Science.gov

Sample records for resonance transition 795-nm

  1. Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795-nm rubidium laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S Q; Soules, T F; Page, R H; Mitchell, S C; Kanz, V K; Beach, R J

    2008-01-09

    An optical resonance transition rubidium laser (5{sup 2}P{sub 1/2} {yields} 5{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}) is demonstrated with a hydrocarbon-free buffer gas. Prior demonstrations of alkali resonance transition lasers have used ethane as either the buffer gas or a buffer gas component to promote rapid fine-structure mixing. However, our experience suggests that the alkali vapor reacts with the ethane producing carbon as one of the reaction products. This degrades long term laser reliability. Our recent experimental results with a 'clean' helium-only buffer gas system pumped by a Ti:sapphire laser demonstrate all the advantages of the original alkali laser system, but without the reliability issues associated with the use of ethane.

  2. Resonance transition 795-nm Rubidium laser using 3He buffer gas

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S S; Soules, T F; Page, R H; Mitchell, S C; Kanz, V K; Beach, R J

    2007-08-02

    We report the first demonstration of a 795-nm Rubidium resonance transition laser using a buffer gas consisting of pure {sup 3}He. This follows our recent demonstration of a hydrocarbon-free 795-nm Rubidium resonance laser which used naturally-occurring He as the buffer gas. Using He gas that is isotopically enriched with {sup 3}He yields enhanced mixing of the Rb fine-structure levels. This enables efficient lasing at reduced He buffer gas pressure, improving thermal management in high average power Rb lasers and enhancing the power scaling potential of such systems.

  3. Developments toward a reliable diode-pumped hydrocarbon-free 795-nm rubidium laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S S; Soules, T F; Page, R H; Mitchell, S C; Kanz, V K; Beach, R J

    2008-05-07

    We report a 795-nm diode-pumpable Rb laser using a buffer gas of pure {sup 3}He. {sup 3}He gas enhances mixing of the Rb fine-structure levels. This enables efficient lasing at reduced He pressures and improved thermal management.

  4. Nucleon Resonance Transition Form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker D.; Mokeev, Viktor I.; Aznauryan, Inna G.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss recent results from CLAS on electromagnetic resonance transition amplitudes and their dependence on the distance scale (Q2). From the comparison of these results with most advanced theoretical calculations within QCD-based approaches there is clear evidence that meson-baryon contributions are present and important at large distances, i.e. small Q2, and that quark core contributions dominate the short distance behavior.

  5. Electromagnetic Transition Form Factors of Nucleon Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2008-10-13

    Recent measurements of nucleon resonance transition form factors with CLAS at Jefferson Lab are discussed. The new data resolve a long-standing puzzle of the nature of the Roper resonance, and confirm the assertion of the symmetric constituent quark model of the Roper as the first radial excitation of the nucleon. The data on high Q{sup 2} n{pi}{sup +} production confirm the slow fall off of the S{sub 11}(1535) transition form factor with Q{sup 2}, and better constrain the branching ratios {beta}{sub N{pi}} = 0.50 and {beta}{sub N{eta}} = 0.45. For the first time, the longitudinal transition amplitude to the S{sub 11}(1535) was extracted from the n{pi}{sup +} data. Also, new results on the transition amplitudes for the D{sub 13}(1520) resonance are presented showing a rapid transition from helicity 3/2 dominance seen at the real photon point to helicty 1/2 dominance at higher Q{sup 2}.

  6. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  7. Dynamics and Transit Variations of Resonant Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David

    2016-06-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) are deviations of the measured midtransit times from the exact periodicity. One of the most interesting causes of TTVs is the gravitational interaction between planets. Here we consider a case of two planets in a mean motion resonance (orbital periods in a ratio of small integers). This case is important because the resonant interaction can amplify the TTV effect and allow planets to be detected more easily. We develop an analytic model of the resonant dynamics valid for small orbital eccentricities and use it to derive the principal TTV terms. We find that a resonant system should show TTV terms with two basic periods (and their harmonics). The resonant TTV period is proportional (m/M *)-2/3, where m and M * are the planetary and stellar masses. For m = 10-4 M *, for example, the TTV period exceeds the orbital period by about two orders of magnitude. The amplitude of the resonant TTV terms scales linearly with the libration amplitude. The ratio of the TTV amplitudes of two resonant planets is inversely proportional to the ratio of their masses. These and other relationships discussed in the main text can be used to aid the interpretation of TTV observations.

  8. Resonant transition-based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chen-Fu; Hsieh, Chang-Yu

    2017-05-01

    In this article we assess a novel quantum computation paradigm based on the resonant transition (RT) phenomenon commonly associated with atomic and molecular systems. We thoroughly analyze the intimate connections between the RT-based quantum computation and the well-established adiabatic quantum computation (AQC). Both quantum computing frameworks encode solutions to computational problems in the spectral properties of a Hamiltonian and rely on the quantum dynamics to obtain the desired output state. We discuss how one can adapt any adiabatic quantum algorithm to a corresponding RT version and the two approaches are limited by different aspects of Hamiltonians' spectra. The RT approach provides a compelling alternative to the AQC under various circumstances. To better illustrate the usefulness of the novel framework, we analyze the time complexity of an algorithm for 3-SAT problems and discuss straightforward methods to fine tune its efficiency.

  9. The {Delta}(1232) resonance transition form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Staurt, L.M. |; Bosted, P.E.; Lung, A.

    1993-08-01

    Old and new measurements of inclusive e--p cross sections in the {Delta}(1232) resonance region have been combined, and a global data fit has been made. Using this fit to parameterize the nonresonant background, the transition form factors have been extracted out to a four-momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}, of 9.8 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The results are systematically higher than those from a previous analysis, but agree within errors. A similar analysis has been done with e--d cross sections, and {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} in the {Delta}(1232) resonance region has been extracted out to a Q{sup 2} of 7.9 (GeV/c){sup 2}. {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} for {Delta}(1232) production is consistent with unity, while {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} for the nonresonant background is constant with Q{sup 2} at approximately 0.4.

  10. Coherent control through near-resonant Raman transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Xingcan; Lerch, Eliza-Beth W.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2006-02-15

    The phase of an electronic wave function is shown to play an important role in coherent control experiments. By using a pulse shaping system with a femtosecond laser, we explore the phase relationships among resonant and off-resonant Raman transitions in Li{sub 2} by measuring the phases of the resulting wave packets, or quantum beats. Specific pixels in a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator are used to isolate the resonant and off-resonant portions of the Raman transitions in Li{sub 2}. The off-resonant Raman transitions have an approximately 90 degree sign phase shift with respect to the resonant Raman transition, and there is an approximately 180 degree sign phase shift between the blue-detuned and the red-detuned off-resonant Raman transitions. Calculations using second-order time-dependent perturbation theory for the electronic transitions agree with the experimental results for the laser pulse intensities used here. Interferences between the off-resonant Raman transitions as a function of detuning are used to demonstrate coherent control of the Raman quantum wave packet.

  11. Resonance transition radiation X-ray laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Piestrup, Melvin A.

    1991-01-01

    A free electron laser is proposed using a periodic dielectric and helical magnetic field. Periodic synchronism between the electrons and the optical wave is obtained at the period of the dielectric and not at the period of the helical magnetic field. The synchronism condition and the gain of the new device are derived. The effects on the gain from dephasing and beam expansion due to elastic scattering of the electrons in the periodic medium are included in the gain calculation. Examples of the resonance transition radiation laser and klystron are given. Operation at photon energies between 2.5 and 3.5 keV with net gain up to 12 percent is feasible using high electron-beam energies of 3 and 5 GeV. Moderate (300-MeV) beam energy allows operation between 80 to 110 eV with up to 57 percent net gain using a klystron design. In both cases, rapid foil heating may limit operation to a single electron-beam pulse.

  12. Improved Tracking of an Atomic-Clock Resonance Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang K.; Tu, Meirong

    2010-01-01

    An improved method of making an electronic oscillator track the frequency of an atomic-clock resonance transition is based on fitting a theoretical nonlinear curve to measurements at three oscillator frequencies within the operational frequency band of the transition (in other words, at three points within the resonance peak). In the measurement process, the frequency of a microwave oscillator is repeatedly set at various offsets from the nominal resonance frequency, the oscillator signal is applied in a square pulse of the oscillator signal having a suitable duration (typically, of the order of a second), and, for each pulse at each frequency offset, fluorescence photons of the transition in question are counted. As described below, the counts are used to determine a new nominal resonance frequency. Thereafter, offsets are determined with respect to the new resonance frequency. The process as described thus far is repeated so as to repeatedly adjust the oscillator to track the most recent estimate of the nominal resonance frequency.

  13. Modulation of Attosecond Beating by Resonant Two-Photon Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Galán, Álvaro; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    We present an analytical model that characterizes two-photon transitions in the presence of autoionising states. We applied this model to interpret resonant RABITT spectra, and show that, as a harmonic traverses a resonance, the phase of the sideband beating significantly varies with photon energy. This phase variation is generally very different from the π jump observed in previous works, in which the direct path contribution was negligible. We illustrate the possible phase profiles arising in resonant two-photon transitions with an intuitive geometrical representation.

  14. Resonant Auger for the detection of quadrupolar transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Danger, J.; Le Fevre, P.; Chandesris, D.; Magnan, H.; Jupille, J.; Bourgeois, S.; Eickhoff, T.; Drube, W.

    2003-01-24

    Quadrupolar transitions can play an important role in X-ray absorption spectroscopy, especially when it is used for magnetic measurements, like in X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism or Resonant Magnetic Scattering. We show here that resonantly excited Ti KL2,3L2,3 Auger spectra of TiO2 (110) carry a clear signature of quadrupolar transitions from the 1s to localized eg and t2g d-like states. The quadrupolar nature of the observed additional spectator lines are clearly demonstrated by their angular dependence, and their intensity is used to locate and quantify the quadrupolar transitions in the absorption spectrum.

  15. Modeling Developmental Transitions in Adaptive Resonance Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raijmakers, Maartje E. J.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2004-01-01

    Neural networks are applied to a theoretical subject in developmental psychology: modeling developmental transitions. Two issues that are involved will be discussed: discontinuities and acquiring qualitatively new knowledge. We will argue that by the appearance of a bifurcation, a neural network can show discontinuities and may acquire…

  16. Modeling Developmental Transitions in Adaptive Resonance Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raijmakers, Maartje E. J.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2004-01-01

    Neural networks are applied to a theoretical subject in developmental psychology: modeling developmental transitions. Two issues that are involved will be discussed: discontinuities and acquiring qualitatively new knowledge. We will argue that by the appearance of a bifurcation, a neural network can show discontinuities and may acquire…

  17. Transit Timing Variations of Resonant Three-planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libert, Anne-Sophie; Renner, S.

    2012-10-01

    The transit timing variations (TTV) method is a powerful technique to infer the existence of additional non-transiting planets. This is especially the case for resonant systems where the variations can be strongly enhanced. Here we focus on resonant 3-planet systems and assume that the inner body transits the star. We show that the TTV curve exhibits three periodicities related to the resonant evolution of the system. We perform a dynamical study for different mass values of the three planets, with a special attention to the detection of terrestrial planets. A very interesting result is that the existence of two terrestrial companions can be deduced from the TTV curve only. We also highlight the degeneracy in the characterization of non-transiting planets: a system of two giant planets in mean-motion resonance can hide a third terrestrial planet in a multi-resonant configuration. The work of A-S L is supported by an F.R.S.-FNRS Postdoctoral Research Fellowship.

  18. Transition representations of quantum evolution with application to scattering resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Y.

    2011-03-15

    A Lyapunov operator is a self-adjoint quantum observable whose expectation value varies monotonically as time increases and may serve as a marker for the flow of time in a quantum system. In this paper it is shown that the existence of a certain type of Lyapunov operator leads to representations of the quantum dynamics, termed transition representations, in which an evolving quantum state {psi}(t) is decomposed into a sum {psi}(t) ={psi}{sup b}(t) +{psi}{sup f}(t) of a backward asymptotic component and a forward asymptotic component such that the evolution process is represented as a transition from {psi}{sup b}(t) to {psi}{sup f}(t). When applied to the evolution of scattering resonances, such transition representations separate the process of decay of a scattering resonance from the evolution of outgoing waves corresponding to the probability 'released' by the resonance and carried away to spatial infinity. This separation property clearly exhibits the spatial probability distribution profile of a resonance. Moreover, it leads to the definition of exact resonance states as elements of the physical Hilbert space corresponding to the scattering problem. These resonance states evolve naturally according to a semigroup law of evolution.

  19. Disorder-induced transitions in resonantly driven Floquet topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titum, Paraj; Lindner, Netanel H.; Refael, Gil

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effects of disorder in Floquet topological insulators (FTIs) occurring in semiconductor quantum wells. Such FTIs are induced by resonantly driving a transition between the valence and conduction bands. We show that when disorder is added, the topological nature of such FTIs persists as long as there is a mobility gap at the resonant quasienergy. For strong enough disorder, this gap closes and all the states become localized as the system undergoes a transition to a trivial insulator. Interestingly, the effects of disorder are not necessarily adverse: we show that in the same quantum well, disorder can also induce a transition from a trivial to a topological system, thereby establishing a Floquet topological Anderson insulator (FTAI). We identify the conditions on the driving field necessary for observing such a transition.

  20. A resonant chain of four transiting, sub-Neptune planets.

    PubMed

    Mills, Sean M; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Migaszewski, Cezary; Ford, Eric B; Petigura, Erik; Isaacson, Howard

    2016-05-26

    Surveys have revealed many multi-planet systems containing super-Earths and Neptunes in orbits of a few days to a few months. There is debate whether in situ assembly or inward migration is the dominant mechanism of the formation of such planetary systems. Simulations suggest that migration creates tightly packed systems with planets whose orbital periods may be expressed as ratios of small integers (resonances), often in a many-planet series (chain). In the hundreds of multi-planet systems of sub-Neptunes, more planet pairs are observed near resonances than would generally be expected, but no individual system has hitherto been identified that must have been formed by migration. Proximity to resonance enables the detection of planets perturbing each other. Here we report transit timing variations of the four planets in the Kepler-223 system, model these variations as resonant-angle librations, and compute the long-term stability of the resonant chain. The architecture of Kepler-223 is too finely tuned to have been formed by scattering, and our numerical simulations demonstrate that its properties are natural outcomes of the migration hypothesis. Similar systems could be destabilized by any of several mechanisms, contributing to the observed orbital-period distribution, where many planets are not in resonances. Planetesimal interactions in particular are thought to be responsible for establishing the current orbits of the four giant planets in the Solar System by disrupting a theoretical initial resonant chain similar to that observed in Kepler-223.

  1. Isotropically sensitive optical filter employing atomic resonance transitions

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1981-01-01

    An ultra-high Q isotropically sensitive optical filter or optical detector employing atomic resonance transitions. More specifically, atomic resonance transitions utilized in conjunction with two optical bandpass filters provide an optical detector having a wide field of view (.about.2.pi. steradians) and very narrow acceptance bandwidth approaching 0.01 A. A light signal to be detected is transmitted through an outer bandpass filter into a resonantly absorbing atomic vapor, the excited atomic vapor then providing a fluorescence signal at a different wavelength which is transmitted through an inner bandpass filter. The outer and inner bandpass filters have no common transmission band, thereby resulting in complete blockage of all optical signals that are not resonantly shifted in wavelength by the intervening atomic vapor. Two embodiments are disclosed, one in which the light signal raises atoms contained in the atomic vapor from the ground state to an excited state from which fluorescence occurs, and the other in which a pump laser is used to raise the atoms in the ground state to a first excited state from which the light signal then is resonantly absorbed, thereby raising the atoms to a second excited state from which fluorescence occurs. A specific application is described in which an optical detector according to the present invention can be used as an underwater detector for light from an optical transmitter which could be located in an orbiting satellite.

  2. Isotropically sensitive optical filter employing atomic resonance transitions

    DOEpatents

    Marling, J.B.

    An ultra-high Q isotropically sensitive optical filter or optical detector is disclosed employing atomic resonance transitions. More specifically, atomic resonance transitions utilized in conjunction with two optical bandpass filters provide an optical detector having a wide field of view (approx. 2 ..pi.. steradians) and very narrow acceptance bandwidth approaching 0.01A. A light signal to be detected is transmitted through an outer bandpass filter into a resonantly absorbing atomic vapor, the excited atomic vapor than providing a fluorescence signal at a different wavelength which is transmitted through an inner bandpass filters have no common transmission band, therby resulting in complete blockage of all optical signals that are not resonantly shifted in wavelength by the intervening atomic vapor. Two embodiments are disclosed, one in which the light signal raises atoms contained in the atomic vapor from the ground state to an excited state from which fluorescence occurs, and the other in which a pump laser is used to raise the atoms in the ground state to a first excited state from which the light signal then is resonantly absorbed, thereby raising the atoms to a second excited state from which fluorescence occurs. A specific application is described in which an optical detector according to the present invention can be located in an orbiting satellite.

  3. Resonant Ultrasound Studies of Complex Transition Metal Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Henry Bass; Dr. J. R. Gladden

    2008-08-18

    Department of Energy EPSCoR The University of Mississippi Award: DE-FG02-04ER46121 Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy Studies of Complex Transition Metal Oxides The central thrust of this DOE funded research program has been to apply resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS), an elegant and efficient method for determining the elastic stiffness constants of a crystal, to the complex and poorly understood class of materials known as transition metal oxides (TMOs). Perhaps the most interesting and challenging feature of TMOs is their strongly correlated behavior in which spin, lattice, and charge degrees of freedom are strongly coupled. Elastic constants are a measure of the interatomic potentials in a crystal and are thus sensitive probes into the atomic environment. This sensitivity makes RUS an ideal tool to study the coupling of phase transition order parameters to lattice strains. The most significant result of the project has been the construction of a high temperature RUS apparatus capable of making elastic constant measurements at temperatures as high as 1000 degrees Celsius. We have designed and built novel acoustic transducers which can operate as high as 600 degrees Celsius based on lithium niobate piezoelectric elements. For measurement between 600 to 1000 C, a buffer rod system is used in which the samples under test and transducers are separated by a rod with low acoustic attenuation. The high temperature RUS system has been used to study the charge order (CO) transition in transition metal oxides for which we have discovered a new transition occurring about 35 C below the CO transition. While the CO transition exhibits a linear coupling between the strain and order parameter, this new precursor transition shows a different coupling indicating a fundamentally different mechanism. We have also begun a study, in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, to study novel thermoelectric materials at elevated temperatures. These materials include silicon

  4. Superfluidity and phase transitions in a resonant Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Radzihovsky, Leo; Weichman, Peter B.; Park, Jae I.

    2008-10-15

    The atomic Bose gas is studied across a Feshbach resonance, mapping out its phase diagram, and computing its thermodynamics and excitation spectra. It is shown that such a degenerate gas admits two distinct atomic and molecular superfluid phases, with the latter distinguished by the absence of atomic off-diagonal long-range order, gapped atomic excitations, and deconfined atomic {pi}-vortices. The properties of the molecular superfluid are explored, and it is shown that across a Feshbach resonance it undergoes a quantum Ising transition to the atomic superfluid, where both atoms and molecules are condensed. In addition to its distinct thermodynamic signatures and deconfined half-vortices, in a trap a molecular superfluid should be identifiable by the absence of an atomic condensate peak and the presence of a molecular one.

  5. Classical theory of resonant transition radiation in multilayer structures.

    PubMed

    Pardo, B; André, J M

    2001-01-01

    A rigorous classical electromagnetic theory of the transition radiation in finite and infinite multilayer structures is presented. It makes the standard results of thin-film optics, such as the matrix formalism, accountable; it allows thus an exact treatment of the propagation of the waves induced by the electron. This method is applied to the particular case of the periodic structures to treat the resonant transition radiation (RTR). It is noted that the present theory gives, in the hard x-ray domain, results previously published. The reason for this approach is to make the numerical calculations rigorous and easy. The numerical results of our theory are compared to experimental RTR data obtained recently by Yamada et al. [Phys. Rev. A 59, 3673 (1999)] with a nickel-carbon multilayer structure.

  6. Two-photon photocurrent autocorrelation using intersubband transitions at nearly-resonant excitation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Harald; Maier, Thomas; Liu, H C; Walther, Martin

    2008-02-04

    We investigate nonlinear mid-infrared detection via two-photon transitions involving two bound subbands and one continuum resonance in an n-type multiple quantum well. By varying the excitation energy, we have tuned the two-photon transition from resonant, yielding optimum resonant enhancement with a real intermediate state, to nearly-resonant, with a virtual but resonantly enhanced intermediate state. For autocorrelation purposes, the latter configuration improves time resolution whilst partially retaining a resonant enhancement of the two-photon transition strength.

  7. Control of photoemission delay in resonant two-photon transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenti, L.; Jiménez-Galán, Á.; Caillat, J.; Taïeb, R.; Maquet, A.; Martín, F.

    2017-04-01

    The photoelectron emission time delay τ associated with one-photon absorption, which coincides with half the Wigner delay τW experienced by an electron scattered off the ionic potential, is a fundamental descriptor of the photoelectric effect. Although it is hard to access directly from experiment, it is possible to infer it from the time delay of two-photon transitions, τ(2 ), measured with attosecond pump-probe schemes, provided that the contribution of the probe stage can be factored out. In the absence of resonances, τ can be expressed as the energy derivative of the one-photon ionization amplitude phase, τ =∂EargDE g , and, to a good approximation, τ =τ(2 )-τcc , where τcc is associated with the dipole transition between Coulomb functions. Here we show that, in the presence of a resonance, the correspondence between τ and ∂EargDE g is lost. Furthermore, while τ(2 ) can still be written as the energy derivative of the two-photon ionization amplitude phase, ∂EargDEg (2 ) , it does not have any scattering counterpart. Indeed, τ(2 ) can be much larger than the lifetime of an intermediate resonance in the two-photon process or more negative than the lower bound imposed on scattering delays by causality. Finally, we show that τ(2 ) is controlled by the frequency of the probe pulse, ωIR , so that by varying ωIR , it is possible to radically alter the photoelectron group delay.

  8. Probing phase transitions of vortex matter by Josephson plasma resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yuji

    2001-03-01

    The vortex matter in high-Tc superconductors exhibits a fascinatingly rich phase diagram with a variety of phase transitions. Recent investigations have revealed that the vortex phase is comprised of three distinct phases; vortex liquid, vortex glass, and Bragg glass. The most direct way to clarify the nature of these vortex phases and the phase transitions among them is to measure the interlayer phase coherence, because the CuO2 layers are connected by the Josephson effect. A most powerful probe for the interlayer phase coherence is the Josephson plasma resonance (JPR) which provides a direct measurement of the Josephson coupling energy U_J. Josephson plasma is a collective oscillation of Cooper pairs through the insulating layers. In Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_8+d with large anisotropy, a very precise determination of UJ is possible because the plasma frequency ω_pl falls within the microwave window. Here we report the detailed and quantitative study of UJ in the vortex liquid, Bragg glass and vortex glass phases of Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_8+d by the JPR. The measurements revealed distinct features in the T- and H-dependencies of ω_pl for each of these three vortex phases. When going across either the Bragg-to-vortex glass or the Bragg-to-liquid transition line, ω_pl shows a dramatic change. We provide a quantitative discussion on the properties of these phase transitions, including the first order nature of the Bragg-to-vortex glass transition.

  9. PULSAR STATE SWITCHING FROM MARKOV TRANSITIONS AND STOCHASTIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, J. M.

    2013-09-20

    Markov processes are shown to be consistent with metastable states seen in pulsar phenomena, including intensity nulling, pulse-shape mode changes, subpulse drift rates, spin-down rates, and X-ray emission, based on the typically broad and monotonic distributions of state lifetimes. Markovianity implies a nonlinear magnetospheric system in which state changes occur stochastically, corresponding to transitions between local minima in an effective potential. State durations (though not transition times) are thus largely decoupled from the characteristic timescales of various magnetospheric processes. Dyadic states are common but some objects show at least four states with some transitions forbidden. Another case is the long-term intermittent pulsar B1931+24 that has binary radio-emission and torque states with wide, but non-monotonic duration distributions. It also shows a quasi-period of 38 ± 5 days in a 13 yr time sequence, suggesting stochastic resonance in a Markov system with a forcing function that could be strictly periodic or quasi-periodic. Nonlinear phenomena are associated with time-dependent activity in the acceleration region near each magnetic polar cap. The polar-cap diode is altered by feedback from the outer magnetosphere and by return currents from the equatorial region outside the light cylinder that may also cause the neutron star to episodically charge and discharge. Orbital perturbations of a disk or current sheet provide a natural periodicity for the forcing function in the stochastic-resonance interpretation of B1931+24. Disk dynamics may introduce additional timescales in observed phenomena. Future work can test the Markov interpretation, identify which pulsar types have a propensity for state changes, and clarify the role of selection effects.

  10. Axial transition form factors and pion decay of baryon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Julia-Diaz, B.; Riska, D.O.; Coester, F.

    2004-10-01

    The pion decay constants of the lowest orbitally excited states of the nucleon and the {delta}(1232) along with the corresponding axial transition form factors are calculated with Poincare covariant constituent-quark models with instant, point, and front forms of relativistic kinematics. The model wave functions are chosen such that the calculated electromagnetic and axial form factors of the nucleon represent the empirical values in all three forms of kinematics, when calculated with single-constituent currents. The pion decay widths calculated with the three forms of kinematics are smaller than the empirical values. Front and instant form kinematics provide a similar description, with a slight preference for front form, while the point form values are significantly smaller in the case of the lowest positive parity resonances.

  11. On transition from Alfvén resonance to forced magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Q.; Wang, X.

    2014-07-15

    We revisit the transition from Alfvén resonance to forced magnetic reconnection with a focus on the property of their singularities. As the driven frequency tends to zero, the logarithmic singularity of Alfvén resonance shifts to the power-law singularity of forced reconnection, due to merging of the two resonance layers. The transition criterion depends on either kinetic effects or dissipations that resolve the singularity. As an example, a small but finite resistivity η is introduced to investigate the transition process. The transition threshold is then obtained as the driven frequency reaches a level of ∼O((η/k){sup 1/3})

  12. Transition from double coherence resonances to single coherence resonance in a neuronal network with phase noise.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanbing; Gu, Huaguang

    2015-12-01

    The effect of phase noise on the coherence dynamics of a neuronal network composed of FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) neurons is investigated. Phase noise can induce dissimilar coherence resonance (CR) effects for different coupling strength regimes. When the coupling strength is small, phase noise can induce double CRs. One corresponds to the average frequency of phase noise, and the other corresponds to the intrinsic firing frequency of the FHN neuron. When the coupling strength is large enough, phase noise can only induce single CR, and the CR corresponds to the intrinsic firing frequency of the FHN neuron. The results show a transition from double CRs to single CR with the increase in the coupling strength. The transition can be well interpreted based on the dynamics of a single neuron stimulated by both phase noise and the coupling current. When the coupling strength is small, the coupling current is weak, and phase noise mainly determines the dynamics of the neuron. Moreover, the phase-noise-induced double CRs in the neuronal network are similar to the phase-noise-induced double CRs in an isolated FHN neuron. When the coupling strength is large enough, the coupling current is strong and plays a key role in the occurrence of the single CR in the network. The results provide a novel phenomenon and may have important implications in understanding the dynamics of neuronal networks.

  13. Electron Spin Resonance of Tetrahedral Transition Metal Oxyanions (MO4n-) in Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenblatt, M.

    1980-01-01

    Outlines general principles in observing sharp electron spin resonance (ESR) lines in the solid state by incorporating the transition metal ion of interest into an isostructural diamagnetic host material in small concentration. Examples of some recent studies are described. (CS)

  14. Dual structure of saturated absorption resonance at an open atomic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, V. V.; Velichanskii, V. L.; Zibrov, S. A.; Sivak, A. V.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2011-05-01

    Experiments on open transitions of the D 1 line of alkali metals (Cs and Rb isotopes) reveal the dual structure of saturated absorption resonance in the signal of a high-intensity optical wave in the presence of a low-intensity counterpropagating wave. Theoretical analysis shows that the observed shape of the resonance is associated with the openness of the atomic transition as well as with the Doppler effect for atoms in a gas. The results are of general physical significance for nonlinear spectroscopy and can also find application in metrology (frequency and time standards on open transitions).

  15. Dual structure of saturated absorption resonance at an open atomic transition

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, V. V. Velichanskii, V. L. Zibrov, S. A.; Sivak, A. V.; Brazhnikov, D. V. Taichenachev, A. V. Yudin, V. I.

    2011-05-15

    Experiments on open transitions of the D{sub 1} line of alkali metals (Cs and Rb isotopes) reveal the dual structure of saturated absorption resonance in the signal of a high-intensity optical wave in the presence of a low-intensity counterpropagating wave. Theoretical analysis shows that the observed shape of the resonance is associated with the openness of the atomic transition as well as with the Doppler effect for atoms in a gas. The results are of general physical significance for nonlinear spectroscopy and can also find application in metrology (frequency and time standards on open transitions).

  16. The Mass-Radius-Eccentricity Distribution of Near-Resonant Transiting Exoplanet Pairs Detected by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabram, Megan; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-12-01

    We characterize the mass-radius-eccentricity distribution of transiting planets near first-order mean motion resonances using Transit Timing Variation (TTV) observations from NASA's Kepler mission. Kepler's precise measurements of transit times (Mazeh et al. 2014; Rowe et al. 2015) constrain the planet-star mass ratio, eccentricity and pericenter directions for hundreds of planets. Strongly-interacting planetary systems allow TTVs to provide precise measurements of masses and orbital eccentricities separately (e.g., Kepler-36, Carter et al. 2012). In addition to these precisely characterized planetary systems, there are several systems harboring at least two planets near a mean motion resonance (MMR) for which TTVs provide a joint constraint on planet masses, eccentricities and pericenter directions (Hadden et al. 2015). Unfortunately, a near degeneracy between these parameters leads to a posterior probability density with highly correlated uncertainties. Nevertheless, the population encodes valuable information about the distribution of planet masses, orbital eccentricities and the planet mass-radius relationship. We characterize the distribution of masses and eccentricities for near-resonant transiting planets by combining a hierarchical Bayesian model with an analytic model for the TTV signatures of near-resonant planet pairs (Lithwick & Wu 2012). By developing a rigorous statistical framework for analyzing the TTV signatures of a population of planetary systems, we significantly improve upon previous analyses. For example, our analysis includes transit timing measurements of near-resonant transiting planet pairs regardless of whether there is a significant detection of TTVs, thereby avoiding biases due to only including TTV detections.

  17. RESONANT INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING FROM TRANSITION METAL OXIDES.

    SciTech Connect

    HILL,J.P.

    1999-08-23

    Recent developments in hard x-ray resonant inelastic x-ray scattering as a probe of strongly correlated systems are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to studies of Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. A charge transfer excitation is observed when the incident photon energy is tuned in the vicinity of the copper K-edge. It is shown that the presence of resonant enhancements is controlled by the polarization dependence of the excitation process and by the overlap between a given intermediate state and the particular excitation being studied. This latter observation has shed light on the non-local effects present in certain intermediate states.

  18. Resonance transition energies and oscillator strengths in lutetium and lawrencium.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu; Fischer, C Froese

    2002-05-06

    The transition energies and oscillator strengths for nd (2)D(3/2)-(n+1)p (2)P(o)(1/2,3/2) transitions in Lu ( n = 5, Z = 71) and Lr ( n = 6, Z = 103) were calculated with the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method. The present study confirmed that the ground state of atomic Lr is [Rn]5f(14)7s(2)7p (2)P(o)(1/2). The calculation for Lr required wave function expansions of more than 330 000 configuration states. In Lu, the transition energies, with Breit and QED corrections included, agree with experiment to within 126 cm(-1). In lighter elements, core correlation is usually neglected but was found to be of extreme importance for these heavy elements, affecting the oscillator strengths by a factor of 3 and 2 in Lu and Lr, respectively.

  19. Transition of EMRIs through resonance: higher order corrections in resonant flux enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaylov, Deyan; Gair, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) are candidate events for gravitational wave detection in the millihertz range (by detectors like LISA and eLISA). These events involve a stellar-mass black hole, or a similar compact object, descending into the gravitational field of a supermassive black hole, eventually merging with it. Properties of the inspiraling trajectory away from resonance are well known and have been studied extensively, however little is known about the behaviour of these binary systems at resonance, when the radial and lateral frequencies of the orbit become commensurate. There are two resonance models in the literature, the instantaneous frequency function by Gair, Bender, and Yunes, and the standard two timescales approach devised by Flanagan and Hinderer. We argue that the Gair, Bender and Yunes model provides a valid treatment of the resonance problem and extend this solution to higher order in the size of the on-resonance perturbation. The non-linear differential equations which arise in treating resonances are interesting from a mathematical view point. We present our algorithm for perturbative solutions and the results to third order in the infinitesimal parameter, and discuss the scope of this approach. Deyan Mihaylov is funded by the STFC.

  20. Transition from traveling to standing waves in the 4:1 resonant Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.

    PubMed

    Marts, Bradley; Lin, Anna L

    2008-02-01

    We report a transition from traveling to standing domain walls in a parametrically forced two-dimensional oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky chemical reaction in 4:1 resonance. Our experimental results demonstrate spatiotemporal solutions not predicted by previous analytic results of the complex Ginzburg-Landau amplitude equation and numerical results from reaction-diffusion models. In addition to the stationary pi fronts at high forcing amplitudes, the 4:1 resonant patterns we observe include stationary pi/2 fronts.

  1. Resonances due to the Landau-Zener transition

    SciTech Connect

    Tazawa, T. ); Abe, Y. )

    1990-01-01

    We have derived a new useful analytic formula for the {ital T} matrix in the quantum-mechanical perturbation approach within the two-state problem with finite-range coupling which is appropriate for the discussion of the Landau-Zener transition. The resonancelike behaviors were predicted by classical or semiclassical approach in which constant coupling between two adiabatic states was assumed. In the quantum-mechanical approach, inclusion of the effect of reasonable finite-range coupling would not destroy the pattern of the resonancelike structures so much, while the magnitude of the calculated cross section is merely about 10% of that calculated by the semiclassical approach.

  2. Transition paths to stochastic oscillations of a self-excited oscillator with a ferrite resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I.S.; Pavlov, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    It is demonstrated experimentally that the transition to stochastic oscillations in a self-excited oscillator with ferrite resonator occurs through the complexification of the structure of self-modulation. All basic types of bifurcations are recorded: doubling, intermittency, hard onset of chaos, and critical behavior of strange attractors. Tripling of the self-modulation period was observed for special values of the parameters.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of microstructure transition in stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Johannes M; van Faassen, Ernst E H; Bakker, Chris J G

    2006-06-01

    Magnetic resonance images are prone to artifacts caused by metallic objects. Such artifacts may not only hamper image interpretation, but also have been shown to provide information about the magnetic properties of the substances involved. In this work, we aim to explore the potential of MRI to detect, localize and characterize changes in magnetic properties that may occur when certain alloys have been exposed to a thermomechanical stress. For this purpose, stainless steel 304 L wires were drawn to induce a change from paramagnetic austenitic into ferromagnetic martensitic microstructure. The changes in magnetic behavior were quantified by analyzing the geometric distortion in spin echo and the geometric distortion and intravoxel dephasing in gradient echo images at 0.5, 1.5 and 3 T. The results of both imaging strategies were in agreement and in accordance with independent measurements with a vibrating sample magnetometer. Drawing wire to 2% of its cross-sectional area was found to increase the volume fraction of the ferromagnetic martensite from 0.3% to 80% and to enhance the magnetization up to two or three orders of magnitude. The results demonstrate the potential of MRI to locate and quantify stress-induced changes in the magnetic properties of alloys in a completely noninvasive and nondestructive way.

  4. Non-resonant collider signatures of a singlet-driven electroweak phase transition

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Lewis, Ian M.

    2017-08-22

    We analyze the collider signatures of the real singlet extension of the Standard Model in regions consistent with a strong first-order electroweak phase transition and a singlet-like scalar heavier than the Standard Model-like Higgs. A definitive correlation exists between the strength of the phase transition and the trilinear coupling of the Higgs to two singlet-like scalars, and hence between the phase transition and non-resonant scalar pair production involving the singlet at colliders. We study the prospects for observing these processes at the LHC and a future 100 TeV pp collider, focusing particularly on double singlet production. We also discuss correlationsmore » between the strength of the electroweak phase transition and other observables at hadron and future lepton colliders. Searches for non-resonant singlet-like scalar pair production at 100 TeV would provide a sensitive probe of the electroweak phase transition in this model, complementing resonant di-Higgs searches and precision measurements. Our study illustrates a strategy for systematically exploring the phenomenologically viable parameter space of this model, which we hope will be useful for future work.« less

  5. Non-resonant collider signatures of a singlet-driven electroweak phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Lewis, Ian M.

    2017-08-01

    We analyze the collider signatures of the real singlet extension of the Standard Model in regions consistent with a strong first-order electroweak phase transition and a singlet-like scalar heavier than the Standard Model-like Higgs. A definitive correlation exists between the strength of the phase transition and the trilinear coupling of the Higgs to two singlet-like scalars, and hence between the phase transition and non-resonant scalar pair production involving the singlet at colliders. We study the prospects for observing these processes at the LHC and a future 100 TeV pp collider, focusing particularly on double singlet production. We also discuss correlations between the strength of the electroweak phase transition and other observables at hadron and future lepton colliders. Searches for non-resonant singlet-like scalar pair production at 100 TeV would provide a sensitive probe of the electroweak phase transition in this model, complementing resonant di-Higgs searches and precision measurements. Our study illustrates a strategy for systematically exploring the phenomenologically viable parameter space of this model, which we hope will be useful for future work.

  6. Casimir-Polder potential and transition rate in resonating cylindrical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Simen A.; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi; Scheel, Stefan

    2010-09-15

    We consider the Casimir-Polder potential of particles placed inside a metallic cylindrical cavity at finite temperatures, taking account of thermal nonequilibrium effects. In particular, we study how the resonant (thermal nonequilibrium) potential and transition rates can be enhanced by fine tuning the radius of the cavity to match the transition wavelength of the dominant transitions of the particle. Numerical calculations show that the cavity-induced energy-level shift of atoms prepared in low-lying Rydberg states can be enhanced beyond 30 kHz, which is within the range of observability of modern experiments. Because the magnitude of the resonance peaks depends sensitively on the low-frequency dissipation of the cavity metal, experiments in this setup could be a critical test of the disputed thermal correction to the Casimir force between metal plates.

  7. Bounce-Transit and Drift Resonance and Neoclassical Toroidal Plasma Viscosity in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaing, K. C.; Chu, M. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2009-05-01

    The importance of the resonance between the bounce frequency of the trapped particles and precession drift frequency in tokamaks to the low frequency magnetohydroynamic instabilities has been recognized for a long time. The resonance is also important in the transport processes as demonstrated by Park, et al. in calculating the neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity [1]. They found that the transport fluxes are independent of the collision frequency, i.e., a resonant plateau regime. Here, we develop a theory for neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity to include not only the bounce and drift resonance of the trapped particles but also the transit and drift resonance the circulating particles [2]. In the resonant plateau regime, our results are similar to those obtained by Park, et al., except that bounce average over the trapped particle trajectories is not performed and that the contributions from the circulating particles are included. In the collisional limit, it is found that the resonant plateau regime is connected to the Pfirsch-Schluter regime. [1] PARK, J.-K.,et al., IAEA,Fusion Energy Conference, Geneva, October 2008, Paper EX/5-3Rb. [2] SHAING, K. C., CHU, M. S., and SABBAGH, S. A., (to be submitted to Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion)

  8. Microwave transitions of pairs of cold Rb Rydberg atoms as Forster resonances of Floquet states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeonghun; Iqbal, Javed; Gallagher, T. F.

    2017-07-01

    Previous measurements of single photon n d5 /2n d5 /2→(n +1 ) dj(n -2 ) f transitions by two of us were described as microwave transitions made possible by configuration interaction (CI) between the n d5 /2n d5 /2 and the nearly degenerate (n +2 ) p3 /2(n -2 ) f states [Lee and Gallagher, Phys. Rev. A 93, 062509 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.062509]. Here we report the observation of the one photon n d5 /2n d5 /2→(n +3 ) s1 /2(n -2 ) f , two photon n d5 /2n d5 /2→(n +3 ) pj(n -2 ) f , and three photon n d5 /2n d5 /2→(n +4 ) s1 /2(n -2 ) f microwave transitions. We show that both single and multiphoton microwave transitions are conveniently described as Forster resonant energy transfers between resonant Floquet states, and we show that the Floquet-Forster model reduces to the CI model used previously. Finally, to show that the transitions observed previously are by no means unique, we report pair transitions with different initial and final states as well as radio instead of microwave frequencies.

  9. Extraction of Electromagnetic Transition Form Factors for Nucleon Resonances within a Dynamical Coupled-Channels Model

    SciTech Connect

    N. Suzuki, T. Sato, T.-S. H. Lee

    2010-10-01

    We explain the application of a recently developed analytic continuation method to extract the electromagnetic transition form factors for the nucleon resonances ($N^*$) within a dynamical coupled-channel model of meson-baryon reactions.Illustrative results of the obtained $N^*\\rightarrow \\gamma N$ transition form factors, defined at the resonance pole positions on the complex energy plane, for the well isolated $P_{33}$ and $D_{13}$, and the complicated $P_{11}$ resonances are presented. A formula has been developed to give an unified representation of the effects due to the first two $P_{11}$ poles, which are near the $\\pi\\Delta$ threshold, but are on different Riemann sheets. We also find that a simple formula, with its parameters determined in the Laurent expansions of $\\pi N \\rightarrow \\pi N$ and $\\gamma N \\rightarrow\\pi N$ amplitudes, can reproduce to a very large extent the exact solutions of the considered model at energies near the real parts of the extracted resonance positions. We indicate the differences between our results and those extracted from the approaches using the Breit-Wigner parametrization of resonant amplitudes to fit the data.

  10. Resonant x-ray scattering in 3d-transition-metal oxides: Anisotropy and charge orderings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subías, G.; García, J.; Blasco, J.; Herrero-Martín, J.; Sánchez, M. C.

    2009-11-01

    The structural, magnetic and electronic properties of transition metal oxides reflect in atomic charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Resonant x-ray scattering (RXS) allows us to perform an accurate investigation of all these electronic degrees. RXS combines high-Q resolution x-ray diffraction with the properties of the resonance providing information similar to that obtained by atomic spectroscopy (element selectivity and a large enhancement of scattering amplitude for this particular element and sensitivity to the symmetry of the electronic levels through the multipole electric transitions). Since electronic states are coupled to the local symmetry, RXS reveals the occurrence of symmetry breaking effects such as lattice distortions, onset of electronic orbital ordering or ordering of electronic charge distributions. We shall discuss the strength of RXS at the K absorption edge of 3d transition-metal oxides by describing various applications in the observation of local anisotropy and charge disproportionation. Examples of these resonant effects are (I) charge ordering transitions in manganites, Fe3O4 and ferrites and (II) forbidden reflections and anisotropy in Mn3+ perovskites, spinel ferrites and cobalt oxides. In all the studied cases, the electronic (charge and/or anisotropy) orderings are determined by the structural distortions.

  11. Dynamically tracking the strain across the metal-insulator transition in VO2 measured using electromechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Pritesh; Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Abhilash, T S; Sengupta, Shamashis; Cheng, Chun; Wu, Junqiao; Deshmukh, Mandar M

    2013-10-09

    We study the strain state of doubly clamped VO2 nanobeam devices by dynamically probing resonant frequency of the nanoscale electromechanical device across the metal-insulator transition. Simultaneous resistance and resonance measurements indicate M1-M2 phase transition in the insulating state with a drop in resonant frequency concomitant with an increase in resistance. The resonant frequency increases by ~7 MHz with the growth of metallic domain (M2-R transition) due to the development of tensile strain in the nanobeam. Our approach to dynamically track strain coupled with simultaneous resistance and resonance measurements using electromechanical resonators enables the study of lattice-involved interactions more precisely than static strain measurements. This technique can be extended to other phase change systems important for device applications.

  12. Continuum-continuum transitions between resonant states using the RABITT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, A.; Argenti, L.; Martín, F.

    2014-04-01

    We present a study of radiative continuum-continuum transitions in helium in the presence of doubly-excited states by using the attosecond RABITT technique beyond the Single Active Electron approximation. On the one hand, transition amplitudes between correlated continuum states are calculated both by direct numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation as well as with a two-photon perturbative model. The effect of autoionizing states on the sideband phaseshift is thus analyzed. On the other hand, we apply the soft-photon approximation to quantify the effects the IR probe intensity on the sideband non-resonant overtone components.

  13. Numerical study of Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for cuprates and transition-metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chunjing; Wang, Yao; Chen, Cheng-Chien; Moritz, Brian; Devereaux, Thomas

    A theoretical understanding of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements on cuprates and other transition-metal oxides remains an important yet challenging topic, especially for its ability to resolve the momentum and photon-polarization dependence of low energy elementary excitations. Here we present our exact diagonalization studies for RIXS spectra at the Cu L-edge for cuprates, with a focus on the dependence of both incoming and outgoing photon polarization and incoming photon energy. A more general method for calculating RIXS on other transition-metal oxides (such as NiO), which includes the multiplet and charge-transfer effects, will also be discussed.

  14. Transition from nonresonant to resonant random lasers by the geometrical confinement of disorder.

    PubMed

    Ghofraniha, N; Viola, I; Zacheo, A; Arima, V; Gigli, G; Conti, C

    2013-12-01

    We report on a transition in random lasers that is induced by the geometrical confinement of the emitting material. Different dye doped paper devices with controlled geometry are fabricated by soft lithography and show two distinguished behaviors in the stimulated emission: in the absence of boundary constraints, the energy threshold decreases for larger laser volumes showing the typical trend of diffusive nonresonant random lasers, while when the same material is lithographed into channels, the walls act as cavity and the resonant behavior typical of standard lasers is observed. The experimental results are consistent with the general theories of random and standard lasers and a clear phase diagram of the transition is reported.

  15. Nonlinear reversal of the PT -symmetric phase transition in a system of coupled semiconductor microring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Absar U.; Hodaei, Hossein; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Khajavikhan, Mercedeh; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2015-12-01

    A system of two coupled semiconductor-based resonators is studied when lasing around an exceptional point. We show that the presence of nonlinear saturation effects can have important ramifications on the transition behavior of this system. In sharp contrast with linear PT -symmetric configurations, nonlinear processes are capable of reversing the order in which the symmetry breaking occurs. Yet, even in the nonlinear regime, the resulting non-Hermitian states still retain the structural form of the corresponding linear eigenvectors expected above and below the phase-transition point. The conclusions of our analysis are in agreement with experimental data.

  16. Non-resonant electromechanical energy harvesting using inter-ferroelectric phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez Moyet, Richard; Rossetti, George A.; Stace, Joseph; Amin, Ahmed; Finkel, Peter

    2015-10-26

    Non-resonant electromechanical energy harvesting is demonstrated under low frequency excitation (<50 Hz) using [110]{sub C}-poled lead indium niobate-lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate relaxor ferroelectric single crystals with compositions near the morphotropic phase boundary. The efficiency of power generation at the stress-induced phase transition between domain-engineered rhombohedral and orthorhombic ferroelectric states is as much as four times greater than is obtained in the linear piezoelectric regime under identical measurement conditions but during loading below the coercive stress of the phase change. The phase transition mode of electromechanical transduction holds potential for non-resonant energy harvesting from low-frequency vibrations and does not require mechanical frequency up-conversion.

  17. Exact transition probabilities for a linear sweep through a Kramers-Kronig resonance

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Chen; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.

    2015-11-19

    We consider a localized electronic spin controlled by a circularly polarized optical beam and an external magnetic field. When the frequency of the beam is tuned near an optical resonance with a continuum of higher energy states, effective magnetic fields are induced on the two-level system via the inverse Faraday effect. We explore the process in which the frequency of the beam is made linearly time-dependent so that it sweeps through the optical resonance, starting and ending at the values far away from it. In addition to changes of spin states, Kramers-Kronig relations guarantee that a localized electron can alsomore » escape into a continuum of states. We argue that probabilities of transitions between different possible electronic states after such a sweep of the optical frequency can be found exactly, regardless the shape of the resonance. In conclusion, we also discuss extension of our results to multistate systems.« less

  18. Exact transition probabilities for a linear sweep through a Kramers-Kronig resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Chen; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.

    2015-11-19

    We consider a localized electronic spin controlled by a circularly polarized optical beam and an external magnetic field. When the frequency of the beam is tuned near an optical resonance with a continuum of higher energy states, effective magnetic fields are induced on the two-level system via the inverse Faraday effect. We explore the process in which the frequency of the beam is made linearly time-dependent so that it sweeps through the optical resonance, starting and ending at the values far away from it. In addition to changes of spin states, Kramers-Kronig relations guarantee that a localized electron can also escape into a continuum of states. We argue that probabilities of transitions between different possible electronic states after such a sweep of the optical frequency can be found exactly, regardless the shape of the resonance. In conclusion, we also discuss extension of our results to multistate systems.

  19. Heteroclinic connections between periodic orbits and resonance transitions in celestial mechanics.

    PubMed

    Koon, Wang Sang; Lo, Martin W.; Marsden, Jerrold E.; Ross, Shane D.

    2000-06-01

    In this paper we apply dynamical systems techniques to the problem of heteroclinic connections and resonance transitions in the planar circular restricted three-body problem. These related phenomena have been of concern for some time in topics such as the capture of comets and asteroids and with the design of trajectories for space missions such as the Genesis Discovery Mission. The main new technical result in this paper is the numerical demonstration of the existence of a heteroclinic connection between pairs of periodic orbits: one around the libration point L(1) and the other around L(2), with the two periodic orbits having the same energy. This result is applied to the resonance transition problem and to the explicit numerical construction of interesting orbits with prescribed itineraries. The point of view developed in this paper is that the invariant manifold structures associated to L(1) and L(2) as well as the aforementioned heteroclinic connection are fundamental tools that can aid in understanding dynamical channels throughout the solar system as well as transport between the "interior" and "exterior" Hill's regions and other resonant phenomena. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Resonant Ultrasound studies of spin- and orbital ordering transitions in RVO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, M.; Yan, J.-Q.; Ren, Y.; Sales, B. C.; Mandrus, D.; Keppens, V.

    2013-03-01

    RVO3 perovskites (R = rare earth) have been shown to undergo multiple spin and orbital transitions due to the Jahn-Teller active V3+ electrons. We have initiated a study of the elastic response of RVO3, (R = Dy, Gd, Ce) as well as Y1-xLaxVO3 (x = 0.05, 0.3, 1) using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. The temperature-dependence of the elastic response is dominated by the ordering transitions, with transition temperatures that change with the size of the rare earth. For CeVO3 and LaVO3, two transitions are observed, separated by 17K and 2K, respectively. DyVO3 and Y0.95La0.05VO3 show three transitions below 220K while GdVO3 only shows one. The full elastic tensor of Y0 . 7 La0.3VO3 has also been determined from 300K to 50K, yielding the temperature dependence of the 9 orthorhombic elastic moduli. Work at ORNL was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  1. Two-photon finite-pulse model for resonant transitions in attosecond experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Galán, Álvaro; Martín, Fernando; Argenti, Luca

    2016-02-01

    We present an analytical model capable of describing two-photon ionization of atoms with attosecond pulses in the presence of intermediate and final isolated autoionizing states. The model is based on the finite-pulse formulation of second-order time-dependent perturbation theory. It approximates the intermediate and final states with Fano's theory for resonant continua, and it depends on a small set of atomic parameters that can either be obtained from separate ab initio calculations or be extracted from a few selected experiments. We use the model to compute the two-photon resonant photoelectron spectrum of helium below the N =2 threshold for the RABITT (reconstruction of attosecond beating by interference of two-photon transitions) pump-probe scheme, in which an XUV attosecond pulse train is used in association with a weak IR probe, obtaining results in quantitative agreement with those from accurate ab initio simulations. In particular, we show that (i) the use of finite pulses results in a homogeneous redshift of the RABITT beating frequency, as well as a resonant modulation of the beating frequency in proximity to intermediate autoionizing states; (ii) the phase of resonant two-photon amplitudes generally experiences a continuous excursion as a function of the intermediate detuning, with either zero or 2 π overall variation.

