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Sample records for resonant controller ppir

  1. Using a genetic algorithm to abbreviate the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R).

    PubMed

    Eisenbarth, Hedwig; Lilienfeld, Scott O; Yarkoni, Tal

    2015-03-01

    Some self-report measures of personality and personality disorders, including the widely used Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R), are lengthy and time-intensive. In recent work, we introduced an automated genetic algorithm (GA)-based method for abbreviating psychometric measures. In Study 1, we used this approach to generate a short (40-item) version of the PPI-R using 3 large-N German student samples (total N = 1,590). The abbreviated measure displayed high convergent correlations with the original PPI-R, and outperformed an alternative measure constructed using a conventional approach. Study 2 tested the convergent and discriminant validity of this short version in a fourth student sample (N = 206) using sensation-seeking and sensitivity to reward and punishment scales, again demonstrating similar convergent and discriminant validity for the PPI-R-40 compared with the full version. In a fifth community sample of North American participants acquired using Amazon Mechanical Turk, the PPI-R-40 showed similarly high convergent correlations, demonstrating stability across language, culture, and data-collection method. Taken together, these studies suggest that the GA approach is a viable method for abbreviating measures of psychopathy, and perhaps personality measures in general.

  2. Examining the necessity for and utility of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R) validity scales.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jaime L; Sellbom, Martin; Wygant, Dustin B; Edens, John F

    2013-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the need for and utility of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R) Deviant Responding (DR) and Virtuous Responding (VR) validity scales in identifying overreporting and underreporting, respectively. Since the PPI-R was published, there has not been an independent peer-reviewed examination of these scales. Participants were 384 undergraduate individuals asked to respond to the PPI-R under standard, underreporting, or overreporting instructions. A comparison group consisting of 200 forensic psychiatric patients was also used for the overreporting analyses. Effects of response bias on mean elevations on the PPI-R substantive scales were examined along with the effects on the PPI-R total, factor, and content scales' correlations with other relevant extratest measures of psychopathy. Mean elevations differed significantly, and correlations with extratest measures of psychopathy were significantly lower. Substantial decrement in psychometric validity of PPI-R scores was observed in the simulation conditions. In addition, the utility of the PPI-R validity scales in differentiating between groups was also determined. Both the VR and DR scales showed utility in differentiating between their respective dissimulation condition and the comparison groups, with acceptable rates of sensitivity and specificity.

  3. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  4. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality.

  5. Controlling metamaterial resonances with light

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Sangeeta; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha; Wanare, Harshawardhan

    2010-08-15

    We investigate the use of coherent optical fields as a means of dynamically controlling the resonant behavior of a variety of composite metamaterials, wherein the metamaterial structures are embedded in a dispersive dielectric medium. Control and switching are implemented by coherently driving the resonant permittivity of the embedding medium with applied optical radiation. The effect of embedding split ring resonators in a frequency-dispersive medium with Lorentz-like dispersion or with dispersion engineered by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is manifested in the splitting of the negative-permeability band, the modified (frequency-dependent) filling fractions, and the dissipation factors. The modified material parameters are strongly linked to the resonant frequencies of the medium, and for an embedding medium exhibiting EIT also to the strength and detuning of the control field. The robustness of control against the deleterious influence of dissipation associated with the metallic structures as well as the inhomogeneous broadening due to structural imperfections is demonstrated. Studies on plasmonic metamaterials that consist of metallic nanorods arranged in loops and exhibit a collective magnetic response at optical frequencies are presented. Control and switching in this class of plasmonic nanorod metamaterials is shown to be possible, for example, by embedding these arrays in a Raman-active liquid like CS{sub 2} and utilizing the inverse Raman effect.

  6. Voltage control of ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ziyao; Peng, Bin; Zhu, Mingmin; Liu, Ming

    2016-05-01

    Voltage control of magnetism in multiferroics, where the ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity are simultaneously exhibiting, is of great importance to achieve compact, fast and energy efficient voltage controllable magnetic/microwave devices. Particularly, these devices are widely used in radar, aircraft, cell phones and satellites, where volume, response time and energy consumption is critical. Researchers realized electric field tuning of magnetic properties like magnetization, magnetic anisotropy and permeability in varied multiferroic heterostructures such as bulk, thin films and nanostructure by different magnetoelectric (ME) coupling mechanism: strain/stress, interfacial charge, spin-electromagnetic (EM) coupling and exchange coupling, etc. In this review, we focus on voltage control of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in multiferroics. ME coupling-induced FMR change is critical in microwave devices, where the electric field tuning of magnetic effective anisotropic field determines the tunability of the performance of microwave devices. Experimentally, FMR measurement technique is also an important method to determine the small effective magnetic field change in small amount of magnetic material precisely due to its high sensitivity and to reveal the deep science of multiferroics, especially, voltage control of magnetism in novel mechanisms like interfacial charge, spin-EM coupling and exchange coupling.

  7. Stochastic resonance in attention control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajo, K.; Yamanaka, K.; Ward, L. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the beneficial role of noise in a human higher brain function, namely visual attention control. We asked subjects to detect a weak gray-level target inside a marker box either in the left or the right visual field. Signal detection performance was optimized by presenting a low level of randomly flickering gray-level noise between and outside the two possible target locations. Further, we found that an increase in eye movement (saccade) rate helped to compensate for the usual deterioration in detection performance at higher noise levels. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence that noise can optimize a higher brain function which involves distinct brain regions above the level of primary sensory systems -- switching behavior between multi-stable attention states -- via the mechanism of stochastic resonance.

  8. Robust Controller Design for Hemispherical Resonator Gyroscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    f v Figure 1. Operating principle of HRG Robust Controller Design for Hemispherical Resonator Gyroscope Chul Hyun1), Byung ...Petersburg, Russia.: 26-34 4) Chul Hyun. 2011. Design of Robust Digital Controller for Hemispherical Resonator Gyroscopes, Ph.D. dissertation, Seoul

  9. Bifurcation control of subsynchronous resonance using TCSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomari, Majdi M.; Zhu, Jian Guo

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents the use of Thyristor-Controlled Series Capacitor (TCSC) to control bifurcations of subsynchronous resonance (SSR) in multimachine power system. The modified second system of the IEEE second benchmark model of subsynchronous resonance is considered. The dynamics of the damper windings, automatic voltage regulator (AVR), and power system stabilizer (PSS) on SSR in power system are included. In the case of neglecting TCSC, the results show that the operating point of the system loses stability via subcritical Hopf bifurcation. When we add TCSC to the system, all bifurcations are eliminated. Therefore, the Thyristor-Controlled compensated system never loses stability at any realistic firing angle.

  10. Discrete control of resonant wave energy devices.

    PubMed

    Clément, A H; Babarit, A

    2012-01-28

    Aiming at amplifying the energy productive motion of wave energy converters (WECs) in response to irregular sea waves, the strategies of discrete control presented here feature some major advantages over continuous control, which is known to require, for optimal operation, a bidirectional power take-off able to re-inject energy into the WEC system during parts of the oscillation cycles. Three different discrete control strategies are described: latching control, declutching control and the combination of both, which we term latched-operating-declutched control. It is shown that any of these methods can be applied with great benefit, not only to mono-resonant WEC oscillators, but also to bi-resonant and multi-resonant systems. For some of these applications, it is shown how these three discrete control strategies can be optimally defined, either by analytical solution for regular waves, or numerically, by applying the optimal command theory in irregular waves. Applied to a model of a seven degree-of-freedom system (the SEAREV WEC) to estimate its annual production on several production sites, the most efficient of these discrete control strategies was shown to double the energy production, regardless of the resource level of the site, which may be considered as a real breakthrough, rather than a marginal improvement.

  11. THE SNS RESONANCE CONTROL COOLING SYSTEM CONTROL VALVE UPGRADE PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Derrick C; Schubert, James Phillip; Tang, Johnny Y

    2008-01-01

    The normal-conducting linac of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) uses 10 separate Resonance Control Cooling System (RCCS) water skids to control the resonance of 6 Drift Tube Linac (DTL) and 4 Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) accelerating structures. The RCCS water skids use 2 control valves; one to regulate the chilled water flow and the other to bypass water to a chilled water heat exchanger. These valves have hydraulic actuators that provide position and feedback to the control system. Frequency oscillations occur using these hydraulic actuators due to their coarse movement and control of the valves. New pneumatic actuator and control positioners have been installed on the DTL3 RCCS water skid to give finer control and regulation of DTL3 cavity temperature. This paper shows a comparison of resonance control performance for the two valve configurations.

  12. Control of Ultra- and Subharmonic Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyrillas, M. M.; Szeri, A. J.

    1998-04-01

    Periodically forced, nonlinear oscillators often show a strong response when driven near a rational multiple of the natural frequency of the linearized system: Such occurrences are known as subharmonic, ultraharmonic, and ultrasubharmonic resonances. In these systems, at these resonances, nonlinearities conspire to shift the response from the driving frequency to (near) the natural frequency of the linearized system. We demonstrate that such resonances are particularly sensitive to a very slight modulation of the forcing to include a component at (near) the natural frequency. This modulation can be constructed—using techniques developed herein—to annihilate or to enhance the subharmonic or ultraharmonic resonance. The ideas are first introduced using a multiple-scales perturbation analysis of the Duffing equation. Later, fully nonlinear techniques are developed that can be implemented using continuation algorithms on a computer. For example, optimal control theory is used to devise a very small modulation of the forcing that annihilates the principal subharmonic of the Duffing equation via a contrived saddle-node bifurcation of periodic orbits. Following this manufactured saddle-node bifurcation, the surviving attractor is of a much smaller amplitude. Similar efforts aimed at the sharp ultraharmonics of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation of nonlinear bubble dynamics are equally successful—although the rich modal structure of the response requires some variations on the control strategy. Finally, these ideas open up the possibility of controlling the shape of broad areas of the response diagrams important in many applications.

  13. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarfe, Alison Lamp; Chokani, Ndaona

    2000-01-01

    The near-zero net mass oscillatory blowing control of a subsonic cavity flow has been experimentally investigated. An actuator was designed and fabricated to provide both steady and oscillatory blowing over a range of blowing amplitudes and forcing frequencies. The blowing was applied just upstream of the cavity front Wall through interchangeable plate configurations These configurations enabled the effects of hole size, hole shape, and blowing angle to be examined. A significant finding is that in terms of the blowing amplitude, the near zero net mass oscillatory blowing is much more effective than steady blowing; momentum coefficients Lip two orders of magnitude smaller than those required for steady blowing are sufficient to accomplish the same control of cavity resonance. The detailed measurements obtained in the experiment include fluctuating pressure data within the cavity wall, and hot-wire measurements of the cavity shear layer. Spectral and wavelet analysis techniques are applied to understand the dynamics and mechanisms of the cavity flow with control. The oscillatory blowing, is effective in enhancing the mixing in the cavity shear layer and thus modifying the feedback loop associated with the cavity resonance. The nonlinear interactions in the cavity flow are no longer driven by the resonant cavity modes but by the forcing associated with the oscillatory blowing. The oscillatory blowing does not suppress the mode switching behavior of the cavity flow, but the amplitude modulation is reduced.

  14. Plasmon resonant liposomes for controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knights-Mitchell, Shellie S.; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Nanotechnology use in drug delivery promotes a reduction in systemic toxicity, improved pharmacokinetics, and better drug bioavailability. Liposomes continue to be extensively researched as drug delivery systems (DDS) with formulations such as Doxil® and Ambisome® approved by FDA and successfully marketed in the United States. However, the limited ability to precisely control release of active ingredients from these vesicles continues to challenge the broad implementation of this technology. Moreover, the full potential of the carrier to sequester drugs until it can reach its intended target has yet to be realized. Here, we describe a liposomal DDS that releases therapeutic doses of an anticancer drug in response to external stimulus. Earlier, we introduced degradable plasmon resonant liposomes. These constructs, obtained by reducing gold on the liposome surface, facilitate spatial and temporal release of drugs upon laser light illumination that ultimately induces an increase in temperature. In this work, plasmon resonant liposomes have been developed to stably encapsulate and retain doxorubicin at physiological conditions represented by isotonic saline at 37o C and pH 7.4. Subsequently, they are stimulated to release contents either by a 5o C increase in temperature or by laser illumination (760 nm and 88 mW/cm2 power density). Successful development of degradable plasmon resonant liposomes responsive to near-infrared light or moderate hyperthermia can provide a new delivery method for multiple lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs with pharmacokinetic profiles that limit clinical utility.

