily accomplished in a three-hour period using a gas chromatograph in which gas flow can be changed and measured. Mathematical solutions can be attained with programmable…

  7. Sexual dimorphism in tooth morphometrics: An evaluation of the parameters.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhishek; Kamath, Venkatesh V; Satelur, Krishnanand; Rajkumar, Komali; Sundaram, Lavanya

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism refers to the variations in tooth size and shape between the sexes. The consistency of these variations is valuable in the identification of the sex of an individual in times of mass disaster when whole body parts get destroyed or are unavailable. There exist differences in the expression of these variables across races and regions. This study aims to tabulate and identify the variations in tooth measurements using standarized reference points in an attempt to establish parameters of sexual dimorphism. 100 individuals (50 of each sex) in the age group 19-23 years were assessed for standard morphometric parameters of the maxillary central incisor, canine, premolar and molar. Odontometric measurements of established parameters were recorded from impression casts of the maxillary jaws. The mesiodistal width (MDW), the bucco-ligual width (BLW), the crown length (CL) and the cervical angle (CA) were charted among the teeth. The consistency of the variations was statistically analyzed and a logistic regression table was prepared to identify the sex of the individual from the tooth measurements. The BLW, MDW and CL reflected significant variations among all the teeth to be effective in establishing sexual dimorphism. CA as a parameter was inadequate across all the teeth. The permanent maxillary canine was the most important tooth to be reflective of the gender and statistically significant to be utilized for gender determination.

  8. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G∗ of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G∗ agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples.

  9. Effects of subcortical cerebrovascular lesions on cortical hemodynamic parameters assessed by perfusion magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nighoghossian, N; Berthezene, Y; Adeleine, P; Wiart, M; Damien, J; Derex, L; Itti, R; Froment, J C; Trouillas, P

    1999-01-01

    A simultaneous decrease of cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been described after subcortical stroke with positron emission tomography. However, this imaging modality cannot be applied routinely to stroke patients. Dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI techniques (DSC-MRI) might be interesting in the assessment of these effects. Dynamic T2-weighted echo planar imaging was used to produce DSC-MR images during an intravenous bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine in 9 patients who experienced a subcortical stroke involving thalamus or basal ganglia and in 8 control subjects. A series of 50 consecutive images at 1-second intervals was acquired at the anatomic level of the centrum semiovale quite distant from the subcortical lesion, rCBF and rCBV were determined over frontal and parietal regions of interest and through the entire cortical mantle. DSC-MRI enabled the detection of hemodynamic changes induced by subcortical stroke. Analysis of rCBV and rCBF values showed that the hemodynamic parameters were significantly decreased on the affected side. In controls mean rCBF and rCBV values recorded over the whole cortical mantle of each hemisphere showed no significant interhemispheric asymmetry.

  10. Evaluation of Voiding Parameters in Healthy Women Using Sound Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Marcel; Krhut, Jan; Hurtik, Petr; Burda, Michal; Zvarova, Katarina; Zvara, Peter

    2016-06-12

    Sonouroflowmetry represents a novel method for estimating urinary flow parameters. The aim of this study was to compare the urinary flow parameters acquired using sonouroflowmetry with those of standard uroflowmetry in healthy female volunteers. Thirty-six healthy female volunteers (aged 25-54 years) were subjected to standard uroflowmetry. Simultaneously, subjects dialed a dedicated number on a mobile phone and kept recording until urination was finished. Sound data were analyzed and compared to the uroflowmetry data. Of 218 recordings, 183 were included in the final analysis. Thirty-four measurements were excluded for voided volume <150 mL or technical problems during the recording. A linear model was fitted to calculate the urinary flow parameters and the voided volume from data obtained by sonouroflowmetry. Subsequently the matching datasets of UF and SUF were compared with respect to flow time, voided volume, maximum (Qmax ) and average (Qave ) flow rate. Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) was used to compare parameters recorded by uroflowmetry with those calculated based on sonouroflowmetry recordings. A strong correlation (PCC = 0.95) was noted between uroflowmetry recorded flow time and duration of the sonouroflowmetry sound signal. The voided volume measured by uroflowmetry showed a moderate correlation (PCC = 0.68) with the calculated area under the sonouroflowmetry curve. Qmax recorded using uroflowmetry and sonouroflowmetry recorded peak sound intensity showed a weak correlation (PCC = 0.38). This study validates the basic concept of using sound analysis to estimate urinary flow parameters and voided volume. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Association of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging parameters with histological findings from MRI/ultrasound fusion prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Dianat, Seyed Saeid; Carter, H Ballentine; Schaeffer, Edward M; Hamper, Ulrik M; Epstein, Jonathan I; Macura, Katarzyna J

    2015-10-01

    Purpose of this pilot study was to correlate quantitative parameters derived from the multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) of the prostate with results from MRI guided transrectal ultrasound (MRI/TRUS) fusion prostate biopsy in men with suspected prostate cancer. Thirty-nine consecutive patients who had 3.0T MP-MRI and subsequent MRI/TRUS fusion prostate biopsy were included and 73 MRI-identified targets were sampled by 177 cores. The pre-biopsy MP-MRI consisted of T2-weighted, diffusion weighted (DWI), and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) images. The association of quantitative MRI measurements with biopsy histopathology findings was assessed by Mann-Whitney U- test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Of 73 targets, biopsy showed benign prostate tissue in 46 (63%), cancer in 23 (31.5%), and atypia/high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in four (5.5%) targets. The median volume of cancer-positive targets was 1.3 cm3. The cancer-positive targets were located in the peripheral zone (56.5%), transition zone (39.1%), and seminal vesicle (4.3%). Nine of 23 (39.1%) cancer-positive targets were higher grade cancer (Gleason grade > 6). Higher grade targets and cancer-positive targets compared to benign lesions exhibited lower mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value (952.7 < 1167.9 < 1278.9), and lower minimal extracellular volume fraction (ECF) (0.13 < 0.185 < 0.213), respectively. The difference in parameters was more pronounced between higher grade cancer and benign lesions. Our findings from a pilot study indicate that quantitative MRI parameters can predict malignant histology on MRI/TRUS fusion prostate biopsy, which is a valuable technique to ensure adequate sampling of MRI-visible suspicious lesions under TRUS guidance and may impact patient management. The DWI-based quantitative measurement exhibits a stronger association with biopsy findings than the other MRI parameters.

  12. Evaluation of magnetic resonance safety of veterinary radiofrequency identification devices at 1 T.

    PubMed

    Baker, Martin A; MacDonald, Iain

    2011-01-01

    Implants containing metallic components have the potential to become heated or move within the patient while in the magnetic resonance (MR) environment. Despite containing a ferromagnetic core and having been in use for over 20 years, no information is available on the safety of veterinary radiofrequency identification devices during MR examinations. These devices are the most commonly encountered metallic implants in dogs and cats undergoing MR imaging. Three commercial veterinary microchips were evaluated for safety in the MR environment at 1 T. Parameters tested were translational force, torque, heating, artifact production, and function. Translation and torque were larger than that expected from normal activity under normal gravity. No significant heating was observed. Signal void artifacts may affect diagnosis if they are too close to the area of clinical importance. Microchip function was unaffected by routine clinical MR imaging. Capsule formation around devices is a major factor in counteracting translation and torque. Our findings support that is acceptable for patients to undergo MR imaging with this 1 T system following an interval of 3 months postimplantation to allow capsule growth. Because of the complex interactions involved, these observations may not be translatable to MR scanners of different field strength and/or manufacturer. Further safety testing of these and other radiofrequency identification devices is therefore recommended at different field strengths and equipment specifications.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance T 2 spectrum: multifractal characteristics and pore structure evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jian-Ping; He, Xu; Geng, Bin; Hu, Qin-Hong; Feng, Chun-Zhen; Kou, Xiao-Pan; Li, Xing-Wen

    2017-06-01

    Pore structure characteristics are important to oil and gas exploration in complex low-permeability reservoirs. Using multifractal theory and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), we studied the pore structure of low-permeability sandstone rocks from the 4th Member (ES4) of the Shahejie Formation in the south slope of the Dongying Sag. We used the existing pore structure data from petrophysics, core slices, and mercury injection tests to classify the pore structure into three categories and five subcategories. Then, the T 2 spectra of samples with different pore structures were interpolated, and the one- and three-dimensional fractal dimensions and the multifractal spectrum were obtained. Parameters α (intensity of singularity) and f (α) (density of distribution) were extracted from the multifractal spectra. The differences in the three fractal dimensions suggest that the pore structure types correlate with α and f (α). The results calculated based on the multifractal spectrum is consistent with that of the core slices and mercury injection. Finally, the proposed method was applied to an actual logging profile to evaluate the pore structure of low-permeability sandstone reservoirs.

  14. Development and validation of a questionnaire evaluating patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging: the Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ).

    PubMed

    Ahlander, Britt-Marie; Årestedt, Kristofer; Engvall, Jan; Maret, Eva; Ericsson, Elisabeth

    2016-06-01

    To develop and validate a new instrument measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations, Magnetic Resonance Imaging- Anxiety Questionnaire. Questionnaires measuring patients' anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations have been the same as used in a wide range of conditions. To learn about patients' experience during examination and to evaluate interventions, a specific questionnaire measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging is needed. Psychometric cross-sectional study with test-retest design. A new questionnaire, Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire, was designed from patient expressions of anxiety in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-scanners. The sample was recruited between October 2012-October 2014. Factor structure was evaluated with exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha. Criterion-related validity, known-group validity and test-retest was calculated. Patients referred for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of either the spine or the heart, were invited to participate. The development and validation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire resulted in 15 items consisting of two factors. Cronbach's alpha was found to be high. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire correlated higher with instruments measuring anxiety than with depression scales. Known-group validity demonstrated a higher level of anxiety for patients undergoing Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan of the heart than for those examining the spine. Test-retest reliability demonstrated acceptable level for the scale. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Anxiety Questionnaire bridges a gap among existing questionnaires, making it a simple and useful tool for measuring patient anxiety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging examinations. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Relativistic theory of nuclear magnetic resonance parameters in a Gaussian basis representation

    SciTech Connect

    Kutzelnigg, Werner; Liu Wenjian

    2009-07-28

    The calculation of NMR parameters from relativistic quantum theory in a Gaussian basis expansion requires some care. While in the absence of a magnetic field the expansion in a kinetically balanced basis converges for the wave function in the mean and for the energy with any desired accuracy, this is not necessarily the case for magnetic properties. The results for the magnetizability or the nuclear magnetic shielding are not even correct in the nonrelativistic limit (nrl) if one expands the original Dirac equation in a kinetically balanced Gaussian basis. This defect disappears if one starts from the unitary transformed Dirac equation as suggested by Kutzelnigg [Phys. Rev. A 67, 032109 (2003)]. However, a new difficulty can arise instead if one applies the transformation in the presence of the magnetic field of a point nucleus. If one decomposes certain contributions, the individual terms may diverge, although their sum is regular. A controlled cancellation may become difficult and numerical instabilities can arise. Various ways exist to avoid these singularities and at the same time get the correct nrl. There are essentially three approaches intermediate between the transformed and the untransformed formulation, namely, the bispinor decomposition, the decomposition of the lower component, and the hybrid unitary transformation partially at operator and partially at matrix level. All three possibilities were first considered by Xiao et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 214101 (2007)] in a different context and in a different nomenclature. Their analysis and classification in a more general context are given here for the first time. Use of an extended balanced basis has no advantages and has other drawbacks and is not competitive, while the use of a restricted magnetic balance basis can be justified.

  16. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G(∗) of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G(∗) agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Subsecond magnetic resonance angiography and the evaluation of abnormal arteriovasuclar communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachariah, Anish B.; Pereles, F. S.; Kaliney, Ryan; Carr, James C.; Collins, Jeremy D.; Wood, Cecil; Finn, John P.

    2003-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography is becoming widely accepted in the diagnosis of vascular diseases. When used for evaluation of arterial stenoses, aneurysm, thrombosis, or occlusion, MR angiography is a robust and accurate technique. Traditional techniques for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) offer the benefit of high spatial resolution in characterizing vascular malformations, but have lacked the temporal resolution to describe dynamic flow events. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the potential role of a novel technique, sub-second MRA, in the evaluation of abdominal arteriovenous malformation.

  18. Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of BVA Resonators under Static and Dynamic Conditions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    AO-AI05 064 FREQUENCY AND TIME SYSTEMS INC BEVERLY MA F/S 9/1. EVALUATION OF THE PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF BVA RESONATORS--ETC(UI AUG 81 D A...HARACTERISTICS OF BVA ESONATORS UNDER STATIC AND YNAMIC CONDITIONS ecuency and Time Systems, Inc. DTIC ELECTE DonaW A. Emmons C APIROVED FOR PUlIC RELEASE... Time Systems, Inc. (FTS) relatinq to a novel quartz frequency control element, the BVA resonator. The pur- pose of the study has been to evaluate the

  19. Experimental evaluation of a modal parameter based system identification procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Minli; Feng, Ningsheng; Hahn, Eric J.

    2016-02-01

    Correct modelling of the foundation of a rotor bearing foundation system (RBFS) is an invaluable asset for the balancing and efficient running of turbomachinery. Numerical experiments have shown that a modal parameter based identification approach could be feasible for this purpose but there is a lack of experimental verification of the suitability of such a modal approach for even the simplest systems. In this paper the approach is tested on a simple experimental rig comprising a clamped horizontal bar with lumped masses. It is shown that apart from damping, the proposed approach can identify reasonably accurately the relevant modal parameters of the rig; and that the resulting equivalent system can predict reasonably well the frequency response of the rig. Hence, the proposed approach shows promise but further testing is required, since application to identifying the foundation of an RBFS involves the additional problem of accurately obtaining the force excitation from motion measurements.

  20. The evaluation of radiation damage parameter for CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    There are a few different phenomenological approaches that aim to track the dependence of signal height in irradiated solid state detectors on the fluence of damaging particles. However, none of them are capable to provide a unique radiation hardness parameter that would reflect solely the material capability to withstand high radiation environment. To extract such a parameter for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, two different diamond detectors were irradiated with proton beams in MeV energy range and subjected afterwards to ion beam induced charge (IBIC) analysis. The change in charge collection efficiency (CCE) due to defects produced was investigated in context of a theoretical model that was developed on the basis of the adjoint method for linearization of the continuity equations of electrons and holes. Detailed modeling of measured data resulted with the first known value of the kσ product for diamond, where k represents the number of charge carriers' traps created per one simulated primary lattice vacancy and σ represents the charge carriers' capture cross section. As discussed in the text, this product could be considered as a true radiation damage parameter.

  1. Thoughts on standardization of parameters for image evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingsley, F. C.

    1976-01-01

    Images received for image processing and analysis are obtained from a wide variety of sources and with a wide variety of sensors. Because it is desirable to have image processing algorithms be as universally applicable as possible, they should be designed, where possible, to be insensitive to the parametric variations of the source material. Where this is not possible, these variations must be taken into account. Therefore, it is necessary to consider what parameters may be defined in common across a suite of image types. Objective parameters or measurements of images which, in the proper combinations, may serve as surrogates for real images may be pixel-specific, location dependent, or combinations thereof. Parameters which have proven useful in defining the characteristics of images include the gray scale linearity, granularity of the quantization, spectral content, geometrical fidelity, resolution of the system expressed as either the point spread function or the modulation transfer function, and the spatial frequency content and characteristics of the data itself.

  2. Thoughts on standardization of parameters for image evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingsley, F. C.

    1976-01-01

    Images received for image processing and analysis are obtained from a wide variety of sources and with a wide variety of sensors. Because it is desirable to have image processing algorithms be as universally applicable as possible, they should be designed, where possible, to be insensitive to the parametric variations of the source material. Where this is not possible, these variations must be taken into account. Therefore, it is necessary to consider what parameters may be defined in common across a suite of image types. Objective parameters or measurements of images which, in the proper combinations, may serve as surrogates for real images may be pixel-specific, location dependent, or combinations thereof. Parameters which have proven useful in defining the characteristics of images include the gray scale linearity, granularity of the quantization, spectral content, geometrical fidelity, resolution of the system expressed as either the point spread function or the modulation transfer function, and the spatial frequency content and characteristics of the data itself.

  3. Impact of measurement parameters on apparent diffusion coefficient quantification in diffusion-weighted-magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Holger; Gatidis, Sergios; Schwenzer, Nina F; Martirosian, Petros

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this work was to systematically evaluate the reproducibility of diffusion-weighted imaging and the impact of b values used for apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) calculation as well as the echo time (TE) on the resulting ADC in phantom studies. We attempted to find a minimum upper b value needed for reliable ADC measurements. In addition, we were able to investigate these impacts not only for different diffusivities but also for different T2 relaxation times. The influence of different b values on ADC calculations for different organs was also assessed in a volunteer study. Diffusion-weighted imaging of a phantom consisting of 16 compartments with combinations of 4 different diffusivities and 4 different T2 relaxation times was conducted 5 times using 11 b values (0-1000 s/mm) and 5 different TEs. Apparent diffusion coefficient was calculated from the 16 compartment regions of interest using 42 different combinations of b values. Reproducibility of ADC was assessed from the coefficient of variation of the 5 measurements. The ADC stability was determined from a voxel-based coefficient of variation (CVsta) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to find the minimum upper b values for a reliable ADC quantification. The influence of TE on ADC quantification was assessed for 9 different b value combinations. The influence of 9 different b value combinations on ADC was evaluated by a region of interest analysis of 7 organs in 12 volunteers. The found coefficient of variation was between 10.2% and 1.4%, decreasing with increasing upper b value and increasing diffusivities. Accordingly, CVsta and SNR showed the same trend. Using an upper b value of 600 s/mm gives already reliable ADC results showing a maximum CVsta of 7.5%, whereas an upper b value of 1000 s/mm revealed a maximum CVsta of 5.5%. Values of ADC reduced with increasing upper b value in phantom as well as in human data. Apparent diffusion coefficient also reduced with increasing TE and tended to

  4. Analysis of Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Biomechanical Parameters on Human Discs with Different Grades of Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, John; Epure, Laura M.; Michalek, Arthur J.; Grant, Michael P.; Iatridis, James C.; Mwale, Fackson

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To establish relationships between quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) and biomechanical parameters to help inform and interpret alterations of human intervertebral discs (IVD) with different grades of degeneration. Materials and Methods The properties of the nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) tissues of each IVD of 10 lumbar spines (range 32–77 years) were analyzed by qMRI (relaxation times T1 and T2, magnetization transfer ratio MTR and apparent diffusion coefficient ADC), and tested in confined compression and dynamic shear. Results T1 and T2 significantly decreased in both the NP and AF with increasing degeneration grades while the MTR increased significantly with grade 4. In contrast with the others qMRI parameters, the ADC had a tendency to decrease with increasing grade. Disc degeneration caused a decrease in the aggregate modulus, hydraulic permeability and shear modulus magnitude along with an increase in phase angle in the AF. On the other hand, disc degeneration of NPs decreased the shear modulus and the phase angle. Conclusion Our studies indicate that qMRI can be used as a non-invasive diagnostic tool in the detection of IVDs properties with potential to help interpret and to detect early, middle and late stages of degeneration. QMRI of the human IVD can therefore become a very important diagnostic assessment tool in determining the functional state of the disc. PMID:23633131

  5. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, Brett H.

    2011-09-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of 235U/238U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

  6. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Value Is Not Dependent on Magnetic Resonance Systems and Field Strength Under Fixed Imaging Parameters in Brain.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Akio; Tamura, Takayuki; Ozaki, Masanori; Doi, Tsukasa; Fujimoto, Koji; Miyati, Tosiaki; Ito, Yukiko; Maeda, Fumie; Tarewaki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the causes of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement errors and to determine the optimal scanning parameters that are independent of the field strength and vendors of the magnetic resonance (MR) system. Brain MR images of 10 healthy volunteers were scanned using 6 MR scanners of different field strengths and vendors in 2 different institutions. Ethical review board approvals were obtained for this study, and all volunteers gave their informed consents. Coefficient of variation (CV) of ADC values were compared for their differences in various MR scanners and in the scanned subjects. The CV of ADC values for 6 different scanners of 6 brains was 3.32%. The CV for repeated measurements in 1 day (10 scans per day) and in 10 days (scan per day for 10 days) for 1 subject was 1.72% and 2.96%, respectively (n = 5, P < 0.001). The CV of measurements for 10 healthy subjects was 5.22%. The measurement errors of the ADC values for 6 different MR units in 1 subject were higher than the intrascanner variance for the same subject but were lower than the intersubject variance for the same scanner. The variance in the ADC values for different MR scanners is reasonably small if appropriate scanning parameters (repetition time, >3000 ms; echo time, minimum; and high enough signal-to-noise ratio of high-b diffusion-weighted image) are used.

  7. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of pediatric spinal anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Dhingani, Dhaval Durlabhbhai; Boruah, Deb Kumar; Dutta, Hemonta Kumar; Gogoi, Rudra Kanta

    2016-01-01

    Context: Spinal dysraphisms are congenital abnormalities of the spine due to imperfect fusion of midline mesenchymal, bony and neural structures. Imaging plays a vital role in their evaluation as significant portion of patients may present with concurrent anomalies that need to be corrected simultaneously to avoid repeat surgeries. Aims: The aims of the study were to evaluate Spinal dysraphisms using USG and MRI and to correlate imaging findings with operative findings in patients undergoing surgery. Settings and Design: Hospital based observational study conducted over a period of year. Materials and Methods: 38 cases of both sexes and below 12 years of age with spinal dysraphism were studied. USG was performed in 29 cases where acoustic window was available for proper evaluation. MRI was performed in all cases. USG findings were compared with MRI findings and operative follow up was taken in 23 cases who underwent operative management. Statistical Analysis Used: Results were analysed using percentage and arithmetic mean. Results: 39.47 % cases were male and 60.53 % cases were female. Neonatal period was the most common presenting age group. Closed spinal dysraphism (63.16%) was more common than open (36.84%). 79.31% cases showed full agreement between spinal USG and MRI examinations and 6 out of 20.69% showed partial agreement. On operative correlation, USG findings were confirmatory in 91.30% cases and MRI findings were confirmatory in 100% cases. Conclusions: USG can be used as the initial modality for evaluation of spinal dysraphism as well as for screening of suspected cases. MRI is indicated to confirm abnormal USG findings, which shows all concurrent abnormalities and also provides additional anatomical details relevant to surgical planning. PMID:27857788

  8. [Comparison of various parameters for determining an index of myocardial perfusion reserve in detecting coronary stenosis with cardiovascular magnetic resonance tomography].

    PubMed

    al-Saadi, N; Gross, M; Bornstedt, A; Schnackenburg, B; Klein, C; Fleck, E; Nagel, E

    2001-11-01

    For the assessment of myocardial perfusion with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, different semiquantitative parameters of the first pass signal intensity time curves can be calculated and myocardial perfusion reserve indices can be determined. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of different perfusion parameters and their perfusion reserve indices for the detection of significant coronary artery stenosis. The signal intensity time curves of the first pass of a gadolinium-DTPA bolus injected via a central vein catheter before and after dipyridamole infusion were investigated in 15 patients with single vessel (stenosis > or = 75% area reduction) and five patients without significant coronary artery disease. For the distinction of ischemic and nonischemic myocardial segments, semiquantitative parameters, such as maximal signal intensity, contrast appearance time, time to maximal signal intensity and the steepness of the signal intensity curve's upslope determined by a linear fit, were assessed after correction for the input function. For each parameter a myocardial perfusion reserve index was calculated and cut off values for the detection of significant coronary stenosis were defined. The diagnostic accuracy of each parameter was then examined prospectively in 36 patients with coronary artery disease and compared with coronary angiography. Where as a distinction of ischemic and normal myocardium was possible with myocardial perfusion reserve indices, semiquantitative parameters at rest or after vasodilation alone did not allow such a distinction. The perfusion reserve index calculated from the upslope showed the most significant difference between ischemic and nonischemic myocardial segments (1.19 +/- 0.4 and 2.38 +/- 0.45, p < 0.001) followed by maximum signal intensity, time to maximum signal intensity and contrast apperance time. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy was 87, 82 and 85% for the detection of hypoperfusion induced by significant

  9. Optimization of Regularization Parameters in Compressed Sensing of Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Can Statistical Image Metrics Mimic Radiologists' Perception?

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Thai; Fujimoto, Koji; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Okada, Tomohisa; Fushumi, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    In Compressed Sensing (CS) of MRI, optimization of the regularization parameters is not a trivial task. We aimed to establish a method that could determine the optimal weights for regularization parameters in CS of time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) by comparing various image metrics with radiologists’ visual evaluation. TOF-MRA of a healthy volunteer was scanned using a 3T-MR system. Images were reconstructed by CS from retrospectively under-sampled data by varying the weights for the L1 norm of wavelet coefficients and that of total variation. The reconstructed images were evaluated both quantitatively by statistical image metrics including structural similarity (SSIM), scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and qualitatively by radiologists’ scoring. The results of quantitative metrics and qualitative scorings were compared. SSIM and SIFT in conjunction with brain masks and CNR of artery-to-parenchyma correlated very well with radiologists’ visual evaluation. By carefully selecting a region to measure, we have shown that statistical image metrics can reflect radiologists’ visual evaluation, thus enabling an appropriate optimization of regularization parameters for CS. PMID:26744843

  10. Evaluation of the keyhole technique applied to the proton resonance frequency method for magnetic resonance temperature imaging.

