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Sample records for resonance raman study

  1. Auger resonant Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Y.; LeBrun, T.; MacDonald, M.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    As noted above, traditional spectroscopy of the electronic structure of the inner shells of atoms, molecules, and solids is limited by the lifetime broadening of the core-excited states. This limitation can also be avoided with the non-radiative analog of X-ray Raman scattering - resonant Auger Raman spectroscopy. We have used this technique to study the K-shell excitation spectrum of argon as the photon energy is continuously scanned across threshold.

  2. Resonance Raman spectroscopic studies of enzymesubstrate intermediates at 5 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Munsok; Carey, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    A simple and versatile system for resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopic analysis of enzymesubstrate complexes at liquid helium temperatures is described. The system allows us to record high-quality RR spectra for dithioacyl papain intermediates (MeO-Phe-Gly- and MeO-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-C (dbnd S)S-papain) in ice matrices at 5 K. Based on established structure-spectra correlations, it is concluded that the active-site conformation of the intermediates about the φ', ψ' glycinic linkages and cysteine-25 side chain is B-G+-PH both in ice matrices at 5 K and in solution at room temperature.

  3. Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-Hui; Sun, Yi; Pu, Yang; Boydston-White, Susie; Liu, Yulong; Alfano, Robert R.

    2012-11-01

    The resonance Raman (RR) spectra of six types of human brain tissues are examined using a confocal micro-Raman system with 532-nm excitation in vitro. Forty-three RR spectra from seven subjects are investigated. The spectral peaks from malignant meningioma, stage III (cancer), benign meningioma (benign), normal meningeal tissues (normal), glioblastoma multiforme grade IV (cancer), acoustic neuroma (benign), and pituitary adenoma (benign) are analyzed. Using a 532-nm excitation, the resonance-enhanced peak at 1548 cm-1 (amide II) is observed in all of the tissue specimens, but is not observed in the spectra collected using the nonresonance Raman system. An increase in the intensity ratio of 1587 to 1605 cm-1 is observed in the RR spectra collected from meningeal cancer tissue as compared with the spectra collected from the benign and normal meningeal tissue. The peak around 1732 cm-1 attributed to fatty acids (lipids) are diminished in the spectra collected from the meningeal cancer tumors as compared with the spectra from normal and benign tissues. The characteristic band of spectral peaks observed between 2800 and 3100 cm-1 are attributed to the vibrations of methyl (-CH3) and methylene (-CH2-) groups. The ratio of the intensities of the spectral peaks of 2935 to 2880 cm-1 from the meningeal cancer tissues is found to be lower in comparison with that of the spectral peaks from normal, and benign tissues, which may be used as a distinct marker for distinguishing cancerous tissues from normal meningeal tissues. The statistical methods of principal component analysis and the support vector machine are used to analyze the RR spectral data collected from meningeal tissues, yielding a diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 100% when two principal components are used.

  4. Study on the resonance Raman scattering properties of β-carotene incorporated into SBA-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shishi; Zhang, Guannan; Shen, Aiguo; Hu, Juncheng; Hu, Jiming

    2010-10-01

    In this study, β-carotene, a resonance Raman active substance, was introduced into the large pore channel of rod-like SBA-15 for the first time. This novel resonance Raman active material has been characterized by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis. The adsorption process did not show any influence on the microstructure of SBA-15 as well as its physicochemical characters. Excited by 514.5 nm laser, the resonance Raman signals of the products were demonstrated as well-defined Raman peaks at 1009, 1158 and 1514 cm -1, which should be assigned to the methyl rock (C-CH 3), carbon single-bond stretch (C-C) and carbon double-bond stretch (C dbnd C) normal modes, respectively. In addition, the internal standard method was utilized by resonance Raman spectroscopy to determine the adsorption capacity of mesoporous silicas for β-carotene using the results of UV-vis spectroscopy as a reference.

  5. Photogenerated radical intermediates of vitamin K 1: a time-resolved resonance Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, G.; Umapathy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Quinones play a vital role in the process of electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers. It is of interest to investigate the photochemical reactions involving quinones with a view to elucidating the structure-function relationships in the biological processes. Resonance Raman spectra of radical anions and the time-resolved resonance Raman spectra of vitamin K 1 (model compound for Q A in Rhodopseudomonas viridis, a bacterial photosynthetic reception center) are presented. The photochemical intermediates of vitamin K 1, viz. radical anion, ketyl radical and o-quinone methide have been identified. The vibrational assignments of all these intermediates are made on the basis of comparison with our earlier TR3 studies on radical anions of naphthoquinone and menaquinone.

  6. Surface plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer and resonance Raman, surface-enhanced resonance Raman studies of cytochrome C mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Junwei

    1999-11-08

    Surface plasmon resonance was utilized to enhance the electron transfer at silver/solution interfaces. Photoelectrochemical reductions of nitrite, nitrate, and CO{sub 2} were studied on electrochemically roughened silver electrode surfaces. The dependence of the photocurrent on photon energy, applied potential and concentration of nitrite demonstrates that the photoelectrochemical reduction proceeds via photoemission process followed by the capture of hydrated electrons. The excitation of plasmon resonances in nanosized metal structures resulted in the enhancement of the photoemission process. In the case of photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO{sub 2}, large photoelectrocatalytic effect for the reduction of CO{sub 2} was observed in the presence of surface adsorbed methylviologen, which functions as a mediator for the photoexcited electron transfer from silver metal to CO{sub 2} in solution. Photoinduced reduction of microperoxidase-11 adsorbed on roughened silver electrode was also observed and attributed to the direct photoejection of free electrons of silver metal. Surface plasmon assisted electron transfer at nanostructured silver particle surfaces was further determined by EPR method.

  7. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Short Jr., Billy Joe

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  8. Spatial correlation between chemical and topological defects in vitreous silica: UV-resonance Raman study

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M. D’Amico, F.; Bencivenga, F.; Cucini, R.; Gessini, A.; Principi, E.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2014-06-28

    A spatial correlation between chemical and topological defects in the tetrahedron network in vitreous silica produced by a fusion process of natural quartz crystals was found by synchrotron-based UV resonance Raman experiments. Furthermore, a quantitative correlation between these defects was obtained by comparing visible Raman and UV absorption spectra. These results indicate that in vitreous silica produced by the fusion process the topological defects disturb the surrounding tetrahedral silica network and induce further disorder regions with sub nanometric sizes.

  9. Multi-wavelength resonance Raman spectroscopy of bacteria to study the effects of growth condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunapareddy, Nagapratima; Grun, Jacob; Lunsford, Robert; Gillis, David; Nikitin, Sergei; Wang, Zheng

    2012-06-01

    We will examine the use of multi-wavelength UV resonance-Raman signatures to identify the effects of growth phase on different types of bacteria. Gram positive and gram-negative species, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Citrobacter koseri and Citrobacter braakii were grown to logarithmic and stationary phases in different culture media. Raman spectra of bacteria were obtained by sequential illumination of samples between 220 and 260 nm; a range which encompasses the resonance frequencies of cellular components. In addition to the information contained in the single spectrum, this two-dimensional signature contains information reflecting variations in resonance cross sections with illumination wavelength. Results of our algorithms in identifying the differences between these germs are discussed. Preliminary results indicate that growth affects the Raman signature, but not to an extent that would negate identification of the species.

  10. Why are blue visual pigments blue? A resonance Raman microprobe study.

    PubMed Central

    Loppnow, G R; Barry, B A; Mathies, R A

    1989-01-01

    A resonance Raman microscope has been developed to study the structure of the retinal prosthetic group in the visual pigments of individual photoreceptor cells. Raman vibrational spectra are obtained by focusing the probe laser on intact photoreceptors frozen on a 77 K cold stage. To elucidate the mechanism of wavelength regulation in blue visual pigments, we have used this apparatus to study the structure of the chromophore in the 440-nm absorbing pigment found in "green rods" of the toad (Bufo marinus). The 9-cis isorhodopsin form of the green rod pigment exhibits a 1662-cm-1 C = NH+ Schiff base stretching mode that shifts to 1636 cm-1 in deuterium-substituted H2O. This demonstrates that the Schiff base linkage to the protein is protonated. Protonation of the Schiff base is sufficient to explain the 440-nm absorption maximum of this pigment without invoking any additional protein-chromophore interactions. The absence of additional perturbations is supported by the observation that the ethylenic band and the perturbation-sensitive C-10-C-11 and C-14-C-15 stretching modes have the same frequency as those of the 9-cis protonated retinal Schiff base in solution. Our demonstration that a blue visual pigment contains an unperturbed protonated Schiff base provides experimental evidence that the protein charge perturbation responsible for the opsin shift in the 500-nm absorbing pigments is removed in the opsins of blue pigments, as suggested by the sequence data. PMID:2493645

  11. On the Increasing Fragility of Human Teeth with Age: ADeep-Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ager III, J.W.; Nalla, R.K.; Balooch, G.; Kim, G.; Pugach, M.; Habelitz, S.; Marshall, G.W.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-07-14

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS) using 244nm excitation was used to investigate the impact of aging on humandentin. The intensity of a spectroscopic feature from the peptide bondsin the collagen increases with tissue age, similar to a finding reportedpreviously for human cortical bone.

  12. Optical pathology study of human abdominal aorta tissues using confocal micro resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-hui; Boydston-White, Susie; Wang, Wubao; Sordillo, Laura A.; Shi, Lingyan; Weisberg, Arel; Tomaselli, Vincent P.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopic technique has a high potential for label-free and in-situ detection of biomedical lesions in vivo. This study evaluates the ability of RR spectroscopy method as an optical histopathology tool to detect the atherosclerotic plaque states of abdominal aorta in vitro. This part demonstrates the RR spectral molecular fingerprint features from different sites of the atherosclerotic abdominal aortic wall tissues. Total 57 sites of five pieces aortic samples in intimal and adventitial wall from an autopsy specimen were examined using confocal micro Raman system of WITec 300R with excitation wavelength of 532nm. The preliminary RR spectral biomarkers of molecular fingerprints indicated that typical calcified atherosclerotic plaque (RR peak at 964cm-1) tissue; fibrolipid plaque (RR peaks at 1007, 1161, 1517 and 2888cm-1) tissue, lipid pool with the fatty precipitation cholesterol) with collagen type I (RR peaks at 864, 1452, 1658, 2888 and 2948cm-1) in the soft tissue were observed and investigated.

  13. [Study of biological molecules in water by using the resonance raman spectra in liquid-core optical fiber].

    PubMed

    Jia, Li-Hua; Wang, Yi-Ding; Sun, Cheng-Lin; Li, Zhan-Long; Li, Zuo-Wei; Wang, Li-Jun

    2009-10-01

    Raman spectrum is an important and effective method for the study of biological molecules in water. Measuring the Raman spectra for biological molecules in water, however, is very difficult because of the small Raman scattering cross section and the high electronic excitation energy of water molecules. In the present paper, the authors applied both technologies of liquid-core optical fiber and the resonance Raman spectra, then the intensity of Raman spectra was enhanced to a great extent. In this experiment, we chose the laser wavelength 514.5 of Ar+ ion laser as excitation laser, because we could obtain the maximal intensity of resonance Raman spectra at this wavelength. The experiment results show that, for the trace inspecting study of beta-carotene biological molecules in water, the concentration in the range of 10(-7)-10(-9) mol x L(-1) can be detected by quartz liquid-core optical fiber and the concentration in the range of 10(-9)-10(-10) mol x L(-1) by Teflon liquid-core optical fiber. The detecting utmost will be further reduced if improving the quality of optical fiber. PMID:20038038

  14. Resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Kitagawa, Teizo

    2014-01-01

    Flavin is a general name given to molecules having the heteroaromatic ring system of 7,8-dimethylisoalloxazine but practically means riboflavin (Rfl), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in biological systems, whose structures are illustrated in Fig. 1, together with the atomic numbering scheme and ring numbering of the isoalloxazine moiety. As the isoalloxazine skeleton cannot be synthesized in human cells, it is obtained from diet as Rfl (vitamin B2). FAD and FMN can act as cofactors in flavoenzymes but Rfl does not. Most flavoenzymes catalyze redox reactions of substrates (Miura, Chem Rec 1:183-194, 2001). When O2 serves as the oxidant in the oxidation half cycle of an enzymic reaction, the enzyme is called "flavo-oxidase" but when others do, the enzyme is called "flavo-dehydrogenase." The difference between the two types of oxidative catalysis arises from delicate differences in the π-electron distributions in the isoalloxazine ring, which can be revealed by Raman spectroscopy (Miura, Chem Rec 1:183-194, 2001). Since a flavin is an extremely versatile molecule, the scientific field including chemistry, biochemistry, and enzymology is collectively called "flavonology." It was found recently, however, that the flavin also acts as a chromophore to initiate light-induced DNA repair and signal transductions (Sancar, Chem Rev 103:2203-2237, 2003).

  15. Resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical gallium arsenide nanowires studied using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Walia, Jaspreet; Boulanger, Jonathan; Dhindsa, Navneet; LaPierre, Ray; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Saini, Simarjeet S

    2016-06-17

    Gallium arsenide nanowires have shown considerable promise for use in applications in which the absorption of light is required. When the nanowires are oriented vertically, a considerable amount of light can be absorbed, leading to significant heating effects. Thus, it is important to understand the threshold power densities that vertical GaAs nanowires can support, and how the nanowire morphology is altered under these conditions. Here, resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical GaAs nanowires was studied using both Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques. Resonant waveguiding, and subsequent absorption of the excited optical mode reduces the irradiance vertical GaAs nanowires can support relative to horizontal ones, by three orders of magnitude before the onset of structural changes occur. A power density of only 20 W mm(-2) was sufficient to induce local heating in the nanowires, resulting in the formation of arsenic species. Upon further increasing the power, a hollow nanowire morphology was realized. These findings are pertinent to all optical applications and spectroscopic measurements involving vertically oriented GaAs nanowires. Understanding the optical absorption limitations, and the effects of exceeding these limitations will help improve the development of all III-V nanowire devices. PMID:27172276

  16. Resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical gallium arsenide nanowires studied using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walia, Jaspreet; Boulanger, Jonathan; Dhindsa, Navneet; LaPierre, Ray; (Shirley Tang, Xiaowu; Saini, Simarjeet S.

    2016-06-01

    Gallium arsenide nanowires have shown considerable promise for use in applications in which the absorption of light is required. When the nanowires are oriented vertically, a considerable amount of light can be absorbed, leading to significant heating effects. Thus, it is important to understand the threshold power densities that vertical GaAs nanowires can support, and how the nanowire morphology is altered under these conditions. Here, resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical GaAs nanowires was studied using both Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques. Resonant waveguiding, and subsequent absorption of the excited optical mode reduces the irradiance vertical GaAs nanowires can support relative to horizontal ones, by three orders of magnitude before the onset of structural changes occur. A power density of only 20 W mm-2 was sufficient to induce local heating in the nanowires, resulting in the formation of arsenic species. Upon further increasing the power, a hollow nanowire morphology was realized. These findings are pertinent to all optical applications and spectroscopic measurements involving vertically oriented GaAs nanowires. Understanding the optical absorption limitations, and the effects of exceeding these limitations will help improve the development of all III-V nanowire devices.

  17. Resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical gallium arsenide nanowires studied using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Walia, Jaspreet; Boulanger, Jonathan; Dhindsa, Navneet; LaPierre, Ray; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Saini, Simarjeet S

    2016-06-17

    Gallium arsenide nanowires have shown considerable promise for use in applications in which the absorption of light is required. When the nanowires are oriented vertically, a considerable amount of light can be absorbed, leading to significant heating effects. Thus, it is important to understand the threshold power densities that vertical GaAs nanowires can support, and how the nanowire morphology is altered under these conditions. Here, resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical GaAs nanowires was studied using both Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques. Resonant waveguiding, and subsequent absorption of the excited optical mode reduces the irradiance vertical GaAs nanowires can support relative to horizontal ones, by three orders of magnitude before the onset of structural changes occur. A power density of only 20 W mm(-2) was sufficient to induce local heating in the nanowires, resulting in the formation of arsenic species. Upon further increasing the power, a hollow nanowire morphology was realized. These findings are pertinent to all optical applications and spectroscopic measurements involving vertically oriented GaAs nanowires. Understanding the optical absorption limitations, and the effects of exceeding these limitations will help improve the development of all III-V nanowire devices.

  18. UV resonance Raman study of model complexes of the Cu B site of cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yasutomo; Liu, Jin-Gang; Naruta, Yoshinori; Kitagawa, Teizo

    2005-02-01

    A newly designed model complex for the CuB site of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), that is, Cu coordinated by two free imidazoles and an imidazole covalently linked to p-cresol [CuIIBIAIPBr]Br, (BIAIP =2-[4-[[Bis(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-ylmethyl)amino]methyl]-1H-imidazol-1-yl]-4-methylphenol), and related molecules have been investigated with absorption and ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy employing the excitation wavelengths between 220 and 290 nm. Attention was focused on the electron delocalization through the cross-linkage between the phenol and imidazole rings, and the influences by the coordination of CuII to imidazole. In addition to the ν8a and ν8b modes of p-cresol, a number of Raman bands involving vibrations of the imidazole moiety have been intensity-enhanced despite Raman excitation in resonance with the π-π* transition of phenol, indicating appreciable mixing of the π systems of imidazole and phenol rings. Furthermore, two kinds of imidazoles seem to be differential; one is the imidazole linked to p-cresol which yielded Raman bands at 1249, 1191, and 1141 cm-1 for protonated CuII-BIAIP, and the other is one not linked to p-cresol, which yielded an intense band at 1488 cm-1 band. Raman enhancement of the latter mode seems to be caused by preresonance to the lowest π-π* transition of imidazole via the A-term mechanism. The Raman excitation profile (REP) of ν8a mode for the deprotonated phenol of the CuII-complex revealed a weak local maximum corresponding to the La band around 240 nm. Raman enhancement by the La band was relatively weaker for the CuII-complex than for the ZnII-complex and metal-free ligand, suggesting the more extensive mixing of π systems of p-cresol-imidazole through the cross-linkage for the Cu II-complex.

  19. Molecular effects of high-pressure processing on food studied by resonance Raman.

    PubMed

    Tintchev, Filip; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Kuhlmann, Uwe; Toepfl, Stefan; Knorr, Dietrich; Hildebrandt, Peter; Heinz, Volker

    2010-02-01

    Pressurization may cause unwanted side effects including color or texture changes of fish and meat. The color changes of poultry, pork, and smoked salmon were studied by CIE L*, a*, b* system, and resonance Raman (RR). High-pressure processing (HPP) of pork and chicken meat resulted in significant color modification at pressures higher than 270 and 280 MPa, respectively. RR spectra were taken after a high-pressure treatment of pork meat. According to the RR-data, deoxymyoglobin is the dominating myoglobin species in pork meat. High-pressure treatment causes conformational changes resulting in a stabile nonnative ferrous myoglobin species while the ferrous myoglobin state is maintained. High-pressure treatment causes a decrease of the relative RR intensities of astaxanthin by salmon as probed with 514 nm. RR spectra excited at 413 nm revealed a heterogeneous broadening of astaxanthin bands accompanied by the formation of deoxymyoglobin or deoxyhemoglobin. The broadening is interpreted as the degradation products of astaxanthin. Obviously, the high-pressure treatment of smoked salmon triggers redox processes of astaxanthin and the heme protein.

  20. Tryptophan as a probe of photosystem I electron transfer reactions: a UV resonance Raman study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Bender, Shana L; Keough, James M; Barry, Bridgette A

    2009-08-20

    Photosystem I (PSI) is one of the two membrane-associated reaction centers involved in oxygenic photosynthesis. In photosynthesis, solar energy is converted to chemical energy in the form of a transmembrane charge separation. PSI oxidizes cytochrome c(6) or plastocyanin and reduces ferredoxin. In cyanobacterial PSI, there are 10 tryptophan residues with indole side chains located less than 10 A from the electron transfer cofactors. In this study, we apply pump-probe difference UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to acquire the spectrum of aromatic amino acids in cyanobacterial PSI. This UVRR technique allows the use of the tryptophan vibrational spectrum as a reporter for structural changes, which are linked to PSI electron transfer reactions. Our results show that photo-oxidation of the chlorophyll a/a' heterodimer, P(700), causes shifts in the vibrational frequencies of two or more tryptophan residues. Similar perturbations of tryptophan are observed when P(700) is chemically oxidized. The observed spectral frequencies suggest that the perturbed tryptophan side chains are only weakly or not hydrogen bonded and are located in an environment in which there is steric repulsion. The direction of the spectral shifts is consistent with an oxidation-induced increase in dielectric constant or a change in hydrogen bonding. To explain our results, the perturbation of tryptophan residues must be linked to a PSI conformational change, which is, in turn, driven by P(700) oxidation.

  1. Resonance Raman studies of the HOOP modes in octopus bathorhodopsin with deuterium-labeled retinal chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, H.; Manor, D.; Weng, G.; Rath, P.; Callender, R.H. ); Koutalos, Y.; Ebrey, T. ); Gebhard, R.; Lugtenburg, J. ); Tsuda, M. )

    1991-05-07

    Resonance Raman spectra of the hydrogen out-of-plane (HOOP) vibrational modes in the retinal chromophore of octopus bathorhodopsin with deuterium label(s) along the polyene chain have been obtained. In clear contrast with bovine bathorhodopsin's HOOP modes, there are only two major HOOP bands at 887 and 940 cm{sup {minus}1} for octopus bathorhodopsin. On the basis of their isotopic shifts upon deuterium labeling, the authors have assigned the band at 887 cm{sup {minus}1} to C{sub 10}H and C{sub 14}H HOOP modes, and the band at 940 cm{sup {minus}1} to C{sub 11}H{double bond}C{sub 12}H A{sub u}-like HOOP mode. They found also that the C{sub 10}H and C{sub 14}H HOOP wags are also similar to those in the model-compound studies. However, they have found that the interaction between the C{sub 7}H and C{sub 8}H HOOP internal coordinates of the chromophore in octopus bathorhodopsin is different from that of the chromophore in solution. The twisted nature of the chromophore, semiquantitatively discussed here, likely affects the {lambda}{sub max} of the chromophore and its enthalpy. The nature of the HOOP modes of octopus bathorhodopsin differs substantially from those found in bovine bathorhodopsin.

  2. Theoretical studies on absorption, emission, and resonance Raman spectra of Coumarin 343 isomers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenpeng; Cao, Zexing; Zhao, Yi

    2012-03-21

    The vibrationally resolved spectral method and quantum chemical calculations are employed to reveal the structural and spectral properties of Coumarin 343 (C343), an ideal candidate for organic dye photosensitizers, in vacuum and solution. The results manifest that the ground-state energies are dominantly determined by different placements of hydrogen atom in carboxylic group of C343 conformations. Compared to those in vacuum, the electronic absorption spectra in methanol solvent show a hyperchromic property together with the redshift and blueshift for the neutral C343 isomers and their deprotonated anions, respectively. From the absorption, emission, and resonance Raman spectra, it is found that the maximal absorption and emission come from low-frequency modes whereas the high-frequency modes have high Raman activities. The detailed spectra are further analyzed for the identification of the conformers and understanding the potential charge transfer mechanism in their photovoltaic applications.

  3. Linear Polarized Transmission Resonance Raman Studies in Fruits: Experimental Versus Model Calculations.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniel; Gonzálvez, Alicia G; Buesing, Franziska; González Ureña, Ángel

    2015-07-01

    A linear polarized transmission resonance Raman spectroscopic technique was developed to measure the depolarization ratio of different β-carotene Raman bands in carrot roots and mangos. Basically, this optical property was measured as a function of the vegetal tissue thickness and fruit postharvest lifetime. In general, the depolarization ratio increases as the sample optical thickness does and decreases as the fruit postharvest lifetime increases. In addition, a previous theoretical model was extended by considering the light state of polarization to obtain the depolarization ratio as a function of the sample absorption and scattering coefficient. It was shown how the reported theoretical model is able to satisfactorily describe the fruit optical parameter dependence on both the sample thickness and its postharvest time. Finally, the advantages and limitations of the present technique and theoretical mode are discussed. PMID:26037146

  4. X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, P.L.; LeBrun, T.; Deslattes, R.D.

    1995-08-01

    X-ray resonant Raman scattering presents great promise as a high-resolution spectroscopic probe of the electronic structure of matter. Unlike other methods, the technique avoids the loss of energy resolution resulting from the lifetime broadening of short-lived core-excited states. In addition, measurements of polarization and angular anisotropies yield information on the symmetries of electronic states of atoms and molecules. We studied the L{sub 3} edge of xenon, where the lifetime broadening is a major feature of the spectra recorded previously. X-ray fluorescence spectra were taken of both the L{alpha}{sub l,2} and L{beta}{sub 2,15} peaks over a range of energies from 10 eV below the edge to 40 eV above. These spectra show the evolution of resonant Raman scattering into characteristic fluorescence as the photon energy is scanned across the edge, and confirm several features of these spectra such as asymmetries in resonant peak shapes due to the onset of the ionization continuum. These results constitute the most comprehensive study of X-ray resonant Raman scattering to date, and were submitted for publication. Studies of other cases are under way, and new instruments that would match the unique characteristics of the APS - and thus render a new range of experiments possible - are under consideration.

  5. Resonance IR: a coherent multidimensional analogue of resonance Raman.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Erin S; Neff-Mallon, Nathan A; Handali, Jonathan D; Wright, John C

    2014-05-01

    This work demonstrates the use of triply resonant sum frequency (TRSF) spectroscopy as a "resonance IR" analogue to resonance Raman spectroscopy. TRSF is a four-wave-mixing process where three lasers with independent frequencies interact coherently with a sample to generate an output at their triple summation frequency. The first two lasers are in the infrared and result in two vibrational excitations, while the third laser is visible and induces a two-quantum anti-Stokes resonance Raman transition. The signal intensity grows when the laser frequencies are all in resonance with coupled vibrational and electronic states. The method therefore provides electronic enhancement of IR-active vibrational modes. These modes may be buried beneath solvent in the IR spectrum and also be Raman-inactive and therefore inaccessible by other techniques. The method is presented on the centrosymmetric complex copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate. In this study, the two vibrational frequencies were scanned across ring-breathing modes, while the visible frequency was left in resonance with the copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate Q band, resulting in a two-dimensional infrared plot that also reveals coupling between vibrational states. TRSF has the potential to be a very useful probe of structurally similar biological motifs such as hemes, as well as synthetic transition-metal complexes. PMID:24707979

  6. Al-doped MgB2 materials studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateni, Ali; Erdem, Emre; Repp, Sergej; Weber, Stefan; Somer, Mehmet

    2016-05-01

    Undoped and aluminum (Al) doped magnesium diboride (MgB2) samples were synthesized using a high-temperature solid-state synthesis method. The microscopic defect structures of Al-doped MgB2 samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance. It was found that Mg-vacancies are responsible for defect-induced peculiarities in MgB2. Above a certain level of Al doping, enhanced conductive properties of MgB2 disappear due to filling of vacancies or trapping of Al in Mg-related vacancy sites.

  7. Picosecond Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Visual Pigments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsen, William Frederick

    We have constructed a picosecond Raman spectrometer to obtain information about primary events in visual excitation. The excitation source at 532 nm is a frequency doubled modelocked Nd:YAG laser optimized for short pulses, high repetition rates, and high pulse to pulse stability. The sample illumination geometry is optimized for pulsed Raman measurements using low magnification light collection and optical multi-channel detection. This instrument gives high signal to noise ratios and high data rates. The visual pigment rhodopsin was studied with this picosecond Raman instrument. We found that within 20 picoseconds of absorbing a photon, low wavenumber Raman bands characteristic of the first photo-intermediate bathorhodopsin appear. This scattering at 853, 875, and 920 wavenumbers arises from enhanced hydrogen out of plane vibrations from a strained all-trans configuration of the retinal chromophore in the protein. Furthermore, bands characteristic of isorhodopsin appear within the 10 picosecond pulse. We therefore conclude that the 11-cis retinal chromophore of rhodopsin isomerizes to a strained all-trans configuration and can further isomerize to a 9-cis form on absorbing a second photon, all within 20 picoseconds. Measurements starting with isorhodopsin show that the reverse process, 9-cis to trans to 11-cis, can also occur within 20 picoseconds. The resonance Raman spectra of bathorhodopsin formed from rhodopsin, however, exhibits consistent small differences from that of bathorhodopsin formed from isorhodopsin. Spectra of corresponding pigments deuterated at the retinal 12 carbon position also show slight differences. These data suggest that the bathorhodopsins formed from rhodopsin and isorhodopsin are initially different. They appear, however, to converge to a common intermediate by the end of 20 picoseconds. This resonance Raman study reveals that much of the isomerization of retinal takes place within a few picoseconds of the absorption of a photon by

  8. Auger resonant Raman spectroscopy used to study the angular distributions of the Xe 4d{sub 5/2} {yields} 6p decay spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, B.; Berrah, N.; Farhat, A.

    1997-04-01

    Auger resonant Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the resonant Auger decay processes with a resolution narrower than the natural lifetime width of the initial inner-shell hole state. This effect has been used to analyze branching ratios of resonantly excited atoms and molecules. In this paper, the authors present results of a study of angular distributions of the spectator decay lines of Xe following 4d{sub 5/2}{r_arrow}6p excitation using the Auger resonant Raman effect and highly resolved photons from the Advanced Light Source (ALS).

  9. Resonance Raman study of the oxygenation cycle of optically trapped single red blood cells in a microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramser, Kerstin; Logg, Katarina; Enger, Jonas; Goksor, Mattias; Kall, Mikael; Hanstorp, Dag

    2004-10-01

    The average environmental response of red blood cells (RBCs) is routinely measured in ensemble studies, but in such investigations valuable information on the single cell level is obscured. In order to elucidate this hidden information is is important to enable the selection of single cells with certain properties while subsequent dynamics triggered by environmental stimulation are recorded in real time. It is also desirable to manipulate and control the cells under phsyiological conditions. As shown here, this can be achieved by combining optical tweezers with a confocal Raman set-up equipped with a microfluidic system. A micro-Raman set-up is combined with an optical trap with separate optical paths, lasers and objectives, which enables the acquisition of resonance Raman profils of single RBCs. The microfluidic system, giving full control over the media surrounding the cell, consists of a pattern of channels and reservoirs produced by electron beam lithography and moulded in PDMS. Fresh Hepes buffer or buffer containing sodium dithionite are transported through the channels using electro-osmotic flow, while the direct Raman response of the single optically trapped RBC is registered in another reservoir in the middle of the channel. Thus, it is possible to monitor the oxygenation cycle in a single cell and to study photo-induced chemistry. This experimental set-up has high potential for monitoring the drug response or conformational changes caused by other environmental stimuli for many types of single functional cells since "in vivo" conditions can be created.

  10. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B P; Saini, G S S

    2016-02-15

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  11. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-02-01

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  12. The resonance Raman excitation profile of fucoxanthin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, L. J.; Glasgow, L. A.; Hoskins, L. C.; Krohe, T.

    1989-01-01

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles (RREPs) of the ν 1 and ν 2 vibrations of fucoxanthin in acetone and toluene solvents have been studied. Fucoxanthin, which is a predominant pigment in marine seaweed and phytoplankton, has several structural differences from carotenoids for which excitation profiles have been determined. The RREPs for fucoxanthin are interpreted in terms of a two-mode model and show a B2 value which is approximately 20% lower than for carotenoids like β-carotene and lutein which occur in higher plants. Excellent fits between experimental data and the theoretical model were observed in both solvents.

  13. An ultraviolet resonance Raman study of dehydrogenase enzymes and their interactions with coenzymes and substrates.

    PubMed

    Austin, J C; Wharton, C W; Hester, R E

    1989-02-21

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectra, with 260-nm excitation, are reported for oxidized and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+ and NADH, respectively). Corresponding spectra are reported for these coenzymes when bound to the enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and liver and yeast alcohol dehydrogenases (LADH and YADH). The observed differences between the coenzyme spectra are interpreted in terms of conformation, hydrogen bonding, and general environment polarity differences between bound and free coenzymes and between coenzymes bound to different enzymes. The possibility of adenine protonation is discussed. UVRR spectra with 220-nm excitation also are reported for holo- and apo-GAPDH (GAPDH-NAD+ and GAPDH alone, respectively). In contrast with the 260-nm spectra, these show only bands due to vibrations of aromatic amino acid residues of the protein. The binding of coenzyme to GAPDH has no significant effect on the aromatic amino acid bands observed. This result is discussed in the light of the known structural change of GAPDH on binding coenzyme. Finally, UVRR spectra with 240-nm excitation are reported for GAPDH and an enzyme-substrate intermediate of GAPDH. Perturbations are reported for tyrosine and tryptophan bands on forming the acyl enzyme.

  14. Far-red resonance Raman study of copper A in subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace-Williams, S.E.; James, C.A.; Woodruff, W.H.; Vries, S. de; Saraste, M.; Lappalainen, P.; Oost, J. van der; Fabian, M.; Palmer, G.

    1996-04-24

    The present work employs far-red resonance Raman spectroscopy (RR) to investigate whether a Cu-Cu bonding interaction exists in Cu{sub A}. The electronic transition of Cu{sub A} near 830 nm provides the opportunity for specific RR observation of the vibrations of this chromophore. We have employed RR with Cu isotopic substitution on genetically modified, solubilized forms of CcO subunit II from Bacillus subtilis and Paracoccus denitrificans. We have also probed the Cu{sub A} site of native beef heart CcO for comparison. The similarity of the CcO and Cu{sub A} fragment (subunit II) spectra suggests that Cu{sub A} in the isolated subunit II has essentially the same structure as that of Cu{sub A} in intact CcO. Thus, the suggested Cu-Cu bonding in Cu{sub A}, if correct, applies both to the isolated subunit II and native CcO. The functional reasons why nature may choose such a structure, or in fact why a two-copper center of any sort is constructed to perform a function which is commonly believed to be simple one-electron transfer, are unclear. 34 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. The study of near-resonance Raman scattering of AlInN/AlN/GaN heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanli; Yang, Lianhong; Chen, Dunjun; Zhang, Li; Lu, Hai; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2015-07-01

    The visible and ultraviolet (UV) Raman scattering of an AlInN/AlN/GaN heterostructure were measured under z (x, _) z bar configuration at room temperature. Compared with the visible Raman spectrum, three new peaks at 609, 700, and 840 cm-1 occurred in the UV Raman spectrum and were verified to result from the resonance enhanced Raman effect. The near-resonance Raman scattering is stimulated by the electron transition process between the valence band and subband of triangular quantum well located at the interface of AlN/GaN because this transition process has a near equal energy with the 325 nm excitation light. According to the calculated dispersion relations of interface phonon modes in the AlInN/AlN/GaN heterostructure and the 2DEG-related resonance enhanced effect, these new Raman peaks were mainly attributed to the interface phonon modes and disorder-activated mode. The contributions from the bulk phonon modes of AlN and AlInN layers play a very minor role.

  16. Resonance Raman study of the active site of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Smulevich, G; Feis, A; Focardi, C; Tams, J; Welinder, K G

    1994-12-27

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra for the resting state ferric and the reduced ferrous forms of recombinant Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP), obtained with different excitation wavelengths and in polarized light, are reported. The spectra are compared with those obtained previously for cytochrome c peroxidase expressed in Escherichia coli [(CCP(MI)] and horseradish peroxidase (HRP-C). Although the enzymic properties of CIP and HRP-C are similar, the RR data show that, in terms of the heme cavity structures, CIP and CCP(MI) are much more closely related to each other than to HRP-C. The ferric state of CIP at neutral pH is characteristic mainly of a five-coordinate high spin heme. However, the lower frequency of the v2 mode and a higher frequency of the v(C = C) vinyl stretching modes for CIP as compared to CCP, indicate a higher degree of vibrational coupling between the two modes in CIP. In addition, CIP is rather unstable under low laser power irradiation as an irreversible transition to a six-coordinate high spin heme followed by a second transition to a six-coordinate low spin heme is observed. This instability of CIP as compared to CCP(MI) is proposed to be a consequence of the presence of a distal Phe54 in CIP rather than the homologous Trp51 in CCP, as Trp51 is hydrogen-bonded to a distal water molecule located above the heme Fe thereby preventing its coordination in CCP. In CIP the FeII-His RR band has two components with frequencies at 230 and 211 cm-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Resonance Raman Studies Of Lactoperoxidase And Sulflactoperoxidase: Drug-Induced Chlorin Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Laura A.

    1989-07-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is a membrane-bound heme enzyme that catalyzes iodination and coupling of thyroglobulin tyrosine residues in the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones. The soluble heme enzyme lactoperoxidase (LPO) also iodinates tyrosine efficiently and serves as a functional model for TPO. Whereas horseradish peroxidase oxidizes sulfur-containing compounds, e.g., cysteine and glutathione, these compounds interact with LPO and TPO without oxidation. Indeed, clinical treatment of thyroid disease involves the use of sulfur-containing drugs (goitrogens) to inactivate TPO. Reactions of TPO and LPO with goitrogens result in enzyme inhibition, in a process similar to the conversion of myoglobin to sulf-myoglobin (sulf-Mb). We have examined the electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectral properties of LPO treated with the potent antithyroid drug methylmercaptoimidazole (MMi). Interaction of LPO with MMi yields a stable, emerald green complex (SLPO (MNi]). The electronic absorption spectra of SLPO [MMi] are similar to those of sulf-Mb (which has a sulfur-modified iron chlorin macrocycle), and to those of the naturally occurring Escherichia coli and Neurospora crassa chlorin catalases. The Soret excitation RR spectrum of the SLPO [DIM] complex is distinct from that of native LPO, but is consistent with the spectral pattern for metallochlorins established by our laboratory. The SLPO [NW RR pattern is also analogous to that of chlorin-containing proteins such as the isomeric sulf-Mb's, myeloperoxidase, and the E. coli and N. crassa catalases. These data strongly suggest that MMi treatment of LPO results in conversion of the porphyrin prosthetic moiety to an iron chlorin. We infer that clinical treatment of thyroid disorders with the goitrogen drug MMi similarly converts the porphyrin prosthetic moiety of thyroid peroxidase to an iron chlorin. Spectral differences between sulf-Mb and SLPO [MMI] are particularly intriguing and suggest structural differences

  18. Resonant Raman spectroscopy study of swift heavy ion irradiated MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hang; Sun, Youmei; Zhai, Pengfei; Zeng, Jian; Zhang, Shengxia; Hu, Peipei; Yao, Huijun; Duan, Jinglai; Hou, Mingdong; Liu, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) crystal samples were irradiated by swift heavy ions (209Bi and 56Fe). Hillock-like latent tracks were observed on the surface of irradiated MoS2 by atomic force microscopy. The modifications of properties of irradiated MoS2 were investigated by resonant Raman spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis). A new peak (E1u2, ∼385.7 cm-1) occurs near the in-plane E2g1 peak (∼383.7 cm-1) after irradiation. The two peaks shift towards lower frequency and broaden due to structural defects and stress with increasing fluence. When irradiated with high fluence, two other new peaks appear at ∼ 190 and ∼ 230 cm-1. The peak at ∼230 cm-1 is disorder-induced LA(M) mode. The presence of this mode indicates defects induced by irradiation. The feature at ∼460 cm-1 is composed of 2LA(M) (∼458 cm-1) and A2u (∼466 cm-1) mode. With increasing fluence, the integrated intensity ratio between 2LA(M) and A2u increases. The relative enhancement of 2LA(M) mode is in agreement with the appearance of LA(M) mode, which both demonstrate structural disorder in irradiated MoS2. The ∼423-cm-1 peak shifts toward lower frequency due to the decrease in exciton energy of MoS2, and this was demonstrated by the results of UV-Vis spectra. The decrease in exciton energy could be due to introduction of defect levels into band gap.

  19. [Resonance Raman Spectral Properties Studies of Beta-carotene in Solution].

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei-jiao; Liu, Shuo; Liu, Tian-yuan; Xu, Sheng-nan; Sun, Cheng-lin; Zhou, Mi; Li, Zuo-wei

    2015-07-01

    Beta-carotene is an important kind of polyene biomolecules, which has significant applications on researching optoelectronic and functional materials. In-situ high pressure Raman spectra of beta-carotene are measured in CS2 solution and water respectively at pressure range from 0-0.60 GPa. Then we compared both of them the Raman shift and CC bond of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the Raman spectra. It is therefore concluded that both of the samples' Raman shift moved to the high wave number and the full width at half maximum increased depending of the pressure. The experiment phenomena were interpreted by the theory of "coherent weakly damped electronic-lattice vibration model" and "effective conjugation length model". The mechanism is that the beta-carotene is compressed and has the lower structure order, shorte the effective conjugation length, decreased Raman active, weaker the coherent weakly damping CC bond vibration in high pressure. Because of the CC bond length become short, so the Raman spectra are found to blueshift. The CC bond of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the Raman spectra increased is attributed to the increase of difference in C--C and C==C bond lengths. Moreover, due to dissolving in non-polar CS2 solvent, the beta-carotene encounters the interaction of the surrounding solvent molecules. So the dispersion force interaction between solute and solvent is more sensitive to pressure. Then it makes that the slop of Raman shift and the full width at half maximum in the CS2 solution are faster than dissolved in water with increasing pressure. This paper provides an application value for research on molecular structure change under the external field and the presence form of polyenes biomolecules in the solvent. PMID:26717749

  20. In situ electron spin resonance and Raman spectroscopic studies of the electrochemical process of conducting polypyrrole films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, C.J.; Tian, Z.Q.; Tian, Z.W. )

    1990-03-08

    The electrochemical redox properties of conducting polypyrrole (PPy) films coated on electrodes are investigated in aqueous solutions by use of the in situ techniques of electron spin resonance (ESR) and Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons between the experimental in situ ESR data and a theoretical kinetic prediction on the basis of the polaron-bipolaron model are presented.

  1. Proton Transfer of Guanine Radical Cations Studied by Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Spectroscopy Combined with Pulse Radiolysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jungkweon; Yang, Cheolhee; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Tojo, Sachiko; Ihee, Hyocherl; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-12-17

    The oxidation of guanine (G) is studied by using transient absorption and time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopies combined with pulse radiolysis. The transient absorption spectral change demonstrates that the neutral radical of G (G(•)(-H(+))), generated by the deprotonation of G radical cation (G(•+)), is rapidly converted to other G radical species. The formation of this species shows the pH dependence, suggesting that it is the G radical cation (G(•+))' formed from the protonation at the N7 of G(•)(-H(+)). On one hand, most Raman bands of (G(•+))' are up-shifted relative to those of G, indicating the increase in the bonding order of pyrimidine (Pyr) and imidazole rings. The (G(•+))' exhibits the characteristic CO stretching mode at ∼1266 cm(-1) corresponding to a C-O single bond, indicating that the unpaired electron in (G(•+))' is localized on the oxygen of the Pyr ring. PMID:26632994

  2. Resonance raman spectroscopic study of alumina-supported vanadium oxide catalysts with 220 and 287 nm excitation.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H. S.; Stair, P. C.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2009-01-01

    We present detailed resonance Raman spectroscopic results excited at 220 and 287 nm for alumina-supported VO{sub x} catalysts. The anharmonic constant, harmonic wavenumber, anharmonic force constant, bond dissociation energy, and bond length change in the excited state for double bonded V{double_bond}O and single bonded V-O were obtained from fundamental and overtone frequencies. Totally symmetric and nontotally symmetric modes could be discerned and assigned on the basis of the overtone and combination progressions found in the resonance Raman spectra. Selective resonance enhancement of two different vibrational modes with two different excitation wavelengths was observed. This allowed us to establish a linear relationship between charge transfer energy and VO bond length and, consequently, to assign the higher-energy charge transfer band centered around 210?250 nm in the UV?vis spectra to the V{double_bond}O transition.

  3. Periodontitis diagnostics using resonance Raman spectroscopy on saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Biryukova, T.; Tsvetkov, M.; Bagratashvily, V.

    2013-07-01

    In view of its wealth of molecular information, Raman spectroscopy has been the subject of active biomedical research. The aim of this work is Raman spectroscopy (RS) application for the determination of molecular biomarkers in saliva with the objective of early periodontitis detection. As was shown in our previous study, carotenoids contained in saliva can be molecular fingerprint information for the periodontitis level. It is shown here that the carotenoid RS lines at wavenumbers of 1156 and 1524 cm-1 can be easily detected and serve as reliable biomarkers of periodontitis using resonance Raman spectroscopy of dry saliva.

  4. Vibrational analysis of hydroxyflavylium derivatives by IR, Fourier transform Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, J. C.; Cornard, J. P.; Stastoua, A.; Saidi-Idrissi, M.; Lautie, M. F.; Brouillard, R.

    In order to give a better insight into the vibrational properties of anthocyanins, the synthesis and the vibrational studies of some hydroxyflavylium derivatives with a controlled substitution pattern have been performed. The IR, Raman and resonance Raman spectra of the investigated hydroxyflavylium compounds have been recorded in the solid and solution states. A number of lines have been assigned on the basis of deuterium isotopic shifts, resonance enhancement and previous studies on parent compounds. An attempt has been made to analyze the influence of hydroxy substituents on vibrational properties of the investigated flavylium cations.

  5. Fano resonance of Li-doped KTa1−xNbxO3 single crystals studied by Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, M. M.; Imai, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Tsukada, S.; Kojima, S.

    2016-01-01

    The enhancement of functionality of perovskite ferroelectrics by local structure is one of current interests. By the Li-doping to KTa1−xNbxO3 (KTN), the large piezoelectric and electro-optic effects were reported. In order to give new insights into the mechanism of doping, the microscopic origin of the Fano resonance induced by the local structure was investigated in 5%Li-doped KTN single crystals by Raman scattering. The coupling between the continuum states and the transverse optical phonon near 196 cm−1 (Slater mode) caused a Fano resonance. In the vicinity of the cubic-tetragonal phase transition temperature, TC-T = 31 °C, the almost disappearance of the Fano resonance and the remarkable change of the central peak (CP) intensity were observed upon heating. The local symmetry of the polar nanoregions (PNRs), which was responsible for the symmetry breaking in the cubic phase, was determined to E(x, y) symmetry by the angular dependence of Raman scattering. The electric field induced the significant change in the intensity of both CP and Fano resonance. From these experimental results, it is concluded that the origin of the Fano resonance in Li-doped KTN crystals is the coupling between polarization fluctuations of PNRs and the Slater mode, both belong to the E(x, y) symmetry. PMID:27049847

  6. Fano resonance of Li-doped KTa(1-x)NbxO3 single crystals studied by Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, M M; Imai, T; Sakamoto, T; Tsukada, S; Kojima, S

    2016-01-01

    The enhancement of functionality of perovskite ferroelectrics by local structure is one of current interests. By the Li-doping to KTa(1-x)NbxO3 (KTN), the large piezoelectric and electro-optic effects were reported. In order to give new insights into the mechanism of doping, the microscopic origin of the Fano resonance induced by the local structure was investigated in 5%Li-doped KTN single crystals by Raman scattering. The coupling between the continuum states and the transverse optical phonon near 196 cm(-1) (Slater mode) caused a Fano resonance. In the vicinity of the cubic-tetragonal phase transition temperature, TC-T = 31 °C, the almost disappearance of the Fano resonance and the remarkable change of the central peak (CP) intensity were observed upon heating. The local symmetry of the polar nanoregions (PNRs), which was responsible for the symmetry breaking in the cubic phase, was determined to E(x, y) symmetry by the angular dependence of Raman scattering. The electric field induced the significant change in the intensity of both CP and Fano resonance. From these experimental results, it is concluded that the origin of the Fano resonance in Li-doped KTN crystals is the coupling between polarization fluctuations of PNRs and the Slater mode, both belong to the E(x, y) symmetry. PMID:27049847

  7. A UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopic study on the extractable compounds of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) wood . Part I: Lipophilic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuopponen, M.; Willför, S.; Jääskeläinen, A.-S.; Sundberg, A.; Vuorinen, T.

    2004-11-01

    The wood resin in Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) stemwood and branch wood were studied using UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy. UVRR spectra of the sapwood and heartwood hexane extracts, solid wood samples and model compounds (six resin acids, three fatty acids, a fatty acid ester, sitosterol and sitosterol acetate) were collected using excitation wavelengths of 229, 244 and 257 nm. In addition, visible Raman spectra of the fatty and resin acids were recorded. Resin compositions of heartwood and sapwood hexane extracts were determined using gas chromatography. Raman signals of both conjugated and isolated double bonds of all the model compounds were resonance enhanced by UV excitation. The oleophilic structures showed strong bands in the region of 1660-1630 cm -1. Distinct structures were enhanced depending on the excitation wavelength. The UVRR spectra of the hexane extracts showed characteristic bands for resin and fatty acids. It was possible to identify certain resin acids from the spectra. UV Raman spectra collected from the solid wood samples containing wood resin showed a band at ˜1650 cm -1 due to unsaturated resin components. The Raman signals from extractives in the resin rich branch wood sample gave even more strongly enhanced signals than the aromatic lignin.

  8. A UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopic study on the extractable compounds of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) wood. Part I: lipophilic compounds.

    PubMed

    Nuopponen, M; Willför, S; Jääskeläinen, A-S; Sundberg, A; Vuorinen, T

    2004-11-01

    The wood resin in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stemwood and branch wood were studied using UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy. UVRR spectra of the sapwood and heartwood hexane extracts, solid wood samples and model compounds (six resin acids, three fatty acids, a fatty acid ester, sitosterol and sitosterol acetate) were collected using excitation wavelengths of 229, 244 and 257 nm. In addition, visible Raman spectra of the fatty and resin acids were recorded. Resin compositions of heartwood and sapwood hexane extracts were determined using gas chromatography. Raman signals of both conjugated and isolated double bonds of all the model compounds were resonance enhanced by UV excitation. The oleophilic structures showed strong bands in the region of 1660-1630 cm(-1). Distinct structures were enhanced depending on the excitation wavelength. The UVRR spectra of the hexane extracts showed characteristic bands for resin and fatty acids. It was possible to identify certain resin acids from the spectra. UV Raman spectra collected from the solid wood samples containing wood resin showed a band at approximately 1650 cm(-1) due to unsaturated resin components. The Raman signals from extractives in the resin rich branch wood sample gave even more strongly enhanced signals than the aromatic lignin.

  9. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process. PMID:26728791

  10. Deep UV Resonance Raman Spectroscopy for Characterizing Amyloid Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Handen, Joseph D; Lednev, Igor K

    2016-01-01

    Deep UV resonance Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique for probing the structure and formation mechanism of protein fibrils, which are traditionally difficult to study with other techniques owing to their low solubility and noncrystalline arrangement. Utilizing a tunable deep UV Raman system allows for selective enhancement of different chromophores in protein fibrils, which provides detailed information on different aspects of the fibrils' structure and formation. Additional information can be extracted with the use of advanced data treatment such as chemometrics and 2D correlation spectroscopy. In this chapter we give an overview of several techniques for utilizing deep UV resonance Raman spectroscopy to study the structure and mechanism of formation of protein fibrils. Clever use of hydrogen-deuterium exchange can elucidate the structure of the fibril core. Selective enhancement of aromatic amino acid side chains provides information about the local environment and protein tertiary structure. The mechanism of protein fibril formation can be investigated with kinetic experiments and advanced chemometrics.

  11. Resonance Raman studies of the heme active site of the homodimeric myoglobin from Nassa mutabilis: a peculiar case.

    PubMed

    Smulevich, G; Mantini, A R; Paoli, M; Coletta, M; Geraci, G

    1995-06-01

    A spectroscopic investigation by resonance Raman has been carried out at pH 7.0 in 0.1 M phosphate buffer on the cooperative homodimeric myoglobin from Nassa mutabilis. The study has been performed on the unligated ferrous form, as well as on the ligated species MbO2 and MbC, and on the ferric form met-Mb. Two v(C = C) vinyl stretching modes have been observed in all the investigated forms, reflecting different degrees of vinyl conjugation with the porphyrin ring, as a consequence of a strongly asymmetric environment for the two side groups of the heme. Furthermore, the ferric form displays a hexacoordinate low-spin heme, which suggests the presence of an endogenous ligand bound to the Fe atom. The frequency of the v(Fe-Im) stretching mode of Mb from Nassa mutabilis shifts down by 4 cm-1 as compared with that of horse heart myoglobin, reflecting a protein-induced proximal strain as a result of heme-heme interaction due to the close proximity of the two hemes in the dimer. The lower frequency of the v(Fe-Im) stretching mode agrees well with the lower affinity for oxygen binding found for Nassa mutabilis Mb and with the slight heme core expansion with respect to horse heart Mb, suggesting a critical role for the Fe-His bond on the heme's function and structure. PMID:7779795

  12. Electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy studies on carbon-doped MgB{sub 2} superconductor nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Bateni, Ali; Somer, Mehmet E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr; Erdem, Emre E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr; Repp, Sergej; Weber, Stefan; Acar, Selcuk; Kokal, Ilkin; Häßler, Wolfgang

    2015-04-21

    Undoped and carbon-doped magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) samples were synthesized using two sets of mixtures prepared from the precursors, amorphous nanoboron, and as-received amorphous carbon-doped nanoboron. The microscopic defect structures of carbon-doped MgB{sub 2} samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mg vacancies and C-related dangling-bond active centers could be distinguished, and sp{sup 3}-hybridized carbon radicals were detected. A strong reduction in the critical temperature T{sub c} was observed due to defects and crystal distortion. The symmetry effect of the latter is also reflected on the vibrational modes in the Raman spectra.

  13. Resonance Raman study of the A-band short-time photodissociation dynamics of 2,5-di-iodothiophene

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan Caibin; Zhu Hailin; Wang Huigang; Zheng Xuming; Phillips, David Lee

    2008-12-07

    Resonance Raman spectra were obtained for 2,5-di-iodothiophene in cyclohexane solution with excitation wavelengths in resonance with its A-band absorption. These spectra indicate that the Franck-Condon region photodissociation dynamics have multidimensional character with motion mostly along the nominal symmetric C{sub 2}C{sub 3}/C{sub 4}C{sub 5} stretch {nu}{sub 2} (1388 cm{sup -1}) of the thienyl ring and this is accompanied by motions along the nominal symmetric CSC stretch {nu}{sub 6} (640 cm{sup -1}), the nominal symmetric C-I stretch {nu}{sub 7} (187 cm{sup -1}), the nominal antisymmetric CSC stretch {nu}{sub 19} (728 cm{sup -1}), the nominal antisymmetric C{sub 2}C{sub 3}/C{sub 4}C{sub 5} stretch {nu}{sub 16} (1497 cm{sup -1}), the nominal C{sub 3}C{sub 4} stretch {nu}{sub 3} (1286 cm{sup -1}) and four other vibrational modes. A preliminary resonance Raman intensity analysis was done and the results for 2,5-di-iodothiophene were compared to previous results for 2-iodothiophene and di-iodomethane to discuss the mechanism of the symmetric breaking in the initial A-band photodissociation dynamics of 2,5-di-iodothiophene and 2-iodothiophene.

  14. Time and neighbor interaction in resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallen, Hans D.; Niu, Shupeng; Li, Ling

    2014-09-01

    We study systems in which the resonance Raman process is fast due to the requirement for phonon involvement in the absorption. The resonance enhancement is found to track the isolated molecule, or vapor phase, absorption since the molecule does not have time to exchange energy with its neighbors. This corroborates with studies of pre-resonance, where Heisenberg's uncertainty principle enforces a rapid process, but differs from resonance on electronically allowed transitions, where the resonance allows a relatively prolonged interaction. High resolution excitation spectroscopy reveals large gains and narrow features usually associated with the isolated molecule. Vibration energies shift as the resonance is approached and the excited state vibration levels are probed. Several multiplets and overtone modes are enhanced along with the strongly coupled ring-breathing mode in aromatic molecules.

  15. High-Resolution Study of X-Ray Resonant Raman Scattering at the K Edge of Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Szlachetko, J.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Berset, M.; Fennane, K.; Szlachetko, M.; Hoszowska, J.; Barrett, R.; Pajek, M.; Kubala-Kukus, A.

    2006-08-18

    We report on the first high-resolution measurements of the K x-ray resonant Raman scattering (RRS) in Si. The measured x-ray RRS spectra, interpreted using the Kramers-Heisenberg approach, revealed spectral features corresponding to electronic excitations to the conduction and valence bands in silicon. The total cross sections for the x-ray RRS at the 1s absorption edge and the 1s-3p excitation were derived. The Kramers-Heisenberg formalism was found to reproduce quite well the x-ray RRS spectra, which is of prime importance for applications of the total-reflection x-ray fluorescence technique.

  16. Excitons and exciton-phonon interactions in 2D MoS2 , WS2 and WSe2 studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, Marcos; Del Corro, Elena; Carvalho, Bruno; Malard, Leandro; Alves, Juliana; Fantini, Cristiano; Terrones, Humberto; Elias, Ana Laura; Terrones, Mauricio

    The 2D materials exhibit a very strong exciton binding energy, and the exciton-phonon coupling plays an important role in their optical properties. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) is a very useful tool to provide information about excitons and their couplings with phonons. We will present in this work a RRS study of different samples of 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (MoS2, WS2 and WSe2) with one, two and three layers (1L, 2L, 3L) and bulk samples, using more than 30 different laser excitation lines covering the visible range. We have observed that all Raman features are enhanced by resonances with excitonic transitions. From the laser energy dependence of the Raman excitation profile (REP) we obtained the energies of the excitonic states and their dependence with the number of atomic layers.. In the case of MoS2, we observed that the electron-phonon coupling is symmetry dependent, and our results provide experimental evidence of the C exciton recently predicted theoretically. The RRS results WSe2 show that the Raman modes are enhanced by the excited excitonic states and we will present the dependence of the excited states energies on the number of layers.

  17. Theoretical studies of resonance enhanced stimulated raman scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelengths in cesium vapor. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1986-10-01

    This work focused on understanding the effects of arbitrary transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates on the susceptibilities of coherently driven three-level systems. The approximation of a single relaxation rate often made in previous work is strongly invalidated by the variation in the spontaneous emission lifetime between various atomic level pairs in systems such as cesium. It is of great importance to the problem of nonlinear infrared generation to determine the dependence of both real and imaginary susceptibility on relaxation rates. The imaginary susceptibility on the pump transition determines the absorption of pump photons and the imaginary susceptibility on the laser transition determines the spectral dependence of the gain. This is of particular importance for pure Raman emission (i.e., absorption at linecenter of the gain transition) as it determines the tunability characteristics we are aiming to predict. The real susceptibility is important when cavities are used at the signal field as this will determine the loaded resonance of the Raman oscillator. Researchers show that in some cases which result from having different relaxation rates mode splitting may result, allowing more than one frequency to have the same Raman wavelength, possibly resulting in a temporal instability.

  18. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelengths in cesium vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    This work focused on understanding the effects of arbitrary transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates on the susceptibilities of coherently driven three-level systems. The approximation of a single relaxation rate often made in previous work is strongly invalidated by the variation in the spontaneous emission lifetime between various atomic level pairs in systems such as cesium. It is of great importance to the problem of nonlinear infrared generation to determine the dependence of both real and imaginary susceptibility on relaxation rates. The imaginary susceptibility on the pump transition determines the absorption of pump photons and the imaginary susceptibility on the laser transition determines the spectral dependence of the gain. This is of particular importance for pure Raman emission (i.e., absorption at linecenter of the gain transition) as it determines the tunability characteristics we are aiming to predict. The real susceptibility is important when cavities are used at the signal field as this will determine the loaded resonance of the Raman oscillator. Researchers show that in some cases which result from having different relaxation rates mode splitting may result, allowing more than one frequency to have the same Raman wavelength, possibly resulting in a temporal instability.

  19. Theoretical studies of resonance enhance stimulated raman scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelengths in cesium vapor. Semiannual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that the presence of a real atomic level which is nearly resonant with the pump field can greatly enhance the Raman emission cross section. In order to accurately calculate the Raman gain in systems where resonance enhancement plays a dominant role, expressions for the pump and signal susceptibilities must be derived. These expressions should be valid for arbitrary field strengths in order to allow for pump and signal saturation. In addition, the theory should allow for arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates. This latter point is extremely vital for three level atomic systems such as the alkali earth metals since they do not have population reservoirs and can have widely varying spontaneous lifetimes on the three pertinent transitions. Moreover, the dephasing rates are strong functions of electron states and are therefore also different for the three coupled pairs of levels. These considerations are not as important when molecular systems are concerned since the large reservoir of rotational states serve to produce essentially equal longitudinal recovery rates for the population of the three levels. The three level system with three arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates was solved. There is no need for setting either pair of rates equal and the expressions are valid for arbitrarily strong fields.

  20. Spectral properties of protonated Schiff base porphyrins and chlorins. INDO-CI calculations and resonance raman studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, L.K.; Chang, C.K.; Ward, B.; Callahan, P.M.; Babcock, G.T.; Head, J.D.

    1984-07-11

    INDO-CI calculations successfully reproduce the striking changes in optical spectra that occur upon protonation of mono- and disubstituted porphyrin, chlorin, and bacteriochlorin Schiff base complexes. They ascribe the changes to Schiff base C=N ..pi..* orbitals which drop in energy upon protonation and mix with and perturb the ..pi..* orbitals of the macrocycle, a result consistent with resonance Raman data. The perturbation is predicted to affect not only transition energies and intensities but also dipole moment directions. The symmetry of the porphyrin and the substitution site of the chlorin are shown to play an important role, especially in governing whether the lowest energy transition will red shift or blue shift. Blue shifts are calculated for protonation of ketimine and enamine isomers of pyrochlorophyll a (PChl). Comparison with reported optical spectra suggests that PChl a Schiff base may undergo isomerization upon protonation. Resonance Raman data on CHO, CHNR, CHNHR/sup +/, and pyrrolidine adducts of chlorin demonstrate the isolation of the peripheral C=O and C=N groups from the macrocycle ..pi.. system intramolecular hydrogen bonding, and selective enhancement of v/sub C=N/ for those species with a split Soret band. V/sub C=N/ is observed with 488.0-nm excitation into the lower-energy Soret and absent for 406.7-nm excitation into the higher-energy Soret, a result predicted by the calculations. 44 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhance Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelengths in cesium vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that the presence of a real atomic level which is nearly resonant with the pump field can greatly enhance the Raman emission cross section. In order to accurately calculate the Raman gain in systems where resonance enhancement plays a dominant role, expressions for the pump and signal susceptibilities must be derived. These expressions should be valid for arbitrary field strengths in order to allow for pump and signal saturation. In addition, the theory should allow for arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates. This latter point is extremely vital for three level atomic systems such as the alkali earth metals since they do not have population reservoirs and can have widely varying spontaneous lifetimes on the three pertinent transitions. Moreover, the dephasing rates are strong functions of electron states and are therefore also different for the three coupled pairs of levels. These considerations are not as important when molecular systems are concerned since the large reservoir of rotational states serve to produce essentially equal longitudinal recovery rates for the population of the three levels. The three level system with three arbitrary longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates was solved. There is no need for setting either pair of rates equal and the expressions are valid for arbitrarily strong fields.

  2. Raman-assisted Rabi resonances in two-mode cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenwald, P.; Singh, S. K.; Vogel, W.

    2011-06-15

    The dynamics of a vibronic system in a lossy two-mode cavity is studied, with the first mode being resonant to the electronic transition and the second one being nearly resonant due to Raman transitions. We derive analytical solutions for the dynamics of this system. For a properly chosen detuning of the second mode from the exact Raman resonance, we obtain conditions that are closely related to the phenomenon of Rabi resonance as it is well known in laser physics. Such resonances can be observed in the spontaneous emission spectra, where the spectrum of the second mode in the case of weak Raman coupling is enhanced substantially.

  3. Resonance electronic Raman scattering in rare earth crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.M.

    1988-11-10

    The intensities of Raman scattering transitions between electronic energy levels of trivalent rare earth ions doped into transparent crystals were measured and compared to theory. A particle emphasis was placed on the examination of the effect of intermediate state resonances on the Raman scattering intensities. Two specific systems were studied: Ce/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 1/) in single crystals of LuPO/sub 4/ and Er/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 11/) in single crystals of ErPO/sub 4/. 134 refs., 92 figs., 33 tabs.

  4. Wavelength dependent resonance Raman band intensity of broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy of malachite green in ethanol.

    PubMed

    Cen, Qiongyan; He, Yuhan; Xu, Mei; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zhaohui

    2015-03-21

    Resonance broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy of malachite green in ethanol has been performed. With a tuning picosecond visible laser source and a broadband Raman probe, the Raman gain and loss spectra have been measured simultaneously. By scanning the Raman pump across the first absorption band of the molecule, we found that the resonant Raman bands could be only seen when the pump laser tuned in the range of the red edge of the S1←S0 transition. Dispersive lineshapes of resonant Raman bands have been observed in the Raman loss spectra, while the line shape is normal (same as spontaneous Raman) in the Raman gain spectra. Although, the resonant bands in the loss spectrum are usually stronger than that in the gain spectrum, the band intensities of both loss and gain linearly increase with the pump energy. The relative magnitude of each corresponding resonant band in the Raman loss and gain varies with the pump wavelength. Mode specified Raman excitation profiles have been obtained through broadband stimulated Raman measurement.

  5. Wavelength dependent resonance Raman band intensity of broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy of malachite green in ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Qiongyan; He, Yuhan; Xu, Mei; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zhaohui

    2015-03-01

    Resonance broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy of malachite green in ethanol has been performed. With a tuning picosecond visible laser source and a broadband Raman probe, the Raman gain and loss spectra have been measured simultaneously. By scanning the Raman pump across the first absorption band of the molecule, we found that the resonant Raman bands could be only seen when the pump laser tuned in the range of the red edge of the S1←S0 transition. Dispersive lineshapes of resonant Raman bands have been observed in the Raman loss spectra, while the line shape is normal (same as spontaneous Raman) in the Raman gain spectra. Although, the resonant bands in the loss spectrum are usually stronger than that in the gain spectrum, the band intensities of both loss and gain linearly increase with the pump energy. The relative magnitude of each corresponding resonant band in the Raman loss and gain varies with the pump wavelength. Mode specified Raman excitation profiles have been obtained through broadband stimulated Raman measurement.

  6. Characterization and identification of contraband using UV resonant Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Richard J.; Hayward, Ian P.; Sands, H. S.; Batchelder, David N.

    1997-02-01

    A range of explosives and narcotics have been examined using Raman spectroscopy with 244 nm excitation. This wavelength of excitation eliminates the fluorescence problems associated with excitation at visible wavelengths. Comparison with spectra obtained using visible excitation reveals that resonance Raman scattering is occurring. This results in simplified spectra, and enhanced Raman scattering efficiencies.

  7. Preventing Raman Lasing in High-Q WGM Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    A generic design has been conceived to suppress the Raman effect in whispering- gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonators that have high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). Although it is possible to exploit the Raman effect (even striving to maximize the Raman gain to obtain Raman lasing), the present innovation is intended to satisfy a need that arises in applications in which the Raman effect inhibits the realization of the full potential of WGM resonators as frequency-selection components. Heretofore, in such applications, it has been necessary to operate high-Q WGM resonators at unattractively low power levels to prevent Raman lasing. (The Raman-lasing thresholds of WGM optical resonators are very low and are approximately proportional to Q(sup -2)). Heretofore, two ways of preventing Raman lasting at high power levels have been known, but both entail significant disadvantages: A resonator can be designed so that the optical field is spread over a relatively large mode volume to bring the power density below the threshold. For any given combination of Q and power level, there is certain mode volume wherein Raman lasing does not start. Unfortunately, a resonator that has a large mode volume also has a high spectral density, which is undesirable in a typical photonic application. A resonator can be cooled to the temperature of liquid helium, where the Raman spectrum is narrower and, therefore, the Raman gain is lower. However, liquid-helium cooling is inconvenient. The present design overcomes these disadvantages, making it possible to operate a low-spectral-density (even a single-mode) WGM resonator at a relatively high power level at room temperature, without risk of Raman lasing.