  15. Resonant mode controllers for launch vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, Ken E.; Roth, Mary Ellen

    Electro-mechanical actuator (EMA) systems are currently being investigated for the National Launch System (NLS) as a replacement for hydraulic actuators due to the large amount of manpower and support hardware required to maintain the hydraulic systems. EMA systems in weight sensitive applications, such as launch vehicles, have been limited to around 5 hp due to system size, controller efficiency, thermal management, and battery size. Presented here are design and test data for an EMA system that competes favorably in weight and is superior in maintainability to the hydraulic system. An EMA system uses dc power provided by a high energy density bipolar lithium thionyl chloride battery, with power conversion performed by low loss resonant topologies, and a high efficiency induction motor controlled with a high performance field oriented controller to drive a linear actuator.

  16. Resonant mode controllers for launch vehicle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, Ken E.; Roth, Mary Ellen

    1992-01-01

    Electro-mechanical actuator (EMA) systems are currently being investigated for the National Launch System (NLS) as a replacement for hydraulic actuators due to the large amount of manpower and support hardware required to maintain the hydraulic systems. EMA systems in weight sensitive applications, such as launch vehicles, have been limited to around 5 hp due to system size, controller efficiency, thermal management, and battery size. Presented here are design and test data for an EMA system that competes favorably in weight and is superior in maintainability to the hydraulic system. An EMA system uses dc power provided by a high energy density bipolar lithium thionyl chloride battery, with power conversion performed by low loss resonant topologies, and a high efficiency induction motor controlled with a high performance field oriented controller to drive a linear actuator.

  17. Dynamic resonant frequency control of ultrasonic transducer for stabilizing resonant state in wide frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokozawa, Hiroki; Twiefel, Jens; Weinstein, Michael; Morita, Takeshi

    2017-07-01

    Controlling the resonant frequency of ultrasonic transducers is important to achieve the excellent performance of ultrasonic devices. The resonant frequency can be shifted by a nonlinear effect or by increasing the temperature under high-power operation. We propose a resonant frequency control method during the transducer’s operation that enables the dynamic compensation of resonant frequency shifts. To realize this, a transducer with passive piezoelectric parts was fabricated. By controlling the electric boundary condition of the passive piezoelectric parts between short and open by utilizing a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET), the stiffness was changed, thus modifying the resonant frequency. In both simulation and experiment, the resonant frequency was modified successfully by controlling the switching duty ratio of the MOSFET. Additionally, a system for exciting a transducer at a resonant state with a wide frequency band was demonstrated.

  18. How the pharyngeal resonator is controlled articulatorily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esling, John H.

    2005-04-01

    Indigenous languages of North America, especially west coast Vancouver Island Nuuchahnulth and Interior BC Salish, illustrate an extensive range of use of the pharyngeal resonator. The pharynx is classified as part of the laryngeal articulator (rather than lingual) because the laryngeal constrictor mechanism (controlling changes from the glottis to the aryepiglottic folds) is the principal articulator whose movements determine the shape of the pharynx. The Nuuchahnulth (Nootka) dialects (e.g., Ahousaht) and Thompson, Moses-Columbia, and Spokane/Kalispel Salish varieties all close the larynx completely for the speech sound epiglottal stop. With the airway optimally shut, the pharynx is small; the aryepiglottic folds are pressed against the epiglottic tubercle, the tongue is retracted, and the larynx is raised. There are good indications that the thyroarytenoid, aryepiglottic, thyroepiglottic, hyoglossus and hyothyroid muscles participate in this buckling maneuvre. These languages also contain either a pharyngeal fricative or approximant (at the same place of articulation but with less stricture) and, in Thompson, also pharyngealized uvulars (with even less stricture). Pharyngeal resonance in all of these cases is dependent initially on the shortening of the supraglottic tube and subsequently on the combined effect of tongue retraction and larynx raising reducing the volume immediately above the supraglottic tube.

  19. Passive separation control by acoustic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. L.; Spedding, G. R.

    2013-10-01

    At transitional Reynolds numbers, the laminar boundary layer separation and possible reattachment on a smooth airfoil, or wing section, are notoriously sensitive to small variations in geometry or in the fluid environment. We report here on the results of a pilot study that adds to this list of sensitivities. The presence of small holes in the suction surface of an Eppler 387 wing has a transformative effect upon the aerodynamics, by changing the mean chordwise separation line location. These changes are not simply a consequence of the presence of the small cavities, which by themselves have no effect. Acoustic resonance in the backing cavities generates tones that interact with intrinsic flow instabilities. Possible consequences for passive flow control strategies are discussed together with potential problems in measurements through pressure taps in such flow regimes.

  20. Electrical Control of Optical Plasmon Resonance with Graphene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    at optical frequencies.10 Here we achieve efficient control of near- infrared plasmon resonance in a hybrid graphene-gold nanorod system. Exploiting...quality factor of gold nanorod plasmon. Our analysis shows that the plasmon− graphene coupling is remarkably strong: even a single electron in...events. KEYWORDS: Graphene, plasmon resonance, metamaterials, active plasmonics, gold nanorod , charge transfer sensor Surface plasmon resonance in

  1. Controlling electromagnetic scattering with wire metamaterial resonators.

    PubMed

    Filonov, Dmitry S; Shalin, Alexander S; Iorsh, Ivan; Belov, Pavel A; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    Manipulation of radiation is required for enabling a span of electromagnetic applications. Since properties of antennas and scatterers are very sensitive to the surrounding environment, macroscopic artificially created materials are good candidates for shaping their characteristics. In particular, metamaterials enable controlling both dispersion and density of electromagnetic states, available for scattering from an object. As a result, properly designed electromagnetic environments could govern wave phenomena and tailor various characteristics. Here electromagnetic properties of scattering dipoles, situated inside a wire medium (metamaterial), are analyzed both numerically and experimentally. The effect of the metamaterial geometry, dipole arrangement inside the medium, and frequency of the incident radiation on the scattering phenomena is studied in detail. It is shown that the resonance of the dipole hybridizes with Fabry-Perot modes of the metamaterial, giving rise to a complete reshaping of electromagnetic properties. Regimes of controlled scattering suppression and super-scattering are experimentally observed. Numerical analysis is in agreement with the experiment, performed at the GHz spectral range. The reported approach to scattering control with metamaterials could be directly mapped into optical and infrared spectral ranges by employing scalability properties of Maxwell's equations.

  2. Toward broadband electroacoustic resonators through optimized feedback control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulandet, R.; Lissek, H.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the design of broadband electroacoustic resonators for low-frequency room equalization. An electroacoustic resonator denotes a loudspeaker used as a membrane resonator, the acoustic impedance of which can be modified through proportional feedback control, to match a target impedance. However, such impedance matching only occurs over a limited bandwidth around resonance, which can limit its use for the low-frequency equalization of rooms, requiring an effective control at least up to the Schroeder frequency. Previous experiments have shown that impedance matching can be achieved over a range of a few octaves using a simple proportional control law. But there is still a limit to the feedback gain, beyond which the feedback-controlled loudspeaker becomes non-dissipative. This paper evaluates the benefits of using PID control and phase compensation techniques to improve the overall performance of the electroacoustic resonator. More specifically, it is shown that some adverse effects due to high-order dynamics in the moving-coil transducer can be mitigated. The corresponding control settings are also identified with equivalent electroacoustic resonator parameters, allowing a straightforward design of the controller. Experimental results using PID control and phase compensation are finally compared in terms of sound absorption performances. As a conclusion the overall performances of electroacoustic resonators for damping the modal resonances inside a duct are presented, along with general discussions on practical implementation and the extension to actual room modes damping.

  3. Resonance control of mid-infrared metamaterials using arrays of split-ring resonator pairs.

    PubMed

    Yue, Weisheng; Wang, Zhihong; Whittaker, John; Schedin, Fredrik; Wu, Zhipeng; Han, Jiaguang

    2016-02-05

    We present our design, fabrication and characterization of resonance-controllable metamaterials operating at mid-infrared wavelengths. The metamaterials are composed of pairs of back-to-back or face-to-face U-shape split-ring resonators (SRRs). Transmission spectra of the metamaterials are measured using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the transmission resonance is dependent on the distance between the two SRRs in each SRR pair. The dips in the transmission spectrum shift to shorter wavelengths with increasing distance between the two SRRs for both the back-to-back and face-to-face SRR pairs. The position of the resonance dips in the spectrum can hence be controlled by the relative position of the SRRs. This mechanism of resonance control offers a promising way of developing metamaterials with tunability for optical filters and bio/chemical sensing devices in integrated nano-optics.

  4. Controller for Driving a Piezoelectric Actuator at Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, Jack; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Chang, Zensheu

    2008-01-01

    A digital control system based partly on an extremum-seeking control algorithm tracks the changing resonance frequency of a piezoelectric actuator or an electrically similar electromechanical device that is driven by a sinusoidal excitation signal and is required to be maintained at or near resonance in the presence of uncertain, changing external loads and disturbances. Somewhat more specifically, on the basis of measurements of the performance of the actuator, this system repeatedly estimates the resonance frequency and alters the excitation frequency as needed to keep it at or near the resonance frequency. In the original application for which this controller was developed, the piezoelectric actuator is part of an ultrasonic/sonic drill/corer. Going beyond this application, the underlying principles of design and operation are generally applicable to tracking changing resonance frequencies of heavily perturbed harmonic oscillators. Resonance-frequency-tracking analog electronic circuits are commercially available, but are not adequate for the present purpose for several reasons: The input/output characteristics of analog circuits tend to drift, often necessitating recalibration, especially whenever the same controller is used in driving a different resonator. In the case of an actuator in a system that has multiple modes characterized by different resonance frequencies, an analog controller can tune erroneously to one of the higher-frequency modes. The lack of programmability of analog controllers is problematic when faults occur, and is especially problematic for preventing tuning to a higher-frequency mode. In contrast, a digital controller can be programmed to restrict itself to a specified frequency range and to maintain stability even when the affected resonator is driven at high power and subjected to uncertain disturbances and variable loads. The present digital control system (see figure) is implemented by means of an algorithm that comprises three main

  5. Algorithms and implementations of APT resonant control system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Ming; Regan, A.

    1997-08-01

    A digital signal processor is implemented to control resonant frequency of the RFQ prototype in APT/LEDA. Two schemes are implemented to calculate the resonant frequency of RFQ. One uses the measurement of the forward and reflected fields. The other uses the measurement of the forward and transmitted fields. The former is sensitive and accurate when the operation frequency is relatively far from the resonant frequency. The latter gives accurate results when the operation frequency is close to the resonant frequency. Linearized algorithms are derived to calculate the resonant frequency of the RFQ efficiently using a fixed-point DSP. The control frequency range is about 100kHz for 350MHz operation frequency. A frequency agile scheme is employed using a dual direct digital synthesizer to drive klystron at the cavity`s resonant frequency (not necessarily the required beam resonant frequency) in power-up mode to quickly the cavity to the desired resonant frequency. This paper will address the algorithm implementation, error analysis, as well as related hardware design issues.

  6. Coherent control through near-resonant Raman transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Xingcan; Lerch, Eliza-Beth W.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2006-02-15

    The phase of an electronic wave function is shown to play an important role in coherent control experiments. By using a pulse shaping system with a femtosecond laser, we explore the phase relationships among resonant and off-resonant Raman transitions in Li{sub 2} by measuring the phases of the resulting wave packets, or quantum beats. Specific pixels in a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator are used to isolate the resonant and off-resonant portions of the Raman transitions in Li{sub 2}. The off-resonant Raman transitions have an approximately 90 degree sign phase shift with respect to the resonant Raman transition, and there is an approximately 180 degree sign phase shift between the blue-detuned and the red-detuned off-resonant Raman transitions. Calculations using second-order time-dependent perturbation theory for the electronic transitions agree with the experimental results for the laser pulse intensities used here. Interferences between the off-resonant Raman transitions as a function of detuning are used to demonstrate coherent control of the Raman quantum wave packet.