    PubMed

    Han, YongHee; Mun, ChiWoong

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the temporal and spatial resolution of magnetic resonance (MR) temperature imaging when using the proton resonance frequency (PRF) method combined with the keyhole technique. Tissue-mimicking phantom and swine muscle tissue were microwave-heated by a coaxial slot antenna. For the sake of MR hardware safety, MR images were sequentially acquired after heating the subjects using a spoiled gradient (SPGR) pulse sequence. Reference raw (k-space) data were collected before heating the subjects. Keyhole temperature images were reconstructed from full k-space data synthesized by combining the peripheral phase-encoding part of the reference raw data and the center phase-encoding keyhole part of the time sequential raw data. Each keyhole image was analyzed with thermal error, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was compared with the self-reference (nonkeyhole) images according to the number of keyhole phase-encoding (keyhole-data size) portions. In applied keyhole temperature images, smaller keyhole-data sizes led to more temperature error increases, but the SNR did not decreased comparably. Additionally, keyhole images with a keyhole-data size of <16 had significantly different temperatures compared with fully phase-encoded self-reference images (P < 0.05). The keyhole technique combined with the PRF method improves temporal resolution and SNR in the measurement of the temperature in the deeper parts of body in real time. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Evaluation of the Physicochemical Parameters of Functional Whey Beverages

    PubMed Central

    Liutkevičius, Algirdas; Sekmokienė, Dalia; Zaborskienė, Gintarė; Šlapkauskaitė, Jūratė

    2015-01-01

    Summary The objective of this study is to determine the impact of the key technological parameters on the quality indices of functional beverages produced from whey and enriched with 0.2% of cold-pressed flaxseed oil, rich in ω-3 fatty acids. The amount of fatty acids, peroxide and anisidine values, fatty acidity, sedimentation and sensory parameters of whey beverages were estimated. It was found that the addition of flaxseed oil affected the sensory, physical and chemical properties of the beverages. High quantities of oleic and α-linolenic fatty acids (18.97 and 54.82%, respectively) and negligible amounts of palmitic and myristic acids (4.79 and 0.04%, respectively) were found in the product. On the basis of the obtained results, the beverages from whey enriched with flaxseed oil had a favourable ratio of n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and atherogenic and thrombogenic indices. The addition of a stabiliser and the pasteurisation of whey beverages with flaxseed oil did not affect the sensory parameters and the acidity of the products. The highest peroxide value (2.36 meq O2/kg) and acidity (0.34%) were found in the samples with pH=4.0 after 30-day storage at (6±1) °С. A strong negative correlation was estimated between the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids and anisidine value (R=–0.871; p<0.05), peroxide value (R=–0.728; p<0.05) and fatty acidity (R=–0.948; p<0.05). PMID:27904340

  12. Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and Local Tumor Control in Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes Lang, Stefan; Kirisits, Christian; Fidarova, Elena F.; Berger, Daniel; Georg, Petra; Doerr, Wolfgang; Poetter, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the value of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for predicting local control in magnetic resonance (MR) image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Our study population consists of 141 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB-IVA) treated with 45-50 Gy external beam radiotherapy plus four times 7 Gy IGBT with or without cisplatin. Gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IRCTV) were contoured, and DVH parameters (minimum dose delivered to 90% of the volume of interest [D90] and D100) were assessed. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) by applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy). Groups were defined for patients with or without local recurrence (LR) in the true pelvis for tumor size at diagnosis (GTV at diagnosis [GTVD] of 2-5 cm (Group 1) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2) and for tumor size response at IGBT (HRCTV) of 2-5 cm (Group 2a) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2b). Results: Eighteen LRs were observed. The most important DVH parameters correlated with LR were the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Mean D90 and D100 values for HRCTV were 86 {+-} 16 and 65 {+-} 10 Gy, respectively. The D90 for HRCTV greater than 87 Gy resulted in an LR incidence of 4% (3 of 68) compared with 20% (15 of 73) for D90 less than 87 Gy. The effect was most pronounced in the tumor group (Group 2b). Conclusions: We showed an increase in local control in IGBT in patients with cervical cancer with the dose delivered, which can be expressed by the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Local control rates greater than 95% can be achieved if the D90 (EQD2) for HRCTV is 87 Gy or greater.

  13. Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

  14. Evaluation of anterior segment parameters during and after pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ataş, Mustafa; Duru, Necati; Ulusoy, Döndü Melek; Altınkaynak, Hasan; Duru, Zeynep; Açmaz, Gökhan; Ataş, Fatma Kaya; Zararsız, Gökmen

    2014-12-01

    To compare the anterior segment parameters during pregnancy and post-pregnancy. Fifty-four healthy pregnant women in their third trimester with ages ranging from 18 to 38 years were included in the study. All of the patients underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic examinations, including refraction, anterior segment, and fundus examinations, intraocular pressure, and axial length measurements. In addition, anterior chamber angle, anterior chamber depth, anterior chamber volume, corneal volume, central corneal thickness, and keratometry values were measured by Pentacam Scheimpflug camera. All measurements were measured again 3 months after delivery. The mean intraocular pressure, anterior chamber angle, anterior chamber depth, anterior chamber volume, corneal volume, central corneal thickness, and keratometry measurements were significantly different during pregnancy and post-pregnancy (p<0.05 for all); however, the mean spherical refraction, cylindrical refraction, and axial length were not statistically significantly different during pregnancy and post-pregnancy (p>0.05 for all). We found that there is an increase in the anterior chamber parameters, corneal volume, corneal thickness, and corneal curvature and a decrease in intraocular pressure in the third trimester. Copyright © 2014 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of physical fitness parameters in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ozbulut, Omer; Genc, Abdurrahman; Bagcioglu, Erman; Coskun, Kerem Senol; Acar, Tolgahan; Alkoc, Ozan Alper; Karabacak, Hatice; Sener, Umit; Ucok, Kagan

    2013-12-30

    The aims of this study were to compare aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacities, pulmonary functions, body composition and fat distribution parameters in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls and to investigate the associations among these parameters. Sixty (30 male, 30 female) patients with schizophrenia and 60 (30 male, 30 female) healthy controls were included in the study. Maximal aerobic capacity was estimated with the Astrand submaximal exercise protocol, and anaerobic performance was determined with a Wingate test. Body composition was established with a bioelectrical impedance analyzer. Pulmonary function tests, skinfold thickness and body circumference measurements were also carried out. Maximal aerobic capacity, maximal anaerobic power, anaerobic capacity and pulmonary function tests (forced vital capacity and maximal voluntary ventilation) were found to be lower in male and female schizophrenic groups as compared to the controls. Body fat percentage, waist and abdomen circumferences, and waist to hip ratio were found to be higher in female schizophrenic patients than in controls. We suggest that maximal aerobic capacity, maximal anaerobic power, and anaerobic capacity are poor in the schizophrenia patients as compared to healthy controls. Low cardiorespiratory fitness is related to reduced pulmonary function and impaired body composition in schizophrenia patients.

  16. Evaluation of Parameters for High Efficiency Transformation of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Suleyman; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Jacobs, Anna C.; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging, nosocomial pathogen that is poorly characterized due to a paucity of genetic tools and methods. While whole genome sequence data from several epidemic and environmental strains have recently become available, the functional characterization of genes is significantly lagging. Efficient transformation is one of the first steps to develop molecular tools that can be used to address these shortcomings. Here we report parameters allowing high efficiency transformation of A. baumannii. Using a multi-factorial experimental design we found that growth phase, voltage, and resistance all significantly contribute to transformation efficiency. The highest efficiency (4.3 × 108 Transformants/μg DNA) was obtained at the stationary growth phase of the bacterium (OD 6.0) using 25 ng of plasmid DNA under 100 Ohms resistance and 1.7 kV/cm voltage. The optimized electroporation parameters reported here provide a useful tool for genetic manipulation of A. baumannii. PMID:26911658

  17. (239)Pu neutron resonance parameters revisited and covariance matrix in the neutron energy range from thermal to 2.5 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M

    2008-01-01

    To obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range up to 2.5 keV neutron energy and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the analysis code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The experimental data were renormalized, aligned on a common energy scale, and corrected for residual background. Average neutron transmission and cross sections calculated with the new resonance parameters were compared to the corresponding experimental data and to ENDF/B-VI.

  18. Evaluation of 3D multi-contrast joint intra- and extracranial vessel wall cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zechen; Li, Rui; Zhao, Xihai; He, Le; Wang, Xiaole; Wang, Jinnan; Balu, Niranjan; Yuan, Chun

    2015-05-27

    Multi-contrast vessel wall cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has demonstrated its capability for atherosclerotic plaque morphology measurement and component characterization in different vasculatures. However, limited coverage and partial volume effect with conventional two-dimensional (2D) techniques might cause lesion underestimation. The aim of this work is to evaluate the performance in a) blood suppression and b) vessel wall delineation of three-dimensional (3D) multi-contrast joint intra- and extracranial vessel wall imaging at 3T. Three multi-contrast 3D black blood (BB) sequences with T1, T2 and heavy T1 weighting and a custom designed 36-channel neurovascular coil covering the entire intra- and extracranial vasculature have been used and investigated in this study. Two healthy subjects were recruited for sequence parameter optimization and twenty-five patients were consecutively scanned for image quality and blood suppression assessment. Qualitative image scores of vessel wall delineation as well as quantitative Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR) were evaluated at five typical locations ranging from common carotid arteries to middle cerebral arteries. The 3D multi-contrast images acquired within 15mins allowed the vessel wall visualization with 0.8 mm isotropic spatial resolution covering intra- and extracranial segments. Quantitative wall and lumen SNR measurements for each sequence showed effective blood suppression at all selected locations (P < 0.0001). Although the wall-lumen CNR varied across measured locations, each sequence provided good or adequate image quality in both intra- and extracranial segments. The proposed 3D multi-contrast vessel wall technique provides isotropic resolution and time efficient solution for joint intra- and extracranial vessel wall CMR.

  19. Carotid Plaque Evaluation Using Gemstone Spectral Imaging: Comparison with Magnetic Resonance Angiography.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Yuki; Sakamoto, Makoto; Kuya, Keita; Kishimoto, Junichi; Yamashita, Eijiro; Fujii, Shinya; Kurosaki, Masamichi; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2017-07-01

    The present study compared the applicability of computed tomography carotid plaque imaging using effective Z maps with gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) to that of magnetic resonance plaque imaging using 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. Stenosis was assessed in 18 carotid arteries of 14 patients, and the effective Z values of noncalcified carotid plaques were compared with the signal intensities of magnetic resonance angiography. It was found that the effective Z value of noncalcified carotid plaques was significantly lower for a group with high signal intensity than for a group with low signal intensity on magnetic resonance angiography (P <.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of effective Z values was .975, and the presumed cutoff effective Z value required to discriminate low and high intensity plaques on magnetic resonance angiography was 7.83. The effective Z value generated by GSI is a useful parameter to detect vulnerable carotid plaque materials. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluating System Parameters on a Dragonfly using Simulation and Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatele, Abhinav; Jain, Nikhil; Livnat, Yarden; Pascucci, Valerio; Bremer, Peer-Timo

    2015-04-24

    The dragon y topology is becoming a popular choice for build- ing high-radix, low-diameter networks with high-bandwidth links. Even with a powerful network, preliminary experi- ments on Edison at NERSC have shown that for communica- tion heavy applications, job interference and thus presumably job placement remains an important factor. In this paper, we explore the e ects of job placement, job sizes, parallel workloads and network con gurations on network through- put to better understand inter-job interference. We use a simulation tool called Damsel y to model the network be- havior of Edison and study the impact of various system parameters on network throughput. Parallel workloads based on ve representative communication patters are used and the simulation studies on up to 131,072 cores are aided by a new visualization of the dragon y network.

  1. Evaluation parameters for the alkaline fuel cell oxygen electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, J.; Srinivasan, V.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were made of Pt- and Au-catalyzed porous electrodes, designed for the cathode of the alkaline H2/O2 fuel cell, employing cyclic voltammetry and the floating half-cell method. The purpose was to obtain parameters from the cyclic voltammograms which could predict performance in the fuel cell. It was found that a satisfactory relationship between these two types of measurement could not be established; however, useful observations were made of relative performance of several types of carbon used as supports for noble metal catalysts and of some Au catalysts. The best half-cell performance with H2/O2 in a 35 percent KOH electrolyte at 80 C was given by unsupported fine particle Au on Teflon; this electrode is used in the Orbiter fuel cell.

  2. Noninvasive amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating the grading and cellularity of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Lin, Yusong; Zhang, Wei; Kong, Lingfei; Wang, Lifu; Zuo, Panli; Vallines, Ignacio; Schmitt, Benjamin; Tian, Jie; Song, Xiaolei; Zhou, Jinyuan; Wang, Meiyun

    2017-01-24

    Using noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging techniques to accurately evaluate the grading and cellularity of gliomas is beneficial for improving the patient outcomes. Amide proton transfer imaging is a noninvasive molecular magnetic resonance imaging technique based on chemical exchange saturation transfer mechanism that detects endogenous mobile proteins and peptides in biological tissues. Between August 2012 and November 2015, a total number of 44 patients with pathologically proven gliomas were included in this study. We compared the capability of amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging with that of noninvasive diffusion-weighted imaging and noninvasive 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin imaging in evaluating the grading and cellularity of gliomas. Our results reveal that amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging is a superior imaging technique to diffusion-weighted imaging and 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin imaging in the grading of gliomas. In addition, our results showed that the Ki-67 index correlated better with the amide proton transfer-weighted signal intensity than with the apparent diffusion coefficient value or the cerebral blood flow value in the gliomas. Amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging is a promising method for predicting the grading and cellularity of gliomas.

  3. Noninvasive amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating the grading and cellularity of gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Kong, Lingfei; Wang, Lifu; Zuo, Panli; Vallines, Ignacio; Schmitt, Benjamin; Tian, Jie; Song, Xiaolei; Zhou, Jinyuan; Wang, Meiyun

    2017-01-01

    Using noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging techniques to accurately evaluate the grading and cellularity of gliomas is beneficial for improving the patient outcomes. Amide proton transfer imaging is a noninvasive molecular magnetic resonance imaging technique based on chemical exchange saturation transfer mechanism that detects endogenous mobile proteins and peptides in biological tissues. Between August 2012 and November 2015, a total number of 44 patients with pathologically proven gliomas were included in this study. We compared the capability of amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging with that of noninvasive diffusion-weighted imaging and noninvasive 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin imaging in evaluating the grading and cellularity of gliomas. Our results reveal that amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging is a superior imaging technique to diffusion-weighted imaging and 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin imaging in the grading of gliomas. In addition, our results showed that the Ki-67 index correlated better with the amide proton transfer-weighted signal intensity than with the apparent diffusion coefficient value or the cerebral blood flow value in the gliomas. Amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging is a promising method for predicting the grading and cellularity of gliomas. PMID:27992380

  4. The Evaluation of Empirical Resonance Energies as Reaction Enthalpies with Particular Reference to Benzene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Philip; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of experimental resonance energy, explaining how its magnitude depends upon choice of reference molecules from which bond energies are derived. Also explains how it can be evaluated more simply, without recourse to bond energies, as enthalpy change for a reaction predetermined by choice of reference molecules. (JN)

  5. The Evaluation of Empirical Resonance Energies as Reaction Enthalpies with Particular Reference to Benzene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Philip; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of experimental resonance energy, explaining how its magnitude depends upon choice of reference molecules from which bond energies are derived. Also explains how it can be evaluated more simply, without recourse to bond energies, as enthalpy change for a reaction predetermined by choice of reference molecules. (JN)

  6. Advanced techniques in magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the large endolymphatic duct and sac syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harnsberger, H R; Dahlen, R T; Shelton, C; Gray, S D; Parkin, J L

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to compare temporal bone computed tomography (CT) to high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using a novel thin-section fast spin echo (FSE) pulse sequence in identifying and characterizing patients with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome. Sixteen patients with sensorineural hearing loss and a CT diagnosis of large vestibular aqueduct(s) underwent high-resolution fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging with dual, 3-in phased array receiver coils centered over the external auditory canals. Magnetic resonance imaging parameters included axial and oblique sagittal fast spin echo with an effective slice thickness of 1 mm contiguous. Thirty-eight patients with 76 normal inner ears who underwent MR imaging using this technique had their endolymphatic duct measured. MR alone identified the enlarged endolymphatic sac seen along with the large endolymphatic duct in all cases. Three cases (five inner ears) with enlarged bony vestibular aqueducts on CT showed no evidence of endolymphatic duct or sac enlargement on MR. MR alone identified a single case of mild cochlear anomaly in conjunction with an enlarged endolymphatic duct and sac. In the normal population the size of the normal endolymphatic duct at its midpoint measured from 0.1 to 1.4 mm. Thin-section, high-resolution fast spin echo MR imaging of the inner ear may be superior to CT in the evaluation of patients with the large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

  7. Evaluation of the lateral pterygoid muscle using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    D'Ippolito, SM; Borri Wolosker, AM; D'Ippolito, G; Herbert de Souza, B; Fenyo-Pereira, M

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the visibility of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) images obtained by MRI, using different projections and to compare image findings with clinical symptoms of patients with and without temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Methods In this study, LPM images of 50 participants with and without TMDs were investigated by MRI. The images of the LPM in different projections of 100 TMJs from 35 participants (70 TMJs) with and 15 participants (30 TMJs) without clinical signs and symptoms of TMD were visible and analysed. Results The oblique sagittal and axial images of the TMJ clearly showed the LPM. Hypertrophy (1.45%), atrophy (2.85%) and contracture (2.85%) were the abnormalities found in the LPM. TMD signs, such as hypermobility (11.4%), hypomobility (12.9%) and disc displacement (20.0%), could be seen in TMJ images. Related clinical symptoms, such as pain (71.4%), articular sounds (30.4%), bruxism (25.7%) and headache (22.9%), were observed. Conclusions Patients with TMD can present with alterations in the LPM thickness. Patients without TMD also showed alterations, such as atrophy and contracture, in TMJ images. Recognition of alterations in the LPM will improve our understanding of clinical symptoms and pathophysiology of TMD, and may lead to a more specific diagnosis of these disorders. PMID:21062943

  8. Functional magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of lumbosacral radiculopathic pain.

    PubMed

    Koefman, Alex J; Licari, Melissa; Bynevelt, Michael; Lind, Christopher R P

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE An objective biomarker for pain is yet to be established. Functional MRI (fMRI) is a promising neuroimaging technique that may reveal an objective radiological biomarker. The purpose of this study was to evaluate fMRI technology in the setting of lumbosacral radiculopathy and discuss its application in revealing a biomarker for pain in the future. METHODS A prospective, within-participant control study was conducted. Twenty participants with painful lumbosacral radiculopathy from intervertebral disc pathology were recruited. Functional imaging of the brain was performed during a randomly generated series of nonprovocative and provocative straight leg raise maneuvers. RESULTS With a statistical threshold set at p < 0.000001, 3 areas showed significant blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal change: right superior frontal gyrus (x = 2, y = 13, z = 48, k = 29, Brodmann area 6 [BA6]), left supramarginal cortex (x = -37, y = -44, z = 33, k = 1084, BA40), and left parietal cortex (x = -19, y = -41, z = 63, k = 354, BA5). With a statistical threshold set at p < 0.0002, 2 structures showed significant BOLD signal change: right putamen (x = 29, y = -11, z = 6, k = 72) and bilateral thalami (right: x = 23, y = -11, z = 21, k = 29; x = 8, y = -11, z = 9, k = 274; and left: x = -28, y = -32, z = 6, k = 21). CONCLUSIONS The results in this study compare with those in previous studies and suggest that fMRI technology can provide an objective assessment of the pain experience.

  9. [Optimal imaging parameters and the advantage of cerebrospinal fluid flow image using time-spatial labeling inversion pulse at 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging: comparison of image quality for 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Masaya; Yahata, Seiji; Yoshida, Ayako; Takeyama, Mamoru; Eshima, Mitsuhiro; Shinohara, Maiko; Yamamoto, Takao; Abe, Kayoko

    2014-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) imaging by time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP) technique is labeled by CSF with a selective inversion recovery (IR) pulse as internal tracer, thus making it possible to visualize CSF dynamics non-invasively. The purpose of this study was to clarify labeled CSF signals during various black blood time to inversion (BBTI) values at 3 tesla (T) and 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to determine appropriate CSF imaging parameters at 3 T MRI in 10 healthy volunteers. To calculate optimal BBTI values, ROIs were set in untagged cerebral parenchyma and CSF on the image of the CSF flow from the aqueduct to the fourth ventricle in 1.5 T and 3 T MRI. Visual evaluation of CSF flow also was assessed with changes of matrix and echo time (TE) at 3 T MRI. The mean BBTI value at null point of untagged CSF in 3 T MRI was longer than that of 1.5 T. The MR conditions of the highest visual evaluation were FOV, 14 cm×14 cm; Matrix, 192×192; and TE, 117 ms. CSF imaging using Time-SLIP at 3 T MRI is expected visualization of CSF flow and clarification of CSF dynamics in more detail by setting the optimal conditions because 3 T MRI has the advantage of high contrast and high signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance nondestructive evaluation of composite materials. Final technical report, 19 September 1987-19 June 10, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, A.C.; Fry, C.G.

    1990-04-09

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was studied for use in the nondestructive evaluation of composite materials, with particular emphasis on NMR imaging. NMR parameters of potential use for generating images showing high contrast between acceptable and unacceptable regions of composites were measured for typical organic matrix materials. The attenuating effects of carbon fibers were measured and relationships were developed to compute the conditions necessary to obtain images of carbon-fiber composites. NMR images of aerospace composites containing poly(aryl-ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) and epoxy resins were obtained using solid state 13C techniques. The contrast mechanism used for these images was the composites. NMR images of hydrogen in PEEK were also obtained using multiple-pulse techniques to reduce dipolar broadening. Selective pulses were used to obtain images of the spatial variations in the crystalline content of PEEK. The results of these experiments were used to assess the feasibility of using NMR for nondestructive evaluation of composite materials.

  11. Doppler echocardiographic parameters of evaluation of left ventricular systolic function.

    PubMed

    Drăgulescu, S I; Roşu, D; Abazid, J; Ionac, A

    1993-01-01

    The authors suggest a new method using Doppler echocardiography for the evaluation of cardiac performance. Doppler echocardiography permits the calculation of left ventricular (LV) ejection force (according to Newton's second law of motion). The ejection force was calculated in 36 patients with heart failure subgrouped into 3 groups based on ejection fraction (EF) (> 60%; 41-60%; < 40%) compared to 11 normal subjects. The LV ejection force showed a good linear correlation with LV ejection fraction (r = 0.86). Data of the study suggest that the LV ejection force is a valuable and accurate index for the assessment of cardiac performance, especially in early stages of disease.

  12. Ultra-early Predictive Assay for Treatment Failure Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Clinical Prognostic Parameters in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Nina A.; Yuh, William T. C.; Jajoura, David; Wang, Jian Z.; Lo, Simon S.; Montebello, Joseph F.; Porter, Kyle; Zhang, Dongqing; McMeekin, D. Scott; Buatti, John M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND We prospectively evaluated MRI-parameters quantifying heterogeneous perfusion pattern and residual tumor volume early during treatment in cervical cancer, and compared their predictive power for primary tumor recurrence and cancer death with the standard clinical prognostic factors (CPFs). A novel approach of augmenting the predictive power of CPFs with MRI-parameters was assessed. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty-two cervical cancer patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI before and during early radiation/chemotherapy (2-2.5 weeks into treatment). Heterogeneous tumor perfusion was analyzed by signal intensity (SI) of each tumor voxel. Poorly-perfused tumor regions were quantitated as lower 10th percentile of SI (SI(10%)). DCE-MRI and three-dimensional (3D) tumor volumetry MRI-parameters were assessed as predictors of recurrence and cancer death (median follow-up, 4.1 years). Their discriminating capacity was compared with CPFs (stage, lymphnode status, histology) using sensitivity/specificity and Cox regression analysis. RESULTS SI(10%) and 3D-volume 2-2.5 weeks into therapy independently predicted recurrence (HR=2.6 [1.0-6.5], P=.04; HR=1.9 [1.1-3.5], P=.03, respectively) and death (HR=1.9 [1.0--3.5], P=.03; HR=1.9 [1.2-2.9], P=.01), and were superior to CPFs. The addition of MRI-parameters to CPFs increased sensitivity and specificity of CPFs from 71% and 51% to 100% and 71% for predicting recurrence; and from 79% and 54% to 93% and 60% for predicting death. CONCLUSIONS MRI-parameters reflecting heterogeneous tumor perfusion and subtle tumor volume change early during radiation/chemotherapy are independent and better predictors of tumor recurrence and death than CPFs. Combination of CPFs and MRI-parameters further improves early prediction of treatment failure and may enable a window of opportunity to alter treatment strategy. PMID:20052727

  13. Within and between session changes in subjective and neuroendocrine stress parameters during magnetic resonance imaging: A controlled scanner training study.

    PubMed

    Lueken, Ulrike; Muehlhan, Markus; Evens, Ricarda; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2012-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner can act as a stressor, eliciting subjective and neuroendocrine stress responses. Approaches to familiarize subjects with the scanner could help minimizing unintended effects on neural activation patterns of interest. Controlled studies on the effects of a scanner training are however missing. Using a comparative design, we analyzed within- and between session changes in subjective and neuroendocrine stress parameters in 63 healthy, scanner-naïve adults who participated in a two-day training protocol in an MRI, mock, or lab environment. A habituation task was used to assess within-session changes in subjective and neuroendocrine (cortisol) stress parameters; between-session changes were indicated by differences between days. MRI and mock, but not lab training were successful in reducing subjective distress towards the scanner. In contrast, cortisol reactivity towards the training environment generally increased during day 2, and the percentage of cortisol responders particularly rose in the mock and MRI groups. Within-session habituation of subjective arousal and anxiety was observed during both days and irrespective of training condition. Present findings demonstrate that training in a scanner environment successfully reduces subjective distress, but may also induce sensitization of endocrine stress levels during repeated scanning. Subjective distress can further be stabilized by acclimating subjects to the environment prior to the MRI assessment, including a short habituation phase into the assessment protocol. If replicated, present findings should be considered by researchers employing repeated measurement designs where subjects are exposed to a scanner more than once.

  14. Key Parameters Evaluation for Hip Prosthesis with Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongqiang; Li, Dichen; Lian, Qin; Li, Xiang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2007-09-01

    Stem length and cross section are two key parameters that influence the stability and longevity of metallic hip prosthesis in the total hip arthroplasty (THA). In order to assess their influence to the stress and fatigue behavior of hip prosthesis, a series model of hip prosthesis with round-shaped or drum-shaped cross section, and with different stem lengths were created. These models were analyzed under both static and dynamic loading conditions with finite element analysis, and dynamic loading represents normal walking was used in the dynamic analysis. The stress on the metallic stem, cement, and adjacent bone were got, micromotion on the cement-metal interface were got too. Safety factors for fatigue life of the hip prothesis were calculated based on data obtained from dynamic analysis. Static analysis shows that drum-shaped cross section can decrease the displacement of the stem, that stress on drum-shaped stem focus on the corner of the femoral neck and the distal part of hip prosthesis, whereas the stress on the round-shaped stem distributes evenly over most part of the stem, and maximum stress on stem prosthesis fluctuates with stem length bottoming out at stem length range from 80 mm to 110 mm, that drum-shaped stems with drum height 8 mm generate more stress at the distal part of stem than drum-shaped stems with drum height 10 mm and round stems do. Dynamic and fatigue analysis shows that drum-shaped stem with drum height 10 mm and stem length 90 mm has the greatest safety factor therefore long fatigue life.