  8. UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy of amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhl, Martin; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Schmitt, Heike; Lenarz, Thomas; Morgner, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Resonant enhancement of Raman signals is a useful method to increase sensitivity in samples with low concentration such as biological tissue. The investigation of resonance profiles shows the optimal excitation wavelength and yields valuable information about the molecules themselves. However careful characterization and calibration of all experimental parameters affecting quantum yield is required in order to achieve comparability of the single spectra recorded. We present an experimental technique for measuring the resonance profiles of different amino acids. The absorption lines of these molecules are located in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range. One limitation for broadband measurement of resonance profiles is the limited availability of Raman filters in certain regions of the UV for blocking the Rayleigh scattered light. Here, a wavelength range from 244.8 nm to 266.0 nm was chosen. The profiles reveal the optimal wavelength for recording the Raman spectra of amino acids in aqueous solutions in this range. This study provides the basis for measurements on more complex molecules such as proteins in the human perilymph. The composition of this liquid in the inner ear is essential for hearing and cannot be analyzed non-invasively so far. The long term aim is to implement this technique as a fiber based endoscope for non-invasive measurements during surgeries (e. g. cochlear implants) making it available as a diagnostic tool for physicians. This project is embedded in the interdisciplinary cluster of excellence "Hearing for all" (H4A).

  9. A combination of dynamic light scattering and polarized resonance Raman scattering applied in the study of Arenicola Marina extracellular hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Jernshøj, K D; Hassing, S; Olsen, L F

    2013-08-14

    Arenicola Marina extracellular hemoglobin (Hbl Hb) is considered to be a promising candidate as a blood substitute. To entangle some of the properties of extracellular giant hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (Hbl Hb) of Arenicola Marina, we combined polarized resonance Raman scattering (532 nm excitation) with dynamic light scattering (DLS) (632.8 nm). An analysis of the depolarization ratio of selected a(2g) skeletal modes of the heme in native Hbl Hb and porcine Hb, shows that the distortion of the heme group away from its ideal fourfold symmetry is much smaller for heme groups bound in the Hbl Hb than for heme groups bound in porcine Hb. Using DLS, the average hydrodynamic diameter () of Hbl Hb was measured at pH = 5, 7, 8, 9, and 10. At pH = 5 to 7, the Hbl Hb was found in its native form with equal to 24.2 nm, while at pH = 8 and 9, a dissociation process starts to take place resulting in = 9 nm. At pH = 10, only large aggregates of fragmented Hbl Hb with larger than 1000 nm was detected, however, a comparison of the DLS results with the polarized resonance Raman scattering (RRS) revealed that the coupling between the fragments did not involve direct interaction between the heme groups, but also that the local heme environment seems to be comparable in the aggregates and in the native Hbl Hb. By comparing the unpolarized RRS results obtained for erythrocytes (RBC) with those for Hbl Hb, led us to the important conclusion that Hbl Hb is much easier photolyzed than porcine RBC.

  10. A combination of dynamic light scattering and polarized resonance Raman scattering applied in the study of Arenicola Marina extracellular hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jernshøj, K. D.; Hassing, S.; Olsen, L. F.

    2013-08-01

    Arenicola Marina extracellular hemoglobin (Hbl Hb) is considered to be a promising candidate as a blood substitute. To entangle some of the properties of extracellular giant hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (Hbl Hb) of Arenicola Marina, we combined polarized resonance Raman scattering (532 nm excitation) with dynamic light scattering (DLS) (632.8 nm). An analysis of the depolarization ratio of selected a2g skeletal modes of the heme in native Hbl Hb and porcine Hb, shows that the distortion of the heme group away from its ideal fourfold symmetry is much smaller for heme groups bound in the Hbl Hb than for heme groups bound in porcine Hb. Using DLS, the average hydrodynamic diameter (⟨dh⟩) of Hbl Hb was measured at pH = 5, 7, 8, 9, and 10. At pH = 5 to 7, the Hbl Hb was found in its native form with ⟨dh⟩ equal to 24.2 nm, while at pH = 8 and 9, a dissociation process starts to take place resulting in ⟨dh⟩ = 9 nm. At pH = 10, only large aggregates of fragmented Hbl Hb with ⟨dh⟩ larger than 1000 nm was detected, however, a comparison of the DLS results with the polarized resonance Raman scattering (RRS) revealed that the coupling between the fragments did not involve direct interaction between the heme groups, but also that the local heme environment seems to be comparable in the aggregates and in the native Hbl Hb. By comparing the unpolarized RRS results obtained for erythrocytes (RBC) with those for Hbl Hb, led us to the important conclusion that Hbl Hb is much easier photolyzed than porcine RBC.

  11. Quantum lattice fluctuations in a 1-dimensional charge-density-wave material: Luminescence and resonance Raman studies of an MX solid

    SciTech Connect

    Long, F.H.; Love, S.P.; Swanson, B.I.

    1993-01-01

    Luminescence spectra, both emission and excitation, and the excitation dependence of the resonance Raman (RR) spectra were measured for a 1-dimensional charge-density-wave solid, [Pt(L)[sub 2]Cl[sub 2

  12. Disorder-induced double resonant Raman process in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, J. F.; Barros, E. B.; Saito, R.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    An analytical study is presented of the double resonant Raman scattering process in graphene, responsible for the D and D' features in the Raman spectra. This work yields analytical expressions for the D and D' integrated Raman intensities that explicitly show the dependencies on laser energy, defect concentration, and electronic lifetime. Good agreement is obtained between the analytical results and experimental measurements on samples with increasing defect concentrations and at various laser excitation energies. The use of Raman spectroscopy to identify the nature of defects is discussed. Comparison between the models for the edge-induced and the disorder-induced D-band intensity suggests that edges or grain boundaries can be distinguished from disorder by the different dependence of their Raman intensity on laser excitation energy. Similarly, the type of disorder can potentially be identified not only by the intensity ratio ID/ID' , but also by its laser energy dependence. Also discussed is a quantitative analysis of quantum interference effects of the graphene wave functions, which determine the most important phonon wave vectors and scattering processes responsible for the D and D' bands.

  13. Resonant Raman scattering background in XRF spectra of binary samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Héctor Jorge; Leani, Juan José

    2015-02-01

    In x-ray fluorescence analysis, spectra present singular characteristics produced by the different scattering processes. When atoms are irradiated with incident energy lower and close to an absorption edge, scattering peaks appear due to an inelastic process known as resonant Raman scattering. In this work we present theoretical calculations of the resonant Raman scattering contributions to the background of x-ray fluorescence spectra of binary samples of current technological or biological interest. On one hand, a binary alloy of Fe with traces of Mn (Mn: 0.01%, Fe: 99.99%) was studied because of its importance in the stainless steels industries. On the second hand a pure sample of Ti with V traces (Ti: 99%, V: 1%) was analyzed due to the current relevance in medical applications. In order to perform the calculations the Shiraiwa and Fujino's model was used to calculate characteristic intensities and scattering interactions. This model makes certain assumptions and approximations to achieve the calculations, especially in the case of the geometrical conditions and the incident and take-off beams. For the binary sample studied in this work and the considered experimental conditions, the calculations show that the resonant Raman scattering background is significant under the fluorescent peak, affects the symmetry of the peaks and, depending on the concentrations, overcomes the enhancements contributions (secondary fluorescence).

  14. Internal intensity standards for heme protein UV resonance Raman studies: excitation profiles of cacodylic acid and sodium selenate.

    PubMed

    Song, S H; Asher, S A

    1991-02-01

    We examine the utility of SO4(2-), ClO4-, cacodylic acid, and SeO4(2-) as internal intensity standards for Raman spectral measurements of protein structure. We find that 0.1 M SO4(2-) and ClO4- perturb the protein tertiary structure of aquomethemoglobin (met-Hb) and its fluoride (met-HbF) and azide (met-HbN3) complexes. Changes occur for the tryptophan near-UV absorption bands, the iron spin state is altered, and the fluoride ligand affinity decreases. Concentrations of ClO4- and SO4(2-) as low as 0.1 M suppress the met-HbF quaternary R----T transition induced by the allosteric effector inositol hexaphosphate (IHP). In contrast, similar concentrations of cacodylic acid and SeO4(2-) show little effect on the hemoglobin tertiary or quaternary protein structures or upon the R----T transition induced by IHP. We measure the Raman cross sections of cacodylic acid and SeO4(2-) between 218 and 514.5 nm and find that for UV excitation they are ca. 5-fold larger than ClO4- or SO4(2-). Thus, cacodylic acid and selenate can be used at lower concentrations. Cacodylic acid and SeO4(2-) are superior Raman internal intensity standards for protein structural studies.

  15. Double resonance Raman modes in monolayer and few-layer MoTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huaihong; Yang, Teng; Yamamoto, Mahito; Zhou, Lin; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ueno, Keiji; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Zhang, Zhidong; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Saito, Riichiro

    2015-05-01

    We study the second-order Raman process of mono- and few-layer MoTe2, by combining ab initio density functional perturbation calculations with experimental Raman spectroscopy using 532, 633, and 785 nm excitation lasers. The calculated electronic band structure and the density of states show that the resonance Raman process occurs at the M point in the Brillouin zone, where a strong optical absorption occurs due to a logarithmic Van Hove singularity of the electronic density of states. The double resonance Raman process with intervalley electron-phonon coupling connects two of the three inequivalent M points in the Brillouin zone, giving rise to second-order Raman peaks due to the M -point phonons. The calculated vibrational frequencies of the second-order Raman spectra agree with the observed laser-energy-dependent Raman shifts in the experiment.

  16. Resonance raman spectroscopy and quantum chemical modeling studies of protein-astaxanthin interactions in alpha-crustacyanin (major blue carotenoprotein complex in carapace of lobster, Homarus gammarus).

    PubMed

    Weesie, R J; Merlin, J C; de Groot, H J; Britton, G; Lugtenburg, J; Jansen, F J; Cornard, J P

    1999-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations were used to investigate the molecular origin of the large redshift assumed by the electronic absorption spectrum of astaxanthin in alpha-crustacyanin, the major blue carotenoprotein from the carapace of the lobster, Homarus gammarus. Resonance Raman spectra of alpha-crustacyanin reconstituted with specifically 13C-labeled astaxanthins at the positions 15, 15,15', 14,14', 13,13', 12,12', or 20,20' were recorded. This approach enabled us to obtain information about the effect of the ligand-protein interactions on the geometry of the astaxanthin chromophore in the ground electronic state. The magnitude of the downshifts of the C==C stretching modes for each labeled compound indicate that the main perturbation on the central part of the polyene chain is not homogeneous. In addition, changes in the 1250-1400 cm(-1) spectral range indicate that the geometry of the astaxanthin polyene chain is moderately changed upon binding to the protein. Semiempirical quantum chemical modeling studies (Austin method 1) show that the geometry change cannot be solely responsible for the bathochromic shift from 480 to 632 nm of protein-bound astaxanthin. The calculations are consistent with a polarization mechanism that involves the protonation or another interaction with a positive ionic species of comparable magnitude with both ketofunctionalities of the astaxanthin-chromophore and support the changes observed in the resonance Raman and visible absorption spectra. The results are in good agreement with the conclusions that were drawn on the basis of a study of the charge densities in the chromophore in alpha-crustacyanin by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. From the results the dramatic bathochromic shift can be explained not only from a change in the ground electronic state conformation but also from an interaction in the excited electronic state that significantly decreases the energy of the pi-antibonding C==O orbitals and

  17. UV resonance Raman sensing of pharmaceutical drugs in hollow fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, D.; Popp, J.; Frosch, T.

    2014-05-01

    We report about the experimental combination of UV resonance Raman sensing (UV-RRS) and fiber enhanced Raman sensing (FERS) on pharmaceuticals. The results show that the chemical sensitivity is highly improved and at the same time the sample volume is reduced compared to conventional measurements. A hundreds-fold improvement of the limit of detection (LOD) has been achieved with the combination of resonance Raman enhancement and fiber enhancement. The enhanced Raman signal has a reliable linear relationship with the concentration of the analyte, and therefore shows great potential for quantitative analysis of pharmaceuticals.

  18. The effect of chemical variations on the structural polarity of relaxor ferroelectrics studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rohrbeck, A; de la Flor, G; Aroyo, M I; Gospodinov, M; Bismayer, U; Mihailova, B

    2016-11-30

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was applied to doped PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3 and PbSc0.5Nb0.5O3 relaxor ferroelectrics, to better understand the effect of composition disorder on the mesoscopic-scale polar order in complex perovskite-type (ABO3) ferroelectrics. The excitation photon energy used was 3.8 eV, which is slightly above the energy gap and corresponds to the maximum of the optical dielectric permittivity. Group-theory analysis reveals that the resonance Raman scattering (RRS) observed under these conditions is allowed only in polar crystal classes. Therefore, RRS is dominated by the atomic dynamics of nanoregions with coherent polar distortions, which considerably facilitates the comparison of polar order in various compounds. The results show that A-site doping (Ba(2+), Sr(2+), La(3+), Bi(3+)) has significantly stronger effect on the structural polarity than the introduction of a third element at the B site (Nb(5+) or Sn(4+) doped in PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3). The A-site substitution by cations that in contrast to Pb(2+) have isotropic outermost electron shells disturbs the system of lone-pair electrons, thus reducing the correlation length of coupled polar distortions and the strength of the electric field associated with the mean polarization of polar nanoregions. A-site doping with larger cations (Ba(2+)) augments the polar deformation of the individual BO6 octahedra due to local elastic fields. As a result, such A-site doping intensifies the initial structural polarity at high temperatures and prevails the enlargement of the polar fraction at low temperatures. A-site doping with smaller cations (Sr(2+), La(3+)), regardless if they are isovalent or aliovalent to Pb(2+), increases the correlation length of antiferrodistortive order (BO6 tilts), which in turn assists the development of double-perovskite structure with coherent local polar distortions. A-site doping with aliovalent cations (Bi(3+)) having the same outermost electron shell and ionic radius as the host A

  19. The effect of chemical variations on the structural polarity of relaxor ferroelectrics studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrbeck, A.; de la Flor, G.; Aroyo, M. I.; Gospodinov, M.; Bismayer, U.; Mihailova, B.

    2016-11-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was applied to doped PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3 and PbSc0.5Nb0.5O3 relaxor ferroelectrics, to better understand the effect of composition disorder on the mesoscopic-scale polar order in complex perovskite-type (ABO3) ferroelectrics. The excitation photon energy used was 3.8 eV, which is slightly above the energy gap and corresponds to the maximum of the optical dielectric permittivity. Group-theory analysis reveals that the resonance Raman scattering (RRS) observed under these conditions is allowed only in polar crystal classes. Therefore, RRS is dominated by the atomic dynamics of nanoregions with coherent polar distortions, which considerably facilitates the comparison of polar order in various compounds. The results show that A-site doping (Ba2+, Sr2+, La3+, Bi3+) has significantly stronger effect on the structural polarity than the introduction of a third element at the B site (Nb5+ or Sn4+ doped in PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3). The A-site substitution by cations that in contrast to Pb2+ have isotropic outermost electron shells disturbs the system of lone-pair electrons, thus reducing the correlation length of coupled polar distortions and the strength of the electric field associated with the mean polarization of polar nanoregions. A-site doping with larger cations (Ba2+) augments the polar deformation of the individual BO6 octahedra due to local elastic fields. As a result, such A-site doping intensifies the initial structural polarity at high temperatures and prevails the enlargement of the polar fraction at low temperatures. A-site doping with smaller cations (Sr2+, La3+), regardless if they are isovalent or aliovalent to Pb2+, increases the correlation length of antiferrodistortive order (BO6 tilts), which in turn assists the development of double-perovskite structure with coherent local polar distortions. A-site doping with aliovalent cations (Bi3+) having the same outermost electron shell and ionic radius as the host A-site Pb2+ cations leads to

  20. The effect of chemical variations on the structural polarity of relaxor ferroelectrics studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rohrbeck, A; de la Flor, G; Aroyo, M I; Gospodinov, M; Bismayer, U; Mihailova, B

    2016-11-30

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was applied to doped PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3 and PbSc0.5Nb0.5O3 relaxor ferroelectrics, to better understand the effect of composition disorder on the mesoscopic-scale polar order in complex perovskite-type (ABO3) ferroelectrics. The excitation photon energy used was 3.8 eV, which is slightly above the energy gap and corresponds to the maximum of the optical dielectric permittivity. Group-theory analysis reveals that the resonance Raman scattering (RRS) observed under these conditions is allowed only in polar crystal classes. Therefore, RRS is dominated by the atomic dynamics of nanoregions with coherent polar distortions, which considerably facilitates the comparison of polar order in various compounds. The results show that A-site doping (Ba(2+), Sr(2+), La(3+), Bi(3+)) has significantly stronger effect on the structural polarity than the introduction of a third element at the B site (Nb(5+) or Sn(4+) doped in PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3). The A-site substitution by cations that in contrast to Pb(2+) have isotropic outermost electron shells disturbs the system of lone-pair electrons, thus reducing the correlation length of coupled polar distortions and the strength of the electric field associated with the mean polarization of polar nanoregions. A-site doping with larger cations (Ba(2+)) augments the polar deformation of the individual BO6 octahedra due to local elastic fields. As a result, such A-site doping intensifies the initial structural polarity at high temperatures and prevails the enlargement of the polar fraction at low temperatures. A-site doping with smaller cations (Sr(2+), La(3+)), regardless if they are isovalent or aliovalent to Pb(2+), increases the correlation length of antiferrodistortive order (BO6 tilts), which in turn assists the development of double-perovskite structure with coherent local polar distortions. A-site doping with aliovalent cations (Bi(3+)) having the same outermost electron shell and ionic radius as the host A

  1. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, Nabil M.

    1987-01-01

    The third phase of research will focus on the propagation and energy extraction of the pump and SERS beams in a variety of configurations including oscillator structures. In order to address these questions a numerical code capable of allowing for saturation and full transverse beam evolution is required. The method proposed is based on a discretized propagation energy extraction model which uses a Kirchoff integral propagator coupled to the three level Raman model already developed. The model will have the resolution required by diffraction limits and will use the previous density matrix results in the adiabatic following limit. Owing to its large computational requirements, such a code must be implemented on a vector array processor. One code on the Cyber is being tested by using previously understood two-level laser models as guidelines for interpreting the results. Two tests were implemented: the evolution of modes in a passive resonator and the evolution of a stable state of the adiabatically eliminated laser equations. These results show mode shapes and diffraction losses for the first case and relaxation oscillations for the second one. Finally, in order to clarify the computing methodology used to exploit the speed of the Cyber's computational speed, the time it takes to perform both of the computations previously mentioned to run on the Cyber and VAX 730 must be measured. Also included is a short description of the current laser model (CAVITY.FOR) and a flow chart of the test computations.

  2. Heme Reactivity is Uncoupled from Quaternary Structure in Gel-encapsulated Hemoglobin: A Resonance Raman Spectroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Eric M.; Balakrishnan, Gurusamy; Spiro, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Encapsulation of hemoglobin (Hb) in silica gel preserves structure and function, but greatly slows protein motion, thereby providing access to intermediates along the allosteric pathway that are inaccessible in solution. Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy with visible and ultraviolet laser excitation provides probes of heme reactivity and of key tertiary and quaternary contacts. These probes were monitored in gels after deoxygenation of oxyHb and after CO binding to deoxyHb, which intiate conformational change in the R-T and T-R directions, respectively. The spectra establish that quaternary structure change in the gel takes a week or more, but that the evolution of heme reactivity, as monitored by the Fe-histidine stretching vibration, νFeHis, is completed within two days, and is therefore uncoupled from the quaternary structure. Within each quaternary structure, the evolving νFeHis frequencies span the full range of values between those previously associated with the high- and low-affinity end states, R and T. This result supports the tertiary two-state (TTS) model, in which the Hb subunits can adopt high- and low-affinity tertiary structures, r and t, within each quaternary state. The spectra also reveal different tertiary pathways, involving the breaking and re-formation of E and F inter-helical contacts in the R-T direction but not the T-R direction. In the latter, tertiary motions are restricted by the T quaternary contacts. PMID:22263778

  3. Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy: exploring reactive intermediates.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sangram Keshari; Umapathy, Siva; Parker, Anthony W

    2011-10-01

    The study of reaction mechanisms involves systematic investigations of the correlation between structure, reactivity, and time. The challenge is to be able to observe the chemical changes undergone by reactants as they change into products via one or several intermediates such as electronic excited states (singlet and triplet), radicals, radical ions, carbocations, carbanions, carbenes, nitrenes, nitrinium ions, etc. The vast array of intermediates and timescales means there is no single "do-it-all" technique. The simultaneous advances in contemporary time-resolved Raman spectroscopic techniques and computational methods have done much towards visualizing molecular fingerprint snapshots of the reactive intermediates in the microsecond to femtosecond time domain. Raman spectroscopy and its sensitive counterpart resonance Raman spectroscopy have been well proven as means for determining molecular structure, chemical bonding, reactivity, and dynamics of short-lived intermediates in solution phase and are advantageous in comparison to commonly used time-resolved absorption and emission spectroscopy. Today time-resolved Raman spectroscopy is a mature technique; its development owes much to the advent of pulsed tunable lasers, highly efficient spectrometers, and high speed, highly sensitive multichannel detectors able to collect a complete spectrum. This review article will provide a brief chronological development of the experimental setup and demonstrate how experimentalists have conquered numerous challenges to obtain background-free (removing fluorescence), intense, and highly spectrally resolved Raman spectra in the nanosecond to microsecond (ns-μs) and picosecond (ps) time domains and, perhaps surprisingly, laid the foundations for new techniques such as spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. PMID:21986070

  4. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Armchair Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haroz, Erik; Rice, William; Lu, Benjamin; Hauge, Robert; Magana, Donny; Doorn, Stephen; Nikolaev, Pasha; Arepalli, Sivaram; Kono, Junichiro

    2009-03-01

    We performed resonance Raman spectroscopy studies of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), including armchair SWNTs from (6,6) through (10,10). The measurements were carried out with excitation of 440-850 nm on aqueous ensemble samples of SWNTs enriched in metallic species. From this, we generated Raman excitation profiles (REPs) of the radial breathing mode and compare the REPs of armchairs and other metallic species. Additionally, we measured REPs of the G-band mode and observed how the Breit-Wigner-Fano line shape of the G^- peak evolves in peak position, width and intensity relative to the G^+ peak as different metallic nanotubes are excited. By combining these studies with absorption and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy studies, we present a comprehensive examination of the optical signatures of metallic SWNTs.

  5. UV Resonant Raman Spectrometer with Multi-Line Laser Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L.; Kohel, James M.; Kirby, James P.; Morookian, John Michael; Pelletier, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    A Raman spectrometer employs two or more UV (ultraviolet) laser wavel engths to generate UV resonant Raman (UVRR) spectra in organic sampl es. Resonant Raman scattering results when the laser excitation is n ear an electronic transition of a molecule, and the enhancement of R aman signals can be several orders of magnitude. In addition, the Ra man cross-section is inversely proportional to the fourth power of t he wavelength, so the UV Raman emission is increased by another fact or of 16, or greater, over visible Raman emissions. The Raman-scatter ed light is collected using a high-resolution broadband spectrograph . Further suppression of the Rayleigh-scattered laser light is provi ded by custom UV notch filters.

  6. Resonance Raman Optical Activity of Single Walled Chiral Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Péter R; Koltai, János; Surján, Péter R; Kürti, Jenő; Szabados, Ágnes

    2016-07-21

    Resonance (vibrational) Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra of six chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are studied by theoretical means. Calculations are performed imposing line group symmetry. Polarizability tensors, computed at the π-electron level, are differentiated with respect to DFT normal modes to generate spectral intensities. This computational protocol yields a ROA spectrum in good agreement with the only experiment on SWCNT, available at present. In addition to the conventional periodic electric dipole operator we introduce magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole operators, suitable for conventional k-space calculations. Consequences of the complex nature of the wave function on the scattering cross section are discussed in detail. The resonance phenomenon is accounted for by the short time approximation. Involvement of fundamental vibrations in the region of the intermediate frequency modes is found to be more notable in ROA than in Raman spectra. Calculations indicate exceptionally strong resonance enhancement of SWCNT ROA signals. Resonance ROA profile of the (6,5) tube shows an interesting sign change that may be exploited experimentally for SWCNT identification. PMID:27315548

  7. Radiolytic oxidation of 1,2,4-benzenetriol. An application of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to kinetic studies of reaction intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, L.; Tripathi, G.N.R.; Schuler, R.H.

    1987-03-26

    In acidic solution, 1,2,4-benzenetriol is rapidly oxidized by OH or N/sub 3/ to form a mixture of neutral 2,4- and 3,4-dihydroxyphenoxyl radicals. At higher pH these radicals deprotonate (pK/sub a/(1) = 4.75) to form the 2-hydroxy-p-benzosemiquinone radical anion which exhibits a prominent resonance Raman band at 1625 cm/sup -1/ attributable to the Wilson 8a ring stretching mode. In basic solutions this radical subsequently reacts with OH/sup -/ to form the radical dianion (pK/sub a/(2) = 8.85) in which the 8a band is shifted to an appreciably lower frequency (1587 cm/sup -1/). While the absorption spectra of these latter radicals are very similar and do not allow ready examination of their interconversion by absorption spectrophotometry, the difference between these 8a frequencies is sufficiently great that the Raman method can be used to examine the acid-base equilibrium between the two forms of the radical and to follow the deprotonation kinetics. It is shown that even at high pH the radical monoanion is initially formed on oxidation by N/sub 3/ and that deprotonation subsequently occurs by its reaction with base with a rate constant of (9.6 +/- 1.5) x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ d/sup -1/. These studies illustrate very well the application of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy as a complement to kinetic spectrophotometry in sorting out the details of secondary processes in pulse radiolysis studies.

  8. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, Nabil M.

    1987-01-01

    The solutions for the imaginary susceptibility of the Raman field transition with arbitrary relaxation rates and field strengths are examined for three different sets of relaxation rates. These rates correspond to: (1) Far Infrared (FIR) Raman lasers in the diabatic collision regime without consideration of coupled population decay in a closed system, (2) Raman FIR lasers in the diabatic collision regime with coupled population conserving decay, and (3) IR Raman gain in cesium vapor. The model is further expanded to include Doppler broadening and used to predict the peak gain as a function of detuning for a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser-pumped cesium vapor gain cell.

  9. Studies on adsorption of mono- and multi-chromophoric hemicyanine dyes on silver nanoparticles by surface-enhanced resonance raman and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Nandita; Thomas, Susy; Kapoor, Sudhir; Mishra, Amaresh; Wategaonkar, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Tulsi

    2008-11-01

    Structural and vibrational properties of mono- and multichromophoric hemicyanine (HC) dyes in solution and adsorbed on silver-coated films have been investigated using optical absorption and resonance Raman scattering techniques, with interpretations aided by theoretical calculations. This is the first report on the Raman spectroscopic studies of multichromophoric HC derivatives. The structure of the monomer, N-propyl-4-(p-N,N-dimethylamino styryl)pyridinium bromide (HC3), and its charged and neutral silver complexes (HC3-Ag) in the ground electronic (S0) state were optimized using density functional calculations with the B3LYP method using the 6-31G* and LANL2DZ basis sets. The ground state structure of N-hexyl-4-(p-N,N-dimethylamino styryl)pyridinium bromide (HC6) and multichromophoric HC dyes were computed using the HF /6-31G* method. The negligible shift or broadening observed in the electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectra in solution with increasing size of the HC chromophore suggests that the excitations are localized within individual monomer units in bis and tetra chromophores. However, in the tris chromophore, considerable redshift and broadening were observed, indicating a significant electronic interaction between the nonbonded electrons of the N atom and the aromatic π-system that is supported by the calculated excitation energies using the time-dependent density functional theory method. The effect of HC dye concentration on the electronic absorption spectra of the silver-coated film showed significant broadening, which was attributed to the formation of H- and J-aggregates in addition to the formation of a metal-molecule complex. A considerable redshift along various vibrations observed in the surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra of the HC derivatives indicates that adsorption on the silver surface leads to a considerable interaction of the electron rich moiety of HC derivatives with the silver surface. The

  10. Structural dynamics of phenylisothiocyanate in the light-absorbing excited states: Resonance Raman and complete active space self-consistent field calculation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Bing; Xue, Jia-Dan; Zheng, Xuming; Fang, Wei-Hai

    2014-05-01

    The excited state structural dynamics of phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) after excitation to the light absorbing S2(A'), S6(A'), and S7(A') excited states were studied by using the resonance Raman spectroscopy and complete active space self-consistent field method calculations. The UV absorption bands of PITC were assigned. The vibrational assignments were done on the basis of the Fourier transform (FT)-Raman and FT-infrared measurements, the density-functional theory computations, and the normal mode analysis. The A-, B-, and C-bands resonance Raman spectra in cyclohexane, acetonitrile, and methanol solvents were, respectively, obtained at 299.1, 282.4, 266.0, 252.7, 228.7, 217.8, and 208.8 nm excitation wavelengths to probe the corresponding structural dynamics of PITC. The results indicated that the structural dynamics in the S2(A'), S6(A'), and S7(A') excited states were very different. The conical intersection point CI(S2/S1) were predicted to play important role in the low-lying excited state decay dynamics. Two major decay channels were predicted for PITC upon excitation to the S2(A') state: the radiative S2,min → S0 transition and the nonradiative S2 → S1 internal conversion via CI(S2/S1). The differences in the decay dynamics between methyl isothiocyanate and PITC in the first light absorbing excited state were discussed. The role of the intersystem crossing point ISC(S1/T1) in the excited state decay dynamics of PITC is evaluated.

  11. Structural dynamics of phenylisothiocyanate in the light-absorbing excited states: Resonance Raman and complete active space self-consistent field calculation study

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Bing Xue, Jia-Dan Zheng, Xuming E-mail: zxm@zstu.edu.cn; Fang, Wei-Hai E-mail: fangwh@dnu.edu.cn

    2014-05-21

    The excited state structural dynamics of phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) after excitation to the light absorbing S{sub 2}(A′), S{sub 6}(A′), and S{sub 7}(A′) excited states were studied by using the resonance Raman spectroscopy and complete active space self-consistent field method calculations. The UV absorption bands of PITC were assigned. The vibrational assignments were done on the basis of the Fourier transform (FT)-Raman and FT-infrared measurements, the density-functional theory computations, and the normal mode analysis. The A-, B-, and C-bands resonance Raman spectra in cyclohexane, acetonitrile, and methanol solvents were, respectively, obtained at 299.1, 282.4, 266.0, 252.7, 228.7, 217.8, and 208.8 nm excitation wavelengths to probe the corresponding structural dynamics of PITC. The results indicated that the structural dynamics in the S{sub 2}(A′), S{sub 6}(A′), and S{sub 7}(A′) excited states were very different. The conical intersection point CI(S{sub 2}/S{sub 1}) were predicted to play important role in the low-lying excited state decay dynamics. Two major decay channels were predicted for PITC upon excitation to the S{sub 2}(A′) state: the radiative S{sub 2,min} → S{sub 0} transition and the nonradiative S{sub 2} → S{sub 1} internal conversion via CI(S{sub 2}/S{sub 1}). The differences in the decay dynamics between methyl isothiocyanate and PITC in the first light absorbing excited state were discussed. The role of the intersystem crossing point ISC(S{sub 1}/T{sub 1}) in the excited state decay dynamics of PITC is evaluated.

  12. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Separated Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. R.; Fagan, J. A.; Tu, X.; Zheng, M.; Hight Walker, A. R.; Duque, J. G.; Crochet, J.; Doorn, S. K.

    2012-02-01

    The heterogeneity of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) produced by typical techniques complicates characterization and presents a barrier for technological applications. Improvements in separation and purification techniques enable detailed studies of specific nanotube properties by providing samples of unique chirality, length, metallicity, bundling, and interior filling. We report resonant Raman spectroscopy (RRS) measurements on these samples over a wide range of excitation wavelengths using a series of discrete and continuously tunable laser sources coupled to a triple-grating spectrometer. RRS of these homogeneous samples reveals unique spectral features and affords interpretation of intrinsic nanotube optical properties. Of particular interest are the G-band of chirally-pure armchair metallic SWCNTS and shifts of the radial breathing mode and excitation energy with water filling. Additionally, we will compare Raman results with other optical characterization techniques.

  13. Brain metastasis detection by resonant Raman optical biopsy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Cheng, Gangge; Zhou, Lixin; Zhang, Chunyuan; Pu, Yang; Li, Zhongwu; Liu, Yulong; Li, Qingbo; Wang, Wei; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    Resonant Raman (RR) spectroscopy provides an effective way to enhance Raman signal from particular bonds associated with key molecules due to changes on a molecular level. In this study, RR is used for detection of human brain metastases of five kinds of primary organs of lung, breast, kidney, rectal and orbital in ex-vivo. The RR spectra of brain metastases cancerous tissues were measured and compared with those of normal brain tissues and the corresponding primary cancer tissues. The differences of five types of brain metastases tissues in key bio-components of carotene, tryptophan, lactate, alanine and methyl/methylene group were investigated. The SVM-KNN classifier was used to categorize a set of RR spectra data of brain metastasis of lung cancerous tissues from normal brain tissue, yielding diagnostic sensitivity and specificity at 100% and 75%, respectively. The RR spectroscopy may provide new moleculebased optical probe tools for diagnosis and classification of brain metastatic of cancers.

  14. Remote sensing of the atmosphere by resonance Raman LIDAR

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Harder, D.; Leung, K.P.; Zuhoski, P.B. Jr.; Burr, D.; Chen, C.L.

    1994-12-01

    When in resonance, Raman scattering exhibits strong enhancement ranging from four to six orders of magnitude. This physical phenomenon has been applied to remote sensing of the Earth`s atmosphere. With a 16 inch Cassegrain telescope and spectrometer/ CCD-detector system, 70-150 ppm-m of SO{sub 2} in the atmosphere has been detected at a distance of 0.5 kilometer. This system can be used to detect/monitor chemical effluence in the atmosphere by their unique Raman fingerprints. Experimental result together with detailed resonance Raman and atmospheric laser propagation effects will be discussed.

  15. Resonant impulsive-stimulated Raman scattering on malachite green

    SciTech Connect

    Chesnoy, J.; Mokhtari, A.

    1988-10-01

    We have studied in the femtosecond regime the transient dynamics of dichroism (anisotropic absorption), birefringence, and frequency shift induced by an intense femtosecond pump beam in the dye malachite green in solution. Vibrational quantum beats were observed superimposed on the saturated absorption and dispersion signals and quantitatively explained in terms of impulsive-stimulated Raman scattering close to an electronic resonance. The selectivity for observation of the vibrations in the two electronic states is described for the different experimental schemes. We discuss the access to vibrational and electronic dynamics in both ground and excited electronic states and compare the possibilities to those of previous techniques.

  16. Deep ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy: A resonance-absorption trade-off illustrated by diluted liquid benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, C. T.; Willitsford, A. H.; Philbrick, C. R.; Hallen, H. D.

    2015-12-01

    The magnitude of resonance Raman intensity, in terms of the real signal level measured on-resonance compared to the signal level measured off-resonance for the same sample, is investigated using a tunable laser source. Resonance Raman enhancements, occurring as the excitation energy is tuned through ultraviolet absorption lines, are used to examine the 1332 cm-1 vibrational mode of diamond and the 992 cm-1 ring-breathing mode of benzene. Competition between the wavelength dependent optical absorption and the magnitude of the resonance enhancement is studied using measured signal levels as a function of wavelength. Two system applications are identified where the resonance Raman significantly increases the real signal levels despite the presence of strong absorption: characterization of trace species in laser remote sensing and spectroscopy of the few molecules in the tiny working volumes of near-field optical microscopy.

  17. Application of resonance Raman LIDAR for chemical species identification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.L.; Heglund, D.L.; Ray, M.D.; Harder, D.; Dobert, R.; Leung, K.P.; Wu, M.; Sedlacek, A.

    1997-07-01

    BNL has been developing a remote sensing technique for the detection of atmospheric pollutants based on the phenomenon of resonance Raman LIDAR that has also incorporated a number of new techniques/technologies designed to extend it`s performance envelope. When the excitation frequency approaches an allowed electronic transition of the molecule, an enormous enhancement of the inelastic scattering cross-section can occur, often up to 2 to 4 orders-of-magnitude, and is referred to as resonance Raman (RR), since the excitation frequency is in resonance with an allowed electronic transition. Exploitation of this enhancement along with new techniques such as pattern recognition algorithms to take advantage of the spectral fingerprint and a new laser frequency modulation technique designed to suppress broadband fluorescence, referred to as Frequency modulated Excitation Raman Spectroscopy (FreMERS) and recent developments in liquid edge filter technology, for suppression of the elastic channel, all help increase the overall performance of Raman LIDAR.

  18. The poly dA strand of poly dA.poly dT adopts an A-form in solution: a UV resonance Raman study.

    PubMed Central

    Jollès, B; Laigle, A; Chinsky, L; Turpin, P Y

    1985-01-01

    The study by resonance Raman spectroscopy with a 257 nm excitation wave-length of adenine in two single-stranded polynucleotides, poly rA and poly dA, and in three double-stranded polynucleotides, poly dA.poly dT, poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) and poly rA.poly rU, allows one to characterize the A-genus conformation of polynucleotides containing adenine and thymine bases. The characteristic spectrum of the A-form of the adenine strand is observed, except small differences, for poly rA, poly rA.poly rU and poly dA.poly dT. Our results prove that it is the adenine strand which adopts the A-family conformation in poly dA.poly dT. PMID:4000953

  19. Cold atom Raman spectrography using velocity-selective resonances.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Fredrik K; Terraciano, Matthew L; Bashkansky, Mark; Dutton, Zachary

    2009-07-20

    We have studied velocity-selective resonances in the presence of a uniform magnetic field and shown how they can be used for rapid, single-shot assessment of the ground state magnetic sublevel spectrum in a cold atomic vapor. Cold atoms are released from a magneto-optical trap in the presence of a small bias magnetic field ( approximately 300 mG) and exposed to a laser field comprised of two phase-locked counterpropagating beams connecting the two ground state hyperfine manifolds. An image of the expanded cloud shows the velocity-selected resonances as distinct features, each corresponding to specific magnetic sublevel, in a direct, intuitive manner. We demonstrate the technique with both 87Rb and 85Rb, and show the utility of the technique by optically pumping into particular magnetic sublevels. The results are shown to agree with a theoretical model, and are compared to traditional Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes studied using 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Davis, Mark F; Gennett, Thomas; Dillon, Anne C; Jones, Kim M; Heben, Michael J

    2005-12-14

    The reversible protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in sulfuric acid and Nafion was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) was used to obtain high-resolution 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization (CP) NMR spectra. The 13C NMR chemical shifts are reported for bulk SWNTs, H2SO4-treated SWNTs, SWNT-Nafion polymer composites, SWNT-AQ55 polymer composites, and SWNTs in contact with water. Protonation occurs without irreversible oxidation of the nanotube substrate via a charge-transfer process. This is the first report of a chemically induced change in a SWNT 13C resonance brought about by a reversible interaction with an acidic proton, providing additional evidence that carbon nanotubes behave as weak bases. Cross polarization was found to be a powerful technique for providing an additional contrast mechanism for studying nanotubes in contact with other chemical species. The CP studies confirmed polarization transfer from nearby protons to nanotube carbon atoms. The CP technique was also applied to investigate water adsorbed on carbon nanotube surfaces. Finally, the degree of bundling of the SWNTs in Nafion films was probed with the 1H-13C CP-MAS technique. PMID:16332107

  1. Proliferation detection using a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-08-01

    The authors discussed the potential of the resonance Raman chemical sensor as a remote sensor that can be used for gases, liquids or solids. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations or excitation frequency. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, the inelastic scattering cross-section can increase anywhere from 4 to 6 orders of magnitude which translates into increased sensing range or lower detection limits. It was also shown that differential cross-sections as small as 10{sup {minus}27} cm{sup 2}/sr do not preclude the use of this technique as being an important component in one`s remote-sensing arsenal. The results obtained in the early 1970s on various pollutants and the more recent work on atmospheric water cast a favorable light on the prospects for the successful development of a resonance Raman remote sensor. Currently, of the 20 CW agent-related {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} chemicals that the authors have investigated, 18 show enhancements ranging from 3 to 6 orders of magnitude. The absolute magnitudes of the measured resonance enhanced Raman cross-sections for these 18 chemicals suggest that detection and identification of trace quantities of the {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} chemicals, through a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor, could be achieved.

  2. Proliferation detection using a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-12-31

    The authors discuss the potential of the resonance Raman chemical sensor as a remote sensor that can be used for gases, liquids or solids. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations or excitation frequency. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, the inelastic scattering cross-section can increase anywhere from 4 to 6 orders of magnitude which translates into increased sensing range or lower detection limits. It was also shown that differential cross-sections as small as 10{sup {minus}27} cm{sup 2}/sr do not preclude the use of this technique as being an important component in one`s remote-sensing arsenal. The results obtained in the early 1970s on various pollutants and the more recent work on atmospheric water cast a favorable light on the prospects for the successful development of a resonance Raman remote sensor. Currently, of the 20 CW agent-related ``signature`` chemicals that the authors have investigated, 18 show enhancements ranging from 3 to 6 orders of magnitude. The absolute magnitudes of the measured resonance enhanced Raman cross-sections for these 18 chemicals suggest that detection and identification of trace quantities of the ``signature`` chemicals, through a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor, could be achieved.

  3. Resonant Raman spectroscopy of PAH-Os self-assembled multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tognalli, N.; Fainstein, A.; Bonazzola, C.; Calvo, E.

    2004-01-01

    We present a resonant Raman scattering study of (PAH-Os/PVS)n and (PAH-Os/GOx)m self-assembled multilayers (n=1-11 and m=1-3). These Os polymer multilayers can be used in electrodes as efficient molecular wires for biomolecular recognition. The Raman intensity dependence on the number of self-assembly cycles provides information on the deposition process. The spectra are identical to that observed for PAH-Os in aqueous solution, indicating that the PAH-Os metal complex structure is conserved in the multilayers. We observe at ˜500 nm incoming and outgoing Raman resonances of osmium and bipyridine vibrational modes. These resonances are associated to the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transition. We study the evolution of these Raman modes as a function of the Os oxidation state during in situ electrochemistry. During the oxidation process, Os(II)→Os(III), the Raman resonance related to the MLCT disappears and the bipyridine related modes harden by ˜10 cm-1. These results are correlated with optical transmission measurements which show the disappearance of the visible region absorption when the Os complex is oxidized. We also find partial quenching of the Raman mode intensity after in situ voltamperometric cycles which demonstrates the existence of photo-electro-chemical processes.

  4. Resonant Raman spectroscopy of PAH--Os self-assembled multilayers.

    PubMed

    Tognalli, N; Fainstein, A; Bonazzola, C; Calvo, E

    2004-01-22

    We present a resonant Raman scattering study of (PAH--Os/PVS)n and (PAH--Os/GOx)m self-assembled multilayers (n=1-11 and m=1-3). These Os polymer multilayers can be used in electrodes as efficient molecular wires for biomolecular recognition. The Raman intensity dependence on the number of self-assembly cycles provides information on the deposition process. The spectra are identical to that observed for PAH--Os in aqueous solution, indicating that the PAH--Os metal complex structure is conserved in the multilayers. We observe at approximately 500 nm incoming and outgoing Raman resonances of osmium and bipyridine vibrational modes. These resonances are associated to the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transition. We study the evolution of these Raman modes as a function of the Os oxidation state during in situ electrochemistry. During the oxidation process, Os(II)-->Os(III), the Raman resonance related to the MLCT disappears and the bipyridine related modes harden by approximately 10 cm(-1). These results are correlated with optical transmission measurements which show the disappearance of the visible region absorption when the Os complex is oxidized. We also find partial quenching of the Raman mode intensity after in situ voltamperometric cycles which demonstrates the existence of photo-electro-chemical processes.

  5. Resonant enhancement of Raman scattering in metamaterials with hybrid electromagnetic and plasmonic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Narayana Rao, D.; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2016-06-01

    A tri-layer metamaterial perfect absorber of light, consisting of (Al/ZnS/Al) films with the top aluminum layer patterned as an array of circular disk nanoantennas, is investigated for resonantly enhancing Raman scattering from C60 fullerene molecules deposited on the metamaterial. The metamaterial is designed to have resonant bands due to plasmonic and electromagnetic resonances at the Raman pump frequency (725 nm) as well as Stokes emission bands. The Raman scattering from C60 on the metamaterial with resonantly matched bands is measured to be enhanced by an order of magnitude more than C60 on metamaterials with off-resonant absorption bands peaking at 1090 nm. The Raman pump is significantly enhanced due to the resonance with a propagating surface plasmon band, while the highly impedance-matched electromagnetic resonance is expected to couple out the Raman emission efficiently. The nature and hybridization of the plasmonic and electromagnetic resonances to form compound resonances are investigated by numerical simulations.

  6. Resonance Raman spectra of. cap alpha. -copper phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bovill, A.J.; McConnell, A.A.; Nimmo, J.A.; Smith, W.E.

    1986-02-13

    Raman spectra of ..cap alpha..-copper phthalocyanine (..cap alpha..-CuPc) were recorded at room temperature and at 10 K with excitation wavelengths between 457 and 714 nm. Resonance enhancement was greatest for modes for which the largest displacements were on either the inner five-membered ring of the isoindole groups or the inner macrocycle and consequently assignment of the bands to modes of the entire molecule was possible by comparison with nickel octaethylporphyrin. Four out of five bands resonant in the Q band region and preresonant near the B band absorption region are totally symmetric modes. B band preresonance occurs more strongly with high-frequency modes. At low temperatures, multimode interactions are reduced and profiles were obtained which can be compared with solution profiles of porphyrins. Both Q/sub x/ and Q/sub y/ 0-0 scattering can be identified and a helper mode is evident. A term enhancement predominates, with B/sub 1g/ and B/sub 2g/ modes enhanced because of a Jahn-Teller distortion of the excited state. The resonance studies, together with electronic absorption spectra and published theoretical studies, confirm that the Q band in ..cap alpha..-CuPc is largely due to an allowed ..pi..-..pi..* transition associated mainly with the macrocycle and inner five-membered rings of the isoindole groups. 25 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Citrate-reduced silver hydrosol modified with omega-mercaptoalkanoic acids self-assembled monolayers as a substrate for surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering. A study with cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Alois; van der Sneppen, Lineke; Gooijer, Cees; van der Zwan, Gert

    2004-07-01

    A new citrate-reduced silver hydrosol coated with omega-mercaptoalkanoic acids (mercaptopropionic and mercaptoundecanoic acids) self-assembled monolayers was prepared and characterized with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The structure and the quality of the coating monolayers are discussed and compared to similar coated and uncoated silver hydrosols previously developed. As an application, the new hydrosol was used as a biocompatible and efficient metal substrate for a surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) study of cytochrome c. The high-quality SERRS spectra reported of cytochrome c (obtained using only 1 microL of a micromolar cytochrome solution) are discussed and compared with data available from literature studies.

  8. Exploitation of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a remote chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.

    1995-08-01

    We have discussed recent experimental results using a resonance-Raman-based LIDAR system as a remote chemical sensor. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, which 6 orders-of-magnitude, can be as large as 4 to an increased sensing range for a given chemical concentration or lower detection limit for a given stand-off distance can be realized. The success discussed above can in part be traced back to the use of new state-of-the-art technologies which, only recently, have allowed the phenomenon of resonance-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to be fully exploited as a remote chemical sensor platform. Since many chemicals have electronic transitions in the UV/IS, it is expected that many will have pronounced resonance enhancements.

  9. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of octopus rhodopsin and its photoproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.; Pande, A.; Yue, K.T.; Callender, R.; Ebrey, T.G.; Tsuda, M.

    1987-08-11

    The authors report here the resonance Raman spectra of octopus rhodopsin and its photoproducts, bathorhodopsin and acid metarhodopsin. These studies were undertaken in order to make comparisons with the well-studied bovine pigments, so as to understand the similarities and the differences in pigment structure and photochemical processes between vertebrates and invertebrates. The flow method was used to obtain the Raman spectrum of rhodopsin at 13 /sup 0/C. The bathorhodopsin spectrum was obtained by computer subtraction of the spectra containing different photostationary mixtures of rhodopsin, isorhodopsin, hypsorhodopsin, and bathorhodopsin, obtained at 12 K using the pump-probe technique and from measurements at 80 K. Like their bovine counterparts, the Schiff base vibrational mode appears at approx. 1660 cm/sup -1/ in octopus rhodopsin and the photoproducts, bathorhodopsin and acid metarhodopsin, suggesting a proteonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein. Differences between the Raman spectra of octopus rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin indicate that the formation of bathorhodopsin is associated with chromophore isomerization. This inference is substantiated by the chromophore chemical extraction data which show that, like the bovine system, octopus rhodopsin is an 11-cis pigment, while the photoproducts contain an all-trans pigment, in agreement with the previous work. The octopus rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin spectra show marked differences from their bovine counterparts in other respects, however. The differences are most dramatic in the structure-sensitive fingerprint and the HOOP regions. Thus, it appears that although the two species differ in the specific nature of the chromophore-protein interactions, the general process of visual transduction is the same.

  10. UV resonance Raman analysis of trishomocubane and diamondoid dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Reinhard Thomsen, Christian; Maultzsch, Janina; Richter, Robert; Merli, Andrea; Fokin, Andrey A.; Koso, Tetyana V.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Rodionov, Vladimir N.

    2014-01-21

    We present resonance Raman measurements of crystalline trishomocubane and diamantane dimers containing a C=C double bond. Raman spectra were recorded with excitation energies between 2.33 eV and 5.42 eV. The strongest enhancement is observed for the C=C stretch vibration and a bending mode involving the two carbon atoms of the C=C bond, corresponding to the B{sub 2g} wagging mode of ethylene. This is associated with the localization of the π-HOMO and LUMO and the elongation of the C=C bond length and a pyramidalization of the two sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon atoms at the optical excitation. The observed Raman resonance energies of the trishomocubane and diamantane dimers are significantly lower than the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the corresponding unmodified diamondoids.

  11. Raman Studies of Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorio, Ado; Souza Filho, Antonio G.

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews recent advances on the use of Raman spectroscopy to study and characterize carbon nanostructures. It starts with a brief survey of Raman spectroscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes, followed by recent developments in the field. Various novel topics, including Stokes–anti-Stokes correlation, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in two dimensions, phonon coherence, and high-pressure and shielding effects, are presented. Some consequences for other fields—quantum optics, near-field electromagnetism, archeology, materials and soil sciences—are discussed. The review ends with a discussion of new perspectives on Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures, including how this technique can contribute to the development of biotechnological applications and nanotoxicology.

  12. Raman Studies of Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorio, Ado; Souza Filho, Antonio G.

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews recent advances on the use of Raman spectroscopy to study and characterize carbon nanostructures. It starts with a brief survey of Raman spectroscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes, followed by recent developments in the field. Various novel topics, including Stokes-anti-Stokes correlation, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in two dimensions, phonon coherence, and high-pressure and shielding effects, are presented. Some consequences for other fields—quantum optics, near-field electromagnetism, archeology, materials and soil sciences—are discussed. The review ends with a discussion of new perspectives on Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures, including how this technique can contribute to the development of biotechnological applications and nanotoxicology.

  13. Ultraviolet resonance Raman and absorption difference spectroscopy of myoglobins: titration behavior of individual tyrosine residues.

    PubMed

    Asher, S A; Larkin, P J; Teraoka, J

    1991-06-18

    The UV resonance Raman spectra of horse and sperm whale myoglobin excited at 240 nm show bands between 600 and 1700 cm-1 which derive from tyrosyl and tryptophyl residues. No significant contribution from phenylalanine and peptide backbone vibrations occurs at this excitation wavelength. We examine the pH dependence of the UV resonance Raman and UV absorption difference spectra of these myoglobins to correlate the local protein environment of the tyrosyl residues as given by the protein crystal structure to their pKa values, molar absorptivities, and Raman cross sections. Some of our pKa values for the tyrosinate residues of horse Mb differ from those of previous studies. We show that the lambda max values, the molar absorptivities, and the Raman cross sections are sensitive to the local environment of the tyrosinate residues in the protein. We relate differences in the tyrosyl absorption spectra to differences in Raman cross sections. In addition, we discuss the importance to the Raman cross sections of the local electromagnetic field enhancement due to the dielectric environment of the tyrosinate residues in the protein. This local field should scale the Raman cross sections in a way useful as a probe of the average aromatic amino acid residue environment.

  14. Investigation of the impact of fiber Bragg grating bandwidth on the efficiency of a Raman resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Leanne J.; Klopfer, Michael; Jain, Ravinder K.

    2015-03-01

    Significant spectral power leakage was found to occur around the high reflectivity fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) defining a 1121 nm Raman resonator cavity comprised of PM 10/125 germanosilicate fiber. This cavity was part of a Raman system pumped with broad linewidth 1069 nm and seeded with narrow linewidth 1178 nm. The 1069 nm upon entering the resonator cavity was Raman converted to 1121 nm which then amplified the 1178 nm as it passed through the cavity. Spectral leakage of 1121 nm light from the resonator cavity resulted in sub-optimal amplification of 1178 nm which forced usage of longer resonator cavities having a decreased threshold for Stimulated Brillouin Scattering. Upon study of 1121 nm linewidth broadening as a function of resonator length for cavities employing 3 nm FBGs, differences in the percentage of 1121 nm power spectrally leaking past the output FBG as a function of the 1121 nm intracavity power propagating in the forward direction are not experimentally discernible for resonator cavities longer than 40 m. But, for cavity's shorter than 40 m, the percentage of 1121 nm power spectrally leaking past the output FBG decreased significantly for similar 1121 nm intracavity power levels. For all cavity lengths, a nearly linear relationship exists between percent 1121 nm power leakage and intracavity power levels. Also, cavities employing broader bandwidth FBGs experience less 1121 nm power leakage for similar 1121 nm intracavity power levels. Finally, modeling predictions of Raman system performance are greatly improved upon usage of experimentally derived effective FBG reflectivities.

  15. Characterization of the pigment xanthomonadin in the bacterial genus Xanthomonas using micro- and resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paret, Mathews L.; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Acosta, Tayro; deSilva, Asoka S.; Vowell, Tomie; Alvarez, Anne M.

    2012-06-01

    We used micro- and resonance Raman spectroscopy with 785 nm and 514.5 nm laser excitation, respectively, to characterize a plant pathogenic bacteria, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae D150. The bacterial genus Xathomonas is closely related to bacterial genus Stenotrophomonas that causes an infection in humans. This study has identified for the first time the unique Raman spectra of the carotenoid-like pigment xanthomonadin of the Xanthomonas strain. Xanthomonadin is a brominated aryl-polyene pigment molecule similar to carotenoids. Further studies were conducted using resonance Raman spectroscopy with 514.5 nm laser excitation on several strains of the bacterial genus Xanthomonas isolated from numerous plants from various geographical locations. The current study revealed that the Raman bands representing the vibrations (v1, v2, v3) of the polyene chain of xanthomonadin are 1003-1005 (v3), 1135-1138 (v2), and 1530 (v1). Overtone bands representing xanthomonadin were identified as 2264-2275 (2v2), and combinational bands at 2653-2662 (v1+ v2). The findings from this study validate our previous finding that the Raman fingerprints of xanthomonadin are unique for the genus Xanthomonas. This facilitates rapid identification (~5 minutes) of Xanthomonas spp. from bacterial culture plates. The xanthomonadin marker is different from Raman markers of many other bacterial genus including Agrobacterium, Bacillus, Clavibacter, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Microbacterium, Paenibacillus, and Ralstonia. This study also identified Xanthomonas spp. from bacterial strains isolated from a diseased wheat sample on a culture plate.

  16. Resonance Raman Studies of Co—O2 and O—O Stretching Vibrations in Oxy-Cobalt Hemes

    PubMed Central

    Mackin, Helen C.; Tsubaki, Motonari; Yu, Nai-Teng

    1983-01-01

    Strong evidence suggests that the stretching vibration of the bound oxygen can be perturbed by an accidentally degenerate porphyrin ring mode, resulting in two split frequencies. In the Co(II)(TpivPP) (pyridine) 18O2 complex, we demonstrate that the ν(18O—18O) mode, after being shifted from its ν(16O—16O) value at 1,156 cm-1, undergoes a resonance interaction with the 1,080 cm-1 porphyrin mode, giving rise to two lines at 1,067 and 1,089 cm-1. In the O2 complex of Co(II) mesoporphyrin IX-substituted sperm whale myoglobin, we observed a dramatic intensity increase at 1,132 cm-1 upon 16O2 → 18O2 substitution, which is due to the reappearance of the 1,132-cm-1 porphyrin mode after the removal of resonance conditions. A decrease in O2 binding affinity, caused by the proximal base tension, corresponds to an increase in the Co—O2 stretching frequency. The ν(Co—O2) at 527 cm-1 for the low affinity Co(II)(TpivPP)(1,2-Me2Im) O2 complex is 11 cm-1 higher than the 516-cm-1 value for the high affinity complex (with N-MeIm replacing 1,2-Me2Im). However, in the corresponding iron complexes the reverse behavior is observed, i.e., the ν(Fe—O2) decreases for the (1,2-Me2Im) complex. There is a 24-cm-1 difference in the Co—O2 stretching frequencies between Co(II)(TpivPP)(N-MeIm)O2 (at 516 cm-1) and oxy meso CoMb (at 540 cm-1), suggesting a protein induced distortion of the Co—O—O linkage. However, the values for ν(Fe—O2) are nearly identical between Fe(II)(TpivPP)(N-MeIm)O2 (at 571 cm-1) and oxy Mb (at 573 cm-1), indicating that O2 binds to myoglobin in the same manner as in the sterically unhindered “picket fence” complex. Evidence is presented that suggests the presence of two dioxygen stretching frequencies due to two different conformers in each of the N-MeIm and 1,2-Me2Im complex of oxy Co(II)(TpivPP). PMID:6838973

  17. Raman resonance in iron-based superconductors: The magnetic scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa, Alberto; Cai, Jiashen; Chubukov, Andrey V.

    2016-02-01

    We perform theoretical analysis of polarization-sensitive Raman spectroscopy on NaFe1 -xCoxAs , EuFe 2 As2 , SrFe2As2 , and Ba (Fe1 -xCox )2As2 , focusing on two features seen in the B1 g symmetry channel (in one Fe unit cell notation): the strong temperature dependence of the static, uniform Raman response in the normal state and the existence of a collective mode in the superconducting state. We show that both features can be explained by the coupling of fermions to pairs of magnetic fluctuations via the Aslamazov-Larkin process. We first analyze magnetically mediated Raman intensity at the leading two-loop order and then include interactions between pairs of magnetic fluctuations. We show that the full Raman intensity in the B1 g channel can be viewed as the result of the coupling of light to Ising-nematic susceptibility via Aslamazov-Larkin process. We argue that the singular temperature dependence in the normal state is the combination of the temperature dependencies of the Aslamazov-Larkin vertex and of Ising-nematic susceptibility. We discuss two scenario for the resonance below Tc. One is the resonance due to development of a pole in the fully renormalized Ising-nematic susceptibility. Another is orbital excitonic scenario, in which spin fluctuations generate attractive interaction between low-energy fermions.

  18. Resonant electronic Raman scattering: A BCS-like system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Leonarde N.; Arantes, A.; Schüller, C.; Bell, M. J. V.; Anjos, V.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we investigate the resonant intersubband Raman scattering of two-dimensional electron systems in GaAs-AlGaAs single quantum wells. Self-consistent calculations of the polarized and depolarized Raman cross sections show that the appearance of excitations at the unrenormalized single-particle energy are related to three factors: the extreme resonance regime, the existence of degeneracy in intersubband excitations of the electron gas, and, finally, degeneracy in the interactions between pairs of excitations. It is demonstrated that the physics that governs the problem is similar to the one that gives rise to the formation of the superconducting state in the BCS theory of normal metals. Comparison between experiment and theory shows an excellent agreement.

  19. A Study of the Dynamics of the Heme Pocket and C-helix in CooA upon CO Dissociation Using Time-Resolved Visible and UV Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Otomo, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Haruto; Mizuno, Misao; Kimura, Tetsunari; Kubo, Minoru; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Aono, Shigetoshi; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-08-18

    CooA is a CO-sensing transcriptional activator from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum that binds CO at the heme iron. The heme iron in ferrous CooA has two axial ligands: His77 and Pro2. CO displaces Pro2 and induces a conformational change in CooA. The dissociation of CO and/or ligation of the Pro2 residue are believed to trigger structural changes in the protein. Visible time-resolved resonance Raman spectra obtained in this study indicated that the ν(Fe-His) mode, arising from the proximal His77-iron stretch, does not shift until 50 μs after the photodissociation of CO. Ligation of the Pro2 residue to the heme iron was observed around 50 μs after the photodissociation of CO, suggesting that the ν(Fe-His) band exhibits no shift until the ligation of Pro2. UV resonance Raman spectra suggested structural changes in the vicinity of Trp110 in the C-helix upon CO binding, but no or very small spectral changes in the time-resolved UV resonance Raman spectra were observed from 100 ns to 100 μs after the photodissociation of CO. These results strongly suggest that the conformational change of CooA is induced by the ligation of Pro2 to the heme iron. PMID:27457181

  20. The effect of an anti-hydrogen bond on Fermi resonance: A Raman spectroscopic study of the Fermi doublet ν1-ν12 of liquid pyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong-Fei; Gao, Shu-Qin; Sun, Cheng-Lin; Li, Zuo-Wei

    2012-08-01

    The effects of an anti-hydrogen bond on the ν1-ν12 Fermi resonance (FR) of pyridine are experimentally investigated by using Raman scattering spectroscopy. Three systems, pyridine/water, pyridine/formamide, and pyridine/carbon tetrachloride, provide varying degrees of strength for the diluent-pyridine anti-hydrogen bond complex. Water forms a stronger anti-hydrogen bond with pyridine than with formamide, and in the case of adding non-polar solvent carbon tetrachloride, which is neither a hydrogen bond donor nor an acceptor and incapable of forming a hydrogen bond with pyridine, the intermolecular distance of pyridine will increase and the interaction of pyridine molecules will reduce. The dilution studies are performed on the three systems. Comparing with the values of the Fermi coupling coefficient W of the ring breathing mode ν1 and triangle mode ν12 of pyridine at different volume concentrations, which are calculated according to the Bertran equations, in three systems, we find that the solution with the strongest anti-hydrogen bond, water, shows the fastest change in the ν1-ν12 Fermi coupling coefficient W with the volume concentration varying, followed by the formamide and carbon tetrachloride solutions. These results suggest that the stronger anti-hydrogen bond-forming effect will cause a greater reduction in the strength of the ν1-ν12 FR of pyridine. According to the mechanism of the formation of an anti-hydrogen bond in the complexes and the FR theory, a qualitative explanation for the anti-hydrogen bond effect in reducing the strength of the ν1-ν12 FR of pyridine is given.

  1. Atmospheric absorption versus deep ultraviolet (pre-)resonance in Raman lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallen, Hans D.; Willitsford, Adam H.; Neely, Ryan R.; Chadwick, C. Todd; Philbrick, C. Russell

    2016-05-01

    The Raman scattering of several liquids and solid materials has been investigated near the deep ultraviolet absorption features corresponding to the electron energy states of the chemical species present. It is found to provide significant enhancement, but is always accompanied by absorption due to that or other species along the path. We investigate this trade-off for water vapor, although the results for liquid water and ice will be quantitatively very similar. An optical parametric oscillator (OPO) was pumped by the third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser, and the output frequency doubled to generate a tunable excitation beam in the 215-600 nm range. We use the tunable laser excitation beam to investigate pre-resonance and resonance Raman spectroscopy near an absorption band of ice. A significant enhancement in the Raman signal was observed. The A-term of the Raman scattering tensor, which describes the pre-resonant enhancement of the spectra, is also used to find the primary observed intensities as a function of incident beam energy, although a wide resonance structure near the final-state-effect related absorption in ice is also found. The results suggest that use of pre-resonant or resonant Raman LIDAR could increase the sensitivity to improve spatial and temporal resolution of atmospheric water vapor measurements. However, these shorter wavelengths also exhibit higher ozone absorption. These opposing effects are modeled using MODTRAN for several configurations relevant for studies of boundary layer water and in the vicinity of clouds. Such data could be used in studies of the measurement of energy flow at the water-air and cloud-air interface, and may help with understanding some of the major uncertainties in current global climate models.

  2. Resonance Raman enhancement optimization in the visible range by selecting different excitation wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong; Li, Yuee

    2015-09-01

    Resonance enhancement of Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used to significantly improve the sensitivity and selectivity of detection for specific components in complicated environments. Resonance RS gives more insight into the biochemical structure and reactivity. In this field, selecting a proper excitation wavelength to achieve optimal resonance enhancement is vital for the study of an individual chemical/biological ingredient with a particular absorption characteristic. Raman spectra of three azo derivatives with absorption spectra in the visible range are studied under the same experimental conditions at 488, 532, and 633 nm excitations. Universal laws in the visible range have been concluded by analyzing resonance Raman (RR) spectra of samples. The long wavelength edge of the absorption spectrum is a better choice for intense enhancement and the integrity of a Raman signal. The obtained results are valuable for applying RR for the selective detection of biochemical constituents whose electronic transitions take place at energies corresponding to the visible spectra, which is much friendlier to biologial samples compared to ultraviolet.

  3. Enhanced Raman sensitivity using an actively stabilized external resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David J.; Glugla, Manfred; Penzhorn, Ralf-Dieter

    2001-04-01

    An enhancement up to 250-fold in laser Raman signals for real-time gas analysis has been achieved within an actively stabilized external resonator (ASER), whose length is actively matched to the single-frequency excitation laser using the Pound-Drever technique. With the Raman cell present, enhancements up to 50-fold are achieved, and the resulting detection limit for hydrogen in ambient-pressure gas mixtures is about ten parts-per-million in a 1 min analysis period at unity signal-to-noise ratio. Based upon the recent development of a fiber-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser with single-frequency output exceeding 5 W at 532 nm, this highly sensitive instrument is applied to detection of tritiated gases, wherein the compactness and low heat of this laser head permit placing the entire optical system, including laser head, charge coupled Raman detector, and ASER, within the glove box necessary for secondary containment of tritium, thereby accomplishing a robust, highly sensitive Raman analytical system for hazardous substances.

  4. Multidimensional resonance raman spectroscopy by six-wave mixing in the deep UV

    SciTech Connect

    Molesky, Brian P.; Giokas, Paul G.; Guo, Zhenkun; Moran, Andrew M.