  7. Geochemical Controls on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Rosemary; Prasad, Manika; Keating, Kristina

    2003-11-11

    OAK-B135 Our research objectives are to determine, through an extensive set of laboratory experiments, the effect of the specific mineralogic form of iron and the effect of the distribution of iron on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation mechanisms. In the first nine months of this project, we have refined the experimental procedures to be used in the acquisition of the laboratory NMR data; have ordered, and conducted preliminary measurements on, the sand samples to be used in the experimental work; and have revised and completed the theoretical model to use in this project. Over the next year, our focus will be on completing the first phase of the experimental work where the form and distribution of the iron in the sands in varied.

  8. Chaos suppression in NEMs resonators by using nonlinear control design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tusset, Angelo Marcelo; Bueno, Atila Madureira; Nascimento, Claudinor Bitencourt; Kaster, Mauricio Dos Santos; Balthazar, José Manoel

    2012-11-01

    In this work the chaotic behavior of a micro-mechanical resonator with electrostatic forces on both sides is suppressed. The aim is to control the system in an orbit of the analytical solution obtained by the Method of Multiple Scales. Two control strategies are used for controlling the trajectory of the system, namely: State Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) Control and Optimal Linear Feedback Control (OLFC). The controls proved effectiveness in controlling the trajectory of the system. Additionally, the robustness of each strategy is tested considering the presence of parametric errors and measurement noise in control.

  9. Control of critical coupling in a coiled coaxial cable resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jie; Wei, Tao; Wang, Tao; Fan, Jun; Xiao, Hai

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports a coiled coaxial cable resonator fabricated by cutting a slot in a spring-like coiled coaxial cable to produce a periodic perturbation. Electromagnetic coupling between two neighboring slots was observed. By manipulating the number of slots, critical coupling of the coiled coaxial cable resonator can be well controlled. An ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio (over 50 dB) at the resonant frequency band was experimentally achieved from a coiled coaxial cable resonator with 38 turns. A theoretic model is developed to understand the device physics. The proposed device can be potentially used as a high quality and flexibly designed band-stop filter or a sensor in structural health monitoring.

  10. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Steady and Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamp, Alison M.; Chokani, Ndaona

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study to investigate the effect of steady and oscillatory (with zero net mass flux) blowing on cavity resonance is undertaken. The objective is to study the basic mechanisms of the control of cavity resonance. An actuator is designed and calibrated to generate either steady blowing or oscillatory blowing with A zero net mass flux. The results of the experiment show that both steady and oscillatory blowing are effective, and reduce the amplitude of the dominant resonant mode by 1OdB. The oscillatory blowing is however found to be more superior in that the same effectiveness could be accomplished with a momentum coefficient an order of magnitude smaller than for steady blowing. The experiment also confirms the results of previous computations that suggest the forcing frequency for oscillatory blowing must not be at harmonic frequencies of the cavity resonant modes.

  11. Control of critical coupling in a coiled coaxial cable resonator.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Wei, Tao; Wang, Tao; Fan, Jun; Xiao, Hai

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports a coiled coaxial cable resonator fabricated by cutting a slot in a spring-like coiled coaxial cable to produce a periodic perturbation. Electromagnetic coupling between two neighboring slots was observed. By manipulating the number of slots, critical coupling of the coiled coaxial cable resonator can be well controlled. An ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio (over 50 dB) at the resonant frequency band was experimentally achieved from a coiled coaxial cable resonator with 38 turns. A theoretic model is developed to understand the device physics. The proposed device can be potentially used as a high quality and flexibly designed band-stop filter or a sensor in structural health monitoring.

  12. Helicopter air resonance modeling and suppression using active control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, M. D.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1991-01-01

    A coupled rotor/fuselage helicopter analysis with the important effects of blade torsional flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics, and forward flight is presented. Using this mathematical model, a nominal configuration is selected with an air resonance instability throughout most of its flight envelope. A multivariable compensator is then designed using two swashplate inputs and a single-body roll rate measurement. The controller design is based on the linear quadratic Gaussian technique and the loop transfer recovery method. The controller is shown to suppress the air resonance instability throughout a wide range of helicopter loading conditions and forward flight speeds.

  13. Helicopter air resonance modeling and suppression using active control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, M. D.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1991-01-01

    A coupled rotor/fuselage helicopter analysis with the important effects of blade torsional flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics, and forward flight is presented. Using this mathematical model, a nominal configuration is selected with an air resonance instability throughout most of its flight envelope. A multivariable compensator is then designed using two swashplate inputs and a single-body roll rate measurement. The controller design is based on the linear quadratic Gaussian technique and the loop transfer recovery method. The controller is shown to suppress the air resonance instability throughout a wide range of helicopter loading conditions and forward flight speeds.

  14. Resonance control in SRF cavities at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Schappert, W.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Scorrano, M.; /INFN, Pisa

    2011-03-01

    The Lorentz force can dynamically detune pulsed Superconducting RF cavities. Considerable additional RF power can be required to maintain the accelerating gradient if no effort is made to compensate for this detuning. Compensation systems using piezo actuators have been used successfully at DESY and elsewhere to control Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD). Recently, Fermilab has developed an adaptive compensation system for cavities in the Horizontal Test Stand, in the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, and for the proposed Project X.

  15. Thermo-optical control of dielectric loaded plasmonic racetrack resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, K.; Weeber, J.-C.; Markey, L.; Dereux, A.

    2011-07-01

    The optical properties of racetrack shaped dielectric loaded surface plasmon polariton resonators are studied experimentally for various radius, interaction lengths, and separation gaps between the resonator and the bus waveguide. Using radiation leakage microscopy, their power transmission spectra is recorded over the telecom frequency range and modeled by a notch filter made of a lossy bus waveguide coupled to a lossy resonator. For a typical separation gap around 250 nm, the optimum critical coupling condition is determined by a radius of 6 μm and an interaction length of 2.5 μm. Extinction ratios of the order of -30 dB are reported for resonators featuring quality factors that are found to be of the order of 110. The static thermo-optical control of such racetrack resonators produces a blueshift of the resonance frequency that can be as large as 4.5 nm for a temperature increase of 75 K. Extinction ratio of the order of 9 dB can be achieved between hot and cold states.

  16. Tuned passive control of combustion instabilities using multiple Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dan; Morgans, A. S.

    2009-03-01

    In this work, tuned passive control is used to damp unstable combustion systems, with particular emphasis on systems which exhibit multiple unstable modes. Helmholtz resonators are used as passive dampers. The frequency at which they offer maximum damping is varied by altering their geometry; in this work, geometry changes are achieved by varying the area of the Helmholtz resonator neck. For each unstable mode exhibited by the combustion system, a separate Helmholtz resonator has its neck area tuned. Two algorithms are developed, one for identifying the characteristics of all modes present in real time, and another for tuning the neck areas of the Helmholtz resonators. These algorithms are successfully implemented in numerical simulations of a longitudinal combustor exhibiting two unstable modes. The algorithms result in both modes being stabilised as long as two Helmholtz resonators are used. Experiments are then conducted on a Rijke tube with its upper part split into two branches of differing lengths, shaped like a 'Y'. The differing lengths give rise to two unstable modes at different frequencies. A Helmholtz resonator is attached to each branch; the neck area of both can be varied by means of an 'iris' valve, which opens and closes like a camera lens. On implementing the procedure for tuning the neck areas, both unstable modes are stabilised, and stability is maintained for large changes in operating condition. This confirms that the procedure developed is sufficiently robust for use in real combustion systems exhibiting multiple unstable modes.

  17. Optical distributed sensors for feedback control: Characterization of photorefractive resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indebetouw, Guy; Lindner, D. K.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the project was to explore, define, and assess the possibilities of optical distributed sensing for feedback control. This type of sensor, which may have some impacts in the dynamic control of deformable structures and the monitoring of small displacements, can be divided into data acquisition, data processing, and control design. Analogue optical techniques, because they are noninvasive and afford massive parallelism may play a significant role in the acquisition and the preprocessing of the data for such a sensor. Assessing these possibilities was the aim of the first stage of this project. The scope of the proposed research was limited to: (1) the characterization of photorefractive resonators and the assessment of their possible use as a distributed optical processing element; and (2) the design of a control system utilizing signals from distributed sensors. The results include a numerical and experimental study of the resonator below threshold, an experimental study of the effect of the resonator's transverse confinement on its dynamics above threshold, a numerical study of the resonator above threshold using a modal expansion approach, and the experimental test of this model. A detailed account of each investigation, including methodology and analysis of the results are also included along with reprints of published and submitted papers.

  18. Controlling of explicit internal signal stochastic resonance by external signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya Ping; Wang, Pin; Li, Qian Shu

    2004-09-01

    Explicit internal signal stochastic resonance (EISSR) is investigated in a model of energy transduction of molecular machinery when noise is added to the region of oscillation in the presence of external signal (ES). It is found that EISSR could be controlled, i.e., enhanced or suppressed by adjusting frequency (ωe) and amplitude (A) of ES, and that there exits an optimal frequency for ES, which makes EISSR strength reach the maximum. Meanwhile, a critical amplitude (Ac) is found, which is a threshold of occurrence of EISSR. Finally, the difference and similarity between EISSR and IISSR (implicit internal signal stochastic resonance) are discussed.

  19. Controlling condensate collapse and expansion with an optical Feshbach resonance.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mi; DeSalvo, B J; Ramachandhran, B; Pu, H; Killian, T C

    2013-03-22

    We demonstrate control of the collapse and expansion of an (88)Sr Bose-Einstein condensate using an optical Feshbach resonance near the (1)S(0)-(3)P(1) intercombination transition at 689 nm. Significant changes in dynamics are caused by modifications of scattering length by up to ± 10a(bg), where the background scattering length of (88)Sr is a(bg) = -2a(0) (1a(0) = 0.053 nm). Changes in scattering length are monitored through changes in the size of the condensate after a time-of-flight measurement. Because the background scattering length is close to zero, blue detuning of the optical Feshbach resonance laser with respect to a photoassociative resonance leads to increased interaction energy and a faster condensate expansion, whereas red detuning triggers a collapse of the condensate. The results are modeled with the time-dependent nonlinear Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

  20. Full controlling of Fano resonances in metal-slit superlattice.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zi-Lan; Yogesh, Natesan; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Wen-Jie; Dong, Jian-Wen; Ouyang, Zhengbiao; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-12-18

    Controlling of the lineshape of Fano resonance attracts much attention recently due to its wide capabilities for lasing, biosensing, slow-light applications and so on. However, the controllable Fano resonance always requires stringent alignment of complex symmetry-breaking structures and thus the manipulation could only be performed with limited degrees of freedom and narrow tuning range. Furthermore, there is no report so far on independent controlling of both the bright and dark modes in a single structure. Here, we semi-analytically show that the spectral position and linewidth of both the bright and dark modes can be tuned independently and/or simultaneously in a simple and symmetric metal-slit superlattice, and thus allowing for a free and continuous controlling of the lineshape of both the single and multiple Fano resonances. The independent controlling scheme is applicable for an extremely large electromagnetic spectrum range from optical to microwave frequencies, which is demonstrated by the numerical simulations with real metal and a microwave experiment. Our findings may provide convenient and flexible strategies for future tunable electromagnetic devices.