  15. Infrared and far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the GeH radical - Determination of ground state parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. M.; Evenson, K. M.; Sears, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The GeH radical has been detected in its ground 2 Pi state in the gas phase reaction of fluorine atoms with GeH4 by laser magnetic resonance techniques. Rotational transitions within both 2 Pi 1/2 and 2 Pi 3/2 manifolds have been observed at far-infrared wavelengths and rotational transitions between the two fine structure components have been detected at infrared wavelengths (10 microns). Signals have been observed for all five naturally occurring isotopes of germanium. Nuclear hyperfine structure for H-1 and Ge-73 has also been observed. The data for the dominant isotope (/Ge-74/H) have been fitted to within experimental error by an effective Hamiltonian to give a set of molecular parameters for the X 2 Pi state which is very nearly complete. In addition, the dipole moment of GeH in its ground state has been estimated from the relative intensities of electric and magnetic dipole transitions in the 10 micron spectrum to be 1.24(+ or - 0.10) D.

  16. Using prior knowledge in SVD-based parameter estimation for magnetic resonance spectroscopy--the ATP example.

    PubMed

    Stoica, Petre; Selén, Yngve; Sandgren, Niclas; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2004-09-01

    We introduce the knowledge-based singular value decomposition (KNOB-SVD) method for exploiting prior knowledge in magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy based on the SVD of the data matrix. More specifically, we assume that the MR data are well modeled by the superposition of a given number of exponentially damped sinusoidal components and that the dampings alphakappa, frequencies omegakappa, and complex amplitudes rhokappa of some components satisfy the following relations: alphakappa = alpha (alpha = unknown), omegakappa = omega + (kappa- 1)delta (omega = unknown, delta = known), and rhokappa = Ckapparho (rho = unknown, ckappa = known real constants). The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) complex, which has one triple peak and two double peaks whose dampings, frequencies, and amplitudes may in some cases be known to satisfy the above type of relations, is used as a vehicle for describing our SVD-based method throughout the paper. By means of numerical examples, we show that our method provides more accurate parameter estimates than a commonly used general-purpose SVD-based method and a previously suggested prior knowledge-based SVD method.

  17. Influence of the injected beam parameters on the capture efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance based charge breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galatà, A.; Mascali, D.; Torrisi, G.; Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Angot, J.

    2017-06-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources based charge breeders (ECR-CB) are fundamental devices for Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL) facilities aiming at postaccelerating radioactive ion beams (RIBs). Presently, low intensity RIBs do not allow a conventional tuning of the ECR-CB: as a consequence, it has to be set with a stable 1+ pilot beam first, switching then to the radioactive one without changing any parameter; this procedure is usually called "blind tuning." Besides having different masses, pilot and radioactive beams can also differ in terms of the rms transverse emittance ɛrms and/or longitudinal energy spread Δ E , so the choice of a given pilot beam can determine the overall performances of the final breeding stage. This paper shows a numerical study of how the capture efficiency of the PHOENIX charge breeder is affected by the aforementioned beam paramaters: the analysis reveals the two-step nature of the process, highlighting the role of the injection optics and the plasma capture capability in the overall performances of this device. The simulations predict highest efficiency for ɛrms<5 π mm mrad and Δ E <5 eV in a optimum energy range between 2 and 6 eV, thus giving important information on the possibility of blindly tuning an ECR-CB. No isotopical effects were observed, while it clearly came out the necessity to improve the 1 + beam characteristics with a rf beam cooler prior to the injection into an ECR-CB.

  18. TI-205 nuclear magnetic resonance determination of the thermodynamic parameters for the binding of monovalent cations to gramicidins A and C.

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, J F; Fernandez, J Q; Shungu, D C; Whaley, W L; Koeppe, R E; Millett, F S

    1988-01-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for the binding of the monovalent cations, Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, NH4+, TI+, and Ag+, to gramicidin A and for the binding of TI+ to gramicidin C, incorporated into lysophosphatidylcholine, have been determined using a combination of TI-205 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and competition binding. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy and entropy, are discussed in terms of a process involving the transfer of cations from an aqueous to amide environment. PMID:2462930

  19. Evaluation of oxidative and antioxidative parameters in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Emhan, Ali; Selek, Salih; Bayazıt, Hüseyin; Fatih Karababa, İbrahim; Katı, Mahmut; Aksoy, Nurten

    2015-12-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a prevalent psychiatric disorder. The exact causes of GAD still unknown, in addition to neurochemical and neuroanatomic disorders, genetic and environmental factors are discussed in etiology. In our study we aimed to evaluate the oxidative metabolism's status and investigate the role of oxidative metabolites in GAD. Blood samples were taken from enrolled subjects in appropriate way and total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) were studied in Harran University Biochemistry Labs. Results were compared between groups. The patients' TOS and OSI levels were significantly higher than control group. The patients' TAS levels were significantly lower than controls'. According to our findings, oxidative stress mechanism might have a role in GAD pathophysiology. In the future, total antioxidants may be used as a biologic marker in GAD etiology but more research is needed.

  20. Nondestructive evaluation of explosively welded clad rods by resonance acoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y; Tysoe, B; Sim, J; Mirkhani, K; Sinclair, A N; Honarvar, F; Sildva, Harry; Szecket, Alexander; Hardwick, Roy

    2003-07-01

    A resonance acoustic spectroscopy technique is assessed for nondestructive evaluation of explosively welded clad rods. Each rod is modeled as a two-layered cylinder with a spring-mass system to represent a thin interfacial layer containing the weld. A range of interfacial profiles is generated in a set of experimental samples by varying the speed of the explosion that drives the copper cladding into the aluminum core. Excellent agreement is achieved between measured and calculated values of the resonant frequencies of the system, through appropriate adjustment of the interfacial mass and spring constants used in the wave scattering calculations. Destructive analysis of the interface in the experimental specimens confirms that key features of the interfacial profile may be inferred from resonance acoustic spectroscopy analysis applied to ultrasonic measurements.

  1. Resonance wood [Picea abies (L.) Karst.]--evaluation and prediction of violin makers' quality-grading.

    PubMed

    Buksnowitz, Christoph; Teischinger, Alfred; Müller, Ulrich; Pahler, Andreas; Evans, Robert

    2007-04-01

    The definition of quality in the field of resonance wood for musical instrument making has attracted considerable interest over decades but has remained incomplete. The current work compares the traditional knowledge and practical experience of violin makers with a material-science approach to objectively characterize the properties of resonance wood. Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] has earned a very high reputation for the construction of resonance tops of stringed instruments and resonance boards of keyboard instruments, and was therefore chosen as the focus of the investigation. The samples were obtained from numerous renowned resonance wood regions in the European Alps and cover the whole range of available qualities. A set of acoustical, anatomical, mechanical and optical material properties was measured on each sample. These measurements were compared with subjective quality grading by violin makers, who estimated the acoustical, optical and overall suitability for violin making. Multiple linear regression models were applied to evaluate the predictability of the subjective grading using the measured material characteristics as predictors. The results show that luthiers are able to estimate wood quality related to visible features, but predictions of mechanical and acoustical properties proved to be very poor.

  2. Modeling of Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy Based Nondestructive Evaluation Using the "XYZ-Algorithm"

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Salahuddin; Bond, Leonard J.

    2007-05-03

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) is employed as a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool in a number of metal/ceramic forming industries [1]. The presence of volumetric defects in an otherwise flaw-free object affects the resonance characteristics of the object. The changes in resonance behavior depend on the number, locations, volume, and material properties of the defects. Since the normal modes of an object depend on its geometry and the position-dependent material properties, namely the density and the complex elastic stiffness tensor, by accurate measurement of a specimen’s resonance frequencies and amplitudes, one can detect and characterize flaws embedded within it. A correct forward mathematical model to predict resonance characteristics is vital to the required analyses. In this paper, we present several computational results depicting the influence of the presence of embedded flaws/defects in a test specimen having simple geometrical shape. The mathematical model is based on the computationally efficient “XYZ Algorithm” of Visscher et al.

  3. Evaluation of repatriation parameters: does medical history matter?

    PubMed

    Greuters, Sjoerd; Christiaans, Herman M T; Veenings, Bart; Loer, Stephan A; Boer, Christa

    2009-01-01

    Aeromedical repatriation of patients is an expanding service due to the growing number of travelers worldwide. Of these repatriated patients, a small number require specialized transportation due to severe medical complications. We evaluated the medical in-flight records of Dutch patients with severe disease or polytrauma who were repatriated by air from 1998 to 2002 via one of the largest Dutch alarm centers. We questioned how this Dutch population of repatriated patients is demographically distributed and whether this population is a priori at high risk for acute medical complications that need specialized medical attention. Seventy-seven of 115 repatriated patients were 50 years and older, of which most were male (73%). Fifty patients had no significant medical history, whereas the remaining 65 patients suffered from comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease or cancer. In patients aged 18 to 49 years, one third of all patients were repatriated due to traumatic fractures. In the older age category, the main reasons for repatriation were cardiopulmonary incidents. There was an equal distribution in the primary medical reason for repatriation as defined by need for trauma/neurological support and ventilation or circulatory support. Of note, 82% of the 65 patients who traveled with a chronic disease condition were repatriated due to worsening of this particular condition. The present study shows that an aeromedical repatriation service is frequently employed by travelers with a history of chronic disease who develop medical complications. The growing number of repatriated elderly patients and/or patients with preexisting comorbidities requires development of secure pretravel risk assessment and adaptation of the medical service level in foreign countries.

  4. Criteria for first- and second-order vibrational resonances and correct evaluation of the Darling-Dennison resonance coefficients using the canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnoshchekov, Sergey V.; Isayeva, Elena V.; Stepanov, Nikolay F.

    2014-12-21

    The second-order vibrational Hamiltonian of a semi-rigid polyatomic molecule when resonances are present can be reduced to a quasi-diagonal form using second-order vibrational perturbation theory. Obtaining exact vibrational energy levels requires subsequent numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix including the first- and second-order resonance coupling coefficients. While the first-order Fermi resonance constants can be easily calculated, the evaluation of the second-order Darling-Dennison constants requires more complicated algebra for seven individual cases with different numbers of creation-annihilation vibrational quanta. The difficulty in precise evaluation of the Darling-Dennison coefficients is associated with the previously unrecognized interference with simultaneously present Fermi resonances that affect the form of the canonically transformed Hamiltonian. For the first time, we have presented the correct form of the general expression for the evaluation of the Darling-Dennison constants that accounts for the underlying effect of Fermi resonances. The physically meaningful criteria for selecting both Fermi and Darling-Dennison resonances are discussed and illustrated using numerical examples.

  5. Contact angle and indentation velocity dependency for a resonance sensor--evaluation on soft tissue silicone models.

    PubMed

    Astrand, Anders P; Jalkanen, Ville; Andersson, Britt M; Lindahl, Olof A

    2013-04-01

    Human tissue stiffness can vary due to different tissue conditions such as cancer tumours. Earlier studies show that stiffness may be detected with a resonance sensor that measures frequency shift and contact force at application. Through the frequency shift and the contact force, a tissue stiffness parameter can be derived. This study evaluated how the probe application angle and indentation velocity affected the results and determined the maximum parameter errors. The evaluation was made on flat silicone discs with specified hardness. The frequency shift, the force and the stiffness parameter all varied with contact angle and indentation velocity. A contact angle of ≤10° was acceptable for reliable measurements. A low indentation velocity was recommended. The maximum errors for the system were <1.1% of the measured values. It was concluded that contact angle and indentation velocity have to be considered in the clinical setting. The angular dependency is especially important in clinical use for studying stiffness of human soft tissue, e.g. in prostate cancer diagnosis.

  6. White LED compared with other light sources: age-dependent photobiological effects and parameters for evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rebec, Katja Malovrh; Klanjšek-Gunde, Marta; Bizjak, Grega; Kobav, Matej B

    2015-01-01

    Ergonomic science at work and living places should appraise human factors concerning the photobiological effects of lighting. Thorough knowledge on this subject has been gained in the past; however, few attempts have been made to propose suitable evaluation parameters. The blue light hazard and its influence on melatonin secretion in age-dependent observers is considered in this paper and parameters for its evaluation are proposed. New parameters were applied to analyse the effects of white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources and to compare them with the currently applied light sources. The photobiological effects of light sources with the same illuminance but different spectral power distribution were determined for healthy 4-76-year-old observers. The suitability of new parameters is discussed. Correlated colour temperature, the only parameter currently used to assess photobiological effects, is evaluated and compared to new parameters.

  7. High correlation between microbubble contrast-enhanced ultrasound, magnetic resonance and histopathology in the evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    de Queiroz, Marcos Roberto Gomes; Francisco, Miguel José; Garcia, Rodrigo Gobbo; Rahal, Antonio; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmão

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of microbubble contrast ultrasound in diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma and to compare its results with those of magnetic resonance and histopathology. Methods A total of 29 patients suffering from chronic liver diseases and awaiting liver transplants at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein were subject to magnetic resonance, microbubble contrast ultrasound, and excision liver biopsies. Results Excellent agreement between magnetic resonance and microbubble contrast ultrasound was observed in this study. There was moderate agreement between both imaging methods and histopathology results. Conclusion Microbubble contrast ultrasound was as accurate as magnetic resonance to evaluate hepatocellular carcinoma. These results were confirmed by comparing both methods to histopathological diagnosis. PMID:24488392

  8. Usefulness of quantitative peritumoural perfusion and proton spectroscopic magnetic resonance imaging evaluation in differentiating brain gliomas from solitary brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Sparacia, Gianvincenzo; Gadde, Judith A; Iaia, Alberto; Sparacia, Benedetta; Midiri, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether peritumoural perfusion weighted and proton spectroscopic magnetic resonance imaging can be used in differentiating between primary gliomas and solitary metastases. Ten low-grade gliomas, eight high-grade gliomas and 10 metastases were prospectively evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging, dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced perfusion imaging and single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy before surgical resection or stereotactic biopsy. Maximal relative cerebral blood volume values were calculated drawing three regions of interest of 2 cm(2) in the non-enhancing peritumoural areas. Maximal relative cerebral blood volume values were normalised to that of contralateral normal-appearing white matter. Maximal choline/creatine ratios were calculated from three voxels of 10 cm(3) placed in the peritumoural areas defined as non-enhancing peritumoural white matter surrounding the tumour. The tumour grade presumed with these values was compared to histopathological grading. Differences in the study parameters between groups were assessed using the Mann-Whitney test. A receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to determine cut-off values. A clear relative cerebral blood volume cut-off value of 1.88 was detected for differentiating low-grade gliomas from high-grade gliomas. A clear relative cerebral blood volume cut-off value of 1.20 was detected for differentiation of metastases from gliomas. The differences in the choline/creatine ratios in the peritumoural regions of high-grade gliomas and of solitary metastasis were statistically significant (P < 0.001) but a clear cut-off value was not found. Our preliminary data support the hypothesis that peritumoural perfusion-weighted imaging can assist in preoperative differentiation between a glioma and a solitary metastasis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and Late Side Effects in Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Georg, Petra; Lang, Stefan; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Doerr, Wolfgang; Sturdza, Alina E.; Berger, Daniel; Georg, Dietmar; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the predictive value of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for late side effects of the rectum, sigmoid colon, and bladder in image-guided brachytherapy for cervix cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 141 patients received external-beam radiotherapy and image-guided brachytherapy with or without chemotherapy. The DVH parameters for the most exposed 2, 1, and 0.1 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cc}, D{sub 1cc}, and D{sub 0.1cc}) of the rectum, sigmoid, and bladder, as well as International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements point doses (D{sub ICRU}) were computed. Total doses were converted to equivalent doses in 2 Gy by applying the linear-quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy). Late side effects were prospectively assessed using the Late Effects in Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic score. The following patient groups were defined: Group 1: no side effects (Grade 0); Group 2: side effects (Grade 1-4); Group 3: minor side effects (Grade 0-1); and Group 4: major side effects (Grade 2-4). Results: The median follow-up was 51 months. The overall 5-year actuarial side effect rates were 12% for rectum, 3% for sigmoid, and 23% for bladder. The mean total D{sub 2cc} were 65 {+-} 12 Gy for rectum, 62 {+-} 12 Gy for sigmoid, and 95 {+-} 22 Gy for bladder. For rectum, statistically significant differences were observed between Groups 1 and 2 in all DVH parameters and D{sub ICRU}. Between Groups 3 and 4, no difference was observed for D{sub 0.1cc.} For sigmoid, significant differences were observed for D{sub 2cc} and D{sub 1cc}, but not for D{sub 0.1cc} in all groups. For bladder, significant differences were observed for all DVH parameters only comparing Groups 3 and 4. No differences were observed for D{sub ICRU}. Conclusions: The parameters D{sub 2cc} and D{sub 1cc} have a good predictive value for rectal toxicity. For sigmoid, no prediction could be postulated because of limited data. In bladder, DVH

  10. Update on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound Evaluation of Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, Parakkal; Kolbe, Amy B.; Fidler, Jeff L.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Knudsen, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and abdominal ultrasound are integral parts of multimodality assessments for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Applications include assessing Crohn’s disease (CD) extent and severity, differentiating CD from ulcerative colitis, detecting CD complications, evaluating response to therapy, and demonstrating postoperative recurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols are being developed that may reduce or eliminate the need for intravenous contrast agents and better differentiate inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. MRE scoring systems have been created to objectively quantify disease activity and response to therapy. By utilizing advanced sonographic imaging techniques, including ultrasound contrast and Doppler assessments, the role of abdominal ultrasonography in the evaluation and management of CD continues to expand. Abdominal ultrasound may function as a low-cost, point-of care assessment tool, especially in CD restricted to the terminal ileum and ileocolic anastomosis. PMID:27231453

  11. Efficiency modeling and evaluation of a resonant snubber based soft- switching inverter for motor drive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.S.; Young, R.W.; Ott, G.W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper establishes an analytical model for a resonant snubber based soft-switching inverter. The model adopts loss separation method to evaluate losses in individual components. Because of symmetry of the inverter circuit, the developed model is suitable for both single-phase and three-phase inverters. A single-phase inverter was built and tested with a single-phase induction motor driving a fan load to verify the developed model. The equivalent single-phase induction motor model was curve-fitted from experiment. Analytical results showed reasonable agreement with experiment. The same efficiency evaluation method was then applied to the conventional hard-switching inverter, and the results were compared with that of the soft-switching inverter. The resonant snubber base soft-switching inverter shows substantial efficiency improvement over the hard switching PWM (pulse-width-modulation) inverter, especially in low speed operation.

  12. Fluctuations Above the Resonance Range in Evaluated Data of 55Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trkov, A.; Capote, R.; Leal, L. C.; Muir, D. W.; Soukhovitskiı˜, E. Sh.

    2014-04-01

    The evaluation procedures for 55Mn are elaborated, focusing on the issues related to the fluctuations in the cross sections above the resolved resonance range. Smooth cross sections are defined in the unresolved resonance range, based on the resolution-broadened total cross section measurements, where relevant. Above this energy fluctuations in the measured total cross section are introduced by scaling all reaction cross sections, but preserving the resolution-broadened total cross section. Special procedures are designed to match the observed structure in the average cosine of scattering by adjusting the ratio of the shape-elastic and compound-elastic contributions to the elastic scattering cross sections. The evaluated data file is being assembled and subjected to rigorous testing, verification and validation.

  13. Profiles of ion beams and plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Sakamoto, Naoki; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    In order to contribute to various applications of plasma and beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance, a new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed with enhanced efficiency for broad and dense ion beam. The magnetic field configuration consists of a pair of comb-shaped magnet surrounding plasma chamber cylindrically. Resonance zones corresponding for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are positioned at spatially different positions. We launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves operated individually, try to control profiles of the plasma parameters and the extracted ion beams, and to measure them in detail.

  14. Profiles of ion beams and plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi; Sakamoto, Naoki; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-15

    In order to contribute to various applications of plasma and beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance, a new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed with enhanced efficiency for broad and dense ion beam. The magnetic field configuration consists of a pair of comb-shaped magnet surrounding plasma chamber cylindrically. Resonance zones corresponding for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are positioned at spatially different positions. We launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves operated individually, try to control profiles of the plasma parameters and the extracted ion beams, and to measure them in detail.

  15. Application of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Evaluation of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Hillary J.; Dragoo, Jason L.; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Levenston, Marc E.; Gold, Garry E.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews current magnetic resonance imaging techniques for imaging the lower extremity, focusing on imaging of the knee, ankle, and hip joints. Recent advancements in MRI include imaging at 7 Tesla, using multiple receiver channels, T2* imaging, and metal suppression techniques, allowing more detailed visualization of complex anatomy, evaluation of morphological changes within articular cartilage, and imaging around orthopedic hardware. PMID:23622097

  16. Acute Cardiac Impairment Associated With Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Magnetic Resonance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Yonezawa, Masato; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nagao, Michinobu; Matsuo, Yoshio; Kamitani, Takeshi; Higo, Taiki; Nishikawa, Kei; Setoguchi, Taro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate acute cardiac effects of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. The left ventricular function (LVF) of 31 patients with esophageal cancer who received cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil-based CCRT was evaluated using cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were classified into two groups according to mean LV dose. The parameters related to LVF were compared between before and during (40 Gy) or between before and after CCRT using a Wilcoxon matched-pairs single rank test, and parameter ratios (during/before CCRT, after/before CCRT) were also compared between the groups with a t test. Data were expressed as mean {+-} SE. Results: In the low LV-dose group (n = 10; mean LV dose <0.6 Gy), LV ejection fraction decreased significantly (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 62.7% {+-} 2.98% vs. 59.8% {+-} 2.56% vs. 60.6% {+-} 3.89%; p < 0.05). In the high LV-dose group (n = 21; mean LV dose of 3.6-41.2 Gy), LV end-diastolic volume index (before vs. after CCRT; 69.1 {+-} 2.93 vs. 57.0 {+-} 3.23 mL/m{sup 2}), LV stroke volume index (38.6 {+-} 1.56 vs. 29.9 {+-} 1.60 mL/m{sup 2}), and LV ejection fraction (56.9% {+-} 1.79% vs. 52.8% {+-} 1.15%) decreased significantly (p < 0.05) after CCRT. Heart rate increased significantly (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 66.8 {+-} 3.05 vs. 72.4 {+-} 4.04 vs. 85.4 {+-} 3.75 beats per minute, p < 0.01). Left ventricle wall motion decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in segments 8 (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 6.64 {+-} 0.54 vs. 4.78 {+-} 0.43 vs. 4.79 {+-} 0.50 mm), 9 (6.88 {+-} 0.45 vs. 5.04 {+-} 0.38 vs. 5.27 {+-} 0.47 mm), and 10 (9.22 {+-} 0.48 vs. 8.08 {+-} 0.34 vs. 8.19 {+-} 0.56 mm). The parameter ratios of LV end-diastolic volume index, stroke volume index, wall motion in segment 9, and heart rate showed significant difference

  17. Quantitative assessment of cartilage status in osteoarthritis by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging: technical validation for use in analysis of cartilage volume and further morphologic parameters.

    PubMed

    Graichen, Heiko; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Vogl, Thomas; Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Eckstein, Felix

    2004-03-01

    Quantitative diagnostic tools for osteoarthritis (OA) are important for evaluating the treatment response to structure-modifying drugs. This study was undertaken to test the technical validity (accuracy) of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) for reliable determination of the total bone interface area, percentage of cartilaginous (denuded) joint surface area, and cartilage thickness in OA. High-resolution MRIs of femorotibial and patellar cartilage were acquired in 21 patients prior to total knee arthroplasty, using a T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence with water excitation. After segmentation of original bone interface areas (before disease onset) and the actual cartilage layer, the percentages of cartilaginous joint surface area, cartilage thickness, and cartilage volume were determined using proprietary software. During surgery, the patella and the medial and lateral tibia were resected. Results obtained with qMRI were compared with those obtained by direct image analysis of surface area, cartilage thickness, and cartilage volume of the surgically removed tissue. Pairwise differences between results obtained with qMRI and morphologic analysis were +/-4.6% for percentage of cartilaginous surface area, +/-8.9% for cartilage thickness, and +/-9.1% for cartilage volume. Correlation coefficients ranged from 0.92 (thickness) to 0.98 (volume). Quantitative MRI permits technically accurate and differential assessment of increases in eroded joint surface area and reductions in cartilage thickness in OA. The surrogate validity of these parameters requires testing in longitudinal studies. These parameters may be advantageous over determination of cartilage volume alone when diagnosing OA, exploring its progression, or testing responsiveness to new therapies.

  18. Evaluation of kinetic constants of biomolecular interaction on optical surface plasmon resonance sensor with Newton Iteration Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Guoliang; Hu, Jiandong; Hu, Fengjiang; Wei, Jianguang; Shi, Liang

    2010-10-01

    In the immunology, there are two important types of biomolecular interaction: antigens-antibodies and receptors-ligands. Monitoring the response rate and affinity of biomolecular interaction can help analyze the protein function, drug discover, genomics and proteomics research. Moreover the association rate constant and dissociation rate constant of receptors-ligands are the important parameters for the study of signal transmission between cells. Recent advances in bioanalyzer instruments have greatly simplified the measurement of the kinetics of molecular interactions. Non-destructive and real-time monitoring the response to evaluate the parameters between antigens and antibodies can be performed by using optical surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor technology. This technology provides a quantitative analysis that is carried out rapidly with label-free high-throughput detection using the binding curves of antigens-antibodies. Consequently, the kinetic parameters of interaction between antigens and antibodies can be obtained. This article presents a low cost integrated SPR-based bioanalyzer (HPSPR-6000) designed by ourselves. This bioanalyzer is mainly composed of a biosensor TSPR1K23, a touch-screen monitor, a microprocessor PIC24F128, a microflow cell with three channels, a clamp and a photoelectric conversion device. To obtain the kinetic parameters, sensorgrams may be modeled using one of several binding models provided with BIAevaluation software 3.0, SensiQ or Autolab. This allows calculation of the association rate constant (ka) and the dissociation rate constant (kd). The ratio of ka to kd can be used to estimate the equilibrium constant. Another kind is the analysis software OriginPro, which can process the obtained data by nonlinear fitting and then get some correlative parameters, but it can't be embedded into the bioanalyzer, so the bioanalyzer don't support the use of OriginPro. This paper proposes a novel method to evaluate the kinetic parameters

  19. BUILDING MODEL ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS WITH THE JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY (JUPITER) API

    EPA Science Inventory

    The open-source, public domain JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) API (Application Programming Interface) provides conventions and Fortran-90 modules to develop applications (computer programs) for analyzing process models. The input ...

  20. A COMPUTATIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR EVALUATION OF NPS MANAGEMENT SCENARIOS: ROLE OF PARAMETER UNCERTAINTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utility of complex distributed-parameter watershed models for evaluation of the effectiveness of non-point source sediment and nutrient abatement scenarios such as Best Management Practices (BMPs) often follows the traditional {calibrate ---> validate ---> predict} procedure. Des...