  2. Transition of lasing modes in polymeric opal photonic crystal resonating cavity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lan-Ting; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Jin, Feng; Dong, Xian-Zi; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2016-06-10

    We demonstrate the transition of lasing modes in the resonating cavity constructed by polystyrene opal photonic crystals and 7 wt. % tert-butyl Rhodamine B doped polymer film. Both single mode and multiple mode lasing emission are observed from the resonating cavity. The lasing threshold is determined to be 0.81  μJ/pulse for single mode lasing emission and 2.25  μJ/pulse for multiple mode lasing emission. The single mode lasing emission is attributed to photonic lasing resulting from the photonic bandgap effect of the opal photonic crystals, while the multiple mode lasing emission is assigned to random lasing due to the defects in the photonic crystals. The result would benefit the development of low threshold polymeric solid state photonic crystal lasers.

  3. Computational study of phononic resonators and waveguides in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulou, A; Sgouros, A P; Sigalas, M M

    2017-03-15

    Using molecular dynamics and semi-empirical potentials, large scale transition metal dichalcogenides monolayers (TMDM) were examined. The focus of the study was the modification of the phonon spectrum of TMDMs by engineering substitutional defects to produce phononic resonators and waveguides on the atomic scale. The resonant frequencies of the aforementioned structures can be tuned by applying tensile or compressive stresses. The TMDMs exhibited wide phononic band gaps (PBG) in their phonon spectrum because they consist of atoms with quite different atomic masses. The PBG from the present semi-empirical calculations were found to be in reasonable agreement with previous ab initio calculations. The problem is very broad since many varieties of TMDMs (with or without defects) can be made. The present study focused on MX2 composites with M being Mo or W and X being S or Se. The most interesting behavior was found in WS2 with substitutional defects of either S ↔ Se or W ↔ Mo.

  4. 18-Electron Resonance Structures in the BCC Transition Metals and Their CsCl-type Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Vinokur, Anastasiya I; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2017-03-06

    Bonding in elemental metals and simple alloys has long been thought of as involving intense delocalization, with little connection to the localized bonds of covalent systems. In this Article, we show that the bonding in body-centered cubic (bcc) structures of the group 6 transition metals can in fact be represented, via the concepts of the 18-n rule and isolobal bonding, in terms of two balanced resonance structures. We begin with a reversed approximation Molecular Orbital (raMO) analysis of elemental Mo in its bcc structure. The raMO analysis indicates that, despite the low electron count (six valence electrons per Mo atom), nine electron pairs can be associated with any given Mo atom, corresponding to a filled 18-electron configuration. Six of these electron pairs take part in isolobal bonds along the second-nearest neighbor contacts, with the remaining three (based on the t2g d orbitals) interacting almost exclusively with first-nearest neighbors. In this way, each primitive cubic network defined by the second-nearest neighbor contacts comprises an 18-n electron system with n = 6, which essentially describes the full electronic structure of the phase. Of course, either of the two interpenetrating primitive cubic frameworks of the bcc structure can act as a basis for this discussion, leading us to write two resonance structures with equal weights for bcc-Mo. The electronic structures of CsCl-type variants with the same electron count can then be interpreted in terms of changing the relative weights of these two resonance structures, as is qualitatively confirmed with raMO analysis. This combination of raMO analysis with the resonance concept offers an avenue to extend the 18-n rule into other transition metal-rich structures.

  5. Long-wavelength approximation in on- and off-resonance transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Komninos, Yannis; Mercouris, Theodoros; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2005-02-01

    In view of the possibilities of laser spectroscopy with very short pulses and relatively high frequencies, we examine aspects of the theory of atom-field interactions that are related to violation of the condition of the long-wavelength approximation (LWA) according to which kr<<1, where r is 'of the order of atomic dimensions' and k is the magnitude of the wave vector. On- and off-resonance transitions are considered, with kr being larger than unity due to the large extent of the two wave functions involved in the coupling matrix element. The implementation of the analysis uses bound-free transition matrix elements with the n=50 and 80 hydrogenic functions as initial states and values of k up to 27 eV, which is sufficient to produce kr>1, thereby rendering the LWA inoperative. In spite of this, it is shown that, for on-resonance transitions, the results from the use of the well-known multipole operators resulting from the LWA [e.g., the electric dipole approximation (EDA)] agree with those from the exact expressions derived here from the application of the multipolar Hamiltonian. This numerical agreement is proven analytically. As a test of the kind of convergence of the multipole series expansion for small values of k and large r, it is shown that the lowest-order ratio of electric dipole to quadrupole matrix elements decreases rapidly within 1.0 atomic unit above threshold. Finally, it is shown that off-resonance couplings lead to differences between the full-interaction operator and the EDA which cannot be neglected. In the extreme case of intrashell couplings for the n=50 shell, calculation shows that the 50p state is coupled to angular momentum states up to l=21, compared to the electric dipole coupling of {delta}l={+-}1.

  6. Finite-momentum superfluidity and phase transitions in a p-wave resonant Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sungsoo; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2011-10-15

    We study a degenerate two-species gas of bosonic atoms interacting through a p-wave Feshbach resonance as, for example, realized in a {sup 85}Rb-{sup 87}Rb mixture. We show that, in addition to a conventional atomic and a p-wave molecular spinor-1 superfluidity at large positive and negative detunings, respectively, the system generically exhibits a finite-momentum atomic-molecular superfluidity at intermediate detuning around the unitary point. We analyze the detailed nature of the corresponding phases and the associated quantum and thermal phase transitions.

  7. Multi-photon transitions in coupled plasmon-cyclotron resonance measured by millimeter-wave reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Ruiyuan; Du, Rui-Rui; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2017-04-01

    We construct a low-temperature microwave waveguide interferometer for measuring the high-frequency properties of two-dimensional electron gases. Coupled plasmon-cyclotron resonance (PCR) spectra are used to extract effective mass, bulk plasmon frequency, and carrier relaxation times. In contrast to traditional transmission spectroscopy, this method does not require sample preparation and is nondestructive. PCR signals can be resolved with a microwave power source as low as 10 nW. We observe PCR in the multi-photon transition regime, which has been proposed to be relevant to the microwave-induced resistance oscillations.

  8. Transition from Coulomb Blockade to Resonant Transmission in a MoS2 Nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanjing; Mason, Nadya

    2014-03-01

    We have measured a side-gated nanoribbon of MoS2 at low temperature, and observed the transition from Coulomb blockade to resonant transmission when the Fermi level is tuned with a gate. We show that near the crossover between these regimes, the entire nanoribbon acts as a single quantum dot. Our findings may shed light on quasi-ballistic transport in the material. We also discuss the quantum dot formation in terms of a substrate-induced disorder potential, and consider other possible origins of disorder.

  9. Giant dipole resonance and shape transitions in hot and rotating 88Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhine Kumar, A. K.; Arumugam, P.; Dang, N. Dinh; Mazumdar, I.

    2017-08-01

    The giant dipole resonance (GDR) observables are calculated within the thermal shape fluctuation model by considering the probability distributions of different angular momentum (I ) and temperature (T ) values estimated recently in the deexcitation process of the compound nucleus 88Mo. These results are found to be very similar to the results obtained with the average T (Tave) and average I (Iave) corresponding to those distributions. The shape transitions in 88Mo at different T and I are also studied through the free energy surfaces calculated within the microscopic-macroscopic approach. The deformation of 88Mo is found to increase considerably with T and I , leading to the Jacobi shape transition at I ˜50 ℏ . The combined effect of increasing deformation, larger fluctuations at higher T , and larger Coriolis splitting of GDR components at higher I , leads to a rapid increase in the GDR width.

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with laser irradiation resonant with vibrational transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatrian, Ani; Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2010-05-01

    An investigation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of polymers, both in bulk form and spin coated on Si wafers, with laser irradiation in the mid-infrared spectral region is presented. Of particular interest is whether the LIBS signals are enhanced when the laser wavelength is resonant with a fundamental vibrational transition of the polymer. Significant increases in the LIBS signals were observed for irradiation on hydride stretch fundamental transitions, and the magnitude of the enhancement showed a strong dependence on the mode excited. The role of the substrate was investigated by comparison of results for bulk and spin-coated samples. The polymers investigated were Nylon 12 and poly(vinyl alcohol-co-ethylene).

  11. Near-field resonance shifts of ferroelectric barium titanate domains upon low-temperature phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Döring, Jonathan; Ribbeck, Hans-Georg von; Kehr, Susanne C.; Eng, Lukas M.; Fehrenbacher, Markus

    2014-08-04

    Scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) has been established as an excellent tool to probe domains in ferroelectric crystals at room temperature. Here, we apply the s-SNOM possibilities to quantify low-temperature phase transitions in barium titanate single crystals by both temperature-dependent resonance spectroscopy and domain distribution imaging. The orthorhombic-to-tetragonal structural phase transition at 263 K manifests in a change of the spatial arrangement of ferroelectric domains as probed with a tunable free-electron laser. More intriguingly, the domain distribution unravels non-favored domain configurations upon sample recovery to room temperature as explainable by increased sample disorder. Ferroelectric domains and topographic influences are clearly deconvolved even at low temperatures, since complementing our s-SNOM nano-spectroscopy with piezoresponse force microscopy and topographic imaging using one and the same atomic force microscope and tip.

  12. Accurate Cross Sections for Excitation of Resonance Transitions in Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2004-01-01

    Electron collision excitation cross sections for the resonance 2p(sup)4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)S(sup 0), 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3d (sup 3)D(sup 0), 2p4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)D(sup 0), 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)P(sup 0) and 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2s2p(sup 5) (sup 3)P(sup 0) transitions have been calculated by using the R matrix with a pseudostates approach for incident electron energies from near threshold to 100 eV. The excitation of these transition sgives rise to strong atomic oxygen emission features at 1304, 1027, 989, 878, and 792 Angstrom in the spectra of several planetary atmospheres. We included 22 spectroscopic bound and autoionizing states and 30 pseudostates in the close-coupling expansion. The target wave functions are chosen to properly account for the important correlation and relaxation effects. The effect of coupling to the continuum is included through the use of pseudostates. The contribution of the ionization continuum is significant for resonance transitions. Measured absolute direct excitation cross sections of 0 I are reported by experimental groups from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Johns Hopkins University. Good agreement is noted for the 2p(sup)4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)S(sup 0) transition (lambda 1304 Ang) with measured cross sections from both groups that agree well with each other. There is disagreement between experiments for other transitions. Our results support the measured cross sections from the Johns Hopkins University for the 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3d (sup 3)D(sup 0) and 2p4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)D(sup 0) transitions, while for the 2p4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)D(sup 0) transition the agreement is switched to the measured cross sections from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  13. Time delay induced transition of gene switch and stochastic resonance in a genetic transcriptional regulatory model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Canjun; Yi, Ming; Yang, Keli; Yang, Lijian

    2012-01-01

    Noise, nonlinear interactions, positive and negative feedbacks within signaling pathways, time delays, protein oligomerization, and crosstalk between different pathways are main characters in the regulatory of gene expression. However, only a single noise source or only delay time in the deterministic model is considered in the gene transcriptional regulatory system in previous researches. The combined effects of correlated noise and time delays on the gene regulatory model still remain not to be fully understood. The roles of time delay on gene switch and stochastic resonance are systematically explored based on a famous gene transcriptional regulatory model subject to correlated noise. Two cases, including linear time delay appearing in the degradation process (case I) and nonlinear time delay appearing in the synthesis process (case II) are considered, respectively. For case I: Our theoretical results show that time delay can induce gene switch, i.e., the TF-A monomer concentration shifts from the high concentration state to the low concentration state ("on"→"off"). With increasing the time delay, the transition from "on" to "off" state can be further accelerated. Moreover, it is found that the stochastic resonance can be enhanced by both the time delay and correlated noise intensity. However, the additive noise original from the synthesis rate restrains the stochastic resonance. It is also very interesting that a resonance bi-peaks structure appears under large additive noise intensity. The theoretical results by using small-delay time-approximation approach are consistent well with our numerical simulation. For case II: Our numerical simulation results show that time delay can also induce the gene switch, however different with case I, the TF-A monomer concentration shifts from the low concentration state to the high concentration state ("off"→"on"). With increasing time delay, the transition from "on" to "off" state can be further enhanced. Moreover, it

  14. A TTV-fueled study of non-resonant companions to multiple-transiting systems in the Kepler sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juliette; Montet, B.; Swift, J.; Johnson, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The high precision, continuous time coverage and long baseline of the Kepler mission have allowed for the first analyses of transit timing variations (TTVs) induced by dynamical interactions between planets. Nearly all previous TTV studies have focused on the detection, characterization, and validation of planetary systems in near-resonant configurations. Transit timing data also contains potentially useful information about the existence of massive, non-resonant companions. We have begun a new study to search for such companions. Here, we present preliminary results from our analysis of the first 16 quarters of Kepler data and discuss the implications for the presence of massive, non-transiting companions in these systems.

  15. Transit Timing Variations for Planets near Eccentricity-type Mean Motion Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deck, Katherine M.; Agol, Eric

    2016-04-01

    We derive the transit timing variations (TTVs) of two planets near a second-order mean motion resonance (MMR) on nearly circular orbits. We show that the TTVs of each planet are given by sinusoids with a frequency of {{jn}}2-(j-2){n}1, where j≥slant 3 is an integer characterizing the resonance and n2 and n1 are the mean motions of the outer and inner planets, respectively. The amplitude of the TTV depends on the mass of the perturbing planet, relative to the mass of the star, and on both the eccentricities and longitudes of pericenter of each planet. The TTVs of the two planets are approximated anti-correlated, with phases of ϕ and ≈ φ +π , where the phase ϕ also depends on the eccentricities and longitudes of pericenter. Therefore, the TTVs caused by proximity to a second-order MMR do not in general uniquely determine both planet masses, eccentricities, and pericenters. This is completely analogous to the case of TTVs induced by two planets near a first-order MMR. We explore how other TTV signals, such as the short-period synodic TTV or a first-order resonant TTV, in combination with the second-order resonant TTV, can break degeneracies. Finally, we derive approximate formulae for the TTVs of planets near any order eccentricity-type MMR; this shows that the same basic sinusoidal TTV structure holds for all eccentricity-type resonances. Our general formula reduces to previously derived results near first-order MMRs.

  16. Distinguishing Unfolding and Functional Conformational Transitions of Calmodulin Using Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Eric M.; Balakrishnan, G.; Squier, Thomas C.; Spiro, Thomas

    2014-06-14

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous moderator protein for calcium signaling in all eukaryotic cells. This small calcium-binding protein exhibits a broad range of structural transitions, including domain opening and folding-unfolding, that allow it to recognize a wide variety of binding partners in vivo. While the static structures of CaM associated with its various binding activities are fairly well known, it has been challenging to examine the dynamics of transition between these structures in real-time, due to a lack of suitable spectroscopic probes of CaM structure. In this paper, we examine the potential of ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy for clarifying the nature of structural transitions in CaM. We find that the UVRR spectral change (with 229 nm excitation) due to thermal unfolding of CaM is qualitatively different from that associated with opening of the C-terminal domain in response to Ca2+ binding. This spectral difference is entirely due to differences in teritary contacts at the inter-domain tyrosine residue Tyr138, toward which other spectroscopic methods are not sensitive. We conclude that UVRR is ideally suited to identifying the different types of structural transitions in CaM and other proteins with conformation-sensitive tyrosine residues, opening a path to time-resolved studies of CaM dynamics using Raman spectroscopy.

  17. Transit Timing Variation of Near-resonance Planetary Pairs: Confirmation of 12 Multiple-planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ji-Wei

    2013-10-01

    We extract transit timing variation (TTV) signals for 12 pairs of transiting planet candidates that are near first-order mean motion resonances (MMR), using publicly available Kepler light curves (Q0-Q14). These pairs show significant sinusoidal TTVs with theoretically predicted periods, which demonstrate these planet candidates are orbiting and interacting in the same system. Although individual masses cannot be accurately extracted based only on TTVs because of the well-known degeneracy between mass and eccentricity, TTV phases and amplitudes can still place upper limits on the masses of the candidates, confirming their planetary nature. Furthermore, the mass ratios of these planet pairs can be relatively tightly constrained using these TTVs. The planetary pair in KOI 880 seems to have particularly high mass and density ratios, which might indicate very different internal compositions of these two planets. Some of these newly confirmed planets are also near MMR with other candidates in the system, forming unique resonance chains (e.g., KOI 500).

  18. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATION OF NEAR-RESONANCE PLANETARY PAIRS: CONFIRMATION OF 12 MULTIPLE-PLANET SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ji-Wei E-mail: jwxie@astro.utoronto.ca

    2013-10-01

    We extract transit timing variation (TTV) signals for 12 pairs of transiting planet candidates that are near first-order mean motion resonances (MMR), using publicly available Kepler light curves (Q0-Q14). These pairs show significant sinusoidal TTVs with theoretically predicted periods, which demonstrate these planet candidates are orbiting and interacting in the same system. Although individual masses cannot be accurately extracted based only on TTVs because of the well-known degeneracy between mass and eccentricity, TTV phases and amplitudes can still place upper limits on the masses of the candidates, confirming their planetary nature. Furthermore, the mass ratios of these planet pairs can be relatively tightly constrained using these TTVs. The planetary pair in KOI 880 seems to have particularly high mass and density ratios, which might indicate very different internal compositions of these two planets. Some of these newly confirmed planets are also near MMR with other candidates in the system, forming unique resonance chains (e.g., KOI 500)

  19. Nutational resonances, transitional precession, and precession-averaged evolution in binary black-hole systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Kesden, Michael; Gerosa, Davide

    2017-07-01

    In the post-Newtonian (PN) regime, the time scale on which the spins of binary black holes precess is much shorter than the radiation-reaction time scale on which the black holes inspiral to smaller separations. On the precession time scale, the angle between the total and orbital angular momenta oscillates with nutation period τ , during which the orbital angular momentum precesses about the total angular momentum by an angle α . This defines two distinct frequencies that vary on the radiation-reaction time scale: the nutation frequency ω ≡2 π /τ and the precession frequency Ω ≡α /τ . We use analytic solutions for generic spin precession at 2PN order to derive Fourier series for the total and orbital angular momenta in which each term is a sinusoid with frequency Ω -n ω for integer n . As black holes inspiral, they can pass through nutational resonances (Ω =n ω ) at which the total angular momentum tilts. We derive an approximate expression for this tilt angle and show that it is usually less than 10-3 radians for nutational resonances at binary separations r >10 M . The large tilts occurring during transitional precession (near zero total angular momentum) are a consequence of such states being approximate n =0 nutational resonances. Our new Fourier series for the total and orbital angular momenta converge rapidly with n providing an intuitive and computationally efficient approach to understanding generic precession that may facilitate future calculations of gravitational waveforms in the PN regime.

  20. Sensitivity Enhancement of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides/Silicon Nanostructure-based Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Qingling; Zeng, Shuwen; Jiang, Li; Hong, Liying; Xu, Gaixia; Dinh, Xuan-Quyen; Qian, Jun; He, Sailing; Qu, Junle; Coquet, Philippe; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we designed a sensitivity-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor structure based on silicon nanosheet and two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. This configuration contains six components: SF10 triangular prism, gold thin film, silicon nanosheet, two-dimensional MoS2/MoSe2/WS2/WSe2 (defined as MX2) layers, biomolecular analyte layer and sensing medium. The minimum reflectivity, sensitivity as well as the Full Width at Half Maximum of SPR curve are systematically examined by using Fresnel equations and the transfer matrix method in the visible and near infrared wavelength range (600 nm to 1024 nm). The variation of the minimum reflectivity and the change in resonance angle as the function of the number of MX2 layers are presented respectively. The results show that silicon nanosheet and MX2 layers can be served as effective light absorption medium. Under resonance conditions, the electrons in these additional dielectric layers can be transferred to the surface of gold thin film. All silicon-MX2 enhanced sensing models show much better performance than that of the conventional sensing scheme where pure Au thin film is used, the highest sensitivity can be achieved by employing 600 nm excitation light wavelength with 35 nm gold thin film and 7 nm thickness silicon nanosheet coated with monolayer WS2. PMID:27305974

  1. Sensitivity Enhancement of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides/Silicon Nanostructure-based Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qingling; Zeng, Shuwen; Jiang, Li; Hong, Liying; Xu, Gaixia; Dinh, Xuan-Quyen; Qian, Jun; He, Sailing; Qu, Junle; Coquet, Philippe; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2016-06-16

    In this work, we designed a sensitivity-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor structure based on silicon nanosheet and two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. This configuration contains six components: SF10 triangular prism, gold thin film, silicon nanosheet, two-dimensional MoS2/MoSe2/WS2/WSe2 (defined as MX2) layers, biomolecular analyte layer and sensing medium. The minimum reflectivity, sensitivity as well as the Full Width at Half Maximum of SPR curve are systematically examined by using Fresnel equations and the transfer matrix method in the visible and near infrared wavelength range (600 nm to 1024 nm). The variation of the minimum reflectivity and the change in resonance angle as the function of the number of MX2 layers are presented respectively. The results show that silicon nanosheet and MX2 layers can be served as effective light absorption medium. Under resonance conditions, the electrons in these additional dielectric layers can be transferred to the surface of gold thin film. All silicon-MX2 enhanced sensing models show much better performance than that of the conventional sensing scheme where pure Au thin film is used, the highest sensitivity can be achieved by employing 600 nm excitation light wavelength with 35 nm gold thin film and 7 nm thickness silicon nanosheet coated with monolayer WS2.

  2. Final state-selected spectra in unimolecular reactions: A transition-state-based random matrix model for overlapping resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, U.; Miller, W.H.; Reisler, H.

    1995-06-08

    Final state-selected spectra in unimolecular decomposition are obtained by a random matrix version of Feshbach`s optical model. The number of final states which are independently coupled to the molecular quasibound states is identified with the number of states at the dividing surface of transition state theory (TST). The coupling of the transition state to the molecular complex is modeled via a universal random matrix effective Hamiltonian which is characterized by its resonance eigenstates and provides the correct average unimolecular decay rate. The transition from nonoverlapping resonances which are associated with isolated Lorentzian spectral peaks, to overlapping resonances, associated with more complex spectra, is characterized in terms of deviations from a {chi}{sup 2}-like distribution of the resonance widths and the approach to a random phase-distribution of the resonance scattering amplitudes. The evolution of the system from a tight transition state to reaction products is treated explicitly as a scattering process where specific dynamics can be incorporated. Comparisons with recently measured final state-selected spectra and rotational distributions for the unimolecular reaction of NO{sub 2} show that the present model provides a useful new approach for understanding and interpreting experimental results which are dominated by overlapping resonances.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the helix-coil transition of poly (dA-dT) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, D J; Canuel, L

    1976-01-01

    The well-resolved base and sugar proton resonances in the high resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of poly(dA-dT) can be monitored during the helix-coil transition. The observable resonances shift upfield on helix formation and the temperature-dependent chemical shifts exhibit a melting temperature t 1/2 = 69.9 +/- 0.3 degrees for 18.8 mM (with respect to phosphorus) poly(dA-dT) in 0.5 M Tris, 0.1 M cacodylate, D2O, pH 7.05. The observable protons are in fast exchange throughout the poly (dA-dT) helix-coil transition. The adenine H2 resonance that shifts upfield by about 1 ppm on helix formation exhibits uncertainty broadening in the fast exchange region... PMID:1062778

  4. NONLINEAR-OPTICS PHENOMENA: Formation of optical pulses by modulating the resonant quantum transition frequency in a spectrally inhomogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polovinkin, V. A.; Radionychev, E. V.

    2010-02-01

    We consider the conversion of monochromatic radiation in the case of resonant interaction with a quantum system under the condition of harmonic modulation of the quantum transition frequency by the action of additional nonresonant radiation due to the Stark or Zeeman effect, taking into account the inhomogeneous broadening of the quantum transition line. It is shown analytically and numerically that resonant radiation can be converted in a train of ultrashort pulses with a peak intensity exceeding manifold the incident wave intensity. The possibility of the additional compression of the produced pulses is studied by compensating the inherent frequency modulation in a medium with a quadratic or programmable dispersion. The optimal values of the radiation — matter interaction parameters are found numerically. It is shown that generation of femtosecond optical pulses of radiation quasi-resonant to the δ transition of the atomic hydrogen Balmer series is possible.

  5. Two Transiting Earth-size Planets Near Resonance Orbiting a Nearby Cool Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petigura, Erik A.; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Howard, Andrew W.; Deck, Katherine M.; Ciardi, David R.; Sinukoff, Evan; Allers, Katelyn N.; Best, William M. J.; Liu, Michael C.; Beichman, Charles A.; Isaacson, Howard; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Lépine, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Discoveries from the prime Kepler mission demonstrated that small planets (<3 {R}\\oplus ) are common outcomes of planet formation. While Kepler detected many such planets, all but a handful orbit faint, distant stars and are not amenable to precise follow up measurements. Here, we report the discovery of two small planets transiting K2-21, a bright (K = 9.4) M0 dwarf located 65+/- 6 pc from Earth. We detected the transiting planets in photometry collected during Campaign 3 of NASA’s K2 mission. Analysis of transit light curves reveals that the planets have small radii compared to their host star, {R}P/{R}\\star = 2.60+/- 0.14% and 3.15+/- 0.20%, respectively. We obtained follow up NIR spectroscopy of K2-21 to constrain host star properties, which imply planet sizes of 1.59 ± 0.43 {R}\\oplus and 1.92 ± 0.53 {R}\\oplus , respectively, straddling the boundary between high-density, rocky planets and low-density planets with thick gaseous envelopes. The planets have orbital periods of 9.32414 days and 15.50120 days, respectively, and a period ratio {P}c/{P}b = 1.6624, very near to the 5:3 mean motion resonance, which may be a record of the system’s formation history. Transit timing variations due to gravitational interactions between the planets may be detectable using ground-based telescopes. Finally, this system offers a convenient laboratory for studying the bulk composition and atmospheric properties of small planets with low equilibrium temperatures.

  6. The fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition in confined water: nuclear magnetic resonance results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, F.; Broccio, M.; Corsaro, C.; Faraone, A.; Wanderlingh, U.; Liu, L.; Mou, C.-Y.; Chen, S. H.

    2006-04-01

    By means of a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, we give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition (FST) in confined water at a temperature TL=223±2K. We have studied the dynamics of water contained in 1D cylindrical nanoporous matrices (MCM-41-S) in the temperature range 190-280K, where experiments on bulk water were so far hampered by crystallization. The FST is clearly inferred from the T dependence of the inverse of the self-diffusion coefficient of water (1/D) as a crossover point from a non-Arrhenius to an Arrhenius behavior. The combination of the measured self-diffusion coefficient D and the average translational relaxation time ⟨τT⟩, as measured by neutron scattering, shows the predicted breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation in deeply supercooled water.

  7. The fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition in confined water: nuclear magnetic resonance results.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, F; Broccio, M; Corsaro, C; Faraone, A; Wanderlingh, U; Liu, L; Mou, C-Y; Chen, S H

    2006-04-28

    By means of a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, we give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition (FST) in confined water at a temperature T(L)=223+/-2 K. We have studied the dynamics of water contained in 1D cylindrical nanoporous matrices (MCM-41-S) in the temperature range 190-280 K, where experiments on bulk water were so far hampered by crystallization. The FST is clearly inferred from the T dependence of the inverse of the self-diffusion coefficient of water (1D) as a crossover point from a non-Arrhenius to an Arrhenius behavior. The combination of the measured self-diffusion coefficient D and the average translational relaxation time tau(T), as measured by neutron scattering, shows the predicted breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation in deeply supercooled water.

  8. Eulerian approach to bounce-transit and drift resonance with magnetic drifts in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaing, K. C.; Seol, J.; Chu, M. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2017-08-01

    Bounce-transit and drift resonance can be important to plasma confinement in tokamaks with a broken symmetry. The resonance usually is either treated by integrating along the unperturbed orbits or calculated using an action-angle approach. An Eulerian approach has been developed to take into account the momentum conservation property of the Coulomb collision operator. The difference between the Eulerian approach and other approaches is in the thermodynamic forces of the transport fluxes, and the corresponding toroidal plasma viscosity. The mass and heat flows that are parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field B appear in the thermodynamic forces in the Eulerian approach. However, in the existing Eulerian approach, only the E × B drift is kept in the theory; the magnetic drifts, i.e., ∇B , and curvature drifts are neglected by adopting the large aspect ratio assumption, where E is the electric field and B = |B|. Here, the Eulerian approach is extended to include the magnetic drifts, which is important for energetic alpha particles as well, to calculate neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity in finite aspect ratio tokamaks. The relation to the nonlinear plasma viscosity in the plateau regime will also be discussed.

  9. Coherent population trapping resonances in the presence of the frequency-phase noises of an exciting field

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A V; Matveev, A N; Samokotin, A Yu; Akimov, A V; Sorokin, Vadim N; Kolachevsky, Nikolai N

    2009-05-31

    The influence of noises of the frequency and phase difference of an exciting bichromatic field on the parameters of coherent population trapping resonances is studied experimentally. When the phase difference fluctuates within a limited interval near its average value with a short correlation time, the resonance contrast decreases proportionally to exp({phi}{sup 2}{sub rms}), where {phi}{sup 2}{sub rms} is the phase dispersion (in rad{sup 2}). In this case, the spectral width of the resonance remains constant. In another limiting case, when the phase noise has a long correlation time, the resonance contour broadens, the area under the contour being invariable. Experiments were performed with the Zeeman sublevels of the ground state of {sup 87}Rb by exciting rubidium vapour in a glass cell at the resonance wavelength of 795 nm. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  10. Relaxation transition in glass-forming polybutadiene as revealed by nuclear resonance X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Toshiji; Inoue, Rintaro; Saito, Makina; Seto, Makoto; Yoda, Yoshitaka

    2014-04-14

    We investigated the arrest mechanism of molecular motions in a glass forming polybutadiene near the glass transition using a new nuclear resonance synchrotron X-ray scattering technique to cover a wide time range (10(-9) to 10(-5) s) and a scattering vector Q range (9.6-40 nm(-1)), which have never been accessed by other methods. Owing to the wide time and Q ranges it was found for the first time that a transition of the α-process to the slow β-process (or the Johari-Goldstein process) was observed in a Q range higher than the first peak in the structure factor S(Q) at the critical temperature T(c) in the mode coupling theory. The results suggest the important roles of hopping motions below T(c), which was predicted by the recent extended mode coupling theory and the cooperative motions due to the strong correlation at the first peak in S(Q) in the arrest mechanism.

  11. Relaxation transition in glass-forming polybutadiene as revealed by nuclear resonance X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Toshiji; Inoue, Rintaro; Saito, Makina; Seto, Makoto; Yoda, Yoshitaka

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the arrest mechanism of molecular motions in a glass forming polybutadiene near the glass transition using a new nuclear resonance synchrotron X-ray scattering technique to cover a wide time range (10-9 to 10-5 s) and a scattering vector Q range (9.6-40 nm-1), which have never been accessed by other methods. Owing to the wide time and Q ranges it was found for the first time that a transition of the α-process to the slow β-process (or the Johari-Goldstein process) was observed in a Q range higher than the first peak in the structure factor S(Q) at the critical temperature Tc in the mode coupling theory. The results suggest the important roles of hopping motions below Tc, which was predicted by the recent extended mode coupling theory and the cooperative motions due to the strong correlation at the first peak in S(Q) in the arrest mechanism.

  12. High field nuclear magnetic resonance in transition metal substituted BaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garitezi, T. M.; Lesseux, G. G.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Adriano, C.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Urbano, R. R.

    2014-05-01

    We report high field 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on Co and Cu substituted BaFe2As2 single crystals displaying same structural/magnetic transition T0≃128 K. From our anisotropy studies in the paramagnetic state, we strikingly found virtually identical quadrupolar splitting and consequently the quadrupole frequency νQ≃2.57(1) MHz for both compounds, despite the claim that each Cu delivers 2 extra 3d electrons in BaFe2As2 compared to Co substitution. These results allow us to conclude that a subtle change in the crystallographic structure, particularly in the Fe-As tetrahedra, must be the most probable tuning parameter to determine T0 in this class of superconductors rather than electronic doping. Furthermore, our NMR data around T0 suggest coexistence of tetragonal/paramagnetic and orthorhombic/antiferromagnetic phases between the structural and the spin density wave magnetic phase transitions, similarly to what was reported for K-doped BaFe2As2 [Urbano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 107001 (2010)].

  13. Plasmonic phase transition and phase retardation: essential optical characteristics of localized surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hung; Chen, Wei-Ting

    2013-09-01

    Phase transition that occurs around the spectral position of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) has various applications for light manipulation and refractive index sensing. Previous studies focused on phase responses of specific plasmonic structures, whereas the general theoretical analysis remains inadequate. In this study, we analytically modeled the phase spectra and the intensity spectra of silver nanodots with temporal coupled-mode theory. The phase transition occurs at the transmission dip, whereas the phase of reflection varies much more gradually. We further derived the equation for the slope of the phase at the transmission dip, which is a function of the rates of Ohmic dissipation and emission. The theoretical analysis is also applicable for wide varieties of LSPR systems and provides an intuitive physical mechanism for phase properties. Then, based on the fundamental discussion, we further investigated plasmonic phase retardation in anisotropic nanodots for the application of boosting the figure of merit (FOM) of refractive index sensing. The anisotropic nanodots induce plasmonic phase transitions, which spectrally split, for transmission waves polarized along the symmetric axes. Thus, anisotropy induces relative phase retardation in the narrow spectral region between the wavelengths of the LSPRs. We numerically manipulated the full width at half maximum of the ellipsometric spectra by adjusting the aspect ratio of the nanodots and observed an FOM of 24.3. In addition, experiments were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of this arrangement.Phase transition that occurs around the spectral position of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) has various applications for light manipulation and refractive index sensing. Previous studies focused on phase responses of specific plasmonic structures, whereas the general theoretical analysis remains inadequate. In this study, we analytically modeled the phase spectra and the intensity spectra of

  14. Fractal analysis of the ischemic transition region in chronic ischemic heart disease using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Michallek, Florian; Dewey, Marc

    2017-04-01

    To introduce a novel hypothesis and method to characterise pathomechanisms underlying myocardial ischemia in chronic ischemic heart disease by local fractal analysis (FA) of the ischemic myocardial transition region in perfusion imaging. Vascular mechanisms to compensate ischemia are regulated at various vascular scales with their superimposed perfusion pattern being hypothetically self-similar. Dedicated FA software ("FraktalWandler") has been developed. Fractal dimensions during first-pass (FDfirst-pass) and recirculation (FDrecirculation) are hypothesised to indicate the predominating pathomechanism and ischemic severity, respectively. Twenty-six patients with evidence of myocardial ischemia in 108 ischemic myocardial segments on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were analysed. The 40th and 60th percentiles of FDfirst-pass were used for pathomechanical classification, assigning lesions with FDfirst-pass ≤ 2.335 to predominating coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) and ≥2.387 to predominating coronary artery disease (CAD). Optimal classification point in ROC analysis was FDfirst-pass = 2.358. FDrecirculation correlated moderately with per cent diameter stenosis in invasive coronary angiography in lesions classified CAD (r = 0.472, p = 0.001) but not CMD (r = 0.082, p = 0.600). The ischemic transition region may provide information on pathomechanical composition and severity of myocardial ischemia. FA of this region is feasible and may improve diagnosis compared to traditional noninvasive myocardial perfusion analysis. • A novel hypothesis and method is introduced to pathophysiologically characterise myocardial ischemia. • The ischemic transition region appears a meaningful diagnostic target in perfusion imaging. • Fractal analysis may characterise pathomechanical composition and severity of myocardial ischemia.

  15. Role of Anatomical Landmarks in Identifying Normal and Transitional Vertebra in Lumbar Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, Devimeenal; Indiran, Venkatraman; Hithaya, Fouzal; Alamelu, M; Padmanaban, S

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective study. Identification of transitional vertebra is important in spine imaging, especially in presurgical planning. Pasted images of the whole spine obtained using high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are helpful in counting vertebrae and identifying transitional vertebrae. Counting vertebrae and identifying transitional vertebrae is challenging in isolated studies of lumbar spine and in studies conducted in low-field MRI. An incorrect evaluation may lead to wrong-level treatment. Here, we identify the location of different anatomical structures that can help in counting and identifying vertebrae. Many studies have assessed the vertebral segments using various anatomical structures such as costal facets (CF), aortic bifurcation (AB), inferior vena cava confluence (IC), right renal artery (RRA), celiac trunk (CT), superior mesenteric artery root (SR), iliolumbar ligament (ILL) psoas muscle (PM) origin, and conus medullaris. However, none have yielded any consistent results. We studied the locations of the anatomical structures CF, AB, IC, RRA, CT, SR, ILL, and PM in patients who underwent whole spine MRI at our department. In our study, 81.4% patients had normal spinal segmentation, 14.7% had sacralization, and 3.8% had lumbarization. Vascular landmarks had variable origin. There were caudal and cranial shifts with respect to lumbarization and sacralization. In 93.8% of cases in the normal group, ILL emerged from either L5 alone or the adjacent disc. In the sacralization group, ILL was commonly seen in L5. In the lumbarization group, ILL emerged from L5 and the adjacent disc (66.6%). CFs were identified at D12 in 96.9% and 91.7% of patients in the normal and lumbarization groups, respectively. The PM origin was observed from D12 or D12-L1 in most patients in the normal and sacralization groups. CF, PM, and ILL were good identification markers for D12 and L5, but none were 100% accurate.

  16. Role of Anatomical Landmarks in Identifying Normal and Transitional Vertebra in Lumbar Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Indiran, Venkatraman; Hithaya, Fouzal; Alamelu, M.; Padmanaban, S.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose Identification of transitional vertebra is important in spine imaging, especially in presurgical planning. Pasted images of the whole spine obtained using high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are helpful in counting vertebrae and identifying transitional vertebrae. Counting vertebrae and identifying transitional vertebrae is challenging in isolated studies of lumbar spine and in studies conducted in low-field MRI. An incorrect evaluation may lead to wrong-level treatment. Here, we identify the location of different anatomical structures that can help in counting and identifying vertebrae. Overview of Literature Many studies have assessed the vertebral segments using various anatomical structures such as costal facets (CF), aortic bifurcation (AB), inferior vena cava confluence (IC), right renal artery (RRA), celiac trunk (CT), superior mesenteric artery root (SR), iliolumbar ligament (ILL) psoas muscle (PM) origin, and conus medullaris. However, none have yielded any consistent results. Methods We studied the locations of the anatomical structures CF, AB, IC, RRA, CT, SR, ILL, and PM in patients who underwent whole spine MRI at our department. Results In our study, 81.4% patients had normal spinal segmentation, 14.7% had sacralization, and 3.8% had lumbarization. Vascular landmarks had variable origin. There were caudal and cranial shifts with respect to lumbarization and sacralization. In 93.8% of cases in the normal group, ILL emerged from either L5 alone or the adjacent disc. In the sacralization group, ILL was commonly seen in L5. In the lumbarization group, ILL emerged from L5 and the adjacent disc (66.6%). CFs were identified at D12 in 96.9% and 91.7% of patients in the normal and lumbarization groups, respectively. The PM origin was observed from D12 or D12–L1 in most patients in the normal and sacralization groups. Conclusions CF, PM, and ILL were good identification markers for D12 and L5, but none were

  17. Reversible Fano resonance by transition from fast light to slow light in a coupled-resonator-induced transparency structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yundong; Zhang, Xuenan; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Ruidong; Gai, Yulong; Liu, Xiaoqi; Yuan, Ping

    2013-04-08

    We theoretically propose and experimentally perform a novel dispersion tuning scheme to realize a tunable Fano resonance in a coupled-resonator-induced transparency (CRIT) structure coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometer. We reveal that the profile of the Fano resonance in the resonator coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometers (RCMZI) is determined not only by the phase shift difference between the two arms of the RCMZI but also by the dispersion (group delay) of the CRIT structure. Furthermore, it is theoretically predicted and experimentally demonstrated that the slope and the asymmetry parameter (q) describing the Fano resonance spectral line shape of the RCMZI experience a sign reversal when the dispersion of the CRIT structure is tuned from abnormal dispersion (fast light) to normal dispersion (slow light). These theoretical and experimental results indicate that the reversible Fano resonance which holds significant implications for some attractive device applications such as highly sensitive biochemical sensors, ultrafast optical switches and routers can be realized by the dispersion tuning scheme in the RCMZI.

  18. Bimodal behavior and isobestic transition pathway in surface plasmon resonance sensing

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Anuj; Canva, Michael; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2012-01-01

    In traditional interpretation of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing and imaging data, total surface coverage of adsorbed or deposited chemical and biological molecules is generally assumed. This homogenous assumption leads to the modeling of monomodal propagation of plasmons on the surface of the metallic film corresponding to a certain relative permittivity and thickness of the medium—such as molecular thin film—next to the metal. In actual SPR Imaging (SPRI) and SPR sensing situations, the plasmonics-active platforms (e.g., biochips) employed may capture the biomolecular targets as aggregates of different domain sizes on the surface of the thin metallic films. Indeed, such binding of target material always has a finite thickness and is characterized by aggregate lateral sizes possibly varying from tens of nanometers to hundreds of micrometers. This paper studies the propagation of surface plasmons in metallic films, with dielectric domain sizes varying within such ranges. Through rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) calculations, it is indicated that when the domain size is small, only a single mode of propagation—i.e. ‘monomodal’ propagation behavior—occurs as indicated by only one dip in the angular reflectance curves associated with metallic film having a periodically structured array of molecules on its surface. On the other hand, as the domain size is increased, there is a transition from the ‘monomodal propagation behavior’ to the existence of a ‘mixture of monomodal and bimodal propagation behavior’, which changes to a purely ‘bimodal behavior’ after the size of the domain periodicity is increased beyond about ten micron. Such a transition pathway clearly exhibits isobestic points. The calculations presented in this paper can enable correct interpretation of experimental angular or spectral reflectance data. PMID:23188328

  19. KOI-142, The King of Transit Variations, is a Pair of Planets near the 2:1 Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David; Kipping, David; Terrell, Dirk; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gáspár Á.; Buchhave, Lars A.

    2013-11-01

    The transit timing variations (TTVs) can be used as a diagnostic of gravitational interactions between planets in a multi-planet system. Many Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) exhibit significant TTVs, but KOI-142.01 stands out among them with an unrivaled sime12 hr TTV amplitude. Here we report a thorough analysis of KOI-142.01's transits. We discover periodic transit duration variations (TDVs) of KOI-142.01 that are nearly in phase with the observed TTVs. We show that KOI-142.01's TTVs and TDVs uniquely detect a non-transiting companion with a mass sime0.63 that of Jupiter (KOI-142c). KOI-142.01's mass inferred from the transit variations is consistent with the measured transit depth, suggesting a Neptune-class planet (KOI-142b). The orbital period ratio Pc /Pb = 2.03 indicates that the two planets are just wide of the 2:1 resonance. The present dynamics of this system, characterized here in detail, can be used to test various formation theories that have been proposed to explain the near-resonant pairs of exoplanets.

  20. KOI-142, THE KING OF TRANSIT VARIATIONS, IS A PAIR OF PLANETS NEAR THE 2:1 RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorný, David; Terrell, Dirk; Kipping, David; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gáspár Á.; Buchhave, Lars A.

    2013-11-01

    The transit timing variations (TTVs) can be used as a diagnostic of gravitational interactions between planets in a multi-planet system. Many Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) exhibit significant TTVs, but KOI-142.01 stands out among them with an unrivaled ≅12 hr TTV amplitude. Here we report a thorough analysis of KOI-142.01's transits. We discover periodic transit duration variations (TDVs) of KOI-142.01 that are nearly in phase with the observed TTVs. We show that KOI-142.01's TTVs and TDVs uniquely detect a non-transiting companion with a mass ≅0.63 that of Jupiter (KOI-142c). KOI-142.01's mass inferred from the transit variations is consistent with the measured transit depth, suggesting a Neptune-class planet (KOI-142b). The orbital period ratio P{sub c} /P{sub b} = 2.03 indicates that the two planets are just wide of the 2:1 resonance. The present dynamics of this system, characterized here in detail, can be used to test various formation theories that have been proposed to explain the near-resonant pairs of exoplanets.

  1. Suppression of surface plasmon resonance in Au nanoparticles upon transition to the liquid state.

    PubMed

    Gerasimov, V S; Ershov, A E; Gavrilyuk, A P; Karpov, S V; Ågren, H; Polyutov, S P

    2016-11-14

    Significant suppression of resonant properties of single gold nanoparticles at the surface plasmon frequency during heating and subsequent transition to the liquid state has been demonstrated experimentally and explained for the first time. The results for plasmonic absorption of the nanoparticles have been analyzed by means of Mie theory using experimental values of the optical constants for the liquid and solid metal. The good qualitative agreement between calculated and experimental spectra support the idea that the process of melting is accompanied by an abrupt increase of the relaxation constants, which depends, beside electron-phonon coupling, on electron scattering at a rising number of lattice defects in a particle upon growth of its temperature, and subsequent melting as a major cause for the observed plasmonic suppression. It is emphasized that observed effect is fully reversible and may underlie nonlinear optical responses of nanocolloids and composite materials containing plasmonic nanoparticles and their aggregates in conditions of local heating and in general, manifest itself in a wide range of plasmonics phenomena associated with strong heating of nanoparticles.

  2. Low-power stimulated emission nuclear quadrupole resonance detection system utilizing Rabi transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolos, John; Mouyos, William; Feng, Judy; Chase, Walter

    2013-06-01

    The application of CW radar techniques to Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) detection of nitrogen based explosives and chlorine based narcotics enables the use of low power levels, in the range of 10's of watts, to yield high signal strengths. By utilizing Rabi transitions the nucleus oscillates between states one and two under the time dependent incident electromagnetic field and alternately absorbs energy from the incident field while emitting coherent energy via stimulated emission. Through the application of a cancellation algorithm the incident field is eliminated from the NQR response, allowing the receive signal to be measured while transmitting. The response signal is processed using matched filters of the NQR response which enables the direct detection of explosives. This technology has applicability to the direct detection of explosives and narcotics for security screening, all at safe low power levels, opposed to the current XRay and Millimeter wave screening systems that detect objects that may contain explosives and utilize high power. The quantum mechanics theoretical basis for the approach and an application for a system for security screening are described with empirical results presented to show the effects observed.

  3. Frequency tuning of single photons from a whispering-gallery mode resonator to MHz-wide transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, G.; Vogl, U.; Sedlmeir, F.; Strekalov, D. V.; Otterpohl, A.; Averchenko, V.; Schwefel, H. G. L.; Leuchs, G.; Marquardt, Ch.

    2016-11-01

    Quantum repeaters rely on interfacing flying qubits with quantum memories. The most common implementations include a narrowband single photon matched in bandwidth and central frequency to an atomic system. Previously, we demonstrated the compatibility of our versatile source of heralded single photons, which is based on parametric down-conversion in a triply resonant whispering-gallery mode resonator, with alkaline transitions [Schunk et al., Optica 2015, 2, 773]. In this paper, we analyse our source in terms of phase matching, available wavelength-tuning mechanisms and applications to narrowband atomic systems. We resonantly address the D1 transitions of caesium and rubidium with this optical parametric oscillator pumped above its oscillation threshold. Below threshold, the efficient coupling of single photons to atomic transitions heralded by single telecom-band photons is demonstrated. Finally, we present an accurate analytical description of our observations. Providing the demonstrated flexibility in connecting various atomic transitions with telecom wavelengths, we show a promising approach to realize an essential building block for quantum repeaters.

  4. Resonant enhancement of second order sideband generation for intraexcitonic transitions in GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, M.; Schneider, H.; Winnerl, S.; Helm, M.; Roch, T.; Andrews, A. M.; Schartner, S.; Strasser, G.

    2009-06-01

    We present an experimental study on efficient second order sideband generation in symmetric undoped GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells. A near-infrared laser tuned to excitonic interband transitions is mixed with an in-plane polarized terahertz beam from a free-electron laser. The terahertz beam is tuned either to the intraexcitonic heavy-hole 1s-2p transition or to the interexcitonic heavy-hole light-hole transition. We find strong evidence that the intraexcitonic transition is of paramount influence on n =±2 sideband generation, leading to an order-of-magnitude resonant enhancement of the conversion efficiency up to 0.1% at low temperature. At room temperature, the efficiency drops only by a factor of 7 for low terahertz powers.

  5. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman

    2016-02-28

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2,5/2,7/2, and 9/2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Furthermore, applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  6. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  7. Atypical Learning in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Transitive Inference

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Marjorie; Ragland, J. Daniel; Niendam, Tara A.; Lesh, Tyler A.; Beck, Jonathan S.; Matter, John C.; Frank, Michael J.; Carter, Cameron S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the neural mechanisms underlying impairments in generalizing learning shown by adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method Twenty-one high-functioning individuals with ASD aged 12–18 years, and 23 gender, IQ, and age-matched adolescents with typical development (TYP) completed a transitive inference (TI) task implemented using rapid event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). They were trained on overlapping pairs in a stimulus hierarchy of colored ovals where A>B>C>D>E>F and then tested on generalizing this training to new stimulus pairings (AF, BD, BE) in a “Big Game.” Whole-brain univariate, region of interest, and functional connectivity analyses were used. Results During training, TYP exhibited increased recruitment of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), while the group with ASD showed greater functional connectivity between the PFC and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Both groups recruited the hippocampus and caudate comparably; however, functional connectivity between these regions was positively associated with TI performance for only the group with ASD. During the Big Game, TYP showed greater recruitment of the PFC, parietal cortex, and the ACC. Recruitment of these regions increased with age in the group with ASD. Conclusion During TI, TYP recruited cognitive control-related brain regions implicated in mature problem solving/reasoning including the PFC, parietal cortex, and ACC, while the group with ASD showed functional connectivity of the hippocampus and the caudate that was associated with task performance. Failure to reliably engage cognitive control-related brain regions may produce less integrated flexible learning in those with ASD unless they are provided with task support that in essence provides them with cognitive control, but this pattern may normalize with age. PMID:26506585

  8. Evidence for the 2B1-2A1 electronic transition in chlorine dioxide from resonance Raman depolarization ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Philip J.; Esposito, Anthony P.; Foster, Catherine E.; Beckman, Robert A.

    1997-11-01

    The resonance Raman depolarization ratios of chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in cyclohexane are measured and analyzed to establish the existence of a 2A1 excited state that is nearly degenerate with the optically stronger, 2A2 excited state. The depolarization ratio of the symmetric stretch fundamental transition is measured at several excitation wavelengths spanning the lowest-energy electronic transition centered at ˜360 nm. The depolarization ratio of this transition reaches a maximum value of 0.25±0.04 directly on resonance suggesting that scattered intensity is not derived from a single excited state. The depolarization ratios are modeled utilizing the time-dependent formalism for Raman scattering. This analysis demonstrates that the observed Raman depolarization ratios are derived from contributions of two excited states of 2A1 and 2A2 symmetry to the observed scattering. The results presented here support the emerging picture of OClO excited-state reaction dynamics in which photoexcitation to the 2A2 excited state is followed by internal conversion from this state to the 2A1 surface. Both the role of the 2A1 state in the photochemistry of OClO and the importance of this state in modeling resonance Raman intensities are discussed.

  9. The theory of electro-magnetic radiation of electron transiting through the resonance-tunnel structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tkach, M.; Seti, Ju.; Voitsekhivska, O.; Fartushynsky, R.

    2009-12-14

    The quasi-stationary electron states are studied in the three-barrier resonance-tunnel structure which is the basic element of coherent quantum cascade lasers. In the models of rectangular and delta-barrier potentials there is established theory of evolution and collapse of double resonance complexes in a symmetric resonance-tunnel structure. The induced conductivity of nano-system is calculated within the both models. It is shown that the negative induced conductivity of three-barrier resonance-tunnel structure in delta-barrier model is dozens times smaller than more realistic magnitudes obtained within the rectangular potentials model.

  10. Nonlinear Transition from Mitigation to Suppression of the Edge Localized Mode with Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in the EAST Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Liang, Y; Liu, Y Q; Gu, S; Yang, X; Guo, W; Shi, T; Jia, M; Wang, L; Lyu, B; Zhou, C; Liu, A; Zang, Q; Liu, H; Chu, N; Wang, H H; Zhang, T; Qian, J; Xu, L; He, K; Chen, D; Shen, B; Gong, X; Ji, X; Wang, S; Qi, M; Song, Y; Yuan, Q; Sheng, Z; Gao, G; Fu, P; Wan, B

    2016-09-09

    Evidence of a nonlinear transition from mitigation to suppression of the edge localized mode (ELM) by using resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in the EAST tokamak is presented. This is the first demonstration of ELM suppression with RMPs in slowly rotating plasmas with dominant radio-frequency wave heating. Changes of edge magnetic topology after the transition are indicated by a gradual phase shift in the plasma response field from a linear magneto hydro dynamics modeling result to a vacuum one and a sudden increase of three-dimensional particle flux to the divertor. The transition threshold depends on the spectrum of RMPs and plasma rotation as well as perturbation amplitude. This means that edge topological changes resulting from nonlinear plasma response plays a key role in the suppression of ELM with RMPs.