    2014-09-21

    Two-dimensional (2D) resonance Raman spectroscopies hold great potential for uncovering photoinduced relaxation processes in molecules but are not yet widely applied because of technical challenges. Here, we describe a newly developed 2D resonance Raman experiment operational at the third-harmonic of a Titanium-Sapphire laser. High-sensitivity and rapid data acquisition are achieved by combining spectral interferometry with a background-free (six-pulse) laser beam geometry. The third-harmonic laser pulses are generated in a filament produced by the fundamental and second-harmonic pulses in neon gas at pressures up to 35 atm. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by probing ground-state wavepacket motions in triiodide. The information provided by the experiment is explored with two different representations of the signal. In one representation, Fourier transforms are carried out with respect to the two experimentally controlled delay times to obtain a 2D Raman spectrum. Further insights are derived in a second representation by dispersing the signal pulse in a spectrometer. It is shown that, as in traditional pump-probe experiments, the six-wave mixing signal spectrum encodes the wavepacket's position by way of the (time-evolving) emission frequency. Anharmonicity additionally induces dynamics in the vibrational resonance frequency. In all cases, the experimental signals are compared to model calculations based on a cumulant expansion approach. This study suggests that multi-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopies conducted on systems with Franck-Condon active modes are fairly immune to many of the technical issues that challenge off-resonant 2D Raman spectroscopies (e.g., third-order cascades) and photon-echo experiments in the deep UV (e.g., coherence spikes). The development of higher-order nonlinear spectroscopies operational in the deep UV is motivated by studies of biological systems and elementary organic photochemistries.

  5. Multidimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy by six-wave mixing in the deep UV.

    PubMed

    Molesky, Brian P; Giokas, Paul G; Guo, Zhenkun; Moran, Andrew M

    2014-09-21

    Two-dimensional (2D) resonance Raman spectroscopies hold great potential for uncovering photoinduced relaxation processes in molecules but are not yet widely applied because of technical challenges. Here, we describe a newly developed 2D resonance Raman experiment operational at the third-harmonic of a Titanium-Sapphire laser. High-sensitivity and rapid data acquisition are achieved by combining spectral interferometry with a background-free (six-pulse) laser beam geometry. The third-harmonic laser pulses are generated in a filament produced by the fundamental and second-harmonic pulses in neon gas at pressures up to 35 atm. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by probing ground-state wavepacket motions in triiodide. The information provided by the experiment is explored with two different representations of the signal. In one representation, Fourier transforms are carried out with respect to the two experimentally controlled delay times to obtain a 2D Raman spectrum. Further insights are derived in a second representation by dispersing the signal pulse in a spectrometer. It is shown that, as in traditional pump-probe experiments, the six-wave mixing signal spectrum encodes the wavepacket's position by way of the (time-evolving) emission frequency. Anharmonicity additionally induces dynamics in the vibrational resonance frequency. In all cases, the experimental signals are compared to model calculations based on a cumulant expansion approach. This study suggests that multi-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopies conducted on systems with Franck-Condon active modes are fairly immune to many of the technical issues that challenge off-resonant 2D Raman spectroscopies (e.g., third-order cascades) and photon-echo experiments in the deep UV (e.g., coherence spikes). The development of higher-order nonlinear spectroscopies operational in the deep UV is motivated by studies of biological systems and elementary organic photochemistries. PMID:25240351

  6. Study on Raman spectra of synthetic celluloses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Na; Zhu, Changjun; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-02-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of aliphatic polyamide fiber and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The results show that Raman peaks beyond 1200 cm-1 appear for aliphatic polyamide fiber processed by sodium hydroxide, while the Raman peaks beyond 1000 cm-1 disappear for aliphatic polyamide fiber processed by sulfuric acid. Raman peaks beyond 1750 cm-1 decrease for polyethylene terephthalate processed by sodium hydroxide, while Raman peaks beyond 1000 cm-1 disappear, except weak peaks around 3000 cm-1 , for polyethylene terephthalate processed by sulfuric acid. The variations of the Raman spectra are primarily related to the changes of chemical bonds and molecular structures.

  7. Photobleaching of the resonance Raman lines of cytochromes in living yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Okotrub, Konstantin A; Surovtsev, Nikolay V

    2014-12-01

    The photobleaching of the resonance cytochrome Raman lines in living Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells was studied. The photobleaching rate versus the irradiation power was described by square function plus a constant in contrast to the linear dependence of the photoinjury rate. This difference distinguishes the cytochrome photooxidation from other processes of the cell photodamage. The square dependence is associated with the reaction involving two photogenerated intermediates while the constant with the dark redox balance rates. This work demonstrates a potential of Raman spectroscopy to characterize the native cytochrome reaction rates and to study the cell photodamage precursors.

  8. Quantum lattice fluctuations in a 1-dimensional charge-density-wave material: Luminescence and resonance Raman studies of an MX solid

    SciTech Connect

    Long, F.H.; Love, S.P.; Swanson, B.I.

    1993-02-01

    Luminescence spectra, both emission and excitation, and the excitation dependence of the resonance Raman (RR) spectra were measured for a 1-dimensional charge-density-wave solid, [Pt(L){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}][Pt(L){sub 2}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 4} ; L=1, 2-diaminoethane. The luminescence experiments support the existence of tail states in the band gap region, which indicate the presence of disorder. In contrast, the RR measurements conclusively demonstrated that the effects of static structural disorder on the vibrational spectroscopy can be neglected. This apparently paradoxical result can be explained by considering the zero-point motion of the lattice. The experimental results are compared to recent theoretical models.

  9. In vitro recognition of DNA base pairs by histones in histone-DNA complexes and reconstituted core particles: an ultraviolet resonance Raman study.

    PubMed Central

    Laigle, A; Chinsky, L; Turpin, P Y; Liquier, J; Taillandier, E

    1982-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of complexes between DNA and the four core histones, alone or associated, have been investigated in vitro using excitations at 300 and 257 nm, which give complementary informations about the DNA bases. H2A and H2B fractions recognize the G-C base pairs, while H3 and H4 (arginine rich fractions) recognize the A-T base pairs. The associated fractions form complexes with DNA which yield about the same DNA spectral modifications as the DNA-H4 complexes. This reveals the important role of the arginine rich fractions in the core particle formation and confirms the preferential in vitro assembly of nucleosome cores on A-T rich regions of DNA (25). PMID:7155896

  10. Real-time measurements of the redox states of c-type cytochromes in electroactive biofilms: a confocal resonance Raman Microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Virdis, Bernardino; Millo, Diego; Donose, Bogdan C; Batstone, Damien J

    2014-01-01

    Confocal Resonance Raman Microscopy (CRRM) was used to probe variations of redox state of c-type cytochromes embedded in living mixed-culture electroactive biofilms exposed to different electrode polarizations, under potentiostatic and potentiodynamic conditions. In the absence of the metabolic substrate acetate, the redox state of cytochromes followed the application of reducing and oxidizing electrode potentials. Real-time monitoring of the redox state of cytochromes during cyclic voltammetry (CV) in a potential window where cytochromes reduction occurs, evidenced a measurable time delay between the oxidation of redox cofactors probed by CV at the electrode interface, and oxidation of distal cytochromes probed by CRRM. This delay was used to tentatively estimate the diffusivity of electrons through the biofilm. In the presence of acetate, the resonance Raman spectra of young (10 days, j = 208 ± 49 µA cm(-2)) and mature (57 days, j = 267 ± 73 µA cm(-2)) biofilms show that cytochromes remained oxidized homogeneously even at layers as far as 70 µm from the electrode, implying the existence of slow metabolic kinetics that do not result in the formation of a redox gradient inside the biofilm during anode respiration. However, old biofilms (80 days, j = 190 ± 37 µA cm(-2)) with thickness above 100 µm were characterized by reduced catalytic activity compared to the previous developing stages. The cytochromes in these biofilm were mainly in the reduced redox state, showing that only aged mixed-culture biofilms accumulate electrons during anode respiration. These results differ substantially from recent observations in pure Geobacter sulfurreducens electroactive biofilms, in which accumulation of reduced cytochromes is already observed in thinner biofilms, thus suggesting different bottlenecks in current production for mixed-culture and G. sulfurreducens biofilms.

  11. Real-Time Measurements of the Redox States of c-Type Cytochromes in Electroactive Biofilms: A Confocal Resonance Raman Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Virdis, Bernardino; Millo, Diego; Donose, Bogdan C.; Batstone, Damien J.

    2014-01-01

    Confocal Resonance Raman Microscopy (CRRM) was used to probe variations of redox state of c-type cytochromes embedded in living mixed-culture electroactive biofilms exposed to different electrode polarizations, under potentiostatic and potentiodynamic conditions. In the absence of the metabolic substrate acetate, the redox state of cytochromes followed the application of reducing and oxidizing electrode potentials. Real-time monitoring of the redox state of cytochromes during cyclic voltammetry (CV) in a potential window where cytochromes reduction occurs, evidenced a measurable time delay between the oxidation of redox cofactors probed by CV at the electrode interface, and oxidation of distal cytochromes probed by CRRM. This delay was used to tentatively estimate the diffusivity of electrons through the biofilm. In the presence of acetate, the resonance Raman spectra of young (10 days, j = 208±49 µA cm−2) and mature (57 days, j = 267±73 µA cm−2) biofilms show that cytochromes remained oxidized homogeneously even at layers as far as 70 µm from the electrode, implying the existence of slow metabolic kinetics that do not result in the formation of a redox gradient inside the biofilm during anode respiration. However, old biofilms (80 days, j = 190±37 µA cm−2) with thickness above 100 µm were characterized by reduced catalytic activity compared to the previous developing stages. The cytochromes in these biofilm were mainly in the reduced redox state, showing that only aged mixed-culture biofilms accumulate electrons during anode respiration. These results differ substantially from recent observations in pure Geobacter sulfurreducens electroactive biofilms, in which accumulation of reduced cytochromes is already observed in thinner biofilms, thus suggesting different bottlenecks in current production for mixed-culture and G. sulfurreducens biofilms. PMID:24587123

  12. Vibrational modes and resonant Raman spectra of new B2C nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Xu, Yuehua; Dong, Jinming

    2011-07-01

    The vibrational properties and first-order resonant Raman spectra of new B2C nanoribbons (B2C-NRs) have been studied by the density functional theory. It is found that there is a characteristic radial-breathing-like mode (RBLM) for all the calculated B2C-NRs with their frequency varying in a linear proportion to the inverse square root of the B2C-NR's width, whose slope depends closely on the types of B2C-NRs. The RBLM resonant peak's intensities and positions in the first-order resonant Raman spectra of the B2C-NRs are found to depend greatly on the polarizations of the incident and scattered light, and also the types of B2C-NRs.

  13. Experimental evaluation of the twofold electromagnetic enhancement theory of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Itoh, Tamitake; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2009-02-15

    We examined an electromagnetic (EM) theory of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) using single Ag nanoaggregates. The SERRS-EM theory is characterized by twofold EM enhancement induced by the coupling of plasmon resonance with both excitation and emission of Raman scattering plus fluorescence. The total emission cross-section spectra of enhanced Raman scattering and enhanced fluorescence were calculated using the following parameters: the spectrum of enhancement factor induced by plasmon resonance, resonance Raman scattering overlapped with fluorescence, and excitation wavelengths. The calculations well agreed with experimental total emission cross-section spectra, thus providing strong indications that the SERRS-EM theory is quantitatively correct.

  14. Remote sensing of the atmosphere by resonance Raman LIDAR

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Harder, D.; Leung, K.P.; Zuhoski, P.B. Jr.; Burr, D.; Chen, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    With the increased environmental awareness has come the need for technologies that can detect, identify and monitor pollutants and, where necessary, verify their destruction. This need is evidenced by the recent creation of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), of which the Title 3-Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) amendments mandate the complete revision and expansion of the earlier Clean Air Act (CAA), section 112. As was pointed out by Grant, Kagann and McClenny, optical remote sensing technologies are expected to play a very important role in insuring that various facilities are in compliance with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for the reduction of HAP emissions that are called for in section 301 of Title 3. Unfortunately, however, many of these technologies have varying detection and applicability characteristics which often dictate the conditions under which one can use the sensor to detect, identify or monitor a chemical species. Some of the advantages that a Raman-based pollution sensor possess are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints), (2) independence from the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region), (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk), (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid and solutions), and (5) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching, or interference from water). Early investigations were not able to take advantage of near-resonance enhancement of the Raman cross-section which occurs when the excitation frequency approaches an electronically excited state of the molecule. The enhancement of the scattering cross-section can be quite large, often approaching 4 to 6 orders of magnitude.

  15. Nitration of internal tyrosine of cytochrome c probed by resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Quaroni, L; Smith, W E

    1999-01-01

    Tyrosines can be selectively nitrated in a protein and the resultant chromophore can be used as an in situ probe of the tyrosine environment. Resonance Raman scattering could have specific advantages as a detection method because of the inherent selectivity of the technique and because shifts in the intensity and frequency of the nitro stretch can be detected and related to the form and environment of the nitrotyrosine. To evaluate this possibility the internal residue Tyr67 of cytochrome c was nitrated and resonance Raman scattering was recorded. With 413.1-nm excitation the resonance scattering from the heme protein dominates, but with 457.9-nm excitation intense bands due to nitrostretching vibrations are readily observed. The frequency of the internal Tyr67 indicates an aqueous environment that suggests that on nitration this residue becomes exposed on the protein surface or that water enters the active pocket. pH dependent measurements can be used to follow the protonation of the residue. A pK(a) of approximately 7 also indicates an aqueous environment. This initial study indicates that resonance Raman scattering does have unique advantages as an in situ probe of the local structure of nitrated tyrosine residues.

  16. [Effect on Fermi Resonance by Some External Fields: Investigation of Fermi Resonance According to Raman Spectra].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiu-lan; Sun, Cheng-lin; Zhou, Mi; Li, Dong-fei; Men, Zhi-wei; Li, Zuo-wei; Gao, Shu-qin

    2015-03-01

    Fermi resonance is a phenomenon of molecular vibrational coupling and energy transfer occurred between different groups of a single molecule or neighboring molecules. Many properties of Fermi resonance under different external fields, the investigation method of Raman spectroscopy as well as the application of Fermi resonance, etc need to be developed and extended further. In this article the research results and development about Fermi resonance obtained by Raman spectral technique were introduced systematically according to our work and the results by other researchers. Especially, the results of the behaviors of intramolecular and intermolecular Fermi resonance of some molecules under some external fields such as molecular field, pressure field and temperature field, etc were investigated and demonstrated in detail according to the Raman spectra obtained by high pressure DAC technique, temperature variation technique as well as the methods we planed originally in our group such as solution concentration variation method and LCOF resonance Raman spectroscopic technique, and some novel properties of Fermi resonance were found firstly. Concretely, (1) Under molecular field. a. The Raman spectra of C5H5 N in CH3 OH and H2O indicates that solvent effect can influence Fermi resonance distinctly; b. The phenomena of the asymmetric movement of the Fermi resonance doublets as well as the fundamental involved is tuned by the Fermi resonance which had not been found by other methods were found firstly by our variation solution concentration method; c. The Fermi resonance properties can be influenced distinctly by the molecular group reorganization induced by the hydrogen bond and anti-hydrogen bond in solution; d. Fermi resonance can occurred between C7 H8 and m-C8H10, and the Fermi resonance properties behave quite differently with the solution concentration; (2) Under pressure field. a. The spectral lines shift towards high wavenumber with increasing pressure, and

  17. A deformable nanoplasmonic membrane reveals universal correlations between plasmon resonance and surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minhee; Kim, Jae-Jun; Oh, Young-Jae; Park, Sang-Gil; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2014-07-01

    A quantitative correlation between plasmon resonance and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals is revealed by using a novel active plasmonic method, that is, a deformable nanoplasmonic membrane. A single SERS peak has the maximum gain at the corresponding plasmon resonance wavelength, which has the maximum extinction product of an excitation and the corresponding Raman scattering wavelengths.

  18. Resonance Raman spectroscopic study of the interaction between Co(II)rrinoids and the ATP:corrinoid adenosyltransferase PduO from Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Park, Kiyoung; Mera, Paola E; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C; Brunold, Thomas C

    2016-09-01

    The human-type ATP:corrinoid adenosyltransferase PduO from Lactobacillus reuteri (LrPduO) catalyzes the adenosylation of Co(II)rrinoids to generate adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) or adenosylcobinamide (AdoCbi(+)). This process requires the formation of "supernucleophilic" Co(I)rrinoid intermediates in the enzyme active site which are properly positioned to abstract the adeonsyl moiety from co-substrate ATP. Previous magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic analyses revealed that LrPduO achieves the thermodynamically challenging reduction of Co(II)rrinoids by displacing the axial ligand with a non-coordinating phenylalanine residue to produce a four-coordinate species. However, relatively little is currently known about the interaction between the tetradentate equatorial ligand of Co(II)rrinoids (the corrin ring) and the enzyme active site. To address this issue, we have collected resonance Raman (rR) data of Co(II)rrinoids free in solution and bound to the LrPduO active site. The relevant resonance-enhanced vibrational features of the free Co(II)rrinoids are assigned on the basis of rR intensity calculations using density functional theory to establish a suitable framework for interpreting rR spectral changes that occur upon Co(II)rrinoid binding to the LrPduO/ATP complex in terms of structural perturbations of the corrin ring. To complement our rR data, we have also obtained MCD spectra of Co(II)rrinoids bound to LrPduO complexed with the ATP analogue UTP. Collectively, our results provide compelling evidence that in the LrPduO active site, the corrin ring of Co(II)rrinoids is firmly locked in place by several amino acid side chains so as to facilitate the dissociation of the axial ligand. PMID:27383231

  19. The confinement induced resonance in spin-orbit coupled cold atoms with Raman coupling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Cai; Song, Shu-Wei; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The confinement induced resonance provides an indispensable tool for the realization of the low-dimensional strongly interacting quantum system. Here, we investigate the confinement induced resonance in spin-orbit coupled cold atoms with Raman coupling. We find that the quasi-bound levels induced by the spin-orbit coupling and Raman coupling result in the Feshbach-type resonances. For sufficiently large Raman coupling, the bound states in one dimension exist only for sufficiently strong attractive interaction. Furthermore, the bound states in quasi-one dimension exist only for sufficient large ratio of the length scale of confinement to three dimensional s-wave scattering length. The Raman coupling substantially changes the confinement-induced resonance position. We give a proposal to realize confinement induced resonance through increasing Raman coupling strength in experiments. PMID:24862314

  20. Theoretical studies of resonance enhanced stimulated raman scattering (RESRS) of frequency doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor. Progress report, July-December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    The third phase of research will focus on the propagation and energy extraction of the pump and SERS beams in a variety of configurations including oscillator structures. In order to address these questions a numerical code capable of allowing for saturation and full transverse beam evolution is required. The method proposed is based on a discretized propagation energy extraction model which uses a Kirchoff integral propagator coupled to the three level Raman model already developed. The model will have the resolution required by diffraction limits and will use the previous density matrix results in the adiabatic following limit. Owing to its large computational requirements, such a code must be implemented on a vector array processor. One code on the Cyber is being tested by using previously understood two-level laser models as guidelines for interpreting the results. Two tests were implemented: the evolution of modes in a passive resonator and the evolution of a stable state of the adiabatically eliminated laser equations. These results show mode shapes and diffraction losses for the first case and relaxation oscillations for the second one. Finally, in order to clarify the computing methodology used to exploit the speed of the Cyber's computational speed, the time it takes to perform both of the computations previously mentioned to run on the Cyber and VAX 730 must be measured. Also included is a short description of the current laser model (CAVITY.FOR) and a flow chart of the test computations.

  1. High-resolution study of the x-ray resonant Raman scattering process around the 1s absorption edge for aluminium, silicon, and their oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Szlachetko, J.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Berset, M.; Fennane, K.; Szlachetko, M.; Hoszowska, J.; Barrett, R.; Pajek, M.; Kubala-Kukus, A.

    2007-02-15

    X-ray resonant Raman scattering (RRS) spectra of Al, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Si, and SiO{sub 2} were measured at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, using a high-resolution Bragg-type curved crystal spectrometer. The x-ray RRS spectra were collected at several beam energies tuned below the 1s absorption thresholds of Al and Si. Differences in the spectral features between the elemental samples and the oxide ones were clearly observed. The data were interpreted using the second-order perturbation theory within the Kramers-Heisenberg (KH) approach. It is shown that, using the KH formalism, oscillator strengths that are similar to the ones deduced from x-ray absorption measurements can be extracted from emission x-ray RRS spectra. The total cross sections for the x-ray RRS process were derived for the different photon beam energies and compared with theoretical predictions. For elemental silicon, the weak 1s-3p excitation was observed and found to be consistent with results of density of states calculations.

  2. Resonant Raman scattering theory for Kitaev models and their Majorana fermion boundary modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreault, Brent; Knolle, Johannes; Perkins, Natalia B.; Burnell, F. J.

    2016-09-01

    We study the inelastic light scattering response in two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Kitaev spin-liquid models with Majorana spinon band structures in the symmetry classes BDI and D leading to protected gapless surface modes. We present a detailed calculation of the resonant Raman/Brillouin scattering vertex relevant to iridate and ruthenate compounds whose low-energy physics is believed to be proximate to these spin-liquid phases. In the symmetry class BDI, we find that while the resonant scattering on thin films can detect the gapless boundary modes of spin liquids, the nonresonant processes do not couple to them. For the symmetry class D, however, we find that the coupling between both types of light-scattering processes and the low-energy surface states is strongly suppressed. Additionally, we describe the effect of weak time-reversal symmetry breaking perturbations on the bulk Raman response of these systems.

  3. Fully reflective deep ultraviolet to near infrared spectrometer and entrance optics for resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, B.; Bäckström, J.; Budelmann, D.; Maeser, R.; Rübhausen, M.; Klein, M. V.; Schoeffel, E.; Mihill, A.; Yoon, S.

    2005-07-01

    We present the design and performance of a new triple-grating deep ultraviolet to near-infrared spectrometer. The system is fully achromatic due to the use of reflective optics. The minimization of image aberrations by using on- and off- axis parabolic mirrors as well as elliptical mirrors yields a strong stray light rejection with high resolution over a wavelength range between 165 and 1000nm. The Raman signal is collected with a reflective entrance objective with a numerical aperture of 0.5, featuring a Cassegrain-type design. Resonance Raman studies on semiconductors and on correlated compounds, such as LaMnO3, highlight the performance of this instrument, and show diverse resonance effects between 1.96 and 5.4eV.

  4. Origin invariance in vibrational resonance Raman optical activity

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, Luciano N. Cappelli, Chiara; Egidi, Franco; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-05-07

    A theoretical investigation on the origin dependence of the vibronic polarizabilities, isotropic and anisotropic rotational invariants, and scattering cross sections in Resonance Raman Optical Activity (RROA) spectroscopy is presented. Expressions showing the origin dependence of these polarizabilities were written in the resonance regime using the Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) approximations for the electronic transition moments. Differently from the far-from-resonance scattering regime, where the origin dependent terms cancel out when the rotational invariants are calculated, RROA spectrum can exhibit some origin dependence even for eigenfunctions of the electronic Hamiltonian. At the FC level, the RROA spectrum is completely origin invariant if the polarizabilities are calculated using a single excited state or for a set of degenerate states. Otherwise, some origin effects can be observed in the spectrum. At the HT level, RROA spectrum is origin dependent even when the polarizabilities are evaluated from a single excited state but the origin effect is expected to be small in this case. Numerical calculations performed for (S)-methyloxirane, (2R,3R)-dimethyloxirane, and (R)-4-F-2-azetidinone at both FC and HT levels using the velocity representation of the electric dipole and quadrupole transition moments confirm the predictions of the theory and show the extent of origin effects and the effectiveness of suggested ways to remove them.

  5. A Turn-On Resonance Raman Scattering (BCS/Cu+) Sensor for Quantitative Determination of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Xue, Xiangxin; Jiang, Dayu; Yang, Jin; Zhao, Bing; Han, Xiao Xia; Mee Jung, Young

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a new method for the quantitative evaluation of proteins is developed using competitive resonance Raman spectroscopy. A chelation reaction between bathocuproine disulfonate (BCS) and Cu(+) which is reduced by proteins in an alkaline environment, is utilized to create a BCS-Cu(+) complex that has strong resonance Raman activity. As a result, the method presented here enables protein detection over a much wider concentration range than conventional methods. Furthermore, the resonance Raman-based method can provide an improved lower limit of detection (500 pg/mL) compared to that obtained by colorimetric and ultraviolet- (UV-) based methods. Additionally, protein-to-protein variation can be determined using a standard curve created from known concentrations of bovine serum albumin (BSA), and excellent protein recovery is observed. More importantly, the proposed method was employing to the real sample (fetal bovine serum [FBS]). Based on the calibration curve from this method, it is extremely accurate for the determination of total protein concentrations in FBS. Results of this study demonstrate that the proposed method provides a novel and highly sensitive protocol for reagent-based protein assays.

  6. Theoretical studies of Resonance Enhanced Stimulated Raman Scattering (RESRS) of frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser wavelength in cesium vapor. Progress report, January-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Lawandy, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    The solutions for the imaginary susceptibility of the Raman field transition with arbitrary relaxation rates and field strengths are examined for three different sets of relaxation rates. These rates correspond to: (1) Far Infrared (FIR) Raman lasers in the diabatic collision regime without consideration of coupled population decay in a closed system, (2) Raman FIR lasers in the diabatic collision regime with coupled population conserving decay, and (3) IR Raman gain in cesium vapor. The model is further expanded to include Doppler broadening and used to predict the peak gain as a function of detuning for a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser-pumped cesium vapor gain cell.

  7. Correlation between vibrational frequencies and hydrogen bonding states of the guanine ring studied by UV resonance Raman spectroscopy of 2'-deoxy-3',5'-bis(triisopropylsilyl)guanosine dissolved in various solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, Akira; Hamuara, Mutsuo; Takeuchi, Hideo

    1996-06-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra of 2'-deoxy-3',5'-bis(triisopropylsilyl)guanosine (TPS-dGuo) were recorded in non-hydrogen bonding, proton acceptor, and proton donor/acceptor solvents. Raman spectral changes observed on going from inert to proton acceptor solvents were ascribed to the hydrogen bonding at the proton donor sites of the guanine ring (N1H and C2NH 2), and the spectral changes associated with the solvent change from proton acceptor to donor/acceptor were ascribed to the hydrogen bonding at the proton acceptor sites (N3, C6O, and N7). A Raman band appearing at 1624 cm -1 in inert solvents is assigned mainly to the NH 2 scissors mode and its frequency changes to ≈ 1640 cm -1 in acceptor solvents, reflecting the hydrogen bonding at C2NH 2. Another band at 1581 cm -1, arising largely from the N1H bend, shows an upshift of ≈ 10 cm -1 upon hydrogen bonding at either N1H or acceptor sites. Hydrogen bonding at the acceptor sites also produces frequency shifts of other Raman bands (at 1710, 1565, 1528, 1481, and 1154 cm -1 in 1,2-dichloroethane solution). Among the Raman bands listed above, the 1710 cm -1 band due to the C6O stretch decreases in frequency, whereas the others increase. The downshift of the C6O stretching frequency is correlated with the strength of hydrogen bonding at C6O. The frequency of the 1481 cm -1 band increases with a decrease of the C6O stretching frequency, indicating that the 1481 cm -1 band is also a marker of hydrogen bonding at C6O. This finding is in sharp contrast to the previously proposed correlation with the hydrogen bonding at N7. The 1565 cm -1 band is assigned to a vibration mainly involving the N1C2N3 linkage, and its frequency increases with increasing strength of the hydrogen bond at N3. Three bands around 1315, 1180, and 1030 cm -1, which are known to be sensitive to the ribose ring puckering and glycosidic bond orientation, also show small frequency changes upon hydrogen

  8. Pre-resonance Raman spectra of some simple gases. [sulfur oxides, hydrogen sulfide, and nitrogen oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    The pre-resonance Raman spectra of SO2, N2O, and H2S were investigated using the 4880 A, 4727 A, and 4579 A lines of the argon ion laser. Although these molecules have electronic absorption bands in the near ultraviolet, none exhibit any pre-resonance enhancement within our experimental error of + or - 10%. Possible explanations taking into account the current theories for resonance Raman are discussed.

  9. Exploring the potential of Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of duplex DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, H. G.; Bass, A.; Addison, C.; Hughesman, C.; So, A. P.; Haynes, C. A.; Blades, M. W.; Turner, R. F. B.

    2005-09-01

    Advances in DNA microarray fabrication technologies, expanding probe libraries, and new bioinformatics methods and resources have firmly established array-based techniques as mainstream bioanalytical tools and the application space is proliferating rapidly. However, the capability of these tools to yield truly quantitative information remains limited, primarily due to problems inherent to the use of fluorescence imaging for reading the hybridized arrays. The obvious advantages of fluorescence are the unrivaled sensitivity and simplicity of the instrumentation. There are disadvantages of this approach, however, such as difficulties in achieving optimal labeling of targets and reproducible signals (due to quenching, resonance energy transfer, photobleaching effects, etc.) that undermine precision. We are exploring alternative approaches, based mainly on Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy, that in principle permit direct analysis of structural differences between hybridized and unhybridized probes, thereby eliminating the need for labeling the target analytes. We report here on the status of efforts to evaluate the potential of these methods based on a combination of measured data and simulated experiments involving short (12-mer) ssDNA oligomer probes with varying degrees of hybridized target DNA. Preliminary results suggest that it may be possible to determine the fraction of duplex probes within a single register on a DNA microarray from 100% down to 10% (or possibly less) with a precision of +/-2 5%. Details of the methods used, their implementation, and their potential advantages and limitations are presented, along with discussion of the utility of using 2DCOS methods to emphasize small spectral changes sensitive to interstrand H bonding, backbone flexibility, hypochromicity due to base-stacking in duplex structures and solvation effects.

  10. High-sensitivity pesticide detection using particle-enhanced resonant Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Bikas; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2016-03-01

    The use of pesticides in agriculture has raised concerns, as even a small residual of pesticide on food can be harmful. It is therefore of great importance to develop a robust technique to detect tiny amounts of pesticides. Although Raman spectroscopy is frequently used for chemical identification, it is not suitable for extremely low molecular concentrations. We propose a technique called particle-enhanced resonant Raman spectroscopy to detect extremely low concentrations of pesticides, where gold nanoparticles of desired plasmonic resonance are synthesized to match the resonance in Raman scattering. We successfully demonstrated the detection of extremely low amounts of pesticides on oranges.

  11. Near-Field Enhanced UV Resonance Raman Spectroscopy Using Aluminum Bow-tie Nano-antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ling; Lim, Shuang Fang; Puretzky, Alexander A; Riehn, Robert; Hallen, Hans

    2012-01-01

    An aluminum bow-tie nano-antenna is combined with the resonance Raman eect in the deep ultraviolet to dramatically increase the sensitivity of Raman spectra to a small volume of material, such as benzene used here. We further demonstrate gradient-eld Raman peaks for several strong IR modes. We achieve a gain of 105 in signal intensity from the near eld enhancement due to the surface plasmon resonance in the aluminum nanostructure. The on-line resonance enhancement contributes another factor of several thousands, limited by the laser line width. Thus, an overall gain of hundreds of million is achieved.

  12. Rapidly reconfigurable slow-light system based on off-resonant Raman absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vudyasetu, Praveen K.; Camacho, Ryan M.; Howell, John C.

    2010-11-01

    We present a slow-light system based on dual Raman absorption resonances in warm rubidium vapor. Each Raman absorption resonance is produced by a control beam in an off-resonant Λ system. This system combines all optical control of the Raman absorption and the low-dispersion broadening properties of the double Lorentzian absorption slow light. The bandwidth, group delay, and central frequency of the slow-light system can all be tuned dynamically by changing the properties of the control beam. We demonstrate multiple pulse delays with low distortion and show that such a system has fast switching dynamics and thus fast reconfiguration rates.

  13. Resonance raman spectroscopy of an ultraviolet-sensitive insect rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.; Deng, H.; Rath, P.; Callender, R.H.; Schwemer, J.

    1987-11-17

    The authors present the first visual pigment resonance Raman spectra from the UV-sensitive eyes of an insect, Ascalaphus macaronius (owlfly). This pigment contains 11-cis-retinal as the chromophore. Raman data have been obtained for the acid metarhodopsin at 10/sup 0/C in both H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O. The C=N stretching mode at 1660 cm/sup -1/ in H/sub 2/O shifts to 1631 cm/sup -1/ upon deuteriation of the sample, clearly showing a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein. The structure-sensitive fingerprint region shows similarities to the all-trans-protonated Schiff base of model retinal chromophores, as well as to the octopus acid metarhodopsin and bovine metarhodopsin I. Although spectra measured at -100/sup 0/C with 406.7-nm excitation, to enhance scattering from rhodopsin (lambda/sub max/ 345 nm), contain a significant contribution from a small amount of contaminants (cytochrome(s) and/or accessory pigment) in the sample, the C=N stretch at 1664 cm/sup -1/ suggests a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein in rhodopsin as well. For comparison, this mode also appears at approx. 1660 cm/sup -1/ in both the vertebrate (bovine) and the invertebrate (octopus) rhodopsins. These data are particularly interesting since the absorption maximum of 345 nm for rhodopsin might be expected to originate from an unprotonated Schiff base linkage. That the Schiff base linkage in the owlfly rhodopsin, like in bovine and in octopus, is protonated suggests that a charged chromophore is essential to visual transduction.

  14. Theory and method for calculating resonance Raman scattering from resonance polarizability derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, L.; Zhao, L. L.; Autschbach, J.; Schatz, G. C.

    2005-11-01

    We present a method to calculate both normal Raman-scattering (NRS) and resonance Raman-scattering (RRS) spectra from the geometrical derivatives of the frequency-dependent polarizability. In the RRS case, the polarizability derivatives are calculated from resonance polarizabilities by including a finite lifetime of the electronic excited states using time-dependent density-functional theory. The method is a short-time approximation to the Kramers, Heisenberg, and Dirac formalism. It is similar to the simple excited-state gradient approximation method if only one electronic excited state is important, however, it is not restricted to only one electronic excited state. Since the method can be applied to both NRS and RRS, it can be used to obtain complete Raman excitation profiles. To test the method we present the results for the S2 state of uracil and the S4,S3, and S2 states of pyrene. As expected, the results are almost identical to the results obtained from the excited-state gradient approximation method. Comparing with the experimental results, we find in general quite good agreement which enables an assignment of the experimental bands to bands in the calculated spectrum. For uracil the inclusion of explicit waters in the calculations was found to be necessary to match the solution spectra. The calculated resonance enhancements are on the order of 104-106, which is in agreement with experimental findings. For pyrene the method is also able to distinguish between the three different electronic states for which experimental data are available. The neglect of anharmonicity and solvent effects in the calculations leads to some discrepancy between theory and experiment.

  15. Resonant Raman detectors for noninvasive assessment of carotenoid antioxidants in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellermann, Werner; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakova, Maia R.; Ermakov, Igor V.; Bernstein, P. S.

    2003-07-01

    Carotenoid antioxidants form an important part of the human body's anti-oxidant system and are thought to play an important role in disease prevention. Studies have shown an inverse correlation between high dietary intake of carotenoids and risk of certain cancers, heart disease and degenerative diseases. For example, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, which are present in high concentrations in the human retina, are thought to prevent age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the Western world. We have developed various clinical prototype instruments, based on resonance Raman spectroscopy, that are able to measure carotenoid levels directly in the tissue of interest. At present we use the Raman technology to quantify carotenoid levels in the human retina, in skin, and in the oral cavity. We use resonant excitation of the π-conjugated molecules in the visible wavelength range and detect the molecules' carbon-carbon stretch frequencies. The spectral properties of the various carotenoids can be explored to selectively measure in some cases individual carotenoid species linked ot the prevention of cancer, in human skin. The instrumentation involves home-built, compact, high-throughput Raman systems capable of measuring physiological carotenoid concentrations in human subjects rapidly and quantitatively. The instruments have been demonstrated for field use and screening of tissue carotenoid status in large populations. In Epidemiology, the technology holds promise as a novel, noninvasive and objective biomarker of fruit and vegetable uptake.

  16. Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy of explosives in solution and the solid state.

    PubMed

    Emmons, Erik D; Tripathi, Ashish; Guicheteau, Jason A; Fountain, Augustus W; Christesen, Steven D

    2013-05-23

    Resonance Raman cross sections of common explosives have been measured by use of excitation wavelengths in the deep-UV from 229 to 262 nm. These measurements were performed both in solution and in the native solid state for comparison. While measurements of UV Raman cross sections in solution with an internal standard are straightforward and commonly found in the literature, measurements on the solid phase are rare. This is due to the difficulty in preparing a solid sample in which the molecules of the internal standard and absorbing analyte/explosive experience the same laser intensity. This requires producing solid samples that are mixtures of strongly absorbing explosives and an internal standard transparent at the UV wavelengths used. For the solid-state measurements, it is necessary to use nanostructured mixtures of the explosive and the internal standard in order to avoid this bias due to the strong UV absorption of the explosive. In this study we used a facile spray-drying technique where the analyte of interest was codeposited with the nonresonant standard onto an aluminum-coated microscope slide. The generated resonance enhancement profiles and quantitative UV-vis absorption spectra were then used to plot the relative Raman return as a function of excitation wavelength and particle size.

  17. Study of virus by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moor, K.; Kitamura, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Sawa, M.; Andriana, B. B.; Ohtani, K.; Yagura, T.; Sato, H.

    2013-02-01

    Problem of viruses is very actual for nowadays. Some viruses, which are responsible for human of all tumors, are about 15 %. Main purposes this study, early detection virus in live cell without labeling and in the real time by Raman spectroscopy. Micro Raman spectroscopy (mRs) is a technique that uses a Raman spectrometer to measure the spectra of microscopic samples. According to the Raman spectroscopy, it becomes possible to study the metabolites of a live cultured cell without labeling. We used mRs to detect the virus via HEK 293 cell line-infected adenovirus. We obtained raman specters of lives cells with viruses in 24 hours and 7 days after the infection. As the result, there is some biochemical changing after the treatment of cell with virus. One of biochemical alteration is at 1081 cm-1. For the clarification result, we use confocal fluorescent microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  18. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering from methylviologen at a silver electrode: Evidence for two distinct adsorption interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Qiao; Yue, W.; Cotton, T.M. )

    1990-03-08

    The electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectra of methylviologen radical cation (MV{sup {sm bullet}+}) and fully reduced methylviologen (MV{sup 0}) have been characterized. The enhancement of Raman and resonance Raman (RR) scattering from the dication and its reduction products at polished and roughened silver electrodes was also investigated.

  19. Intercalation between antitumor anthracyclines and DNA as probed by resonance and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smulevich, G.; Mantini, A. R.; Casu, M.; Marzocchi, M. P.

    1991-05-01

    The antiturnor anthracyclincs, idarubicin (IDA ), adrianiycin (ADM), epirubicin (EPI), carminomycin (CAR) and 1 1-deoxycarminornycin (DCM), whose siructural formula includes a substituted hydroxyanthraquirionc chrornophore and a sugar residue, form intercalation complexes with DNA. The stacking interaction between the chromophore and the base-pairs of DNA gives rise to noticeable ciTects on resonance Raman (RR) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERRS) scattering as well as on the absorption (ABS), its second derivative (D2) and fluorescence emission (FEM) spectra.

  20. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  1. Coherent Raman scattering with incoherent light for a multiply resonant mixture: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, Jason C.; Ulness, Darin J.; Stimson, Michael J.; Albrecht, A. C.

    1998-02-01

    The theory for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) with broadband incoherent light is presented for a multiply resonant, multicomponent mixture of molecules that exhibits simultaneous multiple resonances with the frequencies of the driving fields. All possible pairwise hyperpolarizability contributions to the signal intensity are included in the theoretical treatment-(resonant-resonant, resonant-nonresonant, and nonresonant-nonresonant correlations between chromophores) and it is shown how the different types of correlations manifest themselves as differently behaved components of the signal intensity. The Raman resonances are modeled as Lorentzians in the frequency domain, as is the spectral density of the incoherent light. The analytic results for this multiply resonant mixture are presented and applied to a specific binary mixture. These analytic results will be used to recover frequencies and dephasing times in a series of experiments on multiply resonant mixtures.

  2. Ultrasensitive protein detection in terms of multiphonon resonance Raman scattering in ZnS nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xueying; Hong, Xia; Zou, Peng; Men, Jing; Liu, Yichun

    2011-06-01

    Ultrasensitive protein detection was realized using multiphonon Resonance Raman scattering in ZnS nanocrystals. The longitudinal optical phonon line of ZnS and its overtones, which are called multiphonon Raman lines (MRLs), were used as the Raman probe signals. MRLs have a narrow bandwidth, high stability in aqueous solution, and strong resistance to interference from surface variations. Our results show that these features allow for reliable biodetection with good selectivity and high specificity. The detection limit is about 5 fM. This Raman scattering-based methodology will greatly extend the potential applications for ZnS in the biomedical sciences.

  3. Nanoshock wave resonance enhancement on stimulated Raman scattering of H(2)O(2) in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhanlong; Li, Hongdong; Fang, Wenhui; Wang, Shenghan; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of H(2)O(2)-H(2)O mixtures. The laser-induced plasma nanoshock wave is formed by focusing an intense pulsed 532 nm laser beam on the mixtures. An enhancement at the low-frequency 1715  cm(-1) SRS line of the bending mode of H(2)O(2) is observed. The mechanism of enhancement was attributed to nanoshock wave resonance with the bending mode, which would preferentially excite phonon and lower energy molecular vibrations. PMID:26512509

  4. Deep UV resonance Raman spectroscopy of β-sheet amyloid fibrils: a QM/MM simulation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hao; Jiang, Jun; Mukamel, Shaul

    2011-12-01

    We present a combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics study of the deep ultraviolet ππ* resonance Raman spectra of β-sheet amyloid fibrils Aβ(34-42) and Aβ(1-40). Effects of conformational fluctuations are described using a Ramachandran angle map, thus avoiding repeated ab initio calculations. Experimentally observed effects of hydrogen-deuterium exchange are reproduced. We propose that the AmIII band redshift upon deuteration is caused by the loss of coupling between C(α)-H bending and N-D bending modes, rather than by peptide bond hydration.

  5. Evidence for pyrroloquinolinequinone as the carbonyl cofactor in lysyl oxidase by absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Williamson, P R; Moog, R S; Dooley, D M; Kagan, H M

    1986-12-15

    The present study investigated the possibility that pyrroloquinolinequinone (PQQ), an aromatic carbonyl recently indicated to be the carbonyl cofactor in bovine plasma amine oxidase, may also be present at the active site of lysyl oxidase. The absorption and resonance Raman spectra of the phenylhydrazones of bovine plasma amine oxidase, of peptides derived from the active site of bovine aorta lysyl oxidase, and of PQQ were very similar, indicating that the carbonyl cofactor of lysyl oxidase is PQQ or a compound which closely resembles PQQ.

  6. Nanoshock wave resonance enhancement on stimulated Raman scattering of H(2)O(2) in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhanlong; Li, Hongdong; Fang, Wenhui; Wang, Shenghan; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of H(2)O(2)-H(2)O mixtures. The laser-induced plasma nanoshock wave is formed by focusing an intense pulsed 532 nm laser beam on the mixtures. An enhancement at the low-frequency 1715  cm(-1) SRS line of the bending mode of H(2)O(2) is observed. The mechanism of enhancement was attributed to nanoshock wave resonance with the bending mode, which would preferentially excite phonon and lower energy molecular vibrations.

  7. Intensity Ratio of Resonant Raman Modes for (n , m) Enriched Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Yanmei; Simpson, Jeffrey; Streit, Jason; Ao, Geyou; Fagan, Jeffrey; Hight Walker, Angela

    Relative intensities of resonant Raman spectral features, specifically the radial breathing mode (RBM) and G modes, of eleven, chirality-enriched, single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) species were established under second-order optical transition excitation. The results demonstrate a significantly under-recognized complexity in the evaluation of Raman spectra for the assignment of (n , m) population distributions. Strong chiral angle and mod dependencies affect the intensity ratio of the RBM to G modes and can result in misleading interpretations. Furthermore, we report five additional values for chirality dependent G+ and G- Raman peak positions and intensities, supporting accuracy in literature values, and extending the available data to cover more of the small diameter regime by including the first (5,4) second-order, resonance Raman spectra. Together, the Raman spectral library is demonstrated to be sufficient for decoupling multiple species via a spectral fitting process, and enable fundamental characterization even in mixed chiral population samples.

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS): a review of applications.

    PubMed

    McNay, Graeme; Eustace, David; Smith, W Ewen; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan

    2011-08-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) can provide positive identification of an analyte or an analyte mixture with high sensitivity and selectivity. Better understanding of the theory and advances in the understanding of the practice have led to the development of practical applications in which the unique advantages of SERS/SERRS have been used to provide effective solutions to difficult analytical problems. This review presents a basic theory and illustrates the way in which SERS/SERRS has been developed for practical use.

  9. Decay dynamics of α,β-carboxylic methyl esters (CH3OCOCH:CHR) in the lower-lying excited states--resonance Raman and complete active space self-consistent field calculation study.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Bing; Xue, Jia-Dan; Zheng, Xuming; Xie, Bin-Bin; Fang, Wei-Hai

    2014-10-01

    The photophysics of two α,β-carboxylic methyl esters after excitation to the light absorbing S2(ππ(*)) state were studied by using the resonance Raman spectroscopy and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method calculations. The vibrational spectra were assigned on the basis of the experimental measurements and the B3LYP/6-31G(d) computations, as well as the normal mode analysis. The A-band resonance Raman spectra of methyl 2,4-pentadienoate (M24PDA) and methyl trans cronoate (MTCA) were measured to probe the structural dynamics in Franck-Condon region. CASSCF calculations were done to obtain the minimal excitation energies and geometric structures of the lower-lying singlet and triplet excited states, and the curve-crossing points. It was revealed that the short-time structural dynamics of M24PDA was dominated by the Cα=Cβ-C4=C5 stretch coordinate, while that of MTCA was mostly along the Cα=Cβ and the C=O stretch motion. Comparison of the structural dynamics of M24PDA and MTCA with that of 3-methyl-3-pentene-2-one (3M3P2O) indicated that the structural dynamics of MTCA is similar to that of 3M3P2O but different than that of M24PDA in that the variation of the Raman intensity ratios for ν7/ν8, (ν7+ν8)/2ν8, (ν7+2ν8)/3ν8, (ν7+3ν8)/4ν8 of MTCA is similar to that of 3M3P2O but different from that of M24PDA. It is found that the substitution of methyl group in the α(')-position of α,β-enones by methoxyl group does not substantially affect the short-time structural dynamics, while the substitution of vinyl group in the β-position changes significantly the short-time structural dynamics and the subsequent decay processes. A detailed decay mechanism is proposed. Two sub-processes which consider the reconjugation and the subsequent charge-transfer reaction of O=C-Cα=Cβ chromophore were postulated to describe the variation of short-time structural dynamics with the different substitution.

  10. Resonant stimulation of Raman scattering from single-crystal thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagi, Hisao Marutani, Yusuke; Matsuoka, Naoki; Hiramatsu, Toru; Ishizumi, Atsushi; Sasaki, Fumio; Hotta, Shu

    2013-12-09

    Amplified Raman scattering was observed from single crystals of thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers (TPCOs). Under ns-pulsed excitation, the TPCO crystals exhibited amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) at resonant absorption wavelengths. With increasing excitation wavelength to the 0-0 absorption edge, the stimulated resonant Raman peaks appeared both in the 0-1 and 0-2 ASE band regions. When the excitation wavelength coincided with the 0-1 ASE band energy, the Raman peaks selectively appeared in the 0-2 ASE band. Such unusual enhancement of the 0-2 Raman scattering was ascribed to resonant stimulation via vibronic coupling with electronic transitions in the uniaxially oriented TPCO molecules.

  11. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-06-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging.

  12. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging. PMID:27339882

  13. Continuous-wave deep ultraviolet sources for resonance Raman explosive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellampalle, Balakishore; Martin, Robert; Sluch, Mikhail; McCormick, William; Ice, Robert; Lemoff, Brian

    2015-05-01

    A promising approach to stand-off detection of explosive traces is using resonance Raman spectroscopy with Deepultraviolet (DUV) light. The DUV region offers two main advantages: strong explosive signatures due to resonant and λ- 4 enhancement of Raman cross-section, and lack of fluorescence and solar background. For DUV Raman spectroscopy, continuous-wave (CW) or quasi-CW lasers are preferable to high peak powered pulsed lasers because Raman saturation phenomena and sample damage can be avoided. In this work we present a very compact DUV source that produces greater than 1 mw of CW optical power. The source has high optical-to-optical conversion efficiency, greater than 5 %, as it is based on second harmonic generation (SHG) of a blue/green laser source using a nonlinear crystal placed in an external resonant enhancement cavity. The laser system is extremely compact, lightweight, and can be battery powered. Using two such sources, one each at 236.5 nm and 257.5 nm, we are building a second generation explosive detection system called Dual-Excitation-Wavelength Resonance-Raman Detector (DEWRRED-II). The DEWRRED-II system also includes a compact dual-band high throughput DUV spectrometer, and a highly-sensitive detection algorithm. The DEWRRED technique exploits the DUV excitation wavelength dependence of Raman signal strength, arising from complex interplay of resonant enhancement, self-absorption and laser penetration depth. We show sensor measurements from explosives/precursor materials at different standoff distances.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  15. Characterization of carotenoids in soil bacteria and investigation of their photodegradation by UVA radiation via resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kumar B N, Vinay; Kampe, Bernd; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    A soil habitat consists of an enormous number of pigmented bacteria with the pigments mainly composed of diverse carotenoids. Most of the pigmented bacteria in the top layer of the soil are photoprotected from exposure to huge amounts of UVA radiation on a daily basis by these carotenoids. The photostability of these carotenoids depends heavily on the presence of specific features like a carbonyl group or an ionone ring system on its overall structure. Resonance Raman spectroscopy is one of the most sensitive and powerful techniques to detect and characterize these carotenoids and also monitor processes associated with them in their native system at a single cell resolution. However, most of the resonance Raman profiles of carotenoids have very minute differences, thereby making it extremely difficult to confirm if these differences are attributed to the presence of different carotenoids or if it is a consequence of their interaction with other cellular components. In this study, we devised a method to overcome this problem by monitoring also the photodegradation of the carotenoids in question by UVA radiation wherein a differential photodegradation response will confirm the presence of different carotenoids irrespective of the proximities in their resonance Raman profiles. Using this method, the detection and characterization of carotenoids in pure cultures of five species of pigmented coccoid soil bacteria is achieved. We also shed light on the influence of the structure of the carotenoid on its photodegradation which can be exploited for use in the characterization of carotenoids via resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  16. [Raman spectrum study on turquoise].

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan-Li; Qi, Li-Jian; Chen, Jing-Zhong

    2009-02-01

    The Raman spectrum has been employed to discuss the explanation of the structure of water and the vibration of [PO4(3-)] tetrahedron of the turquoise from Hubei and Anhui province. The Raman spectra are resulted mainly from vibrations of water, hydroxyl units and [PO4(3-)] tetrahedron of turquoise. The 3 510-3 440 cm(-1) bands with the main Raman spectra peak at 3 470 cm(-1) were assigned to the upsilon(OH) stretching vibrations and the 3 290-3 070 cm(-1) bands assigned to the upsilon(H2O) stretching vibrations. The bands observed at 1 200-1 030 cm(-1) with the strong peak at 1 039 cm(-1) were assigned to upsilon3 (PO4) antisymmetric stretching vibrations. And the Raman spectra peaks at 650-540 cm(-1) and 500-410 cm(-1) were attributed to the upsilon4 and upsilon2 bending vibrations of [PO4(3-)] tetrahedron, respectively. The spectra of the turquoise from different localities are basically similar and subtly different.

  17. Exploring the Potential of Stable Isotope (Resonance) Raman Microspectroscopy and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering for the Analysis of Microorganisms at Single Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Kubryk, Patrick; Kölschbach, Janina S; Marozava, Sviatlana; Lueders, Tillmann; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Niessner, Reinhard; Ivleva, Natalia P

    2015-07-01

    Raman microspectroscopy is a prime tool to characterize the molecular and isotopic composition of microbial cells. However, low sensitivity and long acquisition times limit a broad applicability of the method in environmental analysis. In this study, we explore the potential, the applicability, and the limitations of stable isotope Raman microspectroscopy (SIRM), resonance SIRM, and SIRM in combination with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the characterization of single bacterial cells. The latter two techniques have the potential to significantly increase sensitivity and decrease measurement times in SIRM, but to date, there are no (SERS-SIRM) or only a limited number (resonance SIRM) of studies in environmental microbiology. The analyzed microorganisms were grown with substrates fully labeled with the stable isotopes (13)C or (2)H and compounds with natural abundance of atomic isotopes ((12)C 98.89% or (1)H 99.9844%, designated as (12)C or (1)H, respectively). Raman bands of bacterial cell compounds in stable isotope-labeled microorganisms exhibited a characteristic red-shift in the spectra. In particular, the sharp phenylalanine band was found to be an applicable marker band for SIRM analysis of the Deltaproteobacterium strain N47 growing anaerobically on (13)C-naphthalene. The study of G. metallireducens grown with (13)C- and (2)H-acetate showed that the information on the chromophore cytochrome c obtained by resonance SIRM at 532 nm excitation wavelength can be successfully complemented by whole-organism fingerprints of bacteria cells achieved by regular SIRM after photobleaching. Furthermore, we present here for the first time the reproducible SERS analysis of microbial cells labeled with stable isotopes. Escherichia coli strain DSM 1116 cultivated with (12)C- or (13)C-glucose was used as a model organism. Silver nanoparticles synthesized in situ were applied as SERS media. We observed a reproducible red-shift of an adenine-related marker band

  18. High-resolution inverse Raman and resonant-wave-mixing spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, L.A.

    1993-12-01

    These research activities consist of high-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy (IRS) and resonant wave-mixing spectroscopy to support the development of nonlinear-optical techniques for temperature and concentration measurements in combustion research. Objectives of this work include development of spectral models of important molecular species needed to perform coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements and the investigation of new nonlinear-optical processes as potential diagnostic techniques. Some of the techniques being investigated include frequency-degenerate and nearly frequency-degenerate resonant four-wave-mixing (DFWM and NDFWM), and resonant multi-wave mixing (RMWM).

  19. Visualizing resonances in the complex plane with vibrational phase contrast coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Jurna, Martin; Garbacik, Erik T; Korterik, Jeroen P; Herek, Jennifer L; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L

    2010-09-15

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the emitted signal carries both amplitude and phase information of the molecules in the focal volume. Most CARS experiments ignore the phase component, but its detection allows for two advantages over intensity-only CARS. First, the pure resonant response can be determined, and the nonresonant background rejected, by extracting the imaginary component of the complex response, enhancing the sensitivity of CARS measurements. Second, selectivity is increased via determination of the phase and amplitude, allowing separation of individual molecular components of a sample even when their vibrational bands overlap. Here, using vibrational phase contrast CARS (VPC-CARS), we demonstrate enhanced sensitivity in quantitative measurements of ethanol/methanol mixtures and increased selectivity in a heterogeneous mixture of plastics and water. This powerful technique opens a wide range of possibilities for studies of complicated systems where overlapping resonances limit standard methodologies. PMID:20731373

  20. Zeaxanthin ([3R,3'R]-beta, beta-carotene-3-3'diol) as a resonance Raman and visible absorption probe of membrane structure.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, R; Van Holten, R W

    1979-01-01

    When zeaxanthin ([3R,3R']-beta, beta-carotene-3,3'diol) is inserted into phospholipid dispersions and the latter heated through their gel-liquid crystal phase transitions, large changes are noted in the resonance Raman and absorption spectra of the carotenoid molecule. By analogy with the data of Carey and co-workers (J. Raman Spectrosc. 6:282) who studied the aggregation of zeaxanthin in acetone-water solutions, it is suggested that the carotenoid aggregates in the phospholipid gel state while forming a monomer in liquid crystal phases. The alterations in both the visible absorption and resonance Raman data have been used to monitor phospholipid phase behavior in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and distearoylphosphatidylcholine, (DSPC) one-component systems and binary mixtures. The phase diagram obtained for the binary system, as constructed from visible absorption and resonance Raman data, is compared with that of Shimshick and McConnell (Biochemistry. 12:2351) obtained from electron spin resonance (ESR) studies. Although the agreement between absorption and ESR data is generally satisfactory, onset temperatures for phase separation at low DSPC mole fractions deduced from resonance Raman measurements are several degrees lower than those from the other methods. Nevertheless, the use of zeaxanthin as a resonance Raman and visible absorption probe behavior will be useful in some situations where ordinary Raman spectroscopic data cannot be obtained easily. The advantage of the resonance Raman approach is illustrated in a study of the phase behavior of a phospholipid extract of a cel- mutant of Neurospora crassa. A phase separation region is observed with onset and completion temperatures of -19 and -6 degrees C, respectively. PMID:162448

  1. Rapid-flow resonance Raman spectroscopy of bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed Central

    Shreve, A P; Cherepy, N J; Franzen, S; Boxer, S G; Mathies, R A

    1991-01-01

    Rapid-flow resonance Raman vibrational spectra of bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers from the R-26 mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides have been obtained by using excitation wavelengths (810-910 nm) resonant with the lowest energy, photochemically active electronic absorption. The technique of shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy is used to identify genuine Raman scattering bands in the presence of a large fluorescence background. The comparison of spectra obtained from untreated reaction centers and from reaction centers treated with the oxidant K3Fe(CN)6 demonstrates that resonance enhancement is obtained from the special pair. Relatively strong Raman scattering is observed for special pair vibrations with frequencies of 36, 94, 127, 202, 730, and 898 cm-1; other modes are observed at 71, 337, and 685 cm-1. Qualitative Raman excitation profiles are reported for some of the strong modes, and resonance enhancement is observed to occur throughout the near-IR absorption band of the special pair. These Raman data determine which vibrations are coupled to the optical absorption in the special pair and, thus, probe the nuclear motion that occurs after electronic excitation. Implications for the interpretation of previous hole-burning experiments and for the excited-state dynamics and photochemistry of reaction centers are discussed. PMID:1763034

  2. Raman spectroscopic studies on bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maquelin, Kees; Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Endtz, Hubert P.; Bruining, Hajo A.; Puppels, Gerwin J.

    2000-11-01

    Routine clinical microbiological identification of pathogenic micro-organisms is largely based on nutritional and biochemical tests. Laboratory results can be presented to a clinician after 2 - 3 days for most clinically relevant micro- organisms. Most of this time is required to obtain pure cultures and enough biomass for the tests to be performed. In the case of severely ill patients, this unavoidable time delay associated with such identification procedures can be fatal. A novel identification method based on confocal Raman microspectroscopy will be presented. With this method it is possible to obtain Raman spectra directly from microbial microcolonies on the solid culture medium, which have developed after only 6 hours of culturing for most commonly encountered organisms. Not only does this technique enable rapid (same day) identifications, but also preserves the sample allowing it to be double-checked with traditional tests. This, combined with the speed and minimal sample handling indicate that confocal Raman microspectroscopy has much potential as a powerful new tool in clinical diagnostic microbiology.

  3. Double resonance surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates: an intuitive coupled oscillator model.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yizhuo; Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2011-08-01

    The strong coupling between localized surface plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons in a double resonance surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate is described by a classical coupled oscillator model. The effects of the particle density, the particle size and the SiO2 spacer thickness on the coupling strength are experimentally investigated. We demonstrate that by tuning the geometrical parameters of the double resonance substrate, we can readily control the resonance frequencies and tailor the SERS enhancement spectrum. PMID:21934853

  4. Laser Raman Spectroscopy in studies of corrosion and electrocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Melendres, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser Raman Spectroscopy (LRS) has become an important tool for the in-situ structural study of electrochemical systems and processes in recent years. Following a brief introduction of the experimental techniques involved in applying LRS to electrochemical systems, we survey the literature for examples of studies in the inhibition of electrode reactions by surface films (e.g., corrosion and passivation phenomena) as well as the acceleration of reactions by electro-sorbates (electrocatalysis). We deal mostly with both normal and resonance Raman effects on fairly thick surface films in contrast to surface-enhanced Raman investigations of monolayer adsorbates, which is covered in another lecture. Laser Raman spectroelectrochemical studies of corrosion and film formation on such metals as Pb, Ag, Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, Au, stainless steel, etc. in various solution conditions are discussed. Further extension of the technique to studies in high-temperature and high-pressure aqueous environments is demonstrated. Results of studies of the structure of corrosion inhibitors are also presented. As applications of the LRS technique in the area of electrocatalysis, we cite studies of the structure of transition metal macrocyclic compounds, i.e., phthalocyanines and porphyrins, used for catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. 104 refs., 20 figs.

  5. Stand-off detection of explosives vapors by resonance-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Ida; Ceco, Ema; Ehlerding, Anneli; Östmark, Henric

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes a system for stand-off vapor detection based on Resonant Raman spectroscopy, RRS. The system is a step towards a RRS LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system, capable of detecting vapors from explosives and explosives precursors at long distances. The current system was used to detect the vapor of nitromethane and mononitrotoluene outdoors in the open air, at a stand-off distance of 11-13 meters. Also, the signal dependence upon irradiation wavelength and sample concentration was studied in controlled laboratory conditions. A tunable Optical Parametric Oscillator pumped by an Nd:YAG laser, with a pulse length of 6 ns, was operated in the UV range of interest, 210-400 nm, illuminating the sample vapor. The backscattered Raman signal was collected by a telescope and a roundto- slit optical fiber was used to transmit collected light to the spectrometer with minimum losses. A gated intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) registered the spectra. The nitromethane cross section was resonance enhanced more than a factor 30 700, when measured at 220 nm, compared to the 532 nm value. The results show that a decrease in concentration can have a positive effect on the sensitivity of the system, due to a decrease in absorption and selfabsorption in the sample.

  6. Remote detection of trace effluents using Resonance Raman spectroscopy: Field results and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.

    1995-10-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many characteristics that are important for detecting, identifying and monitoring chemical effluents. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy h{nu} promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. Under resonance enhancement, the Raman scattering cross-sections have been observed to increase up to 6 orders of magnitude above the normal scattering cross-sections, thereby providing the practical basis for a remote chemical sensor. Some of the other advantages that a Raman sensor possesses are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints), (2) independence of the spectral fingerprint on the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region), (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk), (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid or solutions), (5) no absolute calibration is necessary because all Raman signals observed from a given species can be compared with the Raman signal for N{sub 2}, whose concentration is known very accurately, and (6) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching, or interference from water vapor). In this presentation, the technology of resonance Raman spectroscopy as applied to the detection of narcotics production activities will be presented along with some recent experimental results.

  7. Characterization of semiconductor core shell nanoparticles by resonant Raman scattering and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhagan, V. M.; Valakh, M. Ya.; Raevskaya, A. E.; Stroyuk, A. L.; Kuchmiy, S. Ya.; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2008-11-01

    Colloidal CdSe nanoparticles (NPs), passivated with CdS and ZnS, were characterized by resonant Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL). The effect of the passivating shell, its volume and formation procedure on optical and vibrational spectra is discussed. Analyzing the Raman peaks due to optical phonons inside the core and those related to the core-shell interface allows some understanding of the relation between the core-shell structure and its PL properties to be achieved. In particular, a compositional intermixing at the core/shell interface of the NPs was deduced from the Raman spectra, which can noticeably affect their PL intensity.

  8. Identifying or measuring selected substances or toxins in a subject using resonant raman signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Methods and systems of the present invention identify the presence of and/or the concentration of a selected analyte in a subject by: (a) illuminating a selected region of the eye of a subject with an optical excitation beam, wherein the excitation beam wavelength is selected to generate a resonant Raman spectrum of the selected analyte with a signal strength that is at least 100 times greater than Raman spectrums generated by non-resonant wavelengths and/or relative to signals of normal constituents present in the selected region of the eye; (b) detecting a resonant Raman spectrum corresponding to the selected illuminated region of the eye; and (c) identifying the presence, absence and/or the concentration of the selected analyte in the subject based on said detecting step. The apparatus may also be configured to be able to obtain biometric data of the eye to identify (confirm the identity of) the subject.

  9. Deep-UV surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering of adenine on aluminum nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Jha, Shankar K; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Agio, Mario; Ekinci, Yasin; Löffler, Jörg F

    2012-02-01

    We report the ultrasensitive detection of adenine using deep-UV surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering on aluminum nanostructures. Well-defined Al nanoparticle arrays fabricated over large areas using extreme-UV interference lithography exhibited sharp and tunable plasmon resonances in the UV and deep-UV wavelength ranges. Theoretical modeling based on the finite-difference time-domain method was used to understand the near-field and far-field optical properties of the nanoparticle arrays. Raman measurements were performed on adenine molecules coated uniformly on the Al nanoparticle arrays at a laser excitation wavelength of 257.2 nm. With this technique, less than 10 amol of label-free adenine molecules could be detected reproducibly in real time. Zeptomole (~30,000 molecules) detection sensitivity was readily achieved proving that deep-UV surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering is an extremely sensitive tool for the detection of biomolecules.

  10. Theory of resonant multiphonon Raman scattering in graphene monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basko, Denis; Aleiner, Igor

    2007-03-01

    The Raman spectrum of graphene consists of distinct narrow peaks corresponding to different optical phonon branches as well as their overtones [1]. We show how the relative intensities of the overtone peaks encode information about relative strengths of different inelastic scattering processes electrons are subject to. In particular, assuming that the most important processes are electron-phonon and electron-electron scattering, it is shown that one can deduce their relative interaction strengths from the Raman spectra. [1] A. C. Ferrari et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 187401 (2006); A. Gupta et al., cond-mat/0606593; D. Graf et al., cond-mat/0607562.

  11. Raman microspectroscopic study of oral buccal mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behl, Isha; Mamgain, Hitesh; Deshmukh, Atul; Kukreja, Lekha; Hole, Arti R.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Oral cancer is the most common cancer among Indian males, with 5-year- survival-rates of less than 50%. Efficacy of Raman spectroscopic methods in non-invasive and objective diagnosis of oral cancers and confounding factors has already been demonstrated. The present Raman microspectroscopic study was undertaken for in-depth and site-specific analysis of normal and tumor tissues. 10 normal and 10 tumors unstained sections from 20 tissues were accrued. Raman data of 160 x 60 μm and 140 x 140 μm in normal and tumor sections, respectively, were acquired using WITec alpha 300R equipped with 532 nm laser, 50X objective and 600 gr/mm grating. Spectral data were corrected for CCDresponse, background. First-derivitized and vector-normalized data were then subjected to K-mean cluster analysis to generate Raman maps and correlated with their respective histopathology. In normal sections, stratification among epithelial layers i.e. basal, intermediate, superficial was observed. Tumor, stromal and inflammatory regions were identified in case of tumor section. Extracted spectra of the pathologically annotated regions were subjected to Principal component analysis. Findings suggest that all three layers of normal epithelium can be differentiated against tumor cells. In epithelium, basal and superficial layers can be separated while intermediate layer show misclassifications. In tumors, discrimination of inflammatory regions from tumor cells and tumor-stroma regions were observed. Finding of the study indicate Raman mapping can lead to molecular level insights of normal and pathological states.

  12. Silica-coated gold nanostars for surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy mapping of integrins in breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenn, Michael B.; Roki, Nikša.; Bashur, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (SERRS) has great potential for improving cancer research and diagnosis. Capable of sub-femtomolar detection, and a high degree of multiplexing, SERRS is an attractive new technique for studying cancer biology. We have developed PEGylated silica-coated gold nanostars that can be tuned to match the Raman laser-light source wavelength, providing high-level SERRS/SERS enhancement when combined with various reporter molecules. Furthermore, the particles were conjugated with cyclo-RGDf/k peptide to investigate integrin expression of breast cancer cells using high-speed Raman mapping. We propose that this may provide a better understanding of the role of integrins in breast cancer invasiveness.