  1. BUILDING MODEL ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS WITH THE JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY (JUPITER) API

    EPA Science Inventory

    The open-source, public domain JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) API (Application Programming Interface) provides conventions and Fortran-90 modules to develop applications (computer programs) for analyzing process models. The input ...

  2. A COMPUTATIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR EVALUATION OF NPS MANAGEMENT SCENARIOS: ROLE OF PARAMETER UNCERTAINTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utility of complex distributed-parameter watershed models for evaluation of the effectiveness of non-point source sediment and nutrient abatement scenarios such as Best Management Practices (BMPs) often follows the traditional {calibrate ---> validate ---> predict} procedure. Des...

  3. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the evaluation of valve disease.

    PubMed

    Karamitsos, Theodoros D; Myerson, Saul G

    2011-01-01

    Echocardiography is the primary imaging modality for initial assessment and longitudinal evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has emerged as an additional or alternative modality in these patients providing clinically useful information not only about the valve lesion itself but also about the consequences for the relevant ventricle. Other unique capabilities of CMR include the assessment of surrounding anatomy (eg, great vessels) and the evaluation of myocardial scar or fibrosis. This review will highlight the role of CMR in the assessment of patients with valve disease with particular emphasis on the advantages of this imaging modality in key areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Utility of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of left ventricular thickening.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Nicholas; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2017-04-01

    Left ventricular (LV) thickening can be due to hypertrophy (concentric, asymmetric, eccentric) or remodelling (concentric or asymmetric). Pathological thickening may be caused by pressure overload, volume overload, infiltrative disorders, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, athlete's heart or neoplastic infiltration. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the comprehensive evaluation of LV thickening, including: establishing diagnosis, determining LV geometry, establishing aetiology, quantification, identifying prognostic factors, serial follow-up and treatment response. In this article, we review the aetiologies and pathophysiology of LV thickening, and demonstrate the comprehensive role of MRI in the evaluation of LV thickening.

  5. Appearance of monoclonal plasma cell diseases in whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and correlation with parameters of disease activity.

    PubMed

    Kloth, Jost K; Hillengass, Jens; Listl, Karin; Kilk, Kerstin; Hielscher, Thomas; Landgren, Ola; Delorme, Stefan; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-André

    2014-11-15

    The aim of our study was to assess in which way different infiltration patterns of monoclonal plasma cell diseases in whole-body (wb) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are associated with clinical stages, plasma cell content in bone marrow samples and established serum markers of disease activity. Institutional review board approval was obtained. We performed wb-MRI in 547 consecutive, unselected and untreated patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, n=138), smoldering myeloma (SMM, n=157) and multiple myeloma (MM, n=252) on two 1.5 T MRI-scanners with body array coils. The studies were evaluated in consensus by two experienced radiologists blinded to the diagnosis. We observed focal lesions in 23.9% (MGUS), 34.4% (SMM) and 81.3% (MM), respectively. A diffuse infiltration pattern was detected in 38.4%, 45.9% and 71%, respectively. The differences between all infiltration patterns were significant (p<0.0001). The presence of focal lesions and the presence of a diffuse bone marrow infiltration was associated with an increased plasma cell percentage in bone marrow samples (median 22% vs. 14%, 26% vs. 10%, both p<0.0001) and monoclonal protein concentration (median 18 g/dl vs. 13 g/dl, p=0.003, 20 g/dl vs. 11 g/dl, p<0.0001). Further categorization of the diffuse infiltration patterns in wb-MRI into "salt-and-pepper," moderate and severe identified significant associations with M-protein (median g/dl for S+P/moderate/severe 23/18/25, p=0.04), plasma cell percentage in the bone marrow (median 25%/24%/40%, p=0.02), and age (median years 67/60/57, p<0.0001). Bone marrow infiltration in wb-MRI is significantly different between the various stages of plasma cell disease and correlates well with established markers of disease activity.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and BMB score in the evaluation of bone involvement in Gaucher's disease patients.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Ricardo Andrade Fernandes; Mello, Melissa Bozzi Nonato; Pessanha, Laís Bastos

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate by magnetic resonance imaging changes in bone marrow of patients undergoing treatment for type I Gaucher's disease. Descriptive, cross-sectional study of Gaucher's disease patients submitted to 3 T magnetic resonance imaging of femurs and lumbar spine. The images were blindly reviewed and the findings were classified according to the semiquantitative bone marrow burden (BMB) scoring system. All of the seven evaluated patients (three men and four women) presented signs of bone marrow infiltration. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head was found in three patients, Erlenmeyer flask deformity in five, and no patient had vertebral body collapse. The mean BMB score was 11, ranging from 9 to 14. Magnetic resonance imaging is currently the method of choice for assessing bone involvement in Gaucher's disease in adults due to its high sensitivity to detect both focal and diffuse bone marrow changes, and the BMB score is a simplified method for semiquantitative analysis, without depending on advanced sequences or sophisticated hardware, allowing for the classification of the disease extent and assisting in the treatment monitoring.

  7. Evaluation of Soft Tissue Sarcoma Response to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Beckett, Brooke R.; Tudorica, Alina; Meyer, Janelle M.; Afzal, Aneela; Chen, Yiyi; Mansoor, Atiya; Hayden, James B.; Doung, Yee-Cheen; Hung, Arthur Y.; Holtorf, Megan L.; Aston, Torrie J.; Ryan, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the utility of quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters in comparison with imaging tumor size for early prediction and evaluation of soft tissue sarcoma response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. In total, 20 patients with intermediate- to high-grade soft tissue sarcomas received either a phase I trial regimen of sorafenib + chemoradiotherapy (n = 8) or chemoradiotherapy only (n = 12), and underwent DCE-MRI at baseline, after 2 weeks of treatment with sorafenib or after the first chemotherapy cycle, and after therapy completion. MRI tumor size in the longest diameter (LD) was measured according to the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors) guidelines. Pharmacokinetic analyses of DCE-MRI data were performed using the Shutter-Speed model. After only 2 weeks of treatment with sorafenib or after 1 chemotherapy cycle, Ktrans (rate constant for plasma/interstitium contrast agent transfer) and its percent change were good early predictors of optimal versus suboptimal pathological response with univariate logistic regression C statistics values of 0.90 and 0.80, respectively, whereas RECIST LD percent change was only a fair predictor (C = 0.72). Post-therapy Ktrans, ve (extravascular and extracellular volume fraction), and kep (intravasation rate constant), not RECIST LD, were excellent (C > 0.90) markers of therapy response. Several DCE-MRI parameters before, during, and after therapy showed significant (P < .05) correlations with percent necrosis of resected tumor specimens. In conclusion, absolute values and percent changes of quantitative DCE-MRI parameters provide better early prediction and evaluation of the pathological response of soft tissue sarcoma to preoperative chemoradiotherapy than the conventional measurement of imaging tumor size change. PMID:28066805

  8. Recent results of the parameters A and R measurements in the resonance region of the {pi}N-elastic scattering and subsequent investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Sumachev, V. V.; Beloglazov, Yu. A.; Filimonov, E. A.; Kovalev, A. I.; Kozlenko, N. G.; Kruglov, S. P.; Kulbardis, A. A.; Lopatin, I. V.; Novinsky, D. V.; Shchedrov, V. A.; Trautman, V. Yu.; Alekseev, I. G.; Budkovsky, P. E.; Kanavets, V. P.; Koroleva, L. I.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Sulimov, A. D.; Svirida, D. N.

    2008-10-13

    The existing models of baryons usually predict considerably more resonance (three or more in number) than it was found by investigation of elastic pion-nucleon scattering. This disagreement invites further investigation of the pion-nucleon interaction and among other things the measurement of spin rotation parameters A and R in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering.Recent experiments of the PNPI and PNPI-ITEP collaborations resolved a part of twofold ambiguities of the existing partial wave analyses (PWA). These results were used in the last PWA of the George Washington University group SP06. The proposal for the additional spin rotation parameters A and R measurement in the resonance region is motivated. Such additional measurements are necessary to resolve remaining twofold ambiguities of the existing PWAs.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest in the evaluation of cancer patients: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Hochhegger, Bruno; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Santana, Pablo Rydz Pinheiro; Sousa, Arthur Soares; Souza, Luciana Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has several advantages in the evaluation of cancer patients with thoracic lesions, including involvement of the chest wall, pleura, lungs, mediastinum, esophagus and heart. It is a quite useful tool in the diagnosis, staging, surgical planning, treatment response evaluation and follow-up of these patients. In the present review, the authors contextualize the relevance of MRI in the evaluation of thoracic lesions in cancer patients. Considering that MRI is a widely available method with high contrast and spatial resolution and without the risks associated with the use of ionizing radiation, its use combined with new techniques such as cine-MRI and functional methods such as perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging may be useful as an alternative tool with performance comparable or complementary to conventional radiological methods such as radiography, computed tomography and PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of patients with thoracic neoplasias.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest in the evaluation of cancer patients: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Hochhegger, Bruno; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Santana, Pablo Rydz Pinheiro; Sousa, Arthur Soares; Souza, Luciana Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has several advantages in the evaluation of cancer patients with thoracic lesions, including involvement of the chest wall, pleura, lungs, mediastinum, esophagus and heart. It is a quite useful tool in the diagnosis, staging, surgical planning, treatment response evaluation and follow-up of these patients. In the present review, the authors contextualize the relevance of MRI in the evaluation of thoracic lesions in cancer patients. Considering that MRI is a widely available method with high contrast and spatial resolution and without the risks associated with the use of ionizing radiation, its use combined with new techniques such as cine-MRI and functional methods such as perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging may be useful as an alternative tool with performance comparable or complementary to conventional radiological methods such as radiography, computed tomography and PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of patients with thoracic neoplasias. PMID:25798006

  11. Evaluation of measures of technical image quality for intracranial magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Chapman, B E; Goodrich, C K; Alexander, A L; Blatter, D D; Parker, D L

    1999-12-01

    We evaluate three measures of technical image quality for intracranial magnetic resonance angiography (MRA): (1) a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) evaluation of vessel visibility, (2) vessel-to-background signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), and (3) observer ranking of the fidelity of vessel morphology compared to that in a gold standard image. The gold standard used for both the 2AFC and ranking measures is intraarterial catheter angiography. These measures are applied to healthy arterial segments. The 2AFC and SDNR measures directly evaluate the visibility of artery segments for which the existence is known from the gold standard images. We argue that (1) 2AFC evaluates the carrier signals on which any vascular disease process is modulated and provides an upper bound on the detectibility of vascular lesions, (2) SDNR is a predictor of 2AFC, and (3) ranking may be used to predict the relative performance of techniques in the detection of vascular lesions.

  12. A magnetic resonance software simulator for the evaluation of myocardial deformation estimation.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Vegas-Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo; Casaseca-de-la-Higuera, Pablo; Aja-Fernández, Santiago; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to design a physiologically realistic computer simulator of images of the left ventricle myocardium based on a patient-specific biomechanical model. The simulator takes a magnetic resonance image of a given patient at end diastole, uses a manual segmentation of that image to model the geometry of the myocardium and sets the parameters of the constitutive model used for biomechanical simulation according to a regional labeling of the contractility of the myocardium for that patient. The simulated deformations are used to warp the magnetic resonance dataset throughout the cardiac cycle to generate different image modalities. The simulator is validated by quantifying its ability to model actual deformations in a set of patients affected by an acute myocardial infarction. Specifically a high correlation has been encountered between the ejection fraction derived from the simulated end systolic deformation of the myocardium and the myocardium segmented from actual data. Additionally, most of the parameters that describe the simulated deformation compare well with reported values. Overall, the simulator is intended as a testbed for extensive comparisons of myocardial motion tracking methods due to its ability to relate the impaired myocardial function with the associated ventricular remodeling, a novel contribution in the literature of cardiac image simulators. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Instrumental Dependent Dissociations of n-Propyl/Isopropyl Phosphonate Isomers: Evaluation of Resonant and Non-Resonant Vibrational Activations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennaceur, Chafia; Afonso, Carlos; Alves, Sandra; Bossée, Anne; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-08-01

    Structural elucidation and distinction of isomeric neurotoxic agents remain a challenge. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used for this purpose in particular if a "diagnostic" product ion is observed. Different vibrational activation methods were investigated to enhance formation of diagnostic ions through consecutive processes from O,O-dialkyl alkylphosphonates. Resonant and non-resonant collisional activation and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) were used with different mass spectrometers: a hybrid quadrupole Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (Qh-FTICR) and a hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap (LTQ/Orbitrap). Double resonance (DR) experiments, in ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cell, were used for unambiguous determination of direct intermediate yielding diagnostic ions. From protonated n-propyl and isopropyl O-O-dialkyl-phosphonates, a diagnostic m/ z 83 ion characterizes the isopropyl isomer. This ion is produced through consecutive dissociation processes. Conditions to favor its formation and observation using different activation methods were investigated. It was shown that with the LTQ, consecutive experimental steps of isolation/activation with modified trapping conditions limiting the low mass cut off (LMCO) effect were required, whereas with FT-ICR by CID and IRMPD the diagnostic ion detection was provided only by one activation step. Among the different investigated activation methods it was shown that by using low-pressure conditions or using non-resonant methods, efficient and fast differentiation of isomeric neurotoxic agents was obtained. This work constitutes a unique comparison of different activation modes for distinction of isomers showing the instrumental dependence characteristic of the consecutive processes. New insights in the dissociation pathways were obtained based on double-resonance IRMPD experiments using a FT-ICR instrument with limitation at low mass values.

  14. Instrumental dependent dissociations of n-propyl/isopropyl phosphonate isomers: evaluation of resonant and non-resonant vibrational activations.

    PubMed

    Bennaceur, Chafia; Afonso, Carlos; Alves, Sandra; Bossée, Anne; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-08-01

    Structural elucidation and distinction of isomeric neurotoxic agents remain a challenge. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used for this purpose in particular if a "diagnostic" product ion is observed. Different vibrational activation methods were investigated to enhance formation of diagnostic ions through consecutive processes from O,O-dialkyl alkylphosphonates. Resonant and non-resonant collisional activation and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) were used with different mass spectrometers: a hybrid quadrupole Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (Qh-FTICR) and a hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap (LTQ/Orbitrap). Double resonance (DR) experiments, in ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cell, were used for unambiguous determination of direct intermediate yielding diagnostic ions. From protonated n-propyl and isopropyl O-O-dialkyl-phosphonates, a diagnostic m/z 83 ion characterizes the isopropyl isomer. This ion is produced through consecutive dissociation processes. Conditions to favor its formation and observation using different activation methods were investigated. It was shown that with the LTQ, consecutive experimental steps of isolation/activation with modified trapping conditions limiting the low mass cut off (LMCO) effect were required, whereas with FT-ICR by CID and IRMPD the diagnostic ion detection was provided only by one activation step. Among the different investigated activation methods it was shown that by using low-pressure conditions or using non-resonant methods, efficient and fast differentiation of isomeric neurotoxic agents was obtained. This work constitutes a unique comparison of different activation modes for distinction of isomers showing the instrumental dependence characteristic of the consecutive processes. New insights in the dissociation pathways were obtained based on double-resonance IRMPD experiments using a FT-ICR instrument with limitation at low mass values.

  15. Compressed Sensing 3-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography for Cerebral Aneurysms: Optimization and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fushimi, Yasutaka; Fujimoto, Koji; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Miyamoto, Susumu; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to optimize parameters for Nesterov algorithm (NESTA) in reconstruction of 3-dimensional time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 3 T by performing an exhaustive search and to validate the performance of compressed sensing (CS) by applying it to data from cerebral aneurysms and evaluating diagnostic quality. Three-dimensional TOF-MRA was obtained using a 3 T MR system with a 32-channel head coil for both healthy volunteers and 10 patients (11 aneurysms). No undersampling was applied for imaging parameters, including parallel imaging or other partial Fourier sampling. In the first step, the experimental setup was for healthy subjects to optimize CS parameters of NESTA and the undersampling mask pattern, so 24,696 different reconstruction conditions were surveyed for sampling rates of 8.0X and 5.0X. Mean square error (MSE) was calculated for each image reconstructed with the undersampling pattern and CS parameter sets. Evaluation was by normalized MSE, edge sharpness for MRA reconstructed using fully sampled data (MRA-full), zero-filled MRA (ZF-MRA) with Poisson disk undersampling mask, and CS-MRA (5.0X and 8.0X) with iterations of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50. CS-MRA (5.0X and 8.0X) with 5, 10, and 50 iterations of the sampling pattern and CS parameter set with the lowest MSE were visually inspected by 2 neuroradiologists to check the diagnostic quality. The sampling pattern and CS parameter set with the lowest MSE were identical for both CS-MRA 5.0X and CS-MRA 8.0X. At the initial 5 to 15 iterations, MSE of both sampling rates greatly decreased from that of ZF-MRA. For subsequent iterations, the decrease in MSE was relatively small. For CS-MRA, sharpness greatly increased from that of ZF-MRA within the initial 5 to 15 iterations, followed by slight increases with further iterations. Two neuroradiologists graded most aneurysms as excellent, with the exception of 1 to 4 aneurysms recognized as good by 1

  16. Evaluation of toroidal torque by non-resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamaks for resonant transport regimes using a Hamiltonian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Christopher G.; Heyn, Martin F.; Kapper, Gernot; Kasilov, Sergei V.; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.

    2016-08-01

    Toroidal torque generated by neoclassical viscosity caused by external non-resonant, non-axisymmetric perturbations has a significant influence on toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. In this article, a derivation for the expressions of toroidal torque and radial transport in resonant regimes is provided within quasilinear theory in canonical action-angle variables. The proposed approach treats all low-collisional quasilinear resonant neoclassical toroidal viscosity regimes including superbanana-plateau and drift-orbit resonances in a unified way and allows for magnetic drift in all regimes. It is valid for perturbations on toroidally symmetric flux surfaces of the unperturbed equilibrium without specific assumptions on geometry or aspect ratio. The resulting expressions are shown to match the existing analytical results in the large aspect ratio limit. Numerical results from the newly developed code NEO-RT are compared to calculations by the quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 at low collisionalities. The importance of the magnetic shear term in the magnetic drift frequency and a significant effect of the magnetic drift on drift-orbit resonances are demonstrated.

  17. Evaluation of toroidal torque by non-resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamaks for resonant transport regimes using a Hamiltonian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Christopher G.; Heyn, Martin F.; Kapper, Gernot; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.; Kasilov, Sergei V.

    2016-08-15

    Toroidal torque generated by neoclassical viscosity caused by external non-resonant, non-axisymmetric perturbations has a significant influence on toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. In this article, a derivation for the expressions of toroidal torque and radial transport in resonant regimes is provided within quasilinear theory in canonical action-angle variables. The proposed approach treats all low-collisional quasilinear resonant neoclassical toroidal viscosity regimes including superbanana-plateau and drift-orbit resonances in a unified way and allows for magnetic drift in all regimes. It is valid for perturbations on toroidally symmetric flux surfaces of the unperturbed equilibrium without specific assumptions on geometry or aspect ratio. The resulting expressions are shown to match the existing analytical results in the large aspect ratio limit. Numerical results from the newly developed code NEO-RT are compared to calculations by the quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 at low collisionalities. The importance of the magnetic shear term in the magnetic drift frequency and a significant effect of the magnetic drift on drift-orbit resonances are demonstrated.

  18. Cassette Sync Recorders. Parameter for Evaluation. Laboratory Test Findings. EPIE Report Number 86e.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Products Information Exchange Inst., Stony Brook, NY.

    This quarterly report by the Educational Products Information Exchange (EPIE) analyzes cassette sync recorders, giving parameters for evaluation and laboratory test findings. The report offers evaluations of the compatibility of different models and the standards for audio and cue tones. It also discusses national and international standards, EPIE…

  19. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Phase filtering of the inphase mode of a linear laser array in the Talbot resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandidov, V. P.; Terekhova, Irina V.

    2003-06-01

    A technique for phase filtering of the inphase collective mode of a laser array in the Talbot resonator is developed. This technique is based on the formation of the phase distribution of the inphase mode field of the linear array with the finite number of channels close to that of the field of the infinite periodic structure. A simple scheme of the phase corrector, providing the increase in the selectivity of the inphase mode of the laser array in the Talbot resonator, is proposed. It is shown that the width of the principal maximum of the far-field intensity does not increase during the phase filtering.

  20. Effects of electromagnetic radiation produced by 3G mobile phones on rat brains: magnetic resonance spectroscopy, biochemical, and histopathological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dogan, M; Turtay, M G; Oguzturk, H; Samdanci, E; Turkoz, Y; Tasdemir, S; Alkan, A; Bakir, S

    2012-06-01

    The effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) produced by a third-generation (3G) mobile phone (MP) on rat brain tissues were investigated in terms of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), biochemistry, and histopathological evaluations. The rats were randomly assigned to two groups: Group 1 is composed of 3G-EMR-exposed rats (n = 9) and Group 2 is the control group (n = 9). The first group was subjected to EMR for 20 days. The control group was not exposed to EMR. Choline (Cho), creatinin (Cr), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) levels were evaluated by MRS. Catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) enzyme activities were measured by spectrophotometric method. Histopathological analyses were carried out to evaluate apoptosis in the brain tissues of both groups. In MRS, NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and NAA/Cho ratios were not significantly different between Groups 1 and 2. Neither the oxidative stress parameters, CAT and GSH-Px, nor the number of apoptotic cells were significantly different between Groups 1 and 2. Usage of short-term 3G MP does not seem to have a harmful effect on rat brain tissue.

  1. Phase II Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guided Focal Laser Ablation of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eggener, Scott E; Yousuf, Ambereen; Watson, Sydeaka; Wang, Shiyang; Oto, Aytekin

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging guided focal laser ablation is an investigational strategy for the treatment of prostate cancer. This phase II evaluation of focal laser ablation included men with stage T1c-T2a, prostate specific antigen less than 15 ng/ml or prostate specific antigen density less than 0.15 ng/ml(3), Gleason 7 or less in 25% or less of biopsies and magnetic resonance imaging with 1 or 2 lesions concordant with biopsy detected cancer. At 3 months all patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging with biopsy of ablation zone(s). At 12 months all underwent magnetic resonance imaging and systematic biopsy. I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) and SHIM (Sexual Health Inventory for Men) scores were collected before focal laser ablation, and at 1, 3 and 12 months. The primary end point was no cancer on the 3-month ablation zone biopsy. Secondary end points were safety, 12-month biopsy, and urinary and sexual function. In the 27 men median age was 62 years and mean prostate specific antigen was 4.4 ng/ml. Biopsy Gleason score was 6 in 23 patients (85%) and Gleason 7 in 4 (15%). Seven men (26%) had low volume Gleason 6 disease outside the intended ablation zone(s). At 3 months 26 patients (96%) had no evidence of cancer on magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy of the ablation zone. No significant I-PSS changes were observed (each p >0.05). SHIM was lower at 1 month (p = 0.03), marginally lower at 3 months (p = 0.05) and without a significant difference at 12 months (p = 0.38). At 12-month biopsy cancer was identified in 10 patients (37%), including in the ablation zone(s) in 3 (11%) and outside the ablation zone(s) in 8 (30%) with cancer in and outside the ablation zone in 1. In select men with localized prostate cancer and visible magnetic resonance imaging lesions focal laser ablation has an acceptable morbidity profile and is associated with encouraging short-term oncologic outcomes. Significantly longer followup is mandatory to fully assess this

  2. Myocardial ischemia evaluation with dual-source computed tomography: comparison with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Carlos; Vázquez, María; Oca, Roque; Vilar, Manuel; Trinidad, Carmen; Sanmartin, Marcelo

    2013-11-01

    Computed tomography does not accurately determine which coronary lesions lead to myocardial ischemia and consequently further tests are required to evaluate ischemia induction. The aim of this study was to compare diagnostic accuracy between dual-energy computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability in patients suspected of coronary artery disease. A prospective study was performed in 56 consecutive patients (39 men [69.6%]; mean age [standard deviation], 63 [10]; range, 23-81). Computed tomography was performed with the following protocol: 1, adenosine stress perfusion; 2, coronary angiography; and 3, delayed enhancement. Magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of stress perfusion and delayed enhancement was performed within 30 days. Two observers in consensus analyzed the perfusion and delayed enhancement images. We studied 952 myocardial segments and 168 vascular territories. In a per-segment analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of computed tomography compared with magnetic resonance were 76%, 99%, 89%, and 98% for perfusion defects, and 64%, 99%, 82%, and 99% for delayed enhancement, respectively. In a per-vascular territory analysis, the same measures were 78%, 97%, 86%, and 95% for perfusion defects, and 72%, 99%, 93%, and 97% for delayed enhancement, respectively. The mean radiation dose was 8.2 (2) mSv. Dual-source computed tomography may allow accurate and concomitant evaluation of perfusion defects and myocardial viability and analysis of coronary anatomy. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in evaluation of congenital/developmental brain abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Shekdar, Karuna; Wang, Dah-Jyuu

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is an invaluable tool to study brain development and in vivo metabolism of brain. MRS is a noninvasive method and also does not involve ionizing radiation. The spectral patterns obtained from MRS evaluation provide unique information about the neonatal brain in several disease processes including hypoxic-ischemic injury, white matter and metabolic disorders, seizure disorders, and brain tumors. MRS also provides quantitative information about specific metabolites that is useful in the diagnosis and in evaluating treatment response of the disease. This discussion is limited to the use of MRS in evaluation of congenital or developmental brain abnormalities. The discussion of clinical utility of MRS is preceded by a brief overview of the technical aspects of MRS, followed by description of normal brain spectra in the neonates and the changes with normal brain development.

  4. Cine-magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of communication between middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts and cisterns.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, T; Taoka, T; Nikaido, Y; Shiomi, K; Fujimoto, T; Otsuka, H; Takeuchi, H

    1996-06-01

    Cine-magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations were performed in 10 patients with middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts to evaluate communication between the cysts and the normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space. Eight of 10 patients were evaluated by time of flight cine-MR imaging, and two by phase contrast cine-MR imaging. Two patients underwent membranectomy of the cysts, and were evaluated both pre- and postoperatively. Computed tomography cisternography was used to confirm communication between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns. Pulsatile fluid motion within the cysts was present in all patients. However, marked fluid motion and jet flow between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns were only observed in communicating cysts. In the two patients who underwent membranectomy, postoperative examination found greater fluid motion and jet flow not previously present. Cine-MR imaging demonstration of marked pulsatile fluid motion accompanied by jet flow suggests that a cyst communicates with the normal CSF space.