  11. Observation of strongly forbidden solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions via electron-electron double resonance detected NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Albert A.; Corzilius, Björn; Haze, Olesya; Swager, Timothy M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2013-12-01

    We present electron paramagnetic resonance experiments for which solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions were observed indirectly via polarization loss on the electron. This use of indirect observation allows characterization of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process close to the electron. Frequency profiles of the electron-detected solid effect obtained using trityl radical showed intense saturation of the electron at the usual solid effect condition, which involves a single electron and nucleus. However, higher order solid effect transitions involving two, three, or four nuclei were also observed with surprising intensity, although these transitions did not lead to bulk nuclear polarization—suggesting that higher order transitions are important primarily in the transfer of polarization to nuclei nearby the electron. Similar results were obtained for the SA-BDPA radical where strong electron-nuclear couplings produced splittings in the spectrum of the indirectly observed solid effect conditions. Observation of high order solid effect transitions supports recent studies of the solid effect, and suggests that a multi-spin solid effect mechanism may play a major role in polarization transfer via DNP.

  12. Observation of strongly forbidden solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions via electron-electron double resonance detected NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Albert A.; Corzilius, Björn; Haze, Olesya; Swager, Timothy M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2013-12-07

    We present electron paramagnetic resonance experiments for which solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions were observed indirectly via polarization loss on the electron. This use of indirect observation allows characterization of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process close to the electron. Frequency profiles of the electron-detected solid effect obtained using trityl radical showed intense saturation of the electron at the usual solid effect condition, which involves a single electron and nucleus. However, higher order solid effect transitions involving two, three, or four nuclei were also observed with surprising intensity, although these transitions did not lead to bulk nuclear polarization—suggesting that higher order transitions are important primarily in the transfer of polarization to nuclei nearby the electron. Similar results were obtained for the SA-BDPA radical where strong electron-nuclear couplings produced splittings in the spectrum of the indirectly observed solid effect conditions. Observation of high order solid effect transitions supports recent studies of the solid effect, and suggests that a multi-spin solid effect mechanism may play a major role in polarization transfer via DNP.

  13. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agnew, Jeanne L.; Choike, James R.

    1987-01-01

    Mathematical observations are made about some continuous curves, called transitions, encountered in well-known experiences. The transition parabola, the transition spiral, and the sidestep maneuver are presented. (MNS)

  14. Effect of photoions on the line shape of the Foerster resonance lines and microwave transitions in cold rubidium Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Entin, V. M.; Yakshina, E. A.; Ryabtsev, I. I.; Dyubko, S. F.; Alekseev, E. A.; Pogrebnyak, N. L.; Bezuglov, N. N.; Arimondo, E.

    2012-01-15

    Experiments are carried out on the spectroscopy of the Foerster resonance lines Rb(37P) + Rb(37P) {yields} Rb(37S) + Rb(38S) and microwave transitions nP {yields} n Prime S, n Prime D between Rydberg states of cold rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Under ordinary conditions, all spectra exhibit a linewidth of 2-3 MHz irrespective of the interaction time between atoms or between atoms and microwave radiation, although the limit resonance width should be determined by the inverse interaction time. The analysis of experimental conditions has shown that the main source of line broadening is the inhomogeneous electric field of cold photoions that are generated under the excitation of initial nP Rydberg states by broadband pulsed laser radiation. The application of an additional electric-field pulse that rapidly extracts photoions produced by a laser pulse leads to a considerable narrowing of lines of microwave resonances and the Foerster resonance. Various sources of line broadening in cold Rydberg atoms are analyzed.

  15. Laser-Induced Transition between Nonlinear and Linear Resonant Behaviors of a Micromechanical Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Bellouard, Yves

    2017-06-01

    We investigate both theoretically and experimentally a laser-based controlled tuning of the nonlinear behaviors of a single mechanical resonator. Thanks to localized three-dimensional modifications induced by femtosecond-laser irradiation, a Duffing-like oscillator is switched from a hardening resonance to a linear response and then to a softening resonance and exhibits a wide tunability of the resonant frequency and a remarkable increase of its linear dynamic range. The principles that underlie laser-tuned nonlinear oscillators are generic and simple, suggesting its wide applicability not only for micro- or nano-optomechanical systems but also as a generic framework for characterizing and understanding the physics of in-volume laser-affected zones.

  16. Probing high-pressure phase transitions in Ti-based perovskite-type ferroelectrics using visible resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fraysse, Guillaume; Rouquette, Jérôme; Haines, Julien; Bornand, Véronique; Papet, Philippe; Pereira, Altaïr Soria

    2012-12-03

    We report unprecedented dramatic changes in the 647.1 nm Raman signal of PbZr(0.6)Ti(0.4)O(3) occurring in the same pressure ranges as the critical pressures of the antiferrodistortive and ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transitions. This huge decrease in intensity of both the Raman modes and the background, observed for both pressure transmitting media used (glycerol or 4:1 methanol ethanol mixture), is shown to originate from the two-step loss of a resonance Raman effect and the concomitant fluorescence. Changes in the local titanium environment (first with the onset of octahedral tilting and then with the removal of polar cation displacements) alter the electronic band structure and modify the resonance conditions. Furthermore, the optimal resonance conditions are found to be particularly narrow, as shown by the fluorescence spectrum of PbZr(0.6)Ti(0.4)O(3) at atmospheric pressure characterized by the presence of a very well-defined sharp peak (fwhm = 8 nm) centered around 647.1 nm. These results thus demonstrate that visible resonance Raman spectroscopy can be used as a quick and efficient technique for probing phase transitions in PbZr(1-x)Ti(x)O(3) (PZT) and other technologically important perovskite-type materials such as PMN-xPT, PZN-xPT relaxors, lead free piezoelectrics, and ferroelectric nanopowders. This technique appears also a good alternative to UV Raman spectroscopy for probing the polar order at the nanoscale in ultrathinfilms and superlattices.

  17. Spin reorientation transition in Fe/CeH2 multilayers probed by soft X-ray resonant magnetic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, H. A.; Münzenberg, M.; Felsch, W.; Dhesi, S. S.

    The magnetic domain configurations of Fe 3d spins in Fe/CeH2 multilayers were measured by soft X-ray resonant magnetic scattering. The interface region could be probed by setting up X-ray standing waves due to the multilayer periodicity. By resolving first- and second-order magnetic scattering contributions, we show that the latter probe directly the magneto-crystalline anisotropy which is dominated by the Fe interface layers causing a spin reorientation transition when the temperature is lowered.

  18. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2, and 9/2. These results may be used to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Heavy Element Chemistry program.

  19. [The Study of Characteristics of Cladding-Reduced Coated Long-Period Fiber Grating Based on Mode Transition and Dual Peak Resonance].

    PubMed

    Lan, Jin-long; Gu, Zheng-tian

    2015-11-01

    Based on coupled-mode theory, the mode transition of the high-order cladding modes in a coated long-period tiber grating (LPFG) has been studied firstly; the mode transition region and non-mode transition region of high-order cladding modes are divided. The response characteristic of cladding mode effective index with increasing the overlay thickness is analyzed; the shift of resonant wavelength in the mode transition region will be larger than that in the non-mode transition region. Further, the changes of the resonant wavelength of some high-order cladding modes with grating period are investigated when the cladding radius are different, the shift between two resonant wavelengths of dual peak in the mode transition region is bigger than that in non-mode transition region when the cladding radius are uniform. And the shift between two resonant wavelengths of dual peak will be increased by the decrease of the cladding radius in both mode transition and non-mode transition regions. Finally, the response characteristics of film refractive index of coated LPFG are investigated for a high-order cladding mode while the cladding radius are different and the overlay thickness is located in mode transition region and non-transition mode region, then the optimized design scheme is come up with. The higher sensitivity dual-peak sensor of coated LPFG than the traditional dual-peak sensor will be obtained when the overlay thickness and refractive index is located in the mode transition region and the grating period close to the phase matching turning points. Further, the resolution power of coated LPFG sensor will further be improved by the appropriate reducing of the cladding radius.

  20. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on transitions for individuals with disabilities contains nine papers discussing transition programs and issues. "Transition Issues for the 1990s," by Michael J. Ward and William D. Halloran, discusses self-determination, school responsibility for transition, continued educational engagement of at-risk students, and service…

  1. Two-state transition between molten globule and unfolded states of acetylcholinesterase as monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, D I; Szosenfogel, R; Goldfarb, D; Silman, I; Weiner, L

    1994-01-01

    Cys-231 of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7) was selectively labeled with the mercury derivative of a stable nitroxyl radical. In 1.5 M guanidinium chloride, this conjugate exists in a molten globule state (MG), whereas in 5 M denaturant, it is in an unfolded state (U). The transition between the two states is reversible. In the MG, the label is highly immobilized, whereas in the U, it is almost freely rotating. The clearly distinct electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of the two states permits the study of this transition. Upon elevating the guanidinium chloride concentration, a decrease in the EPR signal of the MG occurs concomitantly with an increase in the U signal, the total intensity of the EPR spectra remaining constant. This behavior is characteristic of a two-state transition. The thermodynamic characteristics of this transition (delta G0 and m), whether estimated directly from the EPR data or from both CD and fluorescence data analyzed by assuming a two-state scheme, are in good agreement. PMID:7991597

  2. X-ray resonant photoexcitation: linewidths and energies of Kα transitions in highly charged Fe ions.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, J K; Bernitt, S; Epp, S W; Steinbrügge, R; Beilmann, C; Brown, G V; Eberle, S; Graf, A; Harman, Z; Hell, N; Leutenegger, M; Müller, A; Schlage, K; Wille, H-C; Yavaş, H; Ullrich, J; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R

    2013-09-06

    Photoabsorption by and fluorescence of the Kα transitions in highly charged iron ions are essential mechanisms for x-ray radiation transfer in astrophysical environments. We study photoabsorption due to the main Kα transitions in highly charged iron ions from heliumlike to fluorinelike (Fe24+ to Fe17+) using monochromatic x rays around 6.6 keV at the PETRA III synchrotron photon source. Natural linewidths were determined with hitherto unattained accuracy. The observed transitions are of particular interest for the understanding of photoexcited plasmas found in x-ray binary stars and active galactic nuclei.

  3. Size modulated transition in the fluid–structure interaction losses in nano mechanical beam resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Vishwakarma, S. D.; Pratap, R.; Pandey, A. K.; Parpia, J. M.; Craighead, H. G.; Verbridge, S. S.

    2016-05-21

    An understanding of the dominant dissipative mechanisms is crucial for the design of a high-Q doubly clamped nanobeam resonator to be operated in air. We focus on quantifying analytically the viscous losses—the squeeze film damping and drag force damping—that limit the net quality factor of a beam resonator, vibrating in its flexural fundamental mode with the surrounding fluid as air at atmospheric pressure. Specifically, drag force damping dominates at smaller beam widths and squeeze film losses dominate at larger beam widths, with no significant contribution from structural losses and acoustic radiation losses. The combined viscous losses agree well with the experimentally measured Q of the resonator over a large range of beam widths, within the limits of thin beam theory. We propose an empirical relation between the maximum quality factor and the ratio of maximum beam width to the squeeze film air gap thickness.

  4. Size modulated transition in the fluid-structure interaction losses in nano mechanical beam resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, S. D.; Pandey, A. K.; Parpia, J. M.; Verbridge, S. S.; Craighead, H. G.; Pratap, R.

    2016-05-01

    An understanding of the dominant dissipative mechanisms is crucial for the design of a high-Q doubly clamped nanobeam resonator to be operated in air. We focus on quantifying analytically the viscous losses—the squeeze film damping and drag force damping—that limit the net quality factor of a beam resonator, vibrating in its flexural fundamental mode with the surrounding fluid as air at atmospheric pressure. Specifically, drag force damping dominates at smaller beam widths and squeeze film losses dominate at larger beam widths, with no significant contribution from structural losses and acoustic radiation losses. The combined viscous losses agree well with the experimentally measured Q of the resonator over a large range of beam widths, within the limits of thin beam theory. We propose an empirical relation between the maximum quality factor and the ratio of maximum beam width to the squeeze film air gap thickness.

  5. Electromagnetically induced transparency resonances inverted in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D. E-mail: david@ipr.sci.am; Pashayan-Leroy, Y.; Leroy, C.; Cartaleva, S.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.; Auzinsh, M.

    2015-12-15

    The phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is investigated in a Λ-system of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 1} line in an external transverse magnetic field. Two spectroscopic cells having strongly different values of the relaxation rates γ{sub rel} are used: an Rb cell with antirelaxation coating (L ∼ 1 cm) and an Rb nanometric- thin cell (nanocell) with a thickness of the atomic vapor column L = 795 nm. For the EIT in the nanocell, we have the usual EIT resonances characterized by a reduction in the absorption (dark resonance (DR)), whereas for the EIT in the Rb cell with an antirelaxation coating, the resonances demonstrate an increase in the absorption (bright resonances (BR)). We suppose that such an unusual behavior of the EIT resonances (i.e., the reversal of the sign from DR to BR) is caused by the influence of an alignment process. The influence of alignment strongly depends on the configuration of the coupling and probe frequencies as well as on the configuration of the magnetic field.

  6. Probing local bias-induced transitions using photothermal excitation contact resonance atomic force microscopy and voltage spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qian; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; Collins, Liam; Yu, Pu; Kravchenko, Ivan; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina

    2015-01-05

    In this paper, nanomechanical properties are closely related to the states of matter, including chemical composition, crystal structure, mesoscopic domain configuration, etc. Investigation of these properties at the nanoscale requires not only static imaging methods, e.g., contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM), but also spectroscopic methods capable of revealing their dependence on various external stimuli. Here we demonstrate the voltage spectroscopy of CR-AFM, which was realized by combining photothermal excitation (as opposed to the conventional piezoacoustic excitation method) with the band excitation technique. We applied this spectroscopy to explore local bias-induced phenomena ranging from purely physical to surface electromechanical and electrochemical processes. Our measurements show that the changes in the surface properties associated with these bias-induced transitions can be accurately assessed in a fast and dynamic manner, using resonance frequency as a signature. Finally, with many of the advantages offered by photothermal excitation, contact resonance voltage spectroscopy not only is expected to find applications in a broader field of nanoscience but also will provide a basis for future development of other nanoscale elastic spectroscopies.

  7. Probing local bias-induced transitions using photothermal excitation contact resonance atomic force microscopy and voltage spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Qian; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; ...

    2015-01-05

    In this paper, nanomechanical properties are closely related to the states of matter, including chemical composition, crystal structure, mesoscopic domain configuration, etc. Investigation of these properties at the nanoscale requires not only static imaging methods, e.g., contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM), but also spectroscopic methods capable of revealing their dependence on various external stimuli. Here we demonstrate the voltage spectroscopy of CR-AFM, which was realized by combining photothermal excitation (as opposed to the conventional piezoacoustic excitation method) with the band excitation technique. We applied this spectroscopy to explore local bias-induced phenomena ranging from purely physical to surface electromechanical andmore » electrochemical processes. Our measurements show that the changes in the surface properties associated with these bias-induced transitions can be accurately assessed in a fast and dynamic manner, using resonance frequency as a signature. Finally, with many of the advantages offered by photothermal excitation, contact resonance voltage spectroscopy not only is expected to find applications in a broader field of nanoscience but also will provide a basis for future development of other nanoscale elastic spectroscopies.« less

  8. Interband resonant transitions in two-dimensional hexagonal lattices: Rabi oscillations, Zener tunnelling, and tunnelling of phase dislocations.

    PubMed

    Shchesnovich, Valery S; Desyatnikov, Anton S; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2008-09-01

    We study, analytically and numerically, the dynamics of interband transitions in two-dimensional hexagonal periodic photonic lattices. We develop an analytical approach employing the Bragg resonances of different types and derive the effective multi-level models of the Landau-Zener-Majorana type. For two-dimensional periodic potentials without a tilt, we demonstrate the possibility of the Rabi oscillations between the resonant Fourier amplitudes. In a biased lattice, i.e., for a two-dimensional periodic potential with an additional linear tilt, we identify three basic types of the interband transitions or Zener tunnelling. First, this is a quasi-one-dimensional tunnelling that involves only two Bloch bands and occurs when the Bloch index crosses the Bragg planes away from one of the high-symmetry points. In contrast, at the high-symmetry points (i.e., at the M and Gamma points), the Zener tunnelling is essentially two-dimensional, and it involves either three or six Bloch bands being described by the corresponding multi-level Landau-Zener-Majorana systems. We verify our analytical results by numerical simulations and observe an excellent agreement. Finally, we show that phase dislocations, or optical vortices, can tunnel between the spectral bands preserving their topological charge. Our theory describes the propagation of light beams in fabricated or optically-induced two-dimensional photonic lattices, but it can also be applied to the physics of cold atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates tunnelling in tilted two-dimensional optical potentials and other types of resonant wave propagation in periodic media.

  9. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes four articles: "Career Aspirations" (Field); "Making the Transition to a New Curriculum" (Baker, Householder); "How about a 'Work to School' Transition?" (Glasberg); and "Technological Improvisation: Bringing CNC to Woodworking" (Charles, McDuffie). (SK)

  10. Model for the {Delta}(1600) resonance and {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ramalho, G.; Tsushima, K.

    2010-10-01

    A covariant spectator constituent quark model is applied to study the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition. Two processes are important in the transition: a photon couples to the individual quarks of the {Delta}(1600) core (quark core), and a photon couples to the intermediate pion-baryon states (pion cloud). While the quark core contributions are estimated assuming {Delta}(1600) as the first radial excitation of {Delta}(1232), the pion cloud contributions are estimated based on an analogy with the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1232) transition. To estimate the pion cloud contributions in the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition, we include the relevant intermediate states, {pi}N, {pi}{Delta}, {pi}N(1440) and {pi}{Delta}(1600). Dependence on the four-momentum transfer squared, Q{sup 2}, is predicted for the magnetic dipole transition form factor, G{sub M}*(Q{sup 2}), as well as the helicity amplitudes, A{sub 1/2}(Q{sup 2}) and A{sub 3/2}(Q{sup 2}). The results at Q{sup 2}=0 are compared with the existing data.

  11. A model for the Delta(1600) resonance and gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ramalho, K. Tsushima

    2010-10-01

    A covariant spectator constituent quark model is applied to study the gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition. Two processes are important in the transition: a photon couples to the individual quarks of the Delta(1600) core (quark core), and a photon couples to the intermediate pion-baryon states (pion cloud). While the quark core contributions are estimated assuming Delta(1600) as the first radial excitation of Delta(1232), the pion cloud contributions are estimated based on an analogy with the gamma N -> Delta(1232) transition. To estimate the pion cloud contributions in the gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition, we include the relevant intermediate states, pi-N, pi-Delta, pi-N(1440) and pi-Delta(1600). Dependence on the four-momentum transfer squared, Q2, is predicted for the magnetic dipole transition form factor, GM*(Q2), as well as the helicity amplitudes, A_1/2(Q2) and A_3/2(Q2). The results at Q2=0 are compared with the existing data.

  12. Protein unfolding transitions in an intrinsically unstable annexin domain: molecular dynamics simulation and comparison with nuclear magnetic resonance data.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tru; Smith, Jeremy C; Sanson, Alain

    2002-08-01

    Unfolding transitions of an intrinsically unstable annexin domain and the unfolded state structure have been examined using multiple approximately 10-ns molecular dynamics simulations. Three main basins are observed in the configurational space: native-like state, compact partially unfolded or intermediate compact state, and the unfolded state. In the native-like state fluctuations are observed that are nonproductive for unfolding. During these fluctuations, after an initial loss of approximately 20% of the core residue native contacts, the core of the protein transiently completely refolds to the native state. The transition from the native-like basin to the partially unfolded compact state involves approximately 75% loss of native contacts but little change in the radius of gyration or core hydration properties. The intermediate state adopts for part of the time in one of the trajectories a novel highly compact salt-bridge stabilized structure that can be identified as a conformational trap. The intermediate-to-unfolded state transition is characterized by a large increase in the radius of gyration. After an initial relaxation the unfolded state recovers a native-like topology of the domain. The simulated unfolded state ensemble reproduces in detail experimental nuclear magnetic resonance data and leads to a convincing complete picture of the unfolded domain.

  13. Gamma-ray cascade transitions from resonant neutron capture in Cd-111 and Cd-113

    SciTech Connect

    Rusev, Gencho Y.

    2012-08-27

    A neutron-capture experiment on {sup nat}Cd has been carried out at DANCE. Multiple-fold coincidence {gamma}-ray spectra have been collected from J=0, 1 resonances in {sup 111}Cd and {sup 113}Cd. The cascades ending at the ground state can be described by the SLO model while the cascades ending at the 2+ states are better reproduced by the mixed SLO+KMF model.

  14. Glass transition-related changes in molecular mobility below glass transition temperature of freeze-dried formulations, as measured by dielectric spectroscopy and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Sumie; Aso, Yukio

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore why changes in the molecular mobility associated with glass transition, the timescale of which is on the order of 100 s, can be detected by measuring the nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times that reflect molecular motions on the order of 10 kHz and 1 MHz. The molecular motions in freeze-dried dextran 40k, dextran 1k, isomaltotriose (IMT), and alpha-glucose comprising a common unit but with different glass transition temperatures, were investigated by dielectric spectroscopy (DES) in the frequency range of 0.01 Hz to 100 kHz and in the temperature range of -20 degrees to 200 degrees C, in order to compare with the molecular motions reflected in nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times. The alpha-relaxation process for freeze-dried alpha-glucose was visualized by DES, whereas those for freeze-dried dextran 40k, dextran 1k, and IMT were too slow to be visualized by DES. The latter freeze-dried cakes exhibited quasi-dc polarization because of proton-hopping-like motion rather than alpha-relaxation process. The correlation time (tau(c)) for the backbone carbon of dextran 40k and IMT, calculated from the measured value of spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame, was found to be close to the relaxation time of proton-hopping-like motion determined by DES (tau(DES)) at temperatures around glass transition temperature. The timescales of molecular motions reflected in the tau(c) and tau(DES) were significantly smaller than that of motions leading to molecular rearrangement (molecular rearrangement motions), which correspond to alpha-relaxation. However, the shapes of temperature dependence for the tau(c) and tau(DES) were similar to that of the calorimetrically determined relaxation time of molecular rearrangement motions. Results suggest that the molecular motions reflected in the tau(c) and tau(DES) are linked to molecular rearrangement motions, such that enhancement of molecular rearrangement motions enhances

  15. Nonlinear Interaction of Detuned Instability Waves in Boundary-Layer Transition: Resonant-Triad Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sang Soo

    1998-01-01

    The non-equilibrium critical-layer analysis of a system of frequency-detuned resonant-triads is presented using the generalized scaling of Lee. It is shown that resonant-triads can interact nonlinearly within the common critical layer when their (fundamental) Strouhal numbers are different by a factor whose magnitude is of the order of the growth rate multiplied by the wavenumber of the instability wave. Since the growth rates of the instability modes become larger and the critical layers become thicker as the instability waves propagate downstream, the frequency-detuned resonant-triads that grow independently of each other in the upstream region can interact nonlinearly in the later downstream stage. In the final stage of the non-equilibrium critical-layer evolution, a wide range of instability waves with the scaled frequencies differing by almost an Order of (l) can nonlinearly interact. Low-frequency modes are also generated by the nonlinear interaction between oblique waves in the critical layer. The system of partial differential critical-layer equations along with the jump equations are presented here. The amplitude equations with their numerical solutions are given in Part 2. The nonlinearly generated low-frequency components are also investigated in Part 2.

  16. Interfering resonance as an underlying mechanism in the adaptive feedback control of radiationless transitions: Retinal isomerization.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Cyrille; Brumer, Paul

    2017-09-21

    Control of molecular processes via adaptive feedback often yields highly structured laser pulses that have eluded physical explanation. By contrast, coherent control approaches propose physically transparent mechanisms but are not readily visible in experimental results. Here, an analysis of a condensed phase adaptive feedback control experiment on retinal isomerization shows that it manifests a quantum interference based coherent control mechanism: control via interfering resonances. The result promises deep insight into the physical basis for the adaptive feedback control of a broad class of bound state processes.

  17. Interfering resonance as an underlying mechanism in the adaptive feedback control of radiationless transitions: Retinal isomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, Cyrille; Brumer, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Control of molecular processes via adaptive feedback often yields highly structured laser pulses that have eluded physical explanation. By contrast, coherent control approaches propose physically transparent mechanisms but are not readily visible in experimental results. Here, an analysis of a condensed phase adaptive feedback control experiment on retinal isomerization shows that it manifests a quantum interference based coherent control mechanism: control via interfering resonances. The result promises deep insight into the physical basis for the adaptive feedback control of a broad class of bound state processes.

  18. Resonant single-photon and multiphoton coherent transitions in a detuned regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaina, S.; Martens, M.; Egels, M.; Barakel, D.; Chiorescu, I.

    2015-07-01

    We performed quantum manipulations of the multilevel spin system S =5 /2 of a Mn2 + ion, by means of a two-tone pulse drive. The detuning between the excitation and readout radio frequency pulses allows one to select the number of photons involved in a Rabi oscillation as well as increase the frequency of this nutation. Thus detuning can lead to a resonant multiphoton process. Our analytical model for a two-photon process as well as a numerical generalization fit well the experimental findings, with implications for the use of multilevel spin systems as tunable solid state qubits.

  19. Cranio-vertebral transition assessment by magnetic resonance imaging in a sample of a northeast Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Frade, Heitor Cabral; França, Caio César Nuto Leite; Nascimento, José Jailson Costa do; Holanda, Maurus Marques de Almeida; Silva, Eulâmpio José da; Araújo, Severino Aires

    2017-07-01

    Cross-sectional analysis of craniometric parameters from individuals submitted to magnetic resonance at an outpatient imaging center between 2011 and 2012. Of 181 analyzed cases, the Welcker basal angle averaged 128.96º (SD 6.51), median distance between apex of the odontoid and Chamberlain's line was 2.27 mm (IQR -1.23-4.47) and the median clivus-canal angle was 150.5º (IQR 143.2-157.3). The Welcker basal angle was inversely correlated to the clivus-canal angle, and correlated to the distance between the apex of the odontoid and Chamberlain's line. There was a tendency to platibasia, basilar invagination and narrowing of the cranio-vertebral transition.

  20. Transit Timing Variation of Near-resonance Planetary Pairs. II. Confirmation of 30 Planets in 15 Multiple-planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ji-Wei

    2014-02-01

    Following on from Paper I in this series, I report the confirmation of a further 30 planets in 15 multiple-planet systems via transit timing variations (TTVs), using the publicly available Kepler light curves (Q0-Q16). All 15 pairs are near first-order mean motion resonances, showing sinusoidal TTVs consistent with theoretically predicted periods, which demonstrate they are orbiting and interacting in the same systems. Although individual masses cannot be accurately extracted based only on TTVs (because of the well known degeneracy between mass and eccentricity), the measured TTV phases and amplitudes can still place relatively tight constraints on their mass ratios and upper limits on their masses, which confirm their planetary nature. Some of these systems (KOI-274, KOI-285, KOI-370, and KOI-2672) are relatively bright and thus suitable for further follow-up observations.

  1. Effect of spike-timing-dependent plasticity on coherence resonance and synchronization transitions by time delay in adaptive neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huijuan; Gong, Yubing; Wang, Qi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we numerically study how time delay induces multiple coherence resonance (MCR) and synchronization transitions (ST) in adaptive Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks with spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). It is found that MCR induced by time delay STDP can be either enhanced or suppressed as the adjusting rate Ap of STDP changes, and ST by time delay varies with the increase of Ap, and there is optimal Ap by which the ST becomes strongest. It is also found that there are optimal network randomness and network size by which ST by time delay becomes strongest, and when Ap increases, the optimal network randomness and optimal network size increase and related ST is enhanced. These results show that STDP can either enhance or suppress MCR and optimal STDP can enhance ST induced by time delay in the adaptive neuronal networks. These findings provide a new insight into STDP's role for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  2. Resonant absorption and mode conversion in a transition layer between positive-index and negative-index media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kihong; Lee, D-H; Lim, H

    2008-10-27

    We study the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a transition layer between positive-index and negative-index media theoretically. We consider three models where both the dielectric permittivity epsilon and the magnetic permeability micro change linearly from positive values to negative values. At the positions where epsilon or micro vanishes, the mode conversion of the incident electromagnetic waves into longitudinal plasma oscillations can occur. Using the invariant imbedding theory of mode conversion in inhomogeneous media, we calculate the mode conversion coefficient and the electromagnetic field profile in a numerically exact manner. We find that strong mode conversion can occur for both s- and p-polarized incident waves. The dependence of mode conversion on polarization is influenced very sensitively by the spatial profiles of epsilon and micro. We also discuss the interaction effects between mode conversion phenomena occurring at two resonance points located nearby.

  3. Magnetic phase transitions in ferrite nanoparticles characterized by electron spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Arias, Yesica Vázquez-Victorio, Gabriela; Ortega-Zempoalteca, Raul; Acevedo-Salas, Ulises; Valenzuela, Raul; Ammar, Souad

    2015-05-07

    Ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in the composition Zn{sub 0.7}Ni{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were synthesized by the polyol method, with an average size of 8 nm. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements were carried out at a frequency of 9.45 GHz in the 100–500 K temperature range. Obtained results exhibited a characteristic ESR signal in terms of resonance field, H{sub res}, linewidth, ΔH, and peak ratio, R, for each magnetic phase. At low temperatures, the ferrimagnetic phase showed low H{sub res}, broad ΔH, and asymmetric R. At high temperatures, these parameters exhibited opposite values: high H{sub res}, small ΔH, and R ∼ 1. For intermediate temperatures, a different phase was observed, which was identified as a superparamagnetic phase by means of zero-field cooling-field cooling and hysteresis loops measurements. The observed differences were explained in terms of the internal fields and especially due to the cubic anisotropy in the ordered phase.

  4. Phase transitions in the boson-fermion resonance model in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orignac, E.; Citro, R.

    2006-06-01

    We study one-dimensional fermions with photoassociation or with a narrow Fano-Feshbach resonance described by the boson-fermion resonance model. Using the bosonization technique, we derive a low-energy Hamiltonian of the system. We show that at low energy, the order parameters for the Bose condensation and fermion superfluidity become identical, while a spin gap and a gap against the formation of phase slips are formed. As a result of these gaps, charge density wave correlations decay exponentially in contrast with the phases where only bosons or only fermions are present. We find a Luther-Emery point where the phase slips and the spin excitations can be described in terms of pseudofermions. This allows us to provide closed form expressions of the density-density correlations and the spectral functions. The spectral functions of the fermions are gapped, whereas the spectral functions of the bosons remain gapless. The application of a magnetic field results in a loss of coherence between the bosons and the fermion and the disappearance of the gap. Changing the detuning has no effect on the gap until either the fermion or the boson density is reduced to zero. Finally, we discuss the formation of a Mott insulating state in a periodic potential. The relevance of our results for experiments with ultracold atomic gases subject to one-dimensional confinement is also discussed.

  5. Efficient, high-resolution resonance laser ionization spectroscopy using weak transitions to long-lived excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groote, R. P.; Verlinde, M.; Sonnenschein, V.; Flanagan, K. T.; Moore, I.; Neyens, G.

    2017-03-01

    Laser spectroscopic studies on minute samples of exotic radioactive nuclei require very efficient experimental techniques. In addition, high resolving powers are required to allow extraction of nuclear structure information. Here we demonstrate that by using weak atomic transitions, resonance laser ionization spectroscopy is achieved with the required high efficiency (1%-10%) and precision (linewidths of tens of MHz). We illustrate experimentally and through the use of simulations how the narrow experimental linewidths are achieved and how distorted resonance ionization spectroscopy line shapes can be avoided. The role of the delay of the ionization laser pulse with respect to the excitation laser pulse is crucial: the use of a delayed ionization step permits the best resolving powers and line shapes. A high efficiency is maintained if the intermediate level has a lifetime that is at least of the order of the excitation laser pulse width. A model that describes this process reproduces well the observed features and will help to optimize the conditions for future experiments. The simulation code is available upon request to the authors.

  6. Transition from resonances to surface waves in π+-p elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Micheli, Enrico; Viano, Giovanni Alberto

    2008-08-01

    In this article, we study resonances and surface waves in π+-p scattering. We focus on the sequence whose spin-parity values are given by Jp =3/2 +,7/2 +,11/2 +,15/2 +,19/2 + . A widely-held belief takes for granted that this sequence can be connected by a moving pole in the complex angular momentum (CAM)-plane, which gives rise to a linear trajectory of the form J =α0 +α‧m2,α‧ ∼ 1 / (GeV)2 , which is the standard expression of the Regge pole trajectory. But the phenomenology shows that only the first few resonances lie on a trajectory of this type. For higher Jp this rule is violated and is substituted by the relation J∼kR , where k is the pion-nucleon c.m.s. momentum, and R∼ 1 fm. In this article we prove: (a) Starting from a non-relativistic model of the proton, regarded as composed by three quarks confined by harmonic potentials, we prove that the first three members of this π+-p resonance sequence can be associated with a vibrational spectrum of the proton generated by an algebra sp (3, R) . Accordingly, these first three members of the sequence can be described by Regge poles and lie on a standard linear trajectory. (b) At higher energies the amplitudes are dominated by diffractive scattering, and the creeping waves play a dominant role. They can be described by a second class of poles, which can be called Sommerfeld's poles, and lie on a line nearly parallel to the imaginary axis of the CAM-plane. (c) The Sommerfeld's pole which is closest to the real axis of the CAM-plane is dominant at large angles, and describes in a proper way the backward diffractive peak in both the following cases: at fixed k, as a function of the scattering angle, and at fixed scattering angle θ = π , as a function of k. (d) The evolution of this pole, as a function of k, is given in first approximation by J≃kR .

  7. Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandy, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on transition from school to adult life for persons with disabilities. Included are "success stories," brief program descriptions, and a list of resources. Individual articles include the following titles and authors: "Transition: An Energizing Concept" (Paul Bates); "Transition…

  8. Stochastic resonance and dynamic first-order pseudo-phase-transitions in the irreversible growth of thin films under spatially periodic magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Loscar, Ernesto S; Candia, Julián

    2013-10-01

    We study the irreversible growth of magnetic thin films under the influence of spatially periodic fields by means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We find first-order pseudo-phase-transitions that separate a dynamically disordered phase from a dynamically ordered phase. By analogy with time-dependent oscillating fields applied to Ising-type models, we qualitatively associate this dynamic transition with the localization-delocalization transition of spatial hysteresis loops. Depending on the relative width of the magnetic film L compared to the wavelength of the external field λ, different transition regimes are observed. For small systems (L < λ), the transition is associated with the standard stochastic resonance regime, while for large systems (L > λ), the transition is driven by anomalous stochastic resonance. The origin of the latter is identified as due to the emergence of an additional relevant length scale, namely, the roughness of the spin domain switching interface. The distinction between different stochastic resonance regimes is discussed at length both qualitatively by means of snapshot configurations and quantitatively via residence-length and order-parameter probability distributions.

  9. Deuteron NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) in relation to the glass transition in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roessler, E.; Sillescu, H.; Spiess, H. W.; Wallwitz, R.

    1983-01-01

    H-2NMR is introduced as a tool for investigating slow molecular motion in the glass transition region of amorphous polymers. In particular, we compare H-2 spin alignment echo spectra of chain deuterated polystyrene with model calculations for restricted rotational Brownian motion. Molecular motion in the polyztyrene-toluene system has been investigated by analyzing H-2NMR of partially deuterated polystyrene and toluene, respectively. The diluent mobility in the mixed glass has been decomposed into solid and liquid components where the respective average correlation times differ by more than 5 decades.

  10. Deuteron NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) in relation to the glass transition in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roessler, E.; Sillescu, H.; Spiess, H. W.; Wallwitz, R.

    1983-01-01

    H-2NMR is introduced as a tool for investigating slow molecular motion in the glass transition region of amorphous polymers. In particular, we compare H-2 spin alignment echo spectra of chain deuterated polystyrene with model calculations for restricted rotational Brownian motion. Molecular motion in the polyztyrene-toluene system has been investigated by analyzing H-2NMR of partially deuterated polystyrene and toluene, respectively. The diluent mobility in the mixed glass has been decomposed into solid and liquid components where the respective average correlation times differ by more than 5 decades.

  11. Resonance and intersystem transition lines of astrophysical importance in neutral sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, N. C.; Hibbert, A.

    2006-10-01

    A systematic study of S I levels belonging to 3s23p4, 3s3p5, 3s23p3(4So, 2Do, 2Po)nell, where nell = 4s, 5s, 6s, 4p, 5p, 6p, 3d, 4d, 5d, 4f and 5f configurations and optically allowed and intersystem transitions among them are presented. A very large set of basis functions are generated using up to three electron promotions from the ground configurations for each of the 24 symmetries considered belonging to two parities. Many of the levels are reported for the first time. Relativistic effects are included through the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The resulting fine-structure levels and oscillator strengths for some astrophysically important transitions are then presented and compared with the available measured and calculated values. Excellent agreement between the present lifetimes and the measurement of Berzinsh et al (1997 Phys. Rev. A 55 1836) and Beideck et al (1994 Astrophys. J. 428 393) are achieved for the 3s23p3(4So)ns(3S1o), 4 <= n <= 6, 3s23p3(4So)4p(3P0,1,2o) and 3s23p3(2Po)4s(3P0,1,2o) levels, respectively.

  12. Differentiation between Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Extraforaminal Stenosis in Lumbosacral Transitional Vertebra: Role of Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Lumbosacral Radiculography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Woon; Lee, Jae Kyo

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of lumbosacral radiculography using 3-dimentional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) rendering for diagnostic information of symptomatic extraforaminal stenosis in lumbosacral transitional vertebra. Materials and Methods The study population consisted of 18 patients with symptomatic (n = 10) and asymptomatic extraforaminal stenosis (n = 8) in lumbosacral transitional vertebra. Each patient underwent 3D coronal fast-field echo sequences with selective water excitation using the principles of the selective excitation technique (Proset imaging). Morphologic changes of the L5 nerve roots at the symptomatic and asymptomatic extraforaminal stenosis were evaluated on 3D MR rendered images of the lumbosacral spine. Results Ten cases with symptomatic extraforaminal stenosis showed hyperplasia and degenerative osteophytes of the sacral ala and/or osteophytes at the lateral margin of the L5 body. On 3D MR lumbosacral radiculography, indentation of the L5 nerve roots was found in two cases, while swelling of the nerve roots was seen in eight cases at the exiting nerve root. Eight cases with asymptomatic extraforaminal stenosis showed hyperplasia and degenerative osteophytes of the sacral ala and/or osteophytes at the lateral margin of the L5 body. Based on 3D MR lumbosacral radiculography, indentation or swelling of the L5 nerve roots was not found in any cases with asymptomatic extraforaminal stenosis. Conclusion Results from 3D MR lumbosacral radiculography Indicate the indentation or swelling of the L5 nerve root in symptomatic extraforaminal stenosis. Based on these findings, 3D MR radiculography may be helpful in the diagnosis of the symptomatic extraforaminal stenosis with lumbosacral transitional vertebra. PMID:22778561

  13. Differentiation between symptomatic and asymptomatic extraforaminal stenosis in lumbosacral transitional vertebra: role of three-dimensional magnetic resonance lumbosacral radiculography.

    PubMed

    Byun, Woo Mok; Kim, Jae Woon; Lee, Jae Kyo

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of lumbosacral radiculography using 3-dimentional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) rendering for diagnostic information of symptomatic extraforaminal stenosis in lumbosacral transitional vertebra. The study population consisted of 18 patients with symptomatic (n = 10) and asymptomatic extraforaminal stenosis (n = 8) in lumbosacral transitional vertebra. Each patient underwent 3D coronal fast-field echo sequences with selective water excitation using the principles of the selective excitation technique (Proset imaging). Morphologic changes of the L5 nerve roots at the symptomatic and asymptomatic extraforaminal stenosis were evaluated on 3D MR rendered images of the lumbosacral spine. Ten cases with symptomatic extraforaminal stenosis showed hyperplasia and degenerative osteophytes of the sacral ala and/or osteophytes at the lateral margin of the L5 body. On 3D MR lumbosacral radiculography, indentation of the L5 nerve roots was found in two cases, while swelling of the nerve roots was seen in eight cases at the exiting nerve root. Eight cases with asymptomatic extraforaminal stenosis showed hyperplasia and degenerative osteophytes of the sacral ala and/or osteophytes at the lateral margin of the L5 body. Based on 3D MR lumbosacral radiculography, indentation or swelling of the L5 nerve roots was not found in any cases with asymptomatic extraforaminal stenosis. Results from 3D MR lumbosacral radiculography Indicate the indentation or swelling of the L5 nerve root in symptomatic extraforaminal stenosis. Based on these findings, 3D MR radiculography may be helpful in the diagnosis of the symptomatic extraforaminal stenosis with lumbosacral transitional vertebra.

  14. Resonance Raman and photophysical studies of transition metal complexes in solution and entrapped in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, J.R.

    1991-03-29

    This program is subdivided into two major categories: (1) the study of complexes of Ru(II) in fluid solution and (2) the investigation of the effects of incorporation of such complexes into organized assemblies. In the first part of this report, clear evidence is presented for the somewhat unexpected observation of quite specific localization of excited state electron density on a rather small fragment of the coordinated asymmetric bidentate ligand. Thus far, two examples of this behavior have been documented and the results will soon be submitted for publication. The second part of the report describes continuing efforts to develop effective methods for selective preparation of heteroleptic complexes within the supercages of Y-type zeolite. One manuscript has been submitted for publication and a second is now in preparation. Also described in this section of the report are Resonance Raman studies of Ru(bipyrazine){sub 3}{sup 2+} in solutions of varying concentrations of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}; from 0 to 96%.

  15. Time-domain separation of optical properties from structural transitions in resonantly bonded materials.

    PubMed

    Waldecker, Lutz; Miller, Timothy A; Rudé, Miquel; Bertoni, Roman; Osmond, Johann; Pruneri, Valerio; Simpson, Robert E; Ernstorfer, Ralph; Wall, Simon

    2015-10-01

    The extreme electro-optical contrast between crystalline and amorphous states in phase-change materials is routinely exploited in optical data storage and future applications include universal memories, flexible displays, reconfigurable optical circuits, and logic devices. Optical contrast is believed to arise owing to a change in crystallinity. Here we show that the connection between optical properties and structure can be broken. Using a combination of single-shot femtosecond electron diffraction and optical spectroscopy, we simultaneously follow the lattice dynamics and dielectric function in the phase-change material Ge2Sb2Te5 during an irreversible state transformation. The dielectric function changes by 30% within 100 fs owing to a rapid depletion of electrons from resonantly bonded states. This occurs without perturbing the crystallinity of the lattice, which heats with a 2-ps time constant. The optical changes are an order of magnitude larger than those achievable with silicon and present new routes to manipulate light on an ultrafast timescale without structural changes.

  16. Differential electron scattering cross sections for the first optically forbidden and resonance transitions in Mg II, Zn II and Cd II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, I. D.; Chutjian, A.; Mawhorter, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Differential electron scattering cross sections have been measured for dipole-forbidden and resonance transitions in Mg II, Zn II and Cd II in the angular range theta = 4-17 deg at 50 eV. These provide the first recorded angular distributions for an optically forbidden transition. It is found that while the cross section for excitation of the 4s (2)S-3d(9)4s(2) (2)D transition in Zn II is small, those for the 3s (2)S-3d (2)D, 4s (2)S (unresolved lines) in Mg II, and the 5s (2)S-4d(9)5s(2) D in Cd II are comparable in magnitude with the cross sections for resonance excitation. In addition, for Cd II it is found that the allowed and forbidden transitions have very similar angular distributions, and it is proposed that excitation to the 2D state may be dominated by a virtual 'double-dipole' transition via the 2P state. Also, the total excitation cross section of the resonance 2P state in Cd II is a factor of four higher than that predicted by the Gaunt factor approximation, suggesting that the accepted value for the oscillator strength may be too low.

  17. Change in resonance parameters of a linear molecule as it bends: Evidence in electron-impact vibrational transitions of hot COS and CO2 molecules*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masamitsu; Ishijima, Yohei; Kato, Hidetoshi; Mogi, Daisuke; Takahashi, Yoshinao; Fukae, Katsuya; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Shimamura, Isao

    2016-04-01

    Inelastic and superelastic electron-impact vibrational excitation functions of hot carbonyl sulphide COS (and hot CO2) are measured for electron energies from 0.5 to 3.0 eV (1.5 to 6.0 eV) and at a scattering angle of 90°. Based on the vibrational populations and the principle of detailed balance, these excitation functions are decomposed into contributions from state-to-state vibrational transitions involving up to the second bending overtone (030) in the electronically ground state. Both the 2Π resonance for COS around 1.2 eV and the 2Πu resonance for CO2 around 3.8 eV are shifted to lower energies as the initial vibrational state is excited in the bending mode. The width of the resonance hump for COS changes only little as the molecule bends, whereas that of the overall boomerang resonance for CO2 becomes narrower. The angular distribution of the electrons resonantly scattered by hot COS and hot CO2 is also measured. The different shapes depending on the vibrational transitions and gas temperatures are discussed in terms of the symmetry of the vibrational wave functions. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  18. Investigation of high-contrast velocity selective optical pumping resonance at the cycling transition of Cs using fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Saswati; Ray, Biswajit; Ghosh, Pradip Narayan; Cartaleva, Stefka; Slavov, Dimitar

    2015-12-01

    A high contrast (∼48%) Velocity Selective Optical Pumping (VSOP) resonance at the closed transition Fg=4→Fe=5 of Cs-D2 line is obtained in the fluorescence signal under co-propagating pump-probe configuration. We use a 5.2 μm cell operating at reduced temperature (∼55 °C) and the intensity of the pump-laser is kept lower than that of the probe-laser. The observed sharp narrow structure is suitable for side-arms frequency-locking of the cooling- (i.e. probe-) laser in a cold atom experiment, with possibility for "-Γ" to "-4Γ" red-detuning and "+Γ" to "+10Γ" blue-detuning using the standard properties of the commercially available electronics. We have developed a theoretical model corresponding to the thin cell, incorporating the atomic time-of-flight dependent optical pumping decay rate to describe the dimensional anisotropy of the thin cell. The model shows good qualitative agreement with the observation and simulates as well the cases of cells with smaller thickness. It also describes correctly the temperature dependence of the line broadening and shows the potential for further optimization and red-shift detuning above "-4Γ". It may be of interest for further development of miniaturized modules, like the recently developed portable small magneto-optical traps.

  19. Human Urinary Kallidinogenase Improves Outcome of Stroke Patients by Shortening Mean Transit Time of Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingwei; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Meijuan; Xu, Yun

    2015-08-01

    Improving cerebral perfusion remains a good option for ischemic stroke for restoring cerebral blood flow. Human urinary kallidinogenase has been shown promising in treating stroke patients. To investigate whether human urinary kallidinogenase's efficacy in treating stroke patients has relationship with improving cerebral perfusion and possible mechanism. Fifty-eight stroke patients in Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital were enrolled in this prospective study. Of them, 29 received human urinary kallidinogenase, while the other 29 were selected as control. National institute health stroke scale, modified Rankin Scale and activities of daily living score were used to determine patient outcome. Cerebral perfusion in patients was determined by perfusion magnetic resonance imaging. Serum apelin and vascular endothelial growth factor were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We confirmed that human urinary kallidinogenase improved stroke outcome in patients. Cerebral perfusion was elevated by human urinary kallidinogenase 12 days after therapy. Human urinary kallidinogenase enhanced vascular endothelial growth factor and APJ expression in stroke patients. The reduced mean transit time was related with favorable outcome analyzed by univariate logistic regression. Human urinary kallidinogenase facilitated stroke recovery and enhanced cerebral reperfusion through up-regulating vascular endothelial growth factor, apelin/APJ pathway. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Impact of resonant magnetic perturbations on zonal modes, drift-wave turbulence and the L-H transition threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leconte, M.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on turbulence, flows and confinement in the framework of resistive drift-wave turbulence. This work was motivated, in parts, by experiments reported at the IAEA 2010 conference (Xu et al 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 062030) which showed a decrease of long-range correlations during the application of RMPs. We derive and apply a zero-dimensional predator-prey model coupling the drift-wave-zonal-mode system (Leconte and Diamond 2012 Phys. Plasmas 19 055903) to the evolution of mean quantities. This model has both density-gradient drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. This model allows a description of the full L-H transition evolution with RMPs, including the mean sheared flow evolution. The key results are the following: (i) the L-I and I-H power thresholds both increase with RMP amplitude |\\tilde b_x| , the relative increase of the L-I threshold scales as \\Delta P_LI \\propto |\\tilde b_x|^2 \

  1. The influence of higher spatial harmonics of atomic polarization on the saturated absorption resonance upon excitation of open dipole transitions by a field of counterpropagating waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhnikov, D. V.; Novokreshchenov, A. S.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of a double structure of saturated absorption resonance in the field of counterpropagating light waves interacting with an atomic gas is studied. The experimental observation of this effect was first reported in 2011 in a work by our colleagues at the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Laboratory of Frequency Standards). The essence of the effect lies in the fact that, on exciting an open dipole transition, another, narrower, resonance of an opposite sign can be observed at the center of the ordinary saturated absorption resonance. A theoretical analysis of this effect has also been performed in this work in terms of a simple spectroscopic model of an atom with two nondegenerate energy levels without taking into account higher spatial harmonics of atomic polarization and polarizations of light waves (scalar model). The present work is devoted to the development of a theory of the formation of a central narrow resonance for the example of a real F g = 1 → F e = 1 atomic transition and to the study of its main characteristics (amplitude, width, contrast, and amplitude-to-width ratio). In addition, the theoretical results obtained without taking into account the influence of higher spatial harmonics and with inclusion of the influence of first higher harmonics are compared. This comparison shows that their influence on the parameters of the new nonlinear resonance is strong even in moderately intense light fields ( R γ, where R is the Rabi frequency). The results of this study can be of interest for quantum metrology, as well as for many experiments in which the laser-radiation frequency is stabilized by the saturated absorption resonance on open dipole transitions in atoms and molecules.

  2. Low-temperature effects of resonance electronic states at transition-element impurities in the kinetic, magnetic, and acoustic properties of semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okulov, V. I.; Govorkova, T. E.; Gudkov, V. V.; Zhevstovskikh, I. V.; Korolyev, A. V.; Lonchakov, A. T.; Okulova, K. A.; Pamyatnykh, E. A.; Paranchich, S. Yu.

    2007-02-01

    New research results on phenomena due to the existence of electronic resonance energy levels and hybridized states at impurities of transition elements in semiconductors are presented. The data show that the thermal conductivity and ultrasonic parameters of mercury selenide containing iron impurities have resonance anomalies due to the influence of these impurities. A consistent and detailed interpretation is offered for the set of observed effects of hybridized states in mercury selenide with iron impurities. The proposed interpretation of the data obtained on other systems is discussed.

  3. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Numerical simulation of the quasi-resonance regime of a transient double resonance in a scheme with a common upper level at a large inhomogeneous broadening of quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. E.; Parshkov, O. M.

    2005-08-01

    The transient double resonance in the Λ scheme is numerically investigated in the case of a strong inhomogeneous spectral broadening of a medium and nonzero detunings of the frequencies of interacting pulses from the central frequencies of corresponding quantum transitions. It is shown that the signal pulse efficiently interacts with the pump pulse only when a certain condition imposed on the nonzero detunings is satisfied. If this condition is strongly violated at the input to the resonance medium, only a weak field of the rear edge of the input signal pulse mainly interacts with the pump field. In this case, two pulses with different frequencies are formed in the signal channel. This is explained by the specific interaction of radiation with Doppler-broadened quantum transitions.