  1. Full controlling of Fano resonances in metal-slit superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zi-Lan; Yogesh, Natesan; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Wen-Jie; Dong, Jian-Wen; Ouyang, Zhengbiao; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-12-01

    Controlling of the lineshape of Fano resonance attracts much attention recently due to its wide capabilities for lasing, biosensing, slow-light applications and so on. However, the controllable Fano resonance always requires stringent alignment of complex symmetry-breaking structures and thus the manipulation could only be performed with limited degrees of freedom and narrow tuning range. Furthermore, there is no report so far on independent controlling of both the bright and dark modes in a single structure. Here, we semi-analytically show that the spectral position and linewidth of both the bright and dark modes can be tuned independently and/or simultaneously in a simple and symmetric metal-slit superlattice, and thus allowing for a free and continuous controlling of the lineshape of both the single and multiple Fano resonances. The independent controlling scheme is applicable for an extremely large electromagnetic spectrum range from optical to microwave frequencies, which is demonstrated by the numerical simulations with real metal and a microwave experiment. Our findings may provide convenient and flexible strategies for future tunable electromagnetic devices.

  2. Full controlling of Fano resonances in metal-slit superlattice

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zi-Lan; Yogesh, Natesan; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Wen-Jie; Dong, Jian-Wen; Ouyang, Zhengbiao; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-01-01

    Controlling of the lineshape of Fano resonance attracts much attention recently due to its wide capabilities for lasing, biosensing, slow-light applications and so on. However, the controllable Fano resonance always requires stringent alignment of complex symmetry-breaking structures and thus the manipulation could only be performed with limited degrees of freedom and narrow tuning range. Furthermore, there is no report so far on independent controlling of both the bright and dark modes in a single structure. Here, we semi-analytically show that the spectral position and linewidth of both the bright and dark modes can be tuned independently and/or simultaneously in a simple and symmetric metal-slit superlattice, and thus allowing for a free and continuous controlling of the lineshape of both the single and multiple Fano resonances. The independent controlling scheme is applicable for an extremely large electromagnetic spectrum range from optical to microwave frequencies, which is demonstrated by the numerical simulations with real metal and a microwave experiment. Our findings may provide convenient and flexible strategies for future tunable electromagnetic devices. PMID:26680258

  3. Real-time control system for adaptive resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Flath, L; An, J; Brase, J; Hurd, R; Kartz, M; Sawvel, R; Silva, D

    2000-07-24

    Sustained operation of high average power solid-state lasers currently requires an adaptive resonator to produce the optimal beam quality. We describe the architecture of a real-time adaptive control system for correcting intra-cavity aberrations in a heat capacity laser. Image data collected from a wavefront sensor are processed and used to control phase with a high-spatial-resolution deformable mirror. Our controller takes advantage of recent developments in low-cost, high-performance processor technology. A desktop-based computational engine and object-oriented software architecture replaces the high-cost rack-mount embedded computers of previous systems.

  4. Stochastic resonance-a nonlinear control theory interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repperger, D. W.; Farris, K. A.

    2010-07-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is an effect that has been known (Benzi, R., Sutera, A., and Vulpiani, A. (1981), 'The Mechanism of Stochastic Resonance', Journal of Physics, A14, L453-L457) for almost three decades and has been extensively studied in biology, statistics, signal processing and in numerous other eclectic areas (Wiesenfeld, K., and Moss, F. (1995), 'Stochastic Resonance and the Benefits of Noise: From Ice Ages to Crayfish and Squids', Nature, 373, 33-36). Herein, a nonlinear control theory analysis is conducted on how to better understand the class of systems that may exhibit the SR effect. Using nonlinear control theory methods, equilibrium points are manipulated to create the SR response (similar to shaping dynamical response in a phase plane). From this approach, a means of synthesising and designing the appropriate class of nonlinear systems is introduced. New types of nonlinear dynamics that demonstrate the SR effects are discovered, which may have utility in control theory as well as in many diverse applications. A numerical simulation illustrates some powerful attributes of these systems.

  5. Noise control zone for a periodic ducted Helmholtz resonator system.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chenzhi; Mak, Cheuk Ming

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the dispersion characteristics of sound wave propagation in a periodic ducted Helmholtz resonator (HR) system. The predicted result fits well with a numerical simulation using a finite element method. This study indicates that for the same system, no matter how many HRs are connected or what the periodic distance is, the area under average transmission loss T L¯ curves is always the same. The broader the noise attenuation band, the lower the peak attenuation amplitude. A noise control zone compromising the attenuation bandwidth or peak amplitude is proposed for noise control optimization.

  6. Force Control by Flexible Manipulator Based on Resonance Ratio Control using Position Sensitive Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Seiichiro; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    This paper presents a novel force controller to suppress torsional vibration of two-mass resonant system. The resonance ratio control is one of the effective control methods of two-mass resonant system. In this method, the ratio between the resonant frequency of motor and arm is determined arbitrary according to the feedback of estimated reaction torque. The reaction torque is estimated by using position sensitive detector (PSD). Since the estimation method does not need the parameter identification, the torsion information is obtained with accuracy. To attain the affinity and adaptability to environment, motion systems should control the reaction force from the environment. In the force control system, the force response is regarded as a disturbance of the arm portion. The arm disturbance is observed by the arm disturbance observer. The proposed force control system is based on both the conventional PD control and the resonance ratio control and the determination method of pole placement is discussed. The proposed force control system can realize both the suppression of the inner torsional reaction torque and the adaptation to outer force inputs. The numerical and experimental results show viability of the proposed method.

  7. Study to eliminate ground resonance using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effectiveness of active control blade feathering in increasing rotor body damping and the possibility to eliminate ground resonance instabilities were investigated. An analytical model representing rotor flapping and lead-lag degrees of freedom and body pitch, roll, longitudinal and lateral motion is developed. Active control blade feathering is implemented as state variable feedback through a conventional swashplate. The influence of various feedback states, feedback gain, and weighting between the cyclic controls is studied through stability and response analyses. It is shown that blade cyclic inplane motion, roll rate and roll acceleration feedback can add considerable damping to the system and eliminate ground resonance instabilities, which the feedback phase is also a powerful parameter, if chosen properly, it maximizes augmentation of the inherent regressing lag mode damping. It is shown that rotor configuration parameters, like blade root hinge offset, flapping stiffness, and precone considerably influence the control effectiveness. It is found that active control is particularly powerful for hingeless and bearingless rotor systems.

  8. Gate-controlled resonant interband tunneling in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlmaier, S.; Bhuwalka, Krishna K.; Ludsteck, A.; Schmidt, M.; Schulze, J.; Hansch, W.; Eisele, I.

    2004-09-06

    We present gate-controlled resonant interband tunneling on silicon <111>. The investigated structure principally consists of a vertical, gated p-i-n diode grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We evaluated the surface tunnel current from a gate-induced two-dimensional electron channel into the quantized hole states of a degenerately doped {delta}p{sup +} layer. This current reveals a negative differential resistance due to resonant interband tunneling in the forward biased p-i-n diode at 200 K. Even at room temperature the influence of this tunnel mechanism is observed. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulated band diagrams and their dependence on the applied voltages.

  9. Adaptive resonator control techniques for high-power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R.H.; Spinhirne, J.M.; Anafi, D.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental results and interpretations for correcting tilt and astigmatism aberrations using intracavity adaptive optics versus extracavity adaptive optics are presented, along with control algorithm and resonator design considerations when utilizing a multidither COAT control system for astigmatism and tilt correction. It is shown that in a high-power device, PIB (Power-in-the-Bucket) optimization, with the possible added requirement of extracavity beam clean-up to achieve good beam quality, would be a more desirable control algorithm than BQ (beam quality) optimization. Zonal multidither hill-climbing servo COAT techniques applied to tilt correction fail to achieve good correction for large tilt amplitudes when the control loop is closed after tilt is introduced. Therefore, it is suggested that a separate tilt sensor be used to provide error signal for correction of tilt and let the multidither system COAT correct for higher order aberrations

  10. Controlling chaos-assisted directed transport via quantum resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Jintao; Zou, Mingliang; Luo, Yunrong; Hai, Wenhua

    2016-06-15

    We report on the first demonstration of chaos-assisted directed transport of a quantum particle held in an amplitude-modulated and tilted optical lattice, through a resonance-induced double-mean displacement relating to the true classically chaotic orbits. The transport velocity is controlled by the driving amplitude and the sign of tilt, and also depends on the phase of the initial state. The chaos-assisted transport feature can be verified experimentally by using a source of single atoms to detect the double-mean displacement one by one, and can be extended to different scientific fields.

  11. Noise control using a plate radiator and an acoustic resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control subassembly for reducing noise caused by a source (such as an aircraft engine) independent of the subassembly. A noise radiating panel is bendably vibratable to generate a panel noise canceling at least a portion of the source noise. A piezoceramic actuator plate is connected to the panel. A front plate is spaced apart from the panel and the first plate, is positioned generally between the source noise and the panel, and has a sound exit port. A first pair of spaced-apart side walls each generally abut the panel and the front plate so as to generally enclose a front cavity to define a resonator.

  12. Mode Orientation Control For Sapphire Dielectric Ring Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, David G.; Dick, G. John; Prata, Aluizio

    1996-01-01

    Small sapphire tuning wedge used in technique for solving mode-purity problem associated with sapphire dielectric-ring resonator part of cryogenic microwave frequency discriminator. Breaks quasi-degeneracy of two modes and allows selective coupling to just one mode. Wedge mounted on axle entering resonator cavity and rotated while resonator cryogenically operating in vacuum. Furthermore, axle moved vertically to tune resonant frequency.

  13. Sculpting Fano Resonances To Control Photonic-Plasmonic Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Niket; Rea, Morgan T; Smith, Kevin C; Heylman, Kevin D; Quillin, Steven C; Knapper, Kassandra A; Horak, Erik H; Masiello, David J; Goldsmith, Randall H

    2017-10-10

    Hybrid photonic-plasmonic systems have tremendous potential as versatile platforms for the study and control of nanoscale light-matter interactions since their respective components have either high-quality factors or low mode volumes. Individual metallic nanoparticles deposited on optical microresonators provide an excellent example where ultrahigh-quality optical whispering-gallery modes can be combined with nanoscopic plasmonic mode volumes to maximize the system's photonic performance. Such optimization, however, is difficult in practice because of the inability to easily measure and tune critical system parameters. In this Letter, we present a general and practical method to determine the coupling strength and tailor the degree of hybridization in composite optical microresonator-plasmonic nanoparticle systems based on experimentally measured absorption spectra. Specifically, we use thermal annealing to control the detuning between a metal nanoparticle's localized surface plasmon resonance and the whispering-gallery modes of an optical microresonator cavity. We demonstrate the ability to sculpt Fano resonance lineshapes in the absorption spectrum and infer system parameters critical to elucidating the underlying photonic-plasmonic hybridization. We show that including decoherence processes is necessary to capture the evolution of the lineshapes. As a result, thermal annealing allows us to directly tune the degree of hybridization and various hybrid mode quantities such as the quality factor and mode volume and ultimately maximize the Purcell factor to be 10(4).

  14. Ultraefficient cooling of resonators: beating sideband cooling with quantum control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoting; Vinjanampathy, Sai; Strauch, Frederick W; Jacobs, Kurt

    2011-10-21

    The present state of the art in cooling mechanical resonators is a version of sideband cooling. Here we present a method that uses the same configuration as sideband cooling-coupling the resonator to be cooled to a second microwave (or optical) auxiliary resonator-but will cool significantly colder. This is achieved by varying the strength of the coupling between the two resonators over a time on the order of the period of the mechanical resonator. As part of our analysis, we also obtain a method for fast, high-fidelity quantum information transfer between resonators. © 2011 American Physical Society

  15. Control of photoemission delay in resonant two-photon transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenti, L.; Jiménez-Galán, Á.; Caillat, J.; Taïeb, R.; Maquet, A.; Martín, F.

    2017-04-01

    The photoelectron emission time delay τ associated with one-photon absorption, which coincides with half the Wigner delay τW experienced by an electron scattered off the ionic potential, is a fundamental descriptor of the photoelectric effect. Although it is hard to access directly from experiment, it is possible to infer it from the time delay of two-photon transitions, τ(2 ), measured with attosecond pump-probe schemes, provided that the contribution of the probe stage can be factored out. In the absence of resonances, τ can be expressed as the energy derivative of the one-photon ionization amplitude phase, τ =∂EargDE g , and, to a good approximation, τ =τ(2 )-τcc , where τcc is associated with the dipole transition between Coulomb functions. Here we show that, in the presence of a resonance, the correspondence between τ and ∂EargDE g is lost. Furthermore, while τ(2 ) can still be written as the energy derivative of the two-photon ionization amplitude phase, ∂EargDEg (2 ) , it does not have any scattering counterpart. Indeed, τ(2 ) can be much larger than the lifetime of an intermediate resonance in the two-photon process or more negative than the lower bound imposed on scattering delays by causality. Finally, we show that τ(2 ) is controlled by the frequency of the probe pulse, ωIR , so that by varying ωIR , it is possible to radically alter the photoelectron group delay.