  5. Basic T1 Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of the therapeutic effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chun; Feng, Xiaoyan; Bian, Dujun; Du, Wanping; Wang, Xiangquan; Zhao, Yan

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the dynamic changes of blood perfusion coinciding with tumor regression after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Thirty patients with LACC received conventional 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging scans at 3 different times (before NACT, 2 weeks after the first NACT, and 2 weeks after the second NACT). Characteristics of time-intensity diagrams and patterns of blood perfusion maps according to the parameter of area under the curve (AUC) were observed. Eight perfusion parameters were compared among 3 time points at 2 different chemotherapy-sensitive groups by the software of Basic T1 Perfusion. The effective chemotherapy rate was 73.3% (22/30). The characteristic of time-intensity diagrams in cervical cancer was a rapid onset with plateau. There were 3 patterns of AUC perfusion maps. The common perfusion map was rich blood supply type in the effective chemotherapy group and peripheral blood supply type in the ineffective chemotherapy group. Four parameter values (relative enhancement, maximum enhancement, wash-in rate, and AUC) were significantly reduced 2 weeks after the second NACT than those before the therapy (P = 0.000; P = 0.009; P = 0.011; and P = 0.000) in the effective chemotherapy group, especially the value of relative enhancement 2 weeks after the first NACT, was obviously decreased compared to that before the therapy (P = 0.042). The value of time to peak 2 weeks after the second NACT was significantly longer than that before the therapy in the effective chemotherapy group (P = 0.001). There were no obvious changes of blood perfusion parameters among the 3 different times in the ineffective chemotherapy group. Tumor blood perfusion has obviously decreased after effective NACT in the treatment of LACC.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of residual breast tissue following mastectomy and reconstruction with silicone implants.

    PubMed

    Zippel, Douglas; Tsehmaister-Abitbol, Vered; Rundstein, Arie; Shalmon, Anat; Zbar, Andrew; Nardini, Gil; Novikov, Ilya; Sklair-Levy, Miri

    2015-01-01

    We present our use of magnetic resonance (MR) measurement to determine the amount of residual breast tissue (RBT) following total mastectomy with reconstruction. Breast MR images of 45 women who underwent surgery between January and November 2011 were reviewed. The cohort included therapeutic and prophylactic mastectomies. RBT was evaluated at four points with a digital caliper assessing T2-weighted and T1-weighted images. Patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma tended to have less RBT than in prophylactic surgery. Greater age and recent surgery both correlated with larger RBT. Variable thickness of RBT is demonstrable following mastectomy and implant reconstruction using MR imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Forward models for extending the mechanical damage evaluation capability of resonant ultrasound spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Goodlet, B R; Torbet, C J; Biedermann, E J; Jauriqui, L M; Aldrin, J C; Pollock, T M

    2017-02-08

    Finite element (FE) modeling has been coupled with resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of high temperature damage induced by mechanical loading. Forward FE models predict mode-specific changes in resonance frequencies (ΔfR), inform RUS measurements of mode-type, and identify diagnostic resonance modes sensitive to individual or multiple concurrent damage mechanisms. The magnitude of modeled ΔfR correlate very well with the magnitude of measured ΔfR from RUS, affording quantitative assessments of damage. This approach was employed to study creep damage in a polycrystalline Ni-based superalloy (Mar-M247) at 950°C. After iterative applications of creep strains up to 8.8%, RUS measurements recorded ΔfR that correspond to the accumulation of plastic deformation and cracks in the gauge section of a cylindrical dog-bone specimen. Of the first 50 resonance modes that occur, ranging from 3 to 220kHz, modes classified as longitudinal bending were most sensitive to creep damage while transverse bending modes were found to be largely unaffected. Measure to model comparisons of ΔfR show that the deformation experienced by the specimen during creep, specifically uniform elongation of the gauge section, is responsible for a majority of the measured ΔfR until at least 6.1% creep strain. After 8.8% strain considerable surface cracking along the gauge section of the dog-bone was observed, for which FE models indicate low-frequency longitudinal bending modes are significantly affected. Key differences between historical implementations of RUS for NDE and the FE model-based framework developed herein are discussed, with attention to general implementation of a FE model-based framework for NDE of damage.

  8. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Kissing Bonds using Local Defect Resonance (LDR) Spectroscopy: A Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delrue, S.; Tabatabaeipour, M.; Hettler, J.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    With the growing demand from industry to optimize and further develop existing Non-Destructive Testing & Evaluation (NDT&E) techniques or new methods to detect and characterize incipient damage with high sensitivity and increased quality, ample efforts have been devoted to better understand the typical behavior of kissing bonds, such as delaminations and cracks. Recently, it has been shown experimentally that the nonlinear ultrasonic response of kissing bonds could be enhanced by using Local Defect Resonance (LDR) spectroscopy. LDR spectroscopy is an efficient NDT technique that takes advantage of the characteristic fre- quencies of the defect (defect resonances) in order to provide maximum acoustic wave-defect interaction. In fact, for nonlinear methodologies, the ultrasonic excitation of the sample should occur at either multiples or integer ratios of the characteristic defect resonance frequencies, in order to obtain the highest signal-to-noise response in the nonlinear LDR spectroscopy. In this paper, the potential of using LDR spectroscopy for the detection, localization and characterization of kissing bonds is illustrated using a 3D simulation code for elastic wave propagation in materials containing closed but dynamically active cracks or delaminations. Using the model, we are able to define an appropriate method, based on the Scaling Subtraction Method (SSM), to determine the local defect resonance frequencies of a delamination in a composite plate and to illustrate an increase in defect nonlinearity due to LDR. The simulation results will help us to obtain a better understanding of the concept of LDR and to assist in the further design and testing of LDR spectroscopy for the detection, localization and characterization of kissing bonds.

  9. Approximate formulas for the resonance frequency shift in cavities with big variations of parameters inside small regions

    SciTech Connect

    Dodonov, V. V.

    2010-10-15

    The Mueller-Bethe-Schwinger-Casimir formulas for the frequency shift in electromagnetic resonators are generalized to the case of big variations of electric permittivity inside small regions. These formulas are important, in particular, for the studies of the dynamical Casimir effect.

  10. Electrical and ionic conductivity effects on magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of CuI.

    PubMed

    Yesinowski, James P; Ladouceur, Harold D; Purdy, Andrew P; Miller, Joel B

    2010-12-21

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of two different types of conductivity, electrical and ionic, upon magic-angle spinning NMR spectra. The experimental demonstration of these effects involves (63)Cu, (65)Cu, and (127)I variable temperature MAS-NMR experiments on samples of γ-CuI, a Cu(+)-ion conductor at elevated temperatures as well as a wide bandgap semiconductor. We extend previous observations that the chemical shifts depend very strongly upon the square of the spinning-speed as well as the particular sample studied and the magnetic field strength. By using the (207)Pb resonance of lead nitrate mixed with the γ-CuI as an internal chemical shift thermometer we show that frictional heating effects of the rotor do not account for the observations. Instead, we find that spinning bulk CuI, a p-type semiconductor due to Cu(+) vacancies in nonstoichiometric samples, in a magnetic field generates induced AC electric currents from the Lorentz force that can resistively heat the sample by over 200 °C. These induced currents oscillate along the rotor spinning axis at the spinning speed. Their associated heating effects are disrupted in samples containing inert filler material, indicating the existence of macroscopic current pathways between micron-sized crystallites. Accurate measurements of the temperature-dependence of the (63)Cu and (127)I chemical shifts in such diluted samples reveal that they are of similar magnitude (ca. 0.27 ppm/K) but opposite sign (being negative for (63)Cu), and appear to depend slightly upon the particular sample. This relationship is identical to the corresponding slopes of the chemical shifts versus square of the spinning speed, again consistent with sample heating as the source of the observed large shift changes. Higher drive-gas pressures are required to spin samples that have higher effective electrical conductivities, indicating the presence of a braking effect arising from the induced currents produced by

  11. Electrical and ionic conductivity effects on magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of CuI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesinowski, James P.; Ladouceur, Harold D.; Purdy, Andrew P.; Miller, Joel B.

    2010-12-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of two different types of conductivity, electrical and ionic, upon magic-angle spinning NMR spectra. The experimental demonstration of these effects involves 63Cu, 65Cu, and 127I variable temperature MAS-NMR experiments on samples of γ-CuI, a Cu+-ion conductor at elevated temperatures as well as a wide bandgap semiconductor. We extend previous observations that the chemical shifts depend very strongly upon the square of the spinning-speed as well as the particular sample studied and the magnetic field strength. By using the 207Pb resonance of lead nitrate mixed with the γ-CuI as an internal chemical shift thermometer we show that frictional heating effects of the rotor do not account for the observations. Instead, we find that spinning bulk CuI, a p-type semiconductor due to Cu+ vacancies in nonstoichiometric samples, in a magnetic field generates induced AC electric currents from the Lorentz force that can resistively heat the sample by over 200 °C. These induced currents oscillate along the rotor spinning axis at the spinning speed. Their associated heating effects are disrupted in samples containing inert filler material, indicating the existence of macroscopic current pathways between micron-sized crystallites. Accurate measurements of the temperature-dependence of the 63Cu and 127I chemical shifts in such diluted samples reveal that they are of similar magnitude (ca. 0.27 ppm/K) but opposite sign (being negative for 63Cu), and appear to depend slightly upon the particular sample. This relationship is identical to the corresponding slopes of the chemical shifts versus square of the spinning speed, again consistent with sample heating as the source of the observed large shift changes. Higher drive-gas pressures are required to spin samples that have higher effective electrical conductivities, indicating the presence of a braking effect arising from the induced currents produced by rotating a

  12. Sperm motility parameters to evaluate the seminal quality of Boa constrictor occidentalis, a threatened snake species.

    PubMed

    Tourmente, M; Cardozo, G A; Guidobaldi, H A; Giojalas, L C; Bertona, M; Chiaraviglio, M

    2007-02-01

    Semen quality analysis constitutes a powerful tool to evaluate the fertility potential of males in threatened species. The Argentine boa constrictor or lampalagua (Boa constrictor occidentalis) is a threatened snake species and has been included in Appendix I of CITES. The objective of this work is to characterize the sperm of B. c. occidentalis on the bases of dynamic parameters to improve this species conservation. Dynamic parameters were measured in sperm samples using videomicroscopy and image analysis software. The sperm population showed a high degree of heterogeneity in velocity parameter values and 95% of the cells showed a linear pattern of movement. Studies in other species indicate that the number of motile spermatozoa and their movement speed is directly correlated with fertilization success. This work will help to establish basic parameter values for the evaluation of the reproductive potential of populations of B. c. occidentalis and to resolve questions referred to its reproductive strategies.

  13. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments.

    PubMed

    Torrezan, A C; Mayer Alegre, T P; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5 x 10(10) spins/GHz(1/2) despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  14. Radiological evaluation by magnetic resonance of the 'new anatomy' of transsexual patients undergoing male to female sex reassignment surgery.

    PubMed

    Brunocilla, E; Soli, M; Franceschelli, A; Schiavina, R; Borghesi, M; Gentile, G; Pultrone, C V; Martorana, G; Orrei, M G; Colombo, F

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is the best way to assess the new anatomy of the pelvis after male to female (MtF) sex reassignment surgery. The aim of the study was to evaluate the radiological appearance of the small pelvis after MtF surgery and to compare it with the normal women's anatomy. Fifteen patients who underwent MtF surgery were subjected to pelvic MR at least 6 months after surgery. The anthropometric parameters of the small pelvis were measured and compared with those of ten healthy women (control group). Our personal technique (creation of the mons Veneris under the pubic skin) was performed in all patients. In patients who underwent MtF surgery, the mean neovaginal depth was slightly superior than in women (P=0.009). The length of the inferior pelvic aperture and of the inlet of pelvis was higher in the control group (P<0.005). The inclination between the axis of the neovagina and the inferior pelvis aperture, the thickness of the mons Veneris and the thickness of the rectovaginal septum were comparable between the two study groups. MR consents a detailed assessment of the new pelvic anatomy after MtF surgery. The anthropometric parameters measured in our patients were comparable with those of women.

  15. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of transfusional iron overload in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Emmanouil; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Karali, Vasiliki; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Sfikakis, Petros P.; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes represent a group of heterogeneous hematopoietic neoplasms derived from an abnormal multipotent progenitor cell, characterized by a hyperproliferative bone marrow, dysplasia of the cellular hemopoietic elements and ineffective erythropoiesis. Anemia is a common finding in myelodysplastic syndrome patients, and blood transfusions are the only therapeutic option in approximately 40% of cases. The most serious side effect of regular blood transfusion is iron overload. Currently, cardiovascular magnetic resonance using T2 is routinely used to identify patients with myocardial iron overload and to guide chelation therapy, tailored to prevent iron toxicity in the heart. This is a major validated non-invasive measure of myocardial iron overloading and is superior to surrogates such as serum ferritin, liver iron, ventricular ejection fraction and tissue Doppler parameters. The indication for iron chelation therapy in myelodysplastic syndrome patients is currently controversial. However, cardiovascular magnetic resonance may offer an excellent non-invasive, diagnostic tool for iron overload assessment in myelodysplastic syndromes. Further studies are needed to establish the precise indications of chelation therapy and the clinical implications of this treatment on survival in myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:26190429

  16. An automated procedure for material parameter evaluation for viscoplastic constitutive models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbrie, P. K.; James, G. H.; Hill, P. S.; Allen, D. H.; Haisler, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    An automated procedure is presented for evaluating the material parameters in Walker's exponential viscoplastic constitutive model for metals at elevated temperature. Both physical and numerical approximations are utilized to compute the constants for Inconel 718 at 1100 F. When intermediate results are carefully scrutinized and engineering judgement applied, parameters may be computed which yield stress output histories that are in agreement with experimental results. A qualitative assessment of the theta-plot method for predicting the limiting value of stress is also presented. The procedure may also be used as a basis to develop evaluation schemes for other viscoplastic constitutive theories of this type.

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging parameters correlate with advanced revised-ISS and angiopoietin-1/angiopoietin-2 ratio in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Terpos, Evangelos; Matsaridis, Dimitris; Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Zagouri, Flora; Christoulas, Dimitrios; Fontara, Sophia; Panourgias, Evangelia; Gavriatopoulou, Maria; Kastritis, Efstathios; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Moulopoulos, Lia A

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) who were treated with novel anti-myeloma agents. We studied 60 previously untreated MM patients at diagnosis, 14 with smoldering MM (SMM) and 5 with MGUS. All patients underwent MRI of the thoracolumbar spine and pelvis before the administration of any kind of therapy, and DCE-MRI was performed. The MRI perfusion parameters evaluated were wash-in (WIN), washout (WOUT), time-to-peak (TTPK), time-to-maximum slope (TMSP), and the WIN/TMSP ratio. The following serum levels of angiogenic cytokines were measured on the day of MRI: VEGF, angiogenin (Ang), angiopoietin-1 (Angp-1), and -2 (Angp-2). Symptomatic MM patients had increased WIN compared to SMM (p < 0.05) and MGUS patients (p = 0.001). TTPK was decreased, and WIN/TMSP was increased in both symptomatic and SMM patients compared to MGUS patients (p < 0.05). Symptomatic MM patients had decreased TMSP compared to MGUS patients. The Angp-1/Angp-2 ratio was reduced in symptomatic MM compared to SMM (p = 0.017) and MGUS patients (p < 0.001). TTPK correlated with Angp-1/Angp-2 ratio and importantly with R-ISS. Patients with R-ISS-3 had lower TTPK median value (23 s, range 18-29 s) compared to patients with R-ISS-2 (48 s, range 27-68 s) and patients with R-ISS-1 MM (54 s, range 42-76 s; p ANOVA = 0.01). A subset of patients with low TTPK (lower quartile) had shorter time to progression compared to all other patients. These data suggest that certain DCE-MRI parameters correlate with R-ISS and adverse prognostic features of angiogenesis, such as the ratio of Angp-1/Angp-2.

  18. On the evaluation of vorticity using cardiovascular magnetic resonance velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J; Larose, E; Pibarot, P; Kadem, L

    2013-12-01

    Vorticity and vortical structures play a fundamental role affecting the evaluation of energetic aspects (mainly left ventricle work) of cardiovascular function. Vorticity can be derived from cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging velocity measurements. However, several numerical schemes can be used to evaluate the vorticity field. The main objective of this work is to assess different numerical schemes used to evaluate the vorticity field derived from CMR velocity measurements. We compared the vorticity field obtained using direct differentiation schemes (eight-point circulation and Chapra) and derivate differentiation schemes (Richardson 4* and compact Richardson 4*) from a theoretical velocity field and in vivo CMR velocity measurements. In all cases, the effect of artificial spatial resolution up-sampling and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on vorticity computation was evaluated. Theoretical and in vivo results showed that the eight-point circulation method underestimated vorticity. Up-sampling evaluation showed that the artificial improvement of spatial resolution had no effect on mean absolute vorticity estimation but it affected SNR for all methods. The Richardson 4* method and its compact version were the most accurate and stable methods for vorticity magnitude evaluation. Vorticity field determination using the eight-point circulation method, the most common method used in CMR, has reduced accuracy compared to other vorticity schemes. Richardson 4* and its compact version showed stable SNR using both theoretical and in vivo data.

  19. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: clinical implications in the evaluation of connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Markousis-Mavrogenis, George; Koutsogeorgopoulou, Loukia; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is a recently developed noninvasive, nonradiating, operator-independent technique that has been successfully used for the evaluation of congenital heart disease, valvular and pericardial diseases, iron overload, cardiomyopathies, great and coronary vessel diseases, cardiac inflammation, stress–rest myocardial perfusion, and fibrosis. Rheumatoid arthritis and other spondyloarthropathies, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory myopathies, mixed connective tissue diseases (CTDs), systemic sclerosis, vasculitis, and sarcoidosis are among CTDs with serious cardiovascular involvement; this is due to multiple causative factors such as myopericarditis, micro/macrovascular disease, coronary artery disease, myocardial fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and finally heart failure. The complicated pathophysiology and the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality of CTDs demand a versatile, noninvasive, nonradiative diagnostic tool for early cardiovascular diagnosis, risk stratification, and treatment follow-up. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging can detect early silent cardiovascular lesions, assess disease acuteness, and reliably evaluate the effect of both cardiac and rheumatic medication in the cardiovascular system, due to its capability to perform tissue characterization and its high spatial resolution. However, until now, high cost; lack of interaction between cardiologists, radiologists, and rheumatologists; lack of availability; and lack of experts in the field have limited its wider adoption in the clinical practice. PMID:28546762

  20. Clinical application of radial magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Honda, H; Morihara, T; Arai, Y; Horii, M; Ito, H; Furukawa, R; Kida, Y; Sukenari, T; Ikoma, K; Oda, R; Yamada, Y; Fujiwara, H; Kubo, T

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is useful for evaluating the rotator cuff, but some tendinous insertions cannot be assessed using oblique sagittal, oblique coronal, and axial magnetic resonance (MR) images because of the presence of the partial volume effect. The purpose of this study was to determine whether radial-slice MR images could reveal normal rotator cuff insertions and rotator cuff tears more clearly than conventional MR images. The study included 18 subjects with normal rotator cuffs and 30 with rotator cuff tears. MR images of rotator cuff insertions sliced into radial, oblique coronal, and axial sections were obtained. The extent to which normal rotator cuff insertions and rotator cuff tears were visualized in each of the three MR images was evaluated. The top to posterior portions of the rotator cuff insertions from 0° to 120° could be visualized in the radial MR images. In comparison, the posterior portions of the rotator cuff insertions could not be visualized around 45° in both the oblique coronal and axial MR images. These findings demonstrate that radial MR images are superior to the oblique coronal and axial MR images regarding their ability to accurately visualize rotator cuff insertions. Radial MR images also revealed greater detail around 45° in the posterior area of the rotator cuff tears than the oblique coronal and axial MR images. Radial MR images are particularly useful for visualizing clinically important posterosuperior rotator cuff tears. Level III - Diagnostic study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Dependence of the spin-wave resonance spectra in ferrite–garnet films on the microwave field frequency and damping parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Zyuzun, A. M. Bakulin, M. A.; Bezborodov, S. V.; Radaikin, V. V.; Sabaev, S. N.

    2016-04-15

    The factors affecting the slope of the dispersion curve of the spin-wave resonance spectrum in multilayer films are determined. It is shown that an increase in the slope of the curve for the transverse orientation of the constant magnetic field relative to the film upon an increase in frequency is due to enhancement of dynamic as well as dissipative mechanisms of spin pinning. It is found that an increase in the damping parameter increases the degree of spin pinning in the case when the pinning layer is a reactive medium for spin oscillations and can decrease the degree of pinning when it is a dispersive medium. The conditions ensuring a higher degree of accuracy in determining the exchange interaction constant from the spin-wave resonance spectrum in multilayer films are determined.

  2. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Method for calculating a negative-dispersion resonator-type multilayer mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholokhonova, Polina A.; Erg, G. V.

    2005-11-01

    A method is proposed for the calculation of negative-dispersion mirrors with resonator cavities. The mirror optimisation algorithm combines the capabilities of the gradient method and the random search method. A multilayer mirror structure with a reflectivity R>99.9% and a group delay dispersion of -60±10 fs2 in the 930-1070 nm wavelength range was calculated. The sensitivity of the obtained structure to random variations of layer thicknesses was analysed.

  3. Detection and Classification of Buried UXO and Determination of Seafloor Parameters in Littoral Environments using Resonance Scattering Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-02

    Environmental Technology Technical Symposium and Workshop, Washington, D.C. Cobb, W. (2006), Acoustic identification of filler materials in unexploded...Underwater UXO Using Resonance Scattered Sonar, Partners in Environmental Technology Technical Symposium and Workshop, Washington, D.C., Dec. 1-3...Nelson, H., Yoder, T, Kraus, L. and Carin L., 2009, Broadband, Multi-Aspect Scattering from UXO, Partners in Environmental Technology Technical

  4. Numerical evaluation of aperture coupling in resonant cavities and frequency perturbation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, R.; Nayak, B.; Sharma, A.; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a general formulation for numerical evaluation of the coupling between two identical resonant cavities by a small elliptical aperture in a plane common wall of arbitrary thickness. It is organized into two parts. In the first one we discuss the aperture coupling that is expressed in terms of electric and magnetic dipole moments and polarizabilities using Carlson symmetric elliptical integrals. Carlson integrals have been numerically evaluated and under zero thickness approximation, the results match with the complete elliptical integrals of first and second kind. It is found that with zero wall thickness, the results obtained are the same as those of Bethe and Collin for an elliptical and circular aperture of zero thickness. In the second part, Slater's perturbation method is applied to find the frequency changes due to apertures of finite thickness on the cavity wall.

  5. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography in the evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Amparo, E G; Hoddick, W K; Hricak, H; Sollitto, R; Justich, E; Filly, R A; Higgins, C B

    1985-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate abdominal aortic aneurysms in 27 patients. The findings were compared retrospectively with CT, ultrasound (US), and angiography in 17 cases and prospectively with US in 10 cases. MRI identified the renal arteries in all cases, demonstrated involvement at or above the origin of the renal arteries in eight patients, and showed extension of the aneurysm into the iliac arteries in 12 cases. The outer dimension of the aneurysm, the diameter of the residual lumen, and the length of the aneurysm were measured easily from the MR images. The measurements of transverse dimension of the abdominal aortic aneurysm were similar for MRI, CT, and US. MRI more accurately defined extension above the renal arteries and below the aortic bifurcation. It is concluded that MRI provides the necessary information for the surveillance and preoperative evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  6. Evaluation of Possible Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Diagnostic Techniques for Tokamak Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; T.W. Kornack; D. Majeski; G. Schilling; C.H. Skinner; R. Wilson

    2002-08-05

    Potential applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diagnostic techniques to tokamak experiments are evaluated. NMR frequencies for hydrogen isotopes and low-Z nuclei in such experiments are in the frequency range approximately equal to 20-200 MHz, so existing RF [radio-frequency] antennas could be used to rotate the spin polarization and to make the NMR measurements. Our tentative conclusion is that such measurements are possible if highly spin polarized H or (superscript)3He gas sources (which exist) are used to fuel these plasmas. In addition, NMR measurements of the surface layers of the first wall (without plasma) may also be possible, e.g., to evaluate the inventory of tritium inside the vessel.

  7. Evaluation Of Automated Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Relaxometry For Analysis Of Silicone Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    M. H. Wilson

    2009-10-02

    Screening studies and Design of Experiments (DoE) were performed to evaluate measurement variation of a new, non-destructive Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) test system designed to assess age-induced degradation of Outer Pressure Pads (OPP). The test method and results from 54,275 measurements are described. A reduction in measurement error was obtained after metal support struts were replaced with plastic support struts adjacent to the front position of the test chamber. However, remaining interference and a lack of detecting any age-related degradation prevent the use of the NMR system as a non-destructive surveillance test for OPPs. A cursory evaluation of the system with cellular silicone samples obtained more uniform results with increased error as measurements approached the sample’s edge.

  8. Clinical applications of advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques for arthritis evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Martín Noguerol, Teodoro; Luna, Antonio; Gómez Cabrera, Marta; Riofrio, Alexie D

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has allowed a comprehensive evaluation of articular disease, increasing the detection of early cartilage involvement, bone erosions, and edema in soft tissue and bone marrow compared to other imaging techniques. In the era of functional imaging, new advanced MRI sequences are being successfully applied for articular evaluation in cases of inflammatory, infectious, and degenerative arthropathies. Diffusion weighted imaging, new fat suppression techniques such as DIXON, dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI, and specific T2 mapping cartilage sequences allow a better understanding of the physiopathological processes that underlie these different arthropathies. They provide valuable quantitative information that aids in their differentiation and can be used as potential biomarkers of articular disease course and treatment response. PMID:28979849

  9. Evaluation of cathepsin B activity for degrading collagen IV using a surface plasmon resonance method and circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Atsushi; Kabeya, Mitsutaka; Ishida, Yuuki; Yanagida, Akio; Shibusawa, Yoichi; Sugawara, Masao

    2014-07-01

    Evaluation of cathepsin B activities for degrading collagen IV and heat-denatured collagen IV (gelatin) were performed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and circular dichroism (CD) measurements. The optimal pH of cathepsin B activity for degrading each substrate was around 4.0. The ΔRU(15 min), which is a decrease in the SPR signal at 15 min after injection of cathepsin B, was smaller for collagen IV than for heat-denatured collagen IV owing to the presence of triple-helical conformation. An unstable nature of the triple-helical conformation of collagen IV at pH 4.0 was shown by the CD study. Degrading collagen IV by cathepsin B was facilitated owing to a local unwinding of the triple-helical conformation caused by proteolytic cleavage of the non-helical region. The concentration dependence of the initial velocity for degrading collagen IV by cathepsin B at pH 4.0 was biphasic, showing that cathepsin B at low concentration exhibits exopeptidase activity, while the enzyme at high concentration exhibits endopeptidase activity. The kinetic parameters for the exopeptidase activity of cathepsin B toward collagen IV and heat-treated collagen IV were evaluated and discussed in terms of the protease mechanism.