  4. Resonance in the electron-doped high-transition-temperature superconductor Pr0.88LaCe0.12CuO4-delta.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stephen D; Dai, Pengcheng; Li, Shiliang; Chi, Songxue; Kang, H J; Lynn, J W

    2006-07-06

    In conventional superconductors, the interaction that pairs the electrons to form the superconducting state is mediated by lattice vibrations (phonons). In high-transition-temperature (high-T(c)) copper oxides, it is generally believed that magnetic excitations might play a fundamental role in the superconducting mechanism because superconductivity occurs when mobile 'electrons' or 'holes' are doped into the antiferromagnetic parent compounds. Indeed, a sharp magnetic excitation termed 'resonance' has been observed by neutron scattering in a number of hole-doped materials. The resonance is intimately related to superconductivity, and its interaction with charged quasi-particles observed by photoemission, optical conductivity, and tunnelling suggests that it might play a part similar to that of phonons in conventional superconductors. The relevance of the resonance to high-T(c) superconductivity, however, has been in doubt because so far it has been found only in hole-doped materials. Here we report the discovery of the resonance in electron-doped superconducting Pr0.88LaCe0.12CuO4-delta (T(c) = 24 K). We find that the resonance energy (E(r)) is proportional to T(c) via E(r) approximately 5.8k(B)T(c) for all high-T(c) superconductors irrespective of electron- or hole-doping. Our results demonstrate that the resonance is a fundamental property of the superconducting copper oxides and therefore must be essential in the mechanism of superconductivity.

  5. Atomic sulfur: Frequency measurement of the J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition at 56.3 microns by laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Zink, Lyndon R.

    1994-01-01

    The J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition in atomic sulfur (S I) in its ground (3)P state has been detected in the laboratory by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance. The fine-structure interval has been measured accurately as 5,322,492.9 +/- 2.8 MHz which corresponds to a wavelength of 56.325572 +/- 0.000030 micrometers.

  6. Resonant di-Higgs boson production in the b b ¯ W channel: Probing the electroweak phase transition at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T.; No, J. M.; Pernié, L.; Ramsey-Musolf, M.; Safonov, A.; Spannowsky, M.; Winslow, P.

    2017-08-01

    We analyze the prospects for resonant di-Higgs production searches at the LHC in the b b ¯W+W- (W+→ℓ+νℓ, W-→ℓ-ν¯ℓ) channel, as a probe of the nature of the electroweak phase transition in Higgs portal extensions of the Standard Model. In order to maximize the sensitivity in this final state, we develop a new algorithm for the reconstruction of the b b ¯W+W- invariant mass in the presence of neutrinos from the W decays, building from a technique developed for the reconstruction of resonances decaying to τ+τ- pairs. We show that resonant di-Higgs production in the b b ¯W+W- channel could be a competitive probe of the electroweak phase transition already with the data sets to be collected by the CMS and ATLAS experiments in run 2 of the LHC. The increase in sensitivity with larger amounts of data accumulated during the high-luminosity LHC phase can be sufficient to enable a potential discovery of the resonant di-Higgs production in this channel.

  7. Resonant coherent excitation of hydrogen-like ions planar channeled in a crystal; Transition into the first excited state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaev, A.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.

    2012-03-01

    The presented program is designed to simulate the characteristics of resonant coherent excitation of hydrogen-like ions planar-channeled in a crystal. The program realizes the numerical algorithm to solve the Schrödinger equation for the ion-bound electron at a special resonance excitation condition. The calculated wave function of the bound electron defines probabilities for the ion to be in the either ground or first excited state, or to be ionized. Finally, in the outgoing beam the fractions of ions in the ground state, in the first excited state, and ionized by collisions with target electrons, are defined. The program code is written on C++ and is designed for multiprocessing systems (clusters). The output data are presented in the table. Program summaryProgram title: RCE_H-like_1 Catalogue identifier: AEKX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2813 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 34 667 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ (g++, icc compilers) Computer: Multiprocessor systems (clusters) Operating system: Any OS based on LINUX; program was tested under Novell SLES 10 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. Contains MPI directives RAM: <1 MB per processor Classification: 2.1, 2.6, 7.10 External routines: MPI library for GNU C++, Intel C++ compilers Nature of problem: When relativistic hydrogen-like ion moves in the crystal in the planar channeling regime, in the ion rest frame the time-periodic electric field acts on the bound electron. If the frequency of this field matches the transition frequency between electronic energy levels, the resonant coherent excitation can take place. Therefore, ions in the different states may be

  8. Blue diode-pumped solid-state-laser based on ytterbium doped laser crystals operating on the resonance zero-phonon transition

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.; Payne, Stephen A.; Marshall, Christopher D.

    2001-01-01

    The invention provides an efficient, compact means of generating blue laser light at a wavelength near .about.493+/-3 nm, based on the use of a laser diode-pumped Yb-doped laser crystal emitting on its zero phonon line (ZPL) resonance transition at a wavelength near .about.986+/-6 nm, whose fundamental infrared output radiation is harmonically doubled into the blue spectral region. The invention is applied to the excitation of biofluorescent dyes (in the .about.490-496 nm spectral region) utilized in flow cytometry, immunoassay, DNA sequencing, and other biofluorescence instruments. The preferred host crystals have strong ZPL fluorecence (laser) transitions lying in the spectral range from .about.980 to .about.992 nm (so that when frequency-doubled, they produce output radiation in the spectral range from 490 to 496 nm). Alternate preferred Yb doped tungstate crystals, such as Yb:KY(WO.sub.4).sub.2, may be configured to lase on the resonant ZPL transition near 981 nm (in lieu of the normal 1025 nm transition). The laser light is then doubled in the blue at 490.5 nm.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the ferroelastic phase transition of order-disorder type in [N(C2H5)4]2CdCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Kim, Min Soo; Lim, Kye-Young

    2016-08-01

    This study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to examine the detailed changes in [N(C2H5)4]2CdCl4 around its phase transition at the temperature TC = 284 K. The chemical shifts and spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame (T1ρ) were determined from 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR and 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR spectra. The two sets of inequivalent 1H and 13C nuclei in CH3 and CH2 were distinguished. A ferroelastic phase transition was observed at TC, without structural symmetry change. The phase transition is mainly attributed to the orientational ordering of the [N(C2H5)4]+ cations, and the spectral splitting at low temperature is associated with different ferroelastic domains.

  10. State transition analysis of spontaneous branch migration of the Holliday junction by photon-based single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kenji; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    Branch migration of Holliday junction (HJ) DNA in solution is a spontaneous conformational change between multiple discrete states. We applied single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) measurement to three-state branch migration. The photon-based variational Bayes-hidden Markov model (VB-HMM) method was applied to fluorescence signals to reproduce the state transition trajectories and evaluate the transition parameters, such as transition rate. The upper limit of time resolution suggested in simulation was nearly achieved for the state dynamics with relatively small FRET changes, and the distinctions in the populations of different states were successfully retrieved. We also discuss the suitability of the HJ as a standard sample for smFRET dynamics measurements and data analysis.

  11. Spectral Change in 3d-4f Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering of Ce Intermetallics Across the Transition between Kondo Singlet and Localized-Spin State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasabe, Norimasa; Tonai, Hironori; Uozumi, Takayuki

    2017-09-01

    The spectral change in the 3d resonant X-ray inelastic scattering (RIXS) induced by the spin-state transition between Kondo singlet (KS) and localized spin (LS) state is theoretically investigated for γ-like Ce intermetallics by means of a single impurity Anderson model. The basis configurations with an electron-hole pair are included in the calculation within the configuration interaction scheme, in addition to the intra-atomic full multiplet coupling of the Ce impurity. A distinct spectral change is found across the KS-LS transition in the RIXS excited at the charge-transfer satellite of the 3d X-ray absorption spectrum (XAS) under a polarized geometry. In contrast, the 3d XAS and RIXS spectra under a depolarized geometry are rather insensitive to the spin-state transition.

  12. Topological quantum phase transition from a fermionic integer quantum Hall phase to a bosonic fractional quantum Hall phase through a p -wave Feshbach resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Shiuan-Fan; Hu, Zi-Xiang; Yang, Kun

    2017-06-01

    We use exact diagonalization to study the quantum phases and phase transitions when a single species of fermionic atoms at a Landau level filling factor νf=1 in a rotating trap interact through a p -wave Feshbach resonance. We show that under a weak pairing interaction, the system undergoes a second-order quantum phase transition from a νf=1 fermionic integer quantum Hall (FIQH) state at positive detuning, to a νb=1/4 bosonic fractional quantum Hall (BFQH) state at negative detuning. However, when the pairing interaction increases, a new phase between them emerges, corresponding to a fraction of fermionic atoms staying in a coherent superposition of a bosonic molecule state and an unbound pair. The phase transition from the FIQH phase to the new phase is of second order and that from the new phase to BFQH phase is of first order.

  13. Conduction electrons as dissipation channel in friction experiments at the metal-metal transition of LSMO measured by contact-resonance atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfahl, V.; Phani, M. K.; Büchsenschütz-Göbeler, M.; Kumar, A.; Moshnyaga, V.; Arnold, W.; Samwer, K.

    2017-01-01

    We report on friction measurements on a La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 (LSMO) thin film using atomic force microscopy cantilever contact-resonances. There is a contribution to the damping of the cantilever oscillations, which is caused by micro-sliding of the cantilever tip on the surface of the thin film. This frictional part decreases with temperature parallel to the increase in the resistivity of the thin film. The LSMO is well-known for a ferromagnetic to paramagnetic phase transition that occurs without changes in the rhombohedral (R-3c) crystalline structure. The magnetic transition at the Curie temperature TC ˜ 360 K is accompanied by a metal-to-metal transition with a large increase in electrical resistivity. The behavior of the cantilever damping constant demonstrates that there is a direct coupling between mechanical friction and the mobility of the electrons in the LSMO film.

  14. Observation of the 5 p3 /2→6 p3 /2 electric-dipole-forbidden transition in atomic rubidium using optical-optical double-resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponciano-Ojeda, F.; Hernández-Gómez, S.; López-Hernández, O.; Mojica-Casique, C.; Colín-Rodríguez, R.; Ramírez-Martínez, F.; Flores-Mijangos, J.; Sahagún, D.; Jáuregui, R.; Jiménez-Mier, J.

    2015-10-01

    Direct evidence of excitation of the 5 p3 /2→6 p3 /2 electric-dipole-forbidden transition in atomic rubidium is presented. The experiments were performed in a room-temperature rubidium cell with continuous-wave external cavity diode lasers. Optical-optical double-resonance spectroscopy with counterpropagating beams allows the detection of the nondipole transition free of Doppler broadening. The 5 p3 /2 state is prepared by excitation with a laser locked to the maximum F cyclic transition of the D2 line, and the forbidden transition is produced by excitation with a 911 nm laser. Production of the forbidden transition is monitored by detection of the 420 nm fluorescence that results from decay of the 6 p3 /2 state. Spectra with three narrow lines (≈13 MHz FWHM) with the characteristic F -1 , F , and F +1 splitting of the 6 p3 /2 hyperfine structure in both rubidium isotopes were obtained. The results are in very good agreement with a direct calculation that takes into account the 5 s →5 p3 /2 preparation dynamics, the 5 p3 /2→6 p3 /2 nondipole excitation geometry, and the 6 p3 /2→5 s1 /2 decay. The comparison also shows that the electric-dipole-forbidden transition is a very sensitive probe of the preparation dynamics.

  15. Point defects in Cu2ZnSnSe4(CZTSe): Resonant X-ray diffraction study of the low-temperature order/disorder transition

    DOE PAGES

    Schelhas, L. T.; Stone, K. H.; Harvey, S. P.; ...

    2017-07-25

    We report that the interest in Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTS) for photovoltaic applications is motivated by similarities to Cu(In,Ga)Se2 while being comprised of non-toxic and earth abundant elements. However, CZTS suffers from a Voc deficit, where the Voc is much lower than expected based on the band gap, which may be the result of a high concentration of point-defects in the CZTS lattice. Recently, reports have observed a low-temperature order/disorder transition by Raman and optical spectroscopies in CZTS films and is reported to describe the ordering of Cu and Zn atoms in the CZTS crystal structure. To directly determine the level ofmore » Cu/Zn ordering, we have used resonant-XRD, a site, and element specific probe of long range order. We used CZTSe films annealed just below and quenched from just above the transition temperature; based on previous work, the Cu and Zn should be ordered and highly disordered, respectively. Our data show that there is some Cu/Zn ordering near the low temperature transition but significantly less than high chemical order expected from Raman. Finally, to understand both our resonant-XRD results and the Raman results, we present a structural model that involves antiphase domain boundaries and accommodates the excess Zn within the CZTS lattice.« less

  16. Numerical simulation of the evolution of an intense 0{pi} pulse and formation of an optical breather at the inhomogeneously broadened resonance quantum transition

    SciTech Connect

    Parshkov, O M

    2007-09-30

    The interaction of a sufficiently intense 0{pi} pulse with the inhomogeneously broadened resonance quantum transition is studied numerically in the slowly varying envelope approximation. The formation of a single optical breather and evolution of the population of energy levels related to it are described. It is found that in the quasi-resonance case, two 2{pi} pulses of the same duration with different frequencies appear instead of the breather at a large distance. The frequency modulation also prevents the formation of the breather, giving rise to one 2{pi} pulse or two 2{pi} pulses of different frequencies and different durations. The results of numerical analysis of the known experiment on the observation of the 0{pi} pulse in a ruby crystal are presented. It is shown that due to the presence of irreversible relaxation in this experiment, an optical breather was detected at the stage of its transformation to a weak 0{pi} pulse. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  17. Self-organised aggregation of a pair of particles with different resonant frequencies and electric dipole moments of transitions, controlled by an external quasi-resonant field

    SciTech Connect

    Slabko, V V; Tsipotan, A S; Aleksandrovsky, A S

    2013-05-31

    The influence of the oscillation phases of the dipole moments induced in metal nanoparticles and quantum dots by an external laser field on their interaction energy is considered. It is shown that a difference in resonant frequencies leads to the formation of additional minima and maxima, which are absent in the spectral dependence of the interaction energy of identical particles at similar orientations of the pair of particles with respect to the plane of polarisation of radiation. These features are due to the fact that the oscillation phase difference of the induced dipole moments of particles reaches values close to {pi}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  18. Fabrication and optical characterization of pedestal micro-structures on DUV210 polymer: waveguides structures towards micro-resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specht, Marion; Huby, Nolwenn; Lhermite, Hervé; Castro-Beltran, Rigoberto; Loas, Goulchen; Bêche, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the global design, fabrication and optical characterizations of pedestal waveguides and 2D microresonators (MRs) made of DUV210 polymer. These particular geometries are achieved thanks to specific deep-UV lithography procedures allowing sub-lambda development coupled to chemical etching able to shape such pedestal configuration on various optical microstructures. Scanning electron microscopy images have confirmed their features. Moreover, such families of pedestal structures were characterized experimentally, including the optical losses measurements for the waveguides and the optical resonance responses for two kinds of microresonators. Optical studies of single mode propagation losses measurements have been performed by a cut back method leading to values close to 20 dB/cm at a 635 nm wavelength. Additionally, resonant spectral analysis has been performed into pedestal rings and racetracks microresonators with a broadband laser source centered at 795 nm, demonstrating the presence of expected theoretical resonances. Free spectral range (FSR) values of 2.8 nm and 2.51 nm have been measured for these new designed pedestal resonators on DUV210 related to quality factor values superior to 520 and 610 respectively.

  19. Spin-flop transition on Gd5Ge4 observed by x-ray resonant magnetic scattering and first-principles calculations of magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, L.; Kreyssig, A.; Nandi, S.; Jia, S.; Lee, Y. B.; Lang, J. C.; Islam, Z.; Lograsso, T.; Schlagel, D.; Pecharsky, V.; Gschneidner, K.; Canfield, P.; Harmon, B.; McQueeney, R.; Goldman, A.

    2008-02-21

    X-ray resonant magnetic scattering was employed to study a fully reversible spin-flop transition in orthorhombic Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} and to elucidate details of the magnetic structure in the spin-flop phase. The orientation of the moments at the three Gd sites flop 90{sup o} from the c axis to the a axis when a magnetic field, H{sub sf} = 9 kOe, is applied along the c axis at T = 9 K. The magnetic space group changes from Pnm'a to Pn'm'a' for all three Gd sublattices. The magnetic anisotropy energy determined from experimental measurements is in good agreement with the calculations of the magnetic anisotropy based on the spin-orbit coupling of the conduction electrons and an estimation of the dipolar interactions anisotropy. No significant magnetostriction effects were observed at the spin-flop transition.

  20. Structural Insights into the Calcium-Mediated Allosteric Transition in the C-Terminal Domain of Calmodulin from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kukic, Predrag; Lundström, Patrik; Camilloni, Carlo; Evenäs, Johan; Akke, Mikael; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-12

    Calmodulin is a two-domain signaling protein that becomes activated upon binding cooperatively two pairs of calcium ions, leading to large-scale conformational changes that expose its binding site. Despite significant advances in understanding the structural biology of calmodulin functions, the mechanistic details of the conformational transition between closed and open states have remained unclear. To investigate this transition, we used a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments on the Ca(2+)-saturated E140Q C-terminal domain variant. Using chemical shift restraints in replica-averaged metadynamics simulations, we obtained a high-resolution structural ensemble consisting of two conformational states and validated such an ensemble against three independent experimental data sets, namely, interproton nuclear Overhauser enhancements, (15)N order parameters, and chemical shift differences between the exchanging states. Through a detailed analysis of this structural ensemble and of the corresponding statistical weights, we characterized a calcium-mediated conformational transition whereby the coordination of Ca(2+) by just one oxygen of the bidentate ligand E140 triggers a concerted movement of the two EF-hands that exposes the target binding site. This analysis provides atomistic insights into a possible Ca(2+)-mediated activation mechanism of calmodulin that cannot be achieved from static structures alone or from ensemble NMR measurements of the transition between conformations.

  1. On the possibility to detect multipolar order in URu2Si2 by the electric quadrupolar transition of resonant elastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. L.; Fabbris, G.; Meyers, D.; Sung, N. H.; Baumbach, R. E.; Bauer, E. D.; Ryan, P. J.; Kim, J.-W.; Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Kotliar, G.; Dai, X.

    2017-08-01

    Resonant elastic x-ray scattering is a powerful technique for measuring multipolar order parameters. In this paper, we theoretically and experimentally study the possibility of using this technique to detect the proposed multipolar order parameters in URu2Si2 at the U-L3 edge with the electric quadrupolar transition. Based on an atomic model, we calculate the azimuthal dependence of the quadrupolar transition at the U-L3 edge. The results illustrate the potential of this technique for distinguishing different multipolar order parameters. We then perform experiments on ultraclean single crystals of URu2Si2 at the U-L3 edge to search for the predicted signal, but do not detect any indications of multipolar moments within the experimental uncertainty. We theoretically estimate the orders of magnitude of the cross section and the expected count rate of the quadrupolar transition and compare them to the dipolar transitions at the U-M4 and U-L3 edges, clarifying the difficulty in detecting higher order multipolar order parameters in URu2Si2 in the current experimental setup.

  2. Diagrammatic theory of transition of pendulum like systems. [orbit-orbit and spin-orbit gravitational resonance interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    Orbit-orbit and spin-orbit gravitational resonances are analyzed using the model of a rigid pendulum subject to both a time-dependent periodic torque and a constant applied torque. First, a descriptive model of passage through resonance is developed from an examination of the polynomial equation that determines the extremes of the momentum variable. From this study, a probability estimate for capture into libration is derived. Second, a lowest order solution is constructed and compared with the solution obtained from numerical integration. The steps necessary to systematically improve this solution are also discussed. Finally, the effect of a dissipative term in the pendulum equation is analyzed.

  3. Diagrammatic theory of transition of pendulum like systems. [orbit-orbit and spin-orbit gravitational resonance interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    Orbit-orbit and spin-orbit gravitational resonances are analyzed using the model of a rigid pendulum subject to both a time-dependent periodic torque and a constant applied torque. First, a descriptive model of passage through resonance is developed from an examination of the polynomial equation that determines the extremes of the momentum variable. From this study, a probability estimate for capture into libration is derived. Second, a lowest order solution is constructed and compared with the solution obtained from numerical integration. The steps necessary to systematically improve this solution are also discussed. Finally, the effect of a dissipative term in the pendulum equation is analyzed.

  4. Mechanism-based inhibition reveals transitions between two conformational states in the action of lysine 5,6-aminomutase: a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopy, and density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Han; Maity, Amarendra N; Frey, Perry A; Ke, Shyue-Chu

    2013-01-16

    An "open"-state crystal structure of lysine 5,6-aminomutase suggests that transition to a hypothetical "closed"-state is required to bring the cofactors adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) and pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) and the substrate into proximity for the radical-mediated 1,2-amino group migration. This process is achieved by transaldimination of the PLP-Lys144β internal aldimine with the PLP-substrate external aldimine. A closed-state crystal structure is not available. UV-vis and electron paramagnetic resonance studies show that homologues of substrate D-lysine, 2,5-DAPn, 2,4-DAB, and 2,3-DAPr bind to PLP as an external aldimine and elicit the AdoCbl Co-C bond homolysis and the accumulations of cob(II)alamin and analogue-based radicals, demonstrating the existence of a closed state. (2)H- and (31)P-electron nuclear double resonance studies, supported by computations, show that the position for hydrogen atom abstraction from 2,5-DAPn and 2,4-DAB by the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical occurs at the carbon adjacent to the imine, resulting in overstabilized radicals by spin delocalization through the imine into the pyridine ring of PLP. These radicals block the active site, inhibit the enzyme, and poise the enzyme into two distinct conformations: for even-numbered analogues, the cob(II)alamin remains proximal to and spin-coupled with the analogue-based radical in the closed state while odd-numbered analogues could trigger the transition to the open state of the enzyme. We provide here direct spectroscopic evidence that strongly support the existence of a closed state and its analogue-dependent transition to the open state, which is one step that was proposed to complete the catalytic turnover of the substrate lysine.

  5. High-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance study of phase transition kinetics in LiNaSO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Shakhovoy, R. A. E-mail: r.a.shakhovoy@gmail.com; Sarou-Kanian, V.; Rakhmatullin, A.; Véron, E.; Bessada, C.

    2015-12-28

    A new high-temperature NMR technique for measurements of the phase transition kinetics in solids has been developed. The technique allows measuring the time evolution of the volume of the appearing phase at controlled cooling rates. Developed method was applied to study the phase transition kinetics in the superionic conductor LiNaSO{sub 4}. It was revealed that the phase transition in LiNaSO{sub 4} is governed by the diffusion-controlled growth of nuclei (“germs”). An effect of the crystallite rearrangement in the LiNaSO{sub 4} powder after cooling through the phase transition was also revealed. This effect was studied by means of high-temperature XRD and NMR.

  6. High-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance study of phase transition kinetics in LiNaSO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhovoy, R. A.; Sarou-Kanian, V.; Rakhmatullin, A.; Véron, E.; Bessada, C.

    2015-12-01

    A new high-temperature NMR technique for measurements of the phase transition kinetics in solids has been developed. The technique allows measuring the time evolution of the volume of the appearing phase at controlled cooling rates. Developed method was applied to study the phase transition kinetics in the superionic conductor LiNaSO4. It was revealed that the phase transition in LiNaSO4 is governed by the diffusion-controlled growth of nuclei ("germs"). An effect of the crystallite rearrangement in the LiNaSO4 powder after cooling through the phase transition was also revealed. This effect was studied by means of high-temperature XRD and NMR.

  7. Multimode-diode-pumped gas (alkali-vapor) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J; Kanz, V K

    2005-08-22

    We report the first demonstration of a multimode-diode-pumped gas laser--Rb vapor operating on the 795 nm resonance transition. Peak output of {approx}1 Watt was obtained using a volume-Bragg-grating stabilized pump diode array. The laser's output radiance exceeded the pump radiance by a factor greater than 2000. Power scaling (by pumping with larger diode arrays) is therefore possible.

  8. Multimode-diode-pumped gas (alkali-vapor) laser.

    PubMed

    Page, Ralph H; Beach, Raymond J; Kanz, V Keith; Krupke, William F

    2006-02-01

    We report what we believe to be the first demonstration of a multimode-diode-pumped gas laser: Rb vapor operating on the 795 nm D1 resonance transition. Peak output of approximately 1 W was obtained using a volume-Bragg-grating stabilized pump diode array. The laser's output radiance exceeded the pump radiance by a factor greater than 2000. Power scaling (by pumping with larger diode arrays) is therefore possible.

  9. Elastic relaxations associated with the Pm3m-R3c transition in LaA103 III: superattenuation of acoustic resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Timothy W; Carpenter, M A; Buckley, A; Taylor, P A; Mcknight, R E A

    2009-01-01

    Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy has been used to characterize elastic softening and a variety of new acoustic dissipation processes associated with the Pm{bar 3}m {leftrightarrow} R{bar 3}c transition in single crystal and ceramic samples of LaAlO{sub 3}. Softening of the cubic structure ahead of the transition point is not accompanied by an increase in dissipation but follows different temperature dependences for the bulk modulus, 1/3(C{sub 11} + 2C{sub 12}), and the shear components 1/2(C{sub 11}-C{sub 12}) and C{sub 44} as if the tilting instability contains two slightly different critical temperatures. The transition itself is marked by the complete disappearance of resonance peaks (superattenuation), which then reappear below {approx}700 K in spectra from single crystals. Comparison with low frequency, high stress data from the literature indicate that the dissipation is not due to macroscopic displacement of needle twins. An alternative mechanism, local bowing of twin walls under low dynamic stress, is proposed. Pinning of the walls with respect to this displacement process occurs below {approx}350 K. Anelasticity maps, analogous to plastic deformation mechanism maps, are proposed to display dispersion relations and temperature/frequency/stress fields for different twin wall related dissipation mechanisms. An additional dissipation process, with an activation energy of 43 {+-} 6 kJ.mole{sup -1}, occurs in the vicinity of 250 K. The mechanism for this is not known, but it is associated with C{sub 44} and therefore appears to be related in some way to the cubic {leftrightarrow} rhombohedral transition at {approx}817 K. Slight softening in the temperature interval {approx}220 {yields} 70 K of resonance peaks determined by shear elastic constants hints at an incipient E{sub g} ferroelastic instability in LaAlO{sub 3}. The softening interval ends with a further dissipation peak at {approx} 60 K, the origin of which is discussed in terms of freezing of atomic

  10. Characterization of the Embryogenic Tissue of the Norway Spruce Including a Transition Layer between the Tissue and the Culture Medium by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kořínek, R.; Mikulka, J.; Hřib, J.; Hudec, J.; Havel, L.; Bartušek, K.

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes the visualization of the cells (ESEs) and mucilage (ECMSN) in an embryogenic tissue via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) relaxometry measurement combined with the subsequent multi-parametric segmentation. The computed relaxometry maps T1 and T2 show a thin layer (transition layer) between the culture medium and the embryogenic tissue. The ESEs, mucilage, and transition layer differ in their relaxation times T1 and T2; thus, these times can be used to characterize the individual parts within the embryogenic tissue. The observed mean values of the relaxation times T1 and T2 of the ESEs, mucilage, and transition layer are as follows: 1469 ± 324 and 53 ± 10 ms, 1784 ± 124 and 74 ± 8 ms, 929 ± 164 and 32 ± 4.7 ms, respectively. The multi-parametric segmentation exploiting the T1 and T2 relaxation times as a classifier shows the distribution of the ESEs and mucilage within the embryogenic tissue. The discussed T1 and T2 indicators can be utilized to characterize both the growth-related changes in an embryogenic tissue and the effect of biotic/abiotic stresses, thus potentially becoming a distinctive indicator of the state of any examined embryogenic tissue.

  11. Experimental investigation of resonance oscillations of aerosol in tubes at the transition to the shock-wave mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubaidullin, D. A.; Zaripov, R. G.; Tkachenko, L. A.

    2017-07-01

    The coagulation and sedimentation of aerosol droplets are studied experimentally under nonlinear oscillations in closed and open tubes in the mode of transition to shock waves near the first eigenfrequency. In this case, more efficient coagulation and sedimentation than in the shock-free wave mode of oscillations is observed at almost identical amplitude of the piston displacement.

  12. Reply to ``Comment on `Unusual magnetic transitions and nature of magnetic resonance spectra in oxide glasses containing gadolinium' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliava, Janis; Malakhovskii, Alexander; Edelman, Irina; Potseluyko, Anatoly; Melnikova, Svetlana; Petrakovskaja, Eleonora; Zarubina, Tat'Jana; Petrovskii, Gurii; Bruckental, I.; Yeshurun, Y.

    2006-07-01

    In this Reply we show that, contrary to the suggestion of Dubroca, Hack, and Hummel (DHH), the feature observed at ca. 55K in the magnetic susceptibility of gadolinium-containing oxide glasses [as in our earlier paper, Kliava Phys. Rev. B 71, 104406 (2005)] cannot be due to a magnetic transition in oxygen contaminant. In support of this statement, we supply transformed data at low Gd content as well as magnetization curves for a series of glasses containing dysprosium oxide measured with the same superconducting quantum interference device as in our earlier paper. In all these cases the feature in question is absent. Thus, our previous assignment of the 55K feature to a paramagnetic-to-ferromagnetic transition in Gd clusters in the glass remains the only one consistent with the experimental results.

  13. High Resolution Far Infrared Study of Antiferromagnetic Resonance Transitions in α-Fe2O3 (hematite)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Shin Grace; Plusquellic, David F.; Stutzman, Paul E.; Wang, Shuangzhen; Garboczi, Edward J.; Egelhoff, William F.

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we report high resolution optical measurements of the temperature dependence of the antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition in α-Fe2O3 (hematite) between (0.5 and 10) cm-1. The absorption peak position, over a large temperature range, is found to be in agreement with a modified spin-wave model at both the high and low temperature phases, where the temperature is above and below the Morin transition temperature, respectively. The high spectral resolution optical measurements as demonstrated in this study allow unprecedented zero-field spectral analysis of the zone center AFM magnon in a previously challenging spectral region, giving insights into the role of temperature and strain on the exchange and anisotropy interactions in the system. The results also suggest that the frequency-resolved measurement platform could be extended for room-temperature non-destructive examination and imaging applications for antiferromagnetic materials and devices.

  14. Detection of an unconventional superconducting phase in the vicinity of the strong first-order magnetic transition in CrAs using (75)As-nuclear quadrupole resonance.

    PubMed

    Kotegawa, Hisashi; Nakahara, Shingo; Akamatsu, Rui; Tou, Hideki; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Harima, Hisatomo

    2015-03-20

    Pressure-induced superconductivity was recently discovered in the binary helimagnet CrAs. We report the results of measurements of nuclear quadrupole resonance for CrAs under pressure. In the vicinity of the critical pressure P(c) between the helimagnetic (HM) and paramagnetic (PM) phases, a phase separation is observed. The large internal field remaining in the phase-separated HM state indicates that the HM phase disappears through a strong first-order transition. This indicates the absence of a quantum critical point in CrAs; however, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T(1) reveals that substantial magnetic fluctuations are present in the PM state. The absence of a coherence effect in 1/T(1) in the superconducting state provides evidence that CrAs is the first Cr-based unconventional superconductor.

  15. Reactive scattering of F+HD -> HF(v,J)+D: HF(v,J) nascent product state distributions and evidence for quantum transition state resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Warren W. ); Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Nesbitt, David

    2001-12-01

    Single collision reactive scattering dynamics of F+ HDHF(v,J)+ D have been investigated exploiting high-resolution (0.0001 cm?1) infrared laser absorption for quantum state resolved detection of nascent HF(v,J) product states. State resolved Doppler profiles are recorded for a series of HF rovibrational transitions and converted into state resolved fluxes via density-to-flux analysis, yielding cross-section data for relative formation of HF(v,J) at Ecom0.6(2), 1.0(3), 1.5(3), and 1.9(4) kcal/mol. State resolved HF(v,J) products at all but the lowest collision energy exhibit Boltzmann-type populations, characteristic of direct reactive scattering dynamics. At the lowest collision energy[Ecom0.6(2) kcal/mol], however, the HF(v= 2,J) populations behave quite anomalously, exhibiting a nearly''flat'' distribution out to J11 before dropping rapidly to zero at the energetic limit. These results provide strong experimental support for quantum transition state resonance dynamics near Ecom0.6 kcal /mol corresponding classically to H atom chattering between the F and D atoms, and prove to be in remarkably quantitative agreement with theoretical wave packet predictions by Skodje et al.[J. Chem. Phys. 112, 4536 (2000)]. These fully quantum state resolved studies therefore nicely complement the recent crossed beam studies of Dong et al.[J. Chem. Phys. 113, 3633 (2000)], which confirm the presence of this resonance via angle resolved differential cross-section measurements. The observed quantum state distributions near threshold also indicate several rotational states in the HF(v= 3) vibrational manifold energetically inaccessible to F(2P3/2) reagent, but which are consistent with a minor (5%) nonadiabatic contribution from spin?orbit excited F*(2P1/2).?2002 American Institute of Physics.

  16. New insights into the thermal behaviour of organic ionic plastic crystals: magnetic resonance imaging of polycrystalline morphology alterations induced by solid-solid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Pringle, Jennifer M; O'Dell, Luke A; Forsyth, Maria

    2015-07-15

    Organic ionic plastic crystals (OIPCs) show strong potential as solid-state electrolytes for lithium battery applications, demonstrating promising electrochemical performance and eliminating the need for a volatile and flammable liquid electrolyte. The ionic conductivity (σ) in these systems has recently been shown to depend strongly on polycrystalline morphology, which is largely determined by the sample's thermal history. [K. Romanenko et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2014, 136, 15638]. Tailoring this morphology could lead to conductivities sufficiently high for battery applications, so a more complete understanding of how phenomena such as solid-solid phase transitions can affect the sample morphology is of significant interest. Anisotropic relaxation of nuclear spin magnetisation provides a new MRI based approach for studies of polycrystalline materials at both a macroscopic and molecular level. In this contribution, morphology alterations induced by solid-solid phase transitions in triisobutyl(methyl)phosphonium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (P1444FSI) and diethyl(methyl)(isobutyl)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate (P1224PF6) are examined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), alongside nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, diffusion measurements and conductivity data. These observations are linked to molecular dynamics and structural behaviour crucial for the conductive properties of OIPCs. A distinct correlation is established between the conductivity at a given temperature, σ(T), and the intensity of the narrow NMR signal that is attributed to a mobile fraction, fm(T), of ions in the OIPC. To explain these findings we propose an analogy with the well-studied relationship between permeability (k) and void fraction (θ) in porous media, with k(θ) commonly quantified by a power-law dependence that can also be employed to describe σ(fm).

  17. Formation and amplification of subfemtosecond x-ray pulses in a plasma medium of hydrogenlike ions with a modulated resonant transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedzhanov, T. R.; Antonov, V. A.; Morozov, Anatoly; Goltsov, Alexander; Scully, Marlan; Suckewer, Szymon; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2017-09-01

    Coherent intense attosecond x-ray pulses could lead to a fast dynamical imaging of biological macromolecules and other material nanostructures with a unique combination of a record high temporal and spatial resolution. Plasma-based x-ray laser sources are capable of producing high-energy x-ray pulses but with relatively long picosecond duration. The sources based on high-harmonic generation (HHG) of a laser field allow one to produce much shorter pulses but of lower energy. We suggest two different paths towards intense subfemtosecond x-ray sources: (i) via efficient transformation of the picosecond radiation of the x-ray plasma lasers into the trains of subfemtosecond pulses in a resonantly absorbing medium, and (ii) via amplification of HHG radiation in the active medium of the x-ray plasma lasers. We show that essentially the same technique can be used for realization of both paths. This technique is a modulation of the parameters of the resonant transition (accordingly in absorbing or amplifying medium) produced under the action of a sufficiently strong infrared or optical field. We propose experimental realization of the suggested technique in the passive and/or active media of (i) Li iii ions modulated by the mid-IR laser field and (ii) C vi ions modulated by the optical laser radiation.

  18. Multimode mean-field model for the quantum phase transition of a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kónya, G.; Szirmai, G.; Domokos, P.

    2011-11-01

    We develop a mean-field model describing the Hamiltonian interaction of ultracold atoms and the optical field in a cavity. The Bose-Einstein condensate is properly defined by means of a grand-canonical approach. The model is efficient because only the relevant excitation modes are taken into account. However, the model goes beyond the two-mode subspace necessary to describe the self-organization quantum phase transition observed recently. We calculate all the second-order correlations of the coupled atom field and radiation field hybrid bosonic system, including the entanglement between the two types of fields.

  19. Superfluid-Normal Phase Transition in Finite Systems and its Effect on Damping of Hot Giant Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Nguyen Dinh

    2007-04-01

    Thermal fluctuations of quasiparticle number are included making use of the secondary Bogolyubov's transformation, which turns quasiparticles operators into modified-quasiparticle ones. This restores the unitarity relation for the generalized single-particle density operator, which is violated within the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) theory at finite temperature. The resulting theory is called the modified HFB (MHFB) theory, whose limit of a constant pairing interaction yields the modified BCS (MBCS) theory. Within the MBCS theory, the pairing gap never collapses at finite temperature T as it does within the BCS theory, but decreases monotonously with increasing T. It is demonstrated that this non-vanishing thermal pairing is the reason why the width of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) does not increase with T up to T ~ 1 MeV. At higher T, when the thermal pairing is small, the GDR width starts to increase with T. The calculations within the phonon-damping model yield the results in good agreement with the most recent experimental systematic for the GDR width as a function of T. A similar effect, which causes a small GDR width at low T, is also seen after thermal pairing is included in the thermal fluctuation model.

  20. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of the generation of reactive oxygen species catalysed by transition metals and quinoid redox cycling by inhalable ambient particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Valavanidis, A; Fiotakis, K; Bakeas, E; Vlahogianni, T

    2005-01-01

    A range of epidemiological studies in the 1990s showed that exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) is associated with adverse health effects in the respiratory system and increased morbidity and mortality rates. Oxidative stress has emerged as a pivotal mechanism that underlies the toxic pulmonary effects of PM. A key question from a variety of studies was whether the adverse health effects of PM are mediated by the carbonaceous particles of their reactive chemical compounds adsorbed into the particles. Experimental evidence showed that PM contains redox-active transition metals, redox cycling quinoids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which act synergistically to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Fine PM has the ability to penetrate deep into the respiratory tree where it overcomes the antioxidant defences in the fluid lining of the lungs by the oxidative action of ROS. From a previous study [Valavanidis A, Salika A, Theodoropoulou A. Generation of hydroxyl radicals by urban suspended particulate air matter. The role of iron ions. Atmospher Environ 2000; 34 : 2379-2386], we established that ferrous ions in PM play an important role in the generation of hydroxyl radicals in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In the present study, we investigated the synergistic effect of transition metals and persistent quinoid and semiquinone radicals for the generation of ROS without the presence of H2O2. We experimented with airborne particulate matter, such as TSPs (total suspended particulates), fresh automobile exhaust particles (diesel, DEP and gasoline, GEP) and fresh wood smoke soot. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we examined the quantities of persistent free radicals, characteristic of a mixture of quinoid radicals with different structures and a carbonaceous core of carbon-centred radicals. We extracted, separated and analysed the quinoid compounds by EPR at alkaline solution (pH 9.5) and by TLC. Also, we studied the direct

  1. Spin Texture and Spin Dynamics in Superconducting Cuprates Near the Phase Transition Revealed by the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochelaev, B. I.

    2016-12-01

    A short review of experimental results and theoretical models of the spin texture and spin dynamics in superconducting cuprates near the phase transition developed on the basis of the EPR measurements is given. Distortions of the long-range antiferromagnetic order in the YBa_2Cu_3O_{6+y} were investigated for y=0.1-0.4 using Yb^{3+} ions as the EPR probe. In weakly doped samples with y=0.1, a strong anisotropy of the EPR linewidth is revealed which was related to the indirect spin-spin interaction between the ytterbium ions via antiferromagnetic spin-waves. In the case of the doping level y=0.2-0.3, the EPR signal consists of narrow and broad lines, which were attributed to formation of charged domain walls. A theoretical analysis is well consistent with experimental results for the case of coplanar elliptical domain walls. A discussion of possible reasons for the observed unusual planar oxygen isotope effect on a critical temperature T_c related to charge heterogeneity in underdoped cuprates is given.

  2. White noise of Nb-based microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers with NbN coplanar resonators for readout of transition edge sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori; Yamamori, Hirotake; Nagasawa, Shuichi; Fukuda, Daiji; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2014-06-14

    White noise of dissipationless microwave radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (RF-SQUID) multiplexers has been experimentally studied to evaluate their readout performance for transition edge sensor (TES) photon counters ranging from near infrared to gamma ray. The characterization has been carried out at 4 K, first to avoid the low-frequency fluctuations present at around 0.1 K, and second, for a feasibility study of readout operation at 4 K for extended applications. To increase the resonant Q at 4 K and maintain low noise SQUID operation, multiplexer chips consisting of niobium nitride (NbN)-based coplanar-waveguide resonators and niobium (Nb)-based RF-SQUIDs have been developed. This hybrid multiplexer exhibited 1 × 10{sup 4} ≤ Q ≤ 2 × 10{sup 4} and the square root of spectral density of current noise referred to the SQUID input √S{sub I} = 31 pA/√Hz. The former and the latter are factor-of-five and seven improvements from our previous results on Nb-based resonators, respectively. Two-directional readout on the complex plane of the transmission component of scattering matrix S{sub 21} enables us to distinguish the flux noise from noise originating from other sources, such as the cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier. Systematic noise measurements with various microwave readout powers P{sub MR} make it possible to distinguish the contribution of noise sources within the system as follows: (1) The achieved √S{sub I} is dominated by the Nyquist noise from a resistor at 4 K in parallel to the SQUID input coil which is present to prevent microwave leakage to the TES. (2) The next dominant source is either the HEMT-amplifier noise (for small values of P{sub MR}) or the quantization noise due to the resolution of 300-K electronics (for large values of P{sub MR}). By a decrease of these noise levels to a degree that is achievable by current technology, we predict that the

  3. White noise of Nb-based microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers with NbN coplanar resonators for readout of transition edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori; Yamamori, Hirotake; Nagasawa, Shuichi; Fukuda, Daiji; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2014-06-01

    White noise of dissipationless microwave radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (RF-SQUID) multiplexers has been experimentally studied to evaluate their readout performance for transition edge sensor (TES) photon counters ranging from near infrared to gamma ray. The characterization has been carried out at 4 K, first to avoid the low-frequency fluctuations present at around 0.1 K, and second, for a feasibility study of readout operation at 4 K for extended applications. To increase the resonant Q at 4 K and maintain low noise SQUID operation, multiplexer chips consisting of niobium nitride (NbN)-based coplanar-waveguide resonators and niobium (Nb)-based RF-SQUIDs have been developed. This hybrid multiplexer exhibited 1 × 104 ≤ Q ≤ 2 × 104 and the square root of spectral density of current noise referred to the SQUID input √SI = 31 pA/√Hz. The former and the latter are factor-of-five and seven improvements from our previous results on Nb-based resonators, respectively. Two-directional readout on the complex plane of the transmission component of scattering matrix S21 enables us to distinguish the flux noise from noise originating from other sources, such as the cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier. Systematic noise measurements with various microwave readout powers PMR make it possible to distinguish the contribution of noise sources within the system as follows: (1) The achieved √SI is dominated by the Nyquist noise from a resistor at 4 K in parallel to the SQUID input coil which is present to prevent microwave leakage to the TES. (2) The next dominant source is either the HEMT-amplifier noise (for small values of PMR) or the quantization noise due to the resolution of 300-K electronics (for large values of PMR). By a decrease of these noise levels to a degree that is achievable by current technology, we predict that the microwave RF-SQUID multiplexer can exhibit √SI ≤ 5 pA/√Hz, i.e., close to √SI of

  4. Stable tetrabenzo-Chichibabin's hydrocarbons: tunable ground state and unusual transition between their closed-shell and open-shell resonance forms.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zebing; Sung, Young Mo; Bao, Nina; Tan, Davin; Lee, Richmond; Zafra, José L; Lee, Byung Sun; Ishida, Masatoshi; Ding, Jun; López Navarrete, Juan T; Li, Yuan; Zeng, Wangdong; Kim, Dongho; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Webster, Richard D; Casado, Juan; Wu, Jishan

    2012-09-05

    Stable open-shell polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of fundamental interest due to their unique electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and promising applications in materials sciences. Chichibabin's hydrocarbon as a classical open-shell PAH has been investigated for a long time. However, most of the studies are complicated by their inherent high reactivity. In this work, two new stable benzannulated Chichibabin's hydrocarbons 1-CS and 2-OS were prepared, and their electronic structure and geometry in the ground state were studied by various experiments (steady-state and transient absorption spectra, NMR, electron spin resonance (ESR), superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), FT Raman, X-ray crystallographic etc.) and density function theory (DFT) calculations. 1-CS and 2-OS exhibited tunable ground states, with a closed-shell quinoidal structure for 1-CS and an open-shell biradical form for 2-OS. Their corresponding excited-state forms 1-OS and 2-CS were also chemically approached and showed different decay processes. The biradical 1-OS displayed an unusually slow decay to the ground state (1-CS) due to a large energy barrier (95 ± 2.5 kJ/mol) arising from severe steric hindrance during the transition from an orthogonal biradical form to a butterfly-like quinoidal form. The quick transition from the quinoidal 2-CS (excited state) to the orthogonal biradicaloid 2-OS (ground state) happened during the attempted synthesis of 2-CS. Compounds 1-CS and 2-OS can be oxidized into stable dications by FeCl(3) and/or concentrated H(2)SO(4). The open-shell 2-OS also exhibited a large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section (760 GM at 1200 nm).

  5. Use of surface plasmon resonance for real-time measurements of the global conformational transition in human phenylalanine hydroxylase in response to substrate binding and catalytic activation.

    PubMed

    Flatmark, T; Stokka, A J; Berge, S V

    2001-07-15

    In the present study the optical biosensor technique, based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomenon, was used for real-time measurements of the reversible binding of the pterin cofactor (6R)-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and l-phenylalanine (l-Phe) to human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPAH). When BH(4) (241 Da) was injected over the sensor chip with immobilized tetrameric wt-hPAH a positive DeltaRU response was observed with a square-wave type of sensorgram and a saturable response (about 25 RU/(pmol subunit/mm(2)) with a [S](0.5) value of 5.6 +/- 0.8 microM for the pterin cofactor. The rapid on-and-off rates were, however, not possible to determine. By contrast, when l-Phe (165 Da) was injected a time-dependent increase in RU (up to about 3 min) and a much higher saturable DeltaRU response (about 75 RU/(pmol subunit/mm(2)) at 2 mM l-Phe) than expected (i.e., <5 RU/(pmol subunit/mm(2))) from the low molecular mass of l-Phe were observed in the sensorgram. The half-time for the on-and-off rates were 6 +/- 2 and 9 +/- 1 s, respectively, at 2 mM l-Phe. The steady-state (apparent equilibrium) response revealed a hyperbolic concentration dependence with a [S](0.5) value of 98 +/- 7 microM. The [S](0.5) values of both pterin cofactor and l-Phe were lower than those determined by steady-state enzyme kinetic analysis. Evidence is presented that the DeltaRU response to l-Phe is accounted for by the global conformational transition which occurs in the enzyme upon l-Phe binding, i.e., by the slow reversible transition from a low activity state ("T"-state) to a high activity state ("R"-state) characteristic of this hysteretic enzyme.

  6. Feshbach resonances in the exit channel of the F + CH3OH → HF + CH3O reaction observed using transition-state spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichman, Marissa L.; Devine, Jessalyn A.; Babin, Mark C.; Li, Jun; Guo, Lifen; Ma, Jianyi; Guo, Hua; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2017-10-01

    The transition state governs how chemical bonds form and cleave during a chemical reaction and its direct characterization is a long-standing challenge in physical chemistry. Transition state spectroscopy experiments based on negative-ion photodetachment provide a direct probe of the vibrational structure and metastable resonances that are characteristic of the reactive surface. Dynamical resonances are extremely sensitive to the topography of the reactive surface and provide an exceptional point of comparison with theory. Here we study the seven-atom F + CH3OH → HF + CH3O reaction using slow photoelectron velocity-map imaging spectroscopy of cryocooled CH3OHF‑ anions. These measurements reveal spectral features associated with a manifold of vibrational Feshbach resonances and bound states supported by the post-transition state potential well. Quantum dynamical calculations yield excellent agreement with the experimental results, allow the assignment of spectral structure and demonstrate that the key dynamics of complex bimolecular reactions can be captured with a relatively simple theoretical framework.

  7. Double Resonance Sub-Doppler Study of the Allowed and DeltaK = -3 Forbidden Q(3, 3) Transitions to the nu2 Vibrational State of 14NH3.

    PubMed

    Fichoux; Khelkhal; Rusinek; Legrand; Herlemont; Urban

    1998-11-01

    The IR-IR sub-Doppler double resonance and standard saturation sideband spectroscopy have been used to measure the allowed and Deltak = -3 forbidden transitions to the nu2 vibrational level of 14NH3. The IR-IR double resonance technique has made it possible to observe quadrupole hyperfine structures which correspond to the sums as well as differences of the -3Q(3, 3) and Q(3, 3) hyperfine components. The "sum" and "difference" double resonance frequencies have been measured with accuracy better than 30 and 5 kHz, respectively. In addition to this, the hyperfine structure of the allowed Q(3, 3) transition has been independently measured using the "standard" saturation sideband spectroscopy with accuracy better than 15 kHz. A simultaneous analysis of all measured data provides an improved set of effective nuclear quadrupole and spin-rotation parameters for the excited nu2 vibrational state and frequencies of the "pure" rotation-vibration transitions deperturbed from the hyperfine effects at the experimental sample pressure of about 3 mTorr, including a very precise zero pressure value of the "forbidden" spacing between energies of the nu2 ||s, J = 3, K = 3> and ||s, J = 3, K = 0> pure rotational levels of 2883.6795(19) MHz [0.096189194(63) cm-1]. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  8. Observation of the Symmetry-Forbidden 5σu→kσu CS2 Transition: A Vibrationally Driven Photoionization Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbone, G. J.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Bozek, John D.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2004-04-01

    Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and Schwinger calculations are used to characterize a new resonance phenomenon in the 5σu→kσu photoionization of CS2. This resonant channel is symmetry forbidden, yet is observable because it is activated by the antisymmetric stretching vibration. In addition, we show that a Franck-Condon breakdown occurs even though the energy dependence of the cross section is insensitive to geometry changes, which is unprecedented in photoionization.

  9. Doubly resonant Raman electron paramagnetic transitions of Cr{sup 3+} in ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+}).

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Venugopalan, S.; Kim, H.; Grimsditch, M.; Rodriguez, S.; Ramdas, A. K.; Materials Science Division; Purdue Univ.; State Univ. of New York at Binghamton; Sogang Univ.

    2009-06-01

    We report the Raman electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of Cr{sup 3+} in ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+}) in the {sup 4}A{sub 2} (ground) and E{sup -} (excited) states of its well-known R{sub 1} emission line. Using tunable dye laser excitation within the range of the Zeeman components of R{sub 1}, we observe highly selective doubly resonant enhancements of the Raman EPR lines. The double resonances confirm the assignments of the Raman EPR lines, and they underscore the simultaneous occurrence of both 'in resonance' and 'out resonance' as visualized in the Kramers-Heisenberg quantum-mechanical picture of inelastic light scattering. The g factors of the {sup 4}A{sub 2} and E{sup -} states are consistent with the observed magnetic field dependence of the Raman EPR shifts. Through the interplay of Raman effect and the sharp Zeeman components of R{sub 1}, the results provide clear insights into the underlying microscopic mechanism of these resonant Raman EPR spectra of ruby.

  10. A new model for broadband waveguide to microstrip transition design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Downey, Alan N.

    1986-01-01

    A new model is presented which permits the prediction of the resonant frequencies created by antipodal finline waveguide to microstrip transitions. The transition is modeled as a tapered transmission line in series with an infinite set of coupled resonant circuits. The resonant circuits are modeled as simple microwave resonant cavities of which the resonant frequencies are easily determined. The model is developed and the resonant frequencies determined for several different transitions. Experimental results are given to confirm the models.

  11. The Nucleon Resonance Program at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Ralf W. Gothe

    2006-02-01

    The status of the program to study baryon resonances at Jefferson Lab will be exemplified by the latest results on resonance parameters and transition form factors in single and double-pion production as well as kaon-hyperon decays.