  16. Controlling bi-anisotropy in infrared metamaterials using three-dimensional split-ring-resonators for purely magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Moritake, Yuto; Tanaka, Takuo

    2017-07-27

    We propose and demonstrate the strategy to control bi-anisotropic response in three-dimensional split-ring-resonators (3D-SRRs) array for purely magnetic resonance in the mid-infrared region. By using a metal-stress-driven self-folding method, inversion symmetry along a propagation axis of 3D-SRRs was controlled. The inversion symmetry of 3D-SRRs realized non-bi-anisotropic response of a magnetic resonant mode at around 10 μm in wavelength resulting in purely magnetic resonance with high transmission of 70%. Highly transparent purely magnetic artificial elements demonstrated in this study will be a key component for functional applications using artificial magnetism at the optical frequencies.

  17. An actively controlled silicon ring resonator with a fully tunable Fano resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, A.; Bogaerts, W.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a novel way to generate Fano resonance with tunable wavelength, extinction ratio, and slope rate. The device is a silicon add-drop microring with two integrated tunable reflectors inside, which form an embedded Fabry-Perot cavity. The fabrication is executed at a commercial CMOS foundry. Fano resonance at the drop port is generated from the interference between the Fabry-Perot cavity mode and the ring resonance mode. By tuning the reflectivities of these two reflectors with integrated heaters, various Fano resonance shapes can be achieved with a maximum extinction ratio over 40 dB and a slope rate more than 700 dB/nm.

  18. Sawtooth control in JET with ITER relevant low field side resonance ion cyclotron resonance heating and ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, J. P.; Lennholm, M.; Chapman, I. T.; Lerche, E.; Reich, M.; Alper, B.; Bobkov, V.; Dumont, R.; Faustin, J. M.; Jacquet, P.; Jaulmes, F.; Johnson, T.; Keeling, D. L.; Liu, Yueqiang; Nicolas, T.; Tholerus, S.; Blackman, T.; Carvalho, I. S.; Coelho, R.; Van Eester, D.; Felton, R.; Goniche, M.; Kiptily, V.; Monakhov, I.; Nave, M. F. F.; Perez von Thun, C.; Sabot, R.; Sozzi, C.; Tsalas, M.

    2015-01-01

    New experiments at JET with the ITER-like wall show for the first time that ITER-relevant low field side resonance first harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) can be used to control sawteeth that have been initially lengthened by fast particles. In contrast to previous (Graves et al 2012 Nat. Commun. 3 624) high field side resonance sawtooth control experiments undertaken at JET, it is found that the sawteeth of L-mode plasmas can be controlled with less accurate alignment between the resonance layer and the sawtooth inversion radius. This advantage, as well as the discovery that sawteeth can be shortened with various antenna phasings, including dipole, indicates that ICRH is a particularly effective and versatile tool that can be used in future fusion machines for controlling sawteeth. Without sawtooth control, neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) and locked modes were triggered at very low normalised beta. High power H-mode experiments show the extent to which ICRH can be tuned to control sawteeth and NTMs while simultaneously providing effective electron heating with improved flushing of high Z core impurities. Dedicated ICRH simulations using SELFO, SCENIC and EVE, including wide drift orbit effects, explain why sawtooth control is effective with various antenna phasings and show that the sawtooth control mechanism cannot be explained by enhancement of the magnetic shear. Hybrid kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic stability calculations using MISHKA and HAGIS unravel the optimal sawtooth control regimes in these ITER relevant plasma conditions.

  19. Electro-Mechanical Actuator. DC Resonant Link Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, Kenneth E.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed on the 68 HP electro-mechanical actuator (EMA) system developed on NASA contract for the Electrical Actuation (ELA) Technology Bridging Program. The system was designed to demonstrate the capability of large, high power linear ELAs for applications such as Thrust Vector Control (TVC) on rocket engines. It consists of a motor controller, drive electronics and a linear actuator capable of up to 32,00 lbs loading at 7.4 inches/second. The drive electronics are based on the Resonant DC link concept and operate at a nominal frequency of 55 kHz. The induction motor is a specially designed high speed, low inertia motor capable of a 68 peak HP. The actuator was originally designed by MOOG Aerospace under an internal R & D program to meet Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) TVC requirements. The design was modified to meet this programs linear rate specification of 7.4 inches/second. The motor and driver were tested on a dynamometer at the Martin Marietta Space Systems facility. System frequency response, step response and force-velocity tests were conducted at the MOOG Aerospace facility. A complete description of the system and all test results can be found in the body of the report.

  20. Ultrafast electrical control of a resonantly driven single photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Bennett, A. J. Ellis, D. J. P.; Shields, A. J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate generation of a pulsed stream of electrically triggered single photons in resonance fluorescence, by applying high frequency electrical pulses to a single quantum dot in a p-i-n diode under resonant laser excitation. Single photon emission was verified, with the probability of multiple photon emission reduced to 2.8%. We show that despite the presence of charge noise in the emission spectrum of the dot, resonant excitation acts as a “filter” to generate narrow bandwidth photons.

  1. Quantum interference control of an isolated resonance lifetime in the weak-field limit.

    PubMed

    García-Vela, A

    2015-11-21

    Resonance states play an important role in a large variety of physical and chemical processes. Thus, controlling the resonance behavior, and particularly a key property like the resonance lifetime, opens up the possibility of controlling those resonance mediated processes. While such a resonance control is possible by applying strong-field approaches, the development of flexible weak-field control schemes that do not alter significantly the system dynamics still remains a challenge. In this work, one such control scheme within the weak-field regime is proposed for the first time in order to modify the lifetime of an isolated resonance state. The basis of the scheme suggested is quantum interference between two pathways induced by laser fields, that pump wave packet amplitude to the target resonance under control. The simulations reported here show that the scheme allows for both enhancement and quenching of the resonance survival lifetime, being particularly flexible to achieve large lifetime enhancements. Control effects on the resonance lifetime take place only while the pulse is operating. In addition, the conditions required to generate the two interfering quantum pathways are found to be rather easy to meet for general systems, which makes the experimental implementation straightforward and implies the wide applicability of the control scheme.

  2. All-optical control of microfiber resonator by graphene's photothermal effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yadong; Gan, Xuetao; Zhao, Chenyang; Fang, Liang; Mao, Dong; Zhang, Fanlu; Xi, Teli; Zhao, Jianlin; Xu, Yiping; Ren, Liyong

    2016-04-25

    We demonstrate an efficient all-optical control of microfiber resonator assisted by graphene's photothermal effect. Wrapping graphene onto a microfiber resonator, the light-graphene interaction can be strongly enhanced via the resonantly circulating light, which enables a significant modulation of the resonance with a resonant wavelength shift rate of 71 pm/mW when pumped by a 1540 nm laser. The optically controlled resonator enables the implementation of low threshold optical bistability and switching with an extinction ratio exceeding 13 dB. The thin and compact structure promises a fast response speed of the control, with a rise (fall) time of 294.7 μs (212.2 μs) following the 10%–90% rule. The proposed device, with the advantages of compact structure, all-optical control, and low power acquirement, offers great potential in the miniaturization of active in-fiber photonic devices.

  3. Sonic resonator control and method for determining component concentration in multiple component molten liquids

    DOEpatents

    Shen, Sin-Yan

    1984-01-01

    This invention teaches a control to be used in smelting aluminum by the electrolysis breakdown of alumina (A1.sub.2 O.sub.3) in a molten electrolyte heated to approximately 950.degree.-1000.degree. C. The invention provides a sonic resonator and control that can accurately detect the resonant frequency of the resonator in the molten electrolyte. The resonator preferably is made with tubular side wall 1/4 of the sonic wavelength, or is a quarter wave resonator. A wave generator inputs a signal having a range of frequencies that includes the resonant frequency, so that a peak resonant output at the resonant frequency can be detected on an oscilloscope or like detector. This instantaneous resonant frequency is then checked against an accurate data base correlating the resonant frequencies of the resonator in the electrolyte at specific alumina concentrations normally experienced throughout the electrolysis cycle. The electrolysis cycle can thus be controlled and recharged at any predetermined low alumina concentration greater than where the anode effect phase of the cycle normally might begin.

  4. Theory of electrically controlled resonant tunneling spin devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. -Y.; Cartoixa, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    We report device concepts that exploit spin-orbit coupling for creating spin polarized current sources using nonmagnetic semiconductor resonant tunneling heterostructures, without external magnetic fields. The resonant interband tunneling psin filter exploits large valence band spin-orbit interaction to provide strong spin selectivity.

  5. Theory of electrically controlled resonant tunneling spin devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. -Y.; Cartoixa, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    We report device concepts that exploit spin-orbit coupling for creating spin polarized current sources using nonmagnetic semiconductor resonant tunneling heterostructures, without external magnetic fields. The resonant interband tunneling psin filter exploits large valence band spin-orbit interaction to provide strong spin selectivity.

  6. Phonon assisted resonant tunneling and its phonons control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmartsev, F. V.; Krevchik, V. D.; Semenov, M. B.; Filatov, D. O.; Shorokhov, A. V.; Bukharaev, A. A.; Dakhnovsky, Y.; Nikolaev, A. V.; Pyataev, N. A.; Zaytsev, R. V.; Krevchik, P. V.; Egorov, I. A.; Yamamoto, K.; Aringazin, A. K.

    2016-09-01

    We observe a series of sharp resonant features in the tunneling differential conductance of InAs quantum dots. We found that dissipative quantum tunneling has a strong influence on the operation of nanodevices. Because of such tunneling the current-voltage characteristics of tunnel contact created between atomic force microscope tip and a surface of InAs/GaAs quantum dots display many interesting peaks. We found that the number, position, and heights of these peaks are associated with the phonon modes involved. To describe the found effect we use a quasi-classical approximation. There the tunneling current is related to a creation of a dilute instanton-anti-instanton gas. Our experimental data are well described with exactly solvable model where one charged particle is weakly interacting with two promoting phonon modes associated with external medium. We conclude that the characteristics of the tunnel nanoelectronic devices can thus be controlled by a proper choice of phonons existing in materials, which are involved.

  7. Controlling normal incident optical waves with an integrated resonator.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ciyuan; Xu, Qianfan

    2011-12-19

    We show a diffraction-based coupling scheme that allows a micro-resonator to directly manipulate a free-space optical beam at normal incidence. We demonstrate a high-Q micro-gear resonator with a 1.57-um radius whose vertical transmission and reflection change 40% over a wavelength range of only 0.3 nm. Without the need to be attached to a waveguide, a dense 2D array of such resonators can be integrated on a chip for spatial light modulation and parallel bio-sensing.

  8. Controllable optomechanical coupling in serially-coupled triple resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chenguang Zhao, Yunsong; Fan, Jiahua; Zhu, Lin

    2014-12-15

    Radiation pressure can efficiently couple mechanical modes with optical modes in an optical cavity. The coupling efficiency is quite dependent on the interaction between the optical mode and mechanical mode. In this report, we investigate a serially-coupled triple resonator system, where a freestanding beam is placed in the vicinity of the middle resonator. In this coupled system, we demonstrate that the mechanical mode of the free-standing beam can be selectively coupled to different resonance supermodes through the near field interaction.

  9. Frequency control of photonic crystal membrane resonators by monolayer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauf, S.; Rakher, M. T.; Carmeli, I.; Hennessy, K.; Meier, C.; Badolato, A.; DeDood, M. J. A.; Petroff, P. M.; Hu, E. L.; Gwinn, E. G.; Bouwmeester, D.