  10. Theoretical-Experimental Method for Evaluating the Elastic and Damping Characteristics of Soft Materials Based on Studying the Resonance Flexural Vibrations of Test Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Firsov, V. A.; Gyunal, I.; Shishkin, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    A hardware and software system for studying the damping and elastic properties of soft materials in a low-frequency range of deformation up to 100 Hz, which most fully corresponds to the range of dynamic actions in actual service conditions of structures, is proposed. A novel identification method for evaluating the elastic and damping properties of soft materials in shear is developed. It employs the frequency and amplitude characteristics of the resonance flexural vibrations of three-layer test specimens with a soft inner layer. Identification of the elastic shear properties is based on a comparison of calculated and experimental frequencies of resonance vibrations of test specimens. To evaluate the shear damping properties of soft materials, the condition of minimum of an objective function containing experimental and calculated amplitudes of vibrations of the free end of a test specimen is used. The possibility of evaluating the properties mentioned from the experimental and calculated internal damping parameters of test specimens, which significantly reduces the laboriousness of the problem considered, is shown. Numerical calculations are carried out for identifying the elastic and damping characteristics of a technical rubber in shear based on an analysis of resonance flexural vibrations of seven test specimens with outer layers made of a D16AT aluminum alloy.

  11. Classification of the micro and nanoparticles and biological agents by neural network analysis of the parameters of optical resonance of whispering gallery mode in dielectric microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    A novel technique for the label-free analysis of micro and nanoparticles including biomolecules using optical micro cavity resonance of whispering-gallery-type modes is being developed. Various schemes of the method using both standard and specially produced microspheres have been investigated to make further development for microbial application. It was demonstrated that optical resonance under optimal geometry could be detected under the laser power of less 1 microwatt. The sensitivity of developed schemes has been tested by monitoring the spectral shift of the whispering gallery modes. Water solutions of ethanol, ascorbic acid, blood phantoms including albumin and HCl, glucose, biotin, biomarker like C reactive protein so as bacteria and virus phantoms (gels of silica micro and nanoparticles) have been used. Structure of resonance spectra of the solutions was a specific subject of investigation. Probabilistic neural network classifier for biological agents and micro/nano particles classification has been developed. Several parameters of resonance spectra as spectral shift, broadening, diffuseness and others have been used as input parameters to develop a network classifier for micro and nanoparticles and biological agents in solution. Classification probability of approximately 98% for probes under investigation have been achieved. Developed approach have been demonstrated to be a promising technology platform for sensitive, lab-on-chip type sensor which can be used for development of diagnostic tools for different biological molecules, e.g. proteins, oligonucleotides, oligosaccharides, lipids, small molecules, viral particles, cells as well as in different experimental contexts e.g. proteomics, genomics, drug discovery, and membrane studies.

  12. Magnetic resonance angiography for the evaluation of vascular injury in knee dislocations.

    PubMed

    Tocci, Stephen L; Heard, Wendell M R; Fadale, Paul D; Brody, Jeffrey M; Born, Christopher

    2010-12-01

    Knee dislocations can cause extensive soft tissue disruption including vascular insufficiency to the leg secondary to popliteal artery injury. Physical exam may miss vascular injury and possible late occlusion, but there is controversy regarding use of angiography to evaluate patients after dislocation. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) has been shown to be equally effective as angiography in evaluating vascular injury and to have fewer complications than angiography. Patients with knee dislocations routinely receive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess ligament integrity. The purpose of our study was to determine whether it may be prudent and convenient to obtain an MR angiogram at the same time as an MRI scan, with less morbidity and discomfort than with conventional angiography. Sixteen patients with frank and occult knee dislocations were prospectively evaluated over 2 years. After reduction, a physical exam was performed including ankle brachial index (ABI). With ABI < 0.90, emergent vascular surgery consult and angiogram was performed. Patients with ABI > 0.90 were observed for 3 days with serial physical exams, and MRI/MRA was performed as soon as possible. Sixteen dislocations were identified. Two of 16 (12.5%) had abnormal ABIs and received an angiogram and subsequent revascularization. Two had normal exams, but refused MRA. Twelve had normal exams and received MRI/MRA showing a normal popliteal artery with no adverse events. ABI had 100% sensitivity for vascular injury; however, there remains concern among treating surgeons about missing an occult injury such as an intimal tear. Because MRA has been shown to be as accurate and useful as angiography, we may be able to evaluate ligamentous and vascular injury simultaneously with less morbidity than that with conventional angiography.

  13. Study of the selection of indicator parameters in marine water quality evaluation and the evaluation methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Pan, Delu; Wang, Difeng; Fu, Dongyang

    2014-10-01

    In order to obtain the indicator types which must be introduced in marine water quality evaluation as well as the suitable evaluation methodology, GB3097-1997 National Marine Water Quality Standards is, in the first place, analyzed to establish a hypothetical sample which is consisting of 2000 stances, each stance containing the information of 21 indicators. And then a stepwise discriminant method is utilized to filter the 21 indicators in accordance with their water quality classification discriminant abilities. And finally, 6 indicators with significant discriminant ability, biochemical oxygen demand(BOD5), oil type(Oil), total phosphorus(P), cadmium(Cd), cyanide(HH) and chemical oxygen demand(COD), are selected and the water quality evaluation chart of the corresponding six indicators is also established. Theoretically, the water quality indicator types and the suitable evaluation methodology, which must be introduced when the water quality evaluation is done in all the waters under the jurisdiction of China, are discussed in this paper, providing theoretical basis for the subsequent marine water quality evaluation based on field observation.

  14. Nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.; Pernarowski, Mark; Bosley, David L.

    1990-04-01

    The subjects discussed are: transient and sustained resonance for systems with very slowly varying parameters; free electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillations in biological systems. Plans are discussed for: FEL applications; transient and sustained resonance; and bursting oscillations.

  15. Multi-frequency weak signal detection based on wavelet transform and parameter compensation band-pass multi-stable stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dongying; li, Pei; An, Shujun; Shi, Peiming

    2016-03-01

    In actual fault diagnosis, useful information is often submerged in heavy noise, and the feature information is difficult to extract. A novel weak signal detection method aimed at the problem of detecting multi-frequency signals buried under heavy background noise is proposed based on wavelet transform and parameter compensation band-pass multi-stable stochastic resonance (SR). First, the noisy signal is processed by parameter compensation, with the noise and system parameters expanded 10 times to counteract the effect of the damping term. The processed signal is decomposed into multiple signals of different scale frequencies by wavelet transform. Following this, we adjust the size of the scaled signals' amplitudes and reconstruct the signals; the weak signal frequency components are then enhanced by multi-stable stochastic resonance. The enhanced components of the signal are processed through a band-pass filter, leaving the enhanced sections of the signal. The processed signal is analyzed by FFT to achieve detection of the multi-frequency weak signals. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed method can enhance the signal amplitude, can effectively detect multi-frequency weak signals buried under heavy noise and is valuable and usable for bearing fault signal analysis.

  16. Evaluation of aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics with phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging in normal pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Mehmet; Sığırcı, Ahmet; Ünlü, Serkan

    This study aimed to determine differences according to age groups and gender in the parameters of aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in childhood using phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method. This prospective study included 47 boys and 36 girls for a total of 83 healthy children. The cases were divided into three groups depending on age as infants (1-12 months), children (12-120 months), and adolescents (120-204 months). To quantitatively evaluate CSF flow, images in the transverse plane were taken at the cerebral aqueduct level using the phase-contrast MR angiography technique in a 1.5-T MR unit. Peak and average velocity (cm/s), cranial direction, caudal direction and net volume (ml), and aqueduct area (mm(2)) were calculated. To assess differences between the groups, a one-way analysis of variance and least significant difference tests were used. A statistically significant difference was determined between children and adolescents in peak velocity and caudal direction volume (P=.012 and P=.039, respectively) and between infants and children in cranial direction volume (P=.036). Peak velocity, cranial direction, and net volume were higher in boys (P=.050, P=.016, and P=.029, respectively). There were no differences by age and gender in the aqueduct area. In conclusion, this study determined the normal values for the CSF flow parameters of velocity, volume, and aqueduct area using phase-contrast MRI in healthy children. Velocity and volume parameters varied according to age and sex and were not affected in the aqueductal area. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Incidence and Evaluation of Incidental Abnormal Bone Marrow Signal on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Gunjan L.; Rosenberg, Aaron S.; Jarboe, Jamie; Klein, Andreas; Cossor, Furha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The increased use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has resulted in reports of incidental abnormal bone marrow (BM) signal. Our goal was to determine the evaluation of an incidental abnormal BM signal on MRI and the prevalence of a subsequent oncologic diagnosis. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients over age 18 undergoing MRI between May 2005 and October 2010 at Tufts Medical Center (TMC) with follow-up through November 2013. The electronic medical record was queried to determine imaging site, reason for scan, evaluation following radiology report, and final diagnosis. Results. 49,678 MRIs were done with 110 patients meeting inclusion criteria. Twenty two percent underwent some evaluation, most commonly a complete blood count, serum protein electrophoresis, or bone scan. With median follow-up of 41 months, 6% of patients were diagnosed with malignancies including multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, and metastatic adenocarcinoma. One patient who had not undergone evaluation developed breast cancer 24 months after the MRI. Conclusions. Incidentally noted abnormal or heterogeneous bone marrow signal on MRI was not inconsequential and should prompt further evaluation. PMID:25374938

  18. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of radiation-induced renal damage].

    PubMed

    Haneder, S; Boda-Heggemann, J; Schoenberg, S O; Michaely, H J

    2012-03-01

    The diagnosis of radiation-induced (especially chronic) renal alterations/damage is difficult and currently relies primarily on clinical evaluation. The importance of renal diagnostic evaluation will increase continuously due to the increasing number of long-term survivors after radiotherapy. This article evaluates the potentia diagnostic contribution of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with a focus on functional MRI. The following functional MRI approaches are briefly presented and evaluated: blood oxygenation level-dependent imaging (BOLD), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR perfusion measurements and (23)Na imaging. In summary, only DWI and contrast-enhanced MR perfusion currently seem to be suitable approaches for a broader, clinical implementation. However, up to now valid data from larger patient studies are lacking for both techniques in regard to radiation-induced renal alterations. The BOLD and (23)Na imaging procedures have a huge potential but are currently neither sufficiently evaluated with regard to radiation-induced renal alterations nor technically simple and reliable for implementation into the clinical routine.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of clinical treatment of otospongiosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Vicente, Andy; Chandrasekhar, Sujana S; Yamashita, Helio K; Cruz, Oswaldo Laercio M; Barros, Flavia A; Penido, Norma O

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the applicability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a method for monitoring the activity of otospongiotic lesions before and after clinical treatment. Prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind study. One single tertiary care institution in a large, cosmopolitan city. Twenty-six patients (n = 42 ears) with clinical, audiometric, and tomographic diagnosis of otosclerosis were enrolled. If computed tomography (CT) demonstrated active lesions, these patients underwent MRI to detect otospongiotic foci, seen as areas of gadolinium enhancement. Patients were divided into 3 groups and received treatment with placebo, sodium alendronate, or sodium fluoride for 6 months. After this period, clinical and audiometric evaluations and a second MRI were performed. Each MRI was evaluated by both a neuroradiologist and an otolaryngologist in a subjective (visual) and objective (using specific eFilm Workstation software) manner. Otospongiosis was most predominantly identified in the region anterior to the oval window, and this site was reliable for comparing pre- and posttreatment scans. The patients in the alendronate and sodium fluoride groups had MRI findings that suggested a decrease in activity of otospongiotic lesions, more relevant in the alendronate group. These findings were statistically significant for both subjective and objective MRI evaluations. MRI shows higher sensitivity than clinical or audiometric assessment for detecting reduction in activity of otospongiosis. The objective MRI evaluation based on software analysis was the most accurate method of monitoring clinical treatment response in otospongiosis. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  20. Evaluation of multiatlas label fusion for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging orbital segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Swetasudha; Asman, Andrew J.; Khare, Shweta P.; Thompson, Lindsey; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Multiatlas methods have been successful for brain segmentation, but their application to smaller anatomies remains relatively unexplored. We evaluate seven statistical and voting-based label fusion algorithms (and six additional variants) to segment the optic nerves, eye globes, and chiasm. For nonlocal simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), we evaluate different intensity similarity measures (including mean square difference, locally normalized cross-correlation, and a hybrid approach). Each algorithm is evaluated in terms of the Dice overlap and symmetric surface distance metrics. Finally, we evaluate refinement of label fusion results using a learning-based correction method for consistent bias correction and Markov random field regularization. The multiatlas labeling pipelines were evaluated on a cohort of 35 subjects including both healthy controls and patients. Across all three structures, nonlocal spatial STAPLE (NLSS) with a mixed weighting type provided the most consistent results; for the optic nerve NLSS resulted in a median Dice similarity coefficient of 0.81, mean surface distance of 0.41 mm, and Hausdorff distance 2.18 mm for the optic nerves. Joint label fusion resulted in slightly superior median performance for the optic nerves (0.82, 0.39 mm, and 2.15 mm), but slightly worse on the globes. The fully automated multiatlas labeling approach provides robust segmentations of orbital structures on magnetic resonance imaging even in patients for whom significant atrophy (optic nerve head drusen) or inflammation (multiple sclerosis) is present. PMID:25558466

  1. Mathematical modeling and evaluation of radionuclide transport parameters from the ANL Laboratory Analog Program

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.C.J.; Hull, J.R.; Seitz, M.G.; Sha, W.T.; Shah, V.L.; Soo, S.L.

    1984-07-01

    Computer model simulation is required to evaluate the performance of proposed or future high-level radioactive waste geological repositories. However, the accuracy of a model in predicting the real situation depends on how well the values of the transport properties are prescribed as input parameters. Knowledge of transport parameters is therefore essential. We have modeled ANL's Experiment Analog Program which was designed to simulate long-term radwaste migration process by groundwater flowing through a high-level radioactive waste repository. Using this model and experimental measurements, we have evaluated neptunium (actinide) deposition velocity and analyzed the complex phenomena of simultaneous deposition, erosion, and reentrainment of bentonite when groundwater is flowing through a narrow crack in a basalt rock. The present modeling demonstrates that we can obtain the values of transport parameters, as added information without any additional cost, from the available measurements of laboratory analog experiments. 8 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Important Physiological Parameters and Physical Activity Data for Evaluating Exposure Modeling Performance: a Synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this report is to develop a database of physiological parameters needed for understanding and evaluating performance of the APEX and SHEDS exposure/intake dose rate model used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as part of its regulatory activities. The A...

  3. SENSITIVE PARAMETER EVALUATION FOR A VADOSE ZONE FATE AND TRANSPORT MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents information pertaining to quantitative evaluation of the potential impact of selected parameters on output of vadose zone transport and fate models used to describe the behavior of hazardous chemicals in soil. The Vadose 2one Interactive Processes (VIP) model...

  4. Important Physiological Parameters and Physical Activity Data for Evaluating Exposure Modeling Performance: a Synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this report is to develop a database of physiological parameters needed for understanding and evaluating performance of the APEX and SHEDS exposure/intake dose rate model used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as part of its regulatory activities. The A...

  5. Relating objective measurements to expert evaluation of voice quality in Western classical singing: critical perceptual parameters.

    PubMed

    Ekholm, E; Papagiannis, G C; Chagnon, F P

    1998-06-01

    Communication between voice pedagogues and voice scientists is often impeded by reliance on colorful and sometimes seemingly contradictory descriptions of vocal production and voice quality. A recent study identified perceptual criteria which are generally used by voice experts for the assessment of voice quality in classical singing. In the present study, performances by singers of various voice types and levels of accomplishment were rated by panels of expert voice teachers according to four perceptual criteria: "resonance/ring," "color/warmth," "clarity/focus," and "appropriate vibrato." Subjective ratings were related to objective measurements taken from acoustic analysis of the voice signal. Possible acoustic correlates of critical perceptual parameters influencing judgments of voice quality were thus identified. Results could help bridge the terminology gap between vocal artists and scientists, and help to promote understanding of the way in which acoustic stimuli influence perception of voice quality.

  6. The evaluation of arthroscopic remplissage by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jung; Garcia, Grant; Malhotra, Amit; Major, Nancy; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Kelly, John D

    2012-10-01

    Arthroscopic remplissage is a novel procedure recently advocated for the treatment of large Hill-Sachs lesions with recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. We have shown previously that infraspinatus tenodesis and Bankart repair reduce the risk of recurrent instability in high-risk patients. The ability to perform this procedure arthroscopically and without the need for bone grafting or an open approach makes this an appealing alternative to more traditional techniques. To evaluate and characterize the postoperative appearance of the remplissage procedure on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to correlate these findings to clinical outcome (Western Ontario Shoulder Instability [WOSI] score, range of motion). Case series; Level of evidence, 4. In patients who had undergone arthroscopic remplissage for recurrent glenohumeral instability with large Hill-Sachs defects, images were acquired with a 3-T protocol (and reviewed by 2 musculoskeletal radiologists) with the shoulder in the abduction-external rotation (ABER) and neutral positions at the time of the latest clinical examination. Measured parameters included signal intensity of tissue within the prior defect, signal intensity of the residual infraspinatus, degree of fatty infiltrate and muscle atrophy as a percentage of fat signal versus muscle signal (Goutallier grade), presence of marrow edema, and number of anchors in the defect. Functional scores were obtained with the WOSI questionnaire, and comprehensive range of motion data were recorded with a goniometer. In 11 patients with an average clinical follow-up of 18.0 months (range, 8.8-27.2 months), the average size of the Hill-Sachs deformity was 334.3 mm(3) (range, 93.6-825.1 mm(3)). The percentage of the deformity filled in with tendon was 75% to 100%, and the degree of atrophy was 0% to 25% for all patients studied. No defects were left unfilled. Two patients had granulation tissue filling the lesion, and 3 patients had fibrous tissue

  7. Evaluation of a new parallel numerical parameter optimization algorithm for a dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Ahmet; Tuncel, Mehmet

    2016-10-01

    It is important to have a scalable parallel numerical parameter optimization algorithm for a dynamical system used in financial applications where time limitation is crucial. We use Message Passing Interface parallel programming and present such a new parallel algorithm for parameter estimation. For example, we apply the algorithm to the asset flow differential equations that have been developed and analyzed since 1989 (see [3-6] and references contained therein). We achieved speed-up for some time series to run up to 512 cores (see [10]). Unlike [10], we consider more extensive financial market situations, for example, in presence of low volatility, high volatility and stock market price at a discount/premium to its net asset value with varying magnitude, in this work. Moreover, we evaluated the convergence of the model parameter vector, the nonlinear least squares error and maximum improvement factor to quantify the success of the optimization process depending on the number of initial parameter vectors.

  8. Evaluation of an instrumented walkway for measurement of the kinematic parameters of gait.

    PubMed

    Cutlip, R G; Mancinelli, C; Huber, F; DiPasquale, J

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare kinematic gait parameters measured with an instrumented walkway system (GAITRite(R)) and a video-based system (peak performance motus 3.1(R)). Subjects walked across a GAITRite mat with embedded pressure sensors. Reflective markers were attached to subjects' shoes and video capture was simultaneously performed during each trial. Video data were then digitized manually using peak software. Correlation coefficients for all parameters measured with both systems were high (>/=0.94). Significant differences between systems were found with analysis of variance (ANOVA) for two parameters, step length and stride velocity (P=0.003, 0.0002). The results of this study indicate that the instrumented walkway gave comparable results for temporal parameters but further investigation is needed to evaluate the fidelity of its spatial performance.

  9. 181Ta(n ,γ ) cross section and average resonance parameter measurements in the unresolved resonance region from 24 to 1180 keV using a filtered-beam technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, B. J.; Blain, E.; Daskalakis, A.; Thompson, N.; Youmans, A.; Choun, H. J.; Steinberger, W.; Danon, Y.; Barry, D. P.; Block, R. C.; Epping, B. E.; Leinweber, G.; Rapp, M. R.

    2017-07-01

    A new array of four Deuterated Benzene (C6D6 ) detectors has been installed at the Gaerttner Linear Accelerator Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute for the purpose of measuring neutron capture cross sections in the keV region. Measurements were performed on samples of 181Ta in the unresolved resonance region (URR) using a filtered-beam technique, by which a 30 cm iron filter was placed in a white-spectrum neutron beam to remove all time-dependent γ -ray background and all neutrons except those transmitted through resonance-potential interference "windows" in the iron. The resulting filtered beam was effectively a quasimonoenergetic neutron source, which was used for performing measurements on isotopes with narrow level spacings in the URR. The capture cross-section results obtained for two thicknesses of tantalum are in agreement with those documented in the JEFF-3.2 library, as are the average resonance parameters obtained via a fit to the data using the sammy-fitacs code.

  10. Inverse modeling approach for evaluation of kinetic parameters of a biofilm reactor using tabu search.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B Shiva; Venkateswarlu, Ch

    2014-08-01

    The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm reactors often poses difficulties in analyzing such reactors experimentally. Mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems proves somewhat ineffective due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, we propose an inverse modeling approach based on tabu search (TS) to estimate the parameters of kinetic and film thickness models. TS is used to estimate these parameters as a consequence of the validation of the mathematical models of the process with the aid of measured data obtained from an experimental fixed-bed anaerobic biofilm reactor involving the treatment of pharmaceutical industry wastewater. The results evaluated for different modeling configurations of varying degrees of complexity illustrate the effectiveness of TS for accurate estimation of kinetic and film thickness model parameters of the biofilm process. The results show that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Edward kinetics (with its optimum parameters as mu(max)rho(s)/Y = 24.57, Ks = 1.352 and Ki = 102.36) and three-parameter film thickness expression (with its estimated parameters as a = 0.289 x 10(-5), b = 1.55 x 10(-4) and c = 15.2 x 10(-6)) better describes the biofilm reactor treating the industry wastewater.

  11. Contactless Abdominal Fat Reduction With Selective RF™ Evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Case Study.

    PubMed

    Downie, Jeanine; Kaspar, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Noninvasive body shaping methods seem to be an ascending part of the aesthetics market. As a result, the pressure to develop reliable methods for the collection and presentation of their results has also increased. The most used techniques currently include ultrasound measurements of fat thickness in the treated area, caliper measurements, bioimpedance-based scale measurements or circumferential tape measurements. Although these are the most used techniques, almost all of them have some limitations in reproducibility and/or accuracy. This study shows Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as the new method for the presentation of results in the body shaping industry. Six subjects were treated by a contactless selective radiofrequency device (BTL Vanquish ME, BTL Industries Inc., Boston, MA). The MRI fat thickness was measured at the baseline and at 4-weeks following the treatment. In addition to MRI images and measurements, digital photographs and anthropometric evaluations such as weight, abdominal circumference, and caliper fat thickness measurements were recorded. Abdominal fat thickness measurements from the MRI were performed from the same slices determined by the same tissue artefacts. The MRI fat thickness difference between the baseline measurement and follow up visit showed an average reduction of 5.36 mm as calculated from the data of 5 subjects. One subject dropped out of study due to non-study related issues. The results were statistically significant based on the Student's T-test evaluation. Magnetic resonance imaging abdominal fat thickness measurements seems to be the best method for the evaluation of fat thickness reduction after non-invasive body shaping treatments. In this study, this method shows average fat thickness reduction of 5.36 mm while the weight of the subjects didn't change significantly. A large spot size measuring 1317 cm(2) (204 square inches) covers the abdomen flank to flank. The average thickness of 5.36 mm of the fat layer reduced

  12. Evaluation of thermal effects on the beam quality of disk laser with unstable resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayganmanesh, Mahdi; Beirami, Reza

    2017-01-01

    In this paper thermal effects of the disk active medium and associated effects on the beam quality of laser are investigated. Using Collins integral and iterative method, transverse mode of an unstable resonator including a Yb:YAG active medium in disk geometry is calculated. After that the beam quality of the laser is calculated based on the generalized beam characterization method. Thermal lensing of the disk is calculated based on the OPD (Optical Path Difference) concept. Five factors influencing the OPD including temperature gradient, disk thermal expansion, photo-elastic effect, electronic lens and disk deformation are considered in our calculations. The calculations show that the effect of disk deformation factor on the quality of laser beam in the resonator is strong. However the total effect of all the thermal factors on the internal beam quality is fewer. Also it is shown that thermal effects degrade the output power, beam profile and beam quality of the output laser beam severely. As well the magnitude of each of affecting factors is evaluated distinctly.

  13. Quantitative evaluation of proteins with bicinchoninic acid (BCA): resonance Raman and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering-based methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yu, Zhi; Lee, Youngju; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Bing; Jung, Young Mee

    2012-12-21

    A rapid and highly sensitive bicinchoninic acid (BCA) reagent-based protein quantitation tool was developed using competitive resonance Raman (RR) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) methods. A chelation reaction between BCA and Cu(+), which is reduced by protein in an alkaline environment, is exploited to create a BCA-Cu(+) complex that has strong RR and SERRS activities. Using these methods, protein concentrations in solutions can be quantitatively measured at concentrations as low as 50 μg mL(-1) and 10 pg mL(-1). There are many advantages of using RR and SERRS-based assays. These assays exhibit a much wider linear concentration range and provide an additional one (RR method) to four (SERRS method) orders of magnitude increase in detection limits relative to UV-based methods. Protein-to-protein variation is determined using a reference to a standard curve at concentrations of BSA that exhibits excellent recoveries. These novel methods are extremely accurate in detecting total protein concentrations in solution. This improvement in protein detection sensitivity could yield advances in the biological sciences and medical diagnostic field and extend the applications of reagent-based protein assay techniques.

  14. Centrality dependence of chemical freeze-out parameters from net-proton and net-charge fluctuations using a hadron resonance gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Rama Prasad; Das, Supriya; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Ray, Rajarshi; Samanta, Subhasis

    2017-07-01

    We estimate chemical freeze-out parameters in Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) and Excluded Volume HRG (EVHRG) models by fitting the experimental information of net-proton and net-charge fluctuations measured in Au + Au collisions by the STAR Collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We observe that chemical freeze-out parameters obtained from lower and higher order fluctuations are almost the same for √{sNN}>27 GeV, but tend to deviate from each other at lower √{sNN}. Moreover, these separations increase with decrease of √{sNN}, and for a fixed √{sNN} increase towards central collisions. Furthermore, we observe an approximate scaling behavior of (μB/T ) /(μB/T)central with (Npart) /(Npart)central for the parameters estimated from lower order fluctuations for 11.5 ≤√{sNN}≤200 GeV. Scaling is violated for the parameters estimated from higher order fluctuations for √{sNN}=11.5 and 19.6 GeV. It is observed that the chemical freeze-out parameter, which can describe σ2/M of net protons very well in all energies and centralities, cannot describe the s σ equally well, and vice versa.