  12. Electromagnetic Transition from the 4+ to 2+ Resonance in Be8 Measured via the Radiative Capture in He4+He4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datar, V. M.; Chakrabarty, D. R.; Kumar, Suresh; Nanal, V.; Pastore, S.; Wiringa, R. B.; Behera, S. P.; Chatterjee, A.; Jenkins, D.; Lister, C. J.; Mirgule, E. T.; Mitra, A.; Pillay, R. G.; Ramachandran, K.; Roberts, O. J.; Rout, P. C.; Shrivastava, A.; Sugathan, P.

    2013-08-01

    An earlier measurement on the 4+ to 2+ radiative transition in Be8 provided the first electromagnetic signature of its dumbbell-like shape. However, the large uncertainty in the measured cross section does not allow a stringent test of nuclear structure models. This Letter reports a more elaborate and precise measurement for this transition, via the radiative capture in the He4+He4 reaction, improving the accuracy by about a factor of 3. Ab initio calculations of the radiative transition strength with improved three-nucleon forces are also presented. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of the alpha cluster model and ab initio calculations.

  13. Distinguishing S-plus-minus and S-plus-plus electron pairing symmetries by neutron spin resonances in superconducting Sodium-Iron-Cobalt-Arsenic (transitional temperature = 18 Kelvin)

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Tanmoy; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Zhang, Chenglin; Li, Haifeng; Su, Yiki; Nethertom, Tucker; Redding, Caleb; Carr, Scott; Schneidewind, Astrid; Faulhaber, Enrico; Li, Shiliang; Yao, Daoxin; Bruckel, Thomas; Dai, Pengchen; Sobolev, Oleg

    2012-06-05

    A determination of the superconducting (SC) electron pairing symmetry forms the basis for establishing a microscopic mechansim for superconductivity. For iron pnictide superconductors, the s{sup {+-}}-pairing symmetry theory predicts the presence of a sharp neutron spin resonance at an energy below the sum of hole and electron SC gap energies (E {le} 2{Delta}). Although the resonances have been observed for various iron pnictide superconductors, they are broad in energy and can also be interpreted as arising from the s{sup ++}-pairing symmetry with E {ge} 2{Delta}. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to reveal a sharp resonance at E = 7 meV in the SC NaFe{sub 0.935}Co{sub 0.045}As (T{sub c} = 18 K). By comparing our experiments with calculated spin-excitations spectra within the s{sup {+-}} and s{sup ++}-pairing symmetries, we conclude that the resonance in NaFe{sub 0.935}Co{sub 0.045}As is consistent with the s{sup {+-}}-pairing symmetry, thus eliminating s{sup ++}-pairing symmetry as a candidate for superconductivity.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the phase transitions and local environments of α-alum NH 4Al(SO 4) 2·12H 2O single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Moon, Hyun-Gon; Chang, Jin-Hae

    2010-05-01

    The NMR spectrum, the spin-lattice relaxation time, T1, and the spin-spin relaxation time, T2, of NH 4Al(SO 4) 2·12H 2O crystals were studied as a function of temperature; this crystal was found to undergo increasing loss of H 2O with increasing temperature. Two groups of Al resonance lines were observed below Td (=335 K), whereas above Td the resonance lines of the two groups were reduced to one Al signal. The presence of only one 27Al resonance line Td is due to the structural phase transition. The changes in the temperature dependences of the T1 and T2 near Td are related to the loss of H 2O, which probably disrupts the forms of the octahedral of water molecules surrounding Al 3+. In addition, the α-alum NH 4Al(SO 4) 2·12H 2O can be distinguished from the α-alum RbAl(SO 4) 2·12H 2O and the β-alum CsAl(SO 4) 2·12H 2O on the basis of the temperature dependences of T1.

  15. Can a Resonant Quantum-Well State be Used as the initial and/or Final State of a Golden-Rule Calculation for a Transition Rate due to Photon or Phonon Emission or Absorption?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chia-Ren

    1997-03-01

    According to conventional wisdom, the answer would be `no'. A resonant quantum-well state is an eigen-state with a complex eigen-energy (imaginary part negative), due to tunneling through a potential barrier into a reservoir. Such a state is obtained by demanding that only an `out-going' wave (i.e., away from the tunneling barrier) exists in the reservoir. Its wave function cannot be normalized. Therefore, it cannot be used in the way stated in the title. We have investigated a way to change the answer to `yes', so far with partial success. (I.e., `yes', but with some undesirable features.) An idea to improve it is currently being explored, and will be reported at the meeting. Our main trick is to introduce a suitable optical potential in the reservoir, in order to make the resonant state normalizable, and yet with a complex energy very close to the original value. The Fermi golden rule is then generalized, in order to accommodate a non-hermitian Hamiltonian. Other non-resonant reservoir states should make negligible contributions to the transition rate, if this trick is to work.

  16. Electromagnetic properties of baryon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiator, Lothar

    2013-10-01

    Longitudinal and transverse transition form factors for most of the four-star nucleon resonances have been obtained from high-quality cross section data and polarization observables measured at MAMI, ELSA, BATES, GRAAL and CEBAF. As an application, we further show how the transition form factors can be used to obtain empirical transverse charge densities. Contour plots of the thus derived densities are shown and compared for the Roper and S11 nucleon resonances.

  17. Power Enhancement of a Rubidium Vapor Laser With a Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-15

    Phys. Lett. 34, 655-658 (1979). 5 . W. F. Krupke, R. J. Beach, V. K. Kanz, and S. A. Payne, “Resonance transition 795-nm rubidium laser,” Opt. Lett...Kanz, and W. F. Krupke, “Multimode-diode-pumped gas (alkali-vapor) laser,” Opt. Lett. 31 , 353-355 (2006). 10. Y. Wang, T. Kasamatsu, Y.Zheng, H...OPTICS EXPRESS 8050 #94531 - $15.00 USD Received 7 Apr 2008; revised 4 May 2008; accepted 7 May 2008; published 19 May 2008 (DPAL) started rapidly gaining

  18. Parametric Resonance Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broeck, C.; Bena, I.

    The phenomenon of parametric resonance is revisited. Several physical examples are reviewed and an exactly solvable model is discussed. A mean field theory is presented for globally coupled parametric oscillators with randomly distributed phases. A new type of collective instability appears, which is similar in nature to that of noise induced phase transitions.

  19. Time-resolved resonant soft x-ray diffraction with free-electron lasers: Femtosecond dynamics across the Verwey transition in magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, N.; Kachel, T.; Schuessler-Langeheine, C.; Schlotter, W. F.; Beye, M.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W.; Chang, C. F.; Foehlisch, A.; Berglund, M.; Metcalf, P.

    2011-05-02

    Resonant soft x-ray diffraction (RSXD) with femtosecond (fs) time resolution is a powerful tool for disentangling the interplay between different degrees of freedom in strongly correlated electron materials. It allows addressing the coupling of particular degrees of freedom upon an external selective perturbation, e.g., by an optical or infrared laser pulse. Here, we report a time-resolved RSXD experiment from the prototypical correlated electron material magnetite using soft x-ray pulses from the free-electron laser FLASH in Hamburg. We observe ultrafast melting of the charge-orbital order leading to the formation of a transient phase, which has not been observed in equilibrium.

  20. High-resolution {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of phase transition of Rb,Cs-intercalated single-walled nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhrara, M.; Saih, Y.; Waagberg, T.; Goze-Bac, C.; Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-09-01

    We present 13 C high-resolution magic-angle-turning (MAT) and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance data of Cs and Rb intercalated single walled carbon nanotubes. We find two distinct phases at different intercalation levels. A simple charge transfer is applicable at low intercalation level. The new phase at high intercalation level is accompanied by a hybridization of alkali (s) orbitals with the carbon (sp2) orbitals of the single walled nanotubes, which indicate bundle surface sites is the most probable alkali site.

  1. Energy level systems and transitions of Ho:LuAG laser resonantly pumped by a narrow line-width Tm fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Zhao, Ting; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Le; Zhou, Tianyuan; Tang, Dingyuan; Wong, Chingping; Chen, Yung-Fu; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-11-28

    We presented a Ho:LuAG ceramic laser in-band pumped by a narrow emission line-width Tm fiber laser at 1907 nm. All of potential transitions between 5I7 and 5I8 manifold were discussed to form the Ho's in-band-pump energy level systems, which were not described in details earlier. For the emission band centered at ~2095 nm, both laser absorption and emission transition separately consisted of two groups were first analyzed and observed. Using output couplers (OCs) with different transmittances (T = 6, 10 and 20%), the similar ~0.5 W continuous-wave (CW) output power under an incident pump power of ~4.9 W was obtained, with twin (or triplet) emission bands respectively. The blue shift of center emission wavelengths was observed with the increase of transmittances.

  2. Excitation cross sections for the ns 2S yields np 2P resonance transitions in Mg(+) (n = 3) and Zn(+) (n = 4) using electron-energy-loss and merged-beams methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, A.; Mitroy, J.; Tayal, S. S.; Henry, Ronald J. W.; Man, K.-F.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Williams, I. D.

    1993-01-01

    Electron-excitation cross sections are reported for the 3s 2S yields 3p 2P(h, k) resonance transition in Mg(+) at energies from threshold (4.43 eV) to approximately 9 times threshold (40.0 eV). The electron-energy-loss merged-beams technique used in these measurements is described in detail. In addition, the method of separating contributions of the elastically scattered (Coulomb) and the inelastically scattered electrons in the present Mg(+) case and previously reported Zn(+) results is described. Comparisons in the experimental energy range are made for Mg(+) with the two five-state close-coupling theoretical calculations carried out herein, and with other published close-coupling, distorted-wave, and semiempirical calculations. The present Mg(+) cross sections and Zn(+) cross sections from earlier measurements are tabulated.

  3. Second harmonic generation at 399 nm resonant on the 1S0-1P1 transition of ytterbium using a periodically poled LiNbO3 waveguide.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Akamatsu, Daisuke; Nishida, Yoshiki; Tanabe, Takehiko; Yasuda, Masami; Hong, Feng-Lei; Hosaka, Kazumoto

    2016-05-30

    We demonstrate a compact and robust method for generating a 399-nm light resonant on the 1S0 - 1P1 transition in ytterbium using a single-pass periodically poled LiNbO3 waveguide for second harmonic generation (SHG). The obtained output power at 399 nm was 25 mW when a 798-nm fundamental power of 380 mW was coupled to the waveguide. We observed no degradation of the SHG power for 13 hours with a low power of 6 mW. The obtained SHG light has been used as a seed light for injection locking, which provides sufficient power for laser cooling ytterbium.

  4. a 1+1' Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Scheme for Rotationally State-Selective Detection of Formaldehyde via the ˜{A}^1A_2←˜{X}^1A_1 Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Barratt; Krueger, Bastian C.; Meyer, Sven; Wodtke, Alec; Schaefer, Tim

    2017-06-01

    The formaldehyde molecule is an important model system for understanding dynamical processes in small polyatomic molecules. However, prior to this work, there have been no reports of a resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection scheme for formaldehyde suitable for rovibrationally state-selective detection in molecular beam scattering experiments. Previously reported tunable REMPI schemes are either non-rotationally resolved, involve multiple resonant steps, or involve many-photon ionization steps. In the current work, we present a new 1+1' REMPI scheme for formaldehyde. The first photon is tunable and provides rotational resolution via the vibronically allowed ˜{A}^1A_2←˜{X}^1A_1 transition. Molecules are then directly ionized from the ˜{A} state by one photon of 157 nm. The results indicate that the ionization cross section from the 4^1 vibrational level of the ˜{A} state is independent of the rotational level used as intermediate, to within experimental uncertainty. The 1+1' REMPI intensities are therefore directly proportional to the ˜{A}←˜{X} absorption intensities and can be used for quantitative measurement of ˜{X}-state population distributions.

  5. Resonantly amplified vibronic symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbone, G. J.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Bozek, John D.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2001-05-01

    The energy dependence of the vibrational branching ratio for exciting one quantum of bending is determined for CO2 4σg-1 photoionization. This nominally forbidden transition becomes allowed for a photoionization transition as a result of instantaneous symmetry breaking due to zero point motion, and is strongly enhanced by a continuum shape resonance.

  6. Resonance Raman and photophysical studies of transition metal complexes in solution and entrapped in zeolites. Progress report, August 1, 1990--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, J.R.

    1993-09-01

    Area of most intense activity involves study of effects of entrapment of ruthenium(II)-polypyridyl complexes within the supercages of Y-zeolite. Results of initial studies document alterations in photophysical properties of entrapped complexes and provide insight into the factors responsible for these changes. A second major activity was to undertake an investigation of the feasibility of entrapment of metallophthalocyanines within the Y-zeolite supercages. Initial problems in preparative methodology used for these systems have been overcome and several systems have now been prepared and purified for projected photoredox studies. A third major objective was to develop and utilize a sound interpretive framework for resonance Raman (RR) and time-resolved RR (TR{sup 3}) methods for investigating subtle perturbations in ground- and {sup 3}MLCT-state electronic structure which might be induced by substituent or environmentally-induced asymmetry, effects which could possibly lead to critical functional alterations.

  7. Chemistry of (and on) transition metal clusters: a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance study of the reaction of niobium cluster cations with nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Harding, Daniel J; Oliver, Thomas A A; Walsh, Tiffany R; Drewello, Thomas; Woodruff, D Phil; Derrick, Peter J; Mackenzie, Stuart R

    2009-01-01

    The reactions of niobium cluster cations, Nb(+)(n) (n = 2-19), with nitric oxide have been investigated using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR). The overall reaction rate constants are found to be in reasonable agreement with collision rates calculated using the surface charge capture model. The dominant reaction for small clusters (n <9) involves reaction-induced fragmentation resulting in the loss of either NbO or NbN. By contrast, the main reaction observed for the larger clusters (n> 11) is sequential NO chemisorption. Clusters n = 9, 10 exhibit both extremes of behaviour and are the only clusters upon which there is evidence of NO decomposition with N(2) loss observed whenever multiple NO molecules are co-adsorbed. The rate constants for each process have been determined as a function of cluster size.

  8. Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy below 100 eV: probing first-row transition-metal M-edges in chemical complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxin; Young, Anthony T; Guo, Jinghua; Cramer, Stephen P; Friedrich, Stephan; Braun, Artur; Gu, Weiwei

    2013-07-01

    X-ray absorption and scattering spectroscopies involving the 3d transition-metal K- and L-edges have a long history in studying inorganic and bioinorganic molecules. However, there have been very few studies using the M-edges, which are below 100 eV. Synchrotron-based X-ray sources can have higher energy resolution at M-edges. M-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) could therefore provide complementary information to K- and L-edge spectroscopies. In this study, M2,3-edge XAS on several Co, Ni and Cu complexes are measured and their spectral information, such as chemical shifts and covalency effects, are analyzed and discussed. In addition, M2,3-edge RIXS on NiO, NiF2 and two other covalent complexes have been performed and different d-d transition patterns have been observed. Although still preliminary, this work on 3d metal complexes demonstrates the potential to use M-edge XAS and RIXS on more complicated 3d metal complexes in the future. The potential for using high-sensitivity and high-resolution superconducting tunnel junction X-ray detectors below 100 eV is also illustrated and discussed.

  9. Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy below 100 eV: probing first-row transition-metal M-edges in chemical complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxin; Young, Anthony T.; Guo, Jinghua; Cramer, Stephen P.; Friedrich, Stephan; Braun, Artur; Gu, Weiwei

    2013-01-01

    X-ray absorption and scattering spectroscopies involving the 3d transition-metal K- and L-edges have a long history in studying inorganic and bioinorganic molecules. However, there have been very few studies using the M-edges, which are below 100 eV. Synchrotron-based X-ray sources can have higher energy resolution at M-edges. M-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) could therefore provide complementary information to K- and L-edge spectroscopies. In this study, M 2,3-edge XAS on several Co, Ni and Cu complexes are measured and their spectral information, such as chemical shifts and covalency effects, are analyzed and discussed. In addition, M 2,3-edge RIXS on NiO, NiF2 and two other covalent complexes have been performed and different d–d transition patterns have been observed. Although still preliminary, this work on 3d metal complexes demonstrates the potential to use M-edge XAS and RIXS on more complicated 3d metal complexes in the future. The potential for using high-sensitivity and high-resolution superconducting tunnel junction X-ray detectors below 100 eV is also illustrated and discussed. PMID:23765304

  10. Intense, narrow atomic-clock resonances.

    PubMed

    Jau, Y-Y; Post, A B; Kuzma, N N; Braun, A M; Romalis, M V; Happer, W

    2004-03-19

    We present experimental and theoretical results showing that magnetic resonance transitions from the "end" sublevels of maximum or minimum spin in alkali-metal vapors are a promising alternative to the conventional 0-0 transition for small-size gas-cell atomic clocks. For these "end resonances," collisional spin-exchange broadening, which often dominates the linewidth of the 0-0 resonance, decreases with increasing spin polarization and vanishes for 100% polarization. The end resonances also have much stronger signals than the 0-0 resonance, and are readily detectable in cells with high buffer-gas pressure.

  11. On the molecular mechanism of the blue to purple transition of bacteriorhodopsin. UV-difference spectroscopy and electron spin resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Duñach, M; Padrós, E; Seigneuret, M; Rigaud, J L

    1988-06-05

    Conformational changes in the bacteriorhodopsin molecule related to the blue to purple transition have been monitored using UV-difference spectrophotometry. Mn2+ binding to the deionized blue membrane, which restores the purple form, promotes the appearance of a difference spectrum that can be interpreted as arising from tryptophan perturbation. Similar difference spectra were found upon pH increase of the blue membrane suspensions. Such pH increase yields the deionized purple membrane and shows an apparent pK of 5.4. Binding of Hg2+ to the blue membrane does not induce any UV-difference spectrum or change the apparent pK of the transition. ESR studies of Mn2+ binding show that in the pink membrane several high and medium affinity binding sites have been converted to low affinity ones. In the NaBH4-reduced membrane, a medium affinity site has been converted to a low affinity site. Upon Mn2+ binding to the reduced membrane or pH increase, absorption changes were found in the visible region which showed a dependence upon bound Mn2+ as well as an apparent pK similar to those of the nonreduced membrane. It is proposed that the functional form of the membrane depends primarily on the deprotonated state of a control group and that cation binding only affects the pK of this deprotonation through changes in the membrane surface potential.

  12. Probing dynamics of complex ordered phases in colossal magnetoresistive transition-metal oxides using coherent resonant soft x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Joshua J.

    A growing interest in the physics of complex systems such as in the transition-metal oxide family has exploded recently, especially in the last 20 years or so. One notable effect is the change in electrical resistivity of a system by orders of magnitude in an applied magnetic field, coined the "colossal magnetoresistance effect". In efforts to understand these types of effects, there has been an unveiling of a rich variety of phenomena in the field of strongly correlated electron physics that has come to dominate the current scientific times. Most notable is the competition of myriad types of order: magnetic, lattice, charge and orbital all self-organize to display a fascinating array of phases on a variety of length scales. Furthermore, it has become apparent that new probes are needed to grasp some of this physics that transcends current condensed matter theory, where much of the behavior of these types of systems has remained unexplored. We have developed a new technique to gain more information about the system than with conventional x-ray diffraction. By scattering highly coherent, low energy x-rays, we can measure manganite speckle: a "fingerprint' of the microscopic structure in the bulk. The coherence of the x-rays can further be used to elucidate new insight into the dynamics of these phases. We describe here a number of novel effects near the orbital order phase transition in a half-doped manganite. We observe a small fluctuating component in the scattered signal that is correlated with three effects: both a rapidly decreasing total signal and orbital domain size, as well as an abrupt onset of a broad background intensity that we attribute to the thermal production of correlated polarons. Our results suggest that the transition is characterized by a competition between a pinned orbital domain topology that remains static, and mobile domain boundaries that exhibit slow, spatiotemporal fluctuations. This study opens up a new chapter to the study of

  13. Extra sub-Doppler lines in the vicinity of the third-resonance 6S-8P transition of atomic Cs attributed to optically induced Cs dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passerat de Silans, Thierry; Maurin, Isabelle; Laliotis, Athanasios; Segundo, Pedro Chaves De Souza; Bloch, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    We report on the observation of additional sub-Doppler lines in a saturated absorption experiment when exploring the vicinity of the 6S1/2-8P3/2 transition of Cs (λ=388 nm). These additional lines are observed only under a relatively strong irradiation of both the pump and the probe beams. Extra narrow lines are also observed in copropagating nonlinear spectroscopy, and around the lines of the V-type three-level system 8P3/2-6S1/2-8P1/2 (λ1=388 nm, λ2=389 nm). We attribute theses additional lines to a probing of high-lying molecular cesium, produced as a result of the optical excitation of Cs atoms, as the low Cs atom density (≤1012cm-3) is unable to populate significantly the dimer states in the condition of thermal equilibrium.

  14. Electron Excitation Cross Sections for the 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3) (sup 4)S -> 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3) (sup 2d) ->2s2p(sup 4) (sup 4p) (Resonance) Transitions in Oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuo, M.; Smith, S.; Chutjian, A.; Williams, I.; Tayal, S.; McLaughlin, B.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical excitation cross sections are reported for the first forbidden transition xxx and the first allowed (resonance) transition xxx in OII. Use is made of electron-energy loss and merged beams methods. The electron energy range covered is 3.33 eV (threshold) to 15 eV for the S->D transition, and 14.9 eV (threshold) to 40 eV for the S->P transition. Care was taken to assess and minimize the metastable fraction of the OII beam. An electron mirror was designed and tested to reflect inelastically back-scattered electrons into the forward direction to account for the full range of polar scattering angles. Comparisons are made between present experiments and 11-state R-Matrix calculations. Calculations are also presented for the xxx transition.

  15. Electron Excitation Cross Sections for the 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3) (sup 4)S -> 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3) (sup 2d) ->2s2p(sup 4) (sup 4p) (Resonance) Transitions in Oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuo, M.; Smith, S.; Chutjian, A.; Williams, I.; Tayal, S.; McLaughlin, B.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical excitation cross sections are reported for the first forbidden transition xxx and the first allowed (resonance) transition xxx in OII. Use is made of electron-energy loss and merged beams methods. The electron energy range covered is 3.33 eV (threshold) to 15 eV for the S->D transition, and 14.9 eV (threshold) to 40 eV for the S->P transition. Care was taken to assess and minimize the metastable fraction of the OII beam. An electron mirror was designed and tested to reflect inelastically back-scattered electrons into the forward direction to account for the full range of polar scattering angles. Comparisons are made between present experiments and 11-state R-Matrix calculations. Calculations are also presented for the xxx transition.

  16. Extra sub-Doppler lines in the vicinity of the third-resonance 6S-8P transition of atomic Cs attributed to optically induced Cs dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Passerat de Silans, Thierry; Maurin, Isabelle; Laliotis, Athanasios; Segundo, Pedro Chaves de Souza; Bloch, Daniel

    2011-04-15

    We report on the observation of additional sub-Doppler lines in a saturated absorption experiment when exploring the vicinity of the 6S{sub 1/2}-8P{sub 3/2} transition of Cs ({lambda}=388 nm). These additional lines are observed only under a relatively strong irradiation of both the pump and the probe beams. Extra narrow lines are also observed in copropagating nonlinear spectroscopy, and around the lines of the V-type three-level system 8P{sub 3/2}-6S{sub 1/2}-8P{sub 1/2} ({lambda}{sub 1}=388 nm, {lambda}{sub 2}=389 nm). We attribute theses additional lines to a probing of high-lying molecular cesium, produced as a result of the optical excitation of Cs atoms, as the low Cs atom density ({<=}10{sup 12}cm{sup -3}) is unable to populate significantly the dimer states in the condition of thermal equilibrium.

  17. Low-temperature spin-state transition in LaCoO{sub 3} investigated using resonant x-ray absorption at the Co K edge

    SciTech Connect

    Medarde, M.; Pomjakushina, E.; Conder, K.; Dallera, C.; Grioni, M.; Voigt, J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Neisius, Th.; Tjernberg, O.; Barilo, S. N.

    2006-02-01

    LaCoO{sub 3} displays two broad anomalies in the DC magnetic susceptibility {chi}{sup DC}, occurring, respectively, around 50 K and 500 K. We have investigated the first of them within the 10 Ktransition from a lower to a higher spin state, have been analyzed using a minimal model including the Co 3d and O 2p hybridization in the initial state. The temperature dependence of the Co magnetic moment obtained from the estimated e{sub g} and t{sub 2g} occupations could be satisfactorily reproduced. Also, the decrease of the Co 3d and O 2p hybridization by increasing temperature obtained from this simple model compares favorably with the values estimated from thermal evolution of the crystallographic structure.

  18. Self-diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance, microstructure transitions, and solubilization capacity of phytosterols and cholesterol in Winsor IV food-grade microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Spernath, Aviram; Yaghmur, Anan; Aserin, Abraham; Hoffman, Roy E; Garti, Nissim

    2003-04-09

    Microemulsions are of growing interest to the food industry as vehicles for delivering and enhancing solubilization of natural food supplements with nutritional and health benefits. The incorporation of molecular phytosterols, cholesterol-lowering agents, in food products is of great interest to the food industry. In this work is demonstrated the use of water dilutable food-grade microemulsions consisting of ethoxylated sorbitan ester (Tween 60), water, R-(+)-limonene, ethanol, and propylene glycol as vehicles for enhancing the phytosterols solubilization. Phytosterols were solubilized up to 12 times more than the dissolution capacity of the oil [R-(+)-limonene] for the same compounds. The solubilization capacity of phytosterols and cholesterol along a dilution line in a pseudo-ternary phase diagram [on this dilution line the weight ratio of R-(+)-limonene/ethanol/Tween 60 is constant at 1:1:3] was correlated to the microstructure transitions along the dilution line. Structural aspects were studied by self-diffusion NMR spectroscopy. The ability of phytosterols to compete with cholesterol for penetration into bile salt micelles in the gut may be limited to rich aqueous systems (O/W microemulsion).

  19. Development of a femtosecond time-resolved near-IR multiplex stimulated Raman spectrometer in resonance with transitions in the 900-1550 nm region.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Tomohisa; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-07-21

    Charge transfer and charge delocalisation processes play key roles in the functions of large biomolecular systems and organic/inorganic devices. Many of the short-lived transients involved in these processes can be sensitively detected by monitoring their low-energy electronic transitions in the near-IR region. Ultrafast time-resolved near-IR Raman spectroscopy is a promising tool for investigating the structural dynamics of the short-lived transients as well as their electronic dynamics. In this study, we have developed a femtosecond time-resolved near-IR multiplex stimulated Raman spectrometer using the Raman pump pulse at 1190 nm and a broadband probe pulse covering the 900-1550 nm region. Spectral and temporal instrument responses of the spectrometer are estimated to be 5 cm(-1) and 120 fs, respectively. Time-resolved near-IR stimulated Raman spectra of poly(3-dodecylthiophene) (P3DDT) are recorded in toluene solution for investigating its structural changes following the photoexcitation. The spectra strongly indicate conformational changes of P3DDT in excited states associated with the elongation of its effective conjugation length. The results on P3DDT fully demonstrate the effectiveness of the newly developed femtosecond time-resolved near-IR stimulated Raman spectrometer.

  20. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  1. A new model for broadband waveguide-to-microstrip transition design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Downey, Alan N.

    1988-01-01

    A new model is presented which permits the prediction of the resonant frequencies created by antipodal finline waveguide to microstrip transitions. The transition is modeled as a tapered transmission line in series with an infinite set of coupled resonant circuits. The resonant circuits are modeled as simple microwave resonant cavities of which the resonant frequencies are easily determined. The model is developed and the resonant frequencies determined for several different transitions. Experimental results are given to confirm the models.

  2. Structural and magnetic inhomogeneities, phase transitions, 55Mn nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetoresistive properties of La0.6 - x Nd x Sr0.3Mn1.1O3-δ ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashchenko, A. V.; Pashchenko, V. P.; Prokopenko, V. K.; Revenko, Yu. F.; Kisel, N. G.; Kamenev, V. I.; Sil'cheva, A. G.; Ledenev, N. A.; Burkhovetskii, V. V.; Levchenko, G. G.

    2014-05-01

    The structure, lattice imperfection, and properties of ceramic samples La0.6 - x Nd x Sr0.3Mn1.1O3-δ ( x = 0-0.4) have been investigated using the X-ray diffraction, resistive, magnetic (χac, 55Mn NMR), magnetoresistive and microscopic methods. It has been shown that there is a satisfactory agreement between the concentration decrease in the lattice parameters a of the rhombohedral ( x = 0, 0.1, 0.2) and cubic ( x = 0.3, 0.4) perovskite structures and the average ionic radii for the lattice containing anion vacancies, cation vacancies, and nanostructured clusters with Mn2+ ions in A-positions. With an increase in the neodymium concentration x, the vacancy-type imperfection increases, the cluster-type imperfection decreases, the temperatures of metal-semiconductor phase transition T ms and ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition T C decrease, and the content of the ferromagnetic phase decreases. The anomalous hysteresis is associated with the appearance of unidirectional exchange anisotropy induced in a clustered perovskite structure consisting of a ferromagnetic matrix and a planar antiferromagnetic cluster coherently coupled with it. An analysis of the asymmetrically broadened 55Mn NMR spectra has revealed a high-frequency electronic double exchange (Mn3+-O2--Mn4+) ↔ (Mn4+-O2--Mn3+) and an inhomogeneity of the magnetic and charge states of manganese due to the heterogeneous environment of the manganese ions by other ions and defects. The observed changes in the resonant frequency and width of the resonance curve are caused by changes in the ratio Mn3+/Mn4+ and magnetic inhomogeneity. An increase in the neodymium concentration x leads to a decrease in the ferromagnetic phase content determined from the dependences 4π Nχac( T) and the 55Mn NMR curves. The phase diagram characterizes an interrelation between the composition, the imperfection of the structure, and the transport, magnetic, and magnetoresistive properties of lanthanum neodymium manganite

  3. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  4. Snake resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Tepikian, S.

    1988-01-01

    Siberian Snakes provide a practical means of obtaining polarized proton beams in large accelerators. The effect of snakes can be understood by studying the dynamics of spin precession in an accelerator with snakes and a single spin resonance. This leads to a new class of energy independent spin depolarizing resonances, called snake resonances. In designing a large accelerator with snakes to preserve the spin polarization, there is an added constraint on the choice of the vertical betatron tune due to the snake resonances. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  5. K- and L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) determination of differential orbital covalency (DOC) of transition metal sites

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Michael L.; Mara, Michael W.; Yan, James J.; ...

    2017-02-09

    Continual advancements in the development of synchrotron radiation sources have resulted in X-ray based spectroscopic techniques capable of probing the electronic and structural properties of numerous systems. This review gives an overview of the application of metal K-edge and L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), as well as Kα resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS), to the study of electronic structure in transition metal sites with emphasis on experimentally quantifying 3d orbital covalency. The specific sensitivities of K-edge XAS, L-edge XAS, and RIXS are discussed emphasizing the complementary nature of the methods. L-edge XAS and RIXS are sensitive to mixing between 3dmore » orbitals and ligand valence orbitals, and to the differential orbital covalency (DOC), that is, the difference in the covalencies for different symmetry sets of the d orbitals. Both L-edge XAS and RIXS are highly sensitive to and enable separation of σ and π donor bonding and π back bonding contributions to bonding. Applying ligand field multiplet simulations, including charge transfer via valence bond configuration interactions, DOC can be obtained for direct comparison with density functional theory calculations and to understand chemical trends. Here, the application of RIXS as a probe of frontier molecular orbitals in a heme enzyme demonstrates the potential of this method for the study of metal sites in highly covalent coordination sites in bioinorganic chemistry.« less

  6. K- and L-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) Determination of Differential Orbital Covalency (DOC) of Transition Metal Sites.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael L; Mara, Michael W; Yan, James J; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I

    2017-08-15

    Continual advancements in the development of synchrotron radiation sources have resulted in X-ray based spectroscopic techniques capable of probing the electronic and structural properties of numerous systems. This review gives an overview of the application of metal K-edge and L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), as well as K resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS), to the study of electronic structure in transition metal sites with emphasis on experimentally quantifying 3d orbital covalency. The specific sensitivities of K-edge XAS, L-edge XAS, and RIXS are discussed emphasizing the complementary nature of the methods. L-edge XAS and RIXS are sensitive to mixing between 3d orbitals and ligand valence orbitals, and to the differential orbital covalency (DOC), that is, the difference in the covalencies for different symmetry sets of the d orbitals. Both L-edge XAS and RIXS are highly sensitive to and enable separation of and donor bonding and back bonding contributions to bonding. Applying ligand field multiplet simulations, including charge transfer via valence bond configuration interactions, DOC can be obtained for direct comparison with density functional theory calculations and to understand chemical trends. The application of RIXS as a probe of frontier molecular orbitals in a heme enzyme demonstrates the potential of this method for the study of metal sites in highly covalent coordination sites in bioinorganic chemistry.

  7. Enhancing the superconducting transition temperature of CeRh 1-x IrxIn5 due to the strong-coupling effects of antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations: an 115In nuclear quadrupole resonance study.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Shinji; Yashima, Mitsuharu; Mugino, Yoichi; Mukuda, Hidekazu; Kitaoka, Yoshio; Shishido, Hiroaki; Onuki, Yoshichika

    2006-04-14

    We report on systematic evolutions of antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin fluctuations and unconventional superconductivity (SC) in heavy-fermion (HF) compounds CeRh(1-x)Ir(x)In(5) via an (115)In nuclear-quadrupole-resonance experiment. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T(1) has revealed the marked development of AFM spin fluctuations as approaching an AFM ordered state. Concomitantly, the superconducting transition temperature T(c) and the energy gap Delta0 increase drastically from T(c)= 0.4K and 2Delta0/k(B)T(c)=5 in CeIrIn(5) up to T(c) =1.2K and 2Delta0/k(B)T(c) =8.3 in CeRh(0.3)Ir(0.7)In5 , respectively. The present work suggests that the AFM spin fluctuations in close proximity to the AFM quantum critical point are indeed responsible for the strong-coupling unconventional SC in HF compounds.

  8. Effect of Molecular Guest Binding on the d-d Transitions of Ni(2+) of CPO-27-Ni: A Combined UV-Vis, Resonant-Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy, and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Erik; Gorelov, Evgeny; Guda, Alexander A; Bugaev, Aram L; Bonino, Francesca; Borfecchia, Elisa; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Gianolio, Diego; Chavan, Sachin; Lamberti, Carlo

    2017-10-04

    We used Ni K-edge resonant-valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (RVtC-XES, also referred to as direct RIXS), an element-selective bulk-sensitive synchrotron-based technique, to investigate the electronic structure of the CPO-27-Ni metal-organic framework (MOF) upon molecular adsorption of significant molecular probes: H2O, CO, H2S, and NO. We compare RVtC-XES with UV-vis spectroscopy, and we show that the element selectivity of RVtC-XES is of strategic significance to observe the full set of d-d excitations in Ni(2+), which are partially overshadowed by the low-energy π-π* transitions of the Ni ligands in standard diffuse-reflectance UV-vis experiments. Our combined RVtC-XES/UV-vis approach provides access to the whole set of d-d excitations, allowing us a complete discussion of the changes undergone by the electronic configuration of the Ni(2+) sites hosted within the MOF upon molecular adsorption. The experimental data have been interpreted by multiplet ligand-field theory calculations based on Wannier orbitals. This study represents a step further in understanding the ability of the CPO-27-Ni MOFs in molecular sorption and separation applications.

  9. Nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.

    This report discusses research in the area of slowly varying nonlinear oscillatory systems. Some of the topics discussed are as follows: adiabatic invariants and transient resonance in very slowly varying Hamiltonian systems; sustained resonance in very slowly varying Hamiltonian systems; free-electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillators.

  10. Nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.; Pernarowski, Mark; Bosley, David L.

    1990-04-01

    The subjects discussed are: transient and sustained resonance for systems with very slowly varying parameters; free electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillations in biological systems. Plans are discussed for: FEL applications; transient and sustained resonance; and bursting oscillations.

  11. Nuclear-resonant electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálffy, Adriana; Harman, Zoltán

    2008-04-01

    We investigate nuclear-resonant electron scattering as occurring in the two-step process of nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC) followed by internal conversion. The nuclear excitation and decay are treated by a phenomenological collective model in which nuclear states and transition probabilities are described by experimental parameters. We present capture rates and resonant strengths for a number of heavy-ion collision systems considering various scenarios for the resonant electron-scattering process. The results show that for certain cases resonant electron scattering can have significantly larger resonance strengths than NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the nucleus. We discuss the impact of our findings on the possible experimental observation of NEEC.

  12. πππγ* amplitude and the resonant ρπγ* transition from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Shultz, Christian J.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a determination of the $P$-wave $\\pi\\pi\\to\\pi\\gamma^\\star$ transition amplitude from lattice quantum chromodynamics. Matrix elements of the vector current in a finite-volume are extracted from three-point correlation functions, and from these we determine the infinite-volume amplitude using a generalization of the Lellouch-L\\"uscher formalism. We determine the amplitude for a range of discrete values of the $\\pi\\pi$ energy and virtuality of the photon, and observe the expected dynamical enhancement due to the $\\rho$ resonance. Describing the energy dependence of the amplitude, we are able to analytically continue into the complex energy plane and from the residue at the $\\rho$ pole extract the $\\rho\\to\\gamma^\\star\\pi$ transition form factor. This calculation, at $m_\\pi\\approx 400$~MeV, is the first time a form factor of a hadron resonance has been calculated within a first-principles approach to QCD.

  13. Velocity selective optical pumping resonance sign reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasteva, A.; Slavov, D.; Todorov, G.; Cartaleva, S.

    2013-03-01

    We report experimental and theoretical examinations of the peculiarities in Velocity Selective Optical Pumping (VSOP) resonance behavior at open and closed hyperfine transition spectra of Cs atoms (on the D2 line), confined in optical cell with thickness L = 6λ, where λ = 852 nm. For linear and circular polarizations of the irradiating light, open transitions exhibit reduced absorption (fluorescence) VSOP resonances whose contrast increases with atomic concentration and light intensity. However, in case of closed transition the situation is different, the enhanced absorption (fluorescence) VSOP resonance reverses its sign with the atomic concentration and light intensity. Theoretical analysis based on the density matrix formalism, taking into account the statistical tensors describing atomic population and longitudinal alignment, shows that the VSOP resonance sign reversal at the closed transition can be attributed to the efficiency reduction of population transfer by the spontaneous decay with atomic source temperature.

  14. Site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance study of the calcium-induced structural transition in the N-domain of human cardiac troponin C complexed with troponin I.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Shoji; Nakamura, Motoyoshi; Komori, Tomotaka; Arata, Toshiaki

    2005-01-11

    Calcium-induced structural transition in the amino-terminal domain of troponin C (TnC) triggers skeletal and cardiac muscle contraction. The salient feature of this structural transition is the movement of the B and C helices, which is termed the "opening" of the N-domain. This movement exposes a hydrophobic region, allowing interaction with the regulatory domain of troponin I (TnI) as can be seen in the crystal structure of the troponin ternary complex [Takeda, S., Yamashita, A., Maeda, K., and Maeda, Y. (2003) Nature 424, 35-41]. In contrast to skeletal TnC, Ca(2+)-binding site I (an EF-hand motif that consists of an A helix-loop-B helix motif) is inactive in cardiac TnC. The question arising from comparisons with skeletal TnC is how both helices move according to Ca(2+) binding or interact with TnI in cardiac TnC. In this study, we examined the Ca(2+)-induced movement of the B and C helices relative to the D helix in a cardiac TnC monomer state and TnC-TnI binary complex by means of site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Doubly spin-labeled TnC mutants were prepared, and the spin-spin distances were estimated by analyzing dipolar interactions with the Fourier deconvolution method. An interspin distance of 18.4 A was estimated for mutants spin labeled at G42C on the B helix and C84 on the D helix in a Mg(2+)-saturated monomer state. The interspin distance between Q58C on the C helix and C84 on the D helix was estimated to be 18.3 A under the same conditions. Distance changes were observed by the addition of Ca(2+) ions and the formation of a complex with TnI. Our data indicated that the C helix moved away from the D helix in a distinct Ca(2+)-dependent manner, while the B helix did not. A movement of the B helix by interaction with TnI was observed. Both Ca(2+) and TnI were also shown to be essential for the full opening of the N-domain in cardiac TnC.

  15. Causal connection of non-specific low back pain and disc degeneration in children with transitional vertebra and/or Spina bifida occulta: role of magnetic resonance--prospective study.

    PubMed

    Milicić, Gordana; Krolo, Ivan; Anticević, Darko; Roić, Goran; Zadravec, Dijana; Bojić, Davor; Fattorini, Matija Zutelija; Bumci, Igor

    2012-06-01

    The problem of low back pain (LBP) in children is very common and many specialists are dealing with it in everyday practice. The cause for low back pain often is not found and classified under the diagnosis of non specific low back pain. The objective of this prospective study is to determine wether children with non specific low back pain and existence of anomalies in LS spine (transitional vertebra- TV and/or Spina bifida occulta SBO) also have the degeneration of the intervertebral disc (DD) L4-L5 and/or L5-S1. This prospective study included 69 patients from 8 to 16 years of age (X 12.81) of whom 40 were male (57.97%), and 29 female (42.03%). They all were examinated in University of Zagreb, "Sestre milosrdnice" University Hospital Center, Zagreb Children's Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic, Zagreb, Croatia. The reason of their visit was non specific low back pain. Pain was measured by visual analog scale (VAS) and mean score was three, duration of pain was between two and four weeks. Also, pain was sporadic, during daytime and not connected with level of physical activity. They all have undergone an algorithm of radiological examinations. Standard AP and LL radiographs (RTG) were made, as well as magnetic resonance (MR) of LS spine and sacrum in sagittal and transversal plane in T1 and T2 weighted sequence. The anomalies of L5 and S1 were found in 65 patients: transitional vertebra classified according to Castellvi et al. and SBO. In MRI in T2 weighted sequence DD was found in 61 patients which was classified modified from Pearce. Data analysis and comparison showed that 56patients with TV and/or SBO have changes on vertebral dynamic segment L5-S1 (VDS) and that means DD. In 13 patients only DD or spinal anomaly (TV and/or SBO) were found. Correlation between anomalies and DD in those patients was established by McNemar analysis and has shown significant difference (p=0.581) in favour of the patients with anomaly and DD. This has established that all of 56

  16. Acoustic Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2012-11-01

    Recently my collection of historical physics teaching apparatus was given a group of 19th-century tuning forks on resonant boxes. Figure 1 shows the smallest fork sitting on the largest one. The large tuning fork oscillates at 128 Hz and has a resonator that is 57.9 cm long. The small fork has a frequency 10 times higher, but its resonator has a length of 11.0 cm instead of the 5.8 cm that simple scaling would suggest. How is this possible?

  17. Identifying non-resonant Kepler planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri; Ford, Eric B.

    2012-02-01

    The Kepler mission has discovered a plethora of multiple transiting planet candidate exosystems, many of which feature putative pairs of planets near mean motion resonance commensurabilities. Identifying potentially resonant systems could help guide future observations and enhance our understanding of planetary formation scenarios. We develop and apply an algebraic method to determine which Kepler two-planet systems cannot be in a first-fourth order resonance, given the current, publicly available data. This method identifies when any potentially resonant angle of a system must circulate. We identify and list 70 near-resonant systems which cannot actually reside in resonance, assuming a widely used formulation for deriving planetary masses from their observed radii and that these systems do not contain unseen bodies that affect the interactions of the observed planets. This work strengthens the argument that a high fraction of exoplanetary systems may be near resonance but not actually in resonance.

  18. Structure defects, phase transitions, magnetic resonance and magneto-transport properties of La0.6-xEuxSr0.3Mn1.1O3-δ ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedienov, N. A.; Pashchenko, A. V.; Pashchenko, V. P.; Prokopenko, V. K.; Revenko, Yu. F.; Mazur, A. S.; Sycheva, V. Ya.; Kamenev, V. I.; Levchenko, G. G.

    2016-12-01

    Structure and its defects, magnetic resonance and magneto-transport properties of La0.6-xEuxSr0.3Mn1.1O3-δ magnetoresistive ceramics were investigated by x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric, resistance, magnetic, 55Mn NMR and magnetoresistance methods. It was found that isovalent substitution of lanthanum by europium A-cation of a smaller ionic radius increases the structural imperfection and leads to a symmetry change from the rhombohedrally distorted perovskite structure of R 3 ¯ c symmetry to the pseudocubic type. It was shown that the real structure contains anionic and cationic vacancies, the concentrations of which increases with the Eu concentration and the sintering temperature tann. A decrease in the temperature of the metal-semiconductor Tms and ferromagnetic-paramagnetic TC phase transitions as well as an increase in the resistivity ρ and the activation energy Ea with increasing x are due to an increase in vacancy concentration, which weakens the high-frequency electron double exchange Mn3+ ↔ O2- ↔ Mn4+. The crystal structure of the compositions x = 0 and 0.1 contains nanostructured planar clusters, causing anomalous magnetic hysteresis at T = 77 K. Broad asymmetric 55Mn NMR spectra confirm high-frequency electron double exchange Mn3+(3d4) ↔ O2-(2p6) ↔ Mn4+(3d3) and indicate inhomogeneity of the manganese environment due to the surrounding ions and vacancies. The effective local fields of the hyperfine interaction HHF at 55Mn nuclei have been calculated by decomposing asymmetric NMR spectra into three Gaussian components. The constructed experimental phase diagram of the magnetic and conducting states of the La0.6-xEuxSr0.3Mn1.1O3-δ ceramics revealed strong correlation between the composition, structural imperfection, phase state, and magnetotransport properties of rare-earth manganites.

  19. Polarization effects in recoil-induced resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazebnyi, D. B.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the field polarization on the amplitude of recoil-induced resonances (RIRs) is considered for laser-cooled free atoms and for atoms in a working magneto-optical trap (MOT). For all closed dipole transitions, explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the polarization dependence of the resonance amplitudes within a perturbation theory. Optimal polarization conditions are found for the observation of resonances.

  20. Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statfeld, Jenna L.

    2011-01-01

    Post-school transition is the movement of a child with disabilities from school to activities that occur after the completion of school. This paper provides information about: (1) post-school transition; (2) transition plan; (3) transition services; (4) transition planning; (5) vocational rehabilitation services; (6) services that are available…

  1. Electroexcitation of nucleon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Inna Aznauryan, Volker D. Burkert

    2012-01-01

    We review recent progress in the investigation of the electroexcitation of nucleon resonances, both in experiment and in theory. The most accurate results have been obtained for the electroexcitation amplitudes of the four lowest excited states, which have been measured in a range of Q2 up to 8 and 4.5 GeV2 for the Delta(1232)P33, N(1535)S11 and N(1440)P11, N(1520)D13, respectively. These results have been confronted with calculations based on lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD (pQCD), and QCD-inspired models. The amplitudes for the Delta(1232) indicate large pion-cloud contributions at low Q2 and don't show any sign of approaching the pQCD regime for Q2<7 GeV2. Measured for the first time, the electroexcitation amplitudes of the Roper resonance, N(1440)P11, provide strong evidence for this state as a predominantly radial excitation of a three-quark (3q) ground state, with additional non-3-quark contributions needed to describe the low Q2 behavior of the amplitudes. The longitudinal transition amplitude for the N(1535)S11 was determined and has become a challenge for quark models. Explanations may require large meson-cloud contributions or alternative representations of this state. The N(1520)D13 clearly shows the rapid changeover from helicity-3/2 dominance at the real photon point to helicity-1/2 dominance at Q2 > 0.5 GeV2, confirming a long-standing prediction of the constituent quark model. The interpretation of the moments of resonance transition form factors in terms of transition transverse charge distributions in infinite momentum frame is presented.

  2. Multiquark resonances

    DOE PAGES

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, Antonio D.

    2016-12-02

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building.more » Lastly, data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.« less

  3. Multiquark resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  4. Multiquark resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, Antonio D.

    2016-12-02

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Lastly, data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  5. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  6. Pulsed electron-nuclear-electron triple resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, Hans; Bernardo, Marcelino

    1990-05-01

    A new experimental technique, pulsed electron-nuclear-electron triple resonance spectroscopy, is demonstrated. It is based on a modification of the pulse sequence for electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) in which two EPR and one NMR transition are irradiated. The irradiation of one EPR transition is detected via a second EPR transition. The nuclear hyperfine coupling, which separates these EPR transition frequencies, is the irradiated NMR transition. The major advantages of triple resonance spectroscopy include the ability to resolve overlapping nuclear resonances in the ENDOR spectrum and a more direct quantitative assignment of nuclear hyperfine and quadrupole couplings. The triple resonance experiment is an alternative to the recently proposed method of employing rapid magnetic field jumps between microwave pulses for generating hyperfine selective ENDOR spectra.

  7. Autostereogram resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  8. Measuring the acoustic response of Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Martín; Marti, Arturo C.; Vogt, Patrik; Kasper, Lutz; Quarthal, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    Many experiments have been proposed to investigate acoustic phenomena in college and early undergraduate levels, in particular the speed of sound,1-9 by means of different methods, such as time of flight, transit time, or resonance in tubes. In this paper we propose to measure the acoustic response curves of a glass beaker filled with different gases, used as an acoustic resonator. We show that these curves expose many interesting peaks and features, one of which matches the resonance peak predicted for a Helmholtz resonator fairly well, and gives a decent estimate for the speed of sound in some cases. The measures are obtained thanks to the capabilities of smartphones.

  9. Noise in nonlinear nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Noise limits the sensitivity of linear sensors, in a manner that is well understood, but also limits nonlinear systems in a less trivial way. Nonlinear nanomechanical resonators present interesting possibilities for the sensitive detection of forces and masses, but the noise limitations have not been explored much to date. Here we report on noise effects on nonlinear resonators operated in regimes where they have either one or two stable attractors. We have made quantitative measurements of the nonlinear response of a radiofrequency mechanical resonator with very high quality factor, measuring the noise-free transitions between the two attractors, and find good agreement with theory. We measure the transition rate response to controlled levels of white noise, and extract the basin activation energy. This allows us to obtain precise values for the relevant frequencies and the cubic nonlinearity in the Duffing oscillator, with applications to parametric sensing, in particular mass sensing. References: ``Noise-enabled precision measurements of a Duffing nanomechanical resonator,'' J.S. Aldridge and A.N. Cleland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 156403 (2005). ``Thermomechanical noise limits on parametric sensing with nanomechanical resonators,'' A.N. Cleland, New J. Phys. 7, 235 (2005).

  10. Negative refraction using Raman transitions and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Sikes, D. E.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2011-11-15

    We present a scheme that achieves negative refraction with low absorption in far-off resonant atomic systems. The scheme utilizes Raman resonances and does not require the simultaneous presence of an electric-dipole transition and a magnetic-dipole transition near the same wavelength. We show that two interfering Raman tran-sitions coupled to a magnetic-dipole transition can achieve a negative index of refraction with low absorption through magnetoelectric cross-coupling. We confirm the validity of the analytical results with exact numerical simulations of the density matrix. We also discuss possible experimental implementations of the scheme in rare-earth metal atomic systems.

  11. Simulation methods for looping transitions.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, B J; Silverstone, H J

    1998-09-01

    Looping transitions occur in field-swept electron magnetic resonance spectra near avoided crossings and involve a single pair of energy levels that are in resonance at two magnetic field strengths, before and after the avoided crossing. When the distance between the two resonances approaches a linewidth, the usual simulation of the spectra, which results from a linear approximation of the dependence of the transition frequency on magnetic field, breaks down. A cubic approximation to the transition frequency, which can be obtained from the two resonance fields and the field-derivatives of the transition frequencies, along with linear (or better) interpolation of the transition-probability factor, restores accurate simulation. The difference is crucial for accurate line shapes at fixed angles, as in an oriented single crystal, but the difference turns out to be a smaller change in relative intensity for a powder spectrum. Spin-3/2 Cr3+ in ruby and spin-5/2 Fe3+ in transferrin oxalate are treated as examples.