    2006-01-01

    We study the response of GaAs photonic crystal membrane resonators to thin-film deposition. Slow spectral shifts of the cavity mode of several nanometers are observed at low temperatures, caused by cryo-gettering of background molecules. Heating the membrane resets the drift and shielding will prevent drift altogether. In order to explore the drift as a tool to detect surface layers, or to intentionally shift the cavity resonance frequency, we studied the effect of self-assembled monolayers of polypeptide molecules attached to the membranes. The 2-nm-thick monolayers lead to a discrete step in the resonance frequency and partially passivate the surface.

  10. Controlling interactions between highly magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances.

    PubMed

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic (7)S3 chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on dysprosium and erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P-states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  11. Oscillation control algorithms for resonant sensors with applications to vibratory gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungsu; Tan, Chin-Woo; Kim, Haedong; Hong, Sung Kyung

    2009-01-01

    We present two oscillation control algorithms for resonant sensors such as vibratory gyroscopes. One control algorithm tracks the resonant frequency of the resonator and the other algorithm tunes it to the specified resonant frequency by altering the resonator dynamics. Both algorithms maintain the specified amplitude of oscillations. The stability of each of the control systems is analyzed using the averaging method, and quantitative guidelines are given for selecting the control gains needed to achieve stability. The effects of displacement measurement noise on the accuracy of tracking and estimation of the resonant frequency are also analyzed. The proposed control algorithms are applied to two important problems in a vibratory gyroscope. The first is the leading-following resonator problem in the drive axis of MEMS dual-mass vibratory gyroscope where there is no mechanical linkage between the two proof-masses and the second is the on-line modal frequency matching problem in a general vibratory gyroscope. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed control algorithms are effective. They ensure the proof-masses to oscillate in an anti-phase manner with the same resonant frequency and oscillation amplitude in a dual-mass gyroscope, and two modal frequencies to match in a general vibratory gyroscope.

  12. Controllable coupling between a nanomechanical resonator and a coplanar-waveguide resonator via a superconducting flux qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei; Jin, Da-Yu; Jing, Jun; Lam, Chi-Hang; You, J. Q.

    2015-09-01

    We study a tripartite quantum system consisting of a coplanar-waveguide (CPW) resonator and a nanomechanical resonator (NAMR) connected by a flux qubit, where the flux qubit has a large detuning from both resonators. By a unitary transformation and a second-order approximation, we obtain a strong and controllable (i.e., magnetic-field-dependent) effective coupling between the NAMR and the CPW resonator. Due to the strong coupling, vacuum Rabi splitting can be observed from the voltage-fluctuation spectrum of the CPW resonator. We further study the properties of single-photon transport as inferred from the reflectance or equivalently the transmittance. We show that the reflectance and the corresponding phase-shift spectra both exhibit doublet of narrow spectral features due to vacuum Rabi splitting. By tuning the external magnetic field, the reflectance and the phase shift can be varied from 0 to 1 and -π to π , respectively. The results indicate that this hybrid quantum system can act as a quantum router.

  13. Noise control for a ChamberCore cylindrical structure using long T-shaped acoustic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deyu; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    2003-10-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate has developed a new advanced composite launch vehicle fairing (referred to as ``ChamberCore''). The ChamberCore is sandwich-type structure fabricated from multi-layered composite face sheets separated by channels that form passive acoustic chambers. These acoustic chambers have a potential to create an acoustic resonator network that can be used to attenuate noise inside the closed ChamberCore cylindrical structure. In this study, first, the feasibility of using cylindrical Helmholtz resonators to control noise in a mock-scale ChamberCore composite cylinder is investigated. The targeted frequencies for noise control are the first four acoustic cavity resonances of the ChamberCore cylinder. The optimal position of the Helmholtz resonators for controlling each targeted cavity mode is discussed, and the effects of resonator spacing on noise attenuation are also experimentally evaluated. Next, six long T-shaped acoustic resonators are designed and constructed within the acoustic chambers of the structure and investigated. Several tests are conducted to evaluate the noise control ability of the resonators in the ChamberCore cylinder. Reductions ranging from 3.2 to 6.0 dB were observed in the overall mean-square noise reduction spectrum at the targeted inner cavity resonance frequencies. [Work supported by AFRL/DV.

  14. Application of extremum seeking for time-varying systems to resonance control of RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander

    2016-09-13

    A recently developed form of extremum seeking for time-varying systems is implemented in hardware for the resonance control of radio-frequency cavities without phase measurements. Normal conducting RF cavity resonance control is performed via a slug tuner, while superconducting TESLA-type cavity resonance control is performed via piezo actuators. The controller maintains resonance by minimizing reflected power by utilizing model-independent adaptive feedback. Unlike standard phase-measurement-based resonance control, the presented approach is not sensitive to arbitrary phase shifts of the RF signals due to temperature-dependent cable length or phasemeasurement hardware changes. The phase independence of this method removes common slowly varying drifts and required periodic recalibration of phase-based methods. A general overview of the adaptive controller is presented along with the proof of principle experimental results at room temperature. Lastly, this method allows us to both maintain a cavity at a desired resonance frequency and also to dynamically modify its resonance frequency to track the unknown time-varying frequency of an RF source, thereby maintaining maximal cavity field strength, based only on power-level measurements.

  15. Application of extremum seeking for time-varying systems to resonance control of RF cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Scheinker, Alexander

    2016-09-13

    A recently developed form of extremum seeking for time-varying systems is implemented in hardware for the resonance control of radio-frequency cavities without phase measurements. Normal conducting RF cavity resonance control is performed via a slug tuner, while superconducting TESLA-type cavity resonance control is performed via piezo actuators. The controller maintains resonance by minimizing reflected power by utilizing model-independent adaptive feedback. Unlike standard phase-measurement-based resonance control, the presented approach is not sensitive to arbitrary phase shifts of the RF signals due to temperature-dependent cable length or phasemeasurement hardware changes. The phase independence of this method removes common slowly varying drifts andmore » required periodic recalibration of phase-based methods. A general overview of the adaptive controller is presented along with the proof of principle experimental results at room temperature. Lastly, this method allows us to both maintain a cavity at a desired resonance frequency and also to dynamically modify its resonance frequency to track the unknown time-varying frequency of an RF source, thereby maintaining maximal cavity field strength, based only on power-level measurements.« less

  16. Application of extremum seeking for time-varying systems to resonance control of RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander

    2016-09-13

    A recently developed form of extremum seeking for time-varying systems is implemented in hardware for the resonance control of radio-frequency cavities without phase measurements. Normal conducting RF cavity resonance control is performed via a slug tuner, while superconducting TESLA-type cavity resonance control is performed via piezo actuators. The controller maintains resonance by minimizing reflected power by utilizing model-independent adaptive feedback. Unlike standard phase-measurement-based resonance control, the presented approach is not sensitive to arbitrary phase shifts of the RF signals due to temperature-dependent cable length or phasemeasurement hardware changes. The phase independence of this method removes common slowly varying drifts and required periodic recalibration of phase-based methods. A general overview of the adaptive controller is presented along with the proof of principle experimental results at room temperature. Lastly, this method allows us to both maintain a cavity at a desired resonance frequency and also to dynamically modify its resonance frequency to track the unknown time-varying frequency of an RF source, thereby maintaining maximal cavity field strength, based only on power-level measurements.

  17. Temperature compensation method for the resonant frequency of a differential vibrating accelerometer using electrostatic stiffness control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungshin; Rhim, Jaewook

    2012-09-01

    Differential vibrating accelerometer (DVA) is a resonant-type sensor which detects the change in the resonant frequency in the presence of acceleration input, i.e. inertial loading. However, the resonant frequency of micromachined silicon resonators is sensitive to the temperature change as well as the input acceleration. Therefore, to design a high-precision vibrating accelerometer, the temperature sensitivity of the resonant frequency has to be predicted and compensated accurately. In this study, a temperature compensation method for resonant frequency is proposed which controls the electrostatic stiffness of the dual-ended tuning fork (DETF) using the temperature-dependent dc voltage between the parallel plate electrodes. To do this, the electromechanical model is derived first to predict the change in the electrostatic stiffness and the resonant frequency resulting from the dc voltage between the resonator and the electrodes. Next, the temperature sensitivity of the resonant frequency is modeled, estimated and compared with the measured values. Then it is shown that the resonant frequency of the DETF can be kept constant in the operating temperature range by applying the temperature-dependent driving voltage to the parallel plate electrodes. The proposed method is validated through experiment.

  18. Fast resonator reset in circuit QED using open quantum system optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Samuel; Andersen, Christian Kraglund; Venkatraman, Jayameenakshi; Blais, Alexandre

    Practical implementations of quantum information processing requires repetitive qubit readout. In circuit QED, where readout is performed using a resonator dispersively coupled to the qubits, the measurement repetition rate is limited by the resonator reset time. This reset is usually performed passively by waiting several resonator decay times. Alternatively, it was recently shown that a simple pulse sequence allows to decrease the reset time to twice the resonator decay time. In this work, we show how to further optimize the ring-down pulse sequence by using optimal control theory for open quantum systems. Using a new implementation of the open GRAPE algorithm that is well suited to large Hilbert spaces, we find active resonator reset procedures that are faster than a single resonator decay time. Simple quantum speed limits for this kind of active reset processes will be discussed

  19. 90-deg splicing error control in polarization maintaining fiber resonator based on white-light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huizu; Yao, Qiong; Hu, Yongming; Ma, Lina

    2012-05-01

    Polarization fluctuation in polarization maintaining fiber (PMF) resonator is one of the major noise sources in resonant fiber optic gyroscope (R-FOG). 90-deg polarization-axis rotated splicing in R-FOG is an effective way to suppress the polarization-fluctuation induced noise. 90-deg polarization-axis rotated splicing error influences the noise suppression effect. Here, a polarization-coupling testing system based on white-light interferometry is designed to control 90-deg splicing error in double-coupler PMF resonator first time and a result of 0.37-deg splicing error is obtained for the first time. Then the resonant characteristics of the double-coupler PMF resonator are tested using the saw-tooth waveform scanning method. The finesse of this double-coupler PMF resonator is 24.0 and the phase interval of the two eigenstates of polarization (ESOPs) is π.

  20. Miniaturized Dual-Band Bandpass Filter Using Embedded Dual-Mode Resonator with Controllable Bandwidths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chuanming; Xu, Jin; Kang, Wei; Hu, Zhenxin; Wu, Wen

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a miniaturized dual-band bandpass filter (DB-BPF) using embedded dual-mode resonator (DMR) with controllable bandwidths is proposed. Two passbands are generated by two sets of resonators operating at two different frequencies. One set of resonators is utilized not only as the resonant elements that yield the lower passband, but also as the feeding structures with source-load coupling to excite the other to produce the upper passband. Sufficient degrees of freedom are achieved to control the center frequencies and bandwidths of two passbands. Moreover, multiple transmission zeros (TZs) are created to improve the passband selectivity of the filter. The design of the filter has been demonstrated by the measurement. The filter features not only miniaturized circuit sizes, low insertion loss, independently controllable central frequencies, but also controllable bandwidths and TZs.

  1. Control of the Dissipation Dynamics of Nanomechanical Resonator in Viscous Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-24

    REPORT Control of the dissipation dynamics of nanomechanical resonator in viscous media 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This research aims...to quantify and control the dissipation dynamics of NEMS device in fluid and eventually recover the quality factor of NEMS device in fluid. Our...approach bases upon innovative modeling of micromechanical damping dynamics and exploitation of anti-damping in optomechanical resonators parametrically

  2. Location optimization of a long T-shaped acoustic resonator array in noise control of enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ganghua; Cheng, Li

    2009-11-01

    Acoustic resonators are widely used in various noise control applications. In the pursuit of better performance and broad band control, multiple resonators or a resonator array are usually needed. The interaction among resonators significantly impacts on the control performance and leads to the requirement for a systematic design tool to determine their locations. In this work, simulated annealing (SA) algorithm is employed to optimize the locations of a set of long T-shaped acoustic resonators (TARs) for noise control inside an enclosure. Multiple optimal configurations are shown to exist. The control performance in terms of sound pressure level reduction, however, seems to be independent of the initial resonator-locations. Optimal solutions obtained from the SA approach are shown to outperform other existing methods for a TAR array design. Numerical simulations are systematically verified by experiments. Optimal locations are then synthesized, leading to a set of criteria, applicable to the present configuration, to guide engineering applications. It is concluded that the proposed optimization approach provides a systematic and effective tool to optimize the locations of TARs in noise control inside enclosures.