  13. Wall-to-wall stress induced in (6,5) semiconducting nanotubes by encapsulation in metallic outer tubes of different diameters: a resonance Raman study of individual C60-derived double-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Villalpando-Paez, Federico; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Farhat, Hootan; Endo, Morinobu; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2010-03-01

    We measure resonant Raman scattering from 11 individual C(60)-derived double-wall carbon nanotubes all having inner semiconducting (6,5) tubes and various outer metallic tubes. The Raman spectra show the radial breathing modes (RBM) of the inner and the outer tubes to be simultaneously in resonance with the same laser energy. We observe that an increase in the RBM frequency of the inner tubes is related to an increase in the RBM frequency of the outer tubes. The Raman spectra also contain a sharp G(-) feature that increases in frequency as the nominal diameter of the outer metallic tubes decreases. Finally, the one-phonon second-order D-band mode shows a two-way frequency splitting that decreases with decreasing nominal wall-to-wall distance. We suggest that the stress which increases with decreasing nominal wall-to-wall distance is responsible for the hardening that is observed in the frequencies of the RBM, D and G(-) modes of the inner (6,5) semiconducting tubes.

  14. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Extreme Nanowires and Other 1D Systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, David C; Spencer, Joseph H; Sloan, Jeremy; McDonnell, Liam P; Trewhitt, Harrison; Kashtiban, Reza J; Faulques, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper briefly describes how nanowires with diameters corresponding to 1 to 5 atoms can be produced by melting a range of inorganic solids in the presence of carbon nanotubes. These nanowires are extreme in the sense that they are the limit of miniaturization of nanowires and their behavior is not always a simple extrapolation of the behavior of larger nanowires as their diameter decreases. The paper then describes the methods required to obtain Raman spectra from extreme nanowires and the fact that due to the van Hove singularities that 1D systems exhibit in their optical density of states, that determining the correct choice of photon excitation energy is critical. It describes the techniques required to determine the photon energy dependence of the resonances observed in Raman spectroscopy of 1D systems and in particular how to obtain measurements of Raman cross-sections with better than 8% noise and measure the variation in the resonance as a function of sample temperature. The paper describes the importance of ensuring that the Raman scattering is linearly proportional to the intensity of the laser excitation intensity. It also describes how to use the polarization dependence of the Raman scattering to separate Raman scattering of the encapsulated 1D systems from those of other extraneous components in any sample. PMID:27168195

  15. Monitoring and trace detection of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Dougherty, D.R.; Chen, C.L.

    1993-04-01

    Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon process, which shifts the frequency of an outgoing photon according to the vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. When involving an allowed electronic transition (resonance Raman), this scattering cross section can be enhanced by 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} and provides the basis for a viable technique that can monitor and detect trace quantities of hazardous wastes and toxic chemicals. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many of the ideal characteristics for monitoring and detecting of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals. Some of these traits are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints); (2) independence from the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region); (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk); (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid and solutions -- either bulk or aerosols); and (5) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching). Data from a few chemicals will be presented which illustrate these features. In cases where background fluorescence accompanies the Raman signals, an effective frequency modulation technique has been developed, which can completely eliminate this interference.

  16. Monitoring and trace detection of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Dougherty, D.R.; Chen, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon process, which shifts the frequency of an outgoing photon according to the vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. When involving an allowed electronic transition (resonance Raman), this scattering cross section can be enhanced by 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 6] and provides the basis for a viable technique that can monitor and detect trace quantities of hazardous wastes and toxic chemicals. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many of the ideal characteristics for monitoring and detecting of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals. Some of these traits are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints); (2) independence from the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region); (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk); (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid and solutions -- either bulk or aerosols); and (5) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching). Data from a few chemicals will be presented which illustrate these features. In cases where background fluorescence accompanies the Raman signals, an effective frequency modulation technique has been developed, which can completely eliminate this interference.

  17. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Extreme Nanowires and Other 1D Systems

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David C.; Spencer, Joseph H.; Sloan, Jeremy; McDonnell, Liam P.; Trewhitt, Harrison; Kashtiban, Reza J.; Faulques, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper briefly describes how nanowires with diameters corresponding to 1 to 5 atoms can be produced by melting a range of inorganic solids in the presence of carbon nanotubes. These nanowires are extreme in the sense that they are the limit of miniaturization of nanowires and their behavior is not always a simple extrapolation of the behavior of larger nanowires as their diameter decreases. The paper then describes the methods required to obtain Raman spectra from extreme nanowires and the fact that due to the van Hove singularities that 1D systems exhibit in their optical density of states, that determining the correct choice of photon excitation energy is critical. It describes the techniques required to determine the photon energy dependence of the resonances observed in Raman spectroscopy of 1D systems and in particular how to obtain measurements of Raman cross-sections with better than 8% noise and measure the variation in the resonance as a function of sample temperature. The paper describes the importance of ensuring that the Raman scattering is linearly proportional to the intensity of the laser excitation intensity. It also describes how to use the polarization dependence of the Raman scattering to separate Raman scattering of the encapsulated 1D systems from those of other extraneous components in any sample. PMID:27168195

  18. Stimulated Raman scattering from individual water and ethanol droplets at morphology-dependent resonances.

    PubMed

    Snow, J B; Qian, S X; Chang, R K

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) from an individual liquid droplet (~30-microm radius) has been observed for H(2)O, D(2)O, and ethanol. The occurrence of a series of spectrally narrow peaks that are regularly spaced in wavelength is consistent with morphology-dependent resonances of the droplet, which acts as an optical resonator. The input intensity required to achieve the SRS threshold for the droplet is considerably less than that for the liquid in an optical cell.

  19. Phase-locking transition in Raman combs generated with whispering gallery mode resonators.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guoping; Chembo, Yanne K

    2016-08-15

    We investigate the mechanisms leading to phase locking in Raman optical frequency combs generated with ultrahigh Q crystalline whispering gallery mode disk resonators. We show that several regimes can be triggered depending on the pumping conditions, such as single-frequency Raman lasing, multimode operation involving more than one family of cavity eigenmodes, and Kerr-assisted Raman frequency comb generation. The phase locking and coherence of the combs are experimentally monitored through the measurement of beat signal spectra. These phase-locked combs, which feature high coherence and wide spectral spans, are obtained with pump powers in the range of a few tens of mW. In particular, Raman frequency combs with multiple free-spectral range spacings are reported, and the measured beat signal in the microwave domain features a 3 dB linewidth smaller than 50 Hz, thereby indicating phase locking. PMID:27519071

  20. Phase-locking transition in Raman combs generated with whispering gallery mode resonators.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guoping; Chembo, Yanne K

    2016-08-15

    We investigate the mechanisms leading to phase locking in Raman optical frequency combs generated with ultrahigh Q crystalline whispering gallery mode disk resonators. We show that several regimes can be triggered depending on the pumping conditions, such as single-frequency Raman lasing, multimode operation involving more than one family of cavity eigenmodes, and Kerr-assisted Raman frequency comb generation. The phase locking and coherence of the combs are experimentally monitored through the measurement of beat signal spectra. These phase-locked combs, which feature high coherence and wide spectral spans, are obtained with pump powers in the range of a few tens of mW. In particular, Raman frequency combs with multiple free-spectral range spacings are reported, and the measured beat signal in the microwave domain features a 3 dB linewidth smaller than 50 Hz, thereby indicating phase locking.

  1. Elucidation of reactive wavepackets by two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zhenkun; Molesky, Brian P.; Cheshire, Thomas P.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2015-09-28

    Traditional second-order kinetic theories fail to describe sub-picosecond photochemical reactions when solvation and vibrational dephasing undermine the assumption of equilibrium initial conditions. Four-wave mixing spectroscopies may reveal insights into such non-equilibrium processes but are limited by the single “population time” available in these types of experiments. Here, we use two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy to expose correlations between coherent nuclear motions of the reactant and product in the photodissociation reaction of triiodide. It is shown that the transition of a nuclear wavepacket from the reactant (triiodide) to product (diiodide) states gives rise to a unique pattern of 2DRR resonances. Peaks associated with this coherent reaction mechanism are readily assigned, because they are isolated in particular quadrants of the 2DRR spectrum. A theoretical model in which the chemical reaction is treated as a vibronic coherence transfer transition from triiodide to diiodide reproduces the patterns of 2DRR resonances detected in experiments. These signal components reveal correlation between the nonequilibrium geometry of triiodide and the vibrational coherence frequency of diiodide. The 2DRR signatures of coherent reaction mechanisms established in this work may generalize to studies of ultrafast energy and charge transfer processes.

  2. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Using Silica Whispering-Gallery Mode Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The motivation of this work was to have robust spectroscopic sensors for sensitive detection and chemical analysis of organic and molecular compounds. The solution is to use silica sphere optical resonators to provide surface-enhanced spectroscopic signal. Whispering-gallery mode (WGM) resonators made from silica microspheres were used for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) without coupling to a plasmonic mechanism. Large Raman signal enhancement is observed by exclusively using 5.08-micron silica spheres with 785-nm laser excitation. The advantage of this non-plasmonic approach is that the active substrate is chemically inert silica, thermally stable, and relatively simple to fabricate. The Raman signal enhancement is broadly applicable to a wide range of molecular functional groups including aliphatic hydrocarbons, siloxanes, and esters. Applications include trace organic analysis, particularly for in situ planetary instruments that require robust sensors with consistent response.

  3. Pressure-induced depolarization and resonance in Raman scattering of single-crystalline boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Junjie; Zhang Ling; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen Mingwei; Goto, Takashi

    2010-02-01

    We report polarized and resonant Raman scattering of single-crystal boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) at high pressures. Significant intensity enhancements of 270 and 1086 cm{sup -1} Raman bands of B{sub 4}C have been observed at quasihydrostatic pressures higher than approx20 GPa. The pressure-induced intensity change of the 1086 cm{sup -1} band is mainly due to the resonance between excitation energy and electronic transition, whereas the intensity change of 270 cm{sup -1} band is caused by the depolarization effect. Importantly, the first-order phase transition has not been found at high quasihydrostatic pressures and all the Raman intensity changes along with the corresponding high-pressure lattice distortion can be recovered during unloading.

  4. Stimulated resonance Raman scattering from single crystals of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Hisao; Yoshiki, Atsutoshi; Hotta, Shu; Kobayashi, Shunsuke

    2003-09-01

    We have investigated the stimulated resonance Raman scattering from single crystals of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer. The very narrow lines [full width at half maximum (FWHM)=11-20 cm-1] are observed in the same spectral regions where the spectrally narrowed emissions (FWHM≈300 cm-1) occur upon excitation with intense laser pulse. We related these modes to the stimulated resonance Raman scattering. Two lines of Raman shifts of 1466 and 1605 cm-1 are of molecular origin. Another line with an energy shift of ˜1260 cm-1 from excitation energy, on the other hand, implies the presence of the coherence of crystal origin. The associated split lines accompanying this mode are thought to constitute the longitudinal modes in the Fabry-Pérot cavity naturally formed in the crystals.

  5. Characterizing millisecond intermediates in hemoproteins using rapid-freeze-quenched resonance Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Summary The combination of rapid-freeze-quenching (RFQ) technique and resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy represents a unique tool to investigate the nature of short-lived intermediates formed during the enzymatic reaction of metalloproteins. Commercially available equipment allows trapping of intermediates within the millisecond to second timescale for low-temperature RR analysis and direct detection of metal-ligand vibrations and porphyrin skeletal vibrations in hemoproteins. This chapter briefly discusses previous RFQ-RR studies carried-out in our laboratory, and presents as a practical example protocols for the preparation of RFQ samples of the reaction of metmyoglobin with nitric oxide (NO) which requires anaerobic conditions. We also describe important controls and practical procedure for the analysis of these samples by low-temperature RR spectroscopy. PMID:24639256

  6. 13C Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and µ-Raman Spectroscopic Characterization of Sicilian Amber.

    PubMed

    Barone, Germana; Capitani, Donatella; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Proietti, Noemi; Raneri, Simona; Longobardo, Ugo; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2016-08-01

    (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and µ-Raman spectroscopy were applied to characterize Sicilian amber samples. The main goal of this work was to supply a complete study of simetite, highlighting discriminating criteria useful to distinguish Sicilian amber from fossil resins from other regions and laying the foundations for building a spectroscopic database of Sicilian amber. With this aim, a private collection of unrefined simetite samples and fossil resins from the Baltic region and Dominican Republic was analyzed. Overall, the obtained spectra permitted simetite to be distinguished from the other resins. In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectroscopic data, allowing the clustering of simetite samples with respect to the Baltic and Dominican samples and to group the simetite samples in two sets, depending on their maturity. Finally, the analysis of loadings allowed for a better understanding of the spectral features that mainly influenced the discriminating characteristics of the investigated ambers.

  7. Raman spectroscopy of magneto-phonon resonances in graphene and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goler, Sarah; Yan, Jun; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Pinczuk, Aron

    2012-08-01

    The magneto-phonon resonance or MPR occurs in semiconductor materials when the energy spacing between Landau levels is continuously tuned to cross the energy of an optical phonon mode. MPRs have been largely explored in bulk semiconductors, in two-dimensional systems and in quantum dots. Recently there has been significant interest in the MPR interactions of the Dirac fermion magneto-excitons in graphene, and a rich splitting and anti-crossing phenomena of the even parity E2g long wavelength optical phonon mode have been theoretically proposed and experimentally observed. The MPR has been found to crucially depend on disorder in the graphene layer. This is a feature that creates new venues for the study of interplays between disorder and interactions in the atomic layers. We review here the fundamentals of MRP in graphene and the experimental Raman scattering works that have led to the observation of these phenomena in graphene and graphite.

  8. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Beta-Carotene and Lycopene: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the theory of resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy as it applies to beta-carotene and lycopene pigments (found in tomatoes and carrots, respectively). Also discusses an experiment which demonstrates the theoretical principles involved. The experiment has been tested over a three-year period and has received excellent acceptance by physical…

  9. Distinguishing Unfolding and Functional Conformational Transitions of Calmodulin Using Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Eric M.; Balakrishnan, G.; Squier, Thomas C.; Spiro, Thomas

    2014-06-14

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous moderator protein for calcium signaling in all eukaryotic cells. This small calcium-binding protein exhibits a broad range of structural transitions, including domain opening and folding-unfolding, that allow it to recognize a wide variety of binding partners in vivo. While the static structures of CaM associated with its various binding activities are fairly well known, it has been challenging to examine the dynamics of transition between these structures in real-time, due to a lack of suitable spectroscopic probes of CaM structure. In this paper, we examine the potential of ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy for clarifying the nature of structural transitions in CaM. We find that the UVRR spectral change (with 229 nm excitation) due to thermal unfolding of CaM is qualitatively different from that associated with opening of the C-terminal domain in response to Ca2+ binding. This spectral difference is entirely due to differences in teritary contacts at the inter-domain tyrosine residue Tyr138, toward which other spectroscopic methods are not sensitive. We conclude that UVRR is ideally suited to identifying the different types of structural transitions in CaM and other proteins with conformation-sensitive tyrosine residues, opening a path to time-resolved studies of CaM dynamics using Raman spectroscopy.

  10. Rapid resonance Raman microspectroscopy to probe carbon dioxide fixation by single cells in microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengqiu; Canniffe, Daniel P; Jackson, Philip J; Davison, Paul A; FitzGerald, Simon; Dickman, Mark J; Burgess, J Grant; Hunter, C Neil; Huang, Wei E

    2012-01-01

    Photosynthetic microorganisms play crucial roles in aquatic ecosystems and are the major primary producers in global marine ecosystems. The discovery of new bacteria and microalgae that play key roles in CO2 fixation is hampered by the lack of methods to identify hitherto-unculturable microorganisms. To overcome this problem we studied single microbial cells using stable-isotope probing (SIP) together with resonance Raman (RR) microspectroscopy of carotenoids, the light-absorbing pigments present in most photosynthetic microorganisms. We show that fixation of 13CO2 into carotenoids produces a red shift in single-cell RR (SCRR) spectra and that this SCRR–SIP technique is sufficiently sensitive to detect as little as 10% of 13C incorporation. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of labelled cellular proteins verifies that the red shift in carotenoid SCRR spectra acts as a reporter of the 13C content of single cells. Millisecond Raman imaging of cells in mixed cultures and natural seawater samples was used to identify cells actively fixing CO2, demonstrating that the SCRR–SIP is a noninvasive method for the rapid and quantitative detection of CO2 fixation at the single cell level in a microbial community. The SCRR–SIP technique may provide a direct method for screening environmental samples, and could help to reveal the ecophysiology of hitherto-unculturable microorganisms, linking microbial species to their ecological function in the natural environment. PMID:22113377

  11. Silver-particle-based surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy for biomolecular sensing and recognition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwan; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Nam Hoon

    2007-05-01

    We demonstrate in this work that 2-microm-sized Ag (microAg) powders can be used as a core material for constructing biomolecular sensing/recognition units operating via surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS). This is possible because microAg powders are very efficient substrates for both the diffuse reflectance IR and the surface-enhanced Raman scattering-SERRS spectroscopic characterization of molecular adsorbates prepared in a similar manner on silver surfaces. Besides, the agglomeration of microAg particles in a buffer solution can be prevented by the layer-by-layer deposition of cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes such as poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). In this particular study, we used rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RhBITC) as a SERRS marker molecule, and microAg powders adsorbed consecutively with RhBITC and PAH-PAA bilayers were finally derivatized with biotinylated poly(L-lysine). On the basis of the nature of the SERRS peaks of RhBITC, those microAg powders were confirmed to selectively recognize streptavidin molecules down to concentrations of 10(-10) g mL-1. Since a number of different molecules can be used as SERS-SERRS marker molecules, the present method proves to be an invaluable tool for multiplex biomolecular sensing/recognition via SERS and SERRS.

  12. Resonance Raman and vibronic absorption spectra with Duschinsky rotation from a time-dependent perspective: Application to β-carotene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Kröner, Dominik; Saalfrank, Peter

    2012-12-01

    The time-dependent approach to electronic spectroscopy, as popularized by Heller and co-workers in the 1980s, is applied here in conjunction with linear-response, time-dependent density functional theory to study vibronic absorption and resonance Raman spectra of β-carotene, with and without a solvent. Two-state models, the harmonic and the Condon approximations are used in order to do so. A new code has been developed which includes excited state displacements, vibrational frequency shifts, and Duschinsky rotation, i.e., mode mixing, for both non-adiabatic spectroscopies. It is shown that Duschinsky rotation has a pronounced effect on the resonance Raman spectra of β-carotene. In particular, it can explain a recently found anomalous behaviour of the so-called ν1 peak in resonance Raman spectra [N. Tschirner, M. Schenderlein, K. Brose, E. Schlodder, M. A. Mroginski, C. Thomsen, and P. Hildebrandt, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11, 11471 (2009)], 10.1039/b917341b, which shifts with the change in excitation wavelength.

  13. Hollow Au/Ag nanostars displaying broad plasmonic resonance and high surface-enhanced Raman sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Leis, Adianez; Torreggiani, Armida; Garcia-Ramos, Jose Vicente; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    Bimetallic Au/Ag hollow nanostar (HNS) nanoparticles with different morphologies were prepared in this work. These nanoplatforms were obtained by changing the experimental conditions (concentration of silver and chemical reductors, hydroxylamine and citrate) and by using Ag nanostars as template nanoparticles (NPs) through galvanic replacement. The goal of this research was to create bimetallic Au/Ag star-shaped nanoparticles with advanced properties displaying a broader plasmonic resonance, a cleaner exposed surface, and a high concentration of electromagnetic hot spots on the surface provided by the special morphology of nanostars. The size, shape, and composition of Ag as well as their optical properties were studied by extinction spectroscopy, hyperspectral dark field microscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Finally, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of these HNS was investigated by using thioflavin T, a biomarker of the β-amyloid fibril formation, responsible for Alzheimer's disease. Lucigenin, a molecule displaying different SERS activities on Au and Ag, was also used to explore the presence of these metals on the NP surface. Thus, a relationship between the morphology, plasmon resonance and SERS activity of these new NPs was made.Bimetallic Au/Ag hollow nanostar (HNS) nanoparticles with different morphologies were prepared in this work. These nanoplatforms were obtained by changing the experimental conditions (concentration of silver and chemical reductors, hydroxylamine and citrate) and by using Ag nanostars as template nanoparticles (NPs) through galvanic replacement. The goal of this research was to create bimetallic Au/Ag star-shaped nanoparticles with advanced properties displaying a broader plasmonic resonance, a cleaner exposed surface, and a high concentration of electromagnetic hot spots on the surface provided by the special morphology of nanostars

  14. Secondary and tertiary structure of the A-state of cytochrome c from resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, T.; Eads, J. C.; Spiro, T. G.

    1995-01-01

    Ferricytochrome c can be converted to the partially folded A-state at pH 2.2 in the presence of 1.5 M NaCl. The structure of the A-state has been studied in comparison with the native and unfolded states, using resonance Raman spectroscopy with visible and ultraviolet excitation wavelengths. Spectra obtained with 200 nm excitation show a decrease in amide II intensity consistent with loss of structure for the 50s and 70s helices. The 230-nm spectra contain information on vibrational modes of the single Trp 59 side chain and the four tyrosine side chains (Tyr 48, 67, 74, and 97). The Trp 59 modes indicate that the side chain remains in a hydrophobic environment but loses its tertiary hydrogen bond and is rotationally disordered. The tyrosine modes Y8b and Y9a show disruption of tertiary hydrogen bonding for the Tyr 48, 67, and 74 side chains. The high-wavenumber region of the 406.7-nm resonance Raman spectrum reveals a mixed spin heme iron atom, which arises from axial coordination to His 18 and a water molecule. The low-frequency spectral region reports on heme distortions and indicates a reduced degree of interaction between the heme and the polypeptide chain. A structural model for the A-state is proposed in which a folded protein subdomain, consisting of the heme and the N-terminal, C-terminal, and 60s helices, is stabilized through nonbonding interactions between helices and with the heme. PMID:7613469

  15. Secondary and tertiary structure of the A-state of cytochrome c from resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, T; Eads, J C; Spiro, T G

    1995-04-01

    Ferricytochrome c can be converted to the partially folded A-state at pH 2.2 in the presence of 1.5 M NaCl. The structure of the A-state has been studied in comparison with the native and unfolded states, using resonance Raman spectroscopy with visible and ultraviolet excitation wavelengths. Spectra obtained with 200 nm excitation show a decrease in amide II intensity consistent with loss of structure for the 50s and 70s helices. The 230-nm spectra contain information on vibrational modes of the single Trp 59 side chain and the four tyrosine side chains (Tyr 48, 67, 74, and 97). The Trp 59 modes indicate that the side chain remains in a hydrophobic environment but loses its tertiary hydrogen bond and is rotationally disordered. The tyrosine modes Y8b and Y9a show disruption of tertiary hydrogen bonding for the Tyr 48, 67, and 74 side chains. The high-wavenumber region of the 406.7-nm resonance Raman spectrum reveals a mixed spin heme iron atom, which arises from axial coordination to His 18 and a water molecule. The low-frequency spectral region reports on heme distortions and indicates a reduced degree of interaction between the heme and the polypeptide chain. A structural model for the A-state is proposed in which a folded protein subdomain, consisting of the heme and the N-terminal, C-terminal, and 60s helices, is stabilized through nonbonding interactions between helices and with the heme.

  16. Electronic properties of Sb monolayers on III-V(110) surfaces determined by resonance Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, N.; Koepp, M.; Haier, P.

    1993-07-01

    Resonance Raman scattering (RRS) experiments have been performed to explore the electronic states via the vibrational modes of highly ordered (1 X 1) monolayers of Sb on InP(110) and GaAs(110) prepared by thermal annealing. In accordance to the C{sub s} symmetry of the two-atom unit cell of the monolayers three modes of A{prime} and one of A{double_prime} symmetry are observed by Raman scattering. The scattering intensities show pronounced resonances which are related to electronic transitions between the two-dimensional electronic surface bands. The resonances are found to be characteristic for each vibrational mode. This can be understood in terms of different electronic bands being involved in the scattering process. For Sb on GaAs(110), the resonance of the A{double_prime} mode yields a maximum between 2.2 and 2.3 eV. On InP(110), resonances at 2.55 eV for the 1A{prime}, 2.3-2.6 eV for the 2A{prime}, 1.9 eV for the 1A{double_prime} and{>=}3.0 eV for the 3A{prime} modes occur. For both Sb on GaAs and InP the transition energies observed by RRS coincide with features reported by several other techniques. The resonance behavior of the ideal monolayers can be understood as a fingerprint of the joint density of states at the interface. In contrast, resonance Raman spectra taken after deposition of 1.5 ML Sb without annealing reveal a different resonance behavior. In this case, where the monolayer is not ideally ordered, the resonances are smeared out over an energy range between 2.3 and 2.7 eV revealing the influence of imperfections on the electronic band structure. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Raman scattering enhancement in photon-plasmon resonance mediated metal-dielectric microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Dwivedi, Vindesh K.; Vijaya Prakash, G.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2013-12-01

    Here, we report the photon-plasmon interaction scheme and enhanced field strengths resulted into the amplification of phonon in a novel microcavity. A metal-dielectric microcavity, with unified cavity photonic mode and localized surface plasmon resonances, is visualized by impregnating the gold nanoparticles into the deep see-through nano-sized pores of porous silicon microcavity. The intense optical field strengths resulting from the photon-plasmon interactions are probed by both resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering experiments. Due to photon-plasmon-phonon interaction mechanism, several orders of enhancement in the intensity of scattered Raman Stokes photon (at 500 cm-1) are observed. Our metal nanoparticle-microcavity hybrid system shows the potential to improve the sensing figure of merit as well as the applications of plasmonics for optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and related technologies.

  18. Raman scattering enhancement in photon-plasmon resonance mediated metal-dielectric microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Guddala, Sriram; Narayana Rao, D. E-mail: dnrsp@uohyd.ernet.in; Dwivedi, Vindesh K.; Vijaya Prakash, G.

    2013-12-14

    Here, we report the photon-plasmon interaction scheme and enhanced field strengths resulted into the amplification of phonon in a novel microcavity. A metal-dielectric microcavity, with unified cavity photonic mode and localized surface plasmon resonances, is visualized by impregnating the gold nanoparticles into the deep see-through nano-sized pores of porous silicon microcavity. The intense optical field strengths resulting from the photon-plasmon interactions are probed by both resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering experiments. Due to photon-plasmon-phonon interaction mechanism, several orders of enhancement in the intensity of scattered Raman Stokes photon (at 500 cm{sup −1}) are observed. Our metal nanoparticle-microcavity hybrid system shows the potential to improve the sensing figure of merit as well as the applications of plasmonics for optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and related technologies.

  19. Raman spectroscopic studies on screening of myopathies.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Rekha; Vanga, Sandeep; Madan, Aditi; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Nongthomba, Upendra; Umapathy, Siva

    2015-02-17

    Myopathies are among the major causes of mortality in the world. There is no complete cure for this heterogeneous group of diseases, but a sensitive, specific, and fast diagnostic tool may improve therapy effectiveness. In this study, Raman spectroscopy is applied to discriminate between muscle mutants in Drosophila on the basis of associated changes at the molecular level. Raman spectra were collected from indirect flight muscles of mutants, upheld(1) (up(1)), heldup(2) (hdp(2)), myosin heavy chain(7) (Mhc(7)), actin88F(KM88) (Act88F(KM88)), upheld(101) (up(101)), and Canton-S (CS) control group, for both 2 and 12 days old flies. Difference spectra (mutant minus control) of all the mutants showed an increase in nucleic acid and β-sheet and/or random coil protein content along with a decrease in α-helix protein. Interestingly, the 12th day samples of up(1) and Act88F(KM88) showed significantly higher levels of glycogen and carotenoids than CS. A principal components based linear discriminant analysis classification model was developed based on multidimensional Raman spectra, which classified the mutants according to their pathophysiology and yielded an overall accuracy of 97% and 93% for 2 and 12 days old flies, respectively. The up(1) and Act88F(KM88) (nemaline-myopathy) mutants form a group that is clearly separated in a linear discriminant plane from up(101) and hdp(2) (cardiomyopathy) mutants. Notably, Raman spectra from a human sample with nemaline-myopathy formed a cluster with the corresponding Drosophila mutant (up(1)). In conclusion, this is the first demonstration in which myopathies, despite their heterogeneity, were screened on the basis of biochemical differences using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:25583313

  20. [High performance liquid chromatographic determination of reducing sugars in fruit juices with laser resonance Raman detection].

    PubMed

    Ding, M; Koizumi, H; Suzuki, Y

    1997-07-01

    A liquid chromatographic method using semi-microcolumn separation combined with laser resonance Raman detection was developed for the determination of monosaccharides in fruit juices. Reducing sugars (galactose, glucose, mannose, arabinose, xylose and ribose) were derivatized with 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene-4'-sulfonyl (DABSYL) hydrazine. The derivatives of the monosaccharides exhibited strong resonance Raman scattering at 1136 cm(-1) when Ar+ laser emission line 488.0 nm was used. A semi-microcolumn Inertsil ODS-2 (250 mm x 1.5 mm i.d.) was used to the separation of the monosaccharide derivatives. The saccharides eluted within 25 min. However the excess DABSYL hydrazine was retained strongly with a retention time of about 60 min. In order to reduce the longer analysis time, the excess DABSYL hydrazine was removed by adding glyoxylic acid and then Na2CO3 aqueous solution when the derivation reaction was finished. As a result, the analysis time was reduced to about a half of its initial run time. The sensitivity of resonance Raman detection greater two orders of magnitude than refractive index (RI) detection. The detection limit of glucose is 10 ng (5.5 pmol). The high selectivity of Raman detection came from the facts that only the interested compounds in a given sample was derived with the Raman labeling reagent and that only the characteristic Raman bands of the derivatives were selectively detected. In this work, in spite of the coexisting large quantities of organic acids in fruit juice, the determined values of glucose agreed well with those obtained by RI detection without any derivatization procedure.

  1. Heme Orientation of Cavity Mutant Hemoglobins (His F8 → Gly) in Either α or β Subunits: Circular Dichroism, (1) H NMR, and Resonance Raman Studies.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Masako; Nagai, Yukifumi; Aki, Yayoi; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Mizusawa, Naoki; Ogura, Takashi; Kitagawa, Teizo; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Nagatomo, Shigenori

    2016-08-01

    Native human adult hemoglobin (Hb A) has mostly normal orientation of heme, whereas recombinant Hb A (rHb A) expressed in E. coli contains both normal and reversed orientations of heme. Hb A with the normal heme exhibits positive circular dichroism (CD) bands at both the Soret and 260-nm regions, while rHb A with the reversed heme shows a negative Soret and decreased 260-nm CD bands. In order to examine involvement of the proximal histidine (His F8) of either α or β subunits in determining the heme orientation, we prepared two cavity mutant Hbs, rHb(αH87G) and rHb(βH92G), with substitution of glycine for His F8 in the presence of imidazole. CD spectra of both cavity mutant Hbs did not show a negative Soret band, but instead exhibited positive bands with strong intensity at the both Soret and 260-nm regions, suggesting that the reversed heme scarcely exists in the cavity mutant Hbs. We confirmed by (1) H NMR and resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopies that the cavity mutant Hbs have mainly the normal heme orientation in both the mutated and native subunits. These results indicate that the heme Fe-His F8 linkage in both α and β subunits influences the heme orientation, and that the heme orientation of one type of subunit is related to the heme orientation of the complementary subunits to be the same. The present study showed that CD and RR spectroscopies also provided powerful tools for the examination of the heme rotational disorder of Hb A, in addition to the usual (1) H NMR technique. Chirality 28:585-592, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27427792

  2. Heme Orientation of Cavity Mutant Hemoglobins (His F8 → Gly) in Either α or β Subunits: Circular Dichroism, (1) H NMR, and Resonance Raman Studies.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Masako; Nagai, Yukifumi; Aki, Yayoi; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Mizusawa, Naoki; Ogura, Takashi; Kitagawa, Teizo; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Nagatomo, Shigenori

    2016-08-01

    Native human adult hemoglobin (Hb A) has mostly normal orientation of heme, whereas recombinant Hb A (rHb A) expressed in E. coli contains both normal and reversed orientations of heme. Hb A with the normal heme exhibits positive circular dichroism (CD) bands at both the Soret and 260-nm regions, while rHb A with the reversed heme shows a negative Soret and decreased 260-nm CD bands. In order to examine involvement of the proximal histidine (His F8) of either α or β subunits in determining the heme orientation, we prepared two cavity mutant Hbs, rHb(αH87G) and rHb(βH92G), with substitution of glycine for His F8 in the presence of imidazole. CD spectra of both cavity mutant Hbs did not show a negative Soret band, but instead exhibited positive bands with strong intensity at the both Soret and 260-nm regions, suggesting that the reversed heme scarcely exists in the cavity mutant Hbs. We confirmed by (1) H NMR and resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopies that the cavity mutant Hbs have mainly the normal heme orientation in both the mutated and native subunits. These results indicate that the heme Fe-His F8 linkage in both α and β subunits influences the heme orientation, and that the heme orientation of one type of subunit is related to the heme orientation of the complementary subunits to be the same. The present study showed that CD and RR spectroscopies also provided powerful tools for the examination of the heme rotational disorder of Hb A, in addition to the usual (1) H NMR technique. Chirality 28:585-592, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Ultraviolet resonance Raman studies reveal the environment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues in the native and partially folded states of the E colicin-binding immunity protein Im7.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Mendieta, Iñigo R; Spence, Graham R; Gell, Christopher; Radford, Sheena E; Smith, D Alastair

    2005-03-01

    Understanding the nature of partially folded proteins is a challenging task that is best accomplished when several techniques are applied in combination. Here we present ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy studies of the E colicin-binding immunity proteins, Im7* and Im9*, together with a series of variants of Im7* that are designed to trap a partially folded state at equilibrium. We show that the environments of the tryptophan and tyrosine residues in native wild-type Im7* and Im9* are indistinguishable, in contrast with models for their structures based on X-ray and NMR methods. In addition, we show that there is a general increase in the hydrophobicity in the environment of Trp75 in all of the variants compared with wild-type Im7*. These data suggest that a significant rearrangement of the tryptophan pocket occurs in the variants, which, together with an overall decrease in solvent accessibility of Trp75 as judged by time-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements and fluorescence quenching experiments, rationalize the unusual fluorescence properties of the variants reported previously. The data highlight the power of UVRR in analyzing the structural properties of different conformational states of the same protein and reveal new information about the structural rearrangements occurring during Im7* folding, not possible using other spectroscopic methods alone. Finally, we describe a previously unreported dependence of the tryptophan Fermi doublet on excitation wavelength in the ultraviolet region revealed by these protein spectra. We corroborated this observation using tryptophan-containing model compounds and conclude that the conventional interpretation of this UVRR feature at these wavelengths is unreliable.

  4. Multiband electron resonant Raman scattering in quantum wells in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Richard, V.; Hai, G.-Q.; Trallero-Giner, C.; Marques, G. E.

    2003-04-01

    A theoretical model has been developed for the electronic resonant Raman scattering processes in direct band zinc blende type semiconductor quantum wells in a magnetic field. In order to take into account the spin-flip transitions, anomalous behavior of the Landau levels and the Landè g factor, an 8×8 Kane-Weiler Hamiltonian model has been considered for the evaluation of the Raman scattering amplitude. Elements concerning the selection rules of resonant inelastic light scattering in quantum well systems are reported. The multiband model predicts conditions for resonant spin-flip Raman processes in several light scattering configurations for crossed and parallel polarization. Special emphasis is given to the effects of the interlevel coupling and mixing within the conduction subband and their relation to spin-flip and inter-Landau level transitions. Symmetry and electronic properties of the level structure in the first conduction subband as well as anomalous Landè factors are discussed in terms of complementary Raman scattering configurations, Fermi energy, and multiband parameters.

  5. Resonance Raman effect in mu-oxo-bis[iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin].

    PubMed Central

    Adar, F; Srivastava, T S

    1975-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of mu-oxo-bis[iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin] have been observed and compared to Raman spectra of the monomers iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin chloride and bis(piperidine)iron(II) tetraphenylporphyrin. Selection rules for the Raman effect under conditions of resonance of the incident photons with electronic states are presented for the exact symmetry group (C2) and the pseudo-symmetry group (D4d): emphasis is placed on the physical processes involved in scattering via vibronic states of the dimer. These two models are experimentally distinguishable in the behavior of the depolarization ratios of the dimer vibrational doublets. Experimental data favor the assignment of D4d as the symmetry group relevant to a description of the various states of the dimer. The usefulness of resonance Raman spectra of the mu-oco-dimer of Fe(III) tetraphenylporphyrin has been discussed with respect to several biochemical systems where there is strong evidence of two or more closely interacting chromophores. PMID:1060121

  6. Development of a fiber based Raman probe compatible with interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, Praveen C.; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Rube, Martin; Cox, Benjamin; Melzer, Andreas; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful tool for discriminating between normal and abnormal tissue types. Fiber based Raman probes have demonstrated its potential for in vivo disease diagnostics. Combining Raman spectroscopy with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) opens up new avenues for MR guided minimally invasive optical biopsy. Although Raman probes are commercially available, they are not compatible with a MRI environment due to the metallic components which are used to align the micro-optic components such as filters and lenses at the probe head. Additionally they are not mechanically compatible with a typical surgical environment as factors such as sterility and length of the probe are not addressed in those designs. We have developed an MRI compatible fiber Raman probe with a disposable probe head hence maintaining sterility. The probe head was specially designed to avoid any material that would cause MR imaging artefacts. The probe head that goes into patient's body had a diameter <1.5 mm so that it is compatible with biopsy needles and catheters. The probe has been tested in MR environment and has been proven to be capable of obtaining Raman signal while the probe is under real-time MR guidance.

  7. Interpretation of the resonance Raman spectra of linear tetrapyrroles based on DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneip, Christa; Hildebrandt, Peter; Németh, Károly; Mark, Franz; Schaffner, Kurt

    1999-10-01

    Raman spectra of linear methine-bridged tetrapyrroles in different conformational and protonation states were calculated on the basis of scaled force fields obtained by density functional theory. Results are reported for protonated phycocyanobilin in the extended ZZZasa configuration, as it is found in C-phycocyanin of cyanobacteria. The calculated spectra are in good agreement with experimental spectra of the protein-bound chromophore in the α-subunit of C-phycocyanin and allow a plausible and consistent assignment of most of the observed resonance Raman bands in the region between 1000 and 1700 cm -1.

  8. Demonstration of resonant backward Raman amplification in high-density gas-jet plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. H.; Zhou, K. N.; Zheng, X. M.; Wei, X. F.; Zhu, Q. H.; Su, J. Q.; Xie, N.; Jiao, Z. H.; Peng, H.; Wang, X. D.; Sun, L.; Li, Q.; Huang, Z.; Zuo, Y. L.

    2016-10-01

    Backward Raman amplification was observed in a 0.7 mm-long high-density gas jet plasma. The 800 nm 30 fs seed pulse was amplified by a factor  ∼28, with an output energy of 2.8 mJ. The output spectra showed that the waveband around 800 nm was significantly amplified. The experimental result demonstrated that the resonant Raman amplification can be realized in high-density plasma against strong plasma instability.

  9. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of the thrombin-binding aptamer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsai-Chin; Vasudev, Milana; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2013-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is used to study the Raman spectra and peak shifts the thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) on substrates having two different geometries; one with a single stranded sequence and one with double stranded sequence. The Raman signals of the deoxyribonucleic acids on both substrates are enhanced and specific peaks of bases are identified. These results are highly reproducible and have promising applications in low cost nucleic acid detection.

  10. Raman studies of Halon fire retardants

    SciTech Connect

    May, J.H.; Allen, F.S.; Ondrias, M.R.; Tapscott, R.E.; Beeson, H.D.; Zallen, D.M.

    1986-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be used as a passive probe for the study of active systems. Various types of analytical determinations can be made without perturbing the system under study. Of interest is the elucidation of the extinction processes employed by Halon type extinguishing agents. Raman has in the past been used to study molecules such as H/sub 2/O, N/sub 2/, and CO/sub 2/ in flames. Halons and pyrolyzed products having vibrations that are more polarization sensitive than the above molecules, should then be readily analyzed in flames. As an initial approach to this problem, the authors are studying the pyrolysis of Halon 2402 (1,2 dibromotetrafluoroethane). The pyrolysis products are isolated using vacuum line techniques, and identified using GC/MS and Raman. A library of the Raman spectra from each component is being formed for subsequent use in flame analysis. Experimentally, they use a tube furnace with a specially designed tube, having detachable nitrogen traps on each end, and also capable of holding a vacuum. To simulate the combustion process, Halon 2402 is frozen in one of the nitrogen traps, and the whole system is brought to high vacuum. The Halon is then allowed to vacuum transfer through the pyrolysis tube, which is at approximately 790/sup 0/C, to the other nitrogen trap. This process is repeated several times. The products are then vacuum distilled, capturing fractions as they come over, in different, sealable cuvettes. Presently all fractions are studied in the gas phase at room temperature.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic and surface plasmon resonance in situ study of self-assembly of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid on gold surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi, Minh Do; Volka, Karel

    2010-07-01

    A feasibility study has been undertaken to assess the suitability of a commercially available SERS substrate for monitoring of self-assembling deposition process. Monolayer self-assembly of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid on SERS active substrate Klarite™ from absolute and acidified ethanol was studied and compared with deposition on SPR substrate from absolute ethanol. Changes in integral intensity of the phenyl bands at 1587 and 1076 cm -1 and ethanol band at 1451 cm -1 allow to follow structural changes in the monolayer. Stability of the monolayer assembled from acidified ethanol in contrast to the pure ethanol was demonstrated.

  12. Hollow Au/Ag nanostars displaying broad plasmonic resonance and high surface-enhanced Raman sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Leis, Adianez; Torreggiani, Armida; Garcia-Ramos, Jose Vicente; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago

    2015-08-28

    Bimetallic Au/Ag hollow nanostar (HNS) nanoparticles with different morphologies were prepared in this work. These nanoplatforms were obtained by changing the experimental conditions (concentration of silver and chemical reductors, hydroxylamine and citrate) and by using Ag nanostars as template nanoparticles (NPs) through galvanic replacement. The goal of this research was to create bimetallic Au/Ag star-shaped nanoparticles with advanced properties displaying a broader plasmonic resonance, a cleaner exposed surface, and a high concentration of electromagnetic hot spots on the surface provided by the special morphology of nanostars. The size, shape, and composition of Ag as well as their optical properties were studied by extinction spectroscopy, hyperspectral dark field microscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Finally, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of these HNS was investigated by using thioflavin T, a biomarker of the β-amyloid fibril formation, responsible for Alzheimer's disease. Lucigenin, a molecule displaying different SERS activities on Au and Ag, was also used to explore the presence of these metals on the NP surface. Thus, a relationship between the morphology, plasmon resonance and SERS activity of these new NPs was made.

  13. Relaxation mechanism of β-carotene from S2 (1Bu(+)) state to S1 (2Ag(-)) state: femtosecond time-resolved near-IR absorption and stimulated resonance Raman studies in 900-1550 nm region.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Tomohisa; Iwata, Koichi

    2014-06-12

    Carotenoids have two major low-lying excited states, the second lowest (S2 (1Bu(+))) and the lowest (S1 (2Ag(-))) excited singlet states, both of which are suggested to be involved in the energy transfer processes in light-harvesting complexes. Studying vibrational dynamics of S2 carotenoids requires ultrafast time-resolved near-IR Raman spectroscopy, although it has much less sensitivity than visible Raman spectroscopy. In this study, the relaxation mechanism of β-carotene from the S2 state to the S1 state is investigated by femtosecond time-resolved multiplex near-IR absorption and stimulated Raman spectroscopy. The energy gap between the S2 and S1 states is estimated to be 6780 cm(-1) from near-IR transient absorption spectra. The near-IR stimulated Raman spectrum of S2 β-carotene show three bands at 1580, 1240, and 1050 cm(-1). When excess energy of 4000 cm(-1) is added, the S1 C═C stretch band shows a large upshift with a time constant of 0.2 ps. The fast upshift is explained by a model that excess energy generated by internal conversion from the S2 state to the S1 state is selectively accepted by one of the vibronic levels of the S1 state and is redistributed among all the vibrational modes.

  14. Black phosphorus edges: a polarized Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, H.; Villegas, C.; Bahamon, D.; Castro Neto, A.; de Souza, E.; Rocha, A.; Pimenta, M.; de Matos, C.

    Black phosphorus (BP) has been recently exfoliated down to few-layer thicknesses revealing numerous interesting features such as a tunable direct bandgap. Ever since, demonstrations of BP electronic devices have bloomed, as well as studies of the electric, optical, mechanical and thermal properties of its bulk and few-layer forms. However, the edges of BP crystals have, so far, been poorly characterized, even though the terminations of layered crystals are known to possess a range of interesting properties. In this work, the edges of exfoliated BP flakes are characterized by polarized confocal Raman spectroscopy. We will present experimental Raman spectra at zigzag and armchair edges, as well as density functional theory calculations that explain the peculiarities of the experimental data. Fapesp, INCT/Nanocarbono, Fapemig, CNPq, MackPesquisa, Grid-Unesp, CENAPAD-SP, and NRF.

  15. Feshbach-resonant Raman photoassociation in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, Matt; Phou, Pierre; Shinn, Mannix; Boyce, Heather; Katz, Lev

    2011-10-15

    We model the formation of stable heteronuclear molecules via pulsed Raman photoassociation of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate near a strong Feshbach resonance, for both counterintuitive and intuitive pulse sequencing. Compared to lasers alone, weak Raman photoassociation is enhanced by as much as a factor of ten (five) for a counterintuitive (intuitive) pulse sequence, whereas strong Raman photoassociation is barely enhanced at all--regardless of pulse sequence. Stronger intra-atom, molecule, or atom-molecule collisions lead to an expected decrease in conversion efficiency, but stronger ambient inter-atom collisions lead to an unexpected increase in the efficiency of stable molecule production. Numerical results agree reasonably with an analytical approximation.

  16. Polarized Raman scattering study of kesterite type Cu2ZnSnS4 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guc, Maxim; Levcenko, Sergiu; Bodnar, Ivan V.; Izquierdo-Roca, Victor; Fontane, Xavier; Volkova, Larisa V.; Arushanov, Ernest; Pérez-Rodríguez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A non-destructive Raman spectroscopy has been widely used as a complimentary method to X-ray diffraction characterization of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films, yet our knowledge of the Raman active fundamental modes in this material is far from complete. Focusing on polarized Raman spectroscopy provides important information about the relationship between Raman modes and CZTS crystal structure. In this framework the zone-center optical phonons of CZTS, which is most usually examined in active layers of the CZTS based solar cells, are studied by polarized resonant and non-resonant Raman spectroscopy in the range from 60 to 500 cm-1 on an oriented single crystal. The phonon mode symmetry of 20 modes from the 27 possible vibrational modes of the kesterite structure is experimentally determined. From in-plane angular dependences of the phonon modes intensities Raman tensor elements are also derived. Whereas a strong intensity enhancement of the polar E and B symmetry modes is induced under resonance conditions, no mode intensity dependence on the incident and scattered light polarization configurations was found in these conditions. Finally, Lyddane-Sachs-Teller relations are applied to estimate the ratios of the static to high-frequency optic dielectric constants parallel and perpendicular to c-optical axis.

  17. Polarized Raman scattering study of kesterite type Cu2ZnSnS4 single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Guc, Maxim; Levcenko, Sergiu; Bodnar, Ivan V.; Izquierdo-Roca, Victor; Fontane, Xavier; Volkova, Larisa V.; Arushanov, Ernest; Pérez-Rodríguez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A non-destructive Raman spectroscopy has been widely used as a complimentary method to X-ray diffraction characterization of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films, yet our knowledge of the Raman active fundamental modes in this material is far from complete. Focusing on polarized Raman spectroscopy provides important information about the relationship between Raman modes and CZTS crystal structure. In this framework the zone–center optical phonons of CZTS, which is most usually examined in active layers of the CZTS based solar cells, are studied by polarized resonant and non-resonant Raman spectroscopy in the range from 60 to 500 cm−1 on an oriented single crystal. The phonon mode symmetry of 20 modes from the 27 possible vibrational modes of the kesterite structure is experimentally determined. From in-plane angular dependences of the phonon modes intensities Raman tensor elements are also derived. Whereas a strong intensity enhancement of the polar E and B symmetry modes is induced under resonance conditions, no mode intensity dependence on the incident and scattered light polarization configurations was found in these conditions. Finally, Lyddane-Sachs-Teller relations are applied to estimate the ratios of the static to high-frequency optic dielectric constants parallel and perpendicular to c-optical axis. PMID:26776727

  18. Polarized Raman scattering study of kesterite type Cu2ZnSnS4 single crystals.

    PubMed

    Guc, Maxim; Levcenko, Sergiu; Bodnar, Ivan V; Izquierdo-Roca, Victor; Fontane, Xavier; Volkova, Larisa V; Arushanov, Ernest; Pérez-Rodríguez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A non-destructive Raman spectroscopy has been widely used as a complimentary method to X-ray diffraction characterization of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films, yet our knowledge of the Raman active fundamental modes in this material is far from complete. Focusing on polarized Raman spectroscopy provides important information about the relationship between Raman modes and CZTS crystal structure. In this framework the zone-center optical phonons of CZTS, which is most usually examined in active layers of the CZTS based solar cells, are studied by polarized resonant and non-resonant Raman spectroscopy in the range from 60 to 500 cm(-1) on an oriented single crystal. The phonon mode symmetry of 20 modes from the 27 possible vibrational modes of the kesterite structure is experimentally determined. From in-plane angular dependences of the phonon modes intensities Raman tensor elements are also derived. Whereas a strong intensity enhancement of the polar E and B symmetry modes is induced under resonance conditions, no mode intensity dependence on the incident and scattered light polarization configurations was found in these conditions. Finally, Lyddane-Sachs-Teller relations are applied to estimate the ratios of the static to high-frequency optic dielectric constants parallel and perpendicular to c-optical axis. PMID:26776727

  19. Raman study of opal at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, G.; Wang, S.; Mao, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    More commonly known for their beauty and lore as gemstones, opals are also intriguing geological materials which may have potential for materials science applications. Opal lacks a definite crystalline structure, and is composed of an amorphous packing of hydrated silica (SiO2) spheroids, which provides us with a unique nano-scaled mineraloid with properties unlike those of other amorphous materials like glass. Opals from different localities were studied at high pressure using a diamond anvil cell to apply pressure and Raman spectroscopy to look at changes in bonding as pressure was increased. We first tested different samples from Virgin Valley, NV, Spencer, ID, Juniper Ridge, OR, and Australia, which contain varying amounts of water at ambient conditions, using Raman spectroscopy to determine if they were opal-CT (semicrystalline cristobalite-trydimite volcanic origin) or opal-A (amorphous sedimentary origin). We then used x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell to see how their bonding and structure changed under compression and to determine what effect water content had on their high pressure behavior. Comparison of our results on opal to other high pressure studies of amorphous materials like glass has implications from a geological and materials science standpoint.

  20. Synthesis, characterization, Raman, and surface enhanced Raman studies of semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi

    The major contributions and discoveries of the dissertation include: (1) Homogeneous nucleation processes for the formation of nanocrystals can occur at low temperature and do not need to proceed at high temperature to overcome a high energy barrier. Monodisperse PbS quantum dots (QDs) obtained with nucleation and growth at 45°C support this finding. (2) Monodisperse single elemental Se QDs can be produced by simple solution crystallization from TDE (1-tetradecene) or ODE (1-octadecene). (3) TDE is a better non-coordinating solvent compare to ODE. STDE (S dissolved in TDE) and SeTDE (Se dissolved in TDE) are stable reagents with long storage time. They can be used as universal precursors for S-containing and Se-containing QDs. (4) QDs synthesis can be carried out at low temperature and relatively short reaction time using the simple, non-injection, one-pot synthetic method. (5) The one-pot method can be extended for the synthesis of QDs and graphene oxide nanocomposites and metal and graphene oxide nanocomposites. (6) PbCl2-OLA (oleylamine) is a universal system for the synthesis of Pb-chaclogenides QDs. (7) Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is used to probe both size and wave length dependent quantum confinement effects (QCEs) of PbS QDs. (8) Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool to elucidate crystal structure of Se nanoclusters with size of 1--2 nm. Semiconductor QDs have attracted considerable attention due to their potential for energy-efficient materials in optoelectronic and solar cell applications. When the radius of a QD is decreased to that of the exciton Bohr radius, the valence and conduction bands are known to split into narrower bands due to QCEs. QCEs are both size and wave length dependent. We have developed, synthesized and characterized a series of Pb-chaclogenide QDs, which all the sizes of the QDs are monodisperse and smaller than their respective exciton Bohr radius, to study the QCEs of these QDs. SERS is used as a crucial tool to

  1. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Spectra of Langmuir-Blodgett Films of Tetra-Lauryl Chloroaluminum Phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tao; Zhang, Weiqing; Gan, Fuxi

    1992-07-01

    The Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of tetra-lauryl chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (TLAlClPc) and a 1:1 mixture of TLAlClPc and stearyl alcohol (SA) were prepared. The Raman spectrum of solid TLAlClPc in KBr pellet was investigated. All the Raman lines were assigned. The surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectra of the LB films deposited on the silver island film that were vacuum-deposited on glass slides have been observed.

  2. Excitons in one-phonon resonant Raman scattering: Fröhlich and interference effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarero, A.; Trallero-Giner, C.; Cardona, M.

    1989-12-01

    A theoretical model of resonant Raman scattering including excitons as intermediate states in the process is compared with recent experimental results in some III-V compound semiconductors where the Raman polarizability was obtained in absolute value for several scattering configurations. In particular, Fröhlich (F) interaction and its interference with the deformation potential (DP) one is analyzed in the E0+Δ0 critical point (CP) of GaAs at three different temperatures. Also the E0 and E0+Δ0 CP of GaP and E0+Δ0 of GaSb are analyzed. We show that the inclusion of impurity-induced forbidden LO-phonon Raman scattering is not necessary when excitonic effects are considered. The experimental data of GaAs corresponding to F interaction can be fitted by assuming a Fröhlich constant cF=0.14 eV Aṥ/2. Lifetime broadenings of 12 meV (10 K), 14 meV (100 K), and 28 meV (300 K) are deduced. The lifetime broadening of GaAs and GaSb at 100 K are taken from two-phonon Raman scattering spectra where the incoming and outgoing resonances are well defined. The general features in the comparison with the experiment is that the measured spectra corresponding to F interaction are well fitted; however, the theoretical interference is stronger than the measured one.

  3. Resonance Raman Scattering of Rhodamine 6G as Calculated Using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Lasse; Schatz, George C.

    2006-03-27

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In this work, we present the first calculation of the resonance Raman scattering (RRS) spectrum of rhodamine 6G (R6G) which is a prototype molecule in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The calculation is done using a recently developed time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method, which uses a short-time approximation to evaluate the Raman scattering cross section. The normal Raman spectrum calculated with this method is in good agreement with experimental results. The calculated RRS spectrum shows qualitative agreement with SERS results at a wavelength that corresponds to excitation of the S1 state, but there are significant differences with the measured RRS spectrum at wavelengths that correspond to excitation of the vibronic sideband of S1. Although the agreement with the experiments is not perfect, the results provide insight into the RRS spectrum of R6G at wavelengths close to the absorption maximum where experiments are hindered due to strong fluorescence. The calculated resonance enhancements are found to be on the order of 105. This indicates that a surface enhancement factor of about 1010 would be required in SERS in order to achieve single-molecule detection of R6G.

  4. Shifted excitation resonance Raman difference spectroscopy using a microsystem light source at 488 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiwald, M.; Sowoidnich, K.; Schmidt, H.; Sumpf, B.; Erbert, G.; Kronfeldt, H.-D.

    2010-04-01

    Experimental results in shifted excitation resonance Raman difference spectroscopy (SERRDS) at 488 nm will be presented. A novel compact diode laser system was used as excitation light source. The device is based on a distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser as a pump light source and a nonlinear frequency doubling using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide crystal. All elements including micro-optics are fixed on a micro-optical bench with a footprint of 25 mm × 5 mm. An easy temperature management of the DFB laser and the crystal was used for wavelength tuning. The second harmonic generation (SHG) provides an additional suppression of the spontaneous emission. Raman spectra of polystyrene demonstrate that no laser bandpass filter is needed for the Raman experiments. Resonance-Raman spectra of the restricted food colorant Tartrazine (FD&C Yellow 5, E 102) in distilled water excited at 488 nm demonstrate the suitability of this light source for SERRDS. A limit of detection (LOD) of 0.4 μmol.l-1 of E102 enables SERRDS at 488 nm for trace detection in e.g. food safety control as an appropriate contactless spectroscopic technique.

  5. Concentration-dependent surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering of a porphyrin derivative adsorbed on colloidal silver particles.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Joydeep; Ghosh, Manash; Pal, Prabir; Misra, T N

    2003-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-decylpyridium-4-yl)-21H,23H-porphintetrabromide or Por 10 (H(2)Tdpyp) adsorbed on silver hydrosols are compared with the FTIR and resonance Raman spectrum (RRS) in the bulk and in solution. Comparative analysis of the RR and the FTIR spectra indicate that the molecule, in its free state, has D(2h) symmetry rather than C(2v). The SERS spectra, obtained on adsorption of this molecule on borohydride-reduced silver sol, indicate the formation of silver porphyrin. With the change in the adsorbate concentration, the SERS shows that the molecule changes its orientation on the colloidal silver surface. The appearance of longer wavelength band in the electronic absorption spectra of the sol has been attributed to the coagulation of colloidal silver particles in the sol. The long wavelength band is found to be red-shifted with the decrease in adsorbate concentration. The excitation profile study indicates that the resonance of the Raman excitation radiation with the original sol band is more important than that with the new aggregation band for the SERS activity. This indicates a large contribution of electromagnetic effect to surface enhancement.

  6. Infrared resonance Raman, and excitation profile studies of Os/sub 2/(O/sub 2/CCH/sub 3/)/sub 4/Cl/sub 2/ and Os/sub 2/(O/sub 2/CCD/sub 3/)/sub 4/Cl/sub 2/. The assignment of the osmium-osmium stretching vibration for a complex involving an osmium-osmium multiple bond

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.J.H.; Hempleman, A.J.; Tocher, D.A.

    1988-08-31

    Extensive Raman studies (1525-40 cm/sup /minus/1/) of Os/sub 2/(O/sub 2/CCH/sub 3/)/sub 4/Cl/sub 2/ have led to the identification of the three strong bands, /nu//sub 1/, /nu//sub 2/, and /nu//sub 3/, at 229, 393, and 292 cm/sup /minus/1/ to the key skeletal stretching modes, /nu/(OsOs), /nu/(OsO), and /nu/(OsCl), respectively. Raman spectra of the complex at resonance with the intense electronic band at /lambda//sub max/ = 383 nm lead to the development of a six-membered overtone progression in /nu//sub 1/ as well as combination band progressions in /nu//sub 1/ based upon one quantum of either /nu//sub 2/ or /nu//sub 3/. This indicates that the principal structural change attendant upon excitation to the resonant state is along the OsOs coordinate. Fourier transform infrared spectra (3500-40 cm/sup /minus/1/) have also been obtained. Acetate deuteriation provides conclusive evidence for many of the infrared and Raman band assignments. The study provides the first firm identification of /nu/(OsOs) for a multiply bonded species.

  7. Resonance Raman spectrum and excitation profile of mass-selected zirconium trimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haouari, Hanae; Wang, Huaiming; Craig, Robert; Lombardi, John R.; Lindsay, D. M.

    1995-12-01

    We present the resonance Raman and Raman excitation profile of mass-selected zirconium trimers in argon matrices. In the Raman spectra, two fundamentals and one overtone are observed. Average Raman shifts, along with standard deviations (in parentheses) are 176.7 (13) cm-1 (ν2), 258.0 (12) cm-1 (ν1), and 516.1 (8) cm-1 (2ν1). The ratio of the frequencies of the two lowest lines (ν1/ν2) is 1.46, which is very close to √2. This is indicative of a symmetrical equilateral geometry (D3h). In such a case we expect two normal frequencies, one for a totally symmetric stretch of symmetry a'1 (ν1) and a doubly degenerate bend of symmetry e'(ν2). The Raman excitation profiles of the ν1(a'1) line shows two broad maxima: one near 491 nm and the other near 614 nm. The ν2 (e') profile shows a broad region of intensity only near 614 nm. With the aid of theory we assign the 614 nm band to be 1A'1-1E' (x,y polarized) while the 491 nm band must be 1A'1-1A″2 (z polarized).

  8. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Separated via Aqueous Two-Phase Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. R.; Fagan, J. A.; Hight Walker, A. R.

    2014-03-01

    We report Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) measurements of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) samples dispersed in aqueous solutions via surfactant wrapping and separated using aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) into chirality-enriched semiconducting and metallic SWCNT species. ATPE provides a rapid, robust, and remarkably tunable separation technique that allows isolation of high-purity, individual SWCNT chiralities via modification of the surfactant environment. We report RRS measurements of individual SWCNT species of various chiral index including, armchair and zigzag metals. Raman provides a powerful technique to quantify the metallic SWCNTs in ATPE fractions separated for metallicity. We measure Raman spectra over a wide range of excitation wavelengths from 457 nm to 850 nm using a series of discrete and continuously tunable laser sources coupled to a triple-grating spectrometer with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled detector. The spectra reveal Raman-active vibrational modes, including the low-frequency radial breathing mode (RBM) and higher-order modes. SWCNT chiral vectors are determined from the Raman spectra, specifically the RBM frequencies and corresponding energy excitation profiles, together with input from theoretical models.

  9. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Separated via Aqueous Two-Phase Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. R.; Fagan, J. A.; Hight Walker, A. R.

    2015-03-01

    We report resonance Raman Spectroscopy measurements of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) samples dispersed in aqueous solutions via surfactant wrapping and separated using aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) into chirality-enriched semiconducting and metallic SWCNT species. ATPE provides a rapid, robust, and remarkably tunable separation technique that allows isolation of high-purity, individual SWCNT chiralities via modification of the surfactant environment. We report RRS measurements of individual SWCNT species of various chiral index including, semiconductors, armchair and zigzag metals. Raman provides a powerful technique to quantify the metallic SWCNTs in ATPE fractions separated for metallicity. We measure Raman spectra over a wide range of excitation wavelengths from (457 to 850) nm using a series of discrete and continuously tunable laser sources coupled to a triple-grating spectrometer. The spectra reveal Raman-active vibrational modes, including the low-frequency radial breathing mode (RBM) and higher-order modes. SWCNT chiral vectors are determined from Raman spectra, specifically the RBM frequencies and corresponding energy excitation profiles, together with input from theoretical models.

  10. Quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in Atlantic salmon by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2006-02-01

    Two major carotenoids species found in salmonids muscle tissues are astaxanthin and cantaxanthin. They are taken up from fish food and are responsible for the attractive red-orange color of salmon filet. Since carotenoids are powerful antioxidants and biomarkers of nutrient consumption, they are thought to indicate fish health and resistance to diseases in fish farm environments. Therefore, a rapid, accurate, quantitative optical technique for measuring carotenoid content in salmon tissues is of economic interest. We demonstrate the possibility of using fast, selective, quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in salmon muscle tissues, employing resonance Raman spectroscopy. Analyzing strong Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue laser excitation, we are able to characterize quantitatively the concentrations of carotenoids in salmon muscle tissue. To validate the technique, we compared Raman data with absorption measurements of carotenoid extracts in acetone. A close correspondence was observed in absorption spectra for tissue extract in acetone and a pure astaxanthin solution. Raman results show a linear dependence between Raman and absorption data. The proposed technique holds promise as a method of rapid screening of carotenoid levels in fish muscle tissues and may be attractive for the fish farm industry to assess the dietary status of salmon, risk for infective diseases, and product quality control.

  11. Resonant Raman scattering in Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the electronic structure of Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} studied by synchrotron radiation excitation.

    SciTech Connect

    Ederer, D. L.

    1998-12-03

    This paper is intended to illustrate two points. The first being the extensive growth of resonant Raman soft x-ray scattering due to the emergence of third-generation x-ray sources. With these sources, the ubiquitous presence of Raman scattering near the 3d and 4d ionization thresholds has been used to elucidate the excitation process in a number of rare earth and transition metal compounds. Such scattering can produce dramatic changes in the emission spectrum, as we show in our example of inelastic scattering at the 3d threshold of Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Photon-in photon-out soft x-ray spectroscopy is adding a new dimension to soft x-ray spectroscopy by providing many opportunities for exciting research, especially at third-generation synchrotrons light sources. Second, it is very effective to use theory and experiment to characterize the electronic properties of materials. In particular we confirmed in-plane oxygen-ruthenium bonding in Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}, this first copperless perovskite superconductor, by analyses using calculations, soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (SXE) and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Measurements of this type illustrate the importance of combining SXE and PES measurements with theoretical calculations.

  12. Evidence for methoxatin (pyrroloquinolinequinone) as the cofactor in bovine plasma amine oxidase from resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Moog, R S; McGuirl, M A; Cote, C E; Dooley, D M

    1986-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives of bovine plasma amine oxidase [amine:oxygen oxidoreductase (deaminating) (copper-containing), EC 1.4.3.6] have been measured. Detailed comparisons to the spectra of the corresponding derivatives of methoxatin (pyrroloquinolinequinone), pyridoxal, and other aldehydes and diones provide further evidence that covalently bound methoxatin or a closely similar derivative is the organic cofactor in copper-containing amine oxidases. PMID:3464962

  13. FTIR difference and resonance Raman spectroscopy of rhodopsins with applications to optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint Clair, Erica C.

    The major aim of this thesis is to investigate the molecular basis for the function of several types of rhodopsins with special emphasis on their application to the new field of optogenetics. Rhodopsins are transmembrane biophotonic proteins with 7 alpha-helices and a retinal chromophore. Studies included Archaerhodopsin 3 (AR3), a light driven proton pump similar to the extensively studied bacteriorhodopsin (BR); channelrhodopsins 1 and 2, light-activated ion channels; sensory rhodopsin II (SRII), a light-sensing protein that modulates phototaxis used in archaebacteria; and squid rhodopsins (sRho), the major photopigment in squid vision and a model for human melanopsin, which controls circadian rhythms. The primary techniques used in these studies were FTIR difference spectroscopy and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These techniques, in combination with site directed mutagenesis and other biochemical methodologies produced new knowledge regarding the structural changes of the retinal chromophore, the location and function of internal water molecules as well as specific amino acids and peptide backbone. Specialized techniques were developed that allowed rhodopsins to be studied in intact membrane environments and in some cases in vivo measurements were made on rhodopsin heterologously expressed in E. coli thus allowing the effects of interacting proteins and membrane potential to be investigated. Evidence was found that the local environment of one or more internal water molecules in SRII is altered by interaction with its cognate transducer, HtrII, and is also affected by the local lipid environment. In the case of AR3, many of the broad IR continuum absorption changes below 3000 cm -1, assigned to networks of water molecules involved in proton transport through cytoplasmic and extracellular portions in BR, were found to be very similar to BR. Bands assigned to water molecules near the Schiff base postulated to be involved in proton transport were, however, shifted

  14. Pre-resonance-stimulated Raman scattering for water bilayer structure on laser-induced plasma bubble surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhanlong; Li, Hongdong; Fang, Wenhui; Wang, Shenghan; Sun, Chenglin; Li, Zuowei; Men, Zhiwei

    2015-07-15

    Pre-resonance-stimulated Raman scattering (PSRS) from water molecules in the air/water interfacial regions was studied when the laser-induced plasma bubble was generated at the interfaces. A characteristically lower Raman shift of OH-stretching vibrational modes of water molecules at around 3000  cm(-1) (370 meV) was observed, in which the mechanisms were possibly attributed to the strong hydrogen bond in a well-ordered water bilayer structure that was formed on a laser-induced plasma bubble surface. Simultaneously, the PSRS of ice Ih at about 3100  cm(-1) was obtained, which also belonged to the strong hydrogen bond effect in ice Ih structure.