  12. Transition Probability and the ESR Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBrierty, Vincent J.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of a modified electron spin resonance apparatus to demonstrate some features of the expression for the transition probability per second between two energy levels. Applications to the third year laboratory program are suggested. (CC)

  13. Demographics of Resonances in Exoplanetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragozzine, Darin; Conaway, James L.; MacDonald, Mariah G.; Sallee, Victor

    2016-10-01

    NASA's Kepler Space Telescope has identified ~700 systems of multiple transiting exoplanets containing ~1700 planets. Most of these multi-transiting systems have 3-5 planets small planets with periods of roughly 5-50 days and are known as Systems with Tightly-spaced Inner Planets (STIPs). These information-rich exoplanetary systems have precisely measured period ratios which allows for the identification and characterization of orbital mean motion resonances. Improved understanding of the resonant populations will reveal much about the formation and evolution of planetary systems. Lissauer, Ragozzine, et al. 2011 found that most Kepler systems were not in resonance, but that there was a small excess of planets wide of resonance. We present new analyses that rigorously identify the frequency of planets in multiple resonances (including three-body resonances) and thus identify many specific new results on the demographics of resonances. We also show that the apparent over-abundance of resonances can be attributed to a difference in inclinations (potentially from dissipation) with implications for the true underlying frequency of resonant systems. We compare the period ratio distribution of Kepler (corrected for inclination biases) to Radial Velocity (RV) surveys and conclude that RV systems are often missing small intermediate planets. This has serious implications for the completeness of RV identification of planets in STIPs.

  14. Extraordinary acoustic transmission mediated by Helmholtz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Koju, Vijay; Rowe, Ebony; Robertson, William M.

    2014-07-15

    We demonstrate perfect transmission of sound through a rigid barrier embedded with Helmholtz resonators. The resonators are confined within a waveguide and they are oriented such that one neck protrudes onto each side of the barrier. Perfect sound transmission occurs even though the open area of the necks is less than 3% of the barrier area. Maximum transmission occurs at the resonant frequency of the Helmholtz resonator. Because the dimensions of the Helmholtz resonators are much smaller than the resonant wavelength, the transmission is independent of the direction of sound on the barrier and of the relative placement of the necks. Further, we show that the transmitted sound experiences a continuous phase transition of π radians as a function of frequency through resonance. In simulations of adjacent resonators with slightly offset resonance frequencies, the phase difference leads to destructive interference. By expanding the simulation to a linear array of tuned Helmholtz resonators we show that it is possible to create an acoustic lens. The ability of Helmholtz resonator arrays to manipulate the phase of a plane acoustic wave enables a new class of sonic beam-forming devices analogous to diffractive optics.

  15. Extraordinary acoustic transmission mediated by Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koju, Vijay; Rowe, Ebony; Robertson, William M.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate perfect transmission of sound through a rigid barrier embedded with Helmholtz resonators. The resonators are confined within a waveguide and they are oriented such that one neck protrudes onto each side of the barrier. Perfect sound transmission occurs even though the open area of the necks is less than 3% of the barrier area. Maximum transmission occurs at the resonant frequency of the Helmholtz resonator. Because the dimensions of the Helmholtz resonators are much smaller than the resonant wavelength, the transmission is independent of the direction of sound on the barrier and of the relative placement of the necks. Further, we show that the transmitted sound experiences a continuous phase transition of π radians as a function of frequency through resonance. In simulations of adjacent resonators with slightly offset resonance frequencies, the phase difference leads to destructive interference. By expanding the simulation to a linear array of tuned Helmholtz resonators we show that it is possible to create an acoustic lens. The ability of Helmholtz resonator arrays to manipulate the phase of a plane acoustic wave enables a new class of sonic beam-forming devices analogous to diffractive optics.

  16. Signature to detect the isovector giant quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speth, J.; Cha, D.; Klemt, V.; Wambach, J.

    1985-06-01

    We calculate the γ decay from the isoscalar and isovector giant quadrupole resonances in 208Pb into the low-lying spectrum. Whereas the γ decay from the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance into the first excited 3- state is very small, the corresponding transition from the isovector giant quadrupole resonance is strongly enhanced. According to preliminary calculations, these results hold rather generally for other heavy mass nuclei. We suggest using this property in experimental investigation of the isovector giant quadrupole resonance.

  17. Work transitions.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Nadya A; Bynner, John

    2008-01-01

    Individuals make choices in, and adjust to, a world of work that is often a moving target. Because work is so central to human functioning, and transitions in and out of work can have major mental health repercussions, the authors argue that applied psychologists in health services need to understand those transitions. This article focuses on the different types of transition throughout a person's working life and the resources needed at different stages to ensure the success of these transitions. The authors start by examining the roles of capability and adaptability in supporting and facilitating adjustment to work transitions and their relation to identity development. They then examine the role of social and institutional contexts in shaping work transitions and their outcomes. The authors focus on voluntary versus involuntary transitions and then broaden the lens in discussing the policy implications of research on work transitions.

  18. Resonantly amplified vibronic symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliakoff, E. D.; Rathbone, G. J.; Bozek, J. D.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2002-05-01

    In photoelectron spectroscopy, it is normally assumed that excitation of a single quantum of a non-totally symmetric vibrational mode is forbidden owing to symmetry constraints. Using vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy over a broad spectral range, we have shown that a previously overlooked mechanism can lead to these nominally forbidden transitions. Specifically, the photoelectron can mediate the oscillator strength for such a transition via resonantly amplified vibronic symmetry breaking, and this effect results from intrachannel rather than interchannel coupling. In our first experiments, we focused on bending excitation accompanying CO2 photoionization. Photoelectron spectroscopy on the CO_2^+(C^2Σ_g^+) state showed that the excitation of the (010) vibrational mode is mediated by a shape resonant continuum electron. The degree of vibrational excitation can be substantial, and extensions to other types of symmetry breaking are currently being investigated.

  19. If It's Resonance, What is Resonating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon under the name "resonance," which, is based on the mathematical analogy between mechanical resonance and the behavior of wave functions in quantum mechanical exchange phenomena was described. The resonating system does not have a structure intermediate between those involved in the resonance, but instead a structure which is further…

  20. Stochastic resonance across bifurcation cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolis, C.; Nicolis, G.

    2017-03-01

    The classical setting of stochastic resonance is extended to account for parameter variations leading to transitions between a unique stable state, bistability, and multistability regimes, across singularities of various kinds. Analytic expressions for the amplitude and the phase of the response in terms of key parameters are obtained. The conditions for optimal responses are derived in terms of the bifurcation parameter, the driving frequency, and the noise strength.

  1. Venus Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-05

    It appeared that New Yorkers were not going to be able to see the transit of the planet Venus across the Sun, but just before the transit was over the sun broke through the clouds and Yvette Lee Kang was able to catch a glimpse of the transit on Tuesday, June 5, 2012 in New York. A transit of Venus occurs when the planet passes directly between the sun and earth. This alignment is rare, coming in pairs that are eight years apart but separated by over a century. The next Venus transit will be in December 2117. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Venus Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-05

    It appeared that New Yorkers were not going to be able to see the transit of the planet Venus across the Sun, but just before the transit was over the sun broke through the clouds and Liz Heller and Andriel Mesznik were able to catch a glimpse of the transit on Tuesday, June 5, 2012 in New York. A transit of Venus occurs when the planet passes directly between the sun and earth. This alignment is rare, coming in pairs that are eight years apart but separated by over a century. The next Venus transit will be in December 2117. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of potassium dihydrophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uskova, N. I.; Podorozhkin, D. Yu.; Charnaya, E. V.; Nefedov, D. Yu.; Baryshnikov, S. V.; Bugaev, A. S.; Lee, M. K.; Chang, L. J.

    2016-04-01

    A powder sample of potassium dihydrophosphate KH2PO4 has been studied by the 31P NMR method in a wide temperature range covering the ferroelectric phase transition. Changes in the position and shape of the resonance line at the transition to the ferroelectric phase have been revealed. The parameters of the chemical shift tensor of 31P (isotropic shift, anisotropy, and asymmetry) in the ferroelectric phase have been calculated from the experimental data. A sharp increase in the anisotropy of the tensor at the phase transition has been demonstrated. Dielectric measurements have also been carried out to verify the transition temperature.

  4. Experimental realization of extraordinary acoustic transmission using Helmholtz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, Brian C.; Cullen, Jordan M.; McKenzie, William W.; Koju, Vijay; Robertson, William M.

    2015-02-15

    The phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic transmission through a solid barrier with an embedded Helmholtz resonator (HR) is demonstrated. The Helmholtz resonator consists of an embedded cavity and two necks that protrude, one on each side of the barrier. Extraordinary transmission occurs for a narrow spectral range encompassing the resonant frequency of the Helmholtz resonator. We show that an amplitude transmission of 97.5% is achieved through a resonator whose neck creates an open area of 6.25% of the total barrier area. In addition to the enhanced transmission, we show that there is a smooth, continuous phase transition in the transmitted sound as a function of frequency. The frequency dependent phase transition is used to experimentally realize slow wave propagation for a narrow-band Gaussian wave packet centered at the maximum transmission frequency. The use of parallel pairs of Helmholtz resonators tuned to different resonant frequencies is experimentally explored as a means of increasing the transmission bandwidth. These experiments show that because of the phase transition, there is always a frequency between the two Helmholtz resonant frequencies at which destructive interference occurs whether the resonances are close or far apart. Finally, we explain how the phase transition associated with Helmholtz-resonator-mediated extraordinary acoustic transmission can be exploited to produce diffractive acoustic components including sub-wavelength thickness acoustic lenses.

  5. Experimental realization of extraordinary acoustic transmission using Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Brian C.; Cullen, Jordan M.; McKenzie, William W.; Koju, Vijay; Robertson, William M.

    2015-02-01

    The phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic transmission through a solid barrier with an embedded Helmholtz resonator (HR) is demonstrated. The Helmholtz resonator consists of an embedded cavity and two necks that protrude, one on each side of the barrier. Extraordinary transmission occurs for a narrow spectral range encompassing the resonant frequency of the Helmholtz resonator. We show that an amplitude transmission of 97.5% is achieved through a resonator whose neck creates an open area of 6.25% of the total barrier area. In addition to the enhanced transmission, we show that there is a smooth, continuous phase transition in the transmitted sound as a function of frequency. The frequency dependent phase transition is used to experimentally realize slow wave propagation for a narrow-band Gaussian wave packet centered at the maximum transmission frequency. The use of parallel pairs of Helmholtz resonators tuned to different resonant frequencies is experimentally explored as a means of increasing the transmission bandwidth. These experiments show that because of the phase transition, there is always a frequency between the two Helmholtz resonant frequencies at which destructive interference occurs whether the resonances are close or far apart. Finally, we explain how the phase transition associated with Helmholtz-resonator-mediated extraordinary acoustic transmission can be exploited to produce diffractive acoustic components including sub-wavelength thickness acoustic lenses.

  6. Quantum Transition State Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waalkens, Holger

    2009-03-01

    The main idea of Wigner's transition state theory (TST) is to compute reaction rates from the flux through a dividing surface placed between reactants and products. In order not to overestimate the rate the dividing surface needs to have the no- recrossing property, i.e. reactive trajectories cross the dividing surface exactly once, and nonreactive trajectories do not cross it at all. The long standing problem of how to construct such a diving surface for multi-degree-of-freedom systems was solved only recently using ideas from dynamical systems theory. Here a normal form allows for a local decoupling of the classical dynamics which leads to the explicit construction of the phase space structures that govern the reaction dynamics through transition states. The dividing surface is spanned by a normally hyperbolic manifold which is the mathematical manifestation of the transition state as an unstable invariant subsystem of one degree of freedom less than the full system. The mere existence of a quantum version of TST is discussed controversially in the literature. The key isssue is the presence of quantum mechanical tunneling which prohibits the existence of a local theory analogous to the classical case. Various approaches have been devloped to overcome this problem by propagating quantum wavefunctions through the transition state region. These approaches have in common that they are computationally very expensive which seriously limits their applicability. In contrast the approach by Roman Schubert, Stephen Wiggins and myself is local in nature. A quantum normal form allows us to locally decouple the quantum dynamics to any desired order in Planck's constant. This yields not only the location of the scattering and resonance wavefunctions relative to the classical phase space structures, but also leads to very efficient algorithms to compute cumulative reaction probabilities and Gamov-Siegert resonances which are the quantum imprints of the transition state.

  7. Enhanced optical transmission at the cutoff transition.

    PubMed

    Laux, E; Genet, C; Ebbesen, T W

    2009-04-27

    The phenomenon of extraordinary transmission in the optical regime for circular hole arrays in optically thick metal films is studied as a function of hole size and depth. In the limit of small holes compared to the depth, the transmission properties follow a waveguide type behavior. By describing the transmission process as resulting from the interference between a resonant and a non-resonant contribution, a transition is clearly revealed through the specific spectral variations of the resonance at a given hole depth. This transition is associated to a change in the attenuation through the hole as its size increases, and corresponds to the optimal condition for surface plasmon excitation.

  8. Hadron Resonances from QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef

    2016-03-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study ππ elastic scattering, including the ρ resonance, as well as coupled-channel πK, ηK scattering. The very recent extension to the case where an external current acts is also presented, considering the reaction πγ* → ππ, from which the unstable ρ → πγ transition form factor is extracted. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  9. de Sitter Space as a Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltz, Jonathan; Susskind, Leonard

    2017-03-01

    A quantum mechanical formulation of de Sitter cosmological spacetimes still eludes string theory. In this Letter we conjecture a potentially rigorous framework in which the status of de Sitter space is the same as that of a resonance in a scattering process. We conjecture that transition amplitudes between certain states with asymptotically supersymmetric flat vacua contain resonant pole characteristic metastable intermediate states. A calculation employing constrained instantons illustrates this idea.

  10. de Sitter harmonies: Cosmological spacetimes as resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltz, Jonathan

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work is to provide the details of a calculation summarized in the recent paper by Maltz and Susskind which conjectured a potentially rigorous framework where the status of de Sitter space is the same as that of a resonance in a scattering process. The conjecture is that transition amplitudes between certain states with asymptotically supersymmetric flat vacua contain resonant poles characteristic metastable intermediate states. A calculation employing constrained instantons is presented that illustrates this idea.

  11. Torque detected broad band electron spin resonance.

    PubMed

    El Hallak, Fadi; van Slageren, Joris; Dressel, Martin

    2010-09-01

    We present a novel technique to measure high frequency electron spin resonance spectra in a broad frequency range (30-1440 GHz) with high sensitivity. We use a quasioptical setup with tunable frequency sources to induce magnetic resonance transitions. These transitions are detected by measuring the change in the magnetic torque signal by means of cantilever torque magnetometry. The setup allows tuning of the frequency, magnetic field, polarization, and the angle between the sample and the external magnetic field. We demonstrate the capabilities of this technique by showing preliminary results obtained on a single crystal of an Fe(4) molecular nanomagnet.

  12. Pattern formation in optical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C. O.; Larionova, Ye

    2007-02-01

    We review pattern formation in optical resonators. The emphasis is on 'particle-like' structures such as vortices or spatial solitons. On the one hand, similarities impose themselves with other fields of physics (condensed matter, phase transitions, particle physics, fluds/super fluids). On the other hand the feedback is led by the resonator mirrors to bi- and multi-stability of the spatial field structure, which is the basic ingredient for optical information processing. The spatial dimension or the 'parallelism' is the strength of optics compared to electronics (and will have to be employed to fully use the advantages optics offers in information processing). But even in the 'serial' processing tasks of telecoms (e.g. information buffering) spatial resonator solitons can do better than the schemes proposed so far—including 'slow light'. Pattern formation in optical resonators will likely be the key to brain-like information processing like cognition, learning and association; to complement the precise but limited algorithmic capabilities of electronic processing. But even in the short term it will be useful for solving serial optical processing problems. The prospects for technical uses of pattern formation in resonators are one motivation for this research. The fundamental similarities with other fields of physics, on the other hand, inspire transfer of concepts between fields; something that has always proven fruitful for gaining deeper insights or for solving technical problems.

  13. Thermal bistability through coupled photonic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandekar, Chinmay; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.

    2017-08-01

    We present a scheme for achieving thermal bistability based on the selective coupling of three optical resonances. This approach requires one of the resonant frequencies to be temperature dependent, which can occur in materials exhibiting strong thermo-optic effects. For illustration, we explore thermal bistability in two different passive systems, involving either a periodic array of Si ring resonators or parallel GaAs thin films separated by vacuum and exchanging heat in the near field. Such a scheme could prove to be useful for thermal devices operating with transition times on the order of hundreds of milliseconds.

  14. Superconducting qubit-resonator-atom hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deshui; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2017-09-01

    We propose a hybrid quantum system where an LC resonator inductively interacts with a flux qubit and is capacitively coupled to a Rydberg atom. Varying the external magnetic flux bias controls the flux qubit flipping and the flux qubit-resonator interface. The atomic spectrum is tuned via an electrostatic field, manipulating the qubit-state transition of atom and the atom-resonator coupling. Different types of entanglement of superconducting, photonic and atomic qubits can be prepared via simply tuning the flux bias and electrostatic field, leading to the implementation of three-qubit Toffoli logic gate.

  15. Chirped nonlinear resonance dynamics in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, Lazar; Armon, Tsafrir

    2016-10-01

    Passage through and capture into resonance in systems with slowly varying parameters is one of the outstanding problems of nonlinear dynamics. Examples include resonant capture in planetary dynamics , resonant excitation of nonlinear waves, adiabatic resonant transitions in atomic and molecular systems and more. In the most common setting the problem involves a nonlinear oscillator driven by an oscillating perturbation with a slowly varying frequency, which passes through the resonance with the unperturbed oscillator. The process of resonant capture in this case involves crossing of separatrix and, therefore, the adiabatic theorem cannot be used in studying this problem no matter how slow is the variation of the driving frequency. It will be shown that if instead of analyzing complicated single orbit dynamics in passage through resonance, one considers the evolution of a distribution of initial conditions in phase space, simple adiabaticity and phase space incompressibility arguments yield a solution to the resonant capture probability problem. The approach will be illustrated in the case of a beam of charged particles driven by a chirped frequency wave passing through the Cherenkov resonance with the velocity distribution of the particles. Supported by Israel Science Foundation Grant 30/14.

  16. Experiments with Helmholtz Resonators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Presents experiments that use Helmholtz resonators and have been designed for a sophomore-level course in oscillations and waves. Discusses the theory of the Helmholtz resonator and resonance curves. (JRH)

  17. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  18. Transitional Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Mary; Keating, Stacen A.

    2008-01-01

    Transitional care encompasses a broad range of services and environments designed to promote the safe and timely passage of patients between levels of health care and across care settings. High-quality transitional care is especially important for older adults with multiple chronic conditions and complex therapeutic regimens, as well as for their…

  19. Transitional Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Mary; Keating, Stacen A.

    2008-01-01

    Transitional care encompasses a broad range of services and environments designed to promote the safe and timely passage of patients between levels of health care and across care settings. High-quality transitional care is especially important for older adults with multiple chronic conditions and complex therapeutic regimens, as well as for their…

  20. Diagnosis of lesions of the acetabular labrum, of the labral-chondral transition zone, and of the cartilage in femoroacetabular impingement: Correlation between direct magnetic resonance arthrography and hip arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Crespo Rodríguez, A M; de Lucas Villarrubia, J C; Pastrana Ledesma, M A; Millán Santos, I; Padrón, M

    2015-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity and accuracy of direct MR arthrography in the diagnosis of intra-articular lesions associated with femoroacetabular impingement. We used direct MR arthrography to study 51 patients with femoroacetabular impingement who underwent arthroscopic hip surgery. Surgery demonstrated 37 labral tears, 44 lesions in the labral-chondral transitional zone, and 40 lesions of the articular cartilage. We correlated the findings at preoperative direct MR arthrography with those of hip arthroscopy and calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and validity index for direct MR arthrography. The sensitivity and specificity of MR arthrography were 94.5% and 100%, respectively, for diagnosing labral tears, 100% and 87.5%, respectively, for diagnosing lesions of the labral-chondral transition zone, and 92.5% and 54.5%, respectively, for diagnosing lesions of the articular cartilage. The negative predictive value of MR arthrography for lesions of the labral-chondral transitional zone was 100%. MR arthrography accurately defined extensive lesions of the cartilage and the secondary osseous changes (the main factor in poor prognosis), although its diagnostic performance was not so good in small chondral lesions. In patients with femoroacetabular impingement, direct MR arthrography can adequately detect and characterize lesions of the acetabular labrum and of the labral-chondral transitional zone as well as extensive lesions of the articular cartilage and secondary osseous changes. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Broadband electrically detected magnetic resonance using adiabatic pulses.

    PubMed

    Hrubesch, F M; Braunbeck, G; Voss, A; Stutzmann, M; Brandt, M S

    2015-05-01

    We present a broadband microwave setup for electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) based on microwave antennae with the ability to apply arbitrarily shaped pulses for the excitation of electron spin resonance (ESR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of spin ensembles. This setup uses non-resonant stripline structures for on-chip microwave delivery and is demonstrated to work in the frequency range from 4 MHz to 18 GHz. π pulse times of 50 ns and 70 μs for ESR and NMR transitions, respectively, are achieved with as little as 100 mW of microwave or radiofrequency power. The use of adiabatic pulses fully compensates for the microwave magnetic field inhomogeneity of the stripline antennae, as demonstrated with the help of BIR4 unitary rotation pulses driving the ESR transition of neutral phosphorus donors in silicon and the NMR transitions of ionized phosphorus donors as detected by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Broadband electrically detected magnetic resonance using adiabatic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubesch, F. M.; Braunbeck, G.; Voss, A.; Stutzmann, M.; Brandt, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    We present a broadband microwave setup for electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) based on microwave antennae with the ability to apply arbitrarily shaped pulses for the excitation of electron spin resonance (ESR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of spin ensembles. This setup uses non-resonant stripline structures for on-chip microwave delivery and is demonstrated to work in the frequency range from 4 MHz to 18 GHz. π pulse times of 50 ns and 70 μs for ESR and NMR transitions, respectively, are achieved with as little as 100 mW of microwave or radiofrequency power. The use of adiabatic pulses fully compensates for the microwave magnetic field inhomogeneity of the stripline antennae, as demonstrated with the help of BIR4 unitary rotation pulses driving the ESR transition of neutral phosphorus donors in silicon and the NMR transitions of ionized phosphorus donors as detected by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR).

  3. Magnetism of gold nanorods probed using electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Y.; Yonemura, H.; Sakai, N.; Makihara, Y.; Kawae, T.; Yamada, S.

    2016-08-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy has been performed for gold nanorods (AuNRs) of four different sizes covered with a diamagnetic stabilizing component, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. ESR signals were detected in AuNRs except the largest one. Two smallest AuNRs showed an abrupt change in the temperature dependence of resonance field and line width at around 60 K, indicating ferromagnetic phase transition. In medium-size AuNRs, the resonance with a large shift was observed below 100 K. The resonance field shifts at the lowest temperature exhibit systematic variation with the system size, which is explained by considering magnetic anisotropy for the ferromagnetic resonance.

  4. Magnetism of gold nanorods probed using electron spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Y. Kawae, T.; Yonemura, H.; Yamada, S.; Sakai, N.; Makihara, Y.

    2016-08-15

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy has been performed for gold nanorods (AuNRs) of four different sizes covered with a diamagnetic stabilizing component, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. ESR signals were detected in AuNRs except the largest one. Two smallest AuNRs showed an abrupt change in the temperature dependence of resonance field and line width at around 60 K, indicating ferromagnetic phase transition. In medium-size AuNRs, the resonance with a large shift was observed below 100 K. The resonance field shifts at the lowest temperature exhibit systematic variation with the system size, which is explained by considering magnetic anisotropy for the ferromagnetic resonance.

  5. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  6. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  7. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, Barry L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Huberty, John P.; White, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided.

  8. Superconducting Transition at 38 K in Insulating-Overdoped La2CuO4-La1:64Sr0:36CuO4 Superlattices: Evidence for Interface Electronic Redistribution from Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Smadici, S.; Bozovic, I.; Lee, J. C. T.; Wang, S.; Abbamonte, P.; Logvenov, G.; Gozar, A.; Deville Cavellin, C.

    2009-03-12

    We use resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSXS) to quantify the hole distribution in a superlattice of insulating La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} (LCO) and overdoped La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (LSCO). Despite its nonsuperconducting constituents, this structure is superconducting with T{sub c} = 38 K. We found that the conducting holes redistribute electronically from LSCO to the LCO layers. The LCO layers were found to be optimally doped, suggesting they are the main drivers of superconductivity. Our results demonstrate the utility of RSXS for separating electronic from structural effects at oxide interfaces.

  9. Superconducting transition at 38 K in insulating-overdoped La2CuO4-La1.64Sr0.36CuO4 superlattices: evidence for interface electronic redistribution from resonant soft X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Smadici, S; Lee, J C T; Wang, S; Abbamonte, P; Logvenov, G; Gozar, A; Cavellin, C Deville; Bozovic, I

    2009-03-13

    We use resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSXS) to quantify the hole distribution in a superlattice of insulating La2CuO4 (LCO) and overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO). Despite its nonsuperconducting constituents, this structure is superconducting with T_{c}=38 K. We found that the conducting holes redistribute electronically from LSCO to the LCO layers. The LCO layers were found to be optimally doped, suggesting they are the main drivers of superconductivity. Our results demonstrate the utility of RSXS for separating electronic from structural effects at oxide interfaces.

  10. Superconducting Transition at 38 K in Insulating-Overdoped La2CuO4 - La1.64Sr0.36CuO4 Superlattices: Evidence for Interface Electronic Redistribution from Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Smadici, S.; Lee, J; Wang, S; Abbamonte, P; Logvenov, G; Gozar, A; Deville Cavellin, C; Bozovic, I

    2009-01-01

    We use resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSXS) to quantify the hole distribution in a superlattice of insulating La2CuO4 (LCO) and overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO). Despite its nonsuperconducting constituents, this structure is superconducting with Tc=38 K. We found that the conducting holes redistribute electronically from LSCO to the LCO layers. The LCO layers were found to be optimally doped, suggesting they are the main drivers of superconductivity. Our results demonstrate the utility of RSXS for separating electronic from structural effects at oxide interfaces.

  11. A triple resonance hyperfine sublevel correlation experiment for assignment of electron-nuclear double resonance lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Epel, Boris; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2008-02-01

    A new, triple resonance, pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) sequence is described. It provides spin links between forbidden electron spin transitions (ΔMS=±1, ΔMI≠0) and allowed nuclear spin transitions (ΔMI=±1), thus, facilitating the assignment of nuclear frequencies to their respective electron spin manifolds and paramagnetic centers. It also yields the relative signs of the hyperfine couplings of the different nuclei. The technique is based on the combination of electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR)-detected NMR experiments in a way similar to the TRIPLE experiment. The feasibility and the information content of the method are demonstrated first on a single crystal of Cu-doped L-histidine and then on a frozen solution of a Cu-histidine complex.

  12. Resonance beyond frequency-matching: multidimensional resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Mingzhe; Wang, Ruifang

    2017-03-01

    Resonance, conventionally defined as the oscillation of a system when the temporal frequency of an external stimulus matches a natural frequency of the system, is important in both fundamental physics and applied disciplines. However, the spatial character of oscillation is not considered in this definition. We reveal the creation of spatial resonance when the stimulus matches the space pattern of a normal mode in an oscillating system. The complete resonance, which we call multidimensional resonance, should be a combination of both the temporal and the spatial resonance. We further elucidate that the spin wave produced by multidimensional resonance drives considerably faster reversal of the vortex core in a magnetic nanodisc. Multidimensional resonance provides insight into the nature of wave dynamics and opens the door to novel applications.

  13. Geological Transition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-11

    This image, taken by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the transition between the Murray Formation, in which layers are poorly expressed and difficult to trace from orbit, and the hematite ridge, which is made up of continuous layers.

  14. N+CPT clock resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Crescimanno, M.; Hohensee, M.

    2008-12-15

    In a typical compact atomic time standard a current modulated semiconductor laser is used to create the optical fields that interrogate the atomic hyperfine transition. A pair of optical sidebands created by modulating the diode laser become the coherent population trapping (CPT) fields. At the same time, other pairs of optical sidebands may contribute to other multiphoton resonances, such as three-photon N-resonance [Phys. Rev. A 65, 043817 (2002)]. We analyze the resulting joint CPT and N-resonance (hereafter N+CPT) analytically and numerically. Analytically we solve a four-level quantum optics model for this joint resonance and perturbatively include the leading ac Stark effects from the five largest optical fields in the laser's modulation comb. Numerically we use a truncated Floquet solving routine that first symbolically develops the optical Bloch equations to a prescribed order of perturbation theory before evaluating. This numerical approach has, as input, the complete physical details of the first two excited-state manifolds of {sup 87}Rb. We test these theoretical approaches with experiments by characterizing the optimal clock operating regimes.

  15. Trion formation dynamics in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Akashay; Moody, Galan; Schaibley, John R.; ...

    2016-01-05

    Here, we report charged exciton (trion) formation dynamics in doped monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, specifically molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), using resonant two-color pump-probe spectroscopy. When resonantly pumping the exciton transition, trions are generated on a picosecond time scale through exciton-electron interaction. As the pump energy is tuned from the high energy to low energy side of the inhomogeneously broadened exciton resonance, the trion formation time increases by ~50%. This feature can be explained by the existence of both localized and delocalized excitons in a disordered potential and suggests the existence of an exciton mobility edge in transition metal dichalcogenides.

  16. Trion formation dynamics in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Akashay; Moody, Galan; Schaibley, John R.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David G.; Xu, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqun; Tran, Kha; Scott, Marie E.; Overbeck, Vincent; Berghauser, Gunnar; Seifert, Edward J.; Pleskot, Dennis; Gabor, Nathaniel M.; Richter, Marten; Malic, Ermin

    2016-01-05

    Here, we report charged exciton (trion) formation dynamics in doped monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, specifically molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), using resonant two-color pump-probe spectroscopy. When resonantly pumping the exciton transition, trions are generated on a picosecond time scale through exciton-electron interaction. As the pump energy is tuned from the high energy to low energy side of the inhomogeneously broadened exciton resonance, the trion formation time increases by ~50%. This feature can be explained by the existence of both localized and delocalized excitons in a disordered potential and suggests the existence of an exciton mobility edge in transition metal dichalcogenides.

  17. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed.

  18. Plenary Talk: Baryon resonance analysis from MAID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiator, L.; Drechsel, D.; Kamalov, S. S.; Vanderhaeghen, M.

    2009-12-01

    The unitary isobar model MAID2007 has been used to analyze the recent data of pion electroproduction. The model contains all four-star resonances in the region below W = 2 GeV and both single-Q2 and Q2 dependent transition form factors could be obtained for the Delta, Roper, D13(1520), S11(1535), S31(1620), S11(1650), D15(1675), F15(1680) and P13(1720). From the complete world data base, including also π- data on the neutron, also Q2 dependent neutron form factors are obtained. For all transition form factors we also give convenient numerical parameterizations that can be used in other reactions. Furthermore, we show how the transition form factors can be used to obtain empirical transverse charge densities and our first results are given for the Roper, the S11 and D13 resonances.

  19. Response to 'Comment on 'Resonant dissociative electron transfer of the presolvated electron to CCl{sub 4} in liquid: Direct observation and lifetime of the CCl{sub 4}*{sup -} transition state' [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 027101 (2008)]'

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-R.; Drew, K.; Luo, T.; Lu, M.-J.; Lu, Q.-B.

    2008-07-14

    In our recent paper [J. Chem. Phys.128, 041102 (2008)], we reported a femtosecond time-resolved laser spectroscopic study of the electron transfer reaction of CCl{sub 4} in liquid ethanol. Our results provide direct evidence of the resonant dissociative electron transfer (RDET) of the presolvated electron to CCl{sub 4}, and indicate that RDET can be an efficient process in an aqueous environment. In a recent Comment, the author argues that the relevance of diethanolamine (DEA) induced destruction of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the polar stratosphere as a possible pathway for chemical ozone destruction should not be a motivation for further studies of DEA on CFC molecules, as no correlation is observed between polar chemical ozone loss and cosmic ray activity. Here, we show that this claim is misleading: it is made by using inconclusive and ambiguous data while ignoring pronounced and well-documented data.

  20. Observation of Query Pulse Length Dependent Ramsey Interference in Rubidium Vapor Using Pulsed Raman Excitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-07

    pressure is used. An external-cavity diode laser ( ECDL , Vortex Series, New Focus) operating at 795 nm is used for optical excitation of the D1 line...transitions in 85 Rb atoms, and is locked to the (F=3-F’=3) transition using saturated absorption spectroscopy (SAS). Part of the ECDL light is

  1. Feshbach-Resonance-Enhanced Coherent Atom-Molecule Conversion with Ultranarrow Photoassociation Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taie, Shintaro; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Ichinose, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    We reveal the existence of high-density Feshbach resonances in the collision between the ground and metastable states of 171Yb and coherently produce the associated Feshbach molecules by photoassociation. The extremely small transition rate is overcome by the enhanced Franck-Condon factor of the weakly bound Feshbach molecule, allowing us to observe Rabi oscillations with long decay time between an atom pair and a molecule in an optical lattice. We also perform the precision measurement of the binding energies, which characterizes the observed resonances. The ultranarrow photoassociation will be a basis for practical implementation of optical Feshbach resonances.

  2. Resonant absorption and not-so-resonant absorption in short, intense laser irradiated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Z. Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Zou, D. B.; Yin, Y.; Shao, F. Q.; Yu, W.; Luan, S. X.; Zhou, C. T.; Peng, X. J.

    2013-07-15

    An analytical model for laser-plasma interaction during the oblique incidence by an ultrashort ultraintense p-polarized laser on a solid-density plasma is proposed. Both the resonant absorption and not-so-resonant absorption are self-consistently included. Different from the previous theoretical works, the physics of resonant absorption is found to be valid in more general conditions as the steepening of the electron density profile is considered. Even for a relativistic intensity laser, resonant absorption can still exist under certain plasma scale length. For shorter plasma scale length or higher laser intensity, the not-so-resonant absorption tends to be dominant, since the electron density is steepened to a critical level by the ponderomotive force. The laser energy absorption rates for both mechanisms are discussed in detail, and the difference and transition between these two mechanisms are presented.

  3. Effect of the. delta. (1236) resonance on magnetic dipole properties of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the ..delta..(1236) resonance on magnetic moments, M1 transition rates and beta decay is discussed. The main effect of including this resonance is to renormalize the g-factor of the valence nucleons and explicit values for this renormalization are given. The effect on l-forbidden M1 transitions is investigated.

  4. Inverted crossover resonance within one Zeeman manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, L. A.; de Clercq, E.; McFerran, J. J.

    2017-08-01

    We carry out investigations of inverted crossover resonances (ICRs) in π-driven four-level systems where {{Δ }}F can be zero. Through the use of sub-Doppler frequency modulation spectroscopy of the (6{s}2) {}1{S}0 - (6s6p) {}3{P}1 transition in 171Yb the resonance becomes manifest. The centre frequency is inherently insensitive to first-order Zeeman shifts and equates to the two-level resonance frequency in the absence of a magnetic field. A rate equation model is used to help validate the nature of the resonance. Optical frequency measurements of the F\\prime =1/2 hyperfine line recorded over two months demonstrate a statistical uncertainty of 2 × 10-11. The ICR found with the F\\prime =3/2 line is used for 556 nm laser frequency stabilisation, which is an alternative means when applied to magneto-optical trapping of 171Yb.

  5. Transition Form Factor from CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K.

    2009-01-01

    The excitation of nucleon resonances in electromagnetic interaction has long been studied. The study of resonances helps us to understand the long- and short- range structures of the nucleon and its excited states in terms of quark confinement. While the existing data of the low-lying resonances are consistent with the well-studied SU(6) ⊗ O(3) constituent quark model classification, many open questions still remain. Exclusive electro-production is one of the best ways to investigate nucleon resonances. The exclusive electro-production process e→p→enπ was measured in the photon virtuality range Q2 = 1.7 - 4.5 GeV 2 and the invariant mass range for the n π+ system of W = 1.15 - 1.7 GeV using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. For the first time, these kinematics are probed in exclusive π+ production from protons with nearly full coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the n π+ center-of-mass system. The n π+ channel has particular sensitivity to the isospin 1/2 > excited nucleon states, and together with the p π0 final state will serve to determine the transition form factors of a large number of resonances. The largest discrepancy between these results and present modes was seen in the σ structure function. Thanks to a large volume of data (31,295 cross section and 4,184 asymmetry data points), a reduced set of structure functions and Legendre polynomial moments are presented which are obtained in model-independent fits to the differential cross sections. In this paper, I will discuss the transition form factors of the nucleon resonances in terms of helicity amplitudes.

  6. Nuclear Excitation via Auger Transitions (NEAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Thomas; Emery, Guy; Rasmussen, John; Karwowski, Hugon; Castaneda, Carlos

    2008-10-01

    Triggering (prompt de-excitation) of isomeric states produced in a process of coupling nuclear excitations to atomic shells via Auger transitions (NEAT) is studied. In this resonant process the nuclear transition energy between the two states must be less than the Auger transition energy. This requires the emitted Auger electron energy and the exact on-resonance nuclear excitation share the Auger transition energy. NEAT is compared to other proposed processes of nuclear excitation produced by x-rays (NEET), by electron capture (NEEC) and bound internal conversion (BIC), all of which suffer from off-resonance nuclear excitation except in those accidental cases where the energies may coincide. Estimates of the total resonance strength will be given for the case of ^182mHf which has been extensively studied theoretically. A second case, ^189Os, where NEAT processes may contribute to the nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) of the ground state to the 5.8hr isomeric state will also be examined as a good case for experimental verification of the NEAT process.

  7. Raman-assisted Rabi resonances in two-mode cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenwald, P.; Singh, S. K.; Vogel, W.

    2011-06-15

    The dynamics of a vibronic system in a lossy two-mode cavity is studied, with the first mode being resonant to the electronic transition and the second one being nearly resonant due to Raman transitions. We derive analytical solutions for the dynamics of this system. For a properly chosen detuning of the second mode from the exact Raman resonance, we obtain conditions that are closely related to the phenomenon of Rabi resonance as it is well known in laser physics. Such resonances can be observed in the spontaneous emission spectra, where the spectrum of the second mode in the case of weak Raman coupling is enhanced substantially.

  8. Integral resonator gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses an inertial sensor having an integral resonator. A typical sensor comprises a planar mechanical resonator for sensing motion of the inertial sensor and a case for housing the resonator. The resonator and a wall of the case are defined through an etching process. A typical method of producing the resonator includes etching a baseplate, bonding a wafer to the etched baseplate, through etching the wafer to form a planar mechanical resonator and the wall of the case and bonding an end cap wafer to the wall to complete the case.

  9. Transition operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcock-Zeilinger, J.; Weigert, H.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we give a generic algorithm of the transition operators between Hermitian Young projection operators corresponding to equivalent irreducible representations of 𝖲𝖴 (N ) , using the compact expressions of Hermitian Young projection operators derived in the work of Alcock-Zeilinger and Weigert [eprint arXiv:1610.10088 [math-ph

  10. Presidential Transitions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-09

    Podesta for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies, “Presidential Transition Guidance,” Nov. 13, 2000. 89 U.S. General Services Administration...2000, presidential election, White House Chief of Staff John Podesta issued a November 13, 2000, memorandum to executive branch agencies stating that

  11. Tessellations & Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes two sixth-grade lessons on the work of M. C. Escher: (1) the first lesson instructs students on tessellations, or tiles that interlock in a repeated pattern; (2) the second lesson explores Escher's drawings of transitions from two- to three-dimensional space. (DSK)

  12. Venus transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-05

    Leslie Lowes from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., views the June 5, 2012, Venus transit through a solar telescope. Lowes participated in an education workshop at the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center visitor center and joined others to view the rare celestial event when Venus traverses the face of the sun.

  13. Venus transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-05

    Guests at the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center visitor center use special solar sunglasses to catch a lifetime view of the Venus transit June 5, 2012. The rare celestial event in which the planet Venus traverses the face of the sun will not be visible from Earth again until 2117.

  14. Muted Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kofoed, Jette

    2008-01-01

    This analysis concentrates on the case of a child, Jenny. The paper suggests that the concept of liminality may hold the key to an understanding of muted subject positions like the one assumed by Jenny in a school class. Liminality is proposed as a way of conceptualizing transitions where the subject in question transgresses established rules and…

  15. Tessellations & Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes two sixth-grade lessons on the work of M. C. Escher: (1) the first lesson instructs students on tessellations, or tiles that interlock in a repeated pattern; (2) the second lesson explores Escher's drawings of transitions from two- to three-dimensional space. (DSK)

  16. THE TRANSIT LIGHT CURVE OF AN EXOZODIACAL DUST CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, Christopher C.

    2011-10-15

    Planets embedded within debris disks gravitationally perturb nearby dust and can create clumpy, azimuthally asymmetric circumstellar ring structures that rotate in lock with the planet. The Earth creates one such structure in the solar zodiacal dust cloud. In an edge-on system, the dust 'clumps' periodically pass in front of the star as the planet orbits, occulting and forward-scattering starlight. In this paper, we predict the shape and magnitude of the corresponding transit signal. To do so, we model the dust distributions of collisional, steady-state exozodiacal clouds perturbed by planetary companions. We examine disks with dusty ring structures formed by the planet's resonant trapping of in-spiraling dust for a range of planet masses and semi-major axes, dust properties, and disk masses. We synthesize edge-on images of these models and calculate the transit signatures of the resonant ring structures. The transit light curves created by dusty resonant ring structures typically exhibit two broad transit minima that lead and trail the planetary transit. We find that Jupiter-mass planets embedded within disks hundreds of times denser than our zodiacal cloud can create resonant ring structures with transit depths up to {approx}10{sup -4}, possibly detectable with Kepler. Resonant rings produced by planets more or less massive than Jupiter produce smaller transit depths. Observations of these transit signals may provide upper limits on the degree of asymmetry in exozodiacal clouds.

  17. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  18. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-01-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density. PMID:28186135

  19. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R

    2017-02-10

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  20. Eccentricities & Resonances among Planetary Systems Identified by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Eric B.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-05-01

    NASA's Kepler mission has identified over 1200 transiting planet candidates, including 170 sets of transiting planet candidates with a common host stars. First, we compare the distribution of transit durations for single and multiple planet candidate systems to investigate the potential differences in the eccentricity distributions between these populations. Second, we compare the frequency of pairs of planets (or planet candidates in the case of Kepler) in or near mean-motion resonances based on Kepler and Doppler planet searches. This comparison helps to address a long-standing question regarding the frequency of small planets in mean-motion resonances that are difficult to identify from Doppler data alone. Finally, we compare the frequency of pairs of planet candidates in or near mean-motion resonances with the frequency of transit timing variations in systems with a single or widely separated planet candidates.

  1. Fractional resonances between waves and energetic particles in tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kramer, G J; Chen, L; Fisher, R K; Heidbrink, W W; Nazikian, R; Pace, D C; Van Zeeland, M A

    2012-07-20

    From numerical simulation and analytical modeling it is shown that fast ions can resonate with plasma waves at fractional values of the particle drift-orbit transit frequency when the plasma wave amplitude is sufficiently large. The fractional resonances, which are caused by a nonlinear interaction between the particle orbit and the wave, give rise to an increased density of resonances in phase space which reduces the threshold for stochastic transport. The effects of the fractional resonances on spatial and energy transport are illustrated for an energetic particle geodesic acoustic mode but they apply equally well to other types of MHD activity.

  2. Calculating Few-Body Resonances Using an Oscillator Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, D. V.; Jensen, A. S.; Thøgersen, M.; Garrido, E.; de Diego, R.

    2009-05-01

    We investigate the possibility of calculating the parameters of few-body resonances using the oscillator trap boundary conditions. We place the few-body system in an oscillator trap and calculate the energy spectrum and the strength function of a suitably chosen transition. Broader resonances are identified as Lorentzian peaks in the strength function. Narrower resonances are identified through the pattern of avoided crossings in the spectrum of the system as function of the trap size. As an example we calculate {0^+_2} and {0^+_3} resonances in 12C within the 3 α model.

  3. Crossing simple resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances.

  4. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  5. Neutron resonance averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Progress in the Calculation of Nucleon Transition form Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot

    2016-10-01

    We give a brief account of the Dyson-Schwinger and Faddeev-equation approach and its application to nucleon resonances and their transition form factors. We compare the three-body with the quark-diquark approach and present a quark-diquark calculation for the low-lying nucleon resonances including scalar, axialvector, pseudoscalar and vector diquarks. We also discuss the timelike structure of transition form factors and highlight the advantages of form factors over helicity amplitudes.

  7. Controlling magnetic dipole transition with magnetic plasmonic structures.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tianhua; Zhou, Ying; Liu, Dahe; Li, Jensen

    2011-06-15

    A plasmonic structure with double gold patches is proposed for enhancing the spontaneous emission of a magnetic dipole transition through a magnetic hot area. A Purcell factor of nearly 2000 can be obtained at optical frequencies together with a low sensitivity in spatial and spectral mismatches between the light emitter and the resonance mode. The associated resonance can be tuned from the visible to the IR frequencies, enabling efficient control of forbidden transitions using plasmonic structures.

  8. An Exoplanet Radius and Transit Timing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Jonald; Sada, Pedro

    2009-08-01

    Many exoplanet systems contain Jupiter-mass planets on close-in orbits. Theories of planetary system formation account for these hot Jupiters as being end states of inward migration. Variants of those theories also predict terrestrial planets to be captured in mean motion resonance with the hot Jupiters. A recent explosion of discoveries by transit surveys have given us a sample of 37 hot Jupiters transiting planets brighter than V=13. A transit timing survey of these systems could detect hot Earths in resonance, via the large (~ 180 second) perturbations they induce on the giant planet transits. Moreover, the discovery photometry for these systems usually provides only relatively coarse photometric precision, but larger-aperture follow-up can determine the giant planet radius to a precision limited only by knowledge of the stellar mass, and thereby reveal the diversity of giant exoplanet structure, such as the presence of heavy element cores. The relatively large sample now available means that a radius- and transit timing-survey is well matched to classical observing and telescope scheduling. We propose continued observations to perform transit photometry using FLAMINGOS on the 2.1-meter in the J-band, where stellar limb darkening is minimal and transit photometry has excellent sensitivity to planetary radii and shifts in transit time.

  9. An Exoplanet Radius and Transit Timing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Jonald; Sada, Pedro

    2010-02-01

    Many exoplanet systems contain Jupiter-mass planets on close-in orbits. Theories of planetary system formation account for these hot Jupiters as being end states of inward migration. Variants of those theories also predict terrestrial planets to be captured in mean motion resonance with the hot Jupiters. A continuing explosion of discoveries by transit surveys have given us a sample of 45 hot Jupiters transiting planets brighter than V=13. A transit timing survey of these systems could detect hot Earths in resonance, via the large (~ 180 second) perturbations they induce on the giant planet transits. Moreover, the discovery photometry for these systems usually provides only relatively coarse photometric precision, but larger-aperture follow-up can determine the giant planet radius to a precision limited only by knowledge of the stellar mass, and thereby reveal the diversity of giant exoplanet structure, such as the presence of heavy element cores. The relatively large sample now available means that a radius- and transit timing-survey is well matched to classical observing and telescope scheduling. We propose continued observations to perform transit photometry using FLAMINGOS on the 2.1-meter in the J-band, where stellar limb darkening is minimal and transit photometry has excellent sensitivity to planetary radii and shifts in transit time.

  10. Extracting β and the New DSJ Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Alakabha

    The three body decays B-> D(*) bar {D}(*) Ks, may be used to measure both sin2β and cos2β. Crucial to the cos2β measurement is the resonant contribution to the three body decay from p-wave excited Ds, states. If these p-wave states are the newly discovered Ds(2317) and Ds(2460) then they are below the D(*)K threshold and hence do not contribute to B-> D(*) bar {D}(*) Ks. The three body decays can then be used to measure sin2β without resonant dilution and to look for new physics in b-> c bar{c}s transition.

  11. Dynamical Coupling of Pygmy and Giant Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, Carlos; Brady, Nathan; Aumann, Thomas; Thomas, James

    2016-03-01

    One of the effects overseen in studies of excitation of pygmy resonances is the fact that both pygmy and giant resonances are strongly coupled. This coupling leads to dynamical effects such as the modification of transition probabilities and and cross sections. We make an assessment of such effects by means of the relativistic coupled channels equations developed by our group. Supported by the U.S. NSF Grant No. 1415656 and the U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER41533.

  12. Feshbach resonances of harmonically trapped atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Philipp-Immanuel; Vanne, Yulian V.; Saenz, Alejandro

    2011-03-15

    Employing a short-range two-channel description, we derive an analytic model of atoms in isotropic and anisotropic harmonic traps at a Feshbach resonance. On this basis we obtain a parametrization of the energy-dependent scattering length that differs from the one previously employed. We validate the model by comparison to full numerical calculations for {sup 6}Li-{sup 87}Rb and explain quantitatively the experimental observation of a resonance shift and trap-induced molecules in exited bands. Finally, we analyze the bound state admixture and Landau-Zener transition probabilities.

  13. Optofluidic Fano resonance photonic crystal refractometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuling; Liu, Yonghao; Zhao, Deyin; Yang, Hongjun; Zhou, Weidong; Sun, Yuze

    2017-02-01

    We report an ultra-compact surface-normal optofluidic refractometric sensor based on a two-dimensional silicon photonic crystal on insulator. In contrast to the conventional symmetric Lorentzian resonance that is prevalently used in the label-free sensors, the asymmetric lineshape and steep peak-to-dip transition of a Fano resonance enable the enhanced detection sensitivity. The detection limit of 1.3 × 10-6 refractive index units is achieved, which is among the lowest reported experimentally in the defect-free photonic crystal sensors.

  14. The Electric Giant Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Woude, A.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Experimental Methods to Study Giant Resonances * Introduction * The Tools * Introduction * Tools for Isoscalar Scattering * INELASTIC α-SCATTERING * INELASTIC PROTON SCATTERING * Tools for Isovector Excitations * γ-ABSORPTION AND PARTICLE CAPTURE REACTIONS * CHARGE EXCHANGE REACTIONS - THE (π+, π0) REACTION * Tools For Isoscalar And Isovector Excitations * INELASTIC ELECTRON SCATTERING * GIANT RESONANCE EXCITATION BY FAST HEAVY IONS * From Multipole Cross Section To Multipole Strength * The Electric Isoscalar Resonances * The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance * Systematics on the GMR * Compressibility and the Giant Monopole Resonance * Introduction * The Compressibility of nuclear matter from the GMR energies * Discussion * The Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance * General Trends In Medium-Heavy and Heavy Nuclei * The GQR In Light Nuclei * The Isoscalar 3- Strength, LEOR and HEOR * Isoscalar 4+ Strength * Miscellaneous; Isoscalar 1- and L > 4-Strength * The Electric Isovector Giant Resonances * The Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance: GDR * The Isovector Giant Monopole Resonances: IVGMR * The Isovector Quadrupole Resonance: IVGQR * The Effect of Ground State Deformation on the Shape of Giant Resonance: Microscopic Picture * Giant Resonances Built on Excited States * Introduction * Capture Reactions on Light Nuclei * Statistical decay of GDR γ Emission in Heavy Compound Systems * Introduction * Theoretical Predictions * Some Experimental Results * Summary and Outlook * Acknowledgements * General References * References

  15. An Inexpensive Resonance Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of resonance is applicable to almost every branch of physics. Without resonance, there wouldn't be televisions or stereos, or even swings on the playground. However, resonance also has undesirable side effects such as irritating noises in the car and the catastrophic events such as helicopters flying apart. In this article, the…

  16. Eliminating Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallick, Barb; Lee, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Adults often find themselves transitioning from one activity to another in a short time span. Most of the time, they do not feel they have a lot of control over their schedules, but wish that they could carve out extended time to relax and focus on one project. Picture a group of children in the block area who have spent 15 or 20 minutes building…

  17. Excitation of dark multipolar plasmonic resonances at terahertz frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Wei, YuMing; Zang, XiaoFei; Zhu, YiMing; Zhuang, SongLin

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally observe the excitation of dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances in a hybrid structure consisting of a corrugated metallic disk coupled with a C-shaped dipole resonator. The uncoupled corrugated metallic disk only supports a dipolar resonance in the transmission spectrum due to perfect symmetry of the structure. However, the dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances emerge when coupled with a bright C-shaped resonator which is placed in the vicinity of the corrugated metallic disk. These excited multipolar resonances show minimum influence on the coupling distance between the C-shaped resonator and corrugated metallic disk. The resonance frequencies of the radiative modes are controlled by varying the angle of the C-shaped resonator and the inner disk radius, both of which play dominant roles in the excitation of the spoof localized surface plasmons. Observation of such a transition from the dark to radiative nature of multipolar spoof localized plasmon resonances would find potential applications in terahertz based resonant plasmonic and metamaterial devices. PMID:26903382

  18. Excitation of dark multipolar plasmonic resonances at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Wei, Yuming; Zang, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yiming; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally observe the excitation of dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances in a hybrid structure consisting of a corrugated metallic disk coupled with a C-shaped dipole resonator. The uncoupled corrugated metallic disk only supports a dipolar resonance in the transmission spectrum due to perfect symmetry of the structure. However, the dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances emerge when coupled with a bright C-shaped resonator which is placed in the vicinity of the corrugated metallic disk. These excited multipolar resonances show minimum influence on the coupling distance between the C-shaped resonator and corrugated metallic disk. The resonance frequencies of the radiative modes are controlled by varying the angle of the C-shaped resonator and the inner disk radius, both of which play dominant roles in the excitation of the spoof localized surface plasmons. Observation of such a transition from the dark to radiative nature of multipolar spoof localized plasmon resonances would find potential applications in terahertz based resonant plasmonic and metamaterial devices.