  15. Differential uncertainty analysis for evaluating the accuracy of S-parameter retrieval methods for electromagnetic properties of metamaterial slabs.

    PubMed

    Hasar, Ugur Cem; Barroso, Joaquim J; Sabah, Cumali; Kaya, Yunus; Ertugrul, Mehmet

    2012-12-17

    We apply a complete uncertainty analysis, not studied in the literature, to investigate the dependences of retrieved electromagnetic properties of two MM slabs (the first one with only split-ring resonators (SRRs) and the second with SRRs and a continuous wire) with single-band and dual-band resonating properties on the measured/simulated scattering parameters, the slab length, and the operating frequency. Such an analysis is necessary for the selection of a suitable retrieval method together with the correct examination of exotic properties of MM slabs especially in their resonance regions. For this analysis, a differential uncertainty model is developed to monitor minute changes in the dependent variables (electromagnetic properties of MM slabs) in functions of independent variables (scattering (S-) parameters, the slab length, and the operating frequency). Two complementary approaches (the analytical approach and the dispersion model approach) each with different strengths are utilized to retrieve the electromagnetic properties of various MM slabs, which are needed for the application of the uncertainty analysis. We note the following important results from our investigation. First, uncertainties in the retrieved electromagnetic properties of the analyzed MM slabs drastically increase when values of electromagnetic properties shrink to zero or near resonance regions where S-parameters exhibit rapid changes. Second, any low-loss or medium-loss inside the MM slabs due to an imperfect dielectric substrate or a finite conductivity of metals can decrease these uncertainties near resonance regions because these losses hinder abrupt changes in S-parameters. Finally, we note that precise information of especially the slab length and the operating frequency is a prerequisite for accurate analysis of exotic electromagnetic properties of MM slabs (especially multiband MM slabs) near resonance regions.

  16. Impact of gamma analysis parameters on dose evaluation using Gafchromic EBT2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seu-Ran; Park, Ji-Yeon; Suh, Tae-Suk; Park, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2012-10-01

    To recommend optimal gamma analysis parameters (grid size and search range) for detecting dose errors, we evaluated the impact of gamma models and parameters on dose verification in volumetric modulated fields. Delivered doses were verified under open, 45° wedged, and volumetric modulated fields for prostate, anal, head and neck, and brain cancer by using Gafchromic EBT2 films for gamma evaluation. Two gamma models (a conventional method and a modified method to compensate for unintended dose errors caused by misalignments between reference and evaluated matrixes) were employed. The variation in the detected dose errors was evaluated in each gamma model for different grid sizes (0.5, 1, and 2 mm) and search ranges (1, 2, and 4 mm) applied to determine distant-to-agreement. The dose discrepancy of each evaluation was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated using a pass ratio in analysis software developed in-house. The modified gamma model with a small search range and grid size showed a higher pass ratio than the conventional model in volumetric modulated arc therapy. The pass ratio for 2 mm grid size decreased by over 40% as compared to that for 1 mm grid size. The pass ratio decreased by more than 30% as the search range was increased from 1 mm to 4 mm. Therefore, 1 mm grid size and 1 mm search range may be appropriate to evaluate dose errors in modulated fields after using the modified gamma model.

  17. Incremental parameter evaluation from incomplete data with application to the population pharmacology of anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Vlad, Marcel O.; Dan Corlan, Alexandru; Morán, Federico; Oefner, Peter; Ross, John

    2008-01-01

    We develop a method for parameter evaluation from incomplete data. Improved estimates of the desired parameters are evaluated step by step, from experiment to experiment by using both Bayesian and informational methods. We make dynamical, improved predictions while the experiments are still going on and keep and interpret information about local fluctuations, which is lost on applying global techniques. The input of information in small packets leads to semi-analytic methods for data processing. An evolution criterion for parameter evaluation, similar to Fisher's theorem of population selection, is derived. We develop direct processing methods, which can be applied to low dimensional systems, semi-analytic methods based on direct or double logarithmic phase expansions, steepest descent approaches, variation and perturbation methods. The techniques are illustrated by developing a method of long-term planning of treatments with oral anticoagulants based on limited clinical data. The efficiency of treatment by oral anticoagulants depends strongly on various anthropometric and genotypic factors, which lead to large variations of the clinical response. We use the clinical data, which accumulates from medical consultations, for extracting improved, incremental information about the statistical properties of the kinetic and anthropometric parameters for a given patient, which in turn is used for making repeated, improved clinical predictions as the treatment proceeds. PMID:18353988

  18. Evaluation and interpretation of Thematic Mapper ratios in equations for estimating corn growth parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dardner, B. R.; Blad, B. L.; Thompson, D. R.; Henderson, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Reflectance and agronomic Thematic Mapper (TM) data were analyzed to determine possible data transformations for evaluating several plant parameters of corn. Three transformation forms were used: the ratio of two TM bands, logarithms of two-band ratios, and normalized differences of two bands. Normalized differences and logarithms of two-band ratios responsed similarly in the equations for estimating the plant growth parameters evaluated in this study. Two-term equations were required to obtain the maximum predictability of percent ground cover, canopy moisture content, and total wet phytomass. Standard error of estimate values were 15-26 percent lower for two-term estimates of these parameters than for one-term estimates. The terms log(TM4/TM2) and (TM4/TM5) produced the maximum predictability for leaf area and dry green leaf weight, respectively. The middle infrared bands TM5 and TM7 are essential for maximizing predictability for all measured plant parameters except leaf area index. The estimating models were evaluated over bare soil to discriminate between equations which are statistically similar. Qualitative interpretations of the resulting prediction equations are consistent with general agronomic and remote sensing theory.

  19. Evaluation and interpretation of Thematic Mapper ratios in equations for estimating corn growth parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dardner, B. R.; Blad, B. L.; Thompson, D. R.; Henderson, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Reflectance and agronomic Thematic Mapper (TM) data were analyzed to determine possible data transformations for evaluating several plant parameters of corn. Three transformation forms were used: the ratio of two TM bands, logarithms of two-band ratios, and normalized differences of two bands. Normalized differences and logarithms of two-band ratios responsed similarly in the equations for estimating the plant growth parameters evaluated in this study. Two-term equations were required to obtain the maximum predictability of percent ground cover, canopy moisture content, and total wet phytomass. Standard error of estimate values were 15-26 percent lower for two-term estimates of these parameters than for one-term estimates. The terms log(TM4/TM2) and (TM4/TM5) produced the maximum predictability for leaf area and dry green leaf weight, respectively. The middle infrared bands TM5 and TM7 are essential for maximizing predictability for all measured plant parameters except leaf area index. The estimating models were evaluated over bare soil to discriminate between equations which are statistically similar. Qualitative interpretations of the resulting prediction equations are consistent with general agronomic and remote sensing theory.

  20. [Study of the effect of the microenvironment on magnetic resonance parameters of spin-labeled human serum albumin in a 2-mm ESR range].

    PubMed

    Krinichnyĭ, V I; Grinberg, O Ia; Likhtenshteĭn, G I; Lebedev, Ia S

    1985-01-01

    Basic values of g-tensor and Azz component of HF tensor of two spin labels and spin probe on HSA and nitroxyl radicals HO-15, HO-34 in the solvents of different polarity were measured by 2 mm band ESR of 2 mm range. Magnetic-resonance parameters of liophylized and water-solved spin-labeled HSA were shown to correspond to the parameters of the solvents of the label HO-15 and HO-34 in ethyl alcohol and water. A conclusion was drawn concerning the identity of microenvironment of the nitroxyl fragment of liophylized HSA and frozen solution of the label HO-15 and HO-34 in ethyl alcohol and solvatation of the nitroxyl fragment of spin-labeled HSA and label HO-15 (HO-34) by water molecules.

  1. Slope stability susceptibility evaluation parameter (SSEP) rating scheme - An approach for landslide hazard zonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuvanshi, Tarun Kumar; Ibrahim, Jemal; Ayalew, Dereje

    2014-11-01

    In this paper a new slope susceptibility evaluation parameter (SSEP) rating scheme is presented which is developed as an expert evaluation approach for landslide hazard zonation. The SSEP rating scheme is developed by considering intrinsic and external triggering parameters that are responsible for slope instability. The intrinsic parameters which are considered are; slope geometry, slope material (rock or soil type), structural discontinuities, landuse and landcover and groundwater. Besides, external triggering parameters such as, seismicity, rainfall and manmade activities are also considered. For SSEP empirical technique numerical ratings are assigned to each of the intrinsic and triggering parameters on the basis of logical judgments acquired from experience of studies of intrinsic and external triggering factors and their relative impact in inducing instability to the slope. Further, the distribution of maximum SSEP ratings is based on their relative order of importance in contributing instability to the slope. Finally, summation of all ratings for intrinsic and triggering parameter based on actual observation will provide the expected degree of landslide in a given land unit. This information may be utilized to develop a landslide hazard zonation map. The SSEP technique was applied in the area around Wurgessa Kebelle of North Wollo Zonal Administration, Amhara National Regional State in northern Ethiopia, some 490 km from Addis Ababa. The results obtained indicates that 8.33% of the area fall under Moderately hazard and 83.33% fall within High hazard whereas 8.34% of the area fall under Very high hazard. Further, in order to validate the LHZ map prepared during the study, active landslide activities and potential instability areas, delineated through inventory mapping was overlain on it. All active landslide activities and potential instability areas fall within very high and high hazard zone. Thus, the satisfactory agreement confirms the rationality of

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) by electronic paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ureña-Núñez, F.; Dávila Ballesteros, M. R.

    This work presents the possibility to use the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal of gamma-irradiated sodium carbonate for dosimetric purposes. The dosimeters were irradiated in a 60Co source. The process induced in sodium carbonate by gamma rays results in the formation of carboxil radical anions ./GRAD_A_327316_O_XML_IMAGES/GRAD_A_327316_O_ILM0001.gif . This way, the method is based on the evaluation of the EPR signal of these radical anions in the material. The aspects studied were peak-to-peak signal amplitude as a function of received dose, signal fading, signal repeatability, sample homogeneity, zero response and environmental effects. It has been concluded that sodium carbonate can be used as a sensitive material to gamma radiation.

  3. Septal repair implants: evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging safety at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Shellock, Frank G; Valencerina, Samuel

    2005-12-01

    Specialized implants are used for transcatheter closure of septal defects, including atrial and ventricular septal defects, and patent foramen ovale. These metallic devices may pose a risk to patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures especially if performed at 3 T. Therefore, this investigation evaluated MRI safety at 3 T for septal repair implants (CardioSEAL Septal Repair Implant and STARFlex Septal Repair Implant, NMT Medical, Boston, MA, USA) by characterizing magnetic field interactions, heating and artifacts. These implants exhibited minor magnetic field interactions; heating was not excessive (+0.5 degrees C); and artifacts will only create a problem if the area of interest is in the same area as or near these devices. Thus, the findings indicated that it would be safe for a patient with these implants to undergo MRI at 3 T or lower. Importantly, because of the minor magnetic field interactions, MRI may be performed immediately after implantation.

  4. Usefulness of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for evaluating solitary pulmonary nodules

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) poses a challenge to radiologists. Chest computed tomography (CT) is considered the standard technique for assessing morphologic findings and intrathoracic spread of an SPN. Although the clinical role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for SPNs remains limited, considerable experience has been gained with MRI of thoracic diseases. Dynamic MRI and dynamic CT are useful for differentiating between malignant and benign SPNs (especially tuberculomas and hamartomas). Furthermore, dynamic MRI is useful for assessing tumor vascularity, interstitium, and vascular endothelial growth factor expression, and for predicting survival outcome among patients with peripheral pulmonary carcinoma. These advantages make dynamic MRI a promising method and a potential biomarker for characterizing tumor response to anti-angiogenic treatment as well as for predicting survival outcomes after treatment. PMID:18331971

  5. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of renal transplant failure

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.S.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Waxman, A.D.; Crues, J.V. III

    1988-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compared with radionuclide scintigraphy (RNS) in 16 patients with renal transplants undergoing renal failure to determine which modality could best discriminate between rejection, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and cyclosporin nephrotoxicity (CN). Although all rejecting transplants had reduced corticomedullary differentiation (CMD) on T1-weighted MR images, four of five cases of ATN had appearances that could not be distinguished from rejection. A normal CMD suggests nonrejection, but diminished CMD is nonspecific. Tc-99m DTPA/I-131 hippuran RNS was superior to MRI in differentiating rejection from ATN. Although ATN and CN have similar RNS patterns, this distinction can usually be made based on the clinical time course. Other potential uses of MRI in the evaluation of the renal transplants are discussed.

  6. Hepatic hemangiomas: evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging and technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.K.; Gomes, A.; King, W.; Pusey, E.; Lois, J.; Goldstein, L.; Busuttil, R.W.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    A study was performed to evaluate and compare the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radionuclide blood-pool scanning in the detection of hepatic hemangiomas. All patients had known hemangiomas which were first detected on either ultrasound or computed tomography. Sixteen patients with a total of 23 lesions were investigated. Eleven patients had both MRI and blood-pool scans performed. In the group studied by both modalities, 18 lesions were detected ranging in size from 1 to 11 cm. All lesions were detected by both techniques. However, two of the 18 lesions had an atypical appearance on MRI. Our experience to date indicates that the anatomic location and specific diagnosis of hemangiomas can be made with a high degree of certainty when both MRI and blood-pool scanning techniques are utilized.

  7. Parameter-adjusted stochastic resonance system for the aperiodic echo chirp signal in optimal FrFT domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-feng; Yu, Lei; Wang, Huiqi; Zhong, Suchuan

    2017-02-01

    In order to improve the system performance for moving target detection and localization, this paper presents a new aperiodic chirp signal and additive noise driving stochastic dynamical system, in which the internal frequency has the linear variation matching with the driving frequency. By using the fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) operator with the optimal order, the proposed time-domain dynamical system is transformed into the equivalent FrFT-domain system driven by the periodic signal and noise. Therefore, system performance is conveniently analyzed from the view of output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in optimal FrFT domain. Simulation results demonstrate that the output SNR, as a function of system parameter, shows the different generalized SR behaviors in the case of various internal parameters of driving chirp signal and external parameters of the moving target.

  8. Large-scale biomedical concept recognition: an evaluation of current automatic annotators and their parameters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ontological concepts are useful for many different biomedical tasks. Concepts are difficult to recognize in text due to a disconnect between what is captured in an ontology and how the concepts are expressed in text. There are many recognizers for specific ontologies, but a general approach for concept recognition is an open problem. Results Three dictionary-based systems (MetaMap, NCBO Annotator, and ConceptMapper) are evaluated on eight biomedical ontologies in the Colorado Richly Annotated Full-Text (CRAFT) Corpus. Over 1,000 parameter combinations are examined, and best-performing parameters for each system-ontology pair are presented. Conclusions Baselines for concept recognition by three systems on eight biomedical ontologies are established (F-measures range from 0.14–0.83). Out of the three systems we tested, ConceptMapper is generally the best-performing system; it produces the highest F-measure of seven out of eight ontologies. Default parameters are not ideal for most systems on most ontologies; by changing parameters F-measure can be increased by up to 0.4. Not only are best performing parameters presented, but suggestions for choosing the best parameters based on ontology characteristics are presented. PMID:24571547

  9. Determination of a quantitative parameter to evaluate swimming technique based on the maximal tethered swimming test.

    PubMed

    Soncin, Rafael; Mezêncio, Bruno; Ferreira, Jacielle Carolina; Rodrigues, Sara Andrade; Huebner, Rudolf; Serrão, Julio Cerca; Szmuchrowski, Leszek

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a new force parameter, associated with swimmers' technique and performance. Twelve swimmers performed five repetitions of 25 m sprint crawl and a tethered swimming test with maximal effort. The parameters calculated were: the mean swimming velocity for crawl sprint, the mean propulsive force of the tethered swimming test as well as an oscillation parameter calculated from force fluctuation. The oscillation parameter evaluates the force variation around the mean force during the tethered test as a measure of swimming technique. Two parameters showed significant correlations with swimming velocity: the mean force during the tethered swimming (r = 0.85) and the product of the mean force square root and the oscillation (r = 0.86). However, the intercept coefficient was significantly different from zero only for the mean force, suggesting that although the correlation coefficient of the parameters was similar, part of the mean velocity magnitude that was not associated with the mean force was associated with the product of the mean force square root and the oscillation. Thus, force fluctuation during tethered swimming can be used as a quantitative index of swimmers' technique.

  10. Comparison of three lines of broiler breeders differing in ascites susceptibility or growth rate. 1. Relationship between acoustic resonance data and embryonic or hatching parameters.

    PubMed

    Tona, K; Kemps, B; Bruggeman, V; Bamelis, F; De Smit, L; Onagbesan, O; De Baerdemaeker, J; Decuypere, E

    2005-09-01

    Ascites is a prevalent cardiovascular disease among modern broilers with negative impacts on production and animal welfare. The peak of mortality due to ascites occurs at the end of the growing period, but the etiology of this problem may start during embryonic development. A few recent reports have demonstrated that the signs of ascites susceptibility are manifested during the late stages of incubation. In the current study, we used a nondestructive method based on egg acoustic resonance parameters [resonant frequency (RF) and damping] to establish a relationship between embryo physiological events during early development in broiler eggs and susceptibility to ascites. The hatching eggs of 3 broiler lines differing in ascites susceptibility were used for this study: ascites-resistant dam line (DAR), ascites-sensitive dam line (DAS), and ascites-sensitive sire line (SASL). These lines were selected on the basis of fast growth, high breast meat yield, and ascites induction at low temperatures such that the order of ascites susceptibility in terms of mortality was SASL > DAS > DAR. Eggs were incubated under standard conditions in forced-draft incubators. We measured egg weights at setting, albumen pH, Haugh units (HU) at setting, and embryo weights at d 11 and 18, at internal pipping (IP), and at hatch. The durations of IP, external pipping (EP), and hatching were also determined. At 2 hourly periods during incubation, egg RF and damping were also measured. There were differences in egg weights between DAR and SASL vs. DAS, but albumen HU, albumen pH, and the ratio of yolk weight to egg weight were similar. There were differences in RF, damping, embryonic growth rates, and hatching events. Changes in resonant frequency and damping, which certainly suggest eggshell differences among lines, were not totally related to variations in physiological events during early and late embryonic development. A comparison between DAR and DAS, between DAS and SASL, or DAR and SASL

  11. Cavernosal nerve functionality evaluation after magnetic resonance imaging-guided transurethral ultrasound treatment of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Sammet, Steffen; Partanen, Ari; Yousuf, Ambereen; Sammet, Christina L; Ward, Emily V; Wardrip, Craig; Niekrasz, Marek; Antic, Tatjana; Razmaria, Aria; Farahani, Keyvan; Sokka, Shunmugavelu; Karczmar, Gregory; Oto, Aytekin

    2015-12-28

    To evaluate the feasibility of using therapeutic ultrasound as an alternative treatment option for organ-confined prostate cancer. In this study, a trans-urethral therapeutic ultrasound applicator in combination with 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance was used for real-time multi-planar MRI-based temperature monitoring and temperature feedback control of prostatic tissue thermal ablation in vivo. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of MRI-guided trans-urethral ultrasound to effectively and accurately ablate prostate tissue while minimizing the damage to surrounding tissues in eight canine prostates. MRI was used to plan sonications, monitor temperature changes during therapy, and to evaluate treatment outcome. Real-time temperature and thermal dose maps were calculated using the proton resonance frequency shift technique and were displayed as two-dimensional color-coded overlays on top of the anatomical images. After ultrasound treatment, an evaluation of the integrity of cavernosal nerves was performed during prostatectomy with a nerve stimulator that measured tumescence response quantitatively and indicated intact cavernous nerve functionality. Planned sonication volumes were visually correlated to MRI ablation volumes and corresponding histo-pathological sections after prostatectomy. A total of 16 sonications were performed in 8 canines. MR images acquired before ultrasound treatment were used to localize the prostate and to prescribe sonication targets in all canines. Temperature elevations corresponded within 1 degree of the targeted sonication angle, as well as with the width and length of the active transducer elements. The ultrasound treatment procedures were automatically interrupted when the temperature in the target zone reached 56 °C. In all canines erectile responses were evaluated with a cavernous nerve stimulator post-treatment and showed a tumescence response after stimulation with an electric current. These results indicated intact

  12. Cavernosal nerve functionality evaluation after magnetic resonance imaging-guided transurethral ultrasound treatment of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Sammet, Steffen; Partanen, Ari; Yousuf, Ambereen; Sammet, Christina L; Ward, Emily V; Wardrip, Craig; Niekrasz, Marek; Antic, Tatjana; Razmaria, Aria; Farahani, Keyvan; Sokka, Shunmugavelu; Karczmar, Gregory; Oto, Aytekin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of using therapeutic ultrasound as an alternative treatment option for organ-confined prostate cancer. METHODS: In this study, a trans-urethral therapeutic ultrasound applicator in combination with 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance was used for real-time multi-planar MRI-based temperature monitoring and temperature feedback control of prostatic tissue thermal ablation in vivo. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of MRI-guided trans-urethral ultrasound to effectively and accurately ablate prostate tissue while minimizing the damage to surrounding tissues in eight canine prostates. MRI was used to plan sonications, monitor temperature changes during therapy, and to evaluate treatment outcome. Real-time temperature and thermal dose maps were calculated using the proton resonance frequency shift technique and were displayed as two-dimensional color-coded overlays on top of the anatomical images. After ultrasound treatment, an evaluation of the integrity of cavernosal nerves was performed during prostatectomy with a nerve stimulator that measured tumescence response quantitatively and indicated intact cavernous nerve functionality. Planned sonication volumes were visually correlated to MRI ablation volumes and corresponding histo-pathological sections after prostatectomy. RESULTS: A total of 16 sonications were performed in 8 canines. MR images acquired before ultrasound treatment were used to localize the prostate and to prescribe sonication targets in all canines. Temperature elevations corresponded within 1 degree of the targeted sonication angle, as well as with the width and length of the active transducer elements. The ultrasound treatment procedures were automatically interrupted when the temperature in the target zone reached 56 °C. In all canines erectile responses were evaluated with a cavernous nerve stimulator post-treatment and showed a tumescence response after stimulation with an electric current. These

  13. Value of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the preoperative evaluation of suspected ovarian masses.

    PubMed

    Huber, Sabine; Medl, Michael; Baumann, Louis; Czembirek, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    The stage of ovarian carcinoma at diagnosis directly affects prognosis. Thus, thorough pretreatment evaluation is basic to the successful management of suspected ovarian masses. Among currently available imaging techniques in characterization of suspected ovarian neoplasms, sonography (US) is indisputedly the primary imaging approach. When US is inconclusive, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is generally prefered to computed tomography (CT). 93 patients, who on the basis of clinical findings were suspected to have ovarian cancer and who were scheduled for subsequent surgical staging underwent preoperative transvaginal and abdominal ultrasound as well as magnetic resonance imaging in a prospective comparative study. US and MR images were evaluated for their information on the characterization and staging of the ovarian masses. MRI correctly characterized malignant and benign tumors in 89% of cases versus 85% by ultrasound. The site of the primary tumor was correctly diagnosed in 94% of cases by MRI vs. 90% by ultrasound. For US, the positive predictive value was 85%, the negative predictive value 73% vs. 92% and 89% for MRI. In differentiation of nonadvanced disease from advanced malignancy, US showed a false-positive rate of 0.416 and false-negative rate of 0.258 vs. 0.125 and 0.032 respectively, for MRI. MRI was superior in diagnosis of malignant ovarian masses though US, too, performed well at lesion detection and characterization. With regard to tumor staging MRI is emerging as a problem-solving modality and may allow more appropriate clinical decisions to be made in selected patients with complex adnexal disease.

  14. Evaluation of painful hydronephrosis in pregnancy: magnetic resonance urographic patterns in physiological dilatation versus calculous obstruction.

    PubMed

    Spencer, J A; Chahal, R; Kelly, A; Taylor, K; Eardley, I; Lloyd, S N

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated magnetic resonance urography (MRU) appearances in symptomatic hydronephrosis in pregnancy and compared urographic patterns in physiological and calculous disease. A total of 24 consecutive pregnant women with symptomatic hydronephrosis underwent MRU, comprising an overview fast T2-weighted examination of the abdomen and pelvis, and thick slab, heavily T2-weighted MRU images, followed by focused, high resolution T2-weighted sequences obtained in an axial and coronal oblique plane through the level of ureteral caliber change. Of these 24 pregnant women 15 were found to have physiological hydronephrosis, 7 had calculous disease and 2 had preexisting urinary anomalies. MRU findings in physiological hydronephrosis cases were extrinsic compression of the middle third of the ureter, no filling defect and a collapsed ureter below it. Obstruction by ureteral calculi was seen at points of ureteral narrowing in the ureter, that is at the vesicoureteral junction in 2 cases, in the compressed mid ureter in 3 and at the pelviureteral junction in 1. Nonobstructive renal calculi were seen in another patient. Calculi presented throughout pregnancy but physiological hydronephrosis presented only in the late second and third trimesters. With distal calculi the MRU appearance was the double kink sign with constriction at the pelvic brim and the vesicoureteral junction with a standing column of urine in the pelvic ureter. There was renal edema and perirenal extravasation. Small calculi were only identified using high resolution T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. MRU is a valuable and well tolerated investigation for evaluating painful hydronephrosis in pregnancy. There are characteristic and differing urographic appearances in physiological and calculous obstruction.

  15. A two-temperature model for evaluation of thermoelastic damping in the vibration of a nanoscale resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Ibrahim A.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the thermoelastic damping of a nano-scale resonator is analyzed by the generalized thermoelasticity theory based on two-temperature model (2TLS). The effect of two-temperature parameter and relaxation time in nano-scale resonator are investigated for beams under clamped conditions. Analytical expressions for deflection, temperature change, frequency shifts, and thermoelastic damping in the beam have been derived. The theories of coupled termoelasticity and generalized thermoelasticity with one relaxation time can extracted as limited and special cases of the present model. The numerical results have been presented graphically in respect of thermoelastic damping and frequency shift.