  15. Maximizing the electromagnetic and chemical resonances of surface-enhanced Raman scattering for nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Lindsay M; Pang, Lin; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2014-08-26

    Although surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has previously been performed with nucleic acids, the measured intensities for each nucleic acid have varied significantly depending on the SERS substrate and excitation wavelength. We have demonstrated that the charge-transfer (CT) mechanism, also known as the chemical enhancement of SERS, is responsible for the discrepancies previously reported in literature. The electronic states of cytosine and guanine attached to silver atoms are computationally calculated and experimentally measured to be in the visible range, which leads to a resonance Raman effect at the corresponding maximum wavelengths. The resulting SERS measurements are in good agreement with the simulated values, in which cytosine-silver shows stronger enhancement at 532 nm and guanine-silver shows stronger enhancement at 785 nm. An atomic layer of aluminum oxide is deposited on substrates to prevent charge-transfer, and corresponding measurements show weaker Raman signals caused by the suppression of the chemical resonance. These findings suggest the optimal SERS signal can be achieved by tuning the excitation wavelength to match both the electromagnetic and chemical resonances, paving the way for future single molecule detection of nucleic acids other than adenine.

  16. Resonance Raman spectra of the (2Fe-2S) clusters of the Rieske protein from thermus and phthalate dioxygenase from pseudomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Kuila, D.; Fee, J.A.; Schoonover, J.R.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1987-03-04

    In this paper a resonance Raman (RR) study of novel iron-sulfur-nitrogen clusters is described which provides evidence for an asymmetric distribution of Cys and N ligands on the cluster. The systems examined were Thermus Rieske protein (TRP) and phthalate dioxygenase (PDO) from Pseudomonas cepacia; the RR spectra of these proteins are compared to that of spinach ferredoxin (SFD).

  17. Signal generation and Raman-resonant imaging by non-degenerate four-wave mixing under tight focusing conditions.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Tyler; Schie, Iwan W; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Huser, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    The authors demonstrate Raman-resonant imaging based on the simultaneous generation of several nonlinear frequency mixing processes resulting from a 3-color coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) experiment. The interaction of three coincident short-pulsed laser beams simultaneously generates both 2-color (degenerate) CARS and 3-color (non-degenerate) CARS signals, which are collected and characterized spectroscopically - allowing for resonant, doubly-resonant, and non-resonant contrast mechanisms. Images obtained from both 2-color and 3-color CARS signals are compared and found to provide complementary information. The 3-color CARS microscopy scheme provides a versatile multiplexed modality for biological imaging, which may extend the capabilities of label-free non-linear microscopy, e.g. by probing multiple Raman resonances.

  18. Signal generation and Raman-resonant imaging by non-degenerate four-wave mixing under tight focusing conditions.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Tyler; Schie, Iwan W; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Huser, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    The authors demonstrate Raman-resonant imaging based on the simultaneous generation of several nonlinear frequency mixing processes resulting from a 3-color coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) experiment. The interaction of three coincident short-pulsed laser beams simultaneously generates both 2-color (degenerate) CARS and 3-color (non-degenerate) CARS signals, which are collected and characterized spectroscopically - allowing for resonant, doubly-resonant, and non-resonant contrast mechanisms. Images obtained from both 2-color and 3-color CARS signals are compared and found to provide complementary information. The 3-color CARS microscopy scheme provides a versatile multiplexed modality for biological imaging, which may extend the capabilities of label-free non-linear microscopy, e.g. by probing multiple Raman resonances. PMID:19953535

  19. Application of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a nuclear proliferation detection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-03-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) potentially possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal verification technology. Some of these ideal traits are: very high selectivity and specificity to allow the deconvolution of a mixture of the chemicals of interest, high sensitivity in order to measure a species at trace levels, high reliability and long-term durability, applicability to a wide range of chemicals capability for sensing in a variety of environmental conditions, independence of the physical state of the chemical capability for quantitative analysis, and finally, but no less important capability for full signal development within seconds. In this presentation, the potential of RRS as a detection/identification technology for chemicals pertinent to nuclear materials production and processing will be assessed. A review of the basic principles behind this technique, both theoretical and experimental, will be discussed along with some recent results obtained in this laboratory. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy hv promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, therefore providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. The enhancement of a Raman signal occurs when the excitation frequency is isoenergetic with an allowed electronic transition. Under resonance conditions, scattering cross-sections have been enhanced up to 6 orders of magnitude, thereby allowing the measurement of resonance Raman spectra from concentrations as dilute as 20 ppb for PAHs (with the potential of pptr). In detection/verification programs, this condition translates to increased sensitivity (ppm/ppb) and increased probing distance (m/km).

  20. Application of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a nuclear proliferation detection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) potentially possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal verification technology. Some of these ideal traits are: very high selectivity and specificity to allow the deconvolution of a mixture of the chemicals of interest, high sensitivity in order to measure a species at trace levels, high reliability and long-term durability, applicability to a wide range of chemicals capability for sensing in a variety of environmental conditions, independence of the physical state of the chemical capability for quantitative analysis, and finally, but no less important capability for full signal development within seconds. In this presentation, the potential of RRS as a detection/identification technology for chemicals pertinent to nuclear materials production and processing will be assessed. A review of the basic principles behind this technique, both theoretical and experimental, will be discussed along with some recent results obtained in this laboratory. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy hv promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, therefore providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. The enhancement of a Raman signal occurs when the excitation frequency is isoenergetic with an allowed electronic transition. Under resonance conditions, scattering cross-sections have been enhanced up to 6 orders of magnitude, thereby allowing the measurement of resonance Raman spectra from concentrations as dilute as 20 ppb for PAHs (with the potential of pptr). In detection/verification programs, this condition translates to increased sensitivity (ppm/ppb) and increased probing distance (m/km).

  1. Redox State of Cytochromes in Frozen Yeast Cells Probed by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Okotrub, Konstantin A; Surovtsev, Nikolay V

    2015-12-01

    Cryopreservation is a well-established technique used for the long-term storage of biological materials whose biological activity is effectively stopped under low temperatures (suspended animation). Since most biological methods do not work in a low-temperature frozen environment, the mechanism and details of the depression of cellular activity in the frozen state remain largely uncharacterized. In this work, we propose, to our knowledge, a new approach to study the downregulation of the redox activity of cytochromes b and c in freezing yeast cells in a contactless, label-free manner. Our approach is based on cytochrome photobleaching effects observed in the resonance Raman spectra of live cells. Photoinduced and native redox reactions that contributed to the photobleaching rate were studied over a wide temperature range (from -173 to +25 °C). We found that ice formation influences both the rate of cytochrome redox reactions and the balance between the reduced and oxidized cytochromes. We demonstrate that the temperature dependence of native redox reaction rates can be well described by the thermal activation law with an apparent energy of 32.5 kJ/mol, showing that the redox reaction rate is ∼10(15) times slower at liquid nitrogen temperature than at room temperature.

  2. Redox State of Cytochromes in Frozen Yeast Cells Probed by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Okotrub, Konstantin A; Surovtsev, Nikolay V

    2015-12-01

    Cryopreservation is a well-established technique used for the long-term storage of biological materials whose biological activity is effectively stopped under low temperatures (suspended animation). Since most biological methods do not work in a low-temperature frozen environment, the mechanism and details of the depression of cellular activity in the frozen state remain largely uncharacterized. In this work, we propose, to our knowledge, a new approach to study the downregulation of the redox activity of cytochromes b and c in freezing yeast cells in a contactless, label-free manner. Our approach is based on cytochrome photobleaching effects observed in the resonance Raman spectra of live cells. Photoinduced and native redox reactions that contributed to the photobleaching rate were studied over a wide temperature range (from -173 to +25 °C). We found that ice formation influences both the rate of cytochrome redox reactions and the balance between the reduced and oxidized cytochromes. We demonstrate that the temperature dependence of native redox reaction rates can be well described by the thermal activation law with an apparent energy of 32.5 kJ/mol, showing that the redox reaction rate is ∼10(15) times slower at liquid nitrogen temperature than at room temperature. PMID:26636934

  3. Dyes at Ag colloids: The role of energy transfer processes for surface fluorescence and surface enhanced resonance raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinger, B.; Gerolymatou, A.

    1985-06-01

    The comparison of Raman spectra of a pure water solution with those of an aqueous AG colloid reveals only very weak differences. This indicates, not unexpectedly, a low electromagnetic (EM) enhancement factor ( F ≈ 100) for the Raman scattering of water. Just in opposite to these weak effects, the addition of Ag sol to a {10 -10 M }/{l} rhodamine 6G solution causes the replacement of the former solution fluorescence by a similar intense surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS). At higher dye concentrations (up to {10 -8 M }/{l}) it is replaced by both, by SERRS and surface fluorescence. The SERRS cross section is generally higher than 10 -20 cm 2 sr -1 molecule -1 photon -1. This indicates that a model based on a combination of weak EM resonances with molecular resonance Raman effects cannot explain a total enhancement by more than 10 orders of magnitude. An energy-transfer model seems to be more suitable.

  4. Analysis of normal and diseased colon mucosa using ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boustany, Nada N.; Manoharan, Ramasamy; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    1996-04-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy was used to characterize normal and diseased colon mucosa in vitro. A tunable mode-locked Titanium:Sapphire laser operating at 76 MHz was used to irradiate normal and diseased colon tissue samples with 251 nm light generated from the third harmonic of the fundamental radiation. The Raman scattered light was collected and analyzed using a 1 meter spectrometer fitted with a UV coated, liquid nitrogen cooled CCD detector. The measured spectra show prominent bands that correspond to those of known tissue constituents including nucleic acids, aromatic amino acids and lipids. Using the Raman lineshapes measured from pure solutions of nucleotides, tryptophan, tyrosine, FAD, and from lipid-rich serosal fat, the colon spectra were modeled by a least square fitting algorithm whereby the colon spectra were assumed to be a linear combination of the pure biochemical lineshapes. The relative Raman scattering cross section of each biochemical was determined so that the relative concentration of each compound with respect to the others, could be extracted from a given tissue spectrum.

  5. Resonant-Raman Intensities of N-layer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Henrique; Froehlicher, Guillaume; Lorchat, Ettienne; Fernique, François; Molina-Sánchez, Alejandro; Berciaud, Stéphane; Wirtz, Ludger

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have interesting optical and electronic properties that make them good candidates for nano-engineering applications. Raman spectroscopy provides information about the vibrational modes and optical spectrum at the same time: when the laser energy is close to an electronic transition, the intensity is increased due to resonance. We investigate these effects combining different ab initio methods: we obtain ground-state and vibrational properties from density functional theory and the optical absorption spectrum using GW corrections and the Bethe-Salpeter equation to account for the excitonic effects which are known to play an important role in TMDs. Using a quasi-static finite differences approach, we calculate the dielectric susceptibility for different light polarizations and different phonon modes in order to determine the Raman tensor of TMDs, in particular of multi-layer and bulk MoTe2. We explain recent experimental results for the splitting of high-frequency modes and deviations from the non-resonant Raman model. We also give a brief outlook on possible improvements of the methodology.

  6. Stimulated Stokes and Antistokes Raman Scattering in Microspherical Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators.

    PubMed

    Farnesi, Daniele; Berneschi, Simone; Cosi, Franco; Righini, Giancarlo C; Soria, Silvia; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero

    2016-01-01

    Dielectric microspheres can confine light and sound for a length of time through high quality factor whispering gallery modes (WGM). Glass microspheres can be thought as a store of energy with a huge variety of applications: compact laser sources, highly sensitive biochemical sensors and nonlinear phenomena. A protocol for the fabrication of both the microspheres and coupling system is given. The couplers described here are tapered fibers. Efficient generation of nonlinear phenomena related to third order optical non-linear susceptibility Χ((3)) interactions in triply resonant silica microspheres is presented in this paper. The interactions here reported are: Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS), and four wave mixing processes comprising Stimulated Anti-stokes Raman Scattering (SARS). A proof of the cavity-enhanced phenomenon is given by the lack of correlation among the pump, signal and idler: a resonant mode has to exist in order to obtain the pair of signal and idler. In the case of hyperparametric oscillations (four wave mixing and stimulated anti-stokes Raman scattering), the modes must fulfill the energy and momentum conservation and, last but not least, have a good spatial overlap. PMID:27078752

  7. Stimulated Stokes and Antistokes Raman Scattering in Microspherical Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators.

    PubMed

    Farnesi, Daniele; Berneschi, Simone; Cosi, Franco; Righini, Giancarlo C; Soria, Silvia; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero

    2016-04-04

    Dielectric microspheres can confine light and sound for a length of time through high quality factor whispering gallery modes (WGM). Glass microspheres can be thought as a store of energy with a huge variety of applications: compact laser sources, highly sensitive biochemical sensors and nonlinear phenomena. A protocol for the fabrication of both the microspheres and coupling system is given. The couplers described here are tapered fibers. Efficient generation of nonlinear phenomena related to third order optical non-linear susceptibility Χ((3)) interactions in triply resonant silica microspheres is presented in this paper. The interactions here reported are: Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS), and four wave mixing processes comprising Stimulated Anti-stokes Raman Scattering (SARS). A proof of the cavity-enhanced phenomenon is given by the lack of correlation among the pump, signal and idler: a resonant mode has to exist in order to obtain the pair of signal and idler. In the case of hyperparametric oscillations (four wave mixing and stimulated anti-stokes Raman scattering), the modes must fulfill the energy and momentum conservation and, last but not least, have a good spatial overlap.

  8. Directly probing redox-linked quinones in photosystem II membrane fragments via UV resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Yao, Mingdong; Pagba, Cynthia V; Zheng, Yang; Fei, Liping; Feng, Zhaochi; Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) harvests sunlight with bound pigments to oxidize water and reduce quinone to quinol, which serves as electron and proton mediators for solar-to-chemical energy conversion. At least two types of quinone cofactors in PSII are redox-linked: QA, and QB. Here, we for the first time apply 257-nm ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to acquire the molecular vibrations of plastoquinone (PQ) in PSII membranes. Owing to the resonance enhancement effect, the vibrational signal of PQ in PSII membranes is prominent. A strong band at 1661 cm(-1) is assigned to ring CC/CO symmetric stretch mode (ν8a mode) of PQ, and a weak band at 469 cm(-1) to ring stretch mode. By using a pump-probe difference UVRR method and a sample jet technique, the signals of QA and QB can be distinguished. A frequency difference of 1.4 cm(-1) in ν8a vibrational mode between QA and QB is observed, corresponding to ~86 mV redox potential difference imposed by their protein environment. In addition, there are other PQs in the PSII membranes. A negligible anharmonicity effect on their combination band at 2130 cm(-1) suggests that the 'other PQs' are situated in a hydrophobic environment. The detection of the 'other PQs' might be consistent with the view that another functional PQ cofactor (not QA or QB) exists in PSII. This UVRR approach will be useful to the study of quinone molecules in photosynthesis or other biological systems. PMID:25791219

  9. Directly probing redox-linked quinones in photosystem II membrane fragments via UV resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Yao, Mingdong; Pagba, Cynthia V; Zheng, Yang; Fei, Liping; Feng, Zhaochi; Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) harvests sunlight with bound pigments to oxidize water and reduce quinone to quinol, which serves as electron and proton mediators for solar-to-chemical energy conversion. At least two types of quinone cofactors in PSII are redox-linked: QA, and QB. Here, we for the first time apply 257-nm ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to acquire the molecular vibrations of plastoquinone (PQ) in PSII membranes. Owing to the resonance enhancement effect, the vibrational signal of PQ in PSII membranes is prominent. A strong band at 1661 cm(-1) is assigned to ring CC/CO symmetric stretch mode (ν8a mode) of PQ, and a weak band at 469 cm(-1) to ring stretch mode. By using a pump-probe difference UVRR method and a sample jet technique, the signals of QA and QB can be distinguished. A frequency difference of 1.4 cm(-1) in ν8a vibrational mode between QA and QB is observed, corresponding to ~86 mV redox potential difference imposed by their protein environment. In addition, there are other PQs in the PSII membranes. A negligible anharmonicity effect on their combination band at 2130 cm(-1) suggests that the 'other PQs' are situated in a hydrophobic environment. The detection of the 'other PQs' might be consistent with the view that another functional PQ cofactor (not QA or QB) exists in PSII. This UVRR approach will be useful to the study of quinone molecules in photosynthesis or other biological systems.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study of anthocyanidins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaffino, Chiara; Russo, Bianca; Bruni, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    Anthocyanins are an important class of natural compounds responsible for the red, purple and blue colors in a large number of flowers, fruits and cereal grains. They are polyhydroxy- and polymethoxy-derivatives of 2-phenylbenzopyrylium (flavylium) salts, which are present in nature as glycosylated molecules. The aim of the present study is to assess the identification of anthocyanidins, i.e. anthocyanins without the glycosidic moiety, by means of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), a very chemically-specific technique which is moreover sensitive to subtle changes in molecular structures. These features can lead to elect SERS, among the spectroscopic tools currently at disposal of scientists, as a technique of choice for the identification of anthocyanidins, since: (1) anthocyanidins structurally present the same benzopyrylium moiety and differentiate only for the substitution pattern on their phenyl ring, (2) different species are present in aqueous solution depending on the pH. It will be demonstrated that, while resonance Raman spectra of anthocyanidins are very similar to one another, SER spectra show greater differences, leading to a further step in the identification of such important compounds in diluted solutions by means of vibrational spectroscopy. Moreover, the dependence on the pH of the six most common anthocyanidins, i.e. cyanidin, delphinidin, pelargonidin, peonidin, malvidin and petunidin, is studied. To the best of the authors' knowledge, a complete SERS study of such important molecules is reported in the present work for the first time.

  11. Resonant raman scattering and dispersion of polar optical and acoustic phonons in hexagonal inn

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, V. Yu. Klochikhin, A. A.; Smirnov, A. N.; Strashkova, I. Yu.; Krylov, A. S.; Lu Hai; Schaff, William J.; Lee, H.-M.; Hong, Y.-L.; Gwo, S.

    2010-02-15

    It is shown that a study of the dependence of impurity-related resonant first-order Raman scattering on the frequency of excitation light makes it possible to observe the dispersion of polar optical and acoustic branches of vibrational spectrum in hexagonal InN within a wide range of wave vectors. It is established that the wave vectors of excited phonons are uniquely related to the energy of excitation photon. Frequencies of longitudinal optical phonons E{sub 1}(LO) and A{sub 1}(LO) in hexagonal InN were measured in the range of excitation-photon energies from 2.81 to 1.17 eV and the frequencies of longitudinal acoustic phonons were measured in the range 2.81-1.83 eV of excitation-photon energies. The obtained dependences made it possible to extrapolate the dispersion of phonons A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 1}(LO) to as far as the point {Gamma} in the Brillouin zone and estimate the center-band energies of these phonons (these energies have not been uniquely determined so far).

  12. Two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy of oxygen- and water-ligated myoglobins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Cheshire, Thomas P.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy has recently been developed as a tool for studies of structural heterogeneity and photochemical dynamics in condensed phases. In this paper, 2DRR spectroscopy is used to investigate line broadening mechanisms of both oxygen- and water-ligated myoglobins. General signatures of anharmonicity and inhomogeneous line broadening are first established with model calculations to facilitate signal interpretation. It is shown that the present quasi-degenerate version of 2DRR spectroscopy is insensitive to anharmonicity, because signal generation is allowed for harmonic modes. Rather, the key information to be gained from 2DRR spectroscopy pertains to the line broadening mechanisms, which are fairly obvious by inspection of the data. 2DRR signals acquired for both heme protein systems reveal significant heterogeneity in the vibrational modes local to the heme's propionic acid side chains. These side chains are known to interact with solvent, because they protrude from the hydrophobic pocket that encloses the heme. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the heterogeneity detected in our 2DRR experiments reflects fluctuations in the geometries of the side chains. Knowledge of such thermal motions will be useful for understanding protein function (e.g., ligand binding) because the side chains are an effective "gateway" for the exchange of thermal energy between the heme and solvent.

  13. 13C Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and µ-Raman Spectroscopic Characterization of Sicilian Amber.

    PubMed

    Barone, Germana; Capitani, Donatella; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Proietti, Noemi; Raneri, Simona; Longobardo, Ugo; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2016-08-01

    (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and µ-Raman spectroscopy were applied to characterize Sicilian amber samples. The main goal of this work was to supply a complete study of simetite, highlighting discriminating criteria useful to distinguish Sicilian amber from fossil resins from other regions and laying the foundations for building a spectroscopic database of Sicilian amber. With this aim, a private collection of unrefined simetite samples and fossil resins from the Baltic region and Dominican Republic was analyzed. Overall, the obtained spectra permitted simetite to be distinguished from the other resins. In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectroscopic data, allowing the clustering of simetite samples with respect to the Baltic and Dominican samples and to group the simetite samples in two sets, depending on their maturity. Finally, the analysis of loadings allowed for a better understanding of the spectral features that mainly influenced the discriminating characteristics of the investigated ambers. PMID:27340217

  14. Raman resonance due to magnetic fluctuations in iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jiashen; Hinojosa, Alberto; Chubukov, Andrey

    We perform theoretical analysis of polarization-sensitive Raman spectroscopy on NaFe1-xCoxAs and Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2, focusing on two features seen in the B1 g symmetry channel (in one Fe unit cell notation): the strong temperature dependence of the static, uniform Raman response in the normal state and the existence of a collective mode in the superconducting state. We show that both features can be explained by the coupling of fermions to pairs of magnetic fluctuations via the Aslamazov-Larkin process. We argue that the singular temperature dependence in the normal state comes from the Aslamazov-Larkin vertex, while the resonance is due to the interaction between two propagating spin fluctuations in an s+- superconductor.

  15. [Resonance Raman spectroscopy of metalloporphyrins and photoreaction centers]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bocarsly, A.B.

    1992-12-31

    Critical has been understanding the role of intrinsic cyanometalate overlayers in modulating interfacial photoinduced charge transfer processes occuring at the Cd chalconide/aqueous ferri-ferrocyanide interface. Structural and charge transfer studies of [CdFe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 2-/1-} overlayers were undertaken; a picture has evolved which directly links charge transfer mediated cation intercalation processes to surface overlayer crystal structure, and overlayer structure to critical charge transfer parameters.

  16. Proton capture resonance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.E. |; Bilpuch, E.G. |; Bybee, C.R. |; Cox, J.M.; Fittje, L.M. |; Labonte, M.A.; Moore, E.F.; Shriner, J.D. |; Shriner, J.F. Jr. |; Vavrina, G.A. |; Wallace, P.M. |

    1997-02-01

    The fluctuation properties of quantum systems now are used as a signature of quantum chaos. The analyses require data of extremely high quality. The {sup 29}Si(p,{gamma}) reaction is being used to establish a complete level scheme of {sup 30}P to study chaos and isospin breaking in this nuclide. Determination of the angular momentum J, the parity {pi}, and the isospin T from resonance capture data is considered. Special emphasis is placed on the capture angular distributions and on a geometric description of these angular distributions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Double Resonant Raman Scattering and Valley Coherence Generation in Monolayer WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Glazov, M. M.; Robert, C.; Amand, T.; Marie, X.; Urbaszek, B.

    2015-09-01

    The electronic states at the direct band gap of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides such as WSe2 at the K+ and K- valleys are related by time reversal and may be viewed as pseudospins. The corresponding optical interband transitions are governed by robust excitons. Excitation with linearly polarized light yields the coherent superposition of exciton pseudospin states, referred to as coherent valley states. Here, we uncover how and why valley coherence can be generated efficiently. In double resonant Raman spectroscopy, we show that the optically generated 2 s exciton state differs from the 1 s state by exactly the energy of the combination of several prominent phonons. Superimposed on the exciton photoluminescence (PL), we observe the double resonant Raman signal. This spectrally narrow peak shifts with the excitation laser energy as incoming photons match the 2 s and outgoing photons the 1 s exciton transition. The multiphonon resonance has important consequences: following linearly polarized excitation of the 2 s exciton, a superposition of valley states is efficiently transferred from the 2 s to 1 s state. This explains the high degree of valley coherence measured for the 1 s exciton PL.

  18. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Sonkawade, R. G.; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2013-02-01

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV 60Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  19. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Sonkawade, R. G.

    2013-02-05

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV {sup 60}Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  20. [Vibration studies of amphetamine and methamphetamine by micro Raman].

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Chen, D; Zhang, P; Lu, F; Xie, H; Li, H

    1999-10-01

    For the first time, we obtained and investigated the Raman spectra of amphetamine and methamphetamine by micro Raman with incidence excitation light 514.5 nm under the ambient environment. According to the fact that both molecules belong to single substituted benzene which has the symmetry of Cy2v, the attribution of Raman vibration modes in amphetamine and methamphetamine molecules was carried out by studying the spectral lines in the two spectra. The Raman line that only appeared in methamphetamine but could not be seen in any other drugs we have investigated was most possibly attributed to the stretching vibration between C-N(+)-C.

  1. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of turquoise minerals.

    PubMed

    Čejka, Jiří; Sejkora, Jiří; Macek, Ivo; Malíková, Radana; Wang, Lina; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L

    2015-10-01

    Raman and infrared spectra of three well-defined turquoise samples, CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O, from Lavender Pit, Bisbee, Cochise county, Arizona; Kouroudaiko mine, Faleme river, Senegal and Lynch Station, Virginia were studied, interpreted and compared. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of phosphate tetrahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. Approximate O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths were inferred from the Raman and infrared spectra. No Raman and infrared bands attributable to the stretching and bending vibrations of (PO3OH)(2-) units were observed. PMID:25956330

  2. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of turquoise minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čejka, Jiří; Sejkora, Jiří; Macek, Ivo; Malíková, Radana; Wang, Lina; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L.

    2015-10-01

    Raman and infrared spectra of three well-defined turquoise samples, CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O, from Lavender Pit, Bisbee, Cochise county, Arizona; Kouroudaiko mine, Faleme river, Senegal and Lynch Station, Virginia were studied, interpreted and compared. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of phosphate tetrahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. Approximate O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths were inferred from the Raman and infrared spectra. No Raman and infrared bands attributable to the stretching and bending vibrations of (PO3OH)2- units were observed.

  3. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of turquoise minerals.

    PubMed

    Čejka, Jiří; Sejkora, Jiří; Macek, Ivo; Malíková, Radana; Wang, Lina; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L

    2015-10-01

    Raman and infrared spectra of three well-defined turquoise samples, CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O, from Lavender Pit, Bisbee, Cochise county, Arizona; Kouroudaiko mine, Faleme river, Senegal and Lynch Station, Virginia were studied, interpreted and compared. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of phosphate tetrahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. Approximate O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths were inferred from the Raman and infrared spectra. No Raman and infrared bands attributable to the stretching and bending vibrations of (PO3OH)(2-) units were observed.

  4. Limiting effects on laser compression by resonant backward Raman scattering in modern experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yampolsky, Nikolai A.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-05-15

    Through resonant backward Raman scattering, the plasma wave mediates the energy transfer between long pump and short seed laser pulses. These mediations can result in pulse compression at extraordinarily high powers. However, both the overall efficiency of the energy transfer and the duration of the amplified pulse depend upon the persistence of the plasma wave excitation. At least with respect to the recent state-of-the-art experiments, it is possible to deduce that at present the experimentally realized efficiency of the amplifier is likely constrained mainly by two effects, namely, the pump chirp and the plasma wave wavebreaking.

  5. Monitoring LED-induced carotenoid increase in grapes by Transmission Resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzálvez, Alicia G.; Martínez, Nerea L.; Telle, Helmut H.; Ureña, Ángel González

    2013-02-01

    Transmission Resonance Raman (TRR) spectroscopy combines increased signal-to-noise ratio with enhanced analytical sensibility. TRR was applied to directly monitor, without any sample preparation, the enhancement of β-carotene content in table grapes when they are irradiated by low power UV-LEDs. It was shown that, with respect to control samples, the carotenoid content in the grapes increased about five-fold, using UV-LED irradiation doses being two orders of magnitude lower than the maximum limit allowed by United States Food and Drug Administration. These promising results may pave the way for the development of easy, non-invasive techniques to improve food quality.

  6. Generating monomeric 5-coordinated microperoxidase-11 using carboxylic acid functionalized silver nanoparticles: A surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, Govindasamy; Sivanesan, Arumugam; Kannan, Ayyadurai; Sevvel, Ranganathan

    2016-10-01

    Microperoxidase-11 (MP-11), a heme undecapeptide obtained by proteolytic digestion of cytochrome c, resembles peroxidase enzyme when its heme center is 5-coordinated with a vacant sixth coordination site. However, MP-11 always tends to aggregate in both solution and on surface and eventually forms the 6-coordinated heme. Thus, the present study investigates the immobilization strategy of MP-11 on nanoparticle surface in order to generate monomeric 5-coordinated MP-11 and make them as an efficient biocatalyst. The powerful surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) technique is being employed to attain the detailed structural information of the catalytic site i.e., the heme center. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) tuned and 6-mercaptohexanoic acid (MHA) functionalized silver nanoparticles (Ag@MHA NPs) are used as Raman signal amplifier. The outcome of the SERRS study unambiguously portrays the existence of monomeric 5-coordinated MP-11 on Ag@MHA NPs surface. Here, Ag@MHA NPs plays a dual role of providing a platform to create monomeric 5-coordinated MP-11 and to load large number of MP-11 due to its high surface to volume ratio. Further, the electrostatic interaction between Ag@MHA NPs and MP-11 leads to instantaneous SERRS signal enhancement with a Raman enhancement factor (EFSERS) of 2.36×10(6). Langmuir adsorption isotherm has been employed for the adsorption of MP-11 on Ag@MHA NPs surface, which provides the real surface coverage (ΓS(*)) and equilibrium constant (K) value of 1.54nm and 5×10(11)M(-1). Furthermore, the peroxidase activity of MP-11 has been demonstrated through electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction. PMID:27434160

  7. Generating monomeric 5-coordinated microperoxidase-11 using carboxylic acid functionalized silver nanoparticles: A surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, Govindasamy; Sivanesan, Arumugam; Kannan, Ayyadurai; Sevvel, Ranganathan

    2016-10-01

    Microperoxidase-11 (MP-11), a heme undecapeptide obtained by proteolytic digestion of cytochrome c, resembles peroxidase enzyme when its heme center is 5-coordinated with a vacant sixth coordination site. However, MP-11 always tends to aggregate in both solution and on surface and eventually forms the 6-coordinated heme. Thus, the present study investigates the immobilization strategy of MP-11 on nanoparticle surface in order to generate monomeric 5-coordinated MP-11 and make them as an efficient biocatalyst. The powerful surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) technique is being employed to attain the detailed structural information of the catalytic site i.e., the heme center. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) tuned and 6-mercaptohexanoic acid (MHA) functionalized silver nanoparticles (Ag@MHA NPs) are used as Raman signal amplifier. The outcome of the SERRS study unambiguously portrays the existence of monomeric 5-coordinated MP-11 on Ag@MHA NPs surface. Here, Ag@MHA NPs plays a dual role of providing a platform to create monomeric 5-coordinated MP-11 and to load large number of MP-11 due to its high surface to volume ratio. Further, the electrostatic interaction between Ag@MHA NPs and MP-11 leads to instantaneous SERRS signal enhancement with a Raman enhancement factor (EFSERS) of 2.36×10(6). Langmuir adsorption isotherm has been employed for the adsorption of MP-11 on Ag@MHA NPs surface, which provides the real surface coverage (ΓS(*)) and equilibrium constant (K) value of 1.54nm and 5×10(11)M(-1). Furthermore, the peroxidase activity of MP-11 has been demonstrated through electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction.

  8. Binding of bufuralol, dextromethorphan, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethylamphetamine to wild-type and F120A mutant cytochrome P450 2D6 studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bonifacio, Alois . E-mail: zwan@few.vu.nl

    2006-05-12

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is one of the most important drug-metabolizing enzymes in humans. Resonance Raman data, reported for First time for CYP2D6, show that the CYP2D6 heme is found to be in a six-coordinated low-spin state in the absence of substrates, and it is perturbed to different extents by bufuralol, dextromethorphan, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethylamphetamine (MDMA). Dextromethorphan and MDMA induce in CYP2D6 a significant amount of five-coordinated high-spin heme species and reduce the polarity of its heme-pocket, whereas bufuralol does not. Spectra of the F120A mutant CYP2D6 suggest that Phe{sup 12} is involved in substrate-binding of dextromethorphan and MDMA, being responsible for the spectral differences observed between these two compounds and bufuralol. These differences could be explained postulating a different substrate mobility for each compound in the CYP2D6 active site, consistently with the role previously suggested for Phe{sup 12} in binding dextromethorphan and MDMA.

  9. Physical origin of Davydov splitting and resonant Raman spectroscopy of Davydov components in multilayer MoTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Q. J.; Tan, Q. H.; Zhang, X.; Wu, J. B.; Sheng, B. W.; Wan, Y.; Wang, X. Q.; Dai, L.; Tan, P. H.

    2016-03-01

    We systematically study the high-resolution and polarized Raman spectra of multilayer (ML) MoTe2 . The layer-breathing (LB) and shear (C) modes are observed in the ultralow-frequency region, which are used to quantitatively evaluate the interlayer coupling in ML MoTe2 based on the linear chain model, in which only the nearest interlayer coupling is considered. The Raman spectra on three different substrates verify the negligible substrate effect on the phonon frequencies of ML MoTe2 . Ten excitation energies are used to measure the high-frequency modes of N -layer MoTe2 (N L MoTe2 ; N is an integer). Under the resonant excitation condition, we observe N -dependent Davydov components in ML MoTe2 , originating from the Raman-active A1'(A1g 2) modes at ˜172 c m-1 . More than two Davydov components are observed in N L MoTe2 for N >4 by Raman spectroscopy. The N -dependent Davydov components are further investigated based on the symmetry analysis. A van der Waals model only considering the nearest interlayer coupling has been proposed to well understand the Davydov splitting of high-frequency A1'(A1g 2) modes. The different resonant profiles for the two Davydov components in 3L MoTe2 indicate that proper excitation energy of ˜1.8 -2.2 eV must be chosen to observe the Davydov splitting in ML MoTe2 . Our work presents a simple way to identify layer number of ultrathin MoTe2 flakes by the corresponding number and peak position of Davydov components. Our work also provides a direct evidence from Raman spectroscopy of how the nearest van der Waals interactions significantly affect the frequency of the high-frequency intralayer phonon modes in multilayer MoTe2 and expands the understanding on the lattice vibrations and interlayer coupling of transition metal dichalcogenides and other two-dimensional materials.

  10. Raman spectroscopy of gliomas: an exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Mahesh; Hole, Arti R.; Shridhar, E.; Moiyadi, Aliasgar V.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Gliomas are extremely infiltrative type of brain cancers, the borders of which are difficult to locate. Gliomas largely consist of tumors of astrocytic or oligodendroglial lineage. Usually stereotactic surgery is performed to obtain tumor tissue sample. Complete excision of these tumors with preservation of uninvolved normal areas is important during brain tumor surgeries. The present study was undertaken to explore feasibility of classifying abnormal and normal glioma tissues with Raman spectroscopy (RS). RS is a nondestructive vibrational spectroscopic technique, which provides information about molecular composition, molecular structures and molecular interactions in tissue. Postoperated 33 (20-abnormal and 13-normal) gliomas tissue samples of different grades were collected under clinical supervision. Five micron section from tissue sample was used for confirmatory histopathological diagnosis while the remaining tissue was placed on CaF2 window and spectra were acquired using a fiberoptic-probe-coupled HE-785 Raman-spectrometer. Spectral acquisition parameters were laser power-80mW, integration-20s and averaged over 3 accumulations. Spectra were pre-processed and subjected to unsupervised Principal-Component Analysis (PCA) to identify trends of classification. Supervised PC-LDA (Principal-Component-Linear-Discriminant Analysis) was used to develop standard-models using spectra of 12 normal and abnormal specimens each. Leave-one-out crossvalidation yielded classification-efficiency of 90% and 80% for normal and abnormal conditions, respectively. Evaluation with an independent-test data-set comprising of 135 spectra of 9 samples provided sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 70%. Findings of this preliminary study may pave way for objective tumor margin assessment during brain surgery.

  11. Remote-Raman spectroscopic study of minerals under supercritical CO2 relevant to Venus exploration.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shiv K; Misra, Anupam K; Clegg, Samuel M; Barefield, James E; Wiens, Roger C; Acosta, Tayro E; Bates, David E

    2011-10-01

    The authors have utilized a recently developed compact Raman spectrometer equipped with an 85 mm focal length (f/1.8) Nikon camera lens and a custom mini-ICCD detector at the University of Hawaii for measuring remote Raman spectra of minerals under supercritical CO(2) (Venus chamber, ∼102 atm pressure and 423 K) excited with a pulsed 532 nm laser beam of 6 mJ/pulse and 10 Hz. These experiments demonstrate that by focusing a frequency-doubled 532 nm Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam with a 10× beam expander to a 1mm spot on minerals located at 2m inside a Venus chamber, it is possible to measure the remote Raman spectra of anhydrous sulfates, carbonates, and silicate minerals relevant to Venus exploration during daytime or nighttime with 10s integration time. The remote Raman spectra of gypsum, anhydrite, barite, dolomite and siderite contain fingerprint Raman lines along with the Fermi resonance doublet of CO(2). Raman spectra of gypsum revealed dehydration of the mineral with time under supercritical CO(2) at 423 K. Fingerprint Raman lines of olivine, diopside, wollastonite and α-quartz can easily be identified in the spectra of these respective minerals under supercritical CO(2). The results of the present study show that time-resolved remote Raman spectroscopy with a compact Raman spectrometer of moderate resolution equipped with a gated intensified CCD detector and low power laser source could be a potential tool for exploring Venus surface mineralogy both during daytime and nighttime from a lander.

  12. Resonance Raman spectroscopy for human cancer detection of key molecules with clinical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Li, Jiyou; Zhou, Lixin; He, Jingsheng; Sun, Yi; Pu, Yang; Zhu, Ke; Liu, Yulong; Li, Qingbo; Cheng, Gangge; Alfano, Robert R.

    2013-03-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) has the potential to reveal the differences between cancerous and normal breast and brain tissues in vitro. This differences caused by the changes of specific biomolecules in the tissues were displayed in resonance enhanced of vibrational fingerprints. It observed that the changes of reduced collagen contents and the number of methyl may show the sub-methylation of DNA in cancer cells. Statistical theoretical models of Bayesian, principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machine (SVM) were used for distinguishing cancer from normal based on the RR spectral data of breast and meninges tissues yielding the diagnostic sensitivity of 80% and 90.9%, and specificity of 100% and 100%, respectively. The results demonstrated that the RR spectroscopic technique could be applied as clinical optical pathology tool with a high accuracy and reliability.

  13. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy of iron-dopamine complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalchyk, Will K.; Davis, Kevin L.; Morris, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) at silver colloids is used to detect the catecholamines, 3-hydroxytyramine (dopamine) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), in a modified Ringer's solution. Catecholamines form very strong complexes with iron(III) in solution ( Kf > 10 40) and exhibit a broad ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT) absorption in the visible (˜ 500 nm). Resonance enhancement is achieved by excitation at 532 nm from a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser with high quality spectra attainable in 1 s. Maximum SERRS signal is observed when basic buffer is added to a dopamine sample containing 50 × 10 -6 M ferric ion. Dopamine concentrations in the nanomolar (resting level) range are obtained using this technique.

  14. Raman Lasing and Cavity Resonances in Water Micro-Droplets: Possible Effects on Shortwave Cloud Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Wilson, K. R.; Messer, B. M.; Cohen, R. C.; Saykally, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    The influence of narrow optical resonances, which result from trapping of light rays via total internal reflection in water droplets, on the absorption of shortwave (SW) solar radiation has been characterized through high resolution Mie scattering calculations. Our results indicate that these resonances engender an increase in absorption of solar radiation by cloud droplets by several W/m2 above the linear direct absorption process in the range 0.3-1.1 μ m. This work suggests that Mie scattering calculations performed at the 0.1x (x = 2π r/λ ) resolution typically implemented in cloudy sky radiative transfer models may not be sufficient to correctly model SW absorption, consistent with the recent finding of Nussenveig [2003]. Stimulated Raman scattering experiments on pure water microdroplets yield cavity enhancements in general agreement with the Mie theory results.

  15. Vibrations and reorientations of H2O molecules in [Sr(H2O)6]Cl2 studied by Raman light scattering, incoherent inelastic neutron scattering and proton magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Hetmańczyk, Lukasz; Migdał-Mikuli, Anna; Mikuli, Edward; Florek-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Harańczyk, Hubert

    2014-04-24

    Vibrational-reorientational dynamics of H2O ligands in the high- and low-temperature phases of [Sr(H2O)6]Cl2 was investigated by Raman Spectroscopy (RS), proton magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), quasielastic and inelastic incoherent Neutron Scattering (QENS and IINS) methods. Neutron powder diffraction (NPD) measurements, performed simultaneously with QENS, did not indicated a change of the crystal structure at the phase transition (detected earlier by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at TC(h)=252.9 K (on heating) and at TC(c)=226.5K (on cooling)). Temperature dependence of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of νs(OH) band at ca. 3248 cm(-1) in the RS spectra indicated small discontinuity in the vicinity of phase transition temperature, what suggests that the observed phase transition may be associated with a change of the H2O reorientational dynamics. However, an activation energy value (Ea) for the reorientational motions of H2O ligands in both phases is nearly the same and equals to ca. 8 kJ mol(-1). The QENS peaks, registered for low temperature phase do not show any broadening. However, in the high temperature phase a small QENS broadening is clearly visible, what implies that the reorientational dynamics of H2O ligands undergoes a change at the phase transition. (1)H NMR line is a superposition of two powder Pake doublets, differentiated by a dipolar broadening, suggesting that there are two types of the water molecules in the crystal lattice of [Sr(H2O)6]Cl2 which are structurally not equivalent average distances between the interacting protons are: 1.39 and 1.18 Å. However, their reorientational dynamics is very similar (τc=3.3⋅10(-10) s). Activation energies for the reorientational motion of these both kinds of H2O ligands have nearly the same values in an experimental error limit: and equal to ca. 40 kJ mole(-1). The phase transition is not seen in the (1)H NMR spectra temperature dependencies. Infrared (IR), Raman (RS) and inelastic

  16. Atypical Exciton-Phonon Interactions in WS2 and WSe2 Monolayers Revealed by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Del Corro, E; Botello-Méndez, A; Gillet, Y; Elias, A L; Terrones, H; Feng, S; Fantini, C; Rhodes, Daniel; Pradhan, N; Balicas, L; Gonze, X; Charlier, J-C; Terrones, M; Pimenta, M A

    2016-04-13

    Resonant Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for providing information about excitons and exciton-phonon coupling in two-dimensional materials. We present here resonant Raman experiments of single-layered WS2 and WSe2 using more than 25 laser lines. The Raman excitation profiles of both materials show unexpected differences. All Raman features of WS2 monolayers are enhanced by the first-optical excitations (with an asymmetric response for the spin-orbit related XA and XB excitons), whereas Raman bands of WSe2 are not enhanced at XA/B energies. Such an intriguing phenomenon is addressed by DFT calculations and by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation. These two materials are very similar. They prefer the same crystal arrangement, and their electronic structure is akin, with comparable spin-orbit coupling. However, we reveal that WS2 and WSe2 exhibit quite different exciton-phonon interactions. In this sense, we demonstrate that the interaction between XC and XA excitons with phonons explains the different Raman responses of WS2 and WSe2, and the absence of Raman enhancement for the WSe2 modes at XA/B energies. These results reveal unusual exciton-phonon interactions and open new avenues for understanding the two-dimensional materials physics, where weak interactions play a key role coupling different degrees of freedom (spin, optic, and electronic). PMID:26998817

  17. IR, Raman and SERS studies of methyl salicylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Hema Tresa; Yohannan Panicker, C.; Philip, Daizy; Mannekutla, James R.; Inamdar, S. R.

    2007-04-01

    The IR and Raman spectra of methyl salicylate (MS) were recorded and analysed. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum was recorded in silver colloid. The vibrational wave numbers of the compound have been computed using the Hartree-Fock/6-31G * basis and compared with the experimental values. SERS studies suggest a flat orientation of the molecule at the metal surface.

  18. Magnetic field enriched surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy for early malaria diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2012-01-01

    Hemozoin is a by-product of malaria infection in erythrocytes, which has been explored as a biomarker for early malaria diagnosis. We report magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) of β-hematin crystals, which are the equivalent of hemozoin biocrystals in spectroscopic features, by using magnetic nanoparticles with iron oxide core and silver shell (Fe(3)O(4)@Ag). The external magnetic field enriches β-hematin crystals and enhances the binding between β-hematin crystals and magnetic nanoparticles, which provides further improvement in SERRS signals. The magnetic field-enriched SERRS signal of β-hematin crystals shows approximately five orders of magnitude enhancement in the resonance Raman signal, in comparison to about three orders of magnitude improvement in the SERRS signal without the influence of magnetic field. The improvement has led to a β-hematin detection limit at a concentration of 5 nM (roughly equivalent to 30 parasites/μl at the early stages of malaria infection), which demonstrates the potential of magnetic field-enriched SERRS technique in early malaria diagnosis.

  19. New Feature Observed in the Raman Resonance Excitation Profiles of (6 , 5) -Enriched, Selectively Bundled SWCNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hight Walker, A. R.; Simpson, J. R.; Roslyak, O.; Haroz, E.; Telg, H.; Duque, J. G.; Crochet, J. J.; Piryatinski, A.; Doorn, S. K.

    Understanding the photophysics of exciton behavior in single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles remains important for opto-electronic device applications. We report resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) measurements on (6 , 5) -enriched SWCNTs, dispersed in aqueous solutions and separated using density gradient ultracentrifugation into fractions of increasing bundling. Near-IR to UV absorption spectroscopy shows a redshift and broadening of the main excitonic transitions with increasing bundling. A continuously tunable dye laser coupled to a triple-grating spectrometer affords measurement of Raman resonance excitation profiles (REPs) over a range of wavelengths covering the (6 , 5) -E22 range (505 to 585) nm. REPs of both the radial breathing mode (RBM) and G-band reveal a redshifting and broadening of the (6 , 5) E22 transition energy with increasing bundling. Additionally, we observe an unexpected peak in the REP of bundled SWCNTs, which is shifted lower in energy than the main E22 and is anomalously narrow. We compare these observations to a theoretical model that examines the origin of this peak in relation to bundle polarization-enhanced exciton response.

  20. Magnetic field enriched surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy for early malaria diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2012-01-01

    Hemozoin is a by-product of malaria infection in erythrocytes, which has been explored as a biomarker for early malaria diagnosis. We report magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) of β--hematin crystals, which are the equivalent of hemozoin biocrystals in spectroscopic features, by using magnetic nanoparticles with iron oxide core and silver shell (Fe3O4@Ag). The external magnetic field enriches β--hematin crystals and enhances the binding between β--hematin crystals and magnetic nanoparticles, which provides further improvement in SERRS signals. The magnetic field-enriched SERRS signal of β--hematin crystals shows approximately five orders of magnitude enhancement in the resonance Raman signal, in comparison to about three orders of magnitude improvement in the SERRS signal without the influence of magnetic field. The improvement has led to a β--hematin detection limit at a concentration of 5 nM (roughly equivalent to 30 parasites/μl at the early stages of malaria infection), which demonstrates the potential of magnetic field-enriched SERRS technique in early malaria diagnosis.

  1. Studying disorder in graphite-based systems by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, M A; Dresselhaus, G; Dresselhaus, M S; Cançado, L G; Jorio, A; Saito, R

    2007-03-21

    Raman spectroscopy has historically played an important role in the structural characterization of graphitic materials, in particular providing valuable information about defects, stacking of the graphene layers and the finite sizes of the crystallites parallel and perpendicular to the hexagonal axis. Here we review the defect-induced Raman spectra of graphitic materials from both experimental and theoretical standpoints and we present recent Raman results on nanographites and graphenes. The disorder-induced D and D' Raman features, as well as the G'-band (the overtone of the D-band which is always observed in defect-free samples), are discussed in terms of the double-resonance (DR) Raman process, involving phonons within the interior of the 1st Brillouin zone of graphite and defects. In this review, experimental results for the D, D' and G' bands obtained with different laser lines, and in samples with different crystallite sizes and different types of defects are presented and discussed. We also present recent advances that made possible the development of Raman scattering as a tool for very accurate structural analysis of nano-graphite, with the establishment of an empirical formula for the in- and out-of-plane crystalline size and even fancier Raman-based information, such as for the atomic structure at graphite edges, and the identification of single versus multi-graphene layers. Once established, this knowledge provides a powerful machinery to understand newer forms of sp(2) carbon materials, such as the recently developed pitch-based graphitic foams. Results for the calculated Raman intensity of the disorder-induced D-band in graphitic materials as a function of both the excitation laser energy (E(laser)) and the in-plane size (L(a)) of nano-graphites are presented and compared with experimental results. The status of this research area is assessed, and opportunities for future work are identified.

  2. Resonance Raman fingerprinting of multiheme cytochromes from the cytochrome c3 family.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, Roberto E; Pereira, Patrícia M; Gomes, Inês; Valente, Filipa M A; Pereira, Inês A C; Franco, Ricardo

    2006-03-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy was used to investigate conformational characteristics of the hemes of several ferricytochromes of the cytochrome c3 family, electron transfer proteins isolated from the periplasm and membranes of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Our analysis concentrated on the low-frequency region of the RR spectra, a fingerprint region that includes vibrations for heme-protein C-S bonds [nu(C(a)S)]. It has been proposed that these bonds are directly involved in the electron transfer process. The three groups of tetraheme cytochrome c3 analyzed, namely Type I cytochrome c (3) (TpIc (3)s), Type II cytochrome c (3) (TpIIc (3)s) and Desulfomicrobium cytochromes c3, display different frequency separations for the two nu(C(a)S) lines that are similar among members of each group. These spectral differences correlate with differences in protein structure observed among the three groups of cytochromes c3. Two larger cytochromes of the cytochrome c3 family display RR spectral characteristics for the nu(C(a)S) lines that are closer to TpIIc3 than to TpIc3. Two other multiheme cytochromes from Desulfovibrio that do not belong to the cytochrome c3 family display nu(C(a)S) lines with reverse relative areas in comparison with the latter family. This RR study shows that the small differences in protein structure observed among these cytochrome c3 correlate to differences on the heme-protein bonds, which are likely to have an impact upon the protein function, making RR spectroscopy a sensitive and useful tool for characterizing these cytochromes.

  3. Real time monitoring of sickle cell hemoglobin fiber formation by UV resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Knee, Kelly M; Mukerji, Ishita

    2009-10-20

    In sickle cell hemoglobin, individual tetramers associate into long fibers as a consequence of the mutation at the beta6 position. In this study UV resonance Raman spectroscopy is used to monitor the formation of Hb S fibers in real time through aromatic amino acid vibrational modes. The intermolecular contact formed by the mutation site ((1)beta(1)6 Glu-->Val) of one tetramer and the (2)beta(2)85 Phe-(2)beta(2)88 Leu hydrophobic pocket on a different tetramer is observed by monitoring the increase in signal intensity of Phe vibrational modes as a function of time, yielding kinetic progress curves similar to those obtained by turbidity measurements. Comparison of individual spectra collected at early time points (<1000 s) show small Phe intensity changes, which are attributed to weak transient associations of Hb S tetramers during the initial stages of the polymerization process. At later times (1000-2000 s) Phe signal intensity steadily increases because of increasing hydrophobicity of local Phe environment, a consequence of forming more stable (1)beta(1)-(2)beta(2) contacts. Tyr and Trp vibrational modes monitor H-bond strength between critical residues at the alpha(1)beta(2) interface of individual tetramers. Kinetic progress curves generated from these signals exhibit two distinct transitions at 2040 and 7340 s. These transitions, which occur later in time than those detected either by turbidity (1560 s) or by Phe signal intensity (1680 s), are attributed to initial fiber formation and subsequent formation of larger assemblies, such as macrofibers or gels. These results provide molecular insight into the interactions governing Hb S fiber formation. PMID:19778007

  4. Raman scattering or fluorescence emission? Raman spectroscopy study on lime-based building and conservation materials.

    PubMed

    Kaszowska, Zofia; Malek, Kamilla; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Niedzielska, Karina

    2016-12-01

    This work presents an in-depth study on Raman spectra excited with 1064 and 532nm lasers of lime binders employed in the past as building materials and revealed today as valuable conservation materials. We focus our interest on the bands of strong intensity, which are present in the spectra of all binders acquired with laser excitation at 1064nm, but absent in the corresponding spectra acquired with laser excitation at 532nm. We suggest, that the first group of spectra represents fluorescence phenomena of unknown origin and the second true Raman scattering. In our studies, we also include two other phases of lime cycle, i.e. calcium carbonate (a few samples of calcite of various origins) and calcium oxide (quicklime) to assess how structural and chemical transformations of lime phases affect the NIR-Raman spectral profile. Furthermore, we analyse a set of carbonated limewashes and lime binders derived from old plasters to give an insight into their spectral characteristics after excitation with the 1064nm laser line. NIR-Raman micro-mapping results are also presented to reveal the spatial distribution of building materials and fluorescent species in the cross-section of plaster samples taken from a 15th century chapel. Our study shows that the Raman analysis can help identify lime-based building and conservation materials, however, a caution is advised in the interpretation of the spectra acquired using 1064nm excitation. PMID:27314909

  5. Raman scattering or fluorescence emission? Raman spectroscopy study on lime-based building and conservation materials.

    PubMed

    Kaszowska, Zofia; Malek, Kamilla; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Niedzielska, Karina

    2016-12-01

    This work presents an in-depth study on Raman spectra excited with 1064 and 532nm lasers of lime binders employed in the past as building materials and revealed today as valuable conservation materials. We focus our interest on the bands of strong intensity, which are present in the spectra of all binders acquired with laser excitation at 1064nm, but absent in the corresponding spectra acquired with laser excitation at 532nm. We suggest, that the first group of spectra represents fluorescence phenomena of unknown origin and the second true Raman scattering. In our studies, we also include two other phases of lime cycle, i.e. calcium carbonate (a few samples of calcite of various origins) and calcium oxide (quicklime) to assess how structural and chemical transformations of lime phases affect the NIR-Raman spectral profile. Furthermore, we analyse a set of carbonated limewashes and lime binders derived from old plasters to give an insight into their spectral characteristics after excitation with the 1064nm laser line. NIR-Raman micro-mapping results are also presented to reveal the spatial distribution of building materials and fluorescent species in the cross-section of plaster samples taken from a 15th century chapel. Our study shows that the Raman analysis can help identify lime-based building and conservation materials, however, a caution is advised in the interpretation of the spectra acquired using 1064nm excitation.

  6. Resonance Raman studies of carbon monoxide binding to iron "picket fence" porphyrin with unhindered and hindered axial bases. An inverse relationship between binding affinity and the strength of iron-carbon bond.

    PubMed

    Kerr, E A; Mackin, H C; Yu, N T

    1983-09-13

    The stretching frequency of the iron-carbon bond, v(Fe-CO), is a direct measure of the iron-carbon bond strength when there is no change in the Fe-C-O geometry. Here we report resonance Raman detection of v(Fe-CO) frequencies in the CO complexes of iron (II) alpha, alpha, alpha, alpha-mesotetrakis(o-pivalamidophenyl)porphyrin, FeII(TpivPP), with trans ligands of varying strength: N-methylimidazole (N-MeIm), 1,2-dimethylimidazole (1,2-Me2Im), pyridine (py), and tetrahydrofuran (THF). It was found that the weaker the iron-trans ligand bond, the stronger the iron-carbon bond. Comparisons of sterically hindered (1,2-Me2Im) and unhindered (N-MeIm) bases are of particular interest because of their implication in the phenomenon of hemoglobin cooperativity and the mechanisms of protein control of heme reactivity. While the CO binding affinity of FeII(TpivPP)(1,2-MeIm) is approximately 400 times lower than that of FeII(TpivPP)(N-MeIm), the v(Fe-CO) frequency for the former (at 496 cm-1) is higher than that for the latter (at 489 cm-1). This example shows that the CO binding affinity cannot be directly correlated with the strength of the iron-carbon bond. Comparison of the CO binding to FeII(TpivPP)(THF) and FeII(TpivPP)(N-MeIm) reveals a similar relationship; the v(Fe-CO) frequency (at 527 cm-1) in FeII(TpivPP)(THF)(CO) is 38 cm-1 higher than that in FeII(TpivPP)(N-MeIm)(CO), but the CO binding affinity is lower for the THF complex.

  7. Quantum-mechanical calculation of the intensity distribution in resonance Raman scattering spectra of isolated skatole and skatole-water complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burova, T. G.; Nurlygayanova, M. H.; Ten, G. N.; Yakovleva, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The relative intensities of lines in resonance Raman scattering spectra of isolated skatole and skatole-water complex have been calculated quantum mechanically. The influence of the intermolecular interaction on these spectra has been considered. Particular features of the intensity distribution in the resonance Raman scattering spectra of indole and skatole have been compared.

  8. [Study on Raman spectrum of nanophase anatase].

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Duan, Y; Li, W

    2000-10-01

    The nanophase anatase of different sizes (2-40 nm) were synthesized with chemical precipitation method. Nanophase anatase (2-40 nm), anatase (micron) and natural anatase were investigated by Raman spectrum. The spectra indicate: when the crystalline particles sizes decreased, obvious Raman shifts towards higher frequencies were observed and the intensity of Raman scattering decreased markedly. The shift towards higher frequencies reached max (10 cm-1) at 143 cm-1 comparing 2 nm anatase and natural anatase; when the crystalline particles sizes decreased; the shifts at 515 and 637 cm-1 towards higher frequencies reached max, but while the crystalline particles sizes became smaller, the shifts reached towards lower frequencies; There was no obvious shift at 396 cm-1 with the decreasing of the crystalline particle sizes. These reflect the complexity of nanophase materials structure, that may be caused by flexibility distortion of crystal.

  9. Raman scattering studies of pollutant systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwiesow, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Results and techniques for laboratory measurements of Raman scattering cross sections and depolarization ratios of atmospheric gases as a function of the incident photon energy are discussed. Referred to N2, the cross section of H2O changes by a factor of 2 as the incident photon energy is changed by 5%. Less striking results are obtained for SO2, NO and other atmospheric gases. Tentative results are given for spectral features of scattering from polluted air-water interfaces. Raman lidar is assessed as a potentially useful aid in remote sensing of atmospheric and water-borne pollution distributions at least in near-source concentrations.

  10. Raman structural studies of the nickel electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornilsen, Bahne C.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation have been to define the structures of charged active mass, discharged active mass, and related precursor materials (alpha-phases), with the purpose of better understanding the chemical and electrochemical reactions, including failure mechanisms and cobalt incorporation, so that the nickel electrode may be improved. Although our primary tool has been Raman spectroscopy, the structural conclusions drawn from the Raman data have been supported and augmented by three other analysis methods: infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (in particular EXAFS, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy).

  11. Stimulated Raman spectroscopy and nanoscopy of molecules using near field photon induced forces without resonant electronic enhancement gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Huang, Fei; Nowak, Derek; Kumar Wickramasinghe, H.

    2016-06-01

    We report on stimulated Raman spectroscopy and nanoscopy of molecules, excited without resonant electronic enhancement gain, and recorded using near field photon induced forces. Photon-induced interaction forces between the sharp metal coated silicon tip of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a sample resulting from stimulated Raman excitation were detected. We controlled the tip to sample spacing using the higher order flexural eigenmodes of the AFM cantilever, enabling the tip to come very close to the sample. As a result, the detection sensitivity was increased compared with previous work on Raman force microscopy. Raman vibrational spectra of azobenzene thiol and l-phenylalanine were measured and found to agree well with published results. Near-field force detection eliminates the need for far-field optical spectrometer detection. Recorded images show spatial resolution far below the optical diffraction limit. Further optimization and use of ultrafast pulsed lasers could push the detection sensitivity towards the single molecule limit.

  12. Resonance Raman enhancement of phenyl ring vibrational modes in phenyl iron complex of myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Lin, S H; Yu, N T

    1990-04-01

    Resonance Raman spectra are reported for the organometallic phenyl-FeIII complexes of horse heart myoglobin. We observed the resonance enhancement of the ring vibrational modes of the bound phenyl group. They were identified at 642, 996, 1,009, and 1,048 cm-1, which shift to 619, 961, 972, and 1,030 cm-1, respectively, upon phenyl 13C substitution. The lines at 642 and 996 cm-1 are assigned, respectively, as in-plane phenyl ring deformation mode (derived from benzene vibration No. 6a at 606 cm-1) and out-of-plane CH deformation (derived from benzene vibration No. 5 at 995 cm-1). The frequencies of the ring "breathing" modes at 1,009 and 1,048 cm-1 are higher than the corresponding ones in phenylalanine (at 1,004 and 1,033 cm-1) and benzene (at 992 and 1,010 cm-1), indicating that the ring C--C bonds are strengthened (or shortened) when coordinated to the heme iron. The excitation profiles of these phenyl ring modes and a porphyrin ring vibrational mode at 674 cm-1 exhibit peaks near its Soret absorption maximum at 431 nm. This appears to indicate that these phenyl ring modes may be enhanced via resonance with the Soret pi-pi transition. The FeIII--C bond stretching vibration has not been detected with excitation wavelengths in the 406.7-457.9-nm region.

  13. Amplification of ultra-short laser pulses via resonant backward Raman amplification in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Andreev, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we have examined the possibility of using resonant backward Raman amplification (BRA) as an efficient mechanism in amplifying the low intensity ultra-short ( ≤ fs ) pulses using plasma as intermediate amplifying medium; such pulses are anticipated to get produced in the form of the secondary sources at ALPS (Attosecond Light Pulse Source) center of ELI (Extreme Light Infrastructure). In preliminary assessment of the scheme, the analytical expressions for the pump/seed laser pulses and plasma characteristic features are obtained which concisely describe the parameter regime of resonant BRA applicability in achieving significant amplification. The consistency of the scheme in the context of ELI-ALPS sources has been validated through particle in cell (PIC) simulations. The peak intensity of the amplified seed pulse predicted via simulation results is found in reasonable agreement with the analytical estimates. Utilizing these analytical expressions as a basis in perspective of ELI-ALPS parameter access, a specific example displaying the key plasma and laser parameters for amplifying weak seed pulse has been configured; the limitations and conceivable remedies in resonant BRA implementation have also been highlighted.

  14. A comparative study of Raman enhancement in capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekhari, Fatemeh; Irizar, Juan; Hulbert, Laila; Helmy, Amr S.

    2011-06-01

    This work reports on the comparative studies of Raman enhancement in liquid core waveguides (LCWs). The theoretical considerations that describe Raman enhancement in LCWs is adapted to analyze and compare the performance of hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HCPCFs) to conventional Teflon capillary tubes. The optical losses in both platforms are measured and used to predict their performance for different lengths. The results show that for an optimal waveguide length, two orders of magnitude enhancement in the Raman signal can be achieved for aqueous solutions using HCPCFs. This length, however, cannot be achieved using normal capillary effects. By integrating the interface of the fluidic pump and the HCPCF into a microfluidic chip, we are able to control fluid transport and fill longer lengths of HCPCFs regardless of the viscosity of the sample. The long-term stability and reproducibility of Raman spectra attained through this platform are demonstrated for naphthalenethiol, which is a well-studied organic compound. Using the HCPCF platform, the detection limit of normal Raman scattering in the range of micro-molars has been achieved. In addition to the higher signal-to-noise ratio of the Raman signal from the HCPCF-platform, more Raman modes of naphthalenethiol are revealed using this platform.

  15. Plasmon-resonant Raman spectroscopy in metallic nanoparticles: Surface-enhanced scattering by electronic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carles, R.; Bayle, M.; Benzo, P.; Benassayag, G.; Bonafos, C.; Cacciato, G.; Privitera, V.

    2015-11-01

    Since the discovery of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) 40 years ago, the origin of the "background" that is systematically observed in SERS spectra has remained questionable. To deeply analyze this phenomenon, plasmon-resonant Raman scattering was recorded under specific experimental conditions on a panel of composite multilayer samples containing noble metal (Ag and Au) nanoparticles. Stokes, anti-Stokes, and wide, including very low, frequency ranges have been explored. The effects of temperature, size (in the nm range), embedding medium (SiO2, Si3N4, or TiO2) or ligands have been successively analyzed. Both lattice (Lamb modes and bulk phonons) and electron (plasmon mode and electron-hole excitations) dynamics have been investigated. This work confirms that in Ag-based nanoplasmonics composite layers, only Raman scattering by single-particle electronic excitations accounts for the background. This latter appears as an intrinsic phenomenon independently of the presence of molecules on the metallic surface. Its spectral shape is well described by revisiting a model developed in the 1990s for analyzing electron scattering in dirty metals, and used later in superconductors. The gs factor, that determines the effective mean-free path of free carriers, is evaluated, gsexpt=0.33 ±0.04 , in good agreement with a recent evaluation based on time-dependent local density approximation gstheor=0.32 . Confinement and interface roughness effects at the nanometer range thus appear crucial to understand and control SERS enhancement and more generally plasmon-enhanced processes on metallic surfaces.

  16. The cell-cycle dependence of the spectra of proliferating normal and neoplastic single cells using confocal resonance Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boydston-White, Susie; Liu, Cheng-Hui; Alfano, Robert R.

    2013-03-01

    Confocal resonance Raman (RR) spectra were collected from single proliferating cells and analyzed to detect spectral patterns that are cell-cycle dependent, as a consequence of cellular proliferation — normal or abnormal. The cells' biochemical age at each time point was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining to identify the presence or absence of cellular components that appear and/or disappear as the cells proceed through the cell-cycle. The RR spectra were collected and compared for each time point as the cells proceeded through the cell cycle to determine what spectral vibrational patterns are cell-cycle dependent. In this study, the question is whether the cell-cycle dependent RR spectral patterns of the vibrational modes observed in proliferating normal and neoplastic single cells are due to a state of cancer or are simply the consequences of the cells' changing internal biochemistry due to the process of cellular proliferation --- normal or abnormal.

  17. Resonance Raman spectrum of the allyl-d5 radical and the force field analysis of the allyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianming; Getty, James D.; Kelly, Peter B.

    1993-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the allyl-d5 radical have been obtained with excitation between 247 and 223 nm. Analysis of the spectra yields the first observation of fundamental frequencies, nu4, nu5, and nu7 and overtone frequencies 2nu9, 2nu10, and 2nu12. The new vibrational data are combined with previously observed frequencies of allyl-h5 and allyl-d5 radical to produce the force field analysis for the allyl radical. This study suggests reassignment of several previously observed infrared (IR) bands. Experimental frequencies and assignments for allyl-h5 and allyl-d5 are compared with results from ab initio calculations. Force constants obtained in the present work are compared with the force constants of other sp2 hybridization molecules such as benzene, allene, and ethylene.

  18. Simulating One-Photon Absorption and Resonance Raman Scattering Spectra Using Analytical Excited State Energy Gradients within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Daniel W.; Govind, Niranjan; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-12-10

    A parallel implementation of analytical time-dependent density functional theory gradients is presented for the quantum chemistry program NWChem. The implementation is based on the Lagrangian approach developed by Furche and Ahlrichs. To validate our implementation, we first calculate the Stokes shifts for a range of organic dye molecules using a diverse set of exchange-correlation functionals (traditional density functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids) followed by simulations of the one-photon absorption and resonance Raman scattering spectrum of the phenoxyl radical, the well-studied dye molecule rhodamine 6G, and a molecular host–guest complex (TTFcCBPQT4+). The study of organic dye molecules illustrates that B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP generally give the best agreement with experimentally determined Stokes shifts unless the excited state is a charge transfer state. Absorption, resonance Raman, and fluorescence simulations for the phenoxyl radical indicate that explicit solvation may be required for accurate characterization. For the host–guest complex and rhodamine 6G, it is demonstrated that absorption spectra can be simulated in good agreement with experimental data for most exchange-correlation functionals. Finally, however, because one-photon absorption spectra generally lack well-resolved vibrational features, resonance Raman simulations are necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the exchange-correlation functional for describing a potential energy surface.