  3. Improved Control Strategy for Subsynchronous Resonance Mitigation with Fractional-order PI Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, D. Koteswara; Umre, Bhimrao S.; Junghare, A. S.; Chitti Babu, B.

    2016-12-01

    This paper explores a robust Fractional-order PI (FOPI) controller to diminish Subsynchronous Resonance (SSR) using Static Synchronous series compensator (SSSC). The diminution of SSR is accomplished by increasing the network damping with the injection of voltage of subsynchronous component into the line at those frequencies which are proximate to the torsional mode frequency of the turbine-generator shaft. The voltage of subsynchronous frequency component is extracted from the transmission line and further the similar quantity of series voltage is injected by SSSC into the line to make the current of subsynchronous frequency component to zero which is the major source of oscillations in the turbine-generator shaft. The insertion and fine tuning of Fractional-order PI controller in the control scheme of SSSC the subsynchronous oscillations are reduced to 4 % as compared to conventional PI controller. The studied system is modelled and simulated using MATLAB-Simulink and the results are analysed to show the precision and robustness of the proposed control strategy.

  4. Controllable scattering of photons in a one-dimensional resonator waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C. P.; Zhou, L.; Gong, Z. R.; Liu, Y. X.; Nori, F.

    2009-03-01

    We analyze the coherent transport of a single photon, which propagates in a one-dimensional coupled-resonator waveguide and is scattered by a controllable two-level system located inside one of the resonators of this waveguide. Our approach, which uses discrete coordinates, unifies low and high energy effective theories for single-photon scattering. We show that the controllable two-level system can behave as a quantum switch for the coherent transport of a single photon. This study may inspire new electro-optical single-photon quantum devices. We also suggest an experimental setup based on superconducting transmission line resonators and qubits. [4pt] L. Zhou, Z.R. Gong, Y.X. Liu, C.P. Sun, F. Nori, Controllable scattering of photons in a 1D resonator waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 100501 (2008). URL: http://link.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v101/e100501

  5. Identifying microwave magnetic resonance in chiral elements for creation of controlled matched absorbing metastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraftmakher, G. A.; Butylkin, V. S.; Kazantsev, Yu. N.; Mal'tsev, V. P.; Temirov, Yu. Sh.

    2017-01-01

    It has been suggested a method for identifying and separating magnetic and electric microwave resonance responses of conductive chiral and bianisotropic elements by reflection of electromagnetic waves in the standing and traveling-wave modes. It has been observed experimentally (in waveguide) and confirmed numerically (in free space) that magnetic resonance, which is excited by microwave magnetic field h, and electric resonances, excited by electric field E, show drastically different resonance curves of reflection. These distinctions allow to identifying the magnetic resonance response and using magnetically excited elements for broadband matching of absorbers instead of traditional quarter-wavelength layer. We have fabricated and investigated matched absorbing metastructures which are controlled by voltage as well by light of remote laser pointer.

  6. Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration improves postural control in health care professionals: a worksite randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Elfering, Achim; Schade, Volker; Stoecklin, Lukas; Baur, Simone; Burger, Christian; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2014-05-01

    Slip, trip, and fall injuries are frequent among health care workers. Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training was tested to improve postural control. Participants included 124 employees of a Swiss university hospital. The randomized controlled trial included an experimental group given 8 weeks of training and a control group with no intervention. In both groups, postural control was assessed as mediolateral sway on a force plate before and after the 8-week trial. Mediolateral sway was significantly decreased by stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training in the experimental group but not in the control group that received no training (p < .05). Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training is an option in the primary prevention of balance-related injury at work.

  7. Nonlinear Phenomena and Resonant Parametric Perturbation Control in QR-ZCS Buck DC-DC Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Fei-Hu; Liu, Feng-Shao; Hsieh, Hui-Chang

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the chaotic phenomena and to control in current-mode controlled quasi-resonant zero-current-switching (QR-ZCS) DC-DC buck converters, and to present control of chaos by resonant parametric perturbation control methods. First of all, MATLAB/SIMULINK is used to derive a mathematical model for QR-ZCS DC-DC buck converters, and to simulate the converters to observe the waveform of output voltages, inductance currents and phase-plane portraits from the period-doubling bifurcation to chaos by changing the load resistances. Secondly, using resonant parametric perturbation control in QR-ZCS buck DC-DC converters, the simulation results of the chaotic converter form chaos state turn into stable state period 1, and improve ripple amplitudes of converters under the chaos, to verify the validity of the proposes method.

  8. Acoustic resonators for noise control in enclosures: Modelling, design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ganghua

    approach, the simulated annealing algorithm, and the genetic algorithm. Simulations show that three optimization approaches can all achieve good control performance to different extent. Optimization results reveal the existence of multiple optimal location-configurations of the resonator array. These optimal configurations are verified by experiments. Considering the plural nature of the solutions, engineering design criteria are also proposed. The feasibility and usefulness of this research is demonstrated in the double-glazed window application.

  9. Nano-Resonators for RF-Enabled Networked-Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Networked Control System As a further embodiment of the NCS environment we consider the application to a velocity estimation problem often... Networked Control System Co-simulation for Co-design,” Proc. American Control Conf. Denver, CO, USA, June, 2003. [12] R.H. Brown and S.C. Schneider

  10. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance.

    PubMed

    Moritake, Y; Kanamori, Y; Hane, K

    2016-09-13

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers.

  11. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritake, Y.; Kanamori, Y.; Hane, K.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers.

  12. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance

    PubMed Central

    Moritake, Y.; Kanamori, Y.; Hane, K.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers. PMID:27622503

  13. Center Frequency Stabilization in Planar Dual-Mode Resonators during Mode-Splitting Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, Adham; Soliman, Mina H.

    2017-03-01

    Shape symmetry in dual-mode planar electromagnetic resonators results in their ability to host two degenerate resonant modes. As the designer enforces a controllable break in the symmetry, the degeneracy is removed and the two modes couple, exchanging energy and elevating the resonator into its desirable second-order resonance operation. The amount of coupling is controlled by the degree of asymmetry introduced. However, this mode coupling (or splitting) usually comes at a price. The centre frequency of the perturbed resonator is inadvertently drifted from its original value prior to coupling. Maintaining centre frequency stability during mode splitting is a nontrivial geometric design problem. In this paper, we analyse the problem and propose a novel method to compensate for this frequency drift, based on field analysis and perturbation theory, and we validate the solution through a practical design example and measurements. The analytical method used works accurately within the perturbational limit. It may also be used as a starting point for further numerical optimization algorithms, reducing the required computational time during design, when larger perturbations are made to the resonator. In addition to enabling the novel design example presented, it is hoped that the findings will inspire akin designs for other resonator shapes, in different disciplines and applications.

  14. Center Frequency Stabilization in Planar Dual-Mode Resonators during Mode-Splitting Control.

    PubMed

    Naji, Adham; Soliman, Mina H

    2017-03-08

    Shape symmetry in dual-mode planar electromagnetic resonators results in their ability to host two degenerate resonant modes. As the designer enforces a controllable break in the symmetry, the degeneracy is removed and the two modes couple, exchanging energy and elevating the resonator into its desirable second-order resonance operation. The amount of coupling is controlled by the degree of asymmetry introduced. However, this mode coupling (or splitting) usually comes at a price. The centre frequency of the perturbed resonator is inadvertently drifted from its original value prior to coupling. Maintaining centre frequency stability during mode splitting is a nontrivial geometric design problem. In this paper, we analyse the problem and propose a novel method to compensate for this frequency drift, based on field analysis and perturbation theory, and we validate the solution through a practical design example and measurements. The analytical method used works accurately within the perturbational limit. It may also be used as a starting point for further numerical optimization algorithms, reducing the required computational time during design, when larger perturbations are made to the resonator. In addition to enabling the novel design example presented, it is hoped that the findings will inspire akin designs for other resonator shapes, in different disciplines and applications.

  15. Center Frequency Stabilization in Planar Dual-Mode Resonators during Mode-Splitting Control

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Adham; Soliman, Mina H.

    2017-01-01

    Shape symmetry in dual-mode planar electromagnetic resonators results in their ability to host two degenerate resonant modes. As the designer enforces a controllable break in the symmetry, the degeneracy is removed and the two modes couple, exchanging energy and elevating the resonator into its desirable second-order resonance operation. The amount of coupling is controlled by the degree of asymmetry introduced. However, this mode coupling (or splitting) usually comes at a price. The centre frequency of the perturbed resonator is inadvertently drifted from its original value prior to coupling. Maintaining centre frequency stability during mode splitting is a nontrivial geometric design problem. In this paper, we analyse the problem and propose a novel method to compensate for this frequency drift, based on field analysis and perturbation theory, and we validate the solution through a practical design example and measurements. The analytical method used works accurately within the perturbational limit. It may also be used as a starting point for further numerical optimization algorithms, reducing the required computational time during design, when larger perturbations are made to the resonator. In addition to enabling the novel design example presented, it is hoped that the findings will inspire akin designs for other resonator shapes, in different disciplines and applications. PMID:28272422

  16. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F. Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space. PMID:26981483

  17. Controlling resonant tunneling in graphene via Fermi velocity engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Jonas R. F.; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C.; Bezerra, C. G.

    2016-06-28

    We investigate the resonant tunneling in a single layer graphene superlattice with modulated energy gap and Fermi velocity via an effective Dirac-like Hamiltonian. We calculate the transmission coefficient with the transfer matrix method and analyze the effect of a Fermi velocity modulation on the electronic transmission, in the case of normal and oblique incidence. We find it is possible to manipulate the electronic transmission in graphene by Fermi velocity engineering, and show that it is possible to tune the transmitivity from 0 to 1. We also analyze how a Fermi velocity modulation influences the total conductance and the Fano factor. Our results are relevant for the development of novel graphene-based electronic devices.

  18. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis.

    PubMed

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space.

  19. Control of integrated micro-resonator wavelength via balanced homodyne locking.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jonathan A; Lentine, Anthony L; Trotter, Douglas C; Starbuck, Andrew L

    2014-05-05

    We describe and experimentally demonstrate a method for active control of resonant modulators and filters in an integrated photonics platform. Variations in resonance frequency due to manufacturing processes and thermal fluctuations are corrected by way of balanced homodyne locking. The method is compact, insensitive to intensity fluctuations, minimally disturbs the micro-resonator, and does not require an arbitrary reference to lock. We demonstrate long-term stable locking of an integrated filter to a laser swept over 1.25 THz. In addition, we show locking of a modulator with low bit error rate while the chip temperature is varied from 5 to 60° C.

  20. Controlling phase separation of binary Bose-Einstein condensates via mixed-spin-channel Feshbach resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Tojo, Satoshi; Taguchi, Yoshihisa; Masuyama, Yuta; Hayashi, Taro; Hirano, Takuya; Saito, Hiroki

    2010-09-15

    We investigate controlled phase separation of a binary Bose-Einstein condensate in the proximity of a mixed-spin-channel Feshbach resonance in the |F=1,m{sub F}=+1> and |F=2,m{sub F}=-1> states of {sup 87}Rb at a magnetic field of 9.10 G. Phase separation occurs on the lower-magnetic-field side of the Feshbach resonance while the two components overlap on the higher-magnetic-field side. The Feshbach resonance curve of the scattering length is obtained from the shape of the atomic cloud by comparison with the numerical analysis of coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations.