  16. Measurement and calculation of the Stark-broadening parameters for the resonance lines of singly ionized calcium and magnesium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. W.; Sanchez, A.; Greig, J. R.; Griem, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The electron-impact-broadened profiles of the resonance lines of singly ionized calcium and magnesium have been measured using an electromagnetically driven shock tube and a rapid-scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer. For an electron density of 10 to the 17th power per cu cm and a temperature of 19,000 K, we found the Lorentzian half-width of the Ca+ line to be 0.086 A plus or minus 10% and of the Mg+ line to be 0.044 A plus or minus 10%. Using the quantum-mechanical theory of Barnes and Peach and our semiclassical calculation for the calcium lines, we found that the temperature dependence of the theoretical curves is close to that measured, although both theories predict actual values which are somewhat large.

  17. Noninvasive evaluation of global and regional left ventricular function using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaniewska, Malwina; Schuetz, Georg M; Willun, Steffen; Schlattmann, Peter; Dewey, Marc

    2017-04-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) in the assessment of global and regional left ventricular (LV) function with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MEDLINE, EMBASE and ISI Web of Science were systematically reviewed. Evaluation included: ejection fraction (EF), end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV) and left ventricular mass (LVM). Differences between modalities were analysed using limits of agreement (LoA). Publication bias was measured by Egger's regression test. Heterogeneity was evaluated using Cochran's Q test and Higgins I(2) statistic. In the presence of heterogeneity the DerSimonian-Laird method was used for estimation of heterogeneity variance. Fifty-three studies including 1,814 patients were identified. The mean difference between CT and MRI was -0.56 % (LoA, -11.6-10.5 %) for EF, 2.62 ml (-34.1-39.3 ml) for EDV and 1.61 ml (-22.4-25.7 ml) for ESV, 3.21 ml (-21.8-28.3 ml) for SV and 0.13 g (-28.2-28.4 g) for LVM. CT detected wall motion abnormalities on a per-segment basis with 90 % sensitivity and 97 % specificity. CT is accurate for assessing global LV function parameters but the limits of agreement versus MRI are moderately wide, while wall motion deficits are detected with high accuracy. • CT helps to assess patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). • MRI is the reference standard for evaluation of left ventricular function. • CT provides accurate assessment of global left ventricular function.

  18. Analysis of the decay τ - → π - π - π + v τ and determination of the a 1(1260) resonance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R. D.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Bittner, M.; Eckstein, P.; Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reimer, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Chechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I.; Kostina, G.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Shibaev, V.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1993-03-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the DORIS II e +e- storage ring we have studied the three-pion hadronic final state in the decay τ- → π-π-π+ v τ. From about 7500 events we conclude that the three-pion system is dominated by the J P=1+ resonance a 1 (1260) decaying preferentially via ρ0π-. Our data restrict a possible ρπ contribution of three-pion states without intermediate resonances to less than 6% at 95% CL. Fitting a model by Isgur et al. to the data yieldsm_{a_1 } = (1.211 ± 0.007 ± _{0.0}^{0.050} ) GeV/c^2 andΓ _{a_1 } = (0.446 ± 0.0021 ± _{0.0}^{0.140} ) GeV/c^2 . The second errors reflect the model dependence of the result. This is the currently most significant determination of the a 1 resonance parameters. The ratio of S- and D-wave amplitudes for the ρ0π- intermediate state of the a {1/-} decay at the nominal a {1/-} mass was found to be D/S=-0.11±0.02. Using this D/S ratio we update our former measurement of the parity violating asymmetry parameterγ _{AV} = 2g_A g_V /(g_A^2 + g_V^2 ) to 1.25±0.23±{0.08/0.15}. The branching ratio of the decay τ- → π-π-π+ v τ is determined to be Br(τ- → π-π-π+ v τ)=(6.8±0.1±0.5)%.

  19. One-dimensional plasmonic hotspots located between silver nanowire dimers evaluated by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Tamitake; Yamamoto, Yuko S.; Kitahama, Yasutaka; Balachandran, Jeyadevan

    2017-03-01

    Hotspots of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) are localized within 1 nm at gaps or crevices of plasmonic nanoparticle dimers. We demonstrate SERRS hotspots with volumes that are extended in one dimension tens of thousand times compared to standard zero-dimensional hotspots using crevices of plasmonic nanowire dimers. According to the polarization measurements, a plasmon resonance in the direction along the dimer width generates SERRS hotspots. SERRS images show oscillating patterns between edges of the hotspot. The SERRS intensity becomes the strongest at the edges, indicating that Fabry-Perot-type resonance of surface plasmons is involved in the Raman enhancement. These optical properties of the SERRS hotspots are quantitatively reproduced by numerical calculations based on the electromagnetic (EM) mechanism. EM coupling energy between dye molecule excitons and plasmons is evaluated using spectral changes in plasmon resonance reflected in a loss of SERRS activity at the hotspots. The coupling energies are consistent with the calculated EM enhancement factors.

  20. Performance evaluation of the Particle Smoother with Sequential Importance Resampling for soil hydraulic parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, C.; Moradkhani, H.; Han, X.; Hendricks Franssen, H. J.; Puetz, T.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    An adequate description of soil hydraulic properties is essential for a good performance of hydrological forecasts and soil water fluxes. So far, several studies showed that data assimilation could reduce the parameter uncertainty by considering soil moisture observations. However, these observations and also the model forcings were recorded with a specific measurement error. It seems a logical step to base state updating and parameter estimation on observations made at multiple time steps, in order to reduce the influence of outliers at single time steps given measurement errors and unknown model forcings. Such outliers could result in erroneous state estimation as well as inadequate parameters. This has been one of the reasons to use a smoothing technique as implemented for Bayesian data assimilation methods such as the Ensemble Kalman Filter (i.e. Ensemble Kalman Smoother). In this contribution we present a Particle Smoother (SIR-PS) with sequentially smoothing of particle weights for state and parameter resampling within a time window as opposed to the single time step data assimilation used in filtering techniques. This can be seen as an intermediate variant between a parameter estimation technique using global optimization with estimation of single parameter sets valid for the whole period, and sequential Monte Carlo techniques with estimation of parameter sets evolving from one time step to another. The aims are i) to improve the soil moisture forecast by estimating hydraulic parameters, ii) to reduce the impact of single erroneous model inputs/observations by a smoothing method, and iii) to evaluate the performance of the SIR-PS as opposed to the SIR-PF using different ensemble and smoothing window sizes. In order to validate the performance of the proposed method for real world conditions, experimental data obtained from a two year lysimeter study were used.

  1. Evaluating Human Breast Ductal Carcinomas with High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Leo Ling; Chang, I.-Wen; Smith, Barbara L.; Gonzalez, R. Gilberto

    1998-11-01

    We report the results of a study of human breast ductal carcinomas, conducted by using high resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HRMAS 1HMRS). This recently developed spectroscopic technique can measure tissue metabolism from intact pathological specimens and identify tissue biochemical changes, which closely correspond to tumorin vivostate. This procedure objectively indicates diagnostic parameters, independent of the skill and experience of the investigator, and has the potential to reduce the sampling errors inherently associated with procedures of conventional histopathology. In this study, we measured 19 cases of female ductal carcinomas. Our results demonstrate that: (1) highly resolved spectra of intact specimens of human breast ductal carcinomas can be obtained; (2) carcinoma-free tissues and carcinomas are distinguishable by alterations in the intensities and the spin-spin relaxation time T2 of cellular metabolites; and (3) tumor metabolic markers, such as phosphocholine, lactate, and lipids, may correlate with the histopathological grade determined from evaluation of the adjacent specimen. Our results suggest that biochemical markers thus measured may function as a valuable adjunct to histopathology to improve the accuracy of and reduce the time frame required for the diagnosis of human breast cancer.

  2. Magnetic resonance urography vs computed tomography urography in the evaluation of patients with haematuria.

    PubMed

    Martingano, Paola; Cavallaro, Marco Francesco M; Bertolotto, Michele; Stacul, Fulvio; Ukmar, Maja; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2013-10-01

    This study was done to evaluate by direct comparison the image quality of magnetic resonance urography (MRU) and computed tomography urography (CTU) and to assess the diagnostic confidence of the two techniques in detecting urothelial malignancy in patients with haematuria Thirty-five patients with haematuria underwent both CTU and MRU. Two different investigators evaluated calyceal, renal pelvis, ureteral and bladder visibility. Their diagnostic confidence in detecting urothelial malignancy with the two procedures was assessed. A Wilcoxon matched-pairs test was performed to compare results. Inter-reader agreement was calculated by weighted kappa (WK) statistic. Patient history (further examinations, cystoscopy and histological specimens) was considered as reference standard to calculate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of diagnostic confidence. CTU provided better visibility of urothelial structures (p<0.01) and allowed for greater diagnostic confidence (ROC area 0.994 vs. 0.938) than MRU, with a good inter-reader agreement (WK=0.62). Nevertheless, in obstructive patients with impaired excretory function, MRU, thanks to the static-fluid technique, offered better visualisation than CTU. There is a potential role for MRU in urinary tract imaging, but as diagnostic confidence in detecting urothelial malignancy is poorer than in CTU, it might be stareserved for patients at low risk for malignancy and for evaluating obstructed patients.

  3. A Pilot Study to Evaluate the Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Prostate Cancer Screening in the General Population.

    PubMed

    Nam, Robert K; Wallis, Christopher J D; Stojcic-Bendavid, Jessica; Milot, Laurent; Sherman, Christopher; Sugar, Linda; Haider, Masoom A

    2016-08-01

    To our knowledge the role of magnetic resonance imaging as a first line screening test for prostate cancer is unknown. We performed a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of prostate magnetic resonance imaging as the primary screening test for prostate cancer. We recruited unselected men from the general population. Prostate multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and random or targeted biopsies were performed in all patients, in addition to prostate specific antigen testing. We compared the performance of prostate magnetic resonance imaging and prostate specific antigen test results to predict prostate cancer. Of the 47 recruited patients 18 (38.3%) had cancer while 29 (61.7%) had no evidence of cancer. The adjusted OR of prostate cancer was significantly higher for magnetic resonance imaging score than for prostate specific antigen level (2.7, 95% CI 1.4-5.4, p = 0.004 vs 1.1, 95% CI 0.9-1.4, p = 0.21). Among the 30 patients with a normal prostate specific antigen (less than 4.0 ng/ml) the positive predictive value in those with a magnetic resonance imaging score of 4 or more was 66.7% (6 of 9) and the negative predictive value in those with a magnetic resonance imaging score of 3 or less was 85.7% (18 of 21, p = 0.004). In this pilot study we determined the feasibility of using multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging as the primary screening test for prostate cancer. Initial results showed that prostate magnetic resonance imaging was better to predict prostate cancer than prostate specific antigen in an unselected sample of the general population. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Monte Carlo evaluation of biological variation: Random generation of correlated non-Gaussian model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertog, Maarten L. A. T. M.; Scheerlinck, Nico; Nicolaï, Bart M.

    2009-01-01

    When modelling the behaviour of horticultural products, demonstrating large sources of biological variation, we often run into the issue of non-Gaussian distributed model parameters. This work presents an algorithm to reproduce such correlated non-Gaussian model parameters for use with Monte Carlo simulations. The algorithm works around the problem of non-Gaussian distributions by transforming the observed non-Gaussian probability distributions using a proposed SKN-distribution function before applying the covariance decomposition algorithm to generate Gaussian random co-varying parameter sets. The proposed SKN-distribution function is based on the standard Gaussian distribution function and can exhibit different degrees of both skewness and kurtosis. This technique is demonstrated using a case study on modelling the ripening of tomato fruit evaluating the propagation of biological variation with time.

  5. A preliminary evaluation of an F100 engine parameter estimation process using flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, Trindel A.; Gilyard, Glenn B.; Lambert, Heather H.

    1990-01-01

    The parameter estimation algorithm developed for the F100 engine is described. The algorithm is a two-step process. The first step consists of a Kalman filter estimation of five deterioration parameters, which model the off-nominal behavior of the engine during flight. The second step is based on a simplified steady-state model of the compact engine model (CEM). In this step, the control vector in the CEM is augmented by the deterioration parameters estimated in the first step. The results of an evaluation made using flight data from the F-15 aircraft are presented, indicating that the algorithm can provide reasonable estimates of engine variables for an advanced propulsion control law development.

  6. A search for optimal parameters of resonance circuits ensuring damping of electroelastic structure vibrations based on the solution of natural vibration problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshmarin, D.; Sevodina, N.; Iurlov, M.; Iurlova, N.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, with the aim of providing passive control of structure vibrations a new approach has been proposed for selecting optimal parameters of external electric shunt circuits connected to piezoelectric elements located on the surface of the structure. The approach is based on the mathematical formulation of the natural vibration problem. The results of solution of this problem are the complex eigenfrequencies, the real part of which represents the vibration frequency and the imaginary part corresponds to the damping ratio, characterizing the rate of damping. A criterion of search for optimal parameters of the external passive shunt circuits, which can provide the system with desired dissipative properties, has been derived based on the analysis of responses of the real and imaginary parts of different complex eigenfrequencies to changes in the values of the parameters of the electric circuit. The efficiency of this approach has been verified in the context of natural vibration problem of rigidly clamped plate and semi-cylindrical shell, which is solved for series-connected and parallel -connected external resonance (consisting of resistive and inductive elements) R-L circuits. It has been shown that at lower (more energy-intensive) frequencies, a series-connected external circuit has the advantage of providing lower values of the circuit parameters, which renders it more attractive in terms of practical applications.

  7. A parameter estimation algorithm for spatial sine testing - Theory and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rost, R. W.; Deblauwe, F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the theory and an evaluation of a spatial sine testing parameter estimation algorithm that uses directly the measured forced mode of vibration and the measured force vector. The parameter estimation algorithm uses an ARMA model and a recursive QR algorithm is applied for data reduction. In this first evaluation, the algorithm has been applied to a frequency response matrix (which is a particular set of forced mode of vibration) using a sliding frequency window. The objective of the sliding frequency window is to execute the analysis simultaneously with the data acquisition. Since the pole values and the modal density are obtained from this analysis during the acquisition, the analysis information can be used to help determine the forcing vectors during the experimental data acquisition.

  8. Inter relationship between some routine semen evaluation parameters in Jersey X local hill cattle crossbred bulls

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, M.; Singh, M.; Kapoor, S.; Jasial, S.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted with an objective of establishing a relationship between various routine semen evaluation parameters. Work was conducted at Sperm Station Palampur, Himachal Pradesh, on the semen from five Jersey X local hill cattle crossbred breeding bulls. A total of 40 ejaculates (8 from each bull), were analysed at five different stages of processing namely post dilution, post equilibration, post thaw and after 1 and 2 hours incubation post thaw at 37°C for progressive motility, live dead count, reaction to hypo-osmotic solution, acrosomal integrity and gross morphological abnormalities. The results of the study revealed a highly significant (P<0.01) correlation between the various semen evaluation parameters except for the gross morphological abnormalities where there was a significant (P<0.05) negative correlation between the acrosomal integrity and gross morphological abnormalities. PMID:26623288

  9. A parameter estimation algorithm for spatial sine testing - Theory and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rost, R. W.; Deblauwe, F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the theory and an evaluation of a spatial sine testing parameter estimation algorithm that uses directly the measured forced mode of vibration and the measured force vector. The parameter estimation algorithm uses an ARMA model and a recursive QR algorithm is applied for data reduction. In this first evaluation, the algorithm has been applied to a frequency response matrix (which is a particular set of forced mode of vibration) using a sliding frequency window. The objective of the sliding frequency window is to execute the analysis simultaneously with the data acquisition. Since the pole values and the modal density are obtained from this analysis during the acquisition, the analysis information can be used to help determine the forcing vectors during the experimental data acquisition.

  10. Temperature evaluation of traveling-wave ultrasonic motor considering interaction between temperature rise and motor parameters.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiyang; Ou, Wenchu; Yang, Ming; Guo, Chao; Lu, Cunyue; Hu, Junhui

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a novel model for evaluating the temperature of traveling-wave ultrasonic motor (TWUSM) is developed. The proposed model, where the interaction between the temperature rise and motor parameters is considered, differs from the previous reported models with constant parameters. In this model, losses and temperature rises of the motor were evaluated based on the temperature-related varying parameters: the feedback voltage Vaux of the stator, dielectric permittivity ɛ and dielectric loss factor tanδ. At each new temperature, Vaux, ɛ and tanδ were updated. The feasibility and effectiveness of this proposed model was verified by comparing the predicted temperatures with the measured one. The effects of driving voltage, driving frequency and ambient temperature on the predicted temperature were also analyzed. The results show that the proposed model has more accurate predicted temperature than that with constant parameters. This will be very useful for the optimal design, reducing the heat loss, improvement of control and reliability life of TWUSM.

  11. Resonant alteration of propagation in guiding structures with complex Robin parameter and its magnetic-field-induced restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Olendski, O.

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Solutions of the wave equation are analyzed for the confined circular geometry with complex Robin boundary conditions. > Sharp extremum is found in the energy dependence on the imaginary part of the extrapolation length. > Nonzero real part of the Robin length or/and magnetic field wipe out the resonance. - Abstract: Solutions of the scalar Helmholtz wave equation are derived for the analysis of the transport and thermodynamic properties of the two-dimensional disk and three-dimensional infinitely long straight wire in the external uniform longitudinal magnetic field B under the assumption that the Robin boundary condition contains extrapolation length {Lambda} with nonzero imaginary part {Lambda}{sub i}. As a result of this complexity, the self-adjointness of the Hamiltonian is lost, its eigenvalues E become complex too and the discrete bound states of the disk characteristic for the real {Lambda} turn into the corresponding quasibound states with their lifetime defined by the eigenenergies imaginary parts E{sub i}. Accordingly, the longitudinal flux undergoes an alteration as it flows along the wire with its attenuation/amplification being E{sub i}-dependent too. It is shown that, for zero magnetic field, the component E{sub i} as a function of the Robin imaginary part exhibits a pronounced sharp extremum with its magnitude being the largest for the zero real part {Lambda}{sub r} of the extrapolation length. Increasing magnitude of {Lambda}{sub r} quenches the E{sub i} - {Lambda}{sub i} resonance and at very large {Lambda}{sub r} the eigenenergies E approach the asymptotic real values independent of {Lambda}{sub i}. The extremum is also wiped out by the magnetic field when, for the large B, the energies tend to the Landau levels. Mathematical and physical interpretations of the obtained results are provided; in particular, it is shown that the finite lifetime of the disk quasibound states stems from the {Lambda}{sub i}-induced currents flowing

  12. Effects of chiral fragrances on human autonomic nervous system parameters and self-evaluation.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, E; Hongratanaworakit, T; Böhm, C; Weber, R; Buchbauer, G

    2001-03-01

    The effects of chiral fragrances (enantiomers of limonene and carvone) on the human autonomic nervous system (ANS) and on self-evaluation were studied in 20 healthy volunteers. Each fragrance was administered to each subject by inhalation using an A-A-B design. Individuals were tested in four separate sessions; in one session one fragrance was administered. ANS parameters recorded were skin temperature, skin conductance, breathing rate, pulse rate, blood oxygen saturation and systolic as well as diastolic blood pressure. Subjective experience was assessed in terms of mood, calmness and alertness on visual analog scales. In addition, fragrances were rated in terms of pleasantness, intensity and stimulating property. Inhalation of (+)-limonene led to increased systolic blood pressure, subjective alertness and restlessness. Inhalation of (-)-limonene caused an increase in systolic blood pressure but had no effects on psychological parameters. Inhalation of (-)-carvone caused increases in pulse rate, diastolic blood pressure and subjective restlessness. After inhalation of (+)-carvone increased levels of systolic as well as diastolic blood pressure were observed. Correlational analyses revealed that changes in both ANS parameters and self-evaluation were in part related to subjective evaluation of the odor and suggest that both pharmacological and psychological mechanisms are involved in the observed effects. In conclusion, the present study indicates that: (i) prolonged inhalation of fragrances influences ANS parameters as well as mental and emotional conditions; (ii) effects of fragrances are in part based on subjective evaluation of odor; (iii) chirality of odor molecules seems to be a central factor with respect to the biological activity of fragrances.

  13. Evaluation of Lauha bhasma on classical analytical parameters - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Prasanta Kumar; Choudhary, A K; Prajapati, P K

    2008-01-01

    Lauha Bhasma is the most widely used bhasma preparation in therapeutics, but till date the temperature pattern to prepare Lauha Bhasma in electric muffle furnace is not fixed. So in this pilot study an attempt has been made to confirm the appropriate temperature pattern to prepare Lauha Bhasma. And emphasis has been given to evaluate this prepared Lauha Bhasma on classical analytical parameter, which reflects the physical and chemical properties of the Bhasma.

  14. Evaluation of Lauha bhasma on classical analytical parameters – A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Prasanta Kumar; Choudhary, A. K.; Prajapati, P. K.

    2008-01-01

    Lauha Bhasma is the most widely used bhasma preparation in therapeutics, but till date the temperature pattern to prepare Lauha Bhasma in electric muffle furnace is not fixed. So in this pilot study an attempt has been made to confirm the appropriate temperature pattern to prepare Lauha Bhasma. And emphasis has been given to evaluate this prepared Lauha Bhasma on classical analytical parameter, which reflects the physical and chemical properties of the Bhasma. PMID:22557274

  15. Assessment of cardiac parameters in evaluation of cardiac functions in patients with thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Oztarhan, Kazim; Delibas, Yavuz; Salcioglu, Zafer; Kaya, Guldemet; Bakari, Suleyman; Bornaun, Helen; Aydogan, Gonul

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate cardiac function and early cardiac dysfunction of patients followed as thalassemia major. In this study, the authors compared 100 patients, diagnosed as thalassemia major with mean age 11.84 ± 4.35, with 60 healthy control subjects at the same age between 2008 and 2011. Early diagnosis of iron overload that may occur after repeated transfusions is important in this patient group. To detect early iron accumulation, the authors compared ferritin with the echo findings, the 24-hour Holter, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2* values in the patients of same age and sex, treated with chelators, without heart failure, nonsplenectomized, and do not differ in the presence of hepatitis C. Ferritin levels, left ventricular systolic functions (ejection fraction [EF], shortening fraction [SF]), left ventricular measurements, left ventricular diastolic functions, T2* image on cardiac magnetic resonance, heart rate variables in 24 hours, and Holter rhythm were evaluated to show the early failure of cardiac functions. In this study the authors confirmed that iron-related cardiac toxicity damages electrical activity earlier than myocardial contractility. Left ventricular diastolic diameter (LVDd), left ventricular mass (LVM), and LV systolic diameter (LVDs) levels were significantly higher in the patient group with ectopia. Patients with ectopia are the ones in whom LVM and LVDd are increased. In thalassemia major patients with ectopia, LF/HF ratio was markedly increased, QTc dispersion was clearly found higher in patients with ectopia rather than nonectopic patients. The standard deviation all normal RR interval series (SDNN) was found clearly lower in thalassemia major group with ectopia than control group because it is assumed that increase in cardiac sympathetic neuronal activity is related to exposure to chronic diastolic and systolic failure.

  16. High resolution electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of septet pyridyl-2,4,6-trinitrene in solid argon: Fine-structure parameters of six electron-spin cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misochko, E. Ya.; Akimov, A. V.; Chapyshev, S. V.

    2008-11-01

    The high resolution 9GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of septet pyridyl-2,4,6-trinitrene was recorded after the photolysis of 2,4,6-triazido-3,5-dichloropyridine in solid argon matrix at 15K. Owing to the high resolution of the experimental EPR spectrum, the zero-field splitting parameters of the septet trinitrene were determined with a high accuracy: Ds=-0.1019±0.0004cm-1 and Es=0.00325±0.00015cm-1. All EPR transitions of the septet trinitrene were, for the first, unambiguously assigned based on the eigenfield calculations of the Zeeman energy levels. The spectrum of the septet trinitrene represents a new type of EPR spectra of septet spin states with nonzero zero-field splitting parameter Es. The nonvanishing parameter Es of the septet trinitrene arises due to magnetic nonequivalence of three triplet centers in the molecule and is manifested in the appearance in the spectrum of separate x and y transitions. The septet spin states of this type display at very low magnetic fields two intense z transitions since the ∣3Ds∣ energy gap between zero-field energy levels W±1 and W±2 fits the quantum of microwave irradiation of a 9GHz EPR spectrometer. Analysis of the magnetic parameters shows that semiempirical description of the fine-structure tensor for six electron-spin cluster in the septet trinitrene is appropriate for precise estimations of the parameter Ds but it is too crude to estimate small value of the parameter Es.

  17. Evaluation of a classification method for biodegradable solid wastes using anaerobic degradation parameters.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Phoungthong, Khamphe; Lü, Fan; Shao, Li-Ming; He, Pin-Jing

    2013-12-01

    We studied the biochemical and anaerobic degradation characteristics of 29 types of materials to evaluate the effects of a physical composition classification method for degradable solid waste on the computation of anaerobic degradation parameters, including the methane yield potential (L0), anaerobic decay rate (k), and carbon sequestration factor (CSF). Biochemical methane potential tests were conducted to determine the anaerobic degradation parameters of each material. The results indicated that the anaerobic degradation parameters of nut waste were quite different from those of other food waste and nut waste was classified separately. Paper was subdivided into two categories according to its lignin content: degradable paper with lignin content of <0.05 g g VS(-1), and refractory paper with lignin content >0.15 g g VS(-1). The L0, k, and CSF parameters of leaves, a type of garden waste, were similar to those of grass. This classification method for degradable solid waste may provide a theoretical basis that facilitates the more accurate calculation of anaerobic degradation parameters.

  18. Subsonic flight test evaluation of a propulsion system parameter estimation process for the F100 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Gilyard, Glenn B.

    1992-01-01

    Integrated engine-airframe optimal control technology may significantly improve aircraft performance. This technology requires a reliable and accurate parameter estimator to predict unmeasured variables. To develop this technology base, NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (Edwards, CA), McDonnell Aircraft Company (St. Louis, MO), and Pratt & Whitney (West Palm Beach, FL) have developed and flight-tested an adaptive performance seeking control system which optimizes the quasi-steady-state performance of the F-15 propulsion system. This paper presents flight and ground test evaluations of the propulsion system parameter estimation process used by the performance seeking control system. The estimator consists of a compact propulsion system model and an extended Kalman filter. The extended Laman filter estimates five engine component deviation parameters from measured inputs. The compact model uses measurements and Kalman-filter estimates as inputs to predict unmeasured propulsion parameters such as net propulsive force and fan stall margin. The ability to track trends and estimate absolute values of propulsion system parameters was demonstrated. For example, thrust stand results show a good correlation, especially in trends, between the performance seeking control estimated and measured thrust.

  19. Evaluation of unconfined-aquifer parameters from pumping test data by nonlinear least squares