  19. Lignin Radicals in the Plant Cell Wall Probed by Kerr-Gated Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Barsberg, Søren; Matousek, Pavel; Towrie, Mike; Jørgensen, Henning; Felby, Claus

    2006-01-01

    Lignin radicals are crucial intermediates for lignin biosynthesis in the cell wall of vascular plants. In this work they were for the first time, to our knowledge, selectively observed in wood cell walls by laser-based Kerr-gated resonance Raman spectroscopy, and the observations were supported by density functional theory prediction of their vibrational properties. For dry wood cells a lignin radical Raman band is observed at 1570 cm−1 irrespective of species. For wet beech cells they were generated in situ and observed at 1606 cm−1. DFT/B3LYP/6-31+G(d) modeling results support that in beech they are formed from syringyl (S) phenolic moieties and in spruce from guaiacyl (G) phenolic moieties. The observed lignin radical band is predicted as G is ∼1597 cm−1 and S is ∼1599 cm−1, respectively, and is assigned the (Wilson notation) ν8a phenyl ring mode. The RR band probes lignin radical properties, e.g., spin density distribution, and these respond to charge polarization or hydrogen bonding to proximate water molecules. These observations can be crucial for an understanding of the factors that control cell wall structure during biosynthesis of vascular plants and demonstrate the unique potential of RR spectroscopy of lignin radicals. PMID:16443659

  20. Interface Coupling in Twisted Multilayer Graphene by Resonant Raman Spectroscopy of Layer Breathing Modes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang-Bin; Hu, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Xin; Han, Wen-Peng; Lu, Yan; Shi, Wei; Qiao, Xiao-Fen; Ijiäs, Mari; Milana, Silvia; Ji, Wei; Ferrari, Andrea C; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2015-07-28

    Raman spectroscopy is the prime nondestructive characterization tool for graphene and related layered materials. The shear (C) and layer breathing modes (LBMs) are due to relative motions of the planes, either perpendicular or parallel to their normal. This allows one to directly probe the interlayer interactions in multilayer samples. Graphene and other two-dimensional (2d) crystals can be combined to form various hybrids and heterostructures, creating materials on demand with properties determined by the interlayer interaction. This is the case even for a single material, where multilayer stacks with different relative orientations have different optical and electronic properties. In twisted multilayer graphene there is a significant enhancement of the C modes due to resonance with new optically allowed electronic transitions, determined by the relative orientation of the layers. Here we show that this applies also to the LBMs, which can be now directly measured at room temperature. We find that twisting has a small effect on LBMs, quite different from the case of the C modes. This implies that the periodicity mismatch between two twisted layers mostly affects shear interactions. Our work shows that ultralow-frequency Raman spectroscopy is an ideal tool to uncover the interface coupling of 2d hybrids and heterostructures.

  1. Low skin carotenoid concentration measured by resonance Raman spectroscopy is associated with metabolic syndrome in adults.

    PubMed

    Holt, Edward W; Wei, Esther K; Bennett, Nancy; Zhang, Laura M

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS). Antioxidants, including carotenoids, are decreased in MS. We hypothesized that a low skin carotenoid score (SCS), calculated using resonance Raman spectroscopy, would correlate with the presence of MS. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive patients referred for dietary assessment between 2010 and 2012. For each patient, a nutrition history, medical history, and SCS were recorded. χ(2) and Student t test were used to determine factors associated with MS. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with MS. One hundred fifty-five patients were included. The mean age was 54.1 ± 13.1 years, and the mean body mass index was 28.3 ± 6.1 kg/m(2). Metabolic syndrome was present in 43.9% of patients. The mean SCS was 28 084 ± 14 006 Raman counts (RC), including 23 058 ± 9812 RC for patients with MS and 32 011 ± 15 514 RC for patients without MS (P = .0001). In a multivariate analysis, SCS less than 25 000 RC (odds ratio, 3.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.36-10.7; P = .01) was independently associated with MS. A higher number of MS components was associated with a progressively lower SCS (P = .004). In a consecutive sample of patients referred for dietary assessment, a noninvasively measured SCS was lower among patients with MS.

  2. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, H. Y.; Jia, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Wu, W. B.; Okamoto, J.; Lee, W. S.; Hashimoto, M.; et al

    2016-01-22

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O8+δ. Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast,more » the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors.« less

  3. A Swept Wavelength Optical Resonant Raman Detector (SWOrRD) for Bio-detection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manka, Charles; Grun, Jacob; Zabetakis, Dan; Nikitin, Sergei; Comanescu, Gelu; Bowles, Jeff; Gillis, David

    2007-10-01

    A new device that sequentially illuminates bacteria with different ultraviolet wavelengths and obtains a spectrum at each wavelength has been developed and tested. The available wavelengths are spaced at ˜ 0.3 nm intervals from 210 to 280 nm. Tuning from one wavelength to another requires 20 to 60 seconds, depending on the wavelength region. Liquid samples are contained in a quartz cuvette, illuminated side-on and the scattered light is collected at 90 degrees. A double spectrograph and CCD camera record the resulting Raman Spectra. Spectra from the sequential illumination are assembled into a data ``cube'' for processing and analysis. Measurements of two-dimensional resonant-Raman spectra of bacteria are presented and the applicability of the method for the identification of bacteria, including differentiation of genetically similar species, is demonstrated. We anticipate that information within such two-dimensional spectra will allow identification of bacteria, as well as chemicals, in complex environments containing multiple organisms and chemicals. This device may lead to instruments that rapidly identify bacteria in hospital and food process settings, for screening large populations, and for biochemical-threat warning systems.

  4. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies on celestite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Hua; Yu, Shu-Cheng; Huang, Eugene; Lee, Pei-Lun

    2010-10-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies of celestite (SrSO 4) were carried out in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. Variation in the Raman vibrational frequency and change of lattice parameters with pressure indicate that a transformation occurs in celestite. This transformation caused an adjustment in the Sr-O polyhedra that affected the stretching-force constant of SO 4. Moreover, compressibilities along the crystallographic axes decreased in the order a to c to b. From the compression data, the bulk modulus of the celestite was 87 GPa. Both X-ray and Raman data show that the transition in celestite is reversible.

  5. Operational electrochemical stability of thiophene-thiazole copolymers probed by resonant Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, Jessica; Wood, Sebastian; Kim, Ji-Seon; Beatrup, Daniel; Hurhangee, Michael; McCulloch, Iain; Durrant, James R.; Bronstein, Hugo

    2015-06-28

    We report on the electrochemical stability of hole polarons in three conjugated polymers probed by resonant Raman spectroscopy. The materials considered are all isostructural to poly(3-hexyl)thiophene, where thiazole units have been included to systematically deepen the energy level of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). We demonstrate that increasing the thiazole content planarizes the main conjugated backbone of the polymer and improves the electrochemical stability in the ground state. However, these more planar thiazole containing polymers are increasingly susceptible to electrochemical degradation in the polaronic excited state. We identify the degradation mechanism, which targets the C=N bond in the thiazole units and results in disruption of the main polymer backbone conjugation. The introduction of thiazole units to deepen the HOMO energy level and increase the conjugated backbone planarity can be beneficial for the performance of certain optoelectronic devices, but the reduced electrochemical stability of the hole polaron may compromise their operational stability.

  6. Peak separation and sorting by coherent 2D resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peter C; Joyner, Candace C

    2005-09-01

    The ability to separate and sort peaks is explored using a new coherent two-dimensional form of resonance Raman spectroscopy. This experimental technique distributes normally congested rotational-vibrational peaks along a series of curved lines according to vibrational sequence, rotational quantum number, and selection rule. Each line consists of rotational-vibrational peaks that have the same vibrational sequence and the same value for DeltaJ, distributed in order by rotational quantum number. For diatomic molecules, these lines originate from points where they initially travel in opposite or orthogonal directions in two-dimensional space, which helps facilitate the separation between lines. Simulations and experimental results on C2 in a flame confirm the ability to separate and sort these normally congested rotational-vibrational peaks. This method appears to provide a solution to the long-standing problems of spectral congestion and disorder in gas-phase electronic spectra.

  7. Freely designable optical frequency conversion in Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jian; Katsuragawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear optical processes are governed by the relative-phase relationships among the relevant electromagnetic fields in these processes. In this Report, we describe the physics of arbitrary manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process by artificial control of relative phases. As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely. In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm. PMID:25748023

  8. Simulations of Two-dimensional Infrared and Stimulated Resonance Raman Spectra of Photoactive Yellow Protein

    PubMed Central

    Preketes, Nicholas K; Biggs, Jason D; Ren, Hao; Andricioaei, Ioan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    We present simulations of one and two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) and stimulated resonance Raman (SRR) spectra of the dark state (pG) and early red-shifted intermediate (pR) of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). Shifts in the amide I and Glu46 COOH stretching bands distinguish between pG and pR in the IR absorption and 2DIR spectra. The one-dimensional SRR spectra are similar to the spontaneous RR spectra. The two-dimensional SRR spectra show large changes in cross peaks involving the C=O stretch of the two species and are more sensitive to the chromophore structure than 2DIR spectra. PMID:24244064

  9. Freely designable optical frequency conversion in Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jian; Katsuragawa, Masayuki

    2015-03-01

    Nonlinear optical processes are governed by the relative-phase relationships among the relevant electromagnetic fields in these processes. In this Report, we describe the physics of arbitrary manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process by artificial control of relative phases. As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely. In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm.

  10. Solvent effects on the resonance Raman spectra of bacteriochlorophyll a cation radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misono, Yasuhito; Nishizawa, Ei-ichi; Limantara, Leenawaty; Koyama, Yasushi; Itoh, Koichi

    1995-04-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra were measured for the cation radical of bacteriochlorophyll a in acetone, methanol, dichloromethane and mixed solvents of acetone and methanol. The ring-breathing (C a-C m stretching) frequency of the radical (abbreviated as vr+) was observed at 1601 cm -1 in acetone (forming a penta-coordinated monomer), at 1587 cm -1 in a methanol (forming a hexa-coordinated monomer) and at 1600 cm -1 in dichloromethane (forming a penta-coordinated aggregate). The RR spectrum of the radical in dichloromethane is almost identical to the transient RR spectrum ascribed to 'the aggregated T 1 species of Bchl a' formed in the particular solvent by Nishizawa, Limantara, Nanjou, Nagae, Kakuno and Koyama, indicating that their interpretation needs to be revised.

  11. Rapid analysis of malachite green and leucomalachite green in fish muscles with surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Wansong; Pei, Lu; Lai, Keqiang; Rasco, Barbara A; Huang, Yiqun

    2015-02-15

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) coupled with gold nanospheres was applied for rapid analysis of the hazardous substances malachite green (MG) and leucomalachite green (LMG) in fish muscle tissues. The lowest concentration of MG that could be detected was 0.5ngmL(-1) with high linear correlation (R(2)=0.970-0.998) between MG concentration and intensities of characteristic Raman peaks. A simplified sample preparation method taking less than 1h for recovering MG and LMG in fish fillets was developed for SERRS analysis, and 4-8 samples could be handled in parallel. MG and LMG could be detected in extracts of tilapia fish fillets at as low as 2ngg(-1) with SERRS and a simple principle component analysis method. For six other fish species, the lowest detectable concentration of MG ranged from 1ngg(-1) to 10ngg(-1). This study provides a new sensitive approach for the detection of trace amounts of the prohibited drugs MG and LMG in muscle food, which has the potential for rapidly screening a large number of samples. PMID:25236201

  12. Rapid analysis of malachite green and leucomalachite green in fish muscles with surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Wansong; Pei, Lu; Lai, Keqiang; Rasco, Barbara A; Huang, Yiqun

    2015-02-15

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) coupled with gold nanospheres was applied for rapid analysis of the hazardous substances malachite green (MG) and leucomalachite green (LMG) in fish muscle tissues. The lowest concentration of MG that could be detected was 0.5ngmL(-1) with high linear correlation (R(2)=0.970-0.998) between MG concentration and intensities of characteristic Raman peaks. A simplified sample preparation method taking less than 1h for recovering MG and LMG in fish fillets was developed for SERRS analysis, and 4-8 samples could be handled in parallel. MG and LMG could be detected in extracts of tilapia fish fillets at as low as 2ngg(-1) with SERRS and a simple principle component analysis method. For six other fish species, the lowest detectable concentration of MG ranged from 1ngg(-1) to 10ngg(-1). This study provides a new sensitive approach for the detection of trace amounts of the prohibited drugs MG and LMG in muscle food, which has the potential for rapidly screening a large number of samples.

  13. Effects of Ni-coating on ZnO nanowires: A Raman scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, S.; Wang, X. J.; Devika, M.; Koteeswara Reddy, N.; Tu, C. W.; Chen, W. M.; Buyanova, I. A.

    2013-06-01

    Structural properties of ZnO/Ni core/shell nanowires (NWs) are studied in detail by means of Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that formation of the Ni shell leads to passivation of surface states responsible for the observed enhanced intensity of the A1(LO) Raman mode of the bare ZnO NWs. It also causes appearance of 490 cm-1 and 710 cm-1 modes that are attributed to local vibrational modes of a defect/impurity (or defects/impurities). This defect is concluded to be preferably formed in annealed ZnO/Ni NWs and is unlikely to contain a Ni atom, as the same Raman modes were also reported for the Ni-free ZnO nanostructures. From our resonant Raman studies, we also show that the ZnO/Ni core/shell NWs exhibit an enhanced Raman signal with a multiline structure involving A1(LO). This observation is attributed to combined effects of an enhanced Fröhlich interaction at the ZnO/Ni heterointerface and coupling of the scattered light with local surface plasmons excited in the Ni shell. The plasmonic effect is also suggested to allow detection of carbon-related species absorbed at the surface of a single ZnO/Ni NW, promising for applications of such structures as efficient nano-sized gas sensors.

  14. Near-IR resonance Raman spectroscopy of archaerhodopsin 3: effects of transmembrane potential.

    PubMed

    Saint Clair, Erica C; Ogren, John I; Mamaev, Sergey; Russano, Daniel; Kralj, Joel M; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2012-12-20

    Archaerhodopsin 3 (AR3) is a light driven proton pump from Halorubrum sodomense that has been used as a genetically targetable neuronal silencer and an effective fluorescent sensor of transmembrane potential. Unlike the more extensively studied bacteriorhodopsin (BR) from Halobacterium salinarum, AR3 readily incorporates into the plasma membrane of both E. coli and mammalian cells. Here, we used near-IR resonance Raman confocal microscopy to study the effects of pH and membrane potential on the AR3 retinal chromophore structure. Measurements were performed both on AR3 reconstituted into E. coli polar lipids and in vivo in E. coli expressing AR3 in the absence and presence of a negative transmembrane potential. The retinal chromophore structure of AR3 is in an all-trans configuration almost identical to BR over the entire pH range from 3 to 11. Small changes are detected in the retinal ethylenic stretching frequency and Schiff Base (SB) hydrogen bonding strength relative to BR which may be related to a different water structure near the SB. In the case of the AR3 mutant D95N, at neutral pH an all-trans retinal O-like species (O(all-trans)) is found. At higher pH a second 13-cis retinal N-like species (N(13-cis)) is detected which is attributed to a slowly decaying intermediate in the red-light photocycle of D95N. However, the amount of N(13-cis) detected is less in E. coli cells but is restored upon addition of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) or sonication, both of which dissipate the normal negative membrane potential. We postulate that these changes are due to the effect of membrane potential on the N(13-cis) to M(13-cis) levels accumulated in the D95N red-light photocycle and on a molecular level by the effects of the electric field on the protonation/deprotonation of the cytoplasmic accessible SB. This mechanism also provides a possible explanation for the observed fluorescence dependence of AR3 and other microbial rhodopsins on transmembrane

  15. Symmetry-dependent exciton-phonon coupling in 2D and bulk MoS2 observed by resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Bruno R; Malard, Leandro M; Alves, Juliana M; Fantini, Cristiano; Pimenta, Marcos A

    2015-04-01

    This work describes a resonance Raman study performed on samples with one, two, and three layers (1L, 2L, 3L), and bulk MoS2, using more than 30 different laser excitation lines covering the visible range, and focusing on the intensity of the two most pronounced features of the Raman scattering spectrum of MoS2 (E2g(1) and A1g bands). The Raman excitation profiles of these bands were obtained experimentally, and it is found that the A1g feature is enhanced when the excitation laser is in resonance with A and B excitons of MoS2, while the E2g1 feature is shown to be enhanced when the excitation laser is close to 2.7 eV. We show from the symmetry analysis of the exciton-phonon interaction that the mode responsible for the E2g(1) resonance is identified as the high energy C exciton recently predicted [D. Y. Qiu, F. H. da Jornada, and S. G. Louie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 216805 (2013)].

  16. Deformations of the Heme Group of Different Ferrocytochrome c Proteins Probed by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagarman, Andrew; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Wallace, Carmichael; Laberge, Monique

    2008-11-14

    We measured the low-frequency polarized resonance Raman spectra of horse heart, chicken, and yeast(C102T) ferrocytochromes c with Soret excitation. We examined the out-of-plane deformations of the heme groups by determining the relative intensities and depolarization ratios of a variety of out-of-plane and in-plane Raman active bands. Analysis of relative Raman intensities shows differences in non-planarity of the heme groups of yeast(C102T), horse heart and chicken cytochrome c. Cytochrome c has been shown to have a dominant ruffling (B{sub 1u}) deformation by means of normal coordinate structural decomposition (NSD) analysis of the heme group in crystal structures. The presence and intensity of B{sub 1u} modes, {gamma}{sub 10}-{gamma}{sub 12}, support the indication of ruffling being the major contribution to the non-planar deformations in cytochrome c. Other types of non-planar deformations like doming (A{sub 2U}) and waving (E{sub g}) can be deduced from the Raman activity of {gamma}{sub 5} (A{sub 2u}), {gamma}{sub 21} and {gamma}{sub 22} (E{sub g}). The depolarization ratios of {gamma}{sub 5}, {gamma}{sub 10}, {gamma}{sub 11} and {gamma}{sub 12} are larger than 0.125, indicating the presence of other deformations such as saddling (B{sub 2u}) and propellering (A{sub 1u}), which is again in agreement with the crystal structures of horse heart and yeast ferrocytochrome c. An analysis of the intensities and depolarization ratios of out-of-plane modes revealed that ruffling is comparable in yeast and horse heart cytochrome c, saddling is larger and doming as well as propellering are lower in yeast cytochrome c. With respect to doming and ruffling our results contradict values obtained from the NSD analysis of the corresponding crystal structures. With respect to saddling, our data are in agreement with the crystal structure. The NSD analysis of heme structures resulting from MD simulations did not correlate very well with the spectroscopically obtained results

  17. [Laser Raman Spectroscopy and Its Application in Gas Hydrate Studies].

    PubMed

    Fu, Juan; Wu, Neng-you; Lu, Hai-long; Wu, Dai-dai; Su, Qiu-cheng

    2015-11-01

    Gas hydrates are important potential energy resources. Microstructural characterization of gas hydrate can provide information to study the mechanism of gas hydrate formation and to support the exploitation and application of gas hydrate technology. This article systemly introduces the basic principle of laser Raman spectroscopy and summarizes its application in gas hydrate studies. Based on Raman results, not only can the information about gas composition and structural type be deduced, but also the occupancies of large and small cages and even hydration number can be calculated from the relative intensities of Raman peaks. By using the in-situ analytical technology, laser Raman specstropy can be applied to characterize the formation and decomposition processes of gas hydrate at microscale, for example the enclathration and leaving of gas molecules into/from its cages, to monitor the changes in gas concentration and gas solubility during hydrate formation and decomposition, and to identify phase changes in the study system. Laser Raman in-situ analytical technology has also been used in determination of hydrate structure and understanding its changing process under the conditions of ultra high pressure. Deep-sea in-situ Raman spectrometer can be employed for the in-situ analysis of the structures of natural gas hydrate and their formation environment. Raman imaging technology can be applied to specify the characteristics of crystallization and gas distribution over hydrate surface. With the development of laser Raman technology and its combination with other instruments, it will become more powerful and play a more significant role in the microscopic study of gas hydrate. PMID:26978895

  18. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar Carter, Renata A.; Martin, Airton A.; Netto, Mario M.; Soares, Fernando A.

    2004-07-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been extensively studied as a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to provide information about the chemical and morphologic structure of tissue. Raman Spectroscpy is an inelastic scattering process that can provide a wealth of spectral features that can be related to the specific molecular structure of the sample. This article reports results of an in vitro study of the FT-Raman human breast tissue spectra. An Nd:YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman Spectrometer. The neoplastic human breast samples, both Fibroadenoma and ICD, were obtained during therapeutical routine medical procedures required by the primary disease, and the non-diseased human tissue was obtained in plastic surgery. No sample preparation was needed for the FT-Raman spectra collection. The FT-Raman spectra were recorded from normal, benign (Fibroadenomas) and malignant (IDC-Intraductal Carcinoma) samples, adding up 51 different areas. The main spectral differences of a typical FT-Raman spectra of a Normal (Non-diseased), Fibroadenoma, and Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) breast tissue at the interval of 600 to 1800cm-1, which may differentiate diagnostically the sample, were found in the bands of 1230 to 1295cm-1, 1440 to 1460 cm-1 and 1650 to 1680 cm-1, assigned to the vibrational bands of the carbohydrate-amide III, proteins and lipids, and carbohydrate-amide I, respectively.

  19. [Study on the treatment turquoise using Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan-li; Yuan, Xin-qiang; Chen, Jing-zhong; Qi, Li-jian

    2010-07-01

    Due to a variety of the enhancement and treatment turquoises discovered in gem markets, the identification of turquoise is becoming more and more difficult. By using laser Raman spectroscopy analysis, the characteristics of Raman spectra of the pressed and filled turquoises were studied. The results show that laser Raman spectroscopy is an effective technique to identify the enhancement and treatment turquoises and the natural ones, moreover, it's a non-destructive testing method. The Raman spectra of the enhancement and treatment turquoises are resulted mainly from the vibrational mode and frequency of water, hydroxyl units, PO4 tetrahedron and CH2 units. Besides, they have the characteristic Raman spectra peaks at 2,937, 2,883 and 1,451 cm(-1) which are attributed to the stretching vibration and the bending vibration of CH2, respectively. These characteristic Raman vibration bands, it will help to distinguish the natural turquoises and the treatment ones. The study provides a new train of thought on the rapid, accurate, and non-destructive identification of turquoise. PMID:20827971

  20. [Study on the treatment turquoise using Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan-li; Yuan, Xin-qiang; Chen, Jing-zhong; Qi, Li-jian

    2010-07-01

    Due to a variety of the enhancement and treatment turquoises discovered in gem markets, the identification of turquoise is becoming more and more difficult. By using laser Raman spectroscopy analysis, the characteristics of Raman spectra of the pressed and filled turquoises were studied. The results show that laser Raman spectroscopy is an effective technique to identify the enhancement and treatment turquoises and the natural ones, moreover, it's a non-destructive testing method. The Raman spectra of the enhancement and treatment turquoises are resulted mainly from the vibrational mode and frequency of water, hydroxyl units, PO4 tetrahedron and CH2 units. Besides, they have the characteristic Raman spectra peaks at 2,937, 2,883 and 1,451 cm(-1) which are attributed to the stretching vibration and the bending vibration of CH2, respectively. These characteristic Raman vibration bands, it will help to distinguish the natural turquoises and the treatment ones. The study provides a new train of thought on the rapid, accurate, and non-destructive identification of turquoise.

  1. From molecular fragments to crystals: a UV Raman spectroscopic study on the mechanism of Fe-ZSM-5 synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fengtao; Sun, Keju; Feng, Zhaochi; Xia, Haian; Han, Bo; Lian, Yuxiang; Ying, Pinliang; Li, Can

    2009-01-01

    The nucleation process of iron-exchanged zeolite Fe-ZSM-5, from the assembly of distorted tetrahedrally coordinated iron species and silicate rings in the precursor to the final Fe-ZSM-5 crystals, as well as variations in the coordination environment of iron, were studied by UV resonance Raman spectroscopy and complementary techniques.The entire sequence of crystallization events of Fe-ZSM-5 was monitored by UV Raman spectroscopy in combination with HRTEM, UV/Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction patterns, and periodic DFT calculations. Fe-ZSM-5 was synthesized by an organic-free method to avoid signal interference from the organic template in Raman spectra. Framework iron atoms with resonance Raman bands at 516, 1115, and 1165 cm(-1), and a Raman band at 1016 cm(-1) are detected for Fe-ZSM-5. In the early stage of Fe-ZSM-5 synthesis, the precursor contains iron atoms in distorted tetrahedral coordination and five- and six-membered silicate rings. Nucleation by aggregation of the precursor species was monitored by UV Raman spectroscopy based on the resonance Raman effect, and confirmed by periodic DFT calculations. Evolution of iron species on the surface and in the bulk phase was monitored by UV Raman spectroscopy with excitation at 244 and 325 nm, as well as HRTEM. Nucleation takes place first in the core of the amorphous particles, and crystalline nuclei with Fe-ZSM-5 structure are formed in the core by consuming the amorphous shell. Finally the amorphous particles are completely transformed into Fe-ZSM-5 crystals.

  2. Raman Spectroscopy Study of Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Bulk Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devpura, S.; Dai, H.; Thakur, J. S.; Naik, R.; Cao, A.; Pandya, A.; Auner, G. W.; Sarkar, F.; Sakr, W.; Naik, V.

    2009-03-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer among men. The mortality rate for this disease can be dramatically reduced if it can be diagnosed in its early stages. Raman spectroscopy is one of the optical techniques which can provide fingerprints of a disease in terms of its molecular composition which changes due to the onset of disease. The aim of this project is to investigate the differences in the Raman spectra to identify benign epithelium (BE), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and adenocarcinoma of various Gleason grades in archived bulk tissues embedded in paraffin wax. For each tissue, two adjacent tissue sections were cut and dewaxed, where one of the sections was stained using haematoxylin and eosin for histological examination and the other unstained adjacent section was used for Raman spectroscopic studies. We have collected Raman spectra from 10 prostatic adenocarcinoma dewaxed tissue sections using Raman microscope (785 nm excitation laser). The data were analyzed using statistical methods of principal component analysis and discriminant function analysis to classify the tissue regions. The results indicate that Raman Spectroscopy can differentiate between BE, PIN and Cancer regions.

  3. Versatility of heme coordination demonstrated in a fungal peroxidase. Absorption and resonance Raman studies of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase and the Asp245-->Asn mutant at various pH values.

    PubMed

    Smulevich, G; Neri, F; Marzocchi, M P; Welinder, K G

    1996-08-13

    The pH dependence of the electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of FeIII and FeII forms of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and its Asp245-->Asn (D245N) mutant has been examined in detail. The spectral data were obtained in the pH range 3.8-12.0. These spectra were used to assess the spin and ligation states of the heme via the porphyrin marker band frequencies and the wavelengths of the absorption maxima, especially that of the band (CT1) due to the charge transfer from the porphyrin to the heme iron via the a' 2u(pi)-->eg (d pi) electronic transition. The RR spectra were obtained by using different excitation wavelengths and polarized light. The data obtained for ferric CIP show that two pH-induced structural transitions exist. At acid pH the Soret and the CT1 absorption maxima occur at 394 and 652 nm, respectively, compared with the values of 403 and 649 nm observed at neutral pH. The electronic data indicate that at acid pH the proximal Fe-Im bond might be weakened or ruptured, and the RR spectra show a new species (5-c HS) different from the normal neutral 5-coordinate high-spin (5-c HS) heme. At pH 12.0, the protein converts to a 6-coordinate low-spin (6-c LS) heme with a hydroxyl ligand coordinated in the sixth position of the heme iron and strongly hydrogen-bonded with the positively charged guanidinium group of the distal Arg51 residue. Replacement of the aspartate carboxylate group of Asp245, which acts as hydrogen-bond acceptor to the proximal His183 ligand of the heme Fe, with a carboxamide group of an asparagine residue has a profound influence on the heme coordination. The RR spectra of the Fe(II) form of this mutant at both neutral and alkaline pH values show a band at 204 cm-1 assigned to the Fe-His stretch associated with a fairly weak or non-hydrogen-bonded imidazole. The ferric form of the mutant shows a great variability in coordination and spin states upon pH titration. Between pH 8.8 and 3.8 the spectra are mainly

  4. Phononic Molecules Studied by Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzillotti-Kimura, N. D.; Fainstein, A.; Jusserand, B.; Lemaitre, A.

    2010-01-04

    An acoustic nanocavity can confine phonons in such a way that they act like electrons in an atom. By combining two of these phononic-atoms, it is possible to form a phononic 'molecule', with acoustic modes that are similar to the electronic states in a hydrogen molecule. We report Raman scattering experiments performed in a monolithic structure formed by a phononic molecule embedded in an optical cavity. The acoustic mode splitting becomes evident through both the amplification and change of selection rules induced by the optical cavity confinement. The results are in perfect agreement with photoelastic model simulations.

  5. Coherent Raman Studies of Shocked Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrane, Shawn; Brown, Kathryn; Dang, Nhan; Bolme, Cynthia; Moore, David

    2013-06-01

    Transient vibrational spectroscopies offer the potential to directly observe time dependent shock induced chemical reaction kinetics. We report recent experiments that couple a hybrid picosecond/femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) diagnostic with our tabletop ultrafast laser driven shock platform. Initial results on liquids shocked to 20 GPa suggest that sub-picosecond dephasing at high pressure and temperature may limit the application of this nonresonant background free version of CARS. Initial results using interferometric CARS to increase sensitivity and overcome these limitations will be presented.

  6. Conformational states of N-acylalanine dithio esters: correlation of resonance Raman spectra with structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Angus, R.H.; Storer, A.C.; Varughese, K.I.; Carey, P.R.

    1988-01-12

    The conformational states of N-acylalanine dithio esters, involving rotational isomers about the RC(=O)NH-CH(CH/sub 3/) and NHCH(CH/sub 3/)-C(=S) bonds, are defined and compared to those of N-acylglycine dithio esters. The structure of N-(p-nitrobenzoyl)-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester has been determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis; it is a B-type conformer with the amide N atom cis to the thiol sulfur. Raman and resonance Raman (RR) measurements on this compound and for the B conformers of solid N-benzoyl-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester and N-(..beta..-phenylpropionyl)-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester and its NHCH(CD/sub 3/)C(=S) and NHCH(CH/sub 3/)/sup 13/C(=S) analogues are used to set up a library of RR data for alanine-based dithio esters in a B-conformer state. RR data for this solid material in its isotopically unsubstituted and CH(C-D/sub 3/)C(=S) and CH(CH/sub 3/)/sup 13/C(=S) forms provide information on the RR signatures of alanine dithio esters in A-like conformations. RR spectra are compared for the solid compounds, for N-(p-nitrobenzoyl)-DL-alanine, N-(..beta..-phenylpropionyl)-DL-alanine, and (methyloxycarbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester, and for several /sup 13/C=S- and CD/sub 3/-substituted analogues in CCl/sub 4/ or aqueous solutions. The RR data demonstrate that the alanine-based dithio esters take up A, B, and C/sub 5/ conformations in solution. The RR spectra of these conformers are clearly distinguishable from those for the same conformers of N-acylglycine dithio esters. However, the crystallographic and spectroscopic results show that the results show that the conformational properties of N-acylglycine and N-acylalanine dithio esters are very similar.

  7. A magnetic-field enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy strategy towards the early diagnosis of malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2012-03-01

    Early malaria diagnosis is important because malaria disease can develop into fatal illness within hours upon the appearance of the first symptom. The low concentration of the diagnosis biomarker, hemozoin, at the early stage of malaria disease makes early diagnosis difficult. In this paper, we present a magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) strategy for the sensitive detection of β - hematin crystals, which is equivalent to hemozoin in the characteristics of Raman spectrum, by using magnetic nanoparticles. We observe several orders of magnitude enhancement in the SERRS signal of enriched β - hematin in comparison to the Raman signal of β - hematin in the cases of SERRS alone or magnetic enrichment alone, showing the great potential of this method towards early malaria diagnosis.

  8. A magnetic-field enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy strategy towards the early diagnosis of malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Yuen; Liu, Quan

    2012-02-01

    Early malaria diagnosis is important because malaria disease can develop into fatal illness within hours upon the appearance of the first symptom. The low concentration of the diagnosis biomarker, hemozoin, at the early stage of malaria disease makes early diagnosis difficult. In this paper, we present a magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) strategy for the sensitive detection of β - hematin crystals, which is equivalent to hemozoin in the characteristics of Raman spectrum, by using magnetic nanoparticles. We observe several orders of magnitude enhancement in the SERRS signal of enriched β - hematin in comparison to the Raman signal of β - hematin in the cases of SERRS alone or magnetic enrichment alone, showing the great potential of this method towards early malaria diagnosis.

  9. Resonance Raman mapping as a tool to monitor and manipulate Si nanocrystals in Si-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Ekta; Ingale, Alka A.; Chaturvedi, A.; Joshi, M. P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2015-10-19

    Specially designed laser heating experiment along with Raman mapping on Si-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposites elucidates the contribution of core and surface/interface in the intermediate frequency range (511–514 cm{sup −1}) Si phonons. The contribution of core to surface/interface increases with the size of Si nanocrystal, which itself increases on laser irradiation. Further, it is found that resonance Raman is crucial to the observance of surface/interface phonons and wavelength dependent Raman mapping can be corroborated with band edges observed in absorption spectra. This understanding can be gainfully used to manipulate and characterize Si-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite, simultaneously for photovoltaic device applications.

  10. Structural characterization of titania by X-ray diffraction, photoacoustic, Raman spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kadam, R M; Rajeswari, B; Sengupta, Arijit; Achary, S N; Kshirsagar, R J; Natarajan, V

    2015-02-25

    A titania mineral (obtained from East coast, Orissa, India) was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), Raman and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies. XRD studies indicated the presence of rutile (91%) and anatase (9%) phases in the mineral. Raman investigation supported this information. Both rutile and anatase phases have tetragonal structure (rutile: space group P4(2)/mnm, a=4.5946(1) Å, c=2.9597(1) Å, V=62.48(1) (Å)(3), Z=2; anatase: space group I4(1)/amd, 3.7848(2) Å, 9.5098(11) Å, V=136.22(2) (Å)(3), Z=4). The deconvoluted PAS spectrum showed nine peaks around 335, 370, 415,485, 555, 605, 659, 690,730 and 785 nm and according to the ligand field theory, these peaks were attributed to the presence of V(4+), Cr(3+), Mn(4+) and Fe(3+) species. EPR studies revealed the presence of transition metal ions V(4+)(d(1)), Cr(3+)(d(3)), Mn(4+)(d(3)) and Fe(3+)(d(5)) at Ti(4+) sites. The EPR spectra are characterized by very large crystal filed splitting (D term) and orthorhombic distortion term (E term) for multiple electron system (s>1) suggesting that the transition metal ions substitute the Ti(4+) in the lattice which is situated in distorted octahedral coordination of oxygen. The possible reasons for observation of unusually large D and E term in the EPR spectra of transition metal ions (S=3/2 and 5/2) are discussed. PMID:25233027

  11. Structural characterization of titania by X-ray diffraction, photoacoustic, Raman spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kadam, R M; Rajeswari, B; Sengupta, Arijit; Achary, S N; Kshirsagar, R J; Natarajan, V

    2015-02-25

    A titania mineral (obtained from East coast, Orissa, India) was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), Raman and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies. XRD studies indicated the presence of rutile (91%) and anatase (9%) phases in the mineral. Raman investigation supported this information. Both rutile and anatase phases have tetragonal structure (rutile: space group P4(2)/mnm, a=4.5946(1) Å, c=2.9597(1) Å, V=62.48(1) (Å)(3), Z=2; anatase: space group I4(1)/amd, 3.7848(2) Å, 9.5098(11) Å, V=136.22(2) (Å)(3), Z=4). The deconvoluted PAS spectrum showed nine peaks around 335, 370, 415,485, 555, 605, 659, 690,730 and 785 nm and according to the ligand field theory, these peaks were attributed to the presence of V(4+), Cr(3+), Mn(4+) and Fe(3+) species. EPR studies revealed the presence of transition metal ions V(4+)(d(1)), Cr(3+)(d(3)), Mn(4+)(d(3)) and Fe(3+)(d(5)) at Ti(4+) sites. The EPR spectra are characterized by very large crystal filed splitting (D term) and orthorhombic distortion term (E term) for multiple electron system (s>1) suggesting that the transition metal ions substitute the Ti(4+) in the lattice which is situated in distorted octahedral coordination of oxygen. The possible reasons for observation of unusually large D and E term in the EPR spectra of transition metal ions (S=3/2 and 5/2) are discussed.

  12. Resonance-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Ring-Involved Vibrational Modes in the (1)B(2u) Absorption Band of Benzene, Including the Kekule Vibrational Modes ν(9) and ν(10).

    PubMed

    Willitsford, Adam H; Chadwick, C Todd; Kurtz, Stewart; Philbrick, C Russell; Hallen, Hans

    2016-02-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy provides much stronger Raman signal levels than its off-resonant counterpart and adds selectivity by excitation tuning. Raman preresonance of benzene has been well studied. On-resonance studies, especially at phonon-allowed absorptions, have received less attention. In this case, we observe resonance of many of the vibration modes associated motion of the carbons in the ring while tuning over the (1)B2u absorption, including the related ν9 (CC stretch Herzberg notation, ν14 Wilson notation) and ν10 (CH-parallel bend Herzberg notation, ν15 Wilson notation) vibrational modes along with the ν2 (CC-stretch or ring-breathing Herzberg notation, ν1 Wilson notation) mode and multiples of the ν18 (CCC-parallel bend Herzberg notation, ν6 Wilson notation) vibrational mode. The ring-breathing mode is found to mix with the b2u modes creating higher frequency composites. Through the use of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to tune through the (1)B2u absorption band of liquid benzene, a stiffening (increase in energy) of the vibrational modes is observed as the excitation wavelength nears the (1)B2u absorption peak of the isolated molecule (vapor) phase. The strongest resonance amplitude observed is in the 2 × ν18 (e2g) mode, with nearly twice the intensity of the ring-breathing mode, ν2. Several overtones and combination modes, especially with ν2 (a1g), are also observed to resonate. Raman resonances on phonon-allowed excitations are narrow and permit the measurement of vibrations not Raman-active in the ground state. PMID:26731431

  13. Raman spectroscopic study of the tellurite minerals: rajite and denningite.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Dickfos, Marilla J; Keeffe, Eloise C

    2008-12-15

    Tellurites may be subdivided according to formula and structure. There are five groups based upon the formulae (a) A(XO3), (b) A(XO3).xH2O, (c) A2(XO3)3.xH2O, (d) A2(X2O5) and (e) A(X3O8). Raman spectroscopy has been used to study rajite and denningite, examples of group (d). Minerals of the tellurite group are porous zeolite-like materials. Raman bands for rajite observed at 740, and 676 and 667 cm(-1) are attributed to the nu1 (Te2O5)(2-) symmetric stretching mode and the nu3 (TeO3)(2-) antisymmetric stretching modes, respectively. A second rajite mineral sample provided a more complex Raman spectrum with Raman bands at 754 and 731 cm(-1) assigned to the nu1 (Te2O5)(2-) symmetric stretching modes and two bands at 652 and 603 cm(-1) are accounted for by the nu3 (Te2O5)(2-) antisymmetric stretching mode. The Raman spectrum of dennigite displays an intense band at 734 cm(-1) attributed to the nu1 (Te2O5)(2-) symmetric stretching mode with a second Raman band at 674 cm(-1) assigned to the nu3 (Te2O5)(2-) antisymmetric stretching mode. Raman bands for rajite, observed at (346, 370) and 438 cm(-1) are assigned to the (Te2O5)(2-)nu2 (A1) bending mode and nu4 (E) bending modes.

  14. Resonance Raman imaging as a tool to assess the atmospheric pollution level: carotenoids in Lecanoraceae lichens as bioindicators.

    PubMed

    Ibarrondo, I; Prieto-Taboada, N; Martínez-Arkarazo, I; Madariaga, J M

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy differentiation of carotenoids has traditionally been based on the ν 1 position (C = C stretching vibrations in the polyene chain) in the 1500-1600 cm(-1) range, using a 785 nm excitation laser. However, when the number of conjugated double bonds is similar, as in the cases of zeaxanthin and β-carotene, this distinction is still ambiguous due to the closeness of the Raman bands. This work shows the Raman results, obtained in resonance conditions using a 514 mm laser, on Lecanora campestris and Lecanora atra species, which can be used to differentiate and consequently characterize carotenoids. The presence of the carotenoid found in Lecanoraceae lichens has been demonstrated to depend on the atmospheric pollution level of the environment they inhabit. Astaxanthin, a superb antioxidant, appears as the principal xanthophyll in highly polluted sites, usually together with the UV screening pigment scytonemin; zeaxanthin is the major carotenoid in medium polluted environments, while β-carotene is the major carotenoid in cleaner environments. Based on these observations, an indirect classification of the stress suffered in a given environment can be assessed by simply analysing the carotenoid content in the Lecanoraceae lichens by using resonance Raman imaging. PMID:26620863

  15. Raman spectroscopic study of leptospiral glycolipoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, PeiDi; Bao, Lang; Huang, TianQuan; Liu, XinMing

    1998-04-01

    The Raman scattering spectra of two different samples of Leptospiral Glycoipoprotein (GLP-1 and GLP-2) which have different toxic effects have been obtained and investigated. Leptospirosis is one of the most harmful zoonosis. It is a serious public health issue in some area of Sichusan province. The two samples offer different structural informations of GLP molecules, it would be important to find the difference in contents, structures and the amino acid side - chains environment of the molecules between the two samples of GLP for understanding the different toxic effects. The intense Am I at 1651 cm-1 and weak Am III at 1283 cm-1 show that GLP-1 has a predominantly (alpha) -helix secondary structure. The intense Am I at 1674 cm-1 and intense Am III at 1246 cm-1 show that the conformation of GLP-2 has a high content of (Beta) - sheet and a low content of random - coil secondary structure. Strong Raman scattering occurs in the range 920- 980 cm-1, belong to the C-COO vibration and the stretching of the peptide backbone. The molecules of GLP-1 has trans-gauche-trans configuration of the C-S-S-C-C linkage and the molecules of GLP-2 has trans-gauche-gauche configuration of the C-C-S-S-C-C linkage. The intensity ratio of the two tyrosine liens at 830 cm-1 and 850 cm-1 is 1.1 and 1.23, indicate their tyrosine reduces environment respectively. Other side-chain environment in the two samples were discussed.

  16. Raman spectroscopic study of Lactarius spores (Russulales, Fungi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gussem, Kris; Vandenabeele, Peter; Verbeken, Annemieke; Moens, Luc

    2005-10-01

    Fungi are important organisms in ecosystems, in industrial and pharmaceutical production and are valuable food sources as well. Classical identification is often time-consuming and specialistic. In this study, Raman spectroscopy is applied to the analysis of fungal spores of Lactarius, an economically and ecologically important genus of Basidiomycota. Raman spectra of spores of Lactarius controversus Pers.: Fr., Lactarius lacunarum (Romagn.) ex Hora, Lactarius quieticolor Romagn. and Lactarius quietus (Fr.: Fr.) Fr. are reported for the first time. The spectra of these species show large similarity. These spectra are studied and compared with the Raman spectra of reference substances known to occur in macrofungi, including saccharides, lipids and some minor compounds that may serve as specific biomarkers (adenine, ergosterol and glycine). Most Raman bands could be attributed to specific components. In agreement with the biological role of fungal spores, high amounts of lipids were observed, the main fatty acid being oleate. In addition to different types of lipids and phospholipids, the polysaccharides chitin and amylopectin could be detected as well. The presence of trehalose is not equivocally shown, due to overlapping bands. Raman band positions are reported for the observed bands of the different species and reference products.

  17. Resonance Raman characterization of the radical anion and triplet states of zinc tetraphenylporphine

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.A.; Purrello, R.; Prendergast, K.; Spiro, T.G. )

    1991-11-28

    The photophysical properties of metalloporphyrins are important to a range of current research areas, ranging from solar energy conversion to photodynamic therapy. Resonance Raman (RR) spectra are reported for the anion radical and for the photoexcited triplet state of ZnTPP. RR spectra were obtained by excitation at 457.9 nm, at the anion absorption band maximum. Bands were assigned with the aid of pyrrole-d[sub 8] and phenyl-d[sub 20] isotopomers. The pattern of isotope shifts and polarizations was found to be quite similar to that of the neutral parent, ZnTPP. The frequency shift pattern is discussed in terms of the expectations for placing an electron in the e[sub g]* orbital, including the anticipated Jahn-Teller (J-T) effect. Although band overlaps make depolarization ratios difficult to quantitate, the [nu][sub 10] band is found to be essentially depolarized, indicating that the J-T effect is dynamic, rather than static in character, at least with respect to stretching of the C[sub a]C[sub m] bonds. The [nu][sub 2] and [nu][sub 10] downshifts are attributable to porphyrin core expansion upon reduction, but the [nu][sub 27] and [nu][sub 29] reductions are probably manifestations of the J-T effect. Triplet-state RR spectra were produced with 416-nm photolysis and 459-nm probe pulses (7 ns). The RR peaks were assigned via their polarizations and the d[sub 8] and d[sub 20] isotopomer shifts. The spectrum contains three strong bands of predominantly phenyl character. Their frequencies are unshifted relative to the ground state, implying negligible electronic involvement of the phenyl groups in the T[sub 1] state, but their enhancements indicate substantial involvement in the resonant T[sub n] state. This state is suggested to be produced by charge transfer from the porphyrin e[sub g]* to the phenyl [pi]* orbitals.

  18. E{sub 1} Gap of Wurtzite InAs Single Nanowires Measured by Means of Resonant Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, M.; Lima, M. M. Jr. de; Cantarero, A.; Dacal, L. C. O.; Iikawa, F.; Chiaramonte, T.; Cotta, M. A.

    2011-12-23

    Indium arsenide nanowires were synthesized with an intermixing of wurtzite and zincblende structure by chemical beam epitaxy with the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. Resonant Raman spectroscopy of the transverse optical phonon mode at 215 cm{sup -1} reveals an E{sub 1} gap of 2.47 eV which is assigned to the electronic band gap at the A point in the indium arsenide wurtzite phase.

  19. Determination of chromophore structure and environment in bovine visual pigments with resonance Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Palings, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of /sup 2/H- and /sup 13/C-labeled visual pigments have been obtained and analyzed. The C-C stretching vibrations of rhodopsin, isorhodopsin, and bathorhodopsin have been assigned, as well as those of the 11-cis and 9-cis retinal protonated Schiff base model compounds. The insensitivity of the C/sub 14/-C/sub 15/ stretch frequency to N-deuteration in all three pigments demonstrates that each contains a trans C=N bond. Comparison of the fingerprint modes of the visual pigments and their model compounds shows that the C/sub 10/-C/sub 11/ and C/sub 14/-C/sub 15/ single bonds are s-trans in all three pigments. This provides evidence against the model of bathorhodopsin proposed by Lui and Asato, which suggests a C/sub 10/-C/sub 11/ s-cis structure. The extreme similarity of the C-C stretch modes of rhodopsin and the 11-cis retinal protonated Schiff base argues against the presence of a negatively charged protein residue near C/sub 13/, proposed to be responsible for the opsin shift of rhodopsin. However, the unusually large shift of the C=N stretch frequency upon N-deuteration in rhodopsin relative to the model compound suggests that the opsin shift mechanism may involve altered Schiff base - counter ion interactions.

  20. Accurate Simulation of Resonance-Raman Spectra of Flexible Molecules: An Internal Coordinates Approach.

    PubMed

    Baiardi, Alberto; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-07-14

    The interpretation and analysis of experimental resonance-Raman (RR) spectra can be significantly facilitated by vibronic computations based on reliable quantum-mechanical (QM) methods. With the aim of improving the description of large and flexible molecules, our recent time-dependent formulation to compute vibrationally resolved electronic spectra, based on Cartesian coordinates, has been extended to support internal coordinates. A set of nonredundant delocalized coordinates is automatically generated from the molecular connectivity thanks to a new general and robust procedure. In order to validate our implementation, a series of molecules has been used as test cases. Among them, rigid systems show that normal modes based on Cartesian and delocalized internal coordinates provide equivalent results, but the latter set is much more convenient and reliable for systems characterized by strong geometric deformations associated with the electronic transition. The so-called Z-matrix internal coordinates, which perform well for chain molecules, are also shown to be poorly suited in the presence of cycles or nonstandard structures.

  1. Application of Raman spectroscopy technology to studying Sudan I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Guoping; Chen, Chen

    2006-06-01

    Being an industrial dye, the Sudan I may have a toxic effect after oral intake on the body, and has recently been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice and rabbits. Because China and some other countries have detected the Sudan I in samples of the hot chilli powder and the chilli products, it is necessary to study the characteristics of this dye. As one kind of molecule scattering spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy is characterized by the frequency excursion caused by interactions of molecules and photons. The frequency excursion reflects the margin between certain two vibrational or rotational energy states, and shows the information of the molecule. Because Raman spectroscopy can provides quick, easy, reproducible, and non-destructive analysis, both qualitative and quantitative, with no sample preparation required, Raman spectroscopy has been a particularly promising technique for analyzing the characteristics and structures of molecules, especially organic ones. Now, it has a broad application in biological, chemical, environmental and industrial applications. This paper firstly introduces Sudan I dye and the Raman spectroscopy technology, and then describes its application to the Sudan I. Secondly, the fingerprint spectra of the Sudan I are respectively assigned and analyzed in detail. Finally, the conclusion that the Raman spectroscopy technology is a powerful tool to determine the Sudan I is drawn.

  2. Resonance Raman and temperature-dependent electronic absorption spectra of cavity and noncavity models of the hydrated electron

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Jennifer R.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Most of what is known about the structure of the hydrated electron comes from mixed quantum/classical simulations, which depend on the pseudopotential that couples the quantum electron to the classical water molecules. These potentials usually are highly repulsive, producing cavity-bound hydrated electrons that break the local water H-bonding structure. However, we recently developed a more attractive potential, which produces a hydrated electron that encompasses a region of enhanced water density. Both our noncavity and the various cavity models predict similar experimental observables. In this paper, we work to distinguish between these models by studying both the temperature dependence of the optical absorption spectrum, which provides insight into the balance of the attractive and repulsive terms in the potential, and the resonance Raman spectrum, which provides a direct measure of the local H-bonding environment near the electron. We find that only our noncavity model can capture the experimental red shift of the hydrated electron’s absorption spectrum with increasing temperature at constant density. Cavity models of the hydrated electron predict a solvation structure similar to that of the larger aqueous halides, leading to a Raman O–H stretching band that is blue-shifted and narrower than that of bulk water. In contrast, experiments show the hydrated electron has a broader and red-shifted O–H stretching band compared with bulk water, a feature recovered by our noncavity model. We conclude that although our noncavity model does not provide perfect quantitative agreement with experiment, the hydrated electron must have a significant degree of noncavity character. PMID:23382233

  3. Phase-sensitive detection of optical resonances by using an acousto-optic modulator in the Raman - Nath diffraction mode

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, V N; Domnin, Yu S; Kopylov, L N

    2007-11-30

    A new method for frequency control of an external cavity diode laser without direct modulation of the injection current is proposed. The Pound - Drever optical heterodyne technique or the method of frequency control by frequency-modulated sidebands, in which an acousto-optic modulator operating in the Raman - Nath diffraction mode is used as an external phase modulator, can be employed to obtain error signals upon automatic frequency locking of the diode laser to the saturated absorption resonances within the D{sub 2} line of cesium atoms or to the optical cavity resonances. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  4. Experimental and Theoretical Study on the Surface Enhanced Raman Mechanism of Pristine and Chemically Doped Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Simin; Dos Santos, Maria C.; Lu, Ruitao; Elias, Ana L.; Perea-Lopez, Nestor; Terrones, Mauricio

    2014-03-01

    It is demonstrated that graphene could be used as an efficient surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate. Recently, our group has also shown that chemically doped graphene can improve the SERS signal of pristine graphene. Here we present an experimental and theoretical study on the SERS mechanism for both pristine (PG) and Nitrogen-doped graphene (NG). Large-area and highly-crystalline monolayer PG and NG sheets have been synthesized. Common molecules, such as Rhodamine B, Crystal Violet, Methylene Blue and Melamine were used as Raman probes using different laser excitation energies. It was observed that for each molecule, specific laser energy exhibits large intensity Raman signals when compared to others. More importantly, some signals can be detected even for concentrations as low as 10-8 M, which provides excellent molecular sensing properties. Then the system was modeled using DFT-B3LYP/6-31(d,p) and the Mulliken population analysis was used to calculate the net charge on the adsorbed molecules. By comparing the cases of PG and NG, our preliminary results suggest that stronger Raman enhancement of NG would likely be coming from the resonance of EF of graphene and the LUMO level of the adsorbed molecules.

  5. Raman tensors and their application in structural studies of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Masamichi; Benevides, James M; Thomas, George J

    2009-01-01

    The Raman scattering of a molecule is generated by interactions of its electrons with incident light. The electric vector of the Raman scattered light is related to the electric vector of the incident light through a characteristic Raman tensor. A unique Raman tensor exists for each Raman-active molecular vibrational mode. In the case of biologically important macromolecules Raman tensors have been determined for a few hundred vibrational Raman bands. These include proteins and their amino acid constituents, as well as nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and their nucleotide constituents. In this review Raman tensors for 39 representative vibrational Raman bands of biological molecules are considered. We present details of the Raman tensor determinations and discuss their application in structural studies of filamentous bacteriophages (fd, Pf1, Pf3 and PH75), fowl feather rachis and eyespots of the protists, Chlamydomonas and Euglena. PMID:19282645

  6. Raman tensors and their application in structural studies of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Masamichi; Benevides, James M; Thomas, George J

    2009-01-01

    The Raman scattering of a molecule is generated by interactions of its electrons with incident light. The electric vector of the Raman scattered light is related to the electric vector of the incident light through a characteristic Raman tensor. A unique Raman tensor exists for each Raman-active molecular vibrational mode. In the case of biologically important macromolecules Raman tensors have been determined for a few hundred vibrational Raman bands. These include proteins and their amino acid constituents, as well as nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and their nucleotide constituents. In this review Raman tensors for 39 representative vibrational Raman bands of biological molecules are considered. We present details of the Raman tensor determinations and discuss their application in structural studies of filamentous bacteriophages (fd, Pf1, Pf3 and PH75), fowl feather rachis and eyespots of the protists, Chlamydomonas and Euglena.

  7. Raman Tensors and their application in structural studies of biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Masamichi; Benevides, James M.; Thomas, George J.

    2009-01-01

    The Raman scattering of a molecule is generated by interactions of its electrons with incident light. The electric vector of the Raman scattered light is related to the electric vector of the incident light through a characteristic Raman tensor. A unique Raman tensor exists for each Raman-active molecular vibrational mode. In the case of biologically important macromolecules Raman tensors have been determined for a few hundred vibrational Raman bands. These include proteins and their amino acid constituents, as well as nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and their nucleotide constituents. In this review Raman tensors for 39 representative vibrational Raman bands of biological molecules are considered. We present details of the Raman tensor determinations and discuss their application in structural studies of filamentous bacteriophages (fd, Pf1, Pf3 and PH75), fowl feather rachis and eyespots of the protists, Chlamydomonas and Euglena. PMID:19282645

  8. Raman spectroscopic study of plasma-treated salmon DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Geon Joon; Kim, Yong Hee; Choi, Eun Ha; Kwon, Young-Wan

    2013-01-14

    In this research, we studied the effect of plasma treatment on the optical/structural properties of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from salmon sperm. DNA-cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) films were obtained by complexation of DNA with CTMA. Circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectra indicated that DNA retained its double helical structure in the solid film. The Raman spectra exhibited several vibration modes corresponding to the nuclear bases and the deoxyribose-phosphate backbones of the DNA, as well as the alkylchains of CTMA. Dielectric-barrier-discharge (DBD) plasma treatment induced structural modification and damage to the DNA, as observed by changes in the ultraviolet-visible absorption, CD, and Raman spectra. The optical emission spectra of the DBD plasma confirmed that DNA modification was induced by plasma ions such as reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species.

  9. Raman Spectroscopy Studies of Normal and Burned Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnani, Faranak; Maass, David; Idris, Ahamed; Glosser, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Burn injuries are a significant medical problem, and need to be treated quickly and precisely. Burned skin needs to be removed early, within hours (less than 24 hrs) of injury, when the margins of the burn are still hard to define. Studies show that treating and excising burn wounds soon after the injury prevents the wound from becoming deeper, reduces the release of proinflammatory mediators, and reduces or prevents the systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome. Also, removing burned skin prepares the affected region for skin grafting. Raman spectroscopy could be used as an objective diagnostic method that will assist burn surgeons in removing burned skin precisely. As a first step in developing a diagnostic tool, we present Raman spectroscopy information from normal and burned ex vivo rat skin, and a comparison of our findings. Raman spectroscopy is explored for its specificity and sensitivity.

  10. Raman spectroscopic studies of carbon in extra-terrestrial materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macklin, John; Brownlee, Donald; Chang, Sherwood; Bunch, Ted

    1990-01-01

    The measurements obtained here indicate ways in which micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to elucidate structural characteristics and distribution of carbon in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Existing information about structurally significant aspects of Raman measurements of graphite is combined with structurally relevant findings from the present micro-Raman studies of carbons prepared by carbonization of polyvinylidine chloride (PVDC) at various temperatures and natural material, as well as several acid residues from the Allende and Murchison meteorites in order to establish new spectra-structure relationships. Structural features of many of the materials in this study have been measured by x ray analysis and electron microscopy: thus, their structural differences can be directly correlated with differences in the Raman spectra. The spectral parameters consequently affirmed as indicators of structure are used as a measure of structure in materials that have unknown carbon structure, especially IDPs. The unique applicability of micro-Raman spectroscopy is realized not only in the ability to conveniently measure spectra of micron-size IDPs, but also micro-sized parts of an inhomogeneous material. Microcrystalline graphite is known to give Raman spectra that differ dependent on crystallite size (see e.g., Lespade, et. al., 1984, or Nemanich and Solin, 1979). The spectral changes that accompany decreasing particle size include increase in the ratio (R) of the intensity of the band near 1350 cm(-1) (D band) to that of the band near 1600 cm(-1) (G band) increase in the half width of the D band (wD) increase in the frequency maximum of the G band and increase in the half-width (wG) of the 2nd order band near 2700 cm(-1) (G) band.

  11. Raman structural studies of the nickel electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornilsen, B. C.

    1985-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is sensitive to empirically controlled nickel electrode structural variations, and has unique potential for structural characterization of these materials. How the structure relates to electrochemical properties is examined so that the latter can be more completely understood, controlled, and optimized. Electrodes were impregnated and cycled, and cyclic voltammetry is being used for electrochemical characterization. Structural variation was observed which has escaped detection using other methods. Structural changes are induced by: (1) cobalt doping, (2) the state of change or discharge, (3) the preparation conditions and type of buffer used, and (4) the formation process. Charged active mass has an NiOOH-type structure, agreeing with X-ray diffraction results. Discharged active mass, however, is not isostructural with beta-Ni(OH)2. Chemically prepared alpha phases are not isostructural either. A disordered structural model, containing point defects, is proposed for the cycled materials. This model explains K(+) incorporation. Band assignments were made and spectra interpreted for beta-Ni(OH)2, electrochemical NiOOH and chemically precipitated NiOOH.

  12. Single molecule surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofkens, Johan; De Schryver, Frans C.; Cotlet, Mircea; Habuchi, Satoshi

    2004-06-01

    One of the most intriguing findings in single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) is the observation of Raman spectra of individual molecules, despite the small cross section of the transitions involved. The observation of the spectra can be explained by the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERRS) effect. At the single-molecule level, the SERRS-spectra recorded as a function of time reveal inhomogeneous behaviour such as on/off blinking, spectral diffusion, intensity fluctuations of vibrational line, and even splitting of some lines within the spectrum of one molecule. Single-molecule SERRS (SM-SERRS) spectroscopy opens up exciting opportunities in the field of biophysics and biomedical spectroscopy. The first example of single protein SERRS was performed on hemoglobin. However, the possibility of extracting the heme group by silver sols can not be excluded. Here we report on SM-SERRS spectra of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in which the chromophore is kept in the protein. The time series of SM-SERRS spectra suggest the conversion of the EGFP chromophore between the deprotonated and the protonated form. Autocorrelation analysis of SM-SERRS trajectory reveals the presence of fast dynamics taking place in the protein. Our findings show the potential of the technique to study structural dynamics of protein molecules.

  13. Effect of TiO2 particles on normal and resonance Raman spectra of coumarin 343: a theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linzhi; Wu, Wenpeng; Zhao, Yi

    2015-04-28

    It is well known that interfacial structures and charge transfer in dye-sensitized solar cells are extremely important for the enhancement of cell efficiency. Here, the normal Raman spectra (NRS) and resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of a C343-sensitized TiO2 cluster (Ti9O18) are theoretically predicted from combined electronic structure calculations and a vibrationally-resolved spectral method to reveal the relationship between interfacial geometries and excited-state dynamics. The results show that although the NRS of free C343 and the C343-TiO2 cluster correspond to the vibrational motions of C343 in a high frequency domain, their mode frequencies show obvious differences due to the interaction of the TiO2 cluster on C343, and several new Raman active fingerprint modes, such as bidentate chelating bonding modes, can be used to determine interfacial geometries. However, the resonance Raman activities of low-frequency modes are significantly enhanced and several modes from the TiO2 cluster can be observed, consistent with experimental measurements. Furthermore, the RRS from a locally excited state and a charge transfer state of C343-TiO2 are dramatically different, for instance, new Raman active modes with 1212 cm(-1), 1560 cm(-1) and 1602 cm(-1), corresponding to the motions of CH2 rocking, C=C/C-N/C=O stretching and C=O/C=C stretching, appear from the charge transfer state. The obtained information on mode-specific reorganization energies from these excited states is greatly helpful to understand and control interfacial electron transfer.

  14. Resonance Raman characterization of different forms of ground-state 8-bromo-7-hydroxyquinoline caged acetate in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    An, Hui-Ying; Ma, Chensheng; Nganga, Jameil L; Zhu, Yue; Dore, Timothy M; Phillips, David Lee

    2009-03-26

    The 8-bromo-7-hydroxyquinolinyl group (BHQ) is a derivative of 7-hydroxyquinoline (7-HQ) and BHQ molecules coexisting as different forms in aqueous solution. Absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopic methods were used to examine 8-bromo-7-hydroxyquinoline protected acetate (BHQ-OAc) in acetonitrile (MeCN), H(2)O/MeCN (60:40, v/v, pH 6 approximately 7), and NaOH-H(2)O/MeCN (60:40, v/v, pH 11 approximately 12) to obtain a better characterization of the forms of the ground-state species of BHQ-OAc in aqueous solutions and to examine their properties. The absorption spectra of BHQ-OAc in water show no absorption bands of the tautomeric species unlike the strong band at about 400 nm observed for the tautomeric form in 7-HQ aqueous solution. The resonance Raman spectra in conjunction with Raman spectra predicted from density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal the observation of a double Raman band system characteristic of the neutral form (the nominal C=C ring stretching, C-N stretching, and O-H bending modes at 1564 and 1607 cm(-1)) and a single Raman band diagnostic of the enol-deprotonated anionic form (the nominal C=C ring, C-N, and C-O(-) stretching modes in the 1593 cm(-1) region). These results suggest that the neutral form of BHQ-OAc is the major species in neutral aqueous solution. There is a modest increase in the amount of the anionic form and a big decrease in the amount of the tautomeric form of the molecules for BHQ-OAc compared to 7-HQ in neutral aqueous solution. The presence of the 8-bromo group and/or competitive hydrogen bonding that hinder the formation and transfer process of a BHQ-OAc-water cyclic complex may be responsible for this large substituent effect. PMID:19296708

  15. Infrared, Raman, resonance Raman spectra and lattice dynamics calculations of the solid potassium(I) nickel(II) thiophosphate compound, KNiPS 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourisseau, C.; Cavagnat, R.; Fouassier, M.; Brec, R.; Elder, S. H.

    1995-06-01

    The UV-visible (350-850 nm), infrared and Raman (20-700 cm -1) spectra of a new KNiPS 4 solid compound have been analyzed using powder samples and crystalline platelets. From polarization measurements, the main electronic transition of 1F 2← 1A 1 type due to the PS 43- thiophosphate groups are localized in the 360-570 nm range and vibrational assignments for most of the fundamental modes are proposed. These assignments were checked by complete valence force field lattice dynamics calculations in the various symmetry blocks of the tetragonal crystal structure (D 4h14). Potential energy distributions as well as mean squared vibrational amplitude calculations have shown strong ν(NiS) and σ(SPS) couplings in the (NiPS 4) - structural chains and remarkably high ν(NiS) infrared frequencies. Furthermore, the resonance Raman spectra of single crystals and powder samples were recorded over a wide range (647.1-476.5 nm) of excitatiob wavelengths. This allowed to probe the nature of the broad electronic transition of the complex centered around 510 nm and responsible for KNiPS 4 brown color. The Raman excitation profiles of several fundamentals and combination bands were thus established. Under resonance conditions, various crystalline components of A 1g, B 1g and B 2g symmetry for the ν 4(F 2) or ν 2(E) deformation modes of the PS 43- groups are enhanced. No overtone progressions involving totally symmetric modes were observed but anomalously intense high-order combination bands were detected. It is thus concluded that adiabatic as well as non-adiabatic interactions must play a great role in the vibronically induced Raman scattering processes. Reasons for this peculiar behavior are discussed in relation to the X-ray crystal structure of the KNiPS 4 compound. All the experimental results imply the presence of substantial site and factor group effects on the optical and vibronic properties of the thiophosphate anions.

  16. Resonant surface-enhanced Raman scattering by optical phonons in a monolayer of CdSe nanocrystals on Au nanocluster arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milekhin, Alexander G.; Sveshnikova, Larisa L.; Duda, Tatyana A.; Rodyakina, Ekaterina E.; Dzhagan, Volodymyr M.; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Gordan, Ovidiu D.; Himcinschi, Cameliu; Latyshev, Alexander V.; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2016-05-01

    Here we present the results on an investigation of resonant Stokes and anti- Stokes surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by optical phonons in colloidal CdSe nanocrystals (NCs) homogeneously deposited on arrays of Au nanoclusters using the Langmuir-Blodgett technology. The thickness of deposited NCs, determined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, amounts to approximately 1 monolayer. Special attention is paid to the determination of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) energy in the arrays of Au nanoclusters as a function of the nanocluster size by means of micro-ellipsometry. SERS by optical phonons in CdSe NCs shows a significant enhancement factor with a maximal value of 2 × 103 which depends resonantly on the Au nanocluster size and thus on the LSPR energy. The deposition of CdSe NCs on the arrays of Au nanocluster dimers enabled us to study the polarization dependence of SERS. It was found that a maximal SERS signal is observed for the light polarization along the dimer axis. Finally, SERS by optical phonons was observed for CdSe NCs deposited on the structures with a single Au dimer. A difference of the LO phonon energy is observed for CdSe NCs on different single dimers. This effect is explained as the confinement-induced shift which depends on the CdSe nanocrystal size and indicates quasi-single NC Raman spectra being obtained.