  19. The spherical birdcage resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpen, Michael D.

    A description of the operation of a spherical resonator capable of producing a uniform magnetic induction throughout a spherical volume is presented. Simple closed-form expressions for the spectrum of resonant frequencies are derived for both the low-pass and the high-pass configuration of the resonator and are shown to compare favorably with observation in an experimental coil system. It is shown that the spherical resonator produces a uniform spherical field of view when used as a magnetic resonance imaging radiofrequency coil.

  20. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  1. Monolithic OLED-Microwire Devices for Ultrastrong Magnetic Resonant Excitation.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Shirin; Joshi, Gajadhar; Malissa, Hans; Lupton, John M; Boehme, Christoph

    2017-08-09

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) make highly sensitive probes to test magnetic resonance phenomena under unconventional conditions since spin precession controls singlet-triplet transitions of electron-hole pairs, which in turn give rise to distinct recombination currents in conductivity. Electron paramagnetic resonance can therefore be detected in the absence of spin polarization. We exploit this characteristic to explore the exotic regime of ultrastrong light-matter coupling, where the Rabi frequency of a charge carrier spin is of the order of the transition frequency of the two-level system. To reach this domain, we have to lower the Zeeman splitting of the spin states, defined by the static magnetic field B0, and raise the strength of the oscillatory driving field of the resonance, B1. This is achieved by shrinking the OLED and bringing the source of resonant radio frequency (RF) radiation as close as possible to the organic semiconductor in a monolithic device structure, which incorporates an OLED fabricated directly on top of an RF microwire within one monolithic thin-film device structure. With an RF driving power in the milliwatt range applied to the microwire, the regime of bleaching and inversion of the magnetic resonance signal is reached due to the onset of the spin-Dicke effect. In this example of ultrastrong light-matter coupling, the individual resonant spin transitions of electron-hole pairs become indistinguishable with respect to the driving field, and superradiance of the magnetic dipole transitions sets in.

  2. Nonlinear resonance and dynamical chaos in a diatomic molecule driven by a resonant ir field

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, G.P.; Bulgakov, E.N.; Holm, D.D. ||||

    1995-10-01

    We consider the transition from regular motion to dynamical chaos in a classical model of a diatomic molecule which is driven by a circularly polarized resonant ir field. Under the conditions of a nearly two-dimensional case, the Hamiltonian reduces to that for the nonintegrable motion of a charged particle in an electromagnetic wave [A. J. Lichtenberg and M. A. Lieberman, {ital Regular} {ital and} {ital Stochastic} {ital Motion} (Springer-Verlag, City, 1983)]. In the general case, the transition to chaos is connected with the overlapping of vibrational-rotational nonlinear resonances and appears even at rather low radiation field intensity, {ital S}{approx_gt}1 GW/cm{sup 2}. We also discuss the possibility of experimentally observing this transition.

  3. Optical Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Paul; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad; Pardo, Fabrice

    2014-08-01

    Helmholtz resonators are widely used acoustic components able to select a single frequency. Here, based on an analogy between acoustics and electromagnetism wave equations, we present an electromagnetic 2D Helmholtz resonator made of a metallic slit-box structure. At the resonance, the light is funneled in the λ/800 apertures, and is subsequently absorbed in the cavity. As in acoustics, there is no higher order of resonance, which is an appealing feature for applications such as photodetection or thermal emission. Eventually, we demonstrate that the slit is of capacitive nature while the box behaves inductively. We derive an analytical formula for the resonance wavelength, which does not rely on wave propagation and therefore does not depend on the permittivity of the material filling the box. Besides, in contrast with half-wavelength resonators, the resonance wavelength can be engineered by both the slit aspect ratio and the box area.

  4. Resonance splitting in gyrotropic ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Jalas, Dirk; Petrov, Alexander; Krause, Michael; Hampe, Jan; Eich, Manfred

    2010-10-15

    We present the theoretical concept of an optical isolator based on resonance splitting in a silicon ring resonator covered with a magneto-optical polymer cladding. For this task, a perturbation method is derived for the modes in the cylindrical coordinate system. A polymer magneto-optical cladding causing a 0.01 amplitude of the off-diagonal element of the dielectric tensor is assumed. It is shown that the derived resonance splitting of the clockwise and counterclockwise modes increases for smaller ring radii. For the ring with a radius of approximately 1.5μm, a 29GHz splitting is demonstrated. An integrated optical isolator with a 10μm geometrical footprint is proposed based on a critically coupled ring resonator.

  5. Electromagnetic Transmission Through Resonant Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Steven M.

    Electromagnetic resonators store energy in the form of oscillatory electric and magnetic fields and gradually exchange that energy by coupling with their environment. This coupling process can have profound effects on the transmission and reflection properties of nearby interfaces, with rapid transitions from high transmittance to high reflectance over narrow frequency ranges, and has been exploited to design useful optical components such as spectral filters and dielectric mirrors. This dissertation includes analytic, numeric, and experimental investigations of three different electromagnetic resonators, each based on a different method of confining electromagnetic fields near the region of interest. First, we show that a structure with two parallel conducting plates, each containing a subwavelength slit, supports a localized resonant mode bound to the slits and therefore exhibits (in the absence of nonradiative losses), perfect resonant transmission over a narrow frequency range. In practice, the transmission is limited by conduction losses in the sidewalls; nevertheless, experimental results at 10 GHz show a narrowband transmission enhancement by a factor of 104 compared to the non-resonant transmission, with quality factor (ratio of frequency to peak width) Q ~ 3000. Second, we describe a narrowband transmission filter based on a single-layer dielectric grating. We use a group theory analysis to show that, due to their symmetry, several of the grating modes cannot couple to light at normal incidence, while several others have extremely large coupling. We then show how selectively breaking the system symmetry using off-normal light incidence can produce transmission peaks by enabling weak coupling to some of the previously protected modes. The narrowband filtering capabilities are validated by an experimental demonstration in the long wavelength infrared, showing transmission peaks of quality factor Q ~ 100 within a free-spectral range of 8-15 mum. Third, we

  6. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments.

    PubMed

    Torrezan, A C; Mayer Alegre, T P; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5 x 10(10) spins/GHz(1/2) despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  7. Stochastic Modeling of Laminar-Turbulent Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Choudhari, Meelan

    2002-01-01

    Stochastic versions of stability equations are developed in order to develop integrated models of transition and turbulence and to understand the effects of uncertain initial conditions on disturbance growth. Stochastic forms of the resonant triad equations, a high Reynolds number asymptotic theory, and the parabolized stability equations are developed.

  8. High frequency properties of resonant tunneling diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, H. Y.; Sinkkonen, J.

    The small signal analysis for the resonant tunneling diode (RTD) is carried out by using a semiclassical transport theory. Multiple scattering effects are accounted for in an optical approximation by using a complex mean free path. An analytical expression for the conduction current is given. The results show that the negative differential conductance prevails up to the frequency f0 limited by the quantum well transit time. The imaginary part of the admittance can be presented by a series inductance as has been recently found experimentally. In addition, the equivalent circuit has a capacitor in parallel with the conductance-inductance branch. Above f0 the admittance shows an oscillatory behaviour. The oscillations are associated with the quantum well transit time resonances.

  9. Resonant diffraction of synchrotron radiation: New possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikova, E. N.; Mukhamedzhanov, E. Kh.

    2016-09-01

    Resonant diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) is a modern method of studying the structure and properties of condensed matter that can be implemented on third-generation synchrotrons. This method allows one to investigate local properties of media (including magnetic and electronic ones) and observe thermal vibrations, defects, and orbital and charge orderings. A brief review of the advance provided by SR resonant diffraction is presented, and the capabilities of this method for analyzing phase transitions are considered in more detail by the example of potassium dihydrogen phosphate and rubidium dihydrogen phosphate crystals. It is shown that the investigation of the temperature dependence of forbidden reflections not only makes it possible to observe the transition from para- to ferroelectric phase, but also gives information about the proton distribution at hydrogen bonds.

  10. White-Light Whispering Gallery Mode Optical Resonator System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy A. (Inventor); Maleki, Lute (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An optical resonator system and method that includes a whispering-gallery mode (WGM) optical resonator that is capable of resonating across a broad, continuous swath of frequencies is provided. The optical resonator of the system is shaped to support at least one whispering gallery mode and includes a top surface, a bottom surface, a side wall, and a first curved transition region extending between the side wall and the top surface. The system further includes a coupler having a coupling surface which is arranged to face the transition region of the optical resonator and in the vicinity thereof such that an evanescent field emitted from the coupler is capable of being coupled into the optical resonator through the first curved transition region

  11. On stimulated resonance radiation by channeled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabagov, S. B.; Kalashnikov, N. P.

    2017-07-01

    The channeled particles undergo quasiperiodic transverse bound motion along main crystallographic directions at either 1D planar or 2D axial channeling. This motion is accompanied by spontaneous radiation known as channeling radiation due to projectile's transmission between discrete quantum states. In this work we have presented preliminary evaluation of the processes of resonance scattering of external electromagnetic field when the external frequency becomes close to the channeled particle transition energies that might be of the source for induced radiation at channeling.

  12. Radiative decays of resonances on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Agadjanov, Andria; Bernard, Véronique; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2016-01-22

    We discuss a generalization of the Lüscher approach to the calculation of the matrix elements of the unstable states. A theoretical framework for the lattice extraction of the ΔNγ* transition form factors is formulated. The procedure to measure the form factors at the resonance pole is given. The current theoretical progress on the B → K*γ* decays is briefly summarized.

  13. Resonant pairing of excitons in semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, S. V.

    2016-10-01

    We suggest indirect excitons in two-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures as a platform for the realization of a bosonic analog of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductor. The quantum phase transition to a biexcitonic gapped state can be controlled in situ by tuning the electric field applied to the structure in the growth direction. The proposed playground should allow one to go to strongly correlated and high-temperature regimes, unattainable with Feshbach resonant atomic gases.

  14. Astatine and Yttrium Resonant Ionization Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teigelhoefer, Andrea

    Providing intense, contamination-free beams of rare isotopes to experiments is a challenging task. At isotope separator on-line facilities such as ISAC at TRIUMF, the choice of production target and ion source are key to the successful beam delivery. Due to their element-selectivity, high efficiency and versatility, resonant ionization laser ion sources (RILIS) gain increasingly in importance. The spectroscopic data available are typically incomplete in the region of excited- and autoionizing atomic states. In order to find the most efficient ionization scheme for a particular element, further spectroscopy is often required. The development of efficient laser resonant ionization schemes for yttrium and astatine is presented in this thesis. For yttrium, two ionization schemes with comparable relative intensities were found. Since for astatine, only two transitions were known, the focus was to provide data on atomic energy levels using resonance ionization spectroscopy. Altogether 41 previously unknown astatine energy levels were found.

  15. Exotic Baryon Resonances in the Skyrme Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonov, Dmitri; Petrov, Victor

    We outline how one can understand the Skyrme model from the modern perspective. We review the quantization of the SU(3) rotations of the Skyrmion, leading to the exotic baryons that cannot be made of three quarks. It is shown that in the limit of large number of colors the lowest-mass exotic baryons can be studied from the kaon-Skyrmion scattering amplitudes, an approach known after Callan and Klebanov. We follow this approach and find, both analytically and numerically, a strong Θ+ resonance in the scattering amplitude that is traced to the rotational mode. The Skyrme model does predict an exotic resonance Θ+ but grossly overestimates the width. To understand better the factors affecting the width, it is computed by several methods giving, however, identical results. In particular, we show that insofar as the width is small, it can be found from the transition axial constant. The physics leading to a narrow Θ+ resonance is briefly reviewed and affirmed.

  16. Antiferromagnetic resonance in Rb1C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennati, M.; Griffin, R. G.; Knorr, S.; Grupp, A.; Mehring, M.

    1998-08-01

    High-frequency (94 and 140 GHz) ESR was used to investigate the magnetic properties of the low-dimensional conductor Rb1C60. Below 35 K new features of the electron spin resonance are distinguished from the CESR signal of the conducting phase. The analysis of the resonance linewidth and line shift allows a clear identification of a frequency-dependent antiferromagnetic resonance line (AFMR) below 25 K. The characteristic temperature TN for the ordering transition is 25 K. Between 25 K

  17. Resonance-Enhanced Nonlinear Optical Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuan

    Nonlinear optical processes, which manifest as many interesting phenomena such as nonlinear wave mixing, optical rectification, intensity-dependent refractive index change, harmonic generation, etc., have found very broad applications. Unfortunately, most optical media exhibit rather weak optical nonlinearities and a majority of nonlinear optical processes have to rely on substantial optical powers to support nonlinear wave interactions, which becomes a major challenge for nonlinear photonic application. This thesis is devoted to exploring enhanced nonlinear optical phenomena, by taking advantage of a certain type of resonance to enhance the nonlinear wave interactions. For this purpose, we employed both natural atomic resonances via electron transition and engineered optical resonances in micro/nanophotonic device structures, for different applications. These two types of resonances, although distinctive in their physical natures, both are able to significantly increase the strength and elongate the time of optical wave interactions, thus leading to dramatic enhancement of nonlinear optical effects. On one hand, we utilized unique energy-level structures in alkali vapor plasmas to dramatically enhance the electron tunneling ionization process and to produce significant resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing for efficient terahertz (THz) wave generation that is crucial for long-wave application. On the other hand, we utilized the enhancement offered by high-Q optical resonances inside microresonators to produce significant photothermal backaction to dramatically suppress the fundamental temperature fluctuations of microresonators, which is essential for sensing and metrology applications. With such cavity-resonance enhancement, we revealed a new regime of nonlinear optical oscillation dynamics in lithium niobate microresonators that results from unique competition between the thermo-optic nonlinear effect and the photorefractive effect, which is inaccessible to

  18. Venus Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-05

    A "transit of Venus" occurs when the planet Venus passes directly between the sun and the Earth. During the event, Venus will be seen from Earth as a small black sphere moving across the face of the sun. Such an event won’t occur again until the year 2117. The Goddard Visitor Center hosted a watch party that included near real-time images from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, coverage of the event from several locations via NASA TV, in-person presentations by NASA experts, hands-on activities for children of all ages. Heavy cloud cover did not allow viewing opportunities of the transit via solar telescopes. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Bill Hrybyk NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  19. Electromagnetic excitation of the Delta(1232) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    V. Pascalutsa; M. Vanderhaeghen; Shin Nan Yang

    2006-09-05

    We review the description of the lowest-energy nucleon excitation--the Delta(1232)-resonance. Much of the recent effort has been focused on the precision measurements of the nucleon to Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes. We review the results of those measurements and confront them with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, and QCD-inspired models. Some of the theoretical approaches are reviewed in detail. In particular, we describe the chiral EFT of QCD in the energy domain of the Delta-resonance, and its applications to the electromagnetic nucleon-to-Delta transition (gamma N Delta). We also describe the recent dynamical and unitary-isobar models of pion electroproduction which are extensively used in the extraction of the gamma* N Delta form factors from experiment. Furthermore, we discuss the link of the gamma* N Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs), as well as the predictions of perturbative QCD for these transition form factors. The present status of understanding the Delta-resonance properties and the nature of its excitation is summarized.

  20. Large mode radius resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Resonator configurations permitting operation with large mode radius while maintaining good transverse mode discrimination are considered. Stable resonators incorporating an intracavity telescope and unstable resonator geometries utilizing an output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile are shown to enable large radius single mode laser operation. Results of heterodyne studies of pulsed CO2 lasers with large (11mm e sup-2 radius) fundamental mode sizes are presented demonstrating minimal frequency sweeping in accordance with the theory of laser-induced medium perturbations.

  1. Double resonance in the infinite-range quantum Ising model.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung-Guk; Um, Jaegon; Kim, Beom Jun

    2012-08-01

    We study quantum resonance behavior of the infinite-range kinetic Ising model at zero temperature. Numerical integration of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in the presence of an external magnetic field in the z direction is performed at various transverse field strengths g. It is revealed that two resonance peaks occur when the energy gap matches the external driving frequency at two distinct values of g, one below and the other above the quantum phase transition. From the similar observations already made in classical systems with phase transitions, we propose that the double resonance peaks should be a generic feature of continuous transitions, for both quantum and classical many-body systems.

  2. Baryon transition form factors at the pole

    SciTech Connect

    Tiator, L.; Döring, M.; Workman, R. L.; Hadžimehmedović, M.; Osmanović, H.; Omerović, R.; Stahov, J.; Švarc, A.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic resonance properties are uniquely defined at the pole and do not depend on the separation of the resonance from background or the decay channel. Photon-nucleon branching ratios are nowadays often quoted at the pole, and we generalize the considerations to the case of virtual photons. We derive and compare relations for nucleon to baryon transition form factors both for the Breit-Wigner and the pole positions. Using the MAID2007 and SAID SM08 partial wave analyses of pion electroproduction data, we compare the $G_M$, $G_E$, and $G_C$ form factors for the $\\Delta(1232)$ resonance excitation at the Breit-Wigner resonance and pole positions up to $Q^2=5$ GeV$^2$. We also explore the $E/M$ and $S/M$ ratios as functions of $Q^2$. For pole and residue extraction, we apply the Laurent + Pietarinen method.

  3. Baryon transition form factors at the pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiator, L.; Döring, M.; Workman, R. L.; Hadžimehmedović, M.; Osmanović, H.; Omerović, R.; Stahov, J.; Švarc, A.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic resonance properties are uniquely defined at the pole and do not depend on the separation of the resonance from background or the decay channel. Photon-nucleon branching ratios are nowadays often quoted at the pole, and we generalize the considerations to the case of virtual photons. We derive and compare relations for nucleon to baryon transition form factors both for the Breit-Wigner and the pole positions. Using the MAID2007 and SAID SM08 partial wave analyses of pion electroproduction data, we compare the GM, GE, and GC form factors for the Δ (1232 ) resonance excitation at the Breit-Wigner resonance and pole positions up to Q2=5 GeV2 . We also explore the E /M and S /M ratios as functions of Q2. For pole and residue extraction, we apply the Laurent + Pietarinen method.

  4. Smooth Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    22 February 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a transition from one of the many layered troughs in the north polar region of Mars to the relatively homogeneous-looking upper surface of the polar cap. The difference in brightness across this scene is a function of several factors, one of which is the amount of dust versus that of ice in any given location. The bright material that dominates the scene is largely water ice.

    Location near: 83.2oN, 297.8oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower right Season: Northern Summer

  5. On open electromagnetic resonators: relation between interferometers and resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Manenkov, Aleksandr A; Bykov, Vladimir P; Kuleshov, N V

    2010-05-26

    The physical difference between the concepts 'Fabry-Perot interferometer' and 'open resonator' is discussed. It is shown that the use of the term 'Fabry-Perot resonator' for open laser resonators is incorrect both from the historical viewpoint and from the viewpoint of the physical meaning of the processes occurring in these resonators. (laser beams and resonators)

  6. Electronic Transitions of Yttrium Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Y. W.; Wang, Na; Clark, Andrew B.; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2013-06-01

    The electronic transition spectrum of yttrium monoxide (YO) in the spectral region between 284nm and 307nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. The YO molecule was produced by reacting laser-ablated yttrium atoms with O_{2} seeded in argon. Twenty transition bands were observed in that region and a few bands were selected for further study using optical-optical double resonance (OODR) spectroscopy. The excited C^{2} Π state has been reached via the intermediate B^{2} Σ^{+} state from the ground X^{2} Σ^{+} state. The excited sub-states observed so far have Ω = 0.5 and 1.5. A least squares fit of the measured rotational lines yielded molecular constants for the newly observed excited states.

  7. Resonant spectra of quadrupolar anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Mao, Xingze; Nazarewicz, W.; Michel, N.; Garrett, W. R.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-09-01

    In quadrupole-bound anions, an extra electron is attached at a sufficiently large quadrupole moment of a neutral molecule, which is lacking a permanent dipole moment. The nature of the bound states and low-lying resonances of such anions is of interest for understanding the threshold behavior of open quantum systems in general. In this work, we investigate the properties of quadrupolar anions as halo systems, the formation of rotational bands, and the transition from a subcritical to supercritical electric quadrupole moment. We solve the electron-plus-rotor problem using a nonadiabatic coupled-channel formalism by employing the Berggren ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. The rotor is treated as a linear triad of point charges with zero monopole and dipole moments and nonzero quadrupole moment. We demonstrate that binding energies and radii of quadrupolar anions strictly follow the scaling laws for two-body halo systems. Contrary to the case of dipolar anions, ground-state band of quadrupolar anions smoothly extend into the continuum, and many rotational bands could be identified above the detachment threshold. We study the evolution of a bound state of an anion as it dives into the continuum at a critical quadrupole moment and we show that the associated critical exponent is α =2 . Everything considered, quadrupolar anions represent a perfect laboratory for the studies of marginally bound open quantum systems.

  8. Coupled Resonance Laser Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burd, Shaun; Uys, Hermann; MAQClab Team

    2013-05-01

    We have demonstrated simultaneous laser frequency stabilization of a UV and IR laser, to the same photodiode signal derived from the UV laser only. For trapping and cooling Yb+ ions, a frequency stabilized laser is required at 369.9 nm to drive the S1/2-P1/2 cooling cycle. Since that cycle is not closed, a repump beam is needed at 935.18 nm to drive the D3/2-D[ 3 / 2 ] transition, which rapidly decays back to the S1/2 state. Our 369 nm laser is locked using Doppler free polarization spectroscopy of Yb+ ions, generated in a hollow cathode discharge lamp. Without pumping, the metastable D3/2 level is only sparsely populated, making direct absorption of 935 nm light difficult to detect. A resonant 369 nm pump laser can populate the D3/2 state, and fast repumping to the S1/2 ground state by on resonant 935 nm light, can be detected via the change in absorption of the 369 nm laser. This is accomplished using lock-in detection on the same photodiode signal to which the 369 nm laser is locked. In this way, simultaneous locking of two frequencies in very different spectral regimes is accomplished, while exploiting only the photodiode signal from one of the lasers. A rate equation model gives good qualitative agreement with experimental observation. This work was partially funded by the South African National Research Foundation.

  9. Mechanism of resonant electron emission from the deprotonated GFP chromophore and its biomimetics† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental and computational details, calculated VEEs in anions and radicals, orbitals involved in electronic transitions, detailed discussion of direct and resonant spectral shapes, mechanism of vibrational autodetachment out of S1 above the S1/D0 crossing, impact of the substituents, and coordinates of the optimized structures. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc05529j Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Ciarán R. S.; Parkes, Michael A.; Woodhouse, Joanne L.; Zhang, Lijuan; Lewin, Ross; Ward, John M.; Hailes, Helen C.; Andersen, Lars H.

    2017-01-01

    The Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which is widely used in bioimaging, is known to undergo light-induced redox transformations. Electron transfer is thought to occur resonantly through excited states of its chromophore; however, a detailed understanding of the electron gateway states of the chromophore is still missing. Here, we use photoelectron spectroscopy and high-level quantum chemistry calculations to show that following UV excitation, the ultrafast electron dynamics in the chromophore anion proceeds via an excited shape resonance strongly coupled to the open continuum. The impact of this state is found across the entire 355–315 nm excitation range, from above the first bound–bound transition to below the opening of higher-lying continua. By disentangling the electron dynamics in the photodetachment channels, we provide an important reference for the adiabatic position of the electron gateway state, which is located at 348 nm, and discover the source of the curiously large widths of the photoelectron spectra that have been reported in the literature. By introducing chemical modifications to the GFP chromophore, we show that the detachment threshold and the position of the gateway state, and hence the underlying excited-state dynamics, can be changed systematically. This enables a fine tuning of the intrinsic electron emission properties of the GFP chromophore and has significant implications for its function, suggesting that the biomimetic GFP chromophores are more stable to photooxidation. PMID:28507691

  10. The Concept of Resonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2007-01-01

    A general example of a delocalization system associated with a higher energy than the localized one, which suggests that it is wrong to consider delocalization as equivalent to resonance stabilization, is presented. The meaning of resonance energy as it appears in valence bond theory is described as the lowering of the calculated ground-state…

  11. Resonances in heavy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental situation for the study of resonances in heavy-ion collisions is reviewed, with emphasis on the heaviest systems. New data are presented which show some of the systematics of this phenomenon. The narrow resonance structures are established as a feature of the nuclear structure of the composite system rather than a purely entrance channel effect.

  12. The resonator handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jerry D.; Zhou, Shiliang

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to extend resonator theory into the region in which the planar mirror is quite small. Results of the theoretical description are then extended to resonator design and experimental arrangements as discussed in further sections of this work. Finally, a discussion of dielectric measurements for small samples is included as a specific application of this work.

  13. The Concept of Resonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2007-01-01

    A general example of a delocalization system associated with a higher energy than the localized one, which suggests that it is wrong to consider delocalization as equivalent to resonance stabilization, is presented. The meaning of resonance energy as it appears in valence bond theory is described as the lowering of the calculated ground-state…

  14. Resonant Tunneling and Resonant Excitation Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    2005-12-01

    Issues involved in the tunneling of deuterons in metal deuterides are considered in relation to experimental claims of anomalies in metal deuterides. From earlier studies, screening is thought to be similar to the case of molecular D2. Resonant tunneling has been advocated in the literature as a possible mechanism to achieve tunneling enhancements. We develop a two-level system for a piecewise constant potential model for resonant tunneling that matches the energy levels in the vicinity of a level crossing, arguing that such models are applicable for more general potential models. Resonant tunneling effects and dynamics, including acceleration due to coherence, are accounted for in the model. The model is extended to include relaxation effects, and it is found that one would not expect to find coherent effects associated with tunneling in the case of two deuterons in a metal lattice. We present a simple model for the transfer of excitation from a collection of deuterons to a collection of helium nuclei, a model closely related to resonant tunneling and also to new phonon-coupled SU(N) models under development. The excitation transfer models show coherent enhancements as well as collective effects.

  15. Monolithic MACS micro resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann-Horn, J. A.; Jacquinot, J.-F.; Ginefri, J. C.; Bonhomme, C.; Sakellariou, D.

    2016-10-01

    Magic Angle Coil Spinning (MACS) aids improving the intrinsically low NMR sensitivity of heterogeneous microscopic samples. We report on the design and testing of a new type of monolithic 2D MACS resonators to overcome known limitations of conventional micro coils. The resonators' conductors were printed on dielectric substrate and tuned without utilizing lumped element capacitors. Self-resonance conditions have been computed by a hybrid FEM-MoM technique. Preliminary results reported here indicate robust mechanical stability, reduced eddy currents heating and negligible susceptibility effects. The gain in B1 /√{ P } is in agreement with the NMR sensitivity enhancement according to the principle of reciprocity. A sensitivity enhancement larger than 3 has been achieved in a monolithic micro resonator inside a standard 4 mm rotor at 500 MHz. These 2D resonators could offer higher performance micro-detection and ease of use of heterogeneous microscopic substances such as biomedical samples, microscopic specimens and thin film materials.

  16. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOEpatents

    Lai, J.S.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Chen, D.; Scudiere, M.B.; Ott, G.W. Jr.; White, C.P.; McKeever, J.W.

    1997-06-24

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 14 figs.

  17. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Chen, Daoshen; Scudiere, Matthew B.; Ott, Jr., George W.; White, Clifford P.; McKeever, John W.

    1997-01-01

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  18. Narrowband resonant transmitter

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Simpson, John T.

    2004-06-29

    A transverse-longitudinal integrated optical resonator (TLIR) is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide. The PBG is positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings. An electro-optic waveguide material may be used to permit tuning the TLIR and to permit the TLIR to perform signal modulation and switching. The TLIR may be positioned on a bulk substrate die with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a TLIR including fabricating a broadband reflective grating is disclosed. A method for tuning the TLIR's transmission resonance wavelength is also disclosed.

  19. Vibrationally resolved shape resonant photoionization of N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, L. A.; Duffy, L. M.; Space, B.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Roy, P.

    1989-02-01

    A vibrationally resolved dispersed fluorescence study of 7sigma exp -1 shape resonant photoionization in N2O is presented. It is shown that the lower energy shape resonance results in non-Franck-Condon vibrational branching ratios over a wide range. It is found that the cross section curves for alternative vibrational modes behave differently and that the resonance behavior is influenced more by symmetric stretch than by the asymmetric stretching vibration. Spectroscopic data on the ionic potential surfaces and ratios of Franck-Condon factors for N2O(+) (A to X) transitions are obtained.

  20. Resonance Characteristics for Microwire Pieces as Elements of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorofeev, I. O.; Dunaevskii, G. E.

    2017-04-01

    The half-wave resonance of ultra-thin conductors produced by different technologies is investigated within 8.2-15.5 GHz frequency range using an open quasi-optical resonator. A comparison of the theoretical and experimental results show that for glass-coated and drawn microwires, both fabricated from alloys with specific conductivity of over 105 S/m, the experimental value of the microwire resonant length is less than the theoretical. Supposedly, this is due to the surface effect including the nanoscale transition layer of microwires. Dependence diagrams are obtained for microwires made of alloys with natural ferromagnetic resonance. It is shown that the half-wave length resonance of the latter is considerably longer than that of microwires with a similar value of specific conductivity, but without magnetic properties.

  1. The application of chaotic oscillator in detecting weak resonant signal of MEMS resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huichao; Li, Wenlong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a detection model of a chaotic oscillator is applied in the weak signal detection of an electrothermal excitation MEMS resonator, and the maximum Lyapunov exponent is used to obtain the threshold value and monitor the motion transition of a detection system. The phase drift caused by the electrothermal excitation is studied theoretically and experimentally, and according to the results of above study, the phase of a reference current signal is set to eliminate the phase when the resonator is in a resonant state. Then a new detection algorithm is proposed to detect the resonant signal. The simulation experiment on a weak signal under different magnifications and different levels of noises is conducted, after the impact of the quality factor Q of a resonator on detection results is analyzed. Finally, experiments on the output signal of a detected sensor sample are carried out by a proposed algorithm. Simulation and experiment results show that the detection model can effectively detect the weak signal and accurately obtain the resonant frequency, and it is immune to the noises.

  2. Prediction and identification of multiple-photon resonant ionization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; McKown, H.S.; Young, J.P.; Shaw, R.W.; Donohue, D.L.

    1988-08-01

    Many single-color, multiple-photon transitions leading to ionization are observed for lanthanide and actinide elements in experiments using resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS). It is desirable both to identify the energy levels involved in observed transitions and to be able to predict in advance their location. A computer code, ETRANS, has been written to perform these functions. Examples of both types of operation are given.

  3. Measurement-Induced State Transitions in a Superconducting Qubit: Beyond the Rotating Wave Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sank, Daniel; Chen, Zijun; Khezri, Mostafa; Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Vainsencher, A.; White, T.; Wenner, J.; Korotkov, Alexander N.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-11-01

    Many superconducting qubit systems use the dispersive interaction between the qubit and a coupled harmonic resonator to perform quantum state measurement. Previous works have found that such measurements can induce state transitions in the qubit if the number of photons in the resonator is too high. We investigate these transitions and find that they can push the qubit out of the two-level subspace, and that they show resonant behavior as a function of photon number. We develop a theory for these observations based on level crossings within the Jaynes-Cummings ladder, with transitions mediated by terms in the Hamiltonian that are typically ignored by the rotating wave approximation. We find that the most important of these terms comes from an unexpected broken symmetry in the qubit potential. We confirm the theory by measuring the photon occupation of the resonator when transitions occur while varying the detuning between the qubit and resonator.

  4. LABCOM resonator Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Keres, L.J.

    1990-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop quartz crystal resonator designs, production processes, and test capabilities for 5-MHz, 6.2-MHz, and 10-MHz resonators for Tactical Miniature Crystal Oscillator (TMXO) applications. GE Neutron Devices (GEND) established and demonstrated the capability to produce and test quartz crystal resonators for use in the TMXO developed by the US Army ERADCOM (now LABCOM). The goals in this project were based on the ERADCOM statement of work. The scope of work indicated that the resonator production facilities for this project would not be completely independent, but that they would be supported in part by equipment and processes in place at GEND used in US Department of Energy (DOE) work. In addition, provisions for production test equipment or or eventual technology transfer costs to a commercial supplier were clearly excluded from the scope of work. The demonstrated technical capability of the deep-etched blank design is feasible and practical. It can be manufactured in quantity with reasonable yield, and its performance is readily predictable. The ceramic flatpack is a very strong package with excellent hermeticity. The four-point mount supports the crystal to reasonable shock levels and does not perturb the resonator's natural frequency-temperature behavior. The package can be sealed with excellent yields. The high-temperature, high-vacuum processing developed for the TMXO resonator, including bonding the piezoid to its mount with conductive polyimide adhesive, is consistent with precision resonator fabrication. 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  5. Modelling resonant planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanenko, V.

    2012-09-01

    Many discovered multi-planet systems are in meanmotion resonances. The aim of this work is to study dynamical processes leading to the formation of resonant configurations on the basis of a unified model described earlier [1]. The model includes gravitational interactions of planets and migration of planets due to the presence of a gas disc. For the observed systems 24 Sex, HD 37124, HD 73526, HD 82943, HD 128311, HD 160691, Kepler 9, NN Ser with planets moving in the 2:1 resonance, it is shown that the capture in this resonance occurs at very wide ranges of parameters of both type I and type II migration. Conditions of migration leading to the formation of the resonant systems HD 45364 и HD 200964 (3:2 and 4:3, respectively) are obtained. Formation scenarios are studied for the systems HD 102272, HD 108874, HD 181433, HD 202206 with planets in high order resonances. We discuss also how gravitational interactions of planets and planetesimal discs lead to the breakup of resonant configurations and the formation of systems similar to the 47 UMa system.

  6. A review of dynamical resonances in A  +  BC chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zefeng; Sun, Zhigang; Zhang, Donghui; Yang, Xueming

    2017-02-01

    The concept of the transition state has played an important role in the field of chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics. Reactive resonances in the transition-state region can dramatically enhance the reaction probability; thus investigation of the reactive resonances has attracted great attention from chemical physicists for many decades. In this review, we mainly focus on the recent progress made in probing the elusive resonance phenomenon in the simple A  +  BC reaction and understanding its nature, especially in the benchmark F/Cl  +  H2 and their isotopic variants. The signatures of reactive resonances in the integral cross section, differential cross section (DCS), forward- and backward-scattered DCS, and anion photodetachment spectroscopy are comprehensively presented in individual prototype reactions. The dynamical origins of reactive resonances are also discussed in this review, based on information on the wave function in the transition-state region obtained by time-dependent quantum wave-packet calculations.

  7. Sub-natural width resonances in Cs vapor confined in micrometric thickness optical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartaleva, S.; Krasteva, A.; Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D.; Slavov, D.; Vartanyan, T.

    2013-03-01

    We present here the behavior of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT), Velocity Selective Optical Pumping (VSOP) resonances and Velocity Selective Excitation (VSE) resonances observed in Cs vapor confined in а micrometric optical cell (MC) with thickness L = 6λ, λ = 852nm. For comparison of behavior of VSE resonance another conventional optical cell with thickness L=2.5 cm is used. Cells are irradiated in orthogonal to their windows directions by probe beam scanned on the Fg = 4 → Fe= 3, 4, 5 set of transitions and pump beam fixed at the Fg = 3 → Fe = 4 transition, on the D2 line of Cs. The enhanced absorption (fluorescence) narrow VSOP resonance at the closed transition transforms into reduced absorption (fluorescence) one with small increase of atomic concentration or light intensity. A striking difference appears between the VSE resonance broadening in L = 6λ and conventional L = 2.5cm cells.

  8. A review of dynamical resonances in A  +  BC chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zefeng; Sun, Zhigang; Zhang, Donghui; Yang, Xueming

    2017-02-01

    The concept of the transition state has played an important role in the field of chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics. Reactive resonances in the transition-state region can dramatically enhance the reaction probability; thus investigation of the reactive resonances has attracted great attention from chemical physicists for many decades. In this review, we mainly focus on the recent progress made in probing the elusive resonance phenomenon in the simple A  +  BC reaction and understanding its nature, especially in the benchmark F/Cl  +  H2 and their isotopic variants. The signatures of reactive resonances in the integral cross section, differential cross section (DCS), forward- and backward-scattered DCS, and anion photodetachment spectroscopy are comprehensively presented in individual prototype reactions. The dynamical origins of reactive resonances are also discussed in this review, based on information on the wave function in the transition-state region obtained by time-dependent quantum wave-packet calculations.

  9. High efficiency hydrocarbon-free resonance transition potassium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, Jason; Hager, Gordon; Krupke, William F.

    2009-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a high efficiency potassium laser using a 0.15 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser as the pump source. The laser uses naturally occurring helium as the buffer gas. We achieve a 64% slope efficiency and a 57% optical to optical conversion. A pulsed laser model shows good agreement with the data.

  10. Noise-induced transitions and resonant effects in nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikin, Alexei

    2003-02-01

    Our every-day experience is connected with different acoustical noise or music. Usually noise plays the role of nuisance in any communication and destroys any order in a system. Similar optical effects are known: strong snowing or raining decreases quality of a vision. In contrast to these situations noisy stimuli can also play a positive constructive role, e.g. a driver can be more concentrated in a presence of quiet music. Transmission processes in neural systems are of especial interest from this point of view: excitation or information will be transmitted only in the case if a signal overcomes a threshold. Dr. Alexei Zaikin from the Potsdam University studies noise-induced phenomena in nonlinear systems from a theoretical point of view. Especially he is interested in the processes, in which noise influences the behaviour of a system twice: if the intensity of noise is over a threshold, it induces some regular structure that will be synchronized with the behaviour of neighbour elements. To obtain such a system with a threshold one needs one more noise source. Dr. Zaikin has analyzed further examples of such doubly stochastic effects and developed a concept of these new phenomena. These theoretical findings are important, because such processes can play a crucial role in neurophysics, technical communication devices and living sciences. Unsere alltägliche Erfahrung ist mit verschiedenen akustischen Einfluessen wie Lärm, aber auch Musik verbunden. Jeder weiss, wie Lärm stören kann und Kommunikation behindert oder gar unterbindet. Ähnliche optische Effekte sind bekannt: starkes Schneetreiben oder Regengüsse verschlechtern die Sicht und lassen uns Umrisse nur noch schemenhaft erkennen. Jedoch koennen ähnliche Stimuli auch sehr positive Auswirkungen haben: Autofahrer fahren bei leiser Musik konzentrierter -- die Behauptung von Schulkindern, nur bei dröhnenden Bässen die Mathehausaufgaben richtig rechnen zu können, ist allerdings nicht wissenschaftlich erwiesen. Außerordentlich interessant aus dieser Sicht sind auch Reizleitungsprozesse: Reize werden nur weitergleitet, wenn die strukturlosen Signale der Neuronen mit ausreichend starker Intensität erfolgen, also ein Schwellwert überschritten ist. Der Physiker Dr. Alexei Zaikin von der Universität Potsdam beschäftigt sich mit sogenannten rauschinduzierten Phänomenen aus theorischer Sicht. Sein Forschungsgebiet sind Prozesse, bei denen Rauschen mehrfach das Systemverhalten beeinflusst: ist es ausreichend gross, d.h. größer als ein kritischer Wert, wird eine reguläre Struktur gebildet, die durch das immernoch vorhandene Rauschen mit der Struktur des Nachbarsystems synchronisiert. Um ein solches System mit kritischem Wert zu erhalten, bedarf es einer weiteren Rauschquelle. Herr Zaikin analysierte noch weitere Beispiele solcher doppelt stochastischen Effekte. Die Ausarbeitung derartiger theoretischer Grundlagen ist wichtig, da diese Prozesse in der Neurophysik, in technischen Kommunikationssystemen und in den Lebenswissenschaften eine Rolle spielen.

  11. The nonmonotonous shift of quantum plasmon resonance and plasmon-enhanced photocatalytic activity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ding, Si-Jing; Yang, Da-Jie; Li, Jin-Ling; Pan, Gui-Ming; Ma, Liang; Lin, Yong-Jie; Wang, Jia-Hong; Zhou, Li; Feng, Min; Xu, Hongxing; Gao, Shiwu; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2017-03-02

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of metal nanoparticles exhibits quantum behaviors as the size decreases owing to the transitions of quantized conduction electrons, but most studies are limited to the monotonous SPR blue-shift caused by off-resonant transitions. Here, we demonstrate the nonmonotonous SPR red-shift caused by resonant electron transitions and photocatalytic activity enhanced by the quantum plasmon resonance of colloidal gold nanoparticles. A maximal SPR wavelength and the largest photocatalytic activity are observed in the quantum regime for the first time for the gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 3.6 nm. Theoretical analysis based on a quantum-corrected model reveals the evolution of SPR with quantized electron transitions and well explains the nonmonotonous size-dependencies of the SPR wavelength and absorption efficiency. These findings have profound implications for the understanding of the quantum nature of the SPR of metal nanoparticles and their applications in areas ranging from photophysics to photochemistry.

  12. Resonances in UH

    SciTech Connect

    Badalyan, A.M.; Belova, T.I.; Konyukhova, N.B.; Efros, V.D.

    1985-06-01

    Resonances in UH are calculated using a microscopic approach with only central NN potentials. It is shown that there are broad resonances in the channels with S=1 and 0. P-wave resonances in UH are found at E/sub R/A 4.7-i2.7 MeV (S=1) and E/sub R/approx. = 6.4-i3.7 MeV (S=0) where the energy E is measured from the two-particle t + n threshold.

  13. Thin film resonator technology.

    PubMed

    Lakin, Kenneth M

    2005-05-01

    Advances in wireless systems have placed increased demands on high performance frequency control devices for operation into the microwave range. With spectrum crowding, high bandwidth requirements, miniaturization, and low cost requirements as a background, the thin film resonator technology has evolved into the mainstream of applications. This technology has been under development for over 40 years in one form or another, but it required significant advances in integrated circuit processing to reach microwave frequencies and practical manufacturing for high-volume applications. This paper will survey the development of the thin film resonator technology and describe the core elements that give rise to resonators and filters for today's high performance wireless applications.

  14. Resonant optical antennas.

    PubMed

    Mühlschlegel, P; Eisler, H-J; Martin, O J F; Hecht, B; Pohl, D W

    2005-06-10

    We have fabricated nanometer-scale gold dipole antennas designed to be resonant at optical frequencies. On resonance, strong field enhancement in the antenna feed gap leads to white-light supercontinuum generation. The antenna length at resonance is considerably shorter than one-half the wavelength of the incident light. This is in contradiction to classical antenna theory but in qualitative accordance with computer simulations that take into account the finite metallic conductivity at optical frequencies. Because optical antennas link propagating radiation and confined/enhanced optical fields, they should find applications in optical characterization, manipulation of nanostructures, and optical information processing.

  15. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  16. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex K [Kensington, CA; Jensen, Kenneth J [Berkeley, CA; Girit, Caglar [Albany, CA; Mickelson, William E [San Francisco, CA; Grossman, Jeffrey C [Berkeley, CA

    2011-03-29

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  17. Resonant halide perovskite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiguntseva, Ekaterina Y.; Ishteev, Arthur R.; Komissarenko, Filipp E.; Zuev, Dmitry A.; Ushakova, Elena V.; Milichko, Valentin A.; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Makarov, Sergey V.; Zakhidov, Anvar A.

    2017-09-01

    The hybrid halide perovskites is a prospective material for fabrication of cost-effective optical devices. Unique perovskites properties are used for solar cells and different photonic applications. Recently, perovskite-based nanophotonics has emerged. Here, we consider perovskite like a high-refractive index dielectric material, which can be considered to be a basis for nanoparticles fabrication with Mie resonances. As a result, we fabricate and study resonant perovskite nanoparticles with different sizes. We reveal, that spherical nanoparticles show enhanced photoluminescence signal. The achieved results lay a cornerstone in the field of novel types of organic-inorganic nanophotonics devices with optical properties improved by Mie resonances.

  18. Spin Resonance Strength Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courant, E. D.

    2009-08-01

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  19. Developments in Planet Detection using Transit Timing Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Agol, Eric; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

    2006-12-01

    In a transiting planetary system, the presence of a second planet will cause the time interval between transits to vary. These transit timing variations (TTV) are particularly large near mean-motion resonances and can be used to infer the orbital elements of planets with masses that are too small to detect by any other means. The author presents the results of a study of simulated data where they show the potential that this planet detection technique has to detect and characterize secondary planets in transiting systems. These results have important ramifications for planetary transit searches since each transiting system presents an opportunity for additional discoveries through a TTV analysis. They present such an analysis for 13 transits of the HD 209458 system that were observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. This analysis indicates that a putative companion in a low-order, mean-motion resonance can be no larger than the mass of the Earth and constitutes, to date, the most sensitive probe for extrasolar planets that orbit main sequence stars. The presence or absence of small planets in low-order, mean-motion resonances has implications for theories of the formation and evolution of planetary systems. Since TTV is most sensitive in these regimes, it should prove a valuable tool not only for the detection of additional planets in transiting systems, but also as a way to determine the dominant mechanisms of planet formation and the evolution of planetary systems.

  20. Transitions: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Ann Stace

    1995-01-01

    Distinguishes between unchosen transitions (children maturing and leaving, parents aging, companies downsizing) and chosen ones (moving, divorce, marriage, career changes). Describes the steps one goes through: uneasiness, renewed energy, complaining, exploration, partial transition, and the completed transition. (JOW)

  1. Topological Lifshitz transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volovik, G. E.

    2017-01-01

    Different types of Lifshitz transitions are governed by topology in momentum space. They involve the topological transitions with the change of topology of Fermi surfaces, Weyl and Dirac points, nodal lines, and also the transitions between the fully gapped states.

  2. Transition to Adulthood

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers Workspaces Workspaces Who Knows What? Survey Item Bank Search for: Transition to Adulthood Link-checked, June ... reading… Back to top IDEA’s Definition of Transition Services Any discussion of transition services must begin with ...

  3. New theoretical treatment of ion resonance phenomena.

    PubMed

    Vincze, G; Szasz, A; Liboff, A R

    2008-07-01

    Despite experimental evidence supporting ICR-like interactions in biological systems, to date there is no reasonable theoretical explanation for this phenomenon. The parametric resonance approach introduced by Lednev has enjoyed limited success in predicting the response as a function of the ratio of AC magnetic intensity to that of the DC field, explaining the results in terms of magnetically induced changes in the transition probability of calcium binding states. In the present work, we derive an expression for the velocity of a damped ion with arbitrary q/m under the influence of the Lorentz force. Series solutions to the differential equations reveal transient responses as well as resonance-like terms. One fascinating result is that the expressions for ionic drift velocity include a somewhat similar Bessel function dependence as was previously obtained for the transition probability in parametric resonance. However, in the present work, not only is there an explicit effect due to damping, but the previous Bessel dependence now occurs as a subset of a more general solution, including not only the magnetic field AC/DC ratio as an independent variable, but also the ratio of the cyclotronic frequency Omega to the applied AC frequency omega. In effect, this removes the necessity to explain the ICR interaction as stemming from ion-protein binding sites. We hypothesize that the selectively enhanced drift velocity predicted in this model can explain ICR-like phenomena as resulting from increased interaction probabilities in the vicinity of ion channel gates.

  4. Steady-state multipole moments of atoms in a resonant field with elliptical polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taichenachev, A. V.; Basalaev, M. Yu; Lazebny, D. B.; Yudin, V. I.

    2014-07-01

    Steady-state multipole moments of atoms ρK q of the rank K ⩽ 2 are analytically calculated for all closed dipole transitions Jg → Je in a resonant radiation field with arbitrary intensity and arbitrary elliptical polarization. The nonlinear propagation of a monochromatic elliptically polarized wave through a medium consisting of atoms with resonant transition Jg → Je is considered as an application.

  5. Two-color resonant four-wave mixing: a tool for double resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohlfing, Eric A.; Tobiason, Joseph D.; Dunlop, J. R.; Williams, Skip

    1995-09-01

    Two-color resonant four-wave mixing (RFWM) shows great promise in a variety of double- resonance applications in molecular spectroscopy and chemical dynamics. One such application is stimulated emission pumping (SEP), which is a powerful method of characterizing ground-state potential energy surfaces in regions of chemical interest. We use time-independent, diagrammatic perturbation theory to identify the resonant terms in the third- order nonlinear susceptibility for each possible scheme by which two-color RFWM can be used for double-resonance spectroscopy. After a spherical tensor analysis we arrive at a signal expression for two-color RFWM that separates the molecular properties from purely laboratory-frame factors. In addition, the spectral response for tuning the DUMP laser in RFWM-SEP is found to be a simple Lorentzian in free-jet experiments. We demonstrate the utility of RFWM-SEP and test our theoretical predictions in experiments on jet-cooled transient molecules. In experiments on C3 we compare the two possible RFWM-SEP processes and show that one is particularly well-suited to the common situation in which the PUMP transition is strong but the DUMP transitions are weak. We obtain RFWM-SEP spectra of the formyl radical, HCO, that probe quasibound vibrational resonances lying above the low threshold for dissociation to H+CO. Varying the polarization of the input beams or PUMP rotational branch produces dramatic effects in the relative intensities of rotational lines in the RFWM-SEP spectra of HCO; these effects are well described by our theoretical analysis. Finally, RFWM-SEP spectra of HCO resonances that are homogeneously broadened by dissociation confirm the predicted lineshape and give widths that are in good agreement with those determined via unsaturated fluorescence depletion SEP.

  6. Resonances in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Matthias F. M.; Lange, Jens Sören; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B.; Metag, Volker; Nakano, Takashi; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015 (Fig.~1). A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions; what is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD?; where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers?; and what experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus.This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  7. Micro-machined resonator

    DOEpatents

    Godshall, N.A.; Koehler, D.R.; Liang, A.Y.; Smith, B.K.

    1993-03-30

    A micro-machined resonator, typically quartz, with upper and lower micro-machinable support members, or covers, having etched wells which may be lined with conductive electrode material, between the support members is a quartz resonator having an energy trapping quartz mesa capacitively coupled to the electrode through a diaphragm; the quartz resonator is supported by either micro-machined cantilever springs or by thin layers extending over the surfaces of the support. If the diaphragm is rigid, clock applications are available, and if the diaphragm is resilient, then transducer applications can be achieved. Either the thin support layers or the conductive electrode material can be integral with the diaphragm. In any event, the covers are bonded to form a hermetic seal and the interior volume may be filled with a gas or may be evacuated. In addition, one or both of the covers may include oscillator and interface circuitry for the resonator.

  8. Micro-machined resonator

    DOEpatents

    Godshall, Ned A.; Koehler, Dale R.; Liang, Alan Y.; Smith, Bradley K.

    1993-01-01

    A micro-machined resonator, typically quartz, with upper and lower micro-machinable support members, or covers, having etched wells which may be lined with conductive electrode material, between the support members is a quartz resonator having an energy trapping quartz mesa capacitively coupled to the electrode through a diaphragm; the quartz resonator is supported by either micro-machined cantilever springs or by thin layers extending over the surfaces of the support. If the diaphragm is rigid, clock applications are available, and if the diaphragm is resilient, then transducer applications can be achieved. Either the thin support layers or the conductive electrode material can be integral with the diaphragm. In any event, the covers are bonded to form a hermetic seal and the interior volume may be filled with a gas or may be evacuated. In addition, one or both of the covers may include oscillator and interface circuitry for the resonator.

  9. Optical Resonators and Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, Hermann A.; Popović, Miloš A.; Watts, Michael R.; Manolatou, Christina; Little, Brent E.; Chu, Sai T.