  1. Monolayer rigid arrays of cavity-controllable metallic mesoparticles: Electrochemical preparation and light transmission resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Dong, Han; Pan, Jian; Zhan, Peng; Tang, Chaojun; Wang, Zhen-Lin

    2010-02-01

    We report an efficient and robust electrochemical deposition method to fabricate large-scale two-dimensional rigid arrays of metal colloids with a precise control of the particle morphology by monitoring metal growth that is confined within a templated organic porous mold. Light transmission resonances through the metallic periodic microstructures are observed and the resonance wavelengths are found to depend on the morphology of the scattering elements. Further numerical simulations confirm these transmission resonances and reveal that they are attributed to the excitations of localized or propagating surface plasmon modes supported by the specific structures. The present method of tailoring metallic microstructures could find applications in plasmonics.

  2. Control of oscillations in vibration machines: Start up and passage through resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradkov, A.; Gorlatov, D.; Tomchina, O.; Tomchin, D.

    2016-11-01

    Control of oscillations in mechanical systems in the start-up and passage through resonance modes is studied. In both cases, the control algorithm is based on the speed-gradient method with energy-based goal functions. It is shown that for Hamiltonian 1-degree of freedom (DOF) systems, it is generically possible to move the system from any initial state to any final state by means of a controlling force of arbitrarily small intensity. Controlled passage through resonance is studied for a 5-DOF vibration machine taking friction into account. It is shown by simulation that applying feedback control makes passage through lower resonance feasible with smaller control intensity compared with passage through resonance under constant control torque. The specific feature of this paper is consideration of the case when constant control torques do not allow the rotors even to start rotation. Applying feedback control allows rotors to overcome gravity and to start rotation. Another key novelty of this paper is comparison of the results obtained from the simulation with the experimental results obtained from the two-rotor laboratory mechatronic stand. It appears that most results are qualitatively the same, which confirms the adequacy of the model.

  3. Control of oscillations in vibration machines: Start up and passage through resonance.

    PubMed

    Fradkov, A; Gorlatov, D; Tomchina, O; Tomchin, D

    2016-11-01

    Control of oscillations in mechanical systems in the start-up and passage through resonance modes is studied. In both cases, the control algorithm is based on the speed-gradient method with energy-based goal functions. It is shown that for Hamiltonian 1-degree of freedom (DOF) systems, it is generically possible to move the system from any initial state to any final state by means of a controlling force of arbitrarily small intensity. Controlled passage through resonance is studied for a 5-DOF vibration machine taking friction into account. It is shown by simulation that applying feedback control makes passage through lower resonance feasible with smaller control intensity compared with passage through resonance under constant control torque. The specific feature of this paper is consideration of the case when constant control torques do not allow the rotors even to start rotation. Applying feedback control allows rotors to overcome gravity and to start rotation. Another key novelty of this paper is comparison of the results obtained from the simulation with the experimental results obtained from the two-rotor laboratory mechatronic stand. It appears that most results are qualitatively the same, which confirms the adequacy of the model.

  4. Self-other resonance, its control and prosocial inclinations: Brain-behavior relationships.

    PubMed

    Christov-Moore, Leonardo; Iacoboni, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Humans seem to place a positive reward value on prosocial behavior. Evidence suggests that this prosocial inclination is driven by our reflexive tendency to share in the observed sensations, emotions and behavior of others, or "self-other resonance". In this study, we examine how neural correlates of self-other resonance relate to prosocial decision-making. Subjects performed two tasks while undergoing fMRI: observation of a human hand pierced by a needle, and observation and imitation of emotional facial expressions. Outside the scanner, subjects played the Dictator Game with players of low or high income (represented by neutral-expression headshots). Subjects' offers in the Dictator Game were correlated with activity in neural systems associated with self-other resonance and anticorrelated with activity in systems implicated in the control of pain, affect, and imitation. Functional connectivity between areas involved in self-other resonance and top-down control was negatively correlated with subjects' offers. This study suggests that the interaction between self-other resonance and top-down control processes are an important component of prosocial inclinations towards others, even when biological stimuli associated with self-other resonance are limited. These findings support a view of prosocial decision-making grounded in embodied cognition.

  5. Vibration Control of Two-Mass Resonant System Based on Wave Compensator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Eiichi; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Vibration control of a two-mass resonant system such as a rolling machine is an important problem in industrial applications, because vibration causes a decrease in task accuracy and the destruction of materials. Taking this into the accounts, state feedback control, H∞ control, and resonant ratio control based on a lumped parameter system have been researched for the vibration suppression of a system with a flexible mechanism. On the other hand, methods in distributed parameter model need a lot of calculation in time domain design. In this paper, by considering the distributed parameter system in the Laplace domain, a compensator based on a wave equation is proposed. In addition, a two-mass resonant system is controlled using the proposed compensator. The proposed control system with the wave compensator has a simple structure. Therefore, it is easy to set the control parameters in the proposed control system. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by experimental results for a two-mass resonant system.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Volumetric Analysis of the Putamen in Children with ADHD: Combined Type versus Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellington, Tasha McMahon; Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Gregory, Amanda Louise; Murphy, Jennifer Mary; Lancaster, Jack Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Volumetric differences in the putamen of boys with ADHD combined subtype with psychopathic traits and controls are investigated. Method: The putamen in 24 archival magnetic resonance imaging scans of 12 boys in residential treatment with symptoms of ADHD and psychopathic traits and 12 community control boys are analyzed using Display…

  7. Mode competition and mode control in free electron lasers with one and two dimensional Bragg resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, P.N.; Ginzburg, N.S.; Sergeev, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    In the report we present a time domain approach to the theory of FELs with one and two dimensional Bragg resonators. It is demonstrated that traditional 1-D Bragg resonators provide possibilities for effective longitudinal mode control. In particular, simulation of the FEL realized in the joint experiment of JINR (Dybna) and IAP (N. Novgord) confirms achievement of the single mode operating regime with high efficiency of about 20%. However, 1-D Bragg resonators lose their selectivity as the transverse size of the system is increased. We simulate mode competition in FELs with coaxial 1-D Bragg resonators and observe a progressively more complicated azimuthal mode competition pattern as the perimeter of the resonator is increased. At the same time, using 2-D Bragg resonators for the same electron beam and microwave system perimeter gives very fast establishment of the single frequency regime with an azimuthally symmetric operating mode. Therefore, FELs utilising 2-D Bragg resonators with coaxial and planar geometry may be considered as attractive sources of high power spatially coherent radiation in the mm and sub-mm wave bands.

  8. Non-synchronous control of self-oscillating resonant converters

    DOEpatents

    Glaser, John Stanley; Zane, Regan Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A self-oscillating switching power converter has a controllable reactance including an active device connected to a reactive element, wherein the effective reactance of the reactance and the active device is controlled such that the control waveform for the active device is binary digital and is not synchronized with the switching converter output frequency. The active device is turned completely on and off at a frequency that is substantially greater than the maximum frequency imposed on the output terminals of the active device. The effect is to vary the average resistance across the active device output terminals, and thus the effective output reactance, thereby providing converter output control, while maintaining the response speed of the converter.

  9. [Development and use of quality control program in magnetic resonance].

    PubMed

    Berardi, P; Bergamini, C; Gavelli, G; Lembo, C; Pavlica, P; Pierotti, L; Vianello Vos, C

    1995-03-01

    In 1992, two identical 0.5 Magnetic Resonance units were installed in Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi in Bologna. A Quality Assurance (QA) protocol was designed by the Medical Physics Department to monitor both systems as of Acceptance Test. Our main goals in drawing up the QA protocol were: 1) Completeness--to check all the most significant physical parameters; 2) Efficiency--to reduce examination time of the QC Protocol; 3) Reliability--to achieve good repeatability of results. The QA protocol consists of two QC programs: 1) Daily check of Variable Echo image SNR of a homogeneous phantom, Eddy Current compensation, laser printer test; 2) Monthly check of SNR of Spin Echo and Fast Scan images, integral uniformity, B0 uniformity, B1 uniformity, T2 stability, ghosts, slice thickness, slice profile, geometrical distortion, resolution power. SNR dependence on FOV, NEX, matrix and slice thickness, and resolution dependence on slice thickness and position were tested as Acceptance test. The daily checks provide continual monitoring of the performance of both systems and laser printer and have shown: 1) strong fluctuations in image reproduction probably due to film emulsion instability; 2) a "warning" of imminent malfunction. The monthly checks were in line with acceptance test data and have shown: 1) different behavior of the two systems that should perform analogously; 2) greater result stability in one system with better results also in terms of diagnostic images. The main aim of our QA protocol is to optimize diagnostic accuracy by checking several physical parameters that act as good "indicators" for possible malfunctioning. We believe this can be done with simple but useful daily QC supporting a routine more complex QC program and can be achieved through continual application of both protocols.

  10. Polarization control of intermediate state absorption in resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuwu; Huang, Yunxia; Yao, Yunhua; Jia, Tianqing; Ding, Jingxin; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the control of the intermediate state absorption in an (n + m) resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process by the polarization-modulated femtosecond laser pulse. An analytical solution of the intermediate state absorption in a resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process is obtained based on the time-dependent perturbation theory. Our theoretical results show that the control efficiency of the intermediate state absorption by the polarization modulation is independent of the laser intensity when the transition from the intermediate state to the final state is coupled by the single-photon absorption, but will be affected by the laser intensity when this transition is coupled by the non-resonant multi-photon absorption. These theoretical results are experimentally confirmed via a two-photon fluorescence control in (2 + 1) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of Coumarin 480 dye and a single-photon fluorescence control in (1 + 2) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of IR 125 dye.

  11. Development of a resonant trailing-edge flap actuation system for helicopter rotor vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-S.; Wang, K. W.; Smith, E. C.

    2007-12-01

    A resonant trailing-edge flap actuation system for helicopter rotors is developed and evaluated experimentally. The concept involves deflecting each individual trailing-edge flap using a compact resonant piezoelectric actuation system. Each resonant actuation system yields high authority, while operating at a single frequency. By tailoring the natural frequencies of the actuation system (including the piezoelectric actuator and the related mechanical and electrical elements) to the required operating frequencies, one can increase the output authority. The robustness of the device can be enhanced by increasing the high authority bandwidth through electric circuitry design. Such a resonant actuation system (RAS) is analyzed for a full-scale piezoelectric induced-shear tube actuator, and bench-top testing is conducted to validate the concept. An adaptive feed-forward controller is developed to realize the electric network dynamics and adapt to phase variation. The control strategy is then implemented via a digital signal processor (DSP) system. Analysis is also performed to examine the rotor system dynamics in forward flight with piezoelectric resonant actuators, using a perturbation method to evaluate the system's time-varying characteristics. Numerical simulations reveal that the resonant actuator concept can be applied to forward flights as well as to hover conditions.

  12. Nonlinear resonant Auger spectroscopy in CO using an x-ray pump-control scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song Bin; Kimberg, Victor; Rohringer, Nina

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper we propose nonlinear femtosecond x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy to study the vibrational dynamics of a core-excited molecular state and discuss numerical results in CO. A femtosecond pump resonantly excites the carbon core-excited 1 s -1 π* state of the CO molecule. A second strong probe (control) pulse is applied at variable delay and is resonantly coupled to a valence excited state of the molecule. The strong nonlinear coupling of the control pulse induces Rabi flopping between the two electronic states. During this process, a vibrational wave packet in the core-excited state is created, which can be effectively manipulated by changing the time delay between pump and control pulses. We present an analysis of the resonant Auger electron spectrum and the transient absorption or emission spectrum on the pump transition and discuss their information content for reconstruction of the vibrational wave packet.

  13. Fano resonance control in a photonic crystal structure and its application to ultrafast switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yi; Heuck, Mikkel; Hu, Hao; Xue, Weiqi; Peucheret, Christophe; Chen, Yaohui; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Yvind, Kresten; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal structure that allows easy and robust control of the Fano spectrum. Its operation relies on controlling the amplitude of light propagating along one of the light paths in the structure from which the Fano resonance is obtained. Short-pulse dynamic measurements show that besides drastically increasing the switching contrast, the transmission dynamics itself is strongly affected by the nature of the resonance. The influence of slow-recovery tails implied by a long carrier lifetime can thus be reduced using a Fano resonance due to a hitherto