  17. Multiple-overtone resonance Raman scattering and fluorescence from I{sub 2} species adsorbed on silver surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sibbald, M.S.; Chumanov, G.; Small, G.; Cotton, T.M.

    1998-07-01

    A detailed excitation profile of a Raman progression consisting of up to six overtones and a fundamental band at 123 cm{sup {minus}1} observed from iodide adsorbed on an electrochemically roughened silver surface at 20 K is analyzed. The excitation profile was constructed from 77 spectra obtained by tuning the laser wavelength in {approximately}0.25 nm steps through the spectral range 409 nm{endash}433 nm. The shift between resonances in the excitation profile, corresponding to the spacing between vibronic levels in the excited state, is also equal to 123 cm{sup {minus}1} indicating that the ground state and excited state potential energy surfaces have the same shape. Only two distinct resonances spaced three vibrational quanta apart were evident in the profile for each band in the progression. Curve fitting of the Raman band shapes indicates that each overtone is composed of one sharp and one broad band, whereas the fundamental contains only one sharp component. The measured width of the fundamental was less than 2.5 cm{sup {minus}1} FWHM, limited by the instrument function. It is proposed that the sharp Raman bands represent a normal vibrational mode of a surface-adsorbed I{sub 2}-like species with the width determined by the intrinsic vibrational dephasing in the ground state. On the other hand, the broad Raman bands reflect vibronic coupling between different I{sub 2}-like species adsorbed on the same Ag cluster. The broad bandwidths result from both dephasing associated with the vibronic coupling and the intrinsic vibrational dephasing. Other weak emission bands are attributed to resonance fluorescence corresponding to direct transitions from higher vibronic levels of the excited state to the ground state. An emission at 429.9 nm is assigned to exciton recombination in small silver iodide clusters which are formed after spontaneous oxidation of the iodide-modified silver surface. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. [Laser flash photolysis, EPR and Raman studies of liquids at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    The proposed research will solve a number of analytical chemical problems in solutions with measurement techniques that benefit from the use of elevated hydrostatic pressures: stopped-flow spectrophotometry (Gd[sup 3+] + L(ligand), [RuL[sub 5]H[sub 2]O][sup 2+], laser flash photolysis of Mo(CO)[sub 6] + L, flash photolysis of binuclear metalloproteins), EPR spectroscopy (Gd[sup 3+] ion-exchanged into ETS-10 and ETAS-10 molecular sieves), laser flash photolysis kinetic studies of Mo(CO)[sub 6]-2,2'-bipyridine, and electrochemical studies of metalloporphyrins using resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  19. [Laser flash photolysis, EPR and Raman studies of liquids at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-10-01

    The proposed research will solve a number of analytical chemical problems in solutions with measurement techniques that benefit from the use of elevated hydrostatic pressures: stopped-flow spectrophotometry (Gd{sup 3+} + L(ligand), [RuL{sub 5}H{sub 2}O]{sup 2+}, laser flash photolysis of Mo(CO){sub 6} + L, flash photolysis of binuclear metalloproteins), EPR spectroscopy (Gd{sup 3+} ion-exchanged into ETS-10 and ETAS-10 molecular sieves), laser flash photolysis kinetic studies of Mo(CO){sub 6}-2,2`-bipyridine, and electrochemical studies of metalloporphyrins using resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Microanalysis of organic pigments and glazes in polychrome works of art by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Leona, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Scientific studies of works of art are usually limited by severe sampling restrictions. The identification of organic colorants, a class of compounds relevant for attribution and provenance studies, is further complicated by the low concentrations at which these compounds are used and by the interference of the protein-, gum-, or oil-binding media present in pigment and glaze samples. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) was successfully used to identify natural organic colorants in archaeological objects, polychrome sculptures, and paintings from samples smaller than 25 μm in diameter. The key factors in achieving the necessary sensitivity were a highly active stabilized silver colloid, obtained by the reproducible microwave-supported reduction of silver sulfate with glucose and sodium citrate, and a non-extractive hydrolysis sample treatment procedure that maximizes dye adsorption on the colloid. Among the examples presented are the earliest so far found occurrence of madder lake (in a 4,000 years old Egyptian object dating to the Middle Kingdom period), and the earliest known occurrence in Europe of the South Asian dyestuff lac (in the Morgan Madonna, a 12th century polychrome sculpture from Auvergne, France). PMID:19667181

  1. A copper(II) complex with a Cu-S₈ bond. Attenuated total reflectance, electron paramagnetic resonance, resonance Raman and atoms-in-molecule calculations.

    PubMed

    Shee, Nirmal K; Adekunle, Florence A O; Verma, Ravi; Kumar, Devesh; Datta, Dipankar

    2015-12-01

    Green [Cu(1,10-phenanthroline)2OH2](ClO4)2 (1) reacts with yellow elemental sulfur at room temperature in methanol to yield turquoise blue [Cu(1,10-phenanthro-line)2(S8)](ClO4)2 (2). A comparative study of the EPR spectra of 1 and 2 in solid state and in methanol glass indicates that the S8 unit in 2 is bound to the metal. High level DFT calculations show that the cation in 2 is five coordinate, distorted square pyramidal with S8 occupying the apical position. The crucial Cu(II)-S bond is around 2.9Å. Such long Cu(II)-S bonds occur in oxidized plastocyanin where it is considered to be bonding. Presence of a weak Cu-S8 bond is revealed in the resonance Raman spectra of 2. Satisfactory matching of the calculated and experimental IR spectra vindicates the theoretically derived structure of the cation in 2.

  2. A copper(II) complex with a Cu-S₈ bond. Attenuated total reflectance, electron paramagnetic resonance, resonance Raman and atoms-in-molecule calculations.

    PubMed

    Shee, Nirmal K; Adekunle, Florence A O; Verma, Ravi; Kumar, Devesh; Datta, Dipankar

    2015-12-01

    Green [Cu(1,10-phenanthroline)2OH2](ClO4)2 (1) reacts with yellow elemental sulfur at room temperature in methanol to yield turquoise blue [Cu(1,10-phenanthro-line)2(S8)](ClO4)2 (2). A comparative study of the EPR spectra of 1 and 2 in solid state and in methanol glass indicates that the S8 unit in 2 is bound to the metal. High level DFT calculations show that the cation in 2 is five coordinate, distorted square pyramidal with S8 occupying the apical position. The crucial Cu(II)-S bond is around 2.9Å. Such long Cu(II)-S bonds occur in oxidized plastocyanin where it is considered to be bonding. Presence of a weak Cu-S8 bond is revealed in the resonance Raman spectra of 2. Satisfactory matching of the calculated and experimental IR spectra vindicates the theoretically derived structure of the cation in 2. PMID:26125988

  3. Electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering of nitric oxide: Saturation and Stark effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Ning; Lucht, Robert P.; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2010-08-01

    A theoretical analysis of electronic-resonance-enhanced (ERE) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of NO is described. The time-dependent density-matrix equations for the nonlinear ERE-CARS process are derived and manipulated into a form suitable for direct numerical integration. In the ERE-CARS configuration considered in this paper, the pump and Stokes beams are far from electronic-resonance. The visible 532 and 591 nm laser beams are used to excite Q-branch Raman resonances in the vibrational bands of the X Π2 electronic state of NO. An ultraviolet probe beam at 236 nm is used to excite P-, Q-, or R-branch transitions in the (v '=0, v″=1) band of the A Σ2+-X Π2 electronic system of NO molecule. Experimental spectra are obtained either by scanning the ultraviolet probe beam while keeping the Stokes frequency fixed (probe scans) or by scanning the Stokes frequency while keeping the probe frequency fixed (Stokes scans). The calculated NO ERE-CARS spectra are compared with experimental spectra, and good agreement is observed between theory and experiment in terms of spectral peak locations and relative intensities. The effects of saturation of the two-photon Raman-resonant Q-branch transitions, the saturation of a one-photon electronic-resonant P-, Q-, or R-branch transitions in the A Σ2+-X Π2 electronic system, and the coupling of these saturation processes are investigated. The coupling of the saturation processes for the probe and Raman transitions is complex and exhibits behavior similar to that observed in the electromagnetic induced transparency process. The probe scan spectra are significantly affected by Stark broadening due to the interaction of the pump and Stokes radiation with single-photon resonances between the upper vibration-rotation probe level in the A Σ2+ electronic levels and vibration-rotation levels in higher lying electronic levels. The ERE-CARS signal intensity is found to be much less sensitive to variations in the

  4. Raman spectroscopy and immunohistochemistry for schwannoma characterization: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Lazaro P. M.; das Chagas, Maurilio J.; Carvalho, Luis Felipe C. S.; Ferreira, Isabelle; dos Santos, Laurita; Haddad, Marcelo; Loddi, Vinicius; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    The schwannomas is a tumour of the tissue that covers nerves, called the nerve sheath. Schwannomas are often benign tumors of the Schwan cells, which are the principal glia of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Preoperative diagnosis of this lesion usually is difficult, therefore, new techniques are being studied as pre surgical evaluation. Among these, Raman spectroscopy, that enables the biochemical identification of the tissue analyzed by their optical properties, may be used as a tool for schwannomas diagnosis. The aim of this study was to discriminate between normal nervous tissue and schwannoma through the confocal Raman spectroscopy and Raman optical fiber-based techniques combined with immunohistochemical analysis. Twenty spectra were analyzed from a normal nerve tissue sample (10) and schwannoma (10) by Holospec f / 1.8 (Kayser Optical Systems) coupled to an optical fiber with a 785nm laser line source. The data were pre-processed and vector normalized. The average analysis and standard deviation was performed associated with cluster analysis. AML, 1A4, CD34, Desmin and S-100 protein markers were used for immunohistochemical analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis was positive only for protein S-100 marker which confirmed the neural schwanomma originality. The immunohistochemistry analysis were important to determine the source of the injury, whereas Raman spectroscopy were able to differentiated tissues types indicating important biochemical changes between normal and benign neoplasia.

  5. Chirality Distribution Measurements of the NIST Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Reference Material Using Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Kevin; Simpson, Jeff; Scheel, Logan; Fagan, Jeff; Hightwalker, Angela

    2013-03-01

    The ability to rapidly and easily determine the chiral vector distribution within a nanotube population remains a key measurement need for carbon nanotube processing and applications. We report Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) measurements of a SWCNT reference material from NIST. The SWCNT samples were synthesized using the CoMoCat method, dispersed in aqueous solutions by wrapping in deoxycholate surfactant, and separated by length using ultracentrifugation. We measure Raman spectra over a wide range of excitation wavelengths from 457 nm to 850 nm using a series of discrete and continuously tunable laser sources coupled to a triple-grating spectrometer with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled detector. The spectra reveal Raman-active vibrational modes including the low-frequency radial breathing mode and higher-order modes. Chirality distributions are determined from the Raman spectra, specifically the RBM frequency and energy excitation profiles, together with input from theoretical models. RRS is sensitive to both major and minor chiral species in the sample. We will compare the resulting chirality distribution obtained from RRS with those obtained from other orthogonal measurement techniques.

  6. Chirality Distribution Measurements of the NIST Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Reference Material Using Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, L. F.; Simpson, J. R.; Fagan, J. A.; Hight Walker, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    The ability to rapidly and easily determine the chiral vector distribution within a nanotube population remains a key measurement need for carbon nanotube processing and applications. We report Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) measurements of a SWCNT reference material from NIST. The SWCNT samples were synthesized using the CoMoCat method, dispersed in aqueous solutions by wrapping in deoxycholate surfactant, and separated by length using ultracentrifugation. We measure Raman spectra over a wide range of excitation wavelengths from 457 nm to 850 nm using a series of discrete and continuously tunable laser sources coupled to a triple-grating spectrometer with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled detector. The spectra reveal Raman-active vibrational modes including the low-frequency radial breathing mode and higher-order modes. Chirality distributions are determined from the Raman spectra, specifically the RBM frequency and energy excitation profiles, together with input from theoretical models. RRS is sensitive to both major and minor chiral species in the sample. We will compare the resulting chirality distribution obtained from RRS with those obtained from other orthogonal measurement techniques.

  7. Assignment of bacteriochlorophyll a ligation state from absorption and resonance raman spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, P.M.; Cotton, T.M.

    1987-11-11

    Absorption and Soret excitation resonance Raman (RR) spectra have been obtained for a series of coordination forms on monomeric bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a). Strong and moderate intensity bands are observed in the RR spectrum at 1609 and 1530 cm/sup -1/ for five-coordinate species, which shift to 1595 and 1512 cm/sup -1/, respectively, in the six-coordinate form. These coordination-sensitive vibrations are independent of the nature of the axial ligand and are suggested to have significant C/sub a/ C/sub m/ character, while several other less intense coordination-sensitive bands at 1463, 1444, and 1375 cm/sup -1/ are considered to arise from C/sub b/C/sub b/ and C/sub a/N stretching vibrations. These coordination-sensitive RR bands were used to determine BChl a ligation state in the solvents used, and structure correlations based on absorption maxima have been developed. The Q/sub x/ absorption band position is sensitive not only to BChl a Mg/sup 2 +/ coordination number but also to the nature of the axial ligand, i.e., oxygen, sulfur, or nitrogen. Q/sub x/ maxima are observed at 570, 575-580, and 582 nm for five-coordinate oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen ligands, respectively, and at 590-595 and 605-612 nm, for six-coordinate oxygen and nitrogen species, respectively. The Q/sub y/ absorption maximum is insensitive to coordination number changes but is dependent on the nature of the axial ligand: 770 nm for oxygen ligand(s) and 775 nm for nitrogen ligand(s). A similar series of absorption and Soret excitation RR spectra were obtained for the demetalated form of BChl a, BPheo a.

  8. Spatially resolved confocal resonant Raman microscopic analysis of anode-grown Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Nikolai; Strycharz-Glaven, Sarah M; Tender, Leonard M

    2014-02-01

    When grown on the surface of an anode electrode, Geobacter sulfurreducens forms a multi-cell thick biofilm in which all cells appear to couple the oxidation of acetate with electron transport to the anode, which serves as the terminal metabolic electron acceptor. Just how electrons are transported through such a biofilm from cells to the underlying anode surface over distances that can exceed 20 microns remains unresolved. Current evidence suggests it may occur by electron hopping through a proposed network of redox cofactors composed of immobile outer membrane and/or extracellular multi-heme c-type cytochromes. In the present work, we perform a spatially resolved confocal resonant Raman (CRR) microscopic analysis to investigate anode-grown Geobacter biofilms. The results confirm the presence of an intra-biofilm redox gradient whereby the probability that a heme is in the reduced state increases with increasing distance from the anode surface. Such a gradient is required to drive electron transport toward the anode surface by electron hopping via cytochromes. The results also indicate that at open circuit, when electrons are expected to accumulate in redox cofactors involved in electron transport due to the inability of the anode to accept electrons, nearly all c-type cytochrome hemes detected in the biofilm are oxidized. The same outcome occurs when a comparable potential to that measured at open circuit (-0.30 V vs. SHE) is applied to the anode, whereas nearly all hemes are reduced when an exceedingly negative potential (-0.50 V vs. SHE) is applied to the anode. These results suggest that nearly all c-type cytochrome hemes detected in the biofilm can be electrochemically accessed by the electrode, but most have oxidation potentials too negative to transport electrons originating from acetate metabolism. The results also reveal a lateral heterogeneity (x-y dimensions) in the type of c-type cytochromes within the biofilm that may affect electron transport to the

  9. Localized surface plasmon resonance immunoassay and verification using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2003-11-01

    This work exploits the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy of noble metal nanoparticles to achieve sensitive and selective detection of biological analytes. Noble metal nanoparticles exhibit an LSPR that is strongly dependent on their size, shape, material, and the local dielectric environment. The LSPR is also responsible for the intense signals observed in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Ag nanoparticles fabricated using the nanosphere lithography (NSL) technique exploits this LSPR sensitivity as a signal transduction method in biosensing applications. The current work implements LSPR biosensing for the anti dinitrophenyl (antiDNP) immunoassay system. Upon forming the 2,4 dinitrobenzoic acid/antiDNP complex, this system shows a large LSPR shift of 44 nm when exposed to antiDNP concentration of 1.5 x 10-6 M. In addition, due to the unique molecular characteristics of the functional groups on the biosensor, it can also be characterized using SERS. First, the nanoparticles are functionalized with a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) comprised of 2:1 octanethiol and 11-amino undecanethiol. The SAM is exposed to 2,4-dinitrobenzoic acid with the 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) coupling reagent. Finally, the 2,4-dinitrophenyl terminated SAM is exposed to various concentration of antiDNP. LSPR shifts indicate the occurrence of a binding event. SER spectra confirm binding of 2,4 dinitrobenzoic acid with amine-terminated SAM. This LSPR/SERS biosensing method can be generalized to a myriad of biologically relevant systems.

  10. Strong dependence of surface plasmon resonance and surface enhanced Raman scattering on the composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Vincenzo; Scaramuzza, Stefano; Agnoli, Stefano; Polizzi, Stefano; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Nanoalloys of noble metals with transition metals are crucial components for the integration of plasmonics with magnetic and catalytic properties, as well as for the production of low-cost photonic devices. However, due to synthetic challenges in the realization of nanoscale solid solutions of noble metals and transition metals, very little is known about the composition dependence of plasmonic response in nanoalloys. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the elemental composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys obtained by laser ablation in liquid solution can be tuned by varying the liquid environment. Due to surface passivation and reaction with thiolated ligands, the nanoalloys obtained by our synthetic protocol are structurally and colloidally stable. Hence, we studied the dependence of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on the iron fraction and, for the first time, we observed surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in Au-Fe nanoalloys. SPR and SERS performances are strongly affected by the iron content and are investigated using analytical and numerical models. By demonstrating the strong modification of plasmonic properties on the composition, our results provide important insights into the exploitation of Au-Fe nanoalloys in photonics, nanomedicine, magneto-plasmonic and plasmon-enhanced catalysis. Moreover, our findings show that several other plasmonic materials exist beyond gold and silver nanostructures. PMID:24309909

  11. Ultrasensitive detection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone based on azo coupling and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sui, Huimin; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xiaolei; Wang, Xiaolei; Cheng, Weina; Su, Hongyang; Wang, Xu; Sun, Xiaoying; Han, Xiao Xia; Zhao, Bing; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-08-15

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) has been used to establish a rapid and quantitative assay based on the diazotization coupling reaction for thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). Ultrahigh sensitivity of this approach originates from two factors: changing TRH to an azo compound and the SERRS effect with the addition of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) at 532 nm excitation wavelength. The lowest detectable concentration of TRH was found to be as low as 1 pg mL(-1), which is 10-fold lower than the lowest normal reference value in human serum reported in previous literature. The quantitative measurements in human serum based on this method were conducted, and the results showed its feasibility for detection in complex biological samples. In comparison with conventional TRH identification and quantification methodologies, radioimmunoassay (RIA) and subsequent various hyphenated techniques, the main advantages of this study are simplicity, rapidness (2 minutes), time effectiveness, no additional steps required to further characterize the immunogenic material, highest sensitivity (57.1 fg), high selectivity, practicality and reliability. Thus, this work puts forward a research tool that may be applied to the determination of TRH in practical assays. PMID:27338554

  12. Resonant surface enhancement of Raman scattering of Ag nanoparticles on silicon substrates fabricated by dc sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Yingcui; Li Xiaxi; Blinn, Kevin; Mahmoud, Mahmoud A.; Liu Meilin

    2012-09-15

    Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) were deposited onto silicon substrates by direct current (dc) magnetron sputtering. The influences of sputtering power and sputtering time on the AgNP film morphology were studied using atomic force microscopy. The particle size was successfully tuned from 19 nm to 53 nm by varying the sputtering time at a dc power of 10 W. When Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) was used as the probe molecule, the AgNP films showed significant surface enhanced Raman scattering effect. In particular, it is found that larger particles show stronger enhancement for lower concentrations of R6G while smaller particles display stronger enhancement for higher concentrations of R6G.

  13. In situ Raman spectroscopy study of oxidation of nanostructured carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osswald, Sebastian

    The ability to synthesize carbon nanostructures, such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, nanodiamond, and mesoporous carbon; functionalize their surface; or assemble them into three-dimensional networks has opened new avenues for material design. Carbon nanostructures possess tunable optical, electrical or mechanical properties, making them ideal candidates for numerous applications ranging from composite structures and chemical sensors to electronic devices and medical implants. Unfortunately, current synthesis techniques typically lead to a mixture of different types of carbon rather than a particular nanostructure with defined size and properties. In order to fully exploit the great potential of carbon nanostructures, one needs to provide purification procedures that allow a selective separation of carbon nanostructures, and methods which enable a control of size and surface functionalization. Oxidation is a frequently used method for purification of carbon materials, but it can also damage or destroy the sample. In situ Raman spectroscopy during heating in a controlled environment allows a time-resolved investigation of the oxidation kinetics and can identify the changes in material structure and composition, thus helping to accurately determine optimal purification conditions. However, while carbon allotropes such as graphite and diamond show unique Raman signals and allow a fast and straightforward identification, the interpretation of Raman spectra recorded from nanostructures containing mixtures of sp, sp2 and sp3 bonded carbon is more complex and the origin of some peaks in Raman spectra of nanocarbons is not yet fully understood. In this study we applied in situ Raman spectroscopy to determine conditions for selective oxidation of carbon nanostructures, such as nanodiamond, nanotubes, carbide-derived carbon and carbon onions; accurately measure and control the crystal size; and improve the fundamental understanding of effects of temperature, quantum

  14. Raman spectroscopic study of ancient South African domestic clay pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legodi, M. A.; de Waal, D.

    2007-01-01

    The technique of Raman spectroscopy was used to examine the composition of ancient African domestic clay pottery of South African origin. One sample from each of four archaeological sites including Rooiwal, Lydenburg, Makahane and Graskop was studied. Normal dispersive Raman spectroscopy was found to be the most effective analytical technique in this study. XRF, XRD and FT-IR spectroscopy were used as complementary techniques. All representative samples contained common features, which were characterised by kaolin (Al 2Si 2O 5(OH) 5), illite (KAl 4(Si 7AlO 20)(OH) 4), feldspar (K- and NaAlSi 3O 8), quartz (α-SiO 2), hematite (α-Fe 2O 3), montmorillonite (Mg 3(Si,Al) 4(OH) 2·4.5H 2O[Mg] 0.35), and calcium silicate (CaSiO 3). Gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O) and calcium carbonates (most likely calcite, CaCO 3) were detected by Raman spectroscopy in Lydenburg, Makahane and Graskop shards. Amorphous carbon (with accompanying phosphates) was observed in the Raman spectra of Lydenburg, Rooiwal and Makahane shards, while rutile (TiO 2) appeared only in Makahane shard. The Raman spectra of Lydenburg and Rooiwal shards further showed the presence of anhydrite (CaSO 4). The results showed that South African potters used a mixture of clays as raw materials. The firing temperature for most samples did not exceed 800 °C, which suggests the use of open fire. The reddish brown and grayish black colours were likely due to hematite and amorphous carbon, respectively.

  15. Quantum-mechanical analysis of the intensity distribution in spectra of resonant Raman scattering spectra of aqueous solutions of tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burova, T. G.; Shcherbakov, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    Quantum-mechanical calculations of the intensity distribution in the resonant Raman scattering spectra of aqueous solutions of tyrosine excited by laser radiation with wavelengths of 244, 229, 218, 200, and 193 nm, as well as in the nonresonant Raman scattering spectrum excited at a wavelength of 488 nm, are performed. Satisfactory agreement is achieved between the calculation results and the experimental data. It is shown that the changes in the intensity distribution observed in the spectra with a change in the excitation wavelength from 244 to 193 nm correlate with the determined changes in the contribution made by excited electronic states into the scattering tensor components. It is noted that it is necessary to take into account the Herzberg-Teller effect and that the number of excited electronic states taken into account considerably affects the calculated relative intensities of lines. The possibility of existence of several tyrosine conformers in aqueous solution at room temperature is shown.

  16. Quantum theory of the far-off-resonance continuous-wave Raman laser: Heisenberg-Langevin approach

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, P. A.; Murphy, S. K.; Meng, L. S.; Carlsten, J. L.; Ralph, T. C.; White, A. G.; Brasseur, J. K.

    2003-07-01

    We present the quantum theory of the far-off-resonance continuous-wave Raman laser using the Heisenberg-Langevin approach. We show that the simplified quantum Langevin equations for this system are mathematically identical to those of the nondegenerate optical parametric oscillator in the time domain with the following associations: pump {r_reversible} pump, Stokes {r_reversible} signal, and Raman coherence {r_reversible} idler. We derive analytical results for both the steady-state behavior and the time-dependent noise spectra, using standard linearization procedures. In the semiclassical limit, these results match with previous purely semiclassical treatments, which yield excellent agreement with experimental observations. The analytical time-dependent results predict perfect photon statistics conversion from the pump to the Stokes and nonclassical behavior under certain operational conditions.

  17. Raman spectroscopic study of the uranyl tricarbonate mineral liebigite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Erickson, Kristy L.; Weier, Matt L.; Carmody, Onuma; Čejka, Jiří

    2005-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy at 298 and 77 K has been employed to study the structure of the uranyl tricarbonates liebigite {Ca 2[UO 2(CO 3) 3]11H 2O}. The spectra of the samples are sample dependent and significant differences in the Raman spectra are obtained upon cooling to 77 K. It is proposed that the mineral undergoes a phase change upon cooling. Significant changes in the Raman spectra are observed in the hydroxyl stretching region and in the low wavenumber region. Two Raman bands are observed at 3468 and 3528 cm -1 showing the non-equivalence of the water units in the structure. Obtaining spectra at 77 K enables well resolved bands at 3530, 3501, 3482, 3463, 3443, 3405 and 3364 cm -1. Two well resolved bands at 1087 and 1073 cm -1 in the 298 K spectra become bands at 1093, 1076 and 1008 cm -1 in the 77 K spectrum proving the non-equivalence of the carbonate units. This non-equivalence is reflected in the observation of multiple bands in the carbonate bending regions. The (UO 2) 2+ units are characterised by the antisymmetric stretching vibrations at 902, 885 and 873 cm -1 and by the ν2 bending modes at 248 cm -1. Two bands near 820 cm -1 may be assigned to the ν1 (UO 2) 2+ symmetric stretching vibrations, however, a coincidence of these vibrations with the ν2 (CO 3) 2- out-of plane bending vibrations cannot be excluded. The use of Raman spectroscopy enables a better definition of the vibrational modes of liebigite and shows changes in the molecular structure upon reaching 77 K.

  18. Ab initio study of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of the 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Abdelsalam; Ågren, Hans; Thorvaldsen, Andreas J.; Ruud, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of the 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) C 3H 6N 6O 6 molecule is studied by ab initio methods. The results are compared to available experimental observations and against calculations and experimental observations of the conventional non-resonant Raman spectrum for RDX. It is found that all intense bands in the observed CARS spectrum and all Raman differential cross sections are well reproduced by the calculations. The features of the resonant CARS signal vary strongly from the corresponding Raman signal, and are obtained with a considerably larger cross section, a fact that could further facilitate the use of CARS spectroscopy in applications of stand-off detection of gaseous samples at ultra-low concentrations.

  19. An investigation into the influence of secondary structures for DNA hybridization using surface plasmon resonance and surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yih, J.-N.; Chiu, K.-C.; Chien, F.-C.; Chen, W.-Y.; Chen, S.-J.

    2006-02-01

    This study utilizes a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing to investigate the influence of secondary structures on the DNA hybridization and a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum to yield analytical data regarding the structure of the oligonucleotides. It is found that the SPR angular shifts associated with the three pairs of 60mer oligonucleotides with prominent secondary structures are lower than those observed for the two pairs of oligonucleotides with no obvious secondary structures. It is also determined that increasing the DNA hybridization temperature from 35 °C to 45 °C reduces secondary structure effects. On the hybridization with mixture target oligonucleotides, the SPR results demonstrate that secondary structures interfere significantly. Although the kinetics of biomolecular interaction analysis is performed by using SPR sensor, the structural information of the oligonucleotides can not observed directly. The SERS spectrum provides the structural information of the oligonucleotides with silver colloidal nanoparticles adapted as a Raman active substrate. Also, the detection limit of the DNA Raman signal has been successfully improved to reach sub-micro molarity of DNA concentration.

  20. Optimization of Fe3O4@Ag nanoshells in magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering for malaria diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2013-11-01

    The great potential of magnetic field enriched surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) for early malaria diagnosis has been demonstrated previously. This technique is able to detect β-hematin, which is equivalent to a malaria biomarker (hemozoin) in Raman features, at a concentration of 5 nM. In this study, we present the optimization of nanoparticles used in the magnetic field enriched SERRS by tuning the core size and shell thickness of nanoparticles with an iron oxide core and a silver shell (Fe3O4@Ag). The discrete dipole approximation (DDA) model was introduced to investigate the localized electromagnetic field distributions and extinction efficiencies of the aggregate of Fe3O4@Ag and β-hematin, in correlation with their magnetic field enriched SERRS performance. We find that the optimal core-shell size of Fe3O4@Ag leading to the effective aggregation of Fe3O4@Ag and β-hematin under an external magnetic field with superior extinction efficiencies is the key to realize highly augmented Raman signals in this strategy. Furthermore, it is noted that the optimized result differs from the case without the external magnetic field to that with the external magnetic field. Therefore, this work demonstrates experimentally and theoretically the potential of tuning the core-shell Fe3O4@Ag for achieving the efficient magnetic field-enriched SERRS detection of β-hematin for early malaria diagnosis.

  1. Davydov Splitting and Excitonic Resonance Effects in Raman Spectra of Few-Layer MoSe2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kangwon; Lee, Jae-Ung; Nam, Dahyun; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2016-08-23

    Raman spectra of few-layer MoSe2 were measured with eight excitation energies. New peaks that appear only near resonance with various exciton states are analyzed, and the modes are assigned. The resonance profiles of the Raman peaks reflect the joint density of states for optical transitions, but the symmetry of the exciton wave functions leads to selective enhancement of the A1g mode at the A exciton energy and the shear mode at the C exciton energy. We also find Davydov splitting of intralayer A1g, E1g, and A2u modes due to interlayer interaction for some excitation energies near resonances. Furthermore, by fitting the spectral positions of interlayer shear and breathing modes and Davydov splitting of intralayer modes to a linear chain model, we extract the strength of the interlayer interaction. We find that the second-nearest-neighbor interlayer interaction amounts to about 30% of the nearest-neighbor interaction for both in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations. PMID:27479147

  2. Magnetic immunoassay for cancer biomarker detection based on surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering from coupled plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zhen; Wang, Chongwen; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Donggen; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Shengqi

    2016-10-15

    A surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) sensor was developed for the ultrasensitive detection of cancer biomarkers. Capture antibody-coated silver shell magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@Ag MNPs) were utilized as the CEA enrichment platform and the SERRS signal amplification substrate. Gold nanorods (AuNRs) were coated with a thin silver shell to be in resonance with the resonant Raman dye diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTC) and the excitation wavelength at 785nm. The silver-coated AuNRs (Au@Ag NRs) were then modified with detection antibody as the SERRS tags. Sandwich immune complexes formed in the presence of the target biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and this formation induced the plasmonic coupling between the Au@Ag NRs and Fe3O4@Ag MNPs. The SERRS signal of DTTC molecules located in the coupled plasmonic nanostructures was significantly enhanced. As a result, the proposed SERRS sensor was able to detect CEA with a low limit of detection of 4.75fg/mL and a wide dynamic linear range from 10fg/mL to 100ng/mL. The sensor provides a novel SERRS strategy for trace analyte detection and has a potential for clinical applications. PMID:27149164

  3. Magnetic immunoassay for cancer biomarker detection based on surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering from coupled plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zhen; Wang, Chongwen; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Donggen; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Shengqi

    2016-10-15

    A surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) sensor was developed for the ultrasensitive detection of cancer biomarkers. Capture antibody-coated silver shell magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@Ag MNPs) were utilized as the CEA enrichment platform and the SERRS signal amplification substrate. Gold nanorods (AuNRs) were coated with a thin silver shell to be in resonance with the resonant Raman dye diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTC) and the excitation wavelength at 785nm. The silver-coated AuNRs (Au@Ag NRs) were then modified with detection antibody as the SERRS tags. Sandwich immune complexes formed in the presence of the target biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and this formation induced the plasmonic coupling between the Au@Ag NRs and Fe3O4@Ag MNPs. The SERRS signal of DTTC molecules located in the coupled plasmonic nanostructures was significantly enhanced. As a result, the proposed SERRS sensor was able to detect CEA with a low limit of detection of 4.75fg/mL and a wide dynamic linear range from 10fg/mL to 100ng/mL. The sensor provides a novel SERRS strategy for trace analyte detection and has a potential for clinical applications.

  4. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectra, with resonance enhancement, of cytochrome c and vitamin B12 in dilute aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Nestor, J; Spiro, T G; Klauminzer, G

    1976-10-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectra have been obtained for ferrocytochrome c and cyano cobalamin in aqueous solution at millimolar concentrations, using a pair of tunable dye lasers pumped by a pulsed nitrogen laser. Resonance enhancement was obtained by tuning the omega1 laser to the visible absorption bands of the samples. The spectral features correspond to those observed in the conventional resonance Raman spectra. It appears that CARS spectroscopy, with its advantageous fluorescence rejection, can be usefully applied to biological samples by exploiting resonance enhancement. While the background scattering from water is 10 times higher than that of benzene and other aromatic solvents, it is actually at the low end of the scale for most liquids. The anomalously low background of aromatic liquids is thought to result from competition by the unusually efficient stimulated Raman scattering which they display. Off-resonance spectra for both cobalamin and cytochrome c contain negative peaks, i.e., absorption bands in the background. These are interpreted as inverse Raman processes induced by the omega1 photons in the presence of the continuum provided by the background scattering. While both CARS and the inverse Raman effect are subject to resonance enhancement, the wavelength dependence of CARS is evidently steeper.

  5. Investigation of an unnatural amino acid for use as a resonance Raman probe: Detection limits, solvent and temperature dependence of the νC≡N band of 4-cyanophenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Colin L; Polishchuk, Alexei; Getahun, Zelleka; Degrado, William F; Spiro, Thomas G

    2008-11-01

    The incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins that act as spectroscopic probes can be used to study protein structure and function. One such probe is 4-cyanophenylalanine (PheCN), the nitrile group of which has a stretching mode that occurs in a region of the vibrational spectrum that does not contain any modes from the usual components of proteins and the wavenumber is sensitive to the polarity of its environment. In this work we evaluate the potential of UV resonance Raman spectroscopy for monitoring the sensitivity of the νC≡N band of PheCN incorporated into proteins to the protein environment. Measurement of the Raman excitation profile of PheCN showed that considerable resonance enhancement of the Raman signal was obtained using UV excitation and the best signal-to-noise ratios were obtained with excitation wavelengths of 229 and 244 nm. The detection limit for PheCN in proteins was ~10 μM, approximately a hundred-fold lower than the concentrations used in IR studies, which increases the potential applications of PheCN as a vibrational probe. The wavenumber of the PheCN νC≡N band was strongly dependent on the polarity of its environment, when the solvent was changed from H(2)O to THF it decreased by 8 cm(-1). The presence of liposomes caused a similar though smaller decrease in νC≡N for a peptide, mastoparan X, modified to contain PheCN. The selectivity and sensitivity of resonance Raman spectroscopy of PheCN mean that it can be a useful probe of intra- and intermolecular interactions in proteins and opens the door to its application in the study of protein dynamics using time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  6. [Microalgae Species Identification Study with Raman Microspectroscopy Technology].

    PubMed

    Shao, Yong-ni; Pan, Jian; Jiang, Lu-lu; He, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Identification and classification of microalgae are basis and premise in the study of physiological and biochemical characteristics for microalgae. Microalgae cells mainly consist of five kinds of biological molecules, including proteins, carbonhydrates, lipids, nucleic acids and pigments. These five kinds of biological molecules contents with different ratio in microalgae cells can be utilized to identify microalgae species as a supplement method. This paper investigated the application of Raman microspectroscopy technology in the field of rapid identification on different algae species such as aschlorella sp. and chlamydomonas sp. . Cultivated in the same conditions of culture medium, illumination duration and intensity, these two kinds of species of microalgae cells were immobilized by using agar, and then the samples were placed under 514. 5 nm Raman laser to collect Raman spectra of different growth periods of different species. An approach to remove fluorescence background in Raman spectra called Rolling Circle Filter (RCF) algorithm was adopted to remove the fluorescent background, and then some preprocessing methods were used to offset the baseline and smooth method of Savitzky-Golay was tried to make the spectra curves of total 80 samples smoother. Then 50 samples were randomly extracted from 80 samples for modeling, and the remaining 30 samples for independent validation. This paper adopted different pretreatment methods, and used the partial least squares (PLS) to establish model between the spectral data and the microalgae species, then compared the effects of different pretreatment methods. The results showed that with Raman microspectroscopy technology, the pretreatment method of max-peak ratio standardization was a more effective identification approach which utilizes the different content ratios of pigments of different microalgae species. This method could efficiently eliminate the influence on Raman signal due to different growth stages of

  7. The study of interaction between graphene and metals by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Liang, S. H.; Yu, T.; Han, X. F.; Li, D. H.; Li, Y. B.

    2011-04-01

    Different metal films (Co, Ni, Au, and Ag) were deposited on graphene and the interactions between these metals and graphene were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman peaks were shifted after the deposition of metal films. The electron doping of graphene with cobalt contacts and the hole doping with the nickel contacts are the main reasons for Raman peak shift. However, for gold contacts and silver contacts with graphene, strain effect dominates Raman peak shift instead of charge transfer.

  8. DSC and Raman studies of silver borotellurite glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Khanna, Atul; Gonzàlez, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    Silver borotellurite glasses of composition: xAg2O-yB2O3-(100-x-y)TeO2 (x=20-mol%, y = 0, 10, 20 and 30-mol%) were prepared and characterized by density, X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD confirmed the amorphous structure of all samples. Density of glasses decreases while the glass transition temperature increases with increase in B2O3 content from 10 to 30-mol%. Raman study shows that coordination number of Te with oxygen decreases steadily from 3.42 to 3.18 on adding B2O3 due to the transformation of TeO4 into TeO3 units.

  9. Nanoparticle microinjection and Raman spectroscopy as tools for nanotoxicology studies.

    PubMed

    Candeloro, Patrizio; Tirinato, Luca; Malara, Natalia; Fregola, Annalisa; Casals, Eudald; Puntes, Victor; Perozziello, Gerardo; Gentile, Francesco; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Das, Gobind; Liberale, Carlo; De Angelis, Francesco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2011-11-01

    Microinjection techniques and Raman spectroscopy have been combined to provide a new methodology to investigate the cytotoxic effects due to the interaction of nanomaterials with cells. In the present work, this novel technique has been used to investigate the effects of Ag and Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles on Hela cells. The nanoparticles are microinjected inside the cells and these latter ones are probed by means of Raman spectroscopy after a short incubation time, in order to highlight the first and impulsive mechanisms developed by the cells to counteract the presence of the nanoparticles. The results put in evidence a different behaviour of the cells treated with nanoparticles in comparison with the control cells; these differences are supposed to be generated by an emerging oxidative stress due to the nanoparticles. The achieved results demonstrate the suitability of the proposed method as a new tool for nanotoxicity studies.

  10. Raman spectroscopic study of "The Malatesta": a Renaissance painting?

    PubMed

    Edwards, Howell G M; Vandenabeele, Peter; Benoy, Timothy J

    2015-02-25

    Raman spectroscopic analysis of the pigments on an Italian painting described as a "Full Length Portrait of a Gentleman", known also as the "Malatesta", and attributed to the Renaissance period has established that these are consistent with the historical research provenance undertaken earlier. Evidence is found for the early 19th Century addition of chrome yellow to highlighted yellow ochre areas in comparison with a similar painting executed in 1801 by Sir Thomas Lawrence of John Kemble in the role of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. The Raman data are novel in that no analytical studies have previously been made on this painting and reinforces the procedure whereby scientific analyses are accompanied by parallel historical research.

  11. Polarized Raman study of random copolymers of propylene with olefins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gen, D. E.; Chernyshov, K. B.; Prokhorov, K. A.; Nikolaeva, G. Yu.; Sagitova, E. A.; Pashinin, P. P.; Kovalchuk, A. A.; Klyamkina, A. N.; Nedorezova, P. M.; Optov, V. A.; Shklyaruk, B. F.

    2010-06-01

    The polarized Raman spectroscopy is employed in the study of structural modifications in the films of isotactic polypropylene (PP) whose chain contains ethylene, 1-butene, 1-hexene, 1-octene, and 4-metyl-pentene-1, which represents an isomer of 1-hexene. It is demonstrated that the phase and conformational compositions of copolymer molecules depend on the comonomer content and the side-chain length of the second monomer. The content of the PP molecules in the helical conformation in the crystalline and amorphous phases of the copolymers monotonically decreases with increasing content of the second monomer. The decrease in the content of helical macromolecules in the crystalline phase is faster than the decrease in the amorphous phase. At a certain content of comonomers, the total content of the helical fragments decreases with increasing length of the side chain of the second monomer. The structures and Raman spectra of the copolymers of propylene with 1-hexene and 4-methyl-1-pentene are similar.

  12. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of kamphaugite-(Y)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    We have studied the carbonate mineral kamphaugite-(Y)(CaY(CO3)2(OH)·H2O), a mineral which contains yttrium and specific rare earth elements. Chemical analysis shows the presence of Ca, Y and C. Back scattering SEM appears to indicate a single pure phase. The vibrational spectroscopy of kamphaugite-(Y) was obtained using a combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Two distinct Raman bands observed at 1078 and 1088 cm-1 provide evidence for the non-equivalence of the carbonate anion in the kamphaugite-(Y) structure. Such a concept is supported by the number of bands assigned to the carbonate antisymmetric stretching mode. Multiple bands in the ν4 region offers further support for the non-equivalence of carbonate anions in the structure. Vibrational spectroscopy enables aspects of the structure of the mineral kamphaugite-(Y) to be assessed.

  13. Raman spectroscopic study of "The Malatesta": a Renaissance painting?

    PubMed

    Edwards, Howell G M; Vandenabeele, Peter; Benoy, Timothy J

    2015-02-25

    Raman spectroscopic analysis of the pigments on an Italian painting described as a "Full Length Portrait of a Gentleman", known also as the "Malatesta", and attributed to the Renaissance period has established that these are consistent with the historical research provenance undertaken earlier. Evidence is found for the early 19th Century addition of chrome yellow to highlighted yellow ochre areas in comparison with a similar painting executed in 1801 by Sir Thomas Lawrence of John Kemble in the role of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. The Raman data are novel in that no analytical studies have previously been made on this painting and reinforces the procedure whereby scientific analyses are accompanied by parallel historical research. PMID:25194320

  14. Docking Prediction of a Water Soluble Porphyrin and Tubulin Assisted with Resonance Raman and Vibrational Mode Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMicken, Brady; Brancaleon, Lorenzo; Thomas, Robert; Parker, James

    2015-03-01

    The ability to modify protein conformation by controlling its partial unfolding may have practical applications such as diminishing its function or blocking its activity. One method used to induce partial unfolding of a protein involves the use of a photosensitizer non-covalently bound to a protein that triggers photochemical reactions upon irradiation leading to protein conformational changes. We are investigating the photoinduced conformational changes of tubulin mediated by a bound water-soluble porphyrin that acts as a photosensitizer. Analysis of how tubulin conformational changes affect its function including polymeric assembly forming microtubules is of interest to uncover the mechanism responsible for the structural change. Our approach to better understand the conformational change, we first plan to discover the binding location between the porphyrin and protein. Use of vibrational mode analysis using density functional theory and resonance Raman experiments targeting the porphyrin molecule will be used to correlate Raman peaks with vibrational modes. The relative intensities of the porphyrin bound to tubulin can be used to calculate the equilibrium geometry observed from Raman spectra. These data will provide the relative distortion of the porphyrin when bound to tubulin, which will subsequently be used in docking simulations to find the most likely binding configuration.

  15. Optical pathology of human brain metastasis of lung cancer using combined resonance Raman and spatial frequency spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Pu, Yang; Cheng, Gangge; Zhou, Lixin; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Ke; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy has become widely used for diagnostic purpose of breast, lung and brain cancers. This report introduced a new approach based on spatial frequency spectra analysis of the underlying tissue structure at different stages of brain tumor. Combined spatial frequency spectroscopy (SFS), Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopic method is used to discriminate human brain metastasis of lung cancer from normal tissues for the first time. A total number of thirty-one label-free micrographic images of normal and metastatic brain cancer tissues obtained from a confocal micro- Raman spectroscopic system synchronously with examined RR spectra of the corresponding samples were collected from the identical site of tissue. The difference of the randomness of tissue structures between the micrograph images of metastatic brain tumor tissues and normal tissues can be recognized by analyzing spatial frequency. By fitting the distribution of the spatial frequency spectra of human brain tissues as a Gaussian function, the standard deviation, σ, can be obtained, which was used to generate a criterion to differentiate human brain cancerous tissues from the normal ones using Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. This SFS-SVM analysis on micrograph images presents good results with sensitivity (85%), specificity (75%) in comparison with gold standard reports of pathology and immunology. The dual-modal advantages of SFS combined with RR spectroscopy method may open a new way in the neuropathology applications.

  16. Strong dependence of surface plasmon resonance and surface enhanced Raman scattering on the composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendola, Vincenzo; Scaramuzza, Stefano; Agnoli, Stefano; Polizzi, Stefano; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Nanoalloys of noble metals with transition metals are crucial components for the integration of plasmonics with magnetic and catalytic properties, as well as for the production of low-cost photonic devices. However, due to synthetic challenges in the realization of nanoscale solid solutions of noble metals and transition metals, very little is known about the composition dependence of plasmonic response in nanoalloys. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the elemental composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys obtained by laser ablation in liquid solution can be tuned by varying the liquid environment. Due to surface passivation and reaction with thiolated ligands, the nanoalloys obtained by our synthetic protocol are structurally and colloidally stable. Hence, we studied the dependence of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on the iron fraction and, for the first time, we observed surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in Au-Fe nanoalloys. SPR and SERS performances are strongly affected by the iron content and are investigated using analytical and numerical models. By demonstrating the strong modification of plasmonic properties on the composition, our results provide important insights into the exploitation of Au-Fe nanoalloys in photonics, nanomedicine, magneto-plasmonic and plasmon-enhanced catalysis. Moreover, our findings show that several other plasmonic materials exist beyond gold and silver nanostructures.Nanoalloys of noble metals with transition metals are crucial components for the integration of plasmonics with magnetic and catalytic properties, as well as for the production of low-cost photonic devices. However, due to synthetic challenges in the realization of nanoscale solid solutions of noble metals and transition metals, very little is known about the composition dependence of plasmonic response in nanoalloys. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the elemental composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys obtained by laser ablation in liquid solution can

  17. A novel extremophile strategy studied by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.

    2007-12-01

    A case is made for the classification of the colonisation by Dirina massiliensis forma sorediata of pigments on ancient wall-paintings as extremophilic behaviour. The lichen encrustations studied using FT-Raman spectroscopy have yielded important molecular information which has assisted in the identification of the survival strategy of the organism in the presence of significant levels of heavy metal toxins. The production of a carotenoid, probably astaxanthin, at the surface of the lichen thalli is identified from its characteristic biomolecular signatures in the Raman spectrum, whereas the presence of calcium oxalate dihydrate (weddellite) has been identified at both the upper and lower surfaces of the thalli and in core samples taken from depths of up to 10 mm through the encrustation into the rock substrate. The latter observation explains the significant disintegrative biodeteriorative effect of the colonisation upon the integrity of the wall-paintings and can be used to direct conservatorial and preservation efforts of the art work. A surprising result proved to be the absence of Raman spectroscopic evidence for the complexation of the metal pigments by the oxalic acid produced by the metabolic action of the organisms, unlike several cases that have been reported in the literature.

  18. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27324288

  19. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy.

  20. HPLC assisted Raman spectroscopic studies on bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, W. L.; Cheng, Y.; Yu, W.; Zhang, X. B.; Shen, A. G.; Hu, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    We applied confocal Raman spectroscopy to investigate 12 normal bladder tissues and 30 tumor tissues, and then depicted the spectral differences between the normal and the tumor tissues and the potential canceration mechanism with the aid of the high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) technique. Normal tissues were demonstrated to contain higher tryptophan, cholesterol and lipid content, while bladder tumor tissues were rich in nucleic acids, collagen and carotenoids. In particular, β-carotene, one of the major types of carotenoids, was found through HPLC analysis of the extract of bladder tissues. The statistical software SPSS was applied to classify the spectra of the two types of tissues according to their differences. The sensitivity and specificity of 96.7 and 66.7% were obtained, respectively. In addition, different layers of the bladder wall including mucosa (lumps), muscle and adipose bladder tissue were analyzed by Raman mapping technique in response to previous Raman studies of bladder tissues. All of these will play an important role as a directive tool for the future diagnosis of bladder cancer in vivo.

  1. Raman spectroscopy study of calcium oxalate extracted from cacti stems.

    PubMed

    Frausto-Reyes, Claudio; Loza-Cornejo, Sofia; Terrazas, Teresa; Terrazas, Tania; Miranda-Beltrán, María de la Luz; Aparicio-Fernández, Xóchitl; López-Macías, Brenda M; Morales-Martínez, Sandra E; Ortiz-Morales, Martín

    2014-01-01

    To find markers that distinguish the different Cactaceae species, by using near infrared Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we studied the occurrence, in the stem, of solid deposits in five Cactaceae species (Coryphantha clavata, Ferocactus latispinus, Opuntia ficus-indica, O. robusta, and O. strepthacantha) collected from their natural habitats from a region of México. The deposits in the tissues usually occurred as spheroidal aggregates, druses, or prismatic crystals. From the Raman spectra, the crystals were identified either as calcium oxalate monohydrate (CaC2O4·H2O) or calcium oxalate dihydrate (CaC2O4·2H2O). Opuntia species (subfamily Opuntioideae) showed the presence of CaC2O4·H2O, and the deposition of CaC2O4·2H2O was present in C. clavata and F. latispinus (subfamily Cactoideae, Cacteae tribe). As a punctual technique, Raman spectroscopy seems to be a useful tool to identify crystal composition. In addition to allowing the analysis of crystal morphology, this spectroscopic technique can be used to identify Cactaceae species and their chemotaxonomy.

  2. Raman spectroscopic studies of the cure of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, S. E.; Brown, E. C.; Corrigan, N.; Coates, P. D.; Harkin-Jones, E.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    2005-10-01

    The cure of polydicyclopentadiene conducted by ring-opening metathesis polymerisation in the presence of a Grubbs catalyst was studied using non-invasive Raman spectroscopy. The spectra of the monomer precursor and polymerised product were fully characterised and all stages of polymerisation monitored. Because of the monomer's high reactivity, the cure process is adaptable to reaction injection moulding and reactive rotational moulding. The viscosity of the dicyclopentadiene undergoes a rapid change at the beginning of the polymerisation process and it is critical that the induction time of the viscosity increase is determined and controlled for successful manufacturing. The results from this work show non-invasive Raman spectroscopic monitoring to be an effective method for monitoring the degree of cure, paving the way for possible implementation of the technique as a method of real-time analysis for control and optimisation during reactive processing. Agreement is shown between Raman measurements and ultrasonic time of flight data acquired during the initial induction period of the curing process.

  3. Raman spectroscopic studies of the cure of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD).

    PubMed

    Barnes, S E; Brown, E C; Corrigan, N; Coates, P D; Harkin-Jones, E; Edwards, H G M

    2005-10-01

    The cure of polydicyclopentadiene conducted by ring-opening metathesis polymerisation in the presence of a Grubbs catalyst was studied using non-invasive Raman spectroscopy. The spectra of the monomer precursor and polymerised product were fully characterised and all stages of polymerisation monitored. Because of the monomer's high reactivity, the cure process is adaptable to reaction injection moulding and reactive rotational moulding. The viscosity of the dicyclopentadiene undergoes a rapid change at the beginning of the polymerisation process and it is critical that the induction time of the viscosity increase is determined and controlled for successful manufacturing. The results from this work show non-invasive Raman spectroscopic monitoring to be an effective method for monitoring the degree of cure, paving the way for possible implementation of the technique as a method of real-time analysis for control and optimisation during reactive processing. Agreement is shown between Raman measurements and ultrasonic time of flight data acquired during the initial induction period of the curing process.

  4. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27324288

  5. Dynamical rate theory of enzymatic reactions and triple-resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Wei

    Chapters 2-7 focus on physical enzymology. Despite its long history, recent single-molecule spectroscopy, among many others techniques, has generated new quantitative data that reveal unobserved features of protein dynamics and enzyme catalysis at unprecedented levels. Much of these are beyond the classic framework of transition state theory and Michalis-Menten (MM) enzyme kinetics. Due to the complexity of the problem, theoretical developments in this area have much lagged behind experiments. After an initial experimental characterization on single-molecule protein conformational fluctuations, we then develop a dynamical rate theory for enzyme catalyzed chemical reactions, from a statistical mechanics approach. Towards this goal, we formulate a two-dimensional (2D) multi-surface free energy description of the entire catalytic process that explicitly combines the concept of "fluctuating enzymes" with the MM enzyme kinetics. The outcome of this framework has two folds. On the rate theory side, going much beyond transition state theory, it connects conformational fluctuations to catalysis, allows for the interplay between energetics (e.g. Haldane's stain energy) and dynamics (e.g. Koshland's induced fit), and predicts the time dependence of single-enzyme catalysis. On the enzyme kinetics side, it gives mechanistic and unified understanding of MM and non-MM (both positive and negative cooperativity) kinetics of monomeric enzymes, in term of non-equilibrium steady state cycle on the 2D free energy surface. Chapters 8-11 present the principle and application of a new ultra-sensitive nonlinear optical microspectroscopy, femtosecond (fs) triple-resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), in which the amplitude and phase of input fs laser pulses are optimally shaped to be in triple resonant with the molecular electronic and vibrational transitions to generate a coherent nonlinear signal beam at a new color with a highest possible efficiency. This technique

  6. Cytochrome oxidase heme-protein dynamics: a transient Raman study of carbon monoxide photolysis from cytochrome a

    SciTech Connect

    Findsen, E.W.; Ondrias, M.R.

    1984-09-19

    Data are reported on results of initial efforts to probe the mechanism of cytochrome oxidase function by utilizing time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy. Preparation of the reduced beef-heart cytochrome oxidase sample and cytochrome oxidase-CO sample is described. At the laser powers and concentrations employed, the reduced cytochrome oxidase-CO sample underwent almost complete photolysis during the laser pulse. Principal conclusions drawn from spectral analysis are that time-resolved resonance Raman investigation of the transient heme species generated by ligand photolysis is a viable technique for the study of heme-ligand dynamics in proteins other than hemoglobin. A transient proximal geometry leading to a strengthened iron-histidine bond is present in these. The interplay of porphyrin core size, pi electron density, and Fe-His bonding as modulated by heme-protein dynamics is different for the ligand binding sites of hemoglobin and cytochrome oxidase. 17 references, 1 figure.

  7. SNAKE DEPLORIZING RESONANCE STUDY IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; CAMERON, P.; LUCCIO, A.; HUANG, H.; PITISYN, V.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    Snake depolarizing resonances due to the imperfect cancellation of the accumulated perturbations on the spin precession between snakes were observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). During the RHIC 2005 and 2006 polarized proton runs, we mapped out the spectrum of odd order snake resonance at Q{sub y} = 7/10. Here, Q, is the beam vertical betatron tune. We also studied the beam polarization after crossing the 7/10th resonance as a function of resonance crossing rate. This paper reports the measured resonance spectrum as well as the results of resonance crossing.

  8. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering of cytochrome P450-2D6 on coated silver hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Alois; Keizers, Peter H J; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Commandeur, Jan N M; Gooijer, Cees; van der Zwan, Gert

    2007-02-13

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) from dilute solutions (down to nanomolar concentrations) of human mono-oxygenase CYP2D6 is observed using aqueous dispersions of Ag nanoparticles (hydrosol) coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of mercaptoalkanoic acids of two different lengths. From a direct comparison with its resonance Raman spectrum in solution, CYP2D6 appears to fully retain its native structure upon adsorption on coated hydrosol through electrostatic interaction, while a structural change in the active site is observed when uncoated citrate-reduced hydrosol is used. Using SERRS on these biocompatible coated hydrosols, the effects of dextromethorphan on the enzyme's active site can be observed, demonstrating that CYP2D6 ability of binding substrates is preserved. Moreover, by tuning the wavelength of the exciting laser away from the main absorption band of the heme, the vibrational bands of the SAM coating are observed and analyzed to see how the presence of the protein affects the SAM structure.

  9. Understanding double-resonant Raman scattering in chiral carbon nanotubes: Diameter and energy dependence of the D mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herziger, Felix; Vierck, Asmus; Laudenbach, Jan; Maultzsch, Janina

    2015-12-01

    We present a theoretical model to describe the double-resonant scattering process in arbitrary carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We use this approach to investigate the defect-induced D mode in CNTs and unravel the dependence of the D -mode frequency on the CNT diameter and on the energy of the resonant optical transition. Our approach is based on the symmetry of the hexagonal lattice and geometric considerations; hence the method is independent of the exact model that is chosen to describe the electronic band structure or the phonon dispersion. We finally clarify the diameter dependence of this Raman mode that has been under discussion in the past and demonstrate that, depending on the experimental conditions, in general two different dependencies can be measured. We also prove that CNTs with an arbitrary chiral index can exhibit a D mode in their Raman spectrum, in contrast to previous symmetry-based arguments. Furthermore, we give a direct quantification of the curvature-induced phonon frequency corrections of the D mode in CNTs with respect to graphite.

  10. Theory of dynamic absorption spectroscopy of nonstationary states. 4. Application to 12-fs resonant impulsive Raman spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, W.T.; Peteanu, L.A.; Mathies, R.A.

    1992-07-23

    A time-dependent theory for femtosecond dynamic absorption spectroscopy is used to describe the creation and observation of molecular ground-state vibrational coherence through the resonance impulsive stimulated Raman mechanism. Model calculations show that the oscillatory absorption signal that arises from this ground-state coherence is maximized for a limited range of pulse lengths and that there is a complex relationship between the probe wavelength and the strength of the spectral oscillations. The generalized time-dependent linear susceptibility of the nonstationary system created by the impulsive pump pulse is defined and used to discuss the strong dependence of the measured signals on the properties of the probe pulse. Finally, calculations are presented to analyze the high-frequency oscillations ({approximately}20-fs period) recently observed in the transient absorption spectra of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (BR{sub 568}) following excitation with a 12-fs optical pulse. At the probe wavelengths used in this experiment, the contribution of stimulated emission is negligible at long times because of the extremely rapid excited-state isomerization; as a result, the spectral oscillations observed after this time are due to the impulsive excitation of coherent vibrations in the ground state. The transient response observed for BR{sub 568} is calculated using a 29-mode harmonic potential surface derived from a prior resonance Raman intensity analysis. Both the oscillatory signals and their dependence on the probe wavelength are satisfactorily reproduced. 68 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy study of supported vanadia catalysts: Structure identification and quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili

    2014-10-20

    Revealing the structure of supported metal oxide catalysts is a prerequisite for establishing the structure - catalysis relationship. Among a variety of characterization techniques, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, combining resonance Raman and non-resonance Raman with different excitation wavelengths, has recently emerged as a particularly powerful tool in not only identifying but also quantifying the structure of supported metal oxide clusters. In our review, we make use of two supported vanadia systems, VOx/SiO2 and VOx/CeO2, as examples to showcase how one can employ this technique to investigate the heterogeneous structure of active oxide clusters and to understand the complex interaction between the oxide clusters and the support. Moreover, the qualitative and quantitative structural information gained from the multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy can be utilized to provide fundamental insights for designing more efficient supported metal oxide catalysts.

  12. Multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy study of supported vanadia catalysts: Structure identification and quantification

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Zili

    2014-10-20

    Revealing the structure of supported metal oxide catalysts is a prerequisite for establishing the structure - catalysis relationship. Among a variety of characterization techniques, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, combining resonance Raman and non-resonance Raman with different excitation wavelengths, has recently emerged as a particularly powerful tool in not only identifying but also quantifying the structure of supported metal oxide clusters. In our review, we make use of two supported vanadia systems, VOx/SiO2 and VOx/CeO2, as examples to showcase how one can employ this technique to investigate the heterogeneous structure of active oxide clusters and to understand the complex interaction between themore » oxide clusters and the support. Moreover, the qualitative and quantitative structural information gained from the multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy can be utilized to provide fundamental insights for designing more efficient supported metal oxide catalysts.« less

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in the structural studies of biomolecules: the state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabiev, Igor R.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Efremov, R. G.; Chumanov, George D.

    1991-05-01

    It has been recently demonstrated'3 that very large (in some cases up to iOn) enhancement of Raman crosssection for molecules in the close vicinity of a metal surface results from superposition of two main mechanisms: electromagnetic and so-called molecular (or "chemical"). Enhancement of the local electromagnetic field near a "rough" metal surface induces the electromagnetic mechanism, while the "molecular" mechanism is connected with the appearance of new excited states for the molecule/metal complexes in the process of chemisorption. The techniques of surface-enhanced Raman (SER) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy are based on these mechanisms and widely used in investigations ofbiological molecules.27 The three main questions of applicability of SERS and SERRS for resolving sophisticated problems in molecular biology, bioorganic and physical chemistry are the following: (i) What are the molecular mechanisms of interaction of the biomolecules with a metal surface in the experimental conditions typical of SERS appearance and is it possible to take measurements while preserving the native conformation of the molecule? (ii) What is the exact relationship between the Raman cross-section enhancement and the distance between the metal and the molecule? Is the mechanism for enhancement short-range or long-range and is it be possible to detect all normal vibrations of macromolecules or only vibrations of groups which directly contact the surface? (iii) What are the lowest concentrations for the detection of SER spectra of biomolecules in different experimental systems (electrodes, hydrosols, surfaces with regular roughness)? Is it possible to detect high-quality SER spectra of subpicogram amounts of different classes of biomolecules for successful competition with the traditional techniques in biotechnology and genetic engineering? This paper deals with applications of SERS to the study of membrane proteins and nucleic acids.

  14. Resonance Raman Spectra of Five-Coordinate Heme-Nitrosyl Cytochromes c': Effect of the Proximal Heme-NO Environment.

    PubMed

    Servid, Amy E; McKay, Alison L; Davis, Cherry A; Garton, Elizabeth M; Manole, Andreea; Dobbin, Paul S; Hough, Michael A; Andrew, Colin R

    2015-06-01

    Five-coordinate heme nitrosyl complexes (5cNO) underpin biological heme-NO signal transduction. Bacterial cytochromes c' are some of the few structurally characterized 5cNO proteins, exhibiting a distal to proximal 5cNO transition of relevance to NO sensing. Establishing how 5cNO coordination (distal vs proximal) depends on the heme environment is important for understanding this process. Recent 5cNO crystal structures of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans cytochrome c' (AXCP) and Shewanella frigidimarina cytochrome c' (SFCP) show a basic residue (Arg124 and Lys126, respectively) near the proximal NO binding sites. Using resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy, we show that structurally characterized 5cNO complexes of AXCP variants and SFCP exhibit a range of ν(NO) (1651-1671 cm(-1)) and ν(FeNO) (519-536 cm(-1)) vibrational frequencies, depending on the nature of the proximal heme pocket and the sample temperature. While the AXCP Arg124 residue appears to have little impact on 5cNO vibrations, the ν(NO) and ν(FeNO) frequencies of the R124K variant are consistent with (electrostatically) enhanced Fe(II) → (NO)π* backbonding. Notably, RR frequencies for SFCP and R124A AXCP are significantly displaced from the backbonding trendline, which in light of recent crystallographic data and density functional theory modeling may reflect changes in the Fe-N-O angle and/or extent of σ-donation from the NO(π*) to the Fe(II) (dz(2)) orbital. For R124A AXCP, correlation of vibrational and crystallographic data is complicated by distal and proximal 5cNO populations. Overall, this study highlights the complex structure-vibrational relationships of 5cNO proteins that allow RR spectra to distinguish 5cNO coordination in certain electrostatic and steric environments.

  15. Soluble guanylate cyclase is activated differently by excess NO and by YC-1: Resonance Raman spectroscopic evidence†

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohammed; Derbyshire, Emily R.; Soldatova, Alexandra V.; Marletta, Michael A.; Spiro, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Modulation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) activity by nitric oxide (NO) involves two distinct steps. Low level activation of sGC is achieved by the stoichiometric binding of NO (1-NO) to the heme cofactor, while much higher activation is achieved by the binding of additional NO (xsNO) at a non-heme site. Addition of the allosteric activator YC-1 to the 1-NO form leads to activity comparable to xsNO state. In this study the mechanisms of sGC activation were investigated using electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopic methods. RR spectroscopy confirmed that the 1-NO form contains 5-coordinate NO-heme and showed that the addition of NO to the 1-NO form has no significant effect on the spectrum. In contrast, addition of YC-1 to either the 1-NO or xsNO forms alters the RR spectrum significantly, indicating a protein-induced change in the heme geometry. This change in the heme geometry was also observed when BAY 41-2272 was added to the xsNO form. Bands assigned to bending and stretching motions of the vinyl and propionate substituents change intensity in a pattern suggesting altered tilting of the pyrrole rings to which they are attached. In addition, the N-O stretching frequency increases, with no change in the Fe-NO frequency, an effect modeled via DFT calculations as resulting from a small opening of the Fe-N-O angle. These spectral differences demonstrate different mechanisms of activation by synthetic activators, such as YC-1 and BAY 41-2272, and excess NO. PMID:20459051

  16. Soluble guanylate cyclase is activated differently by excess NO and by YC-1: resonance Raman spectroscopic evidence.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohammed; Derbyshire, Emily R; Soldatova, Alexandra V; Marletta, Michael A; Spiro, Thomas G

    2010-06-15

    Modulation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) activity by nitric oxide (NO) involves two distinct steps. Low-level activation of sGC is achieved by the stoichiometric binding of NO (1-NO) to the heme cofactor, while much higher activation is achieved by the binding of additional NO (xsNO) at a non-heme site. Addition of the allosteric activator YC-1 to the 1-NO form leads to activity comparable to that of the xsNO state. In this study, the mechanisms of sGC activation were investigated using electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopic methods. RR spectroscopy confirmed that the 1-NO form contains five-coordinate NO-heme and showed that the addition of NO to the 1-NO form has no significant effect on the spectrum. In contrast, addition of YC-1 to either the 1-NO or xsNO forms alters the RR spectrum significantly, indicating a protein-induced change in the heme geometry. This change in the heme geometry was also observed when BAY 41-2272 was added to the xsNO form. Bands assigned to bending and stretching motions of the vinyl and propionate substituents undergo changes in intensity in a pattern suggesting altered tilting of the pyrrole rings to which they are attached. In addition, the N-O stretching frequency increases, with no change in the Fe-NO stretching frequency, an effect modeled via DFT calculations as resulting from a small opening of the Fe-N-O angle. These spectral differences demonstrate different mechanisms of activation by synthetic activators, such as YC-1 and BAY 41-2272, and excess NO. PMID:20459051

  17. Raman spectroscopy study of silicon nanoribbons on Ag(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speiser, E.; Buick, B.; Esser, N.; Richter, W.; Colonna, S.; Cricenti, A.; Ronci, F.

    2014-04-01

    The grating of self-assembled Si nanoribbons at the Ag(110) surface has been studied by Raman spectroscopy. The study, conducted in situ with uncapped samples, resulted in phonon frequencies in disagreement with the results of theoretical calculations reported in literature for freestanding silicene sheets and nanoribbons. These results suggest that the structure of these silicon nanoribbons is very different from the planar and lightly buckled structural models and that the influence of the substrate might be underestimated in the discussed structural models.

  18. Interaction of anthranilic acid with silver nanoparticles: A Raman, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and density functional theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadha, Ridhima; Maiti, Nandita; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2014-11-01

    Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of anthranilic acid have been investigated in solid, aqueous solution and on silver colloid. Anthranilic acid plays a key role in the brain in the production of quinolinic acid which is a powerful excitant and convulsant substance. Due to its medicinal importance, the surface adsorption properties of anthranilic acid have been studied. The experimental Raman and SERS data is supported with DFT calculations using B3LYP functional with aug-cc-pvdz and LANL2DZ basis sets. The comparison of experimental and theoretical results infers that anthranilate is chemisorbed to the silver surface directly through the carboxylate group with a perpendicular orientation. The time-dependent SERS spectrum of anthranilate showed no observable change indicating no structural transformation with time. The SERS spectrum recorded at different excitation wavelengths helped in understanding the origin of the SERS mechanism.

  19. Correlation of observed and model vibrational frequencies for aqueous organic acids: UV resonance Raman spectra and molecular orbital calculations of benzoic, salicylic, and phthalic acids.

    PubMed

    Trout, Chad C; Tambach, T J; Kubicki, James D

    2005-09-01

    The aromatic carboxylic acids benzoic, salicylic and phthalic acid were used to study the interaction of soluble organics compounds with metal cations. To accomplish this, we have developed methods for studying the carboxylic acids using UV resonance Raman (UVRR) combined with molecular orbital density functional theory calculations. The pH values of the acid solutions were based on the pK(a)'s for the different acids to examine the neutral and charged species. Deprotonation of the organic acids was detectable down to 10(-4)M using UVRR (two orders of magnitude lower than previous vibrational spectroscopy studies). Limitations to decreasing the concentration lower using the current UVRR facilities are discussed. Two methods were used to calculate the optimized geometry and frequencies of the acids: explicit and continuum solvation. The frequencies from the experimental spectra were then compared to the theoretical results obtained from the two methods.

  20. Correlation of observed and model vibrational frequencies for aqueous organic acids: UV resonance Raman spectra and molecular orbital calculations of benzoic, salicylic, and phthalic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trout, Chad C.; Tambach, T. J.; Kubicki, James D.

    2005-09-01

    The aromatic carboxylic acids benzoic, salicylic and phthalic acid were used to study the interaction of soluble organics compounds with metal cations. To accomplish this, we have developed methods for studying the carboxylic acids using UV resonance Raman (UVRR) combined with molecular orbital density functional theory calculations. The pH values of the acid solutions were based on the p Ka's for the different acids to examine the neutral and charged species. Deprotonation of the organic acids was detectable down to 10 -4 M using UVRR (two orders of magnitude lower than previous vibrational spectroscopy studies). Limitations to decreasing the concentration lower using the current UVRR facilities are discussed. Two methods were used to calculate the optimized geometry and frequencies of the acids: explicit and continuum solvation. The frequencies from the experimental spectra were then compared to the theoretical results obtained from the two methods.

  1. Combined infrared and Raman study of solid CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urso, R. G.; Scirè, C.; Baratta, G. A.; Compagnini, G.; Palumbo, M. E.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Knowledge about the composition and structure of interstellar ices is mainly based on the comparison between astronomical and laboratory spectra of astrophysical ice analogues. Carbon monoxide is one of the main components of the icy mantles of dust grains in the interstellar medium. Because of its relevance, several authors have studied the spectral properties of solid CO both pure and in mixtures. Aims: The aim of this work is to study the profile (shape, width, peak position) of the solid CO band centered at about 2140 cm-1 at low temperature, during warm up, and after ion irradiation to search for a structural variation of the ice sample. We also report on the appearance of the longitudinal optical-transverse optical (LO-TO) splitting in the infrared spectra of CO films to understand if this phenomenon can be related to a phase change. Methods: We studied the profile of the 2140 cm-1 band of solid CO by means of infrared and Raman spectroscopy. We used a free web interface that we developed that allows us to calculate the refractive index of the sample to measure the thickness of the film. Results: The profile of the fundamental band of solid CO obtained with infrared and Raman spectroscopy does not show any relevant modification after warm up or ion bombardment in the dose range investigated. We explain that the LO-TO splitting is not connected to a structural variation of the film. Ion irradiation causes the formation of new molecular species. Raman spectroscopy allowed us to detect, among other bands, a band centered at 1817 cm-1 that has been attributed to the infrared inactive species C2 and a band centered at 1767 cm-1 that remains unidentified.

  2. Study on residual stress in carbon fibres by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanchen; Wang, Qiuping; Wu, Junfang; Zhang, Chonghui; Wang, Jing; Tang, Yuanhe

    2008-12-01

    Based on the principle that residual stress in crystal lattice leads to change of distance among atoms, an approximate linear relationship between Raman shift and suffered strain of fibers is deduced. According to the stress-strain curve, a linear relationship between the stress and Raman shift is also deduced, and the ratio coefficient of the stress and Raman frequency shift is given. In high intensity carbon fibers, different spectra of the carbon fibers are obtained by Raman spectroscopy. The approximate linear relationship between the carbon fiber tensile strain and Raman shift is validated and the stress factor is given as well. Both the theoretic and experimental results show that the stress factor is -486.7GPa.mm. The experiment results also show that the Raman spectroscopy is a very effective method for the microstructure residual stress measurement. This method for residual stress measurement by Raman shift is able to be used in textile, biology, materials etc..

  3. [IR and Raman spectra studies of Rotundine based on DFT].

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Ping; Zhou, Guang-Ming; Zhang, Li-Jun; Cheng, Hong-Mei; Qin, Hong-Ying

    2014-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopy (IR), the normal Raman spectroscopy (NRS) and the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in new Ag/Cu nanomaterial of Rotundine were studied in the present paper. The IR and the NRS of Rotundine were calculated by the density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP/6-311+G(d, p), then the spectral intensity graph of Rotundine were given. The vibrational peaks were assigned comprehensively by the visualization software of Gauss view 5. 0. Rotundine has obvious infrared and Raman vibrational peak in the wave number range of 3 300-2500 and 1 800-600 cm(-1). SnCl2 and PVP was used as capping agent for the silver nanoparticles in SERS of Rotundine. Finally, by using the method of cyclic immersion well dispersed silver nanoparticles was obtained and achieved good enhancement effect. This molecule acquired strong selective enhancement vibration peak, In the wave number ranges of 1 500-1 400 and 1 000-700 cm(-1) the enhancement effect is most obvious. After analyzed, the methylene of this molecule is adsorbed on the silver nanoparticles surface and the angle between the benzene ring and the silver substrate is close to 90 degrees. The theoretically calculated spectra of Rotundine are consistent with the obtained experimental spectra. There are some differences may be due to the interaction forces between molecules and so on. The visualization software displayed the structure characteristics and molecular group vibration of this molecular visually and provided important basis for assigning the vibrational peaks. Rotundine is an important traditional Chinese medicine agent contained in many kinds of sedative drugs. The study provides a strong basis for the rapid, feature and trace identification of Rotundine and also supplies important reference for the biological role of central inhibition of analgesic drugs. PMID:25752044

  4. Shifting of infrared radiation using rotational raman resonances in diatomic molecular gases

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A device for shifting the frequency of infrared radiation from a CO.sub.2 laser by stimulated Raman scattering in either H.sub.2 or D.sub.2. The device of the preferred embodiment comprises an H.sub.2 Raman laser having dichroic mirrors which are reflective for 16 .mu.m radiation and transmittive for 10 .mu.m, disposed at opposite ends of an interaction cell. The interaction cell contains a diatomic molecular gas, e.g., H.sub.2, D.sub.2, T.sub.2, HD, HT, DT and a capillary waveguide disposed within the cell. A liquid nitrogen jacket is provided around the capillary waveguide for the purpose of cooling. In another embodiment the input CO.sub.2 radiation is circularly polarized using a Fresnel rhomb .lambda./4 plate and applied to an interaction cell of much longer length for single pass operation.

  5. Multiple relaxation and inhomogeneous broadening in resonance enhanced Raman scattering - Application to tunable infrared generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. C.; Lawandy, N. M.

    1989-01-01

    The solutions for the imaginary susceptibility of the Raman field transition with arbitrary relaxation rates and field strengths are examined for differing sets of relaxation rates with emphasis on alkali metal vapors which have spontaneous emission dominated relaxation. The model is further expanded to include Doppler broadening and used to predict the peak gain as a function of detuning for a frequency doubled alexandrite laser-pumped cesium vapor gain cell.

  6. Observation of structural relaxation during exciton self-trapping via excited-state resonant impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mance, J. G.; Felver, J. J.; Dexheimer, S. L.

    2015-02-28

    We detect the change in vibrational frequency associated with the transition from a delocalized to a localized electronic state using femtosecond vibrational wavepacket techniques. The experiments are carried out in the mixed-valence linear chain material [Pt(en){sub 2}][Pt(en){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}]⋅(ClO{sub 4}){sub 4} (en = ethylenediamine, C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N{sub 2}), a quasi-one-dimensional system with strong electron-phonon coupling. Vibrational spectroscopy of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton is carried out using a multiple pulse excitation technique: an initial pump pulse creates a population of delocalized excitons that self-trap and equilibrate, and a time-delayed second pump pulse tuned to the red-shifted absorption band of the self-trapped exciton impulsively excites vibrational wavepacket oscillations at the characteristic vibrational frequencies of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton state by the resonant impulsive stimulated Raman mechanism, acting on the excited state. The measurements yield oscillations at a frequency of 160 cm{sup −1} corresponding to a Raman-active mode of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton with Pt-Cl stretching character. The 160 cm{sup −1} frequency is shifted from the previously observed wavepacket frequency of 185 cm{sup −1} associated with the initially generated exciton and from the 312 cm{sup −1} Raman-active symmetric stretching mode of the ground electronic state. We relate the frequency shifts to the changes in charge distribution and local structure that create the potential that stabilizes the self-trapped state.

  7. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectra of water-insoluble tetraphenylporphyrin and chlorophyll a on silver hydrosols with a dioxane molecular spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolley, Paul S.; Keely, Brendan J.; Hester, Ronald E.

    1996-08-01

    A surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopic (SERRS) study of tetraphenylporphyrin (TTP) on a silver hydrosol, obtained by mixing a dioxane solution of the water-insoluble TPP with the hydrosol, indicates that there is no metallation of the porphyrin. By contrast, water-soluble porphyrins such as tetra-N-methylpyridylporphyrin (TMPyP) have been shown to undergo metallation. We suggest that the TPP is encapsulated within a dioxane envelope which is co-adsorbed to the surface of the silver hydrosol and functions as a molecular spacer. This spacer does not eliminate the analytical advantages afforded by SERRS, but does prevent significant perturbation from the native conformation, as is demonstrated by results obtained using chlorophyll a.

  8. Investigation of magnetic field enriched surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering performance using Fe3O4@Ag nanoparticles for malaria diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2014-03-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated the magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) of β-hematin by using nanoparticles with iron oxide core and silver shell (Fe3O4@Ag) for the potential application in the early malaria diagnosis. In this study, we investigate the dependence of the magnetic field-enriched SERRS performance of β-hematin on the different core and shell sizes of the Fe3O4@Ag nanoparticles. We note that the core and shell parameters are critical in the realization of the optimal magnetic field-enrich SERRS β-hematin signal. These results are consistent with our simulations that will guide the optimization of the magnetic SERRS performance for the potential early diagnosis in the malaria disease.

  9. Towards combined electrochemistry and surface-enhanced resonance Raman of heme proteins: Improvement of diffusion electrochemistry of cytochrome c at silver electrodes chemically modified with 4-mercaptopyridine.

    PubMed

    Millo, Diego; Ranieri, Antonio; Koot, Wynanda; Gooijer, Cees; van der Zwan, Gert

    2006-08-01

    To date, a successful combination of surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) and electrochemistry to study heme proteins is inhibited by the problems raised by the prerequisite to use silver as electrode metal. This paper indicates an approach to overcome these problems. It describes a quick and reproducible procedure to prepare silver electrodes chemically modified with 4-mercaptopyridine suitable to perform diffusion electrochemistry of cytochrome c (cyt c). The method involves the employment of a mechanical and a chemical treatment and avoids the use of alumina slurries and any electrochemical pretreatment. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to test the electrochemical response of cyt c, and the CV signals were found identical with those obtained on gold electrodes under the same experimental conditions. Compared to previous literature, a significant improvement of the CV signal of cyt c at silver electrodes was achieved. Preliminary results show that this treatment can be also successfully employed for the preparation of SERRS-active electrodes.

  10. Optical fibre probe NIR Raman measurements in ambient light and in combination with a tactile resonance sensor for possible cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Morgan; Ramser, Kerstin; Lindahl, Olof A

    2013-07-21

    First measurements on a combined instrument with a thin fibre optic Raman probe mounted inside a hollow tactile resonance sensor have been performed in ambient light on porcine tissue. The ambient fluorescent light was removed successfully from the spectra. The stiffness and the biomolecular composition of the tissue were analysed.

  11. The use of ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy in the analysis of ionizing-radiation-induced damage in DNA.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C P; Jirasek, A

    2009-04-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS) was used to determine damage done in both calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and a short stranded DNA oligomer (SS-DNA) due to ionizing radiation from a medical (60)Co radiation therapy unit used in the treatment of cancer. Spectra were acquired at incident UV wavelengths of 248, 257, and 264 nm in order to utilize the differences in UVRR cross-sections of the bases with wavelength. Through the analysis of difference spectra between irradiated and unirradiated DNA at each of the incident UV wavelengths, damage to CT- and SS-DNA was observed and identified. Significant radiation-induced increases in the difference spectra of the CT-DNA indicated disruption of the stable, stacked structure of its bases, as well as the disruption of Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds between the base pairs. Base unstacking was not as evident in the SS-DNA, while radiation-induced spectral decreases suggest disruption of the structure of the nucleotides. As demonstrated, UVRRS has the ability to highlight contributions from specific moieties with the use of varying incident UV wavelengths, thus enhancing the already information-rich content of the Raman spectra.

  12. Resonance Raman and excitation energy dependent charge transfer mechanism in halide-substituted hybrid perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Byung-wook; Jain, Sagar M; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2015-02-24

    Organo-metal halide perovskites (OMHPs) are materials with attractive properties for optoelectronics. They made a recent introduction in the photovoltaics world by methylammonium (MA) lead triiodide and show remarkably improved charge separation capabilities when chloride and bromide are added. Here we show how halide substitution in OMHPs with the nominal composition CH3NH3PbI2X, where X is I, Br, or Cl, influences the morphology, charge quantum yield, and local interaction with the organic MA cation. X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence data demonstrate that halide substitution affects the local structure in the OMHPs with separate MAPbI3 and MAPbCl3 phases. Raman spectroscopies as well as theoretical vibration calculations reveal that this at the same time delocalizes the charge to the MA cation, which can liberate the vibrational movement of the MA cation, leading to a more adaptive organic phase. The resonance Raman effect together with quantum chemical calculations is utilized to analyze the change in charge transfer mechanism upon electronic excitation and gives important clues for the mechanism of the much improved photovoltage and photocurrent also seen in the solar cell performance for the materials when chloride compounds are included in the preparation. PMID:25668059

  13. Time-resolved absorption and resonance Raman investigations of short-lived intermediates in solution or occluded in zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brémard, C.; Buntinx, G.; De Waele, V.; Didierjean, C.; Gener, I.; Poizat, O.

    1999-05-01

    Two examples of structural investigation of photogenerated short-lived transient species of aromatic compounds, by using time-resolved electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy are provided. The picosecond Raman spectra of the lowest excited singlet state (S 1) of 4,4'-bipyridine and 2,2'-bipyridine in solution are discussed first. The results provide strong evidence for a surprising asymmetric S 1 structure in which the electronic excitation and the consequent structural distortion are localized in one of the pyridyl rings, the other ring being almost unaffected. The laser photolysis of biphenyl occluded in the pores and cavities of ZSM-5 and faujasitic zeolites have been investigated in the nanosecond time-scale as functions of aluminium content, the extraframework cations, sample loading and intensity of photolysis. At low pump power and low aluminium content the triplet state of biphenyl is observed. At higher pump power and in aluminated zeolites, biphotonic ionization was observed to generate the cation radical. As the loading increased, the anion radical yield increased. This is characteristic of faujasitic zeolites in which scavenger molecules with restricted diffusional motions are confined in the vicinity of photoionized molecules. The lifetimes of cation radical were particularly long in aluminated ZSM-5 zeolites with efficient trapping sites of the photoejected electron.

  14. A new combined nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopic probe applied to in situ investigations of catalysts and catalytic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, Jules C. J.; Mantle, Michael D.; York, Andrew P. E.; McGregor, James

    2014-06-15

    Both Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies are valuable analytical techniques capable of providing mechanistic information and thereby providing insights into chemical processes, including catalytic reactions. Since both techniques are chemically sensitive, they yield not only structural information but also quantitative analysis. In this work, for the first time, the combination of the two techniques in a single experimental apparatus is reported. This entailed the design of a new experimental probe capable of recording simultaneous measurements on the same sample and/or system of interest. The individual datasets acquired by each spectroscopic method are compared to their unmodified, stand-alone equivalents on a single sample as a means to benchmark this novel piece of equipment. The application towards monitoring reaction progress is demonstrated through the evolution of the homogeneous catalysed metathesis of 1‑hexene, with both experimental techniques able to detect reactant consumption and product evolution. This is extended by inclusion of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capabilities with a custom made MAS 7 mm rotor capable of spinning speeds up to 1600 Hz, quantified by analysis of the spinning sidebands of a sample of KBr. The value of this is demonstrated through an application involving heterogeneous catalysis, namely the metathesis of 2-pentene and ethene. This provides the added benefit of being able to monitor both the reaction progress (by NMR spectroscopy) and also the structure of the catalyst (by Raman spectroscopy) on the very same sample, facilitating the development of structure-performance relationships.

  15. A new combined nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopic probe applied to in situ investigations of catalysts and catalytic processes.

    PubMed

    Camp, Jules C J; Mantle, Michael D; York, Andrew P E; McGregor, James

    2014-06-01

    Both Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies are valuable analytical techniques capable of providing mechanistic information and thereby providing insights into chemical processes, including catalytic reactions. Since both techniques are chemically sensitive, they yield not only structural information but also quantitative analysis. In this work, for the first time, the combination of the two techniques in a single experimental apparatus is reported. This entailed the design of a new experimental probe capable of recording simultaneous measurements on the same sample and/or system of interest. The individual datasets acquired by each spectroscopic method are compared to their unmodified, stand-alone equivalents on a single sample as a means to benchmark this novel piece of equipment. The application towards monitoring reaction progress is demonstrated through the evolution of the homogeneous catalysed metathesis of 1‑hexene, with both experimental techniques able to detect reactant consumption and product evolution. This is extended by inclusion of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capabilities with a custom made MAS 7 mm rotor capable of spinning speeds up to 1600 Hz, quantified by analysis of the spinning sidebands of a sample of KBr. The value of this is demonstrated through an application involving heterogeneous catalysis, namely the metathesis of 2-pentene and ethene. This provides the added benefit of being able to monitor both the reaction progress (by NMR spectroscopy) and also the structure of the catalyst (by Raman spectroscopy) on the very same sample, facilitating the development of structure-performance relationships.

  16. Guided-Mode Resonance Grating with Self-Assembled Silver Nanoparticles for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Xinyuan; Fan, Donglei; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Wang, Zheng; Chen, Ray T.; Wang, Alan X.

    2016-01-01

    We designed and fabricated guided-mode resonance (GMR) gratings on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin film to generate a significantly enhanced local electric field for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were self-assembled onto the surface of the grating, which can provide a large amount of “hot-spots” for SERS sensing. The ITO gratings also exhibit excellent tolerance to fabrication deviations due to the large refractive index contrast of the ITO grating. Quantitative experimental results of 5,5’-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) demonstrate the best enhancement factor of ~14× on ITO gratings when compared with Ag NPs on a flat ITO film, and the limit of detection (LOD) of DTNB is as low as 10 pM. PMID:26958546

  17. Theoretical calculation (DFT), Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study of ponceau 4R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yunfei; Li, Yan; Sun, Yingying; Wang, Heya; Qian, He; Yao, Weirong

    2012-10-01

    Ponceau 4R is used as a coloring agent in many different products, such as food, drinks, medicines, cosmetics and tobacco. However, ponceau 4R also shows carcinogenic, teratogenic and mutagenic behavior in high doses. In this work, standard Raman, theoretical Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra have been used to investigate ponceau 4R. More specifically, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to calculate the optimized Raman spectrum of ponceau 4R at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. This has provided a better understanding of the optimized geometry and vibrational frequencies of this dye. In addition, the experimental spectrum of ponceau 4R has been compared with the theoretical spectrum; good agreement was obtained. Finally, it has shown that using SERS the detection limit of the ponceau 4R solution can be as low as 5 μg/mL. This has been achieved by SERS measurements of ponceau 4R on a substrate of gold nanoparticles. The SERS peaks at 1030, 1236, 1356 and 1502 cm-1 were chosen as index for semi-quantitative analysis, showing that the SERS technique provided a useful ultrasensitive method for the detection of ponceau 4R.

  18. Time-resolved remote Raman study of minerals under supercritical CO2 and high temperatures relevant to Venus exploration.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shiv K; Misra, Anupam K; Clegg, Samuel M; Barefield, James E; Wiens, Roger C; Acosta, Tayro

    2010-07-13

    We report time-resolved (TR) remote Raman spectra of minerals under supercritical CO(2) (approx. 95 atm pressure and 423 K) and under atmospheric pressure and high temperature up to 1003 K at distances of 1.5 and 9 m, respectively. The TR Raman spectra of hydrous and anhydrous sulphates, carbonate and silicate minerals (e.g. talc, olivine, pyroxenes and feldspars) under supercritical CO(2) (approx. 95 atm pressure and 423 K) clearly show the well-defined Raman fingerprints of each mineral along with the Fermi resonance doublet of CO(2). Besides the CO(2) doublet and the effect of the viewing window, the main differences in the Raman spectra under Venus conditions are the phase transitions, the dehydration and decarbonation of various minerals, along with a slight shift in the peak positions and an increase in line-widths. The dehydration of melanterite (FeSO(4).7H(2)O) at 423 K under approximately 95 atm CO(2) is detected by the presence of the Raman fingerprints of rozenite (FeSO(4).4H(2)O) in the spectrum. Similarly, the high-temperature Raman spectra under ambient pressure of gypsum (CaSO(4).2H(2)O) and talc (Mg(3)Si(4)O(10)(OH)(2)) indicate that gypsum dehydrates at 518 K, but talc remains stable up to 1003 K. Partial dissociation of dolomite (CaMg(CO(3))(2)) is observed at 973 K. The TR remote Raman spectra of olivine, alpha-spodumene (LiAlSi(2)O(6)) and clino-enstatite (MgSiO(3)) pyroxenes and of albite (NaAlSi(3)O(8)) and microcline (KAlSi(3)O(8)) feldspars at high temperatures also show that the Raman lines remain sharp and well defined in the high-temperature spectra. The results of this study show that TR remote Raman spectroscopy could be a potential tool for exploring the surface mineralogy of Venus during both daytime and nighttime at short and long distances.

  19. Stress analysis of zirconia studied by Raman spectroscopy at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kurpaska, L; Kozanecki, M; Jasinski, J J; Sitarz, M

    2014-10-15

    The paper presents effect of low temperature upon location of selected Raman bands. The structural properties of pure zirconium pre-oxidized at 773K and 873K have been studied during cooling in the range of temperatures 273K and 93K by Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the Raman band positions for the monoclinic phase of zirconia oxide was performed. Raman spectroscopy has shown that monoclinic phase of zirconia oxide undergoes a continuous band displacement, individual for each studied Raman mode. Registered shift is aimed towards the high frequency direction. Recorded Raman band displacement was employed to study stress state in zirconia oxide films grown on pure zirconium developed during control cooling. Presented results showed a good correlation between different thicknesses of the oxide scale.

  20. Remote Raman and fluorescence studies of mineral samples.

    PubMed

    Bozlee, Brian J; Misra, Anupam K; Sharma, Shiv K; Ingram, Melissa

    2005-08-01

    In the present study, we investigated remote laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), at a distance of 4.8 m, of a variety of natural minerals and rocks, and Hawaiian Ti (Cordyline terminalis) plant leaves. These minerals included calcite cleavage, calcite onex and calcite travertine, gypsum, fluorapatite, Dover flint and chalk, chalcedony and nephelene syenite, and rubies containing rock. Pulsed laser excitation of the samples at 355 and 266 nm often resulted in strong fluorescence. The LIF bands in the violet-blue region at approximately 413 and approximately 437 nm were observed only in the spectrum of calcite cleavage. The green LIF bands with band maxima in the narrow range of approximately 501-504 nm were observed in the spectra of all the minerals with the exception of the nephelene syenite and ruby rocks. The LIF red bands were observed in the range approximately 685-711 nm in all samples. Excitation with 532 nm wavelength laser gave broad but relatively low fluorescence background in the low-frequency region of the Raman spectra of these minerals. One microsecond signal gating was effective in removing nearly all background fluorescence (with peak at approximately 610 nm) from calcite cleavage Raman spectra, indicating that the fluorescence was probably from long-lifetime inorganic phosphorescence. PMID:16029855

  1. Raman study of radiation-damaged zircon under hydrostatic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasdala, Lutz; Miletich, Ronald; Ruschel, Katja; Váczi, Tamás

    2008-12-01

    Pressure-induced changes of Raman band parameters of four natural, gem-quality zircon samples with different degrees of self-irradiation damage, and synthetic ZrSiO4 without radiation damage, have been studied under hydrostatic compression in a diamond anvil cell up to ~10 GPa. Radiation-damaged zircon shows similar up-shifts of internal SiO4 stretching modes at elevated pressures as non-damaged ZrSiO4. Only minor changes of band-widths were observed in all cases. This makes it possible to estimate the degree of radiation damage from the width of the ν3(SiO4) band of zircon inclusions in situ, almost independent from potential “fossilized pressures” or compressive strain acting on the inclusions. An application is the non-destructive analysis of gemstones such as corundum or spinel: broadened Raman bands are a reliable indicator of self-irradiation damage in zircon inclusions, whose presence allows one to exclude artificial color enhancement by high-temperature treatment of the specimen.

  2. Remote Raman and fluorescence studies of mineral samples.

    PubMed

    Bozlee, Brian J; Misra, Anupam K; Sharma, Shiv K; Ingram, Melissa

    2005-08-01

    In the present study, we investigated remote laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), at a distance of 4.8 m, of a variety of natural minerals and rocks, and Hawaiian Ti (Cordyline terminalis) plant leaves. These minerals included calcite cleavage, calcite onex and calcite travertine, gypsum, fluorapatite, Dover flint and chalk, chalcedony and nephelene syenite, and rubies containing rock. Pulsed laser excitation of the samples at 355 and 266 nm often resulted in strong fluorescence. The LIF bands in the violet-blue region at approximately 413 and approximately 437 nm were observed only in the spectrum of calcite cleavage. The green LIF bands with band maxima in the narrow range of approximately 501-504 nm were observed in the spectra of all the minerals with the exception of the nephelene syenite and ruby rocks. The LIF red bands were observed in the range approximately 685-711 nm in all samples. Excitation with 532 nm wavelength laser gave broad but relatively low fluorescence background in the low-frequency region of the Raman spectra of these minerals. One microsecond signal gating was effective in removing nearly all background fluorescence (with peak at approximately 610 nm) from calcite cleavage Raman spectra, indicating that the fluorescence was probably from long-lifetime inorganic phosphorescence.

  3. Raman Spectroscopy Applied to Mars Water Cycle Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakakos, G.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    One of the key findings during the Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory landed Mars missions has been the detection of perchlorate, a highly deliquescent salt. Perchlorates are of great interest on Mars due to their high affinity for water vapour as well as their ability to greatly depress the freezing point of water when in solution. This has intriguing biological implications as resulting brines could potentially provide a habitable environment for living organisms. Additionally, it has been speculated that these salts may play a significant role in influencing the hydrological cycle on Mars. In order to experimentally study brine formation on Mars and assess the feasibility of a future landed detection tool, a stand-off Raman spectroscopy instrument and environmental simulation chamber have been developed at York University. A sample of magnesium perchlorate has been subjected to the water vapour pressure, background pressure and temperatures found at polar Martian latitudes. Results indicate that at a water vapour pressure of ~20 Pa, Raman spectroscopy is able to detect the onset of brine formation and provide an estimate of the quantity of water taken up by the sample. At the lower water vapour pressures typically found on Mars ( ~1 Pa), it appears that slower dynamics inhibit the onset of water uptake over relevant time scales. The experimental setup and current results will be presented.

  4. Recurrence prediction in oral cancers: a serum Raman spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Aditi; Nandakumar, Nikhila; Sawant, Sharada; Krishna, C Murali

    2015-04-01

    High mortality rates associated with oral cancers can be primarily attributed to the failure of current histological procedures in predicting recurrence. Identifying recurrence related factors can lead to improved prognosis, optimized treatment and enhanced overall outcomes. Serum Raman spectroscopy has previously shown potential in the diagnosis of cancers, such as head and neck, cervix, breast, oral cancers, and also in predicting treatment response. In the present study, serum was collected from 22 oral cancer subjects [with recurrence (n = 10) and no-recurrence (n = 12)] before and after surgery and spectra were acquired using a Raman microprobe coupled with a 40× objective. Spectral acquisition parameters were as follows: λex = 785 nm, laser power = 30 mW, integration time: 12 s and averages: 3. Data was analyzed in a patient-wise approach using unsupervised PCA and supervised PC-LDA, followed by LOOCV. PCA and PC-LDA findings suggest that recurrent and non-recurrent cases cannot be classified in before surgery serum samples; an average classification efficiency of ∼78% was obtained in after-surgery samples. Mean and difference spectra and PCA loadings indicate that DNA and protein markers may be potential spectral markers for recurrence. RS of post surgery serum samples may have the potential to predict the probability of recurrence in clinics, after prospective large-scale validation.

  5. Structure, IR and Raman spectra of phosphotrihydrazide studied by DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furer, V. L.; Vandyukov, A. E.; Majoral, J. P.; Caminade, A. M.; Kovalenko, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The FTIR and FT Raman measurements of the phosphotrihydrazide (S)P[N(Me)-NH2]3 have been performed. This compound is a zero generation dendrimer G0 with terminal amine groups. Structural optimization and normal mode analysis were obtained for G0 by the density functional theory (DFT). Optimized geometric bond length and angles obtained by DFT show good agreement with experiment. The amine terminal groups are characterized by the well-defined bands at 3321, 3238, 1614 cm- 1 in the experimental IR spectrum and by bands at 3327, 3241 cm- 1 in the Raman spectrum of G0. The experimental frequencies of asymmetric and symmetric NH2 stretching vibrations of amine group are lower than theoretical values due to intramolecular Nsbnd H ⋯ S hydrogen bond. This hydrogen bond is also responsible for higher experimental infrared intensity of these bands as compared with theoretical values. Relying on DFT calculations a complete vibrational assignment is proposed for the studied dendrimer.

  6. Structure, IR and Raman spectra of phosphotrihydrazide studied by DFT.

    PubMed

    Furer, V L; Vandyukov, A E; Majoral, J P; Caminade, A M; Kovalenko, V I

    2016-09-01

    The FTIR and FT Raman measurements of the phosphotrihydrazide (S)P[N(Me)-NH2]3 have been performed. This compound is a zero generation dendrimer G0 with terminal amine groups. Structural optimization and normal mode analysis were obtained for G0 by the density functional theory (DFT). Optimized geometric bond length and angles obtained by DFT show good agreement with experiment. The amine terminal groups are characterized by the well-defined bands at 3321, 3238, 1614cm(-1) in the experimental IR spectrum and by bands at 3327, 3241cm(-1) in the Raman spectrum of G0. The experimental frequencies of asymmetric and symmetric NH2 stretching vibrations of amine group are lower than theoretical values due to intramolecular NH⋯S hydrogen bond. This hydrogen bond is also responsible for higher experimental infrared intensity of these bands as compared with theoretical values. Relying on DFT calculations a complete vibrational assignment is proposed for the studied dendrimer. PMID:27179692

  7. Comparative studies by IR, Raman, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of azodicarbonamide, biurea and semicarbazide hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yunfei; Li, Pei; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Heya; Qian, He; Yao, Weirong

    2013-10-01

    Azodicarbonamide is widely applied in the food industry as a new flour gluten fortifier in China, Canada, the United States, and some other countries, whose metabolites of biurea and semicarbazide hydrochloride are reaction products during baking. In this study, IR, Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of azodicarbonamide, biurea, and semicarbazide hydrochloride have been studied, and vibrational bands have been assigned on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The calculated Raman spectra were in good agreement with experimental Raman spectra. The SERS method coupled with active gold substrates has also been applied for detection of the three chemicals with pure water as solvent, with the limit of detection of this method being as low as 10 μg/mL (less than 45 μg/mL). These results showed that azodicarbonamide and its metabolites could be detected by the vibrational spectra technique, which might be applied as a powerful tool for the rapid detection on these species derived from agents added to flour.

  8. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering studies of L-amino acids adsorbed on silver nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Raju; Rajanikanth, A.; Bansal, C.

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanocluster films were prepared using plasma inert gas phase condensation technique. These were used as Raman active substrates for Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) studies of 19 standard L-amino acids adsorbed on the surface of Ag nanoclusters via Agsbnd N bonds. A detailed study of two essential aromatic amino acids viz. L-Phenylalanine and L-Tryptophan showed a correlation between the Raman intensity of the characteristic lines of phenol and indole side chains and their molar concentrations in the range 1 μM-1 mM. This indicates that Raman studies can be used for quantitative determination of the amino acids in proteins.

  9. Raman spectroscopy: an evolving technique for live cell studies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachael; Wright, Karen L; Ashton, Lorna

    2016-06-21

    One of the most exciting developments in Raman spectroscopy in the last decade has been its application to cells and tissues for diagnostic and pharmaceutical applications, and in particular its use in the analysis of cellular dynamics. Raman spectroscopy is rapidly advancing as a cell imaging method that overcomes many of the limitations of current techniques and is earning its place as a routine tool in cell biology. In this review we focus on important developments in Raman spectroscopy that have evolved into the exciting technique of live-cell Raman microscopy and highlight some of the most recent and significant applications to cell biology.

  10. Structure sensitive in situ Raman study of iron passive films using SERS-active Fe/Au(111) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allongue, P.; Joiret, S.

    2005-03-01

    This work describes the preparation of well-defined Fe/Au(111) /mica substrates for in situ Raman studies of the iron passive film with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). It is a two-step technique in which a SERS active (111) epitaxial gold substrate is prepared by resistive evaporation on mica. An epitaxial Fe(110) film is then electrodeposited to serve as iron electrode. It is shown that the SERS enhancement factor depends primarily on the good matching between the gold film plasmon resonance wavelength λP and the excitation wavelength. The iron thickness is the second main parameter controlling the SERS enhancement factor with a maximum found for a thickness of 20 monolayers. Under optimized conditions an amplification factor of 5×104 is demonstrated with respect to the case of a bulk polycrystalline iron substrate. This technique allows the recording of Raman spectra of nm-thick passive films within a few seconds only, which opens up to nearly real-time bias-dependent investigations of the chemistry at the electrochemical interface. In addition, taking advantage of the well-defined structure of the Fe(110)/Au(111)/ mica substrates, we present a preliminary structure-sensitive in situ Raman study of the iron passive film formed in a borate solution of pH8.4 . It is thought that this simple approach of promoting SERS should find more general interest for the electrochemistry community.

  11. Surface plasmon enhanced Raman scattering frequency and angular resonance of Raman scattered light from pyridine on Au, Ag and Cu electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinger, B.; Wenning, U.; Wetzel, H.

    1980-12-01

    The strong dependence of the surface Raman intensity on the exciting frequency and on the angle of incidence for pyridine molecules adsorbed on Au, Ag and Cu electrodes after a weak oxidation/reduction cycle is evidence for a surface plasmon enhanced Raman scattering (SPERS).

  12. Two-dimensional stimulated resonance Raman spectroscopy of molecules with broadband x-ray pulses

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Jason D.; Zhang, Yu; Healion, Daniel; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    Expressions for the two-dimensional stimulated x-ray Raman spectroscopy (2D-SXRS) signal obtained using attosecond x-ray pulses are derived. The 1D- and 2D-SXRS signals are calculated for trans-N-methyl acetamide (NMA) with broad bandwidth (181 as, 14.2 eV FWHM) pulses tuned to the oxygen and nitrogen K-edges. Crosspeaks in 2D signals reveal electronic Franck-Condon overlaps between valence orbitals and relaxed orbitals in the presence of the core-hole. PMID:22583220

  13. Nickel(II)-substituted azurin I from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans as characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Marzena B; Czernuszewicz, Roman S

    2009-05-01

    Metal-substituted blue copper proteins (cupredoxins) have been successfully used to study the effect of metal-ion identity on their active-site properties, specifically the coordination geometry and metal-ligand bond strengths. In this work, low-temperature (77 K) resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the blue copper protein Alcaligenes xylosoxidans azurin I and its Ni(II) derivative are reported. A detailed analysis of all observed bands is presented and responsiveness to metal substitution is discussed in terms of structural and bonding changes. The native cupric site exhibits a RR spectrum characteristic of a primarily trigonal planar (type 1) coordination geometry, identified by the nu(Cu-S)(Cys) markers at 373, 399, 409, and 430 cm(-1). Replacement of Cu(II) with Ni(II) results in optical and RR spectra that reveal (1) a large hypsochromic shift in the main (Cys)S --> M(II) charge-transfer absorption from 622 to 440 nm, (2) greatly reduced metal-thiolate bonding interaction, indicated by substantially lower nu(Ni-S)(Cys) stretching frequencies, (3) elevation of the cysteine nu(C( beta )-S) stretching, amide III, and rho (s)(C( beta )H(2)) scissors vibrational modes, and (4) primarily four-coordinated, trigonally distorted tetrahedral geometry of the Ni(II) site that is marked by characteristic nu(Ni-S)(Cys) stretching RR bands at 347, 364, and 391 cm(-1). Comparisons of the electronic and vibrational properties between A. xylosoxidans azurin I and its closely structurally related azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa are made and discussed. For cupric azurins, the intensity-weighted average M(II)-S(Cys) stretching frequencies are calculated to be nu(Cu-S)(iwa) = 406.3 and 407.6 cm(-1), respectively. These values decreased to nu(Ni-S)(iwa) = 359.3 and 365.5 cm(-1), respectively, after Ni(II) --> Cu(II) exchange, suggesting that the metal-thiolate interactions are similar in the two native proteins but are much less alike in their Ni(II)-substituted forms.

  14. Raman spectroscopic study of sodium chloride water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furić, K.; Ciglenečki, I.; Ćosović, B.

    2000-09-01

    The Raman spectra of NaCl water solutions have been studied in the concentration range between 0 and 3.3 M using a difference technique. The temperature dependence of the spectral profiles observed for the O-H stretching in the high frequency region (between 2500 and 4000 cm -1) was also investigated in the narrow interval around a room temperature. Although the considered bandshape is not of a simple kind, the measured Id/ I0 ratio plotted versus NaCl concentration and temperature fits a straight line in both diagrams very satisfactorily. The linear dependence of Id/ I0 versus NaCl molarity was checked in the study of natural seawater samples for which discrepancies were found. These deviations were attributed to other organic and inorganic dissolved components in the seawater.

  15. Structural analysis of molybdo-zinc-phosphate glasses: Neutron scattering, FTIR, Raman scattering, MAS NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuka, C.; Shinde, A. B.; Krishna, P. S. R.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2016-08-01

    Vitreous samples were prepared in the xMoO3-17ZnO-(83-x) NaPO3 with 35 ≥ x ≥ 55 glass forming system by energy efficient microwave heating method. Structural evolution of the vitreous network was monitored as a function of composition by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman scattering, Magic Angle Spin Nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and Neutron scattering. Addition of MoO3 to the ZnO-NaPO3 glass leads to a pronounced increase in glass transition temperature (Tg) suggesting a significant increase in network connectivity and strength. In order to analyze FTIR and Raman scattering, a simple structural model is presented to rationalize the experimental observations. A number of structural units are formed due to network modification, and the resulting glass may be characterized by a network polyhedral with different numbers of unshared corners. 31P MAS NMR confirms a clear distinction between structural species having 3, 2, 1, 0 bridging oxygens (BOs). Further, Neutron scattering studies were used to probe the structure of these glasses. The result suggests that all the investigated glasses have structures based on chains of four coordinated phosphate and six coordinated molybdate units, besides, two different lengths of P-O bonds in tetrahedral phosphate units that are assigned to bonds of the P-atom with terminal and bridging oxygen atoms.

  16. Vibrational properties of epitaxial Bi4Te3 films as studied by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Song, Yuxin; Pan, Wenwu; Chen, Qimiao; Wu, Xiaoyan; Lu, Pengfei; Gong, Qian; Wang, Shumin

    2015-08-01

    Bi4Te3, as one of the phases of the binary Bi-Te system, shares many similarities with Bi2Te3, which is known as a topological insulator and thermoelectric material. We report the micro-Raman spectroscopy study of 50 nm Bi4Te3 films on Si substrates prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. Raman spectra of Bi4Te3 films completely resolve the six predicted Raman-active phonon modes for the first time. Structural features and Raman tensors of Bi4Te3 films are introduced. According to the wavenumbers and assignments of the six eigenpeaks in the Raman spectra of Bi4Te3 films, it is found that the Raman-active phonon oscillations in Bi4Te3 films exhibit the vibrational properties of those in both Bi and Bi2Te3 films.

  17. A computational study on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of para-substituted Benzenethiol derivatives adsorbed on gold nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    You, Tingting; Liang, Xiu; Gao, Yukun; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin; Yang, Shihe

    2016-01-01

    We presented a computational study on para-substituted Benzenethiol (x-BT, x=H, F, Cl, Br, OH, SH, SeH, NH2, CH3) derivatives interacting with gold cluster for chemical effects related to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed on a series of bridge-type and vertex type x-BT/Au13 complexes for geometric, electronic and excitation properties to determine the key factor in spectral enhancement. Results indicated that off-resonance enhancement factors of bridge-type and vertex-type complexes exhibited different dependency on substitutions, which was greatly influenced by molecule-cluster transitions instead of properties such as interaction energy and charge transfer due to same origination for off-resonance and resonance chemical enhancement.

  18. Enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of rotational isomers on metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, B. H.; Lee, Y. G.; Frazier, D. O.

    1986-01-01

    Surfaced-enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to study rotational isomers of succinonitrile and N-methyl-thioacetamide on Cu and Ag surfaces. Both the gauche and trans conformers of succinonitrile are found to chemisorb on the metal surface. The doubly degenerate nu(C-triple bond-N) in the free molecules is removed when succinonitrile adsorbs on copper, which indicates that the two (C-triple bond-N) groups are no longer chemically equivalent. Both conformers are found to coordinate to the copper surface through the pi system of one of the two (C-triple bond-N) groups. In the case of N-methyl-thioacetamide, the population of the cis isomer is greatly increased on Cu and Ag surfaces. This is probably due to surface-induced cis-trans isomerization, in which the predominant trans isomer is converted to the cis isomer.

  19. A Raman Spectroscopic Study of Kernite to 25 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, M. E.; O'Bannon, E. F., III; Williams, Q. C.

    2015-12-01

    A Raman spectroscopic study of kernite to 25 GPaMarcus Silva, Earl O'Bannon III, and Quentin Williams Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz The Raman spectrum of kernite (Na2B4O6(OH)2·3(H2O)) has been characterized up to ~25 GPa in order to explore pressure-induced changes in a structurally novel mineral that contains mixed coordination borate groups (three- and four-fold), and both hydroxyl units and water. During compression, all of the ~30 modes monitored shift positively and monotonically until ~2.2 GPa where a few low frequency modes disappear and tetrahedral borate modes merge. The low frequency modes that disappear at ~2.2 GPa are likely associated with Na vibrations, and their disappearance suggests that dramatic changes occur in the Na sites at ~2.2 GPa. The merging of the boron bending and stretching modes at ~2.2 GPa suggests that the local symmetry of the BO4 tetrahedra changes at this pressure, and likely becomes more symmetric. The remaining modes shift positively up to ~7.4 GPa where a second notable change occurs. All but 5 modes (with initial frequencies of 150, 166, 289, 307, and 525 cm-1) disappear at ~7.4 GPa. This indicates that a second phase transition has occurred which affects both the BO3H and BO4­ groups: based on the loss of modes, this transition may be associated with disordering of the crystal. These 5 modes persist and shift monotonically up to ~25 GPa. On decompression, the 5 modes shift smoothly down to ~2.0 GPa where a few new modes appear in the spectrum. When fully decompressed to room pressure, the Raman spectrum of the recovered sample is significantly different from the ambient spectrum of the initial sample. Thus, our results are suggest a phase transition occurring at 2.2 GPa with changes in the Na and tetrahedral boron sites, followed by an additional transition at 7.4 GPa that may involve disordering of the crystal. In the latter transition, at least the BO3H groups appear to be

  20. Natural and synthetic gas hydrates studied by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savy, Jean-Philippe; Bigalke, Nikolaus; Aloisi, Giovanni; Kossel, Elke; Pansegrau, Moritz; Haeckel, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Over the past decade, the interest in using CH4-hydrates as an energy resource and CO2-hydrates as a storage option for anthropogenic CO2 has grown in the scientific community as well as in the oil and gas industry. Among all the techniques used to characterize gas hydrates, the non-destructive, non-invasive Raman spectroscopy provides significant insights into the structure and composition of hydrates. In this study, we compare gas hydrates synthetically produced in the laboratory with natural hydrate samples collected from marine sediments. CO2 and CH4 gas hydrates were investigated with a high-resolution Raman microscope at in-situ p-T conditions. A water-filled glass capillary (inner diameter: 1.7 mm) was placed in a stainless steel cell, which was sealed, cooled down to 3.6 ° C and pressurized to 60 bar with liquid CO2. Video images taken after 1 h revealed droplets (~10 μm in diameter) trapped in the ice-like solid. The two Fermi dyads of CO2 in the liquid and hydrate phase at 1274 & 1381 cm1 and 1280 & 1384 cm-1, respectively, confirm the presence of liquid CO2 droplets trapped in a CO2-hydrate matrix. Equivalent experiments were conducted with CH4 gas at 1 ° C and 90 bar. The nucleation of CH4-hydrate was followed in the Raman spectral region of the C-H stretching mode. At the early stage of the nucleation, the peak at 2915 cm-1 (CH4 in small cages) was stronger than the one at 2904 cm-1 (CH4 in large cages) indicating that methane starts to populate the small 512 cages of the s-I hydrate structure first and then, as nucleation continues, the large cages are stabilized leading to a quickly growing peak at 2904 cm-1 until a final peak intensity ratio of 3.7 is established. In contrast to other studies, intermediate stabilization of the s-II structure was not observed. Video images confirmed the absence of gas inclusions. The hydrate density, 1.1 & 0.9 for CO2-hydrate and CH4-hydrate respectively, compared to the one of water may explain the formation of

  1. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G.

    2014-05-01

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of 7Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the 7Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in 11C.

  2. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G.

    2014-05-02

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the {sup 7}Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in {sup 11}C.

  3. Micro-Raman spectroscopy study of ALVAC virus infected chicken embryo cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Anupam K.; Kamemoto, Lori E.; Hu, Ningjie; Dykes, Ava C.; Yu, Qigui; Zinin, Pavel V.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2011-05-01

    Micro- Raman spectroscopic investigation of ALVAC virus and of normal chicken embryo fibroblast cells and the cells infected with ALVAC virus labeled with green fluorescence protein (GFP) were performed with a 785 nm laser. Good quality Micro-Raman spectra of the Alvac II virus were obtained. These spectra show that the ALVAC II virus contains buried tyrosine residues and the coat protein of the virus has α-helical structure. A comparison of Raman spectra of normal and virus infected chicken embryo fibroblast cells revealed that the virus infected cells show additional bands at 535, 928, and 1091 cm-1, respectively, corresponding to δ(C-O-C) glycosidic ring, protein α-helix, and DNA (O-P-O) modes. In addition, the tyrosine resonance double (833 and 855 cm-1) shows reversal in the intensity of the higher-frequency band as compared to the normal cells that can be used to identify the infected cells. In the C-H stretching region, the infected cells show bands with higher intensity as compared to that of the corresponding bands in the normal cells. We also found that the presence of GFP does not affect the Raman spectra of samples when using a 785 nm micro-Raman system because the green fluorescence wavelength of GFP is well below the Stokes-Raman shifted spectral region.

  4. Molecular vibrational dynamics in water studied by femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Sheng; Zhou, Boyang; Dong, Zhiwei; Chen, Deying; Zhang, Zhonghua; Xia, Yuanqin

    2014-10-01

    We utilized femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) to study the ultrafast vibrational dynamics in distilled water at room temperature. The CARS signals from the broad OH-stretching modes between 3100 cm-1 and 3700 cm-1 were obtained and analyzed. The dephasing times of four Raman modes in water were detected and compared.

  5. Temperature induced changes in resonance Raman spectra intensity of all-trans-β-carotene: Changes in the fundamental, combination and overtone modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyuan; Xu, Shengnan; Li, Zuowei; Wang, Mengzhou; Sun, Chenglin

    2014-10-01

    The resonance Raman spectra of the fundamental, combination and overtone modes around the Csbnd C and Cdbnd C stretches of all-trans-β-carotene in 1,2-dichloroethane solution are obtained from the 293 K to 83 K temperature range. The results indicate that the intensity of the fundamentals in the liquid and solid phases generally increases as the temperature decreases, except for the liquid-solid phase transition, which exhibits a decreasing trend. The Raman intensities ratio between the fundamentals υ1 and υ2, combinations (overtones) and the fundamentals both increases with decreasing temperature. The Raman bandwidths of the Cdbnd C bonds gradually become narrow as the temperature decreases. These varieties of relative intensity are analyzed using the coherent weakly damped electron-lattice vibration mode, the effective conjugation length mode as well as the theory of electron-phonon interaction in this work.

  6. Studies of Minerals, Organic and Biogenic Materials through Time-Resolved Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Ismail, Syed; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Nyugen, Trac; Elsayed-Ali, hani

    2009-01-01

    A compact remote Raman spectroscopy system was developed at NASA Langley Research center and was previously demonstrated for its ability to identify chemical composition of various rocks and minerals. In this study, the Raman sensor was utilized to perform time-resolved Raman studies of various samples such as minerals and rocks, Azalea leaves and a few fossil samples. The Raman sensor utilizes a pulsed 532 nm Nd:YAG laser as excitation source, a 4-inch telescope to collect the Raman-scattered signal from a sample several meters away, a spectrograph equipped with a holographic grating, and a gated intensified CCD (ICCD) camera system. Time resolved Raman measurements were carried out by varying the gate delay with fixed short gate width of the ICCD camera, allowing measurement of both Raman signals and fluorescence signals. Rocks and mineral samples were characterized including marble, which contain CaCO3. Analysis of the results reveals the short (approx.10-13 s) lifetime of the Raman process, and shows that Raman spectra of some mineral samples contain fluorescence emission due to organic impurities. Also analyzed were a green (pristine) and a yellow (decayed) sample of Gardenia leaves. It was observed that the fluorescence signals from the green and yellow leaf samples showed stronger signals compared to the Raman lines. Moreover, it was also observed that the fluorescence of the green leaf was more intense and had a shorter lifetime than that of the yellow leaf. For the fossil samples, Raman shifted lines could not be observed due the presence of very strong short-lived fluorescence.

  7. A combined Raman lidar for low tropospheric studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arshinov, Y. F.; Bobrovnikov, S. M.; Zuev, V. E.; Nadeev, A. I.; Shelevoy, K. D.

    1986-01-01

    One of the main goals of laser sensing of the atmosphere was the development of techniques and facilities for remote determination of atmospheric meteorological and optical parameters. Of lidar techniques known at present the Raman-lidar technique occupies a specific place. On the one hand Raman lidar returns due to scattering on different molecular species are very simple for interpretation and for extracting the information on the atmospheric parameters sought, but, on the other hand, the performance of these techniques in a lidar facility is overburdened with some serious technical difficulties due to extremely low cross sections of Raman effect. Some results of investigations into this problem is presented which enables the construction of a combined Raman lidar capable of acquiring simultaneously the profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity, and some optical characteristics in the ground atmospheric layer up to 1 km height. The operation of this system is briefly discussed.

  8. The pH dependent Raman spectroscopic study of caffeine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Gu, Huaimin; Zhong, Liang; Hu, Yongjun; Liu, Fang

    2011-02-01

    First of all the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and normal Raman spectra of caffeine aqueous solution were obtained at different pH values. In order to obtain the detailed vibrational assignments of the Raman spectroscopy, the geometry of caffeine molecule was optimized by density functional theory (DFT) calculation. By comparing the SERS of caffeine with its normal spectra at different pH values; it is concluded that pH value can dramatically affect the SERS of caffeine, but barely affect the normal Raman spectrum of caffeine aqueous solution. It can essentially affect the reorientation of caffeine molecule to the Ag colloid surface, but cannot impact the vibration of functional groups and chemical bonds in caffeine molecule.

  9. Comparative study of mobile Raman instrumentation for art analysis.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, P; Castro, K; Hargreaves, M; Moens, L; Madariaga, J M; Edwards, H G M

    2007-04-01

    In archaeometry, one of the main concerns is to extract information from an art object, without damaging it. Raman spectroscopy is being applied in this research field with recent developments in mobile instrumentation facilitating more routine analysis. This research paper evaluates the performances of five mobile Raman instruments (Renishaw RA100, Renishaw Portable Raman Analyser RX210, Ocean Optics RSL-1, Delta Nu Inspector Raman, Mobile Art Analyser--MArtA) in three different laboratories. A set of samples were collected, in order to obtain information on the spectral performances of the instruments including: spectral resolution, calibration, laser cut-off, the ability to record spectra of organic and inorganic pigments through varnish layers and on the possibilities to identify biomaterials. Spectra were recorded from predefined regions on a canvas painting to simulate the investigation of artworks and the capabilities to record spectra from hardly accessible areas was evaluated. PMID:17386799

  10. Sensitive Trimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering-Fluorescence Detection of Cancer Cells with Stable Magneto-Plasmonic Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Carrouée, Ambre; Allard-Vannier, Emilie; Même, Sandra; Szeremeta, Frederic; Beloeil, Jean-Claude; Chourpa, Igor

    2015-11-17

    Novel magneto-plasmonic nanoprobes were designed for multimodal diagnosis of cancer by combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS), and fluorescence emission in the very near infrared (VNIR). A controlled electrostatic assembly of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), VNIR dye Nile Blue (NB), and biopolymer chitosan (Chi) was used to formulate the AgIONs-Chi nanoprobes. The formulation protocol did not involve organic solvents and was rapid and efficient as confirmed by magnetic sorting. The SERRS response of the nanoprobes was very intense and constant for days. It decreased linearly upon 1000-fold dilution and was still recognizable at 0.1 nM NB concentration. After 30 days of storage, the SERRS loss was less than 30% and the hydrodynamic size of the AgIONs-Chi in PBS remained below 200 nm. The gradual decrease of the ratio SERRS/fluorescence allowed one to monitor the release of the fluorescent molecule upon long-term nanoprobe dissociation. The AgIONs-Chi exhibited 2-fold higher MRI contrast than that of commercially available SPION suspensions. Finally, the nanoprobes were actively uptaken by HeLa cancer cells and ensured trimodal MRI-SERRS-fluorescence detection of 10 μL cell inclusions in cm-sized agarose gels used here as phantom models of microtumors. The above results show that the magneto-plasmonic AgIONs-Chi are promising substrates for SERRS analysis in solution and for multimodal imaging of cancer cells. PMID:26488315

  11. Studying the distribution of deep Raman spectroscopy signals using liquid tissue phantoms with varying optical properties.

    PubMed

    Vardaki, Martha Z; Gardner, Benjamin; Stone, Nicholas; Matousek, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    In this study we employed large volume liquid tissue phantoms, consisting of a scattering agent (Intralipid), an absorption agent (Indian ink) and a synthesized calcification powder (calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP)) similar to that found in cancerous tissues (e.g. breast and prostate), to simulate human tissues. We studied experimentally the magnitude and origin of Raman signals in a transmission Raman geometry as a function of optical properties of the medium and the location of calcifications within the phantom. The goal was to inform the development of future noninvasive cancer screening applications in vivo. The results provide insight into light propagation and Raman scattering distribution in deep Raman measurements, exploring also the effect of the variation of relative absorbance of laser and Raman photons within the phantoms. Most notably when modeling breast and prostate tissues it follows that maximum signals is obtained from the front and back faces of the tissue with the central region contributing less to the measured spectrum.

  12. Raman study of aluminum speciation in simulated alkaline nuclear waste.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Cliff T; Agnew, Stephen F; Schoonover, Jon R; Kenney, John W; Page, Bobbi; Osborn, Jill; Corbin, Rob

    2002-06-01

    The chemistry of concentrated sodium aluminate solutions stored in many of the large, underground storage tanks containing high-level waste (HLW) at the Hanford and Savannah River Nuclear Reservations is an area of recent research interest. Not only is the presence of aluminate in solution important for continued safe storage of these wastes, the nature of both solid and solution aluminum oxyhydroxides is important for waste pretreatment. Moreover, for many tanks that have leaked high aluminum waste in the past, little is known about the speciation of Al in the soil. In this study, Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate the speciation of the aqueous species in the Al2O3-Na2O-H2O system over a wide range of solution compositions and hydration. A ternary phase diagram has been used to correlate the observed changes in the spectra with the composition of the solution and with dimerization of aluminate that occurs at elevated aluminate concentrations (>1.5 M). Dimerization is evidenced by growth of new Al-O stretching bands at 535 and 695 cm(-1) at the expense of the aluminate monomer band at 620 cm(-1). The spectrum of water was strongly influenced by the high concentrations of Na+ and OH- (>17 M). Upon increasing the concentration of NaOH in solution, the delta-(H-O-H) bending band of water (v2 mode) increased in frequency to 1663 cm(-1), indicating that the water contained in the concentrated caustic solution was more strongly hydrogen bonded at the higher base content. In addition, the sharp, well-resolved band at 3610 cm(-1), assigned to the v(O-H) of free OH-, increased in intensity with increasing NaOH. Analysis of the v(O-H) bands in the 3800-2600 cm(-1) region supported the overall increase in hydrogen bonding as evidenced by the increase in relative intensity of a strongly hydrated water band at 3118 cm(-1). Taking into consideration the activity of water, the molar concentrations of the monomeric and dimeric aluminate species were estimated using

  13. Ionic strength dependence of cytochrome c structure and Trp-59 H/D exchange from ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, G Y; Grygon, C A; Spiro, T G

    1989-06-13

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra are reported for cytochrome c (cyt c) in FeII and FeIII oxidation states at low (0.005 M) and high (0.9-1.5 M) ionic strength. With 200-nm excitation the amide band intensities are shown to remain constant, establishing that redox state and ionic strength have no influence on the alpha-helical content. The tyrosine 830/850-cm-1 doublet, however, shows a loss in 830-cm-1 intensity at I = 0.005 M for the FeIII protein, suggesting a weakening or a loss of H-bonding from an internal tyrosine, probably Tyr-48, which is H-bonded to a heme propionate group in cyt c crystals. Excitation profiles of tryptophan peak at approximately 229 nm for both FeII and FeIII forms of cyt c, but at approximately 218 nm for aqueous tryptophan. The approximately 2200-cm-1 red shift of the resonant electronic transition is attributed to the Trp-59 residue being buried and H-bonded. Consistent with this Trp environment, the H-bond-sensitive 877-cm-1 Trp band is strong and sharp, and the 1357/1341-cm-1 doublet has a large intensity ratio, approximately 1.5, for both FeII and FeIII cyt c. The 877-cm-1-band frequency shifts to 860 cm-1 when the Trp indole proton is replaced by a deuteron. This band was used to show that Trp H/D exchange in D2O is much faster for FeIII than FeII cyt c. The half-time for exchange at room temperature is estimated to be approximately 30 and approximately 5 h, respectively, for FeII and FeIII when examined at I = 0.005.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Raman spectroscopy as a versatile tool for studying the properties of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Andrea C.; Basko, Denis M.

    2013-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an integral part of graphene research. It is used to determine the number and orientation of layers, the quality and types of edge, and the effects of perturbations, such as electric and magnetic fields, strain, doping, disorder and functional groups. This, in turn, provides insight into all sp2-bonded carbon allotropes, because graphene is their fundamental building block. Here we review the state of the art, future directions and open questions in Raman spectroscopy of graphene. We describe essential physical processes whose importance has only recently been recognized, such as the various types of resonance at play, and the role of quantum interference. We update all basic concepts and notations, and propose a terminology that is able to describe any result in literature. We finally highlight the potential of Raman spectroscopy for layered materials other than graphene.

  15. Qualitative study of ethanol content in tequilas by Raman spectroscopy and principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frausto-Reyes, C.; Medina-Gutiérrez, C.; Sato-Berrú, R.; Sahagún, L. R.

    2005-09-01

    Using Raman spectroscopy, with an excitation radiation source of 514.5 nm, and principal component analysis (PCA) was elaborated a method to study qualitatively the ethanol content in tequila samples. This method is based in the OH region profile (water) of the Raman spectra. Also, this method, using the fluorescence background of the Raman spectra, can be used to distinguish silver tequila from aged tequilas. The first three PCs of the Raman spectra, that provide the 99% of the total variance of the data set, were used for the samples classification. The PCA1 and PCA2 are related with the water (or ethanol) content of the sample, whereas the PCA3 is related with the fluorescence background of the Raman spectra.

  16. Raman spectroscopy in the study of normal and pathological tissue structure and of prosthetic material biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoluzza, Alessandro; Fagnano, C.; Tinti, A.; Mancini, S.; Caramazza, R.; Marchetti, P. G.; Maggi, G.

    1993-06-01

    Vibrational Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful tool for biomedical applications such as the molecular characterization of normal and pathological tissues as well as the evaluation of prosthetic material bicompatibility. This work deals with the applications of Raman spectroscopy to the study of ocular tissues (lens, cornea, vitreous humour), the respective prosthetic biomaterials, bone tissue, and the main biomaterials used in the prosthetic surgery of bone. In particular the Raman spectra of the cornea in different conditions, of vitreous humour, and of pathological bone are reported and discussed. The Raman spectrum of air dried cornea suggests that the tissue is made up almost entirely of collagen. The spectra of normal and pathological bone tissues indicate that pathological bone has a more minor phosphate content than normal bone and some modifications are also observed for the amide III components. Moreover, the Raman spectrum of an arthroplastic bone before defatting suggests a substitution of phosphate with carbonate ions.

  17. Qualitative study of ethanol content in tequilas by Raman spectroscopy and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Frausto-Reyes, C; Medina-Gutiérrez, C; Sato-Berrú, R; Sahagún, L R

    2005-09-01

    Using Raman spectroscopy, with an excitation radiation source of 514.5 nm, and principal component analysis (PCA) was elaborated a method to study qualitatively the ethanol content in tequila samples. This method is based in the OH region profile (water) of the Raman spectra. Also, this method, using the fluorescence background of the Raman spectra, can be used to distinguish silver tequila from aged tequilas. The first three PCs of the Raman spectra, that provide the 99% of the total variance of the data set, were used for the samples classification. The PCA1 and PCA2 are related with the water (or ethanol) content of the sample, whereas the PCA3 is related with the fluorescence background of the Raman spectra.

  18. Structure of the retinal chromophore in the hR/sub L/ intermediate of halorhodopsin from resonance raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, S.P.A.; Bogomolni, R.A.; Mathies, R.A.

    1987-10-20

    Time-resolved resonance Raman spectra of the hR/sub L/ intermediate of halorhodopsin have been obtained. The structurally sensitive fingerprint region of the hR/sub L/ spectrum is very similar to that of bacteriorhodospin's L/sub 550/ intermediate, which is known to have a 13-cis configuration. This indicates that hR/sub L/ contains a 13-cis chromophore and that an all-trans ..-->.. 13-cis isomerization occurs in the halorhodopsin photocycle.hR/sub L/ exhibits a Schiff base stretching mode at 1644 cm/sup -1/, which shifts to 1620 cm/sup -1/ in D/sub 2/O. This demonstrates that the Schiff base linkage to the protein is protonated. The insensitivity of the C-C stretching mode frequencies to N-deuteriation suggests that the Schiff base configuration is anti. The 24 cm/sup -1/ shift of the Schiff base mode in D/sub 2/O indicates that the Schiff base proton in hR/sub L/ has a stronger hydrogen-bonding interaction with the protein than does hR/sub 578/.

  19. Anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering for atom specific and excited state selective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Josefsson, Ida; Rajkovic, Ivan; Schreck, Simon; Quevedo, Wilson; Beye, Martin; Grübel, Sebastian; Scholz, Mirko; Nordlund, Dennis; Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Kennedy, Brian; Hennies, Franz; Techert, Simone; Wernet, Philippe; Odelius, Michael; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Ultrafast electronic and structural dynamics of matter govern rate and selectivity of chemical reactions, as well as phase transitions and efficient switching in functional materials. Since x-rays determine electronic and structural properties with elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity, short pulse x-ray sources have become central enablers of ultrafast science. Despite of these strengths, ultrafast x-rays have been poor at picking up excited state moieties from the unexcited ones. With time-resolved anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering (AS-RXRS) performed at the LCLS, and ab initio theory we establish background free excited state selectivity in addition to the elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity of x-rays. This unparalleled selectivity extracts low concentration excited state species along the pathway of photo induced ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 in ethanol. Conceptually a full theoretical treatment of all accessible insights to excited state dynamics with AS-RXRS with transform-limited x-ray pulses is given—which will be covered experimentally by upcoming transform-limited x-ray sources.

  20. Detection of DNA Sequences Refractory to PCR Amplification Using a Biophysical SERRS Assay (Surface Enhanced Resonant Raman Spectroscopy)

    PubMed Central

    Feuillie, Cécile; Merheb, Maxime M.; Gillet, Benjamin; Montagnac, Gilles; Daniel, Isabelle; Hänni, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of ancient or processed DNA samples is often a great challenge, because traditional Polymerase Chain Reaction – based amplification is impeded by DNA damage. Blocking lesions such as abasic sites are known to block the bypass of DNA polymerases, thus stopping primer elongation. In the present work, we applied the SERRS-hybridization assay, a fully non-enzymatic method, to the detection of DNA refractory to PCR amplification. This method combines specific hybridization with detection by Surface Enhanced Resonant Raman Scattering (SERRS). It allows the detection of a series of double-stranded DNA molecules containing a varying number of abasic sites on both strands, when PCR failed to detect the most degraded sequences. Our SERRS approach can quickly detect DNA molecules without any need for DNA repair. This assay could be applied as a pre-requisite analysis prior to enzymatic reparation or amplification. A whole new set of samples, both forensic and archaeological, could then deliver information that was not yet available due to a high degree of DNA damage. PMID:25502338