    Dielectric optical resonators of small size are considered for densely-integrated optical components. High-index-contrast microresonators of low Q are shown, using microwave design principles, to permit wavelength-sized, low-loss, reflectionless waveguide bends and low-crosstalk waveguide crossings. The analysis and synthesis of high Q high-order microring- and racetrack-resonator channel add/drop filters are reviewed, supplemented by simulation examples. Standing-wave, distributed Bragg resonator filters are also described. The study is unified by a coupled-mode theory approach. Rigorous numerical simulations are justified for the design of high-index-contrast optical "circuits". Integrated-optical components are described within a polarization-diversity scheme that circumvents the inherent polarization dependence of high-index-contrast devices. Filters fabricated in academic and commercial research, and a review of microring resonator technology, advances and applications are presented.

  10. Electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Goennenwein, S. T. B.; Schink, S. W.; Brandlmaier, A.; Boger, A.; Opel, M.; Gross, R.; Keizer, R. S.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Gupta, A.; Huebl, H.; Bihler, C.; Brandt, M. S.

    2007-04-16

    We study the magnetoresistance properties of thin ferromagnetic CrO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films under microwave irradiation. Both the sheet resistance {rho} and the Hall voltage V{sub Hall} characteristically change when a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) occurs in the film. The electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance (EDFMR) signals closely match the conventional FMR, measured simultaneously, in both resonance fields and line shapes. The sign and the magnitude of the resonant changes {delta}{rho}/{rho} and {delta}V{sub Hall}/V{sub Hall} can be consistently described in terms of a Joule heating effect. Bolometric EDFMR thus is a powerful tool for the investigation of magnetic anisotropy and magnetoresistive phenomena in ferromagnetic micro- or nanostructures.

  11. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert

    1991-01-01

    A resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method provides a unique characterization of an object for use in distinguishing similar objects having physical differences greater than a predetermined tolerance. A resonant response spectrum is obtained for a reference object by placing excitation and detection transducers at any accessible location on the object. The spectrum is analyzed to determine the number of resonant response peaks in a predetermined frequency interval. The distribution of the resonance frequencies is then characterized in a manner effective to form a unique signature of the object. In one characterization, a small frequency interval is defined and stepped though the spectrum frequency range. Subsequent objects are similarly characterized where the characterizations serve as signatures effective to distinguish objects that differ from the reference object by more than the predetermined tolerance.

  12. Triple-resonant transducers.

    PubMed

    Butler, Stephen C

    2012-06-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of two novel multiple-resonant transducers which produce a wider transmit response than that of a conventional Tonpilz-type transducer. These multi-resonant transducers are Tonpilz-type longitudinal vibrators that produce three coupled resonances and are referred to as triple-resonant transducers (TRTs). One of these designs is a mechanical series arrangement of a tail mass, piezoelectric ceramic stack, central mass, compliant spring, second central mass, second compliant spring, and a piston-radiating head mass. The other TRT design is a mechanical series arrangement of a tail mass, piezoelectric ceramic stack, central mass, compliant spring, and head mass with a quarter-wave matching layer of poly(methyl methacrylate) on the head mass. Several prototype transducer element designs were fabricated that demonstrated proof-of-concept.

  13. Perspective on resonances of metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Min, Li; Huang, Lirong

    2015-07-27

    Electromagnetic resonance as the most important characteristic of metamaterials enables lots of exotic phenomena, such as invisible, negative refraction, man-made magnetism, etc. Conventional LC-resonance circuit model as the most authoritative and classic model is good at explaining and predicting the fundamental resonance wavelength of a metamaterial, while feels hard for high-order resonances, especially for resonance intensity (strength of resonance, determining on the performance and efficiency of metamaterial-based devices). In present work, via an easy-to-understand mass-spring model, we present a different and comprehensive insight for the resonance mechanism of metamaterials, through which both the resonance wavelengths (including the fundamental and high-order resonance wavelengths) and resonance intensities of metamaterials can be better understood. This developed theory has been well verified by different-material and different-structure resonators. This perspective will provide a broader space for exploring novel optical devices based on metamaterials (or metasurfaces).

  14. Resonant dielectric metamaterials

    DOEpatents

    Loui, Hung; Carroll, James; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-12-02

    A resonant dielectric metamaterial comprises a first and a second set of dielectric scattering particles (e.g., spheres) having different permittivities arranged in a cubic array. The array can be an ordered or randomized array of particles. The resonant dielectric metamaterials are low-loss 3D isotropic materials with negative permittivity and permeability. Such isotropic double negative materials offer polarization and direction independent electromagnetic wave propagation.

  15. Cylindrical laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Casperson, Lee W.

    1976-02-24

    The properties of an improved class of lasers is presented. In one configuration of these lasers the radiation propagates radially within the amplifying medium, resulting in high fields and symmetric illumination at the resonator axis. Thus there is a strong focusing of energy at the axis of the resonator. In a second configuration the radiation propagates back and forth in a tubular region of space.

  16. Injector with integrated resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; York, William David; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2014-07-29

    The system may include a turbine engine. The turbine engine may include a fuel nozzle. The fuel nozzle may include an air path. The fuel nozzle may also include a fuel path such that the fuel nozzle is in communication with a combustion zone of the turbine engine. Furthermore, the fuel nozzle may include a resonator. The resonator may be disposed in the fuel nozzle directly adjacent to the combustion zone.

  17. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively .+-.60.degree. away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-02-07

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor.

  19. Resonant megavolt pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Zheltov, K.A.; Malygin, A.V.; Petrenko, A.N.; Shalimanov, V.F.

    1987-09-01

    A compact pulse generator with a capacitive load is described that employs resonant voltage multiplication at the load. A 60-pF capacitor is charged to 1.1 MV in a pulse with a rise time of 0.25 ..mu..sec. The dimensions of the resonant generator are considerably smaller than those of known Tesla-coil voltage sources (by a factor of approx. 30 in volume).

  20. Influence of film thickness in THz active metamaterial devices: A comparison between superconductor and metal split-ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ranjan; Roy Chowdhury, Dibakar; Xiong, Jie; Yang, Hao; Azad, Abul K.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Jia, Q. X.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2013-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate thickness-dependent resonance tuning in planar terahertz superconducting metamaterials. Inductive-capacitive resonance of arrays of split-ring resonators fabricated from 50, 100, and 200 nm thick YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) and gold films were characterized and compared as a function of temperature. In the YBCO metamaterials the resonance frequency strongly depends on the thickness, and they show high thermal tunability in both resonance strength and frequency below the superconducting transition temperature, where the imaginary conductivity varies by three orders of magnitude. In contrast, the resonance in the gold metamaterials exhibits little thickness-dependence and very small tunability.

  1. Entangled states and superradiant phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Aparicio Alcalde, M.; Cardenas, A. H.; Svaiter, N. F.; Bezerra, V. B.

    2010-03-15

    The full Dicke model is composed of a single bosonic mode and an ensemble of N identical two-level atoms. In the model, the coupling between the bosonic mode and the atoms generates resonant and nonresonant processes. We also consider a dipole-dipole interaction between the atoms, which is able to generate entangled states in the atomic system. By assuming thermal equilibrium with a reservoir at temperature {beta}{sup -1}, the transition from fluorescent to superradiant phase and the quantum phase transition are investigated. It is shown that the critical behavior of the full Dicke model is not modified by the introduction of the dipole-dipole interaction.

  2. Resonant nonlinear ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Paul A.; TenCate, James A.; Guyer, Robert A.; Van Den Abeele, Koen E. A.

    2001-01-01

    Components with defects are identified from the response to strains applied at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies. The relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0.vertline., is determined as a function of applied strain amplitude for an acceptable component, where .function..sub.0 is the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak of a selected mode to determine a reference relationship. Then, the relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0 is determined as a function of applied strain for a component under test, where fo .function..sub.0 the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak to determine a quality test relationship. The reference relationship is compared with the quality test relationship to determine the presence of defects in the component under test.

  3. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.S.

    1980-11-01

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible.

  4. Plasmon resonances in linear noble-metal chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin; Ruud, Kenneth; Luo, Yi

    2012-11-01

    The electronic excitations of three noble-metall chains—copper, silver, and gold—have been investigated at the time-dependent density functional theory level. The reduced single-electron density matrix is propagated according to the Liouville-von Neumann equation in the real-time domain after an impulse excitation. The propagation in the real-time domain enables us to investigate the formation and size evolution of electronic excitations in these metallic chains with different number of atoms, up to a total of 26 atoms. The longitudinal oscillations at lower excitation energies are dominated by s → p transitions in these chains and have collective or central resonances, while the first peak involving d → p transitions in the longitudinal mode appears at a higher excitation energy and shows collective resonances. In the transverse oscillations, there are in most cases d → p transitions in each resonance, which can be attributed to either central or end resonances. Convergence of the oscillations, in particular those involving the collective and central resonances in the three noble-metal chains can only be observed for chains with 18 atoms or more. Different spectroscopic characteristics among these three metallic chains can be attributed to their different electronic structures, in particular the relativistic effects in the gold chains have a dramatic effect on their electronic structures and excitations.

  5. Fano resonances in prism-coupled multimode square micropillar resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Tong; Zhou, Linjie; Poon, Andrew W.

    2005-06-01

    We report Fano resonances in a multimode square glass micropillar resonator; the resonances were obtained by using angle-resolved prism coupling. Our experiments reveal characteristically asymmetric line shapes of high-Q resonances and of detuned low-Q resonances in multimode reflection spectra. The asymmetric resonance line shapes evolve for an approximately pi phase within a 0.5° range of reflection angles. We model our observed asymmetric multimode resonances by the far-field interference between a light wave that is evanescently coupled with a high-Q mode orbit and a coherent light wave that is refractively coupled with a detuned low-Q mode orbit.

  6. Resonance Raman scattering from Cd1-xZnxS nanoparticles dispersed in oxide glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Akhilesh K.; Rajalakshmi, M.

    2000-11-01

    Resonance Raman scattering from 1 and 2 LO phonons is investigated from Cd1-xZnxS nanoparticles dispersed in oxide glass before and after annealing. The resonance profiles are found to exhibit asymmetry which is attributed to the interference effects arising from a nonresonant contribution to the polarizability. The energies of the resonances are found to be consistent with the direct interband transition energies estimated from the reported optical data.

  7. A microwave resonator integrated on a polymer microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, S. Z.; Rostas, A. M.; Heidinger, L.; Spengler, N.; Meissner, M. V.; MacKinnon, N.; Schleicher, E.; Weber, S.; Korvink, J. G.

    2016-09-01

    We describe a novel stacked split-ring type microwave (MW) resonator that is integrated into a 10 mm by 10 mm sized microfluidic chip. A straightforward and scalable batch fabrication process renders the chip suitable for single-use applications. The resonator volume can be conveniently loaded with liquid sample via microfluidic channels patterned into the mid layer of the chip. The proposed MW resonator offers an alternative solution for compact in-field measurements, such as low-field magnetic resonance (MR) experiments requiring convenient sample exchange. A microstrip line was used to inductively couple MWs into the resonator. We characterised the proposed resonator topology by electromagnetic (EM) field simulations, a field perturbation method, as well as by return loss measurements. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra at X-band frequencies were recorded, revealing an electron-spin sensitivity of 3.7 ·1011spins ·Hz - 1 / 2G-1 for a single EPR transition. Preliminary time-resolved EPR experiments on light-induced triplet states in pentacene were performed to estimate the MW conversion efficiency of the resonator.

  8. A microwave resonator integrated on a polymer microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Kiss, S Z; Rostas, A M; Heidinger, L; Spengler, N; Meissner, M V; MacKinnon, N; Schleicher, E; Weber, S; Korvink, J G

    2016-09-01

    We describe a novel stacked split-ring type microwave (MW) resonator that is integrated into a 10mm by 10mm sized microfluidic chip. A straightforward and scalable batch fabrication process renders the chip suitable for single-use applications. The resonator volume can be conveniently loaded with liquid sample via microfluidic channels patterned into the mid layer of the chip. The proposed MW resonator offers an alternative solution for compact in-field measurements, such as low-field magnetic resonance (MR) experiments requiring convenient sample exchange. A microstrip line was used to inductively couple MWs into the resonator. We characterised the proposed resonator topology by electromagnetic (EM) field simulations, a field perturbation method, as well as by return loss measurements. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra at X-band frequencies were recorded, revealing an electron-spin sensitivity of 3.7·10(11)spins·Hz(-1/2)G(-1) for a single EPR transition. Preliminary time-resolved EPR experiments on light-induced triplet states in pentacene were performed to estimate the MW conversion efficiency of the resonator.

  9. Shifts and widths of Feshbach resonances in atomic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidian, Shahpoor; Melezhik, Vladimir S.; Schmelcher, Peter

    2012-12-01

    We develop and analyze a theoretical model which yields the shifts and widths of Feshbach resonances in an atomic waveguide. It is based on a multichannel approach for confinement-induced resonances (CIRs) and atomic transitions in the waveguides in the multimode regime. In this scheme we replace the single-channel scalar interatomic interaction by the four-channel tensorial potential modeling resonances of broad, narrow, and overlapping character according to the two-channel parametrization of Lange [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.79.013622 79, 013622 (2009)]. As an input the experimentally known parameters of Feshbach resonances in the absence of the waveguide are used. We calculate the shifts and widths of s-, d-, and g-wave magnetic Feshbach resonances of Cs atoms emerging in harmonic waveguides as CIRs and resonant enhancement of the transmission at zeros of the free space scattering length. We have found the linear dependence of the width of the resonance on the longitudinal atomic momentum and quadratic dependence on the waveguide width. Our model opens possibilities for quantitative studies of the scattering processes in ultracold atomic gases in waveguides beyond the framework of s-wave resonant scattering.

  10. FERMILAB SWITCHYARD RESONANT BEAM POSITION MONITOR ELECTRONICS UPGRADE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, T.; Diamond, J.; Liu, N.; Prieto, P. S.; Slimmer, D.; Watts, A.

    2016-10-12

    The readout electronics for the resonant beam position monitors (BPMs) in the Fermilab Switchyard (SY) have been upgraded, utilizing a low noise amplifier transition board and Fermilab designed digitizer boards. The stripline BPMs are estimated to have an average signal output of between -110 dBm and -80 dBm, with an estimated peak output of -70 dBm. The external resonant circuit is tuned to the SY machine frequency of 53.10348 MHz. Both the digitizer and transition boards have variable gain in order to accommodate the large dynamic range and irregularity of the resonant extraction spill. These BPMs will aid in auto-tuning of the SY beamline as well as enabling operators to monitor beam position through the spill.

  11. Full counting statistics of quantum dot resonance fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Matthiesen, Clemens; Stanley, Megan J.; Hugues, Maxime; Clarke, Edmund; Atatüre, Mete

    2014-01-01

    The electronic energy levels and optical transitions of a semiconductor quantum dot are subject to dynamics within the solid-state environment. In particular, fluctuating electric fields due to nearby charge traps or other quantum dots shift the transition frequencies via the Stark effect. The environment dynamics are mapped directly onto the fluorescence under resonant excitation and diminish the prospects of quantum dots as sources of indistinguishable photons in optical quantum computing. Here, we present an analysis of resonance fluorescence fluctuations based on photon counting statistics which captures the underlying time-averaged electric field fluctuations of the local environment. The measurement protocol avoids dynamic feedback on the electric environment and the dynamics of the quantum dot's nuclear spin bath by virtue of its resonant nature and by keeping experimental control parameters such as excitation frequency and external fields constant throughout. The method introduced here is experimentally undemanding. PMID:24810097

  12. Application of resonance Raman LIDAR for chemical species identification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.L.; Heglund, D.L.; Ray, M.D.; Harder, D.; Dobert, R.; Leung, K.P.; Wu, M.; Sedlacek, A.

    1997-07-01

    BNL has been developing a remote sensing technique for the detection of atmospheric pollutants based on the phenomenon of resonance Raman LIDAR that has also incorporated a number of new techniques/technologies designed to extend it`s performance envelope. When the excitation frequency approaches an allowed electronic transition of the molecule, an enormous enhancement of the inelastic scattering cross-section can occur, often up to 2 to 4 orders-of-magnitude, and is referred to as resonance Raman (RR), since the excitation frequency is in resonance with an allowed electronic transition. Exploitation of this enhancement along with new techniques such as pattern recognition algorithms to take advantage of the spectral fingerprint and a new laser frequency modulation technique designed to suppress broadband fluorescence, referred to as Frequency modulated Excitation Raman Spectroscopy (FreMERS) and recent developments in liquid edge filter technology, for suppression of the elastic channel, all help increase the overall performance of Raman LIDAR.

  13. Capture probabilities for secondary resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malhotra, Renu

    1990-01-01

    A perturbed pendulum model is used to analyze secondary resonances, and it is shown that a self-similarity between secondary and primary resonances exists. Henrard's (1982) theory is used to obtain formulas for the capture probability into secondary resonances. The tidal evolution of Miranda and Umbriel is considered as an example, and significant probabilities of capture into secondary resonances are found.

  14. Quantum paraelectricity probed by superconducting resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidovikj, D.; Manca, N.; van der Zant, H. S. J.; Caviglia, A. D.; Steele, G. A.

    2017-06-01

    Superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonators are powerful and versatile tools used in areas ranging from radiation detection to circuit quantum electrodynamics. Their potential for low intrinsic losses makes them attractive as sensitive probes of electronic properties of bulk materials and thin films. Here we use superconducting MoRe CPW resonators to investigate the high-frequency (up to 0.3 GHz) and low-temperature (down to 3.5 K) permittivity of SrTiO3 , a nonlinear dielectric on the verge of a ferroelectric transition (quantum paraelectricity). We perform a quantitative analysis of its dielectric properties as a function of external dc bias (up to ±15 V ), rf power, and mode number and discuss our results within the framework of the most recent theoretical models. We also discuss the origin of a fatigue effect that reduces the tunability of the dielectric constant of SrTiO3 , which we relate to the presence of oxygen vacancies.

  15. Surface plasmon resonances in liquid metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershov, A. E.; Gerasimov, V. S.; Gavrilyuk, A. P.; Karpov, S. V.

    2017-06-01

    We have shown significant suppression of resonant properties of metallic nanoparticles at the surface plasmon frequency during the phase transition "solid-liquid" in the basic materials of nanoplasmonics (Ag, Au). Using experimental values of the optical constants of liquid and solid metals, we have calculated nanoparticle plasmonic absorption spectra. The effect was demonstrated for single particles, dimers and trimers, as well as for the large multiparticle colloidal aggregates. Experimental verification was performed for single Au nanoparticles heated to the melting temperature and above up to full suppression of the surface plasmon resonance. It is emphasized that this effect may underlie the nonlinear optical response of composite materials containing plasmonic nanoparticles and their aggregates.

  16. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Short Jr., Billy Joe

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  17. Dissecting nucleon transition electromagnetic form factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segovia, Jorge; Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-10-01

    In Poincaré-covariant continuum treatments of the three valence-quark bound-state problem, the force behind dynamical chiral symmetry breaking also generates nonpointlike interacting diquark correlations in the nucleon and its resonances. We detail the impact of these correlations on the electromagnetically induced nucleon-Δ and nucleon-Roper transitions, providing a flavor separation of the latter and associated predictions that can be tested at modern facilities.

  18. Tunable Resonant Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagu, Jean I.

    1987-01-01

    The most attractive features of resonant scanners are high reliability and eternal life as well as extremely low wobble and jitter. Power consumption is also low, electronic drive is simple, and the device is capable of handling large beams. All of these features are delivered at a low cost in a small package. The resonant scanner's use in numerous high precision applications, however, has been limited because of the difficulty in controlling its phase and resonant frequency. This paper introduces the concept of tunable/controllable resonant scanners, discusses their features, and offers a number of tuning techniques. It describes two angular scanner designs and presents data on tunable range and life tests. It also reviews applications for these new tunable resonant scanners that preserve the desirable features of earlier models while removing the old problems with synchronization or time base flexibility. The three major types of raster scanning applications where the tunable resonant scanner may be of benefit are: 1. In systems with multiple time bases such as multiple scanner networks or with scanners keyed to a common clock (the line frequency or data source) or a machine with multiple resonant scanners. A typical application is image and text transmission, also a printer with a large data base where a buffer is uneconomical. 2. In systems sharing data processing or laser equipment for reasons of cost or capacity, typically multiple work station manufacturing processes or graphic processes. 3. In systems with extremely precise time bases where the frequency stability of conventional scanners cannot be relied upon.

  19. Resonance frequency in ferromagnetic superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Rong-ke; Huang, An-dong; Li, Da; Zhang, Zhi-dong

    2011-10-01

    The resonance frequency in two-layer and three-layer ferromagnetic superlattices is studied, using the Callen's Green function method, the Tyablikov decoupling approximation and the Anderson-Callen decoupling approximation. The effects of interlayer exchange coupling, anisotropy, external magnetic field and temperature on the resonance frequency are investigated. It is found that the resonance frequencies increase with increasing external magnetic field. In a parameter region of the asymmetric system, each sublayer corresponds to its own resonance frequency. The anisotropy of a sublayer affects only the resonance frequency corresponding to this sublayer. The stronger the anisotropy, the higher is the resonance frequency. The interlayer exchange coupling affects only the resonance frequencies belonging to the sublayers connected by it. The stronger the interlayer exchange coupling, the higher are the resonance frequencies. All the resonance frequencies decrease as the reduced temperature increases. The results direct the method to enhance and adjust the resonance frequency of magnetic multilayered materials with a wide band.

  20. Not-so-resonant, resonant absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunel, F.

    1987-07-01

    When an intense electromagnetic wave is incident obliquely on a sharply bounded overdense plasma, strong energy absorption can be accounted for by the electrons that are dragged into the vacuum and sent back into the plasma with velocities v~=vosc. This mechanism is more efficient than usual resonant absorption for vosc/ω>L, with L being the density gradient length. In the very high-intensity CO2-laser-target interaction, this mechanism may account for most of the energy absorption.

  1. Tips for Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellems, Ryan, Comp.; Morningstar, Mary E., Comp.

    2009-01-01

    The Tips for Transition contains 134 Transition Tips submitted from all over the country by practitioners. The purpose of the Tips was to identify grassroots transition practices being used by practitioners. Tips are categorized into the following domains: (1) Transition Planning; (2) Student Involvement; (3) Family Involvement; (4) Curriculum and…

  2. Hyperbolic resonances of metasurface cavities.

    PubMed

    Keene, D; Durach, M

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new class of optical resonator structures featuring one or two metasurface reflectors or metacavities and predict that such resonators support novel hyperbolic resonances. As an example of such resonances we introduce hyperbolic Tamm plasmons (HTPs) and hyperbolic Fabry-Perot resonances (HFPs). The hyperbolic optical modes feature low-loss incident power re-distribution over TM and TE polarization output channels, clover-leaf anisotropic dispersion, and other unique properties which are tunable and are useful for multiple applications.

  3. Resonant ultrasound spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Visscher, William M.; Fisk, Zachary

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasound resonant spectrometer determines the resonant frequency spectrum of a rectangular parallelepiped sample of a high dissipation material over an expected resonant response frequency range. A sample holder structure grips corners of the sample between piezoelectric drive and receive transducers. Each transducer is mounted on a membrane for only weakly coupling the transducer to the holder structure and operatively contacts a material effective to remove system resonant responses at the transducer from the expected response range. i.e., either a material such as diamond to move the response frequencies above the range or a damping powder to preclude response within the range. A square-law detector amplifier receives the response signal and retransmits the signal on an isolated shield of connecting cabling to remove cabling capacitive effects. The amplifier also provides a substantially frequency independently voltage divider with the receive transducer. The spectrometer is extremely sensitive to enable low amplitude resonance to be detected for use in calculating the elastic constants of the high dissipation sample.

  4. MACHINERY RESONANCE AND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.; Fowley, M.

    2010-01-23

    New developments in vibration analysis better explain machinery resonance, through an example of drill bit chattering during machining of rusted steel. The vibration of an operating drill motor was measured, the natural frequency of an attached spring was measured, and the two frequencies were compared to show that the system was resonant. For resonance to occur, one of the natural frequencies of a structural component must be excited by a cyclic force of the same frequency. In this case, the frequency of drill bit chattering due to motor rotation equaled the spring frequency (cycles per second), and the system was unstable. A soft rust coating on the steel to be drilled permitted chattering to start at the drill bit tip, and the bit oscillated on and off of the surface, which increased the wear rate of the drill bit. This resonant condition is typically referred to as a motor critical speed. The analysis presented here quantifies the vibration associated with this particular critical speed problem, using novel techniques to describe resonance.

  5. LASER BEAMS AND RESONATORS: On open electromagnetic resonators: relation between interferometers and resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manenkov, Aleksandr A.; Bykov, Vladimir P.; Kuleshov, N. V.

    2010-05-01

    The physical difference between the concepts 'Fabry—Perot interferometer' and 'open resonator' is discussed. It is shown that the use of the term 'Fabry—Perot resonator' for open laser resonators is incorrect both from the historical viewpoint and from the viewpoint of the physical meaning of the processes occurring in these resonators.

  6. Precession of a rapidly rotating cylinder flow: traverse through resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Marques, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    The flow in a rapidly rotating cylinder that is titled and also rotating around another axis can undergo sudden transitions to turbulence. Experimental observations of this have been associated with triadic resonances. The experimental and theoretical results are well-established in the literature, but there remains a lack of understanding of the physical mechanisms at play in the sudden transition from laminar to turbulent flow with very small variations in the governing parameters. Here, we present direct numerical simulations of a traverse in parameter space through an isolated resonance, and describe in detail the bifurcations involved in the sudden transition. U.S. National Science Foundation Grant CBET-1336410 and Spanish Ministry of Education and Science Grant (with FEDER funds) FIS2013-40880.

  7. Lévy stable noise-induced transitions: stochastic resonance, resonant activation and dynamic hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2009-05-01

    A standard approach to analysis of noise-induced effects in stochastic dynamics assumes a Gaussian character of the noise term describing interaction of the analyzed system with its complex surroundings. An additional assumption about the existence of timescale separation between the dynamics of the measured observable and the typical timescale of the noise allows external fluctuations to be modeled as temporally uncorrelated and therefore white. However, in many natural phenomena the assumptions concerning the above mentioned properties of 'Gaussianity' and 'whiteness' of the noise can be violated. In this context, in contrast to the spatiotemporal coupling characterizing general forms of non-Markovian or semi-Markovian Lévy walks, so called Lévy flights correspond to the class of Markov processes which can still be interpreted as white, but distributed according to a more general, infinitely divisible, stable and non-Gaussian law. Lévy noise-driven non-equilibrium systems are known to manifest interesting physical properties and have been addressed in various scenarios of physical transport exhibiting a superdiffusive behavior. Here we present a brief overview of our recent investigations aimed at understanding features of stochastic dynamics under the influence of Lévy white noise perturbations. We find that the archetypal phenomena of noise-induced ordering are robust and can be detected also in systems driven by memoryless, non-Gaussian, heavy-tailed fluctuations with infinite variance.

  8. A resonance based model of biological evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasco, Achille; Giuliani, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    We propose a coarse grained physical model of evolution. The proposed model 'at least in principle' is amenable of an experimental verification even if this looks as a conundrum: evolution is a unique historical process and the tape cannot be reversed and played again. Nevertheless, we can imagine a phenomenological scenario tailored upon state transitions in physical chemistry in which different agents of evolution play the role of the elements of a state transition like thermal noise or resonance effects. The abstract model we propose can be of help for sketching hypotheses and getting rid of some well-known features of natural history like the so-called Cambrian explosion. The possibility of an experimental proof of the model is discussed as well.

  9. Measurement of the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies by the solid effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.

    2008-07-01

    1H- 14N nuclear quadrupole double resonance using magnetic field cycling between high and low magnetic field and solid effect in the low magnetic field is analyzed in details. The transition probabilities per unit time for the solid-effect transitions are calculated. The double resonance spectra are calculated in the limiting cases of fast and slow nitrogen spin-lattice relaxation. The double resonance spectra are measured in histamine and quinolinic acid. The experimental spectra are analyzed and the 14N NQR frequencies are determined.

  10. Collider Signal I :. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Tim M. P.

    2010-08-01

    These TASI lectures were part of the summer school in 2008 and cover the collider signal associated with resonances in models of physics beyond the Standard Model. I begin with a review of the Z boson, one of the best-studied resonances in particle physics, and review how the Breit-Wigner form of the propagator emerges in perturbation theory and discuss the narrow width approximation. I review how the LEP and SLAC experiments could use the kinematics of Z events to learn about fermion couplings to the Z. I then make a brief survey of models of physics beyond the Standard Model which predict resonances, and discuss some of the LHC observables which we can use to discover and identify the nature of the BSM physics. I finish up with a discussion of the linear moose that one can use for an effective theory description of a massive color octet vector particle.

  11. Fundamental properties of resonances

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, S.; Hadžimehmedović, M.; Osmanović, H.; Percan, A.; Zauner, B.

    2017-01-01

    All resonances, from hydrogen nuclei excited by the high-energy gamma rays in deep space to newly discovered particles produced in Large Hadron Collider, should be described by the same fundamental physical quantities. However, two distinct sets of properties are used to describe resonances: the pole parameters (complex pole position and residue) and the Breit-Wigner parameters (mass, width, and branching fractions). There is an ongoing decades-old debate on which one of them should be abandoned. In this study of nucleon resonances appearing in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering we discover an intricate interplay of the parameters from both sets, and realize that neither set is completely independent or fundamental on its own. PMID:28345595

  12. Quartz resonator processing system

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a single chamber ultra-high vacuum processing system for the oduction of hermetically sealed quartz resonators wherein electrode metallization and sealing are carried out along with cleaning and bake-out without any air exposure between the processing steps. The system includes a common vacuum chamber in which is located a rotatable wheel-like member which is adapted to move a plurality of individual component sets of a flat pack resonator unit past discretely located processing stations in said chamber whereupon electrode deposition takes place followed by the placement of ceramic covers over a frame containing a resonator element and then to a sealing stage where a pair of hydraulic rams including heating elements effect a metallized bonding of the covers to the frame.

  13. Nanowire Plasmon Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon, Nathalie; Shields, Brendan; Yu, Chun; Englund, Dirk; Akimov, Alexey; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun

    2011-05-01

    Strong interactions between light and matter can be engineered by confining light to a small volume for an extended period of time. Nanoscale plasmonic structures can concentrate lighte well below the diffraction limit, but realization of small mode-volume plasmon cavities remains an outstanding challenge. We propose and demonstrate a new approach for realization of nanoscale plasmon resonators enabling strong light-matter interaction. In our approach, chemically synthesized silver nanowires are surrounded by patterned dielectric to create resonators with mode volumes that are two orders of magnitude below the diffraction limit and quality factors approaching 100. We show that they can be used to enhance spontaneous emission rates of CdSe quantum dots and single diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers by a factor larger than 20 at the cavity resonance.

  14. Fundamental properties of resonances.

    PubMed

    Ceci, S; Hadžimehmedović, M; Osmanović, H; Percan, A; Zauner, B

    2017-03-27

    All resonances, from hydrogen nuclei excited by the high-energy gamma rays in deep space to newly discovered particles produced in Large Hadron Collider, should be described by the same fundamental physical quantities. However, two distinct sets of properties are used to describe resonances: the pole parameters (complex pole position and residue) and the Breit-Wigner parameters (mass, width, and branching fractions). There is an ongoing decades-old debate on which one of them should be abandoned. In this study of nucleon resonances appearing in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering we discover an intricate interplay of the parameters from both sets, and realize that neither set is completely independent or fundamental on its own.

  15. Spectroscopy of baryon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Reinhard; Thoma, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Within project A.1 of the SFB/TR16 "Subnuclear Structure of Matter", a large amount of data on photoproduction reactions has been accumulated at the Bonn Electron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA with the CBELSA/TAPS detector and was analysed in detail. In particular, data have been taken with unpolarized or with linearly or circularly polarized photons and with unpolarized or with longitudinally or transversely polarized protons. Photoproduction off neutrons was studied to determine the helicity amplitudes for the excitation of resonances off neutrons. In a partial wave analysis of the data, new resonances have been found and the properties of new and of known resonances have been determined, including the measurement of partial widths of so far unmeasured decay modes.

  16. Magnetostrictive resonance excitation

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    1992-01-01

    The resonance frequency spectrum of a magnetostrictive sample is remotely determined by exciting the magnetostrictive property with an oscillating magnetic field. The permeability of a magnetostrictive material and concomitant coupling with a detection coil varies with the strain in the material whereby resonance responses of the sample can be readily detected. A suitable sample may be a magnetostrictive material or some other material having at least one side coated with a magnetostrictive material. When the sample is a suitable shape, i.e., a cube, rectangular parallelepiped, solid sphere or spherical shell, the elastic moduli or the material can be analytically determined from the measured resonance frequency spectrum. No mechanical transducers are required and the sample excitation is obtained without contact with the sample, leading to highly reproducible results and a measurement capability over a wide temperature range, e.g. from liquid nitrogen temperature to the Curie temperature of the magnetostrictive material.

  17. From chiral quark dynamics with Polyakov loop to the hadron resonance gas model

    SciTech Connect

    Arriola, E. R.; Salcedo, L. L.; Megias, E.

    2013-03-25

    Chiral quark models with Polyakov loop at finite temperature have been often used to describe the phase transition. We show how the transition to a hadron resonance gas is realized based on the quantum and local nature of the Polyakov loop.

  18. Electroproduction of the {Delta}(1232) Resonance at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, V.V.; Adams, G.S.; Davidson, R.M.; Klusman, M.; Mukhopadhyay, N.C.; Napolitano, J.; Nozar, M.; Price, J.W.; Stoler, P.; Witkowski, M.; Bosted, P.; Armstrong, C.S.; Meekins, D.; Assamagan, K.; Avery, S.; Baker, O.K.; Eden, T.; Gaskell, D.; Gueye, P.; Hinton, W.; Keppel, C.; Madey, R.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Tang, L.; Ahmidouch, A.; Madey, R.; Kim, W.; Baker, O.K.; Burkert, V.; Carlini, R.; Dunne, J.; Ent, R.; Keppel, C.; Mack, D.; Mitchell, J.; Tang, L.; Wood, S.; Koltenuk, D.; Minehart, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Tadevosian, V.

    1999-01-01

    We studied the electroproduction of the {Delta}(1232) resonance via the reaction p(e,thinspe{sup {prime}}p){pi}{sup 0} at four-momentum transfers Q{sup 2}=2.8 and 4.0 GeV{sup 2} . This is the highest Q{sup 2} for which exclusive resonance electroproduction has ever been observed. Decay angular distributions for {Delta}{r_arrow}p{pi}{sup 0} were measured over a wide range of barycentric energies covering the resonance. The N{endash}{Delta} transition form factor G{sup {asterisk}}{sub M} and ratios of resonant multipoles E{sub 1+}/M{sub 1+} and S{sub 1+}/M{sub 1+} were extracted from the decay angular distributions. These ratios remain small, indicating that perturbative QCD is not applicable for this reaction at these momentum transfers. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  19. Exploitation of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a remote chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.

    1995-08-01

    We have discussed recent experimental results using a resonance-Raman-based LIDAR system as a remote chemical sensor. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, which 6 orders-of-magnitude, can be as large as 4 to an increased sensing range for a given chemical concentration or lower detection limit for a given stand-off distance can be realized. The success discussed above can in part be traced back to the use of new state-of-the-art technologies which, only recently, have allowed the phenomenon of resonance-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to be fully exploited as a remote chemical sensor platform. Since many chemicals have electronic transitions in the UV/IS, it is expected that many will have pronounced resonance enhancements.

  20. Detection and Characterization of Non-Transiting Planets from Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorny, David; Kipping, David; Terrell, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    The Transit Timing Variations (TTVs) can be used as a diagnostic of gravitational interactions between planets in a multi-planet system. Here we conduct a photo-dynamical analysis of several Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) that exhibit significant TTVs. We show that KOI-142, KOI-227 and KOI-319 are (at least) two planet systems. KOI-142.01's TTVs uniquely detect a non-transiting companion with a mass 0.63 that of Jupiter. KOI-142.01's mass inferred from the TTVs is consistent with the measured transit depth, suggesting a Neptune-class planet. The orbital period ratio 2.03 indicates that the two planets are just wide of the 2:1 resonance. For KOI-319 and KOI-884, the observed TTVs of the inner transiting planet are used to detect an outer non-transiting planet. The outer planet in KOI-884 is 2.6 Jupiter masses and has the orbital period just narrow of the 3:1 resonance with the inner planet (orbital period ratio 2.93). The distribution of parameters inferred from KOI-319.01's TTVs is bimodal with either a 1.6 Neptune-mass planet wide of the 5:3 resonance (period 80.1 d) or a Saturn-mass planet wide of the 7:3 resonance (period 109.2 d). The radial velocity measurements can be used in this case to determine which of these parameter modes is correct. We discuss how the orbital architecture of KOI-142, KOI-227 and KOI-319 systems constrains their formation.

  1. Reconfigurable optical routers based on Coupled Resonator Induced Transparency resonances.

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, M; Bettotti, P; Fedeli, J M; Pavesi, L

    2012-10-08

    The interferometric coupling of pairs of resonators in a resonator sequence generates coupled ring induced transparency (CRIT) resonances. These have quality factors an order of magnitude greater than those of single resonators. We show that it is possible to engineer CRIT resonances in tapered SCISSOR (Side Coupled Integrated Space Sequence of Resonator) to realize fast and efficient reconfigurable optical switches and routers handling several channels while keeping single channel addressing capabilities. Tapered SCISSORs are fabricated in silicon-on-insulator technology. Furthermore, tapered SCISSORs show multiple-channel switching behavior that can be exploited in DWDM applications.

  2. Modulating the Near Field Coupling through Resonator Displacement in Planar Terahertz Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Rao, S. Jagan; Kumar, Deepak; Kumar, Gagan; Chowdhury, Dibakar Roy

    2017-01-01

    We present the effect of vertical displacements between the resonators inside the unit cell of planar coupled metamaterials on their near field coupling and hence on the terahertz (THz) wave modulation. The metamolecule design consists of two planar split- ring resonators (SRRs) in a unit cell which are coupled through their near fields. The numerically simulated transmission spectrum is found to have split resonances due to the resonance mode hybridization effect. With the increase in displacement between the near field coupled SRRs, this metamaterial system shows a transition from coupled to uncoupled state through merging of the split resonances to the single intrinsic resonance. We have used a semi-analytical model describing the effect of displacements between the resonators and determine that it can predict the numerically simulated results. The outcome could be useful in modulating the terahertz waves employing near field coupled metamaterials, hence, can be useful in the development of terahertz modulators and frequency tunable devices in future.

  3. Method for resonant measurement

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, George W.; Migliori, Albert; Dixon, Raymond D.

    1996-01-01

    A method of measurement of objects to determine object flaws, Poisson's ratio (.sigma.) and shear modulus (.mu.) is shown and described. First, the frequency for expected degenerate responses is determined for one or more input frequencies and then splitting of degenerate resonant modes are observed to identify the presence of flaws in the object. Poisson's ratio and the shear modulus can be determined by identification of resonances dependent only on the shear modulus, and then using that shear modulus to find Poisson's ratio using other modes dependent on both the shear modulus and Poisson's ratio.

  4. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system.

  5. Microwave Resonators and Filters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-22

    inductance of the equivalent circuit of the resonator. For x - ray photons and typical circuit parameters f/f  10-4. The width of the resonance...MKIDs can be used as detectors for millimeter wave, infrared, optical/UV, and x - ray photons. A detailed treatment is given in (Zmuidzinas 2012...discussed the first edition shown in Figure 16 . Figure 15 X -band 5-pole filter From (Z.-Y. Shen 2003)the lines are approximately 160-m wide 18

  6. Field resonance propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    A propulsion concept was developed based on a proposed resonance between coherent, pulsed electromagnetic wave forms, and gravitational wave forms (or space-time metrics). Using this concept a spacecraft propulsion system potentially capable of galactic and intergalactic travel without prohibitive travel times was designed. The propulsion system utilizes recent research associated with magnetic field line merging, hydromagnetic wave effects, free-electron lasers, laser generation of megagauss fields, and special structural and containment metals. The research required to determine potential, field resonance characteristics and to evaluate various aspects of the spacecraft propulsion design is described.

  7. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    DOEpatents

    Peters, R.D.M.

    1982-11-02

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively [+-]60[degree] away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency. 3 figs.

  8. Method for resonant measurement

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Dixon, R.D.

    1996-03-05

    A method of measurement of objects to determine object flaws, Poisson`s ratio ({sigma}) and shear modulus ({mu}) is shown and described. First, the frequency for expected degenerate responses is determined for one or more input frequencies and then splitting of degenerate resonant modes are observed to identify the presence of flaws in the object. Poisson`s ratio and the shear modulus can be determined by identification of resonances dependent only on the shear modulus, and then using that shear modulus to find Poisson`s ratio using other modes dependent on both the shear modulus and Poisson`s ratio. 1 fig.

  9. Physics of Sports: Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, David

    2000-04-01

    When force is applied by an athlete to sports equipment resonances can occur. Just a few examples are: the ringing of a spiked volleyball, the strumming of a golf club shaft during a swing, and multiple modes induced in an aluminum baseball bat when striking a ball. Resonances produce acoustic waves which, if conditions are favorable, can be detected off the playing field. This can provide a means to evaluate athletic performance during game conditions. Results are given from the use of a simple hand-held acoustic detector - by a spectator sitting in the stands - to determine how hard volleyballs were spiked during college and high school games.

  10. Coupled-Resonator-Induced Transparency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hong-Rok; Fuller, Kirk A.; Rosenberger, A. T.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that a cancellation of absorption occurs on resonance for two (or any even number of) coupled optical resonators, due to mode splitting and classical destructive interference, particularly when the resonator finesse is large and the loss in the resonator furthest from the excitation waveguide is small. The linewidth and group velocity of a collection of such coupled-resonator structures may be decreased by using larger resonators of equal size, using larger resonators of unequal size where the optical path length of the larger resonator is an integer multiple of that of the smaller one, or by using a larger number of resonators per structure. We explore the analogy between these effects and electromagnetically induced transparency in an atomic system.

  11. Isospin decomposition of γN→N* transitions within a dynamical coupled-channels model

    DOE PAGES

    Kamano, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, S. X.; Lee, T. -S. H.; ...

    2016-07-07

    Here, by extending the dynamical coupled-channels analysis performed in our previous work to include the available data of photoproduction of pi mesons off neutrons, the transition amplitudes for the photoexcitation of the neutron-to-nucleon resonances, γn → N*, at the resonance pole positions are determined. The combined fits to the data for both the proton- and neutron-target reactions also revise our results for the resonance pole positions and the γp → N* transition amplitudes. Our results allow an isospin decomposition of the γN → N* transition amplitudes for the isospin I = 1/2 N* resonances, which is necessary for testing hadronmore » structure models and gives crucial inputs for constructing models of neutrino-induced reactions in the nucleon resonance region.« less

  12. Elementary excitations in charge-tunable InGaAs quantum dots studied by resonant Raman and resonant photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köppen, Tim; Franz, Dennis; Schramm, Andreas; Heyn, Christian; Gutjahr, Johann; Pfannkuche, Daniela; Heitmann, Detlef; Kipp, Tobias

    2011-04-01

    We report on resonant optical spectroscopy of self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots in which the number of electrons can accurately be tuned to N=0,1,2 by an external gate voltage. Polarization, wave vector, and magnetic field dependent measurements enable us to clearly distinguish between resonant Raman and resonant photoluminescence processes. The Raman spectra for N=1 and 2 electrons considerably differ from each other. In particular, for N=2, the quantum-dot He, the spectra exhibit both singlet and triplet transitions reflecting the elementary many-particle interaction. Also the resonant photoluminescence spectra are significantly changed by varying the number of electrons in the QDs. For N=1 we observe complex spectra possibly induced by strong polaronic effects that are suppressed for N=2.

  13. Resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy and resonant piezoelectric spectroscopy in ferroelastic lead phosphate, Pb3(PO4)2.

    PubMed

    Aktas, O; Salje, E K H; Carpenter, M A

    2013-11-20

    Elastic properties of the ferroelastic compound Pb3(PO4)2 were investigated using resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy. Results show softening of the mechanical resonance frequencies at the D3m → C2/c ferroelastic transition temperature Ttrans = 453.6 K with no noticeable frequency dispersion. The reduction of resonance frequencies corresponds to 25% softening of the effective elastic constants at Ttrans relative to the value at 700 K. The data analysis indicates that the elastic precursor softening is driven by a displacive soft mode that is coupled to the order-disorder movements of Pb atoms around the rhombohedral threefold axis, which gives rise to local monoclinicity in the paraelastic phase. Finally, resonant piezoelectric spectroscopy (RPS) is used to determine if microstructures are polar in the cubic phase. RPS measurements find no evidence of piezoelectric signals in Pb3(PO4)2, confirming that the possible polar behavior detected using second harmonic generation is due to crystal imperfections.

  14. Resonance propagation of electrons through three-barrier structures in a two-frequency electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Pashkovskii, A. B.

    2011-06-15

    The solution of the Schroedinger equation that describes resonance transitions between three equidistant quantum levels in asymmetric three-barrier resonance-tunnel structures in a high one-frequency electric field is extended to the case of differently separated levels and a two-frequency field, with the frequencies corresponding to resonance transitions in each of the coupled quantum wells. It is shown that, in the conditions of coherent electron transport, irrespective of the parameters of the structure, for any amplitude of the high resonance field in one well, there exists an amplitude of the resonance field in the other well such that the structure is absolutely transparent and most electrons (in the limiting case, all electrons) incident on the upper resonance level can emit two photons with different frequencies and leave the structure through the lower level with no intermediate interaction with phonons. The probability of the transitions substantially depends on the amplitudes of the fields and does not depend on the phase difference between the fields. It is found that the possibility exists of almost complete blocking of resonance transitions in one of the wells by a high-frequency field in the other well.

  15. Architecture and Dynamics of Kepler's Multi-transiting Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Kepler Science Team

    2012-05-01

    Having discovered almost 900 planet candidates in over 360 multiple-planet systems, Kepler has made transits a powerful method for studying the architecture and dynamics of planetary systems. Pairs of planets in this sample are typically not in orbital resonances. However, pairs with orbital period ratios within a few percent of a first-order resonance (e.g. 2:1, 3:2) prefer orbital spacings just wide of the resonance and avoid spacings just narrow of the resonance, requiring a dynamical mechanism. Several systems likely do show dynamical resonance behavior: some are engaged in very tight resonances (6:5, 9:7), and others have several planets in chains of first-order resonances. Finally, we discuss the statistics of mutual inclinations based on transit duration ratios. We infer that the inner planets of pairs tend to have a smaller impact parameter than their outer companions, suggesting these planetary systems are typically coplanar to within a few degrees. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. D. F. acknowledges support from NASA through Hubble Fellowship grant #HF-51272.01-A

  16. Use of magnetic resonance urography.

    PubMed

    Klein, L T; Frager, D; Subramanium, A; Lowe, F C

    1998-10-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) is a new technique that uses heavily weighted T2 coronal images with fat suppression pulse. Urine appears white on MRU, resembling an intravenous urogram (IVU). Contrast agents are not necessary. This study describes the use of MRU in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with hematuria. One hundred six patients with microscopic or gross hematuria and 6 normal volunteers underwent MRU between 1992 and 1995. A modified, heavily weighted T2 technique with intravenous administration of furosemide and ureteral compression was used. Thirty-two patients had other imaging techniques as well for comparison. MRU provided high-resolution images in almost all cases; 73 (69%) had a normal MRU. Significant findings in the 33 patients with abnormalities included renal cysts in 17 (51%), renal cell carcinoma in 6 (18%), transitional cell carcinoma in 5 (15%), ureteropelvic junction obstruction in 3 (9%), and stones causing obstruction in 6 (18%). Five patients with renal failure also had good visualization of the entire urinary tract. MRU was comparable to other imaging modalities except in identifying nonobstructing calculi. MRU provides an alternative to conventional imaging of the urinary tract, especially in those patients who have contraindications to ionizing radiation and contrast agents. Improvements in resolution, technique, and cost have to be addressed before it can be used regularly in urologic practice.

  17. High Quality Factor Mechanical Resonators Based on WSe2 Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Morell, Nicolas; Reserbat-Plantey, Antoine; Tsioutsios, Ioannis; Schädler, Kevin G; Dubin, François; Koppens, Frank H L; Bachtold, Adrian

    2016-08-10

    Suspended monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) are membranes that combine ultralow mass and exceptional optical properties, making them intriguing materials for opto-mechanical applications. However, the low measured quality factor of TMD resonators has been a roadblock so far. Here, we report an ultrasensitive optical readout of monolayer TMD resonators that allows us to reveal their mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures. We find that the quality factor of monolayer WSe2 resonators greatly increases below room temperature, reaching values as high as 1.6 × 10(4) at liquid nitrogen temperature and 4.7 × 10(4) at liquid helium temperature. This surpasses the quality factor of monolayer graphene resonators with similar surface areas. Upon cooling the resonator, the resonant frequency increases significantly due to the thermal contraction of the WSe2 lattice. These measurements allow us to experimentally study the thermal expansion coefficient of WSe2 monolayers for the first time. High Q-factors are also found in resonators based on MoS2 and MoSe2 monolayers. The high quality-factor found in this work opens new possibilities for coupling mechanical vibrational states to two-dimensional excitons, valley pseudospins, and single quantum emitters and for quantum opto-mechanical experiments based on the Casimir interaction.

  18. Tuning Fano resonances of graphene-based gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ceglia, Domenico; Vincenti, Maria A.; Grande, Marco; Bianco, Giuseppe Valerio; Bruno, Giovanni; D'Orazio, Antonella; Scalora, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We present a strategy to control Fano resonances in hybrid graphene-silicon-on-insulator gratings. The presence of a mono- or few-layer graphene film allows to electrically and/or chemically tuning the Fano resonances that result from the interaction of narrow-band, quasi-normal modes and broad-band, Fabry-Perot-like modes. Transmission, reflection and absorption spectra undergo significant modulations under the application of a static voltage to the graphene film. In particular, for low values of the graphene chemical potential, the structure exhibits a symmetric Lorentzian resonance; when the chemical potential increases beyond a specific threshold, the grating resonance becomes Fano-like, hence narrower and asymmetric. This transition occurs when the graphene optical response changes from that of a lossy dielectric medium into that of a low-loss metal. Further increasing the chemical potential allows to blue-shift the Fano resonance, leaving its shape and linewidth virtually unaltered. We provide a thorough description of the underlying physics by resorting to the quasi-normal mode description of the resonant grating and retrieve perturbative expressions for the characteristic wavelength and linewidth of the resonance. The roles of number of graphene layers, waveguide-film thickness and graphene quality on the tuning abilities of the grating will be discussed. Although developed for infrared telecom wavelengths and silicon-on-insulator technology, the proposed structure can be easily designed for other wavelengths, including visible, far-infrared and terahertz, and other photonic platforms.

  19. High Quality Factor Mechanical Resonators Based on WSe2 Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Suspended monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) are membranes that combine ultralow mass and exceptional optical properties, making them intriguing materials for opto-mechanical applications. However, the low measured quality factor of TMD resonators has been a roadblock so far. Here, we report an ultrasensitive optical readout of monolayer TMD resonators that allows us to reveal their mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures. We find that the quality factor of monolayer WSe2 resonators greatly increases below room temperature, reaching values as high as 1.6 × 104 at liquid nitrogen temperature and 4.7 × 104 at liquid helium temperature. This surpasses the quality factor of monolayer graphene resonators with similar surface areas. Upon cooling the resonator, the resonant frequency increases significantly due to the thermal contraction of the WSe2 lattice. These measurements allow us to experimentally study the thermal expansion coefficient of WSe2 monolayers for the first time. High Q-factors are also found in resonators based on MoS2 and MoSe2 monolayers. The high quality-factor found in this work opens new possibilities for coupling mechanical vibrational states to two-dimensional excitons, valley pseudospins, and single quantum emitters and for quantum opto-mechanical experiments based on the Casimir interaction. PMID:27459399

  20. Application of Glass Transition in Food Processing.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, S; Devi, Apramita; Singh, K K; Bosco, S J D; Mohite, Ashish M

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of glass transition has been employed to food products to study their stability. It can be applied as an integrated approach along with water activity and physical and chemical changes in food in processing and storage to determine the food stability. Also associated with the changes during agglomeration crystallization, caking, sticking, collapse, oxidation reactions, nonenzymatic browning, and microbial stability of food system. Various techniques such as Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, etc. have been developed to determine the glass transition temperature (Tg) of food system. Also, various theories have been applied to explain the concept of Tg and its relation to changes in food system. This review summarizes the understanding of concept of glass transition, its measurement, and application in food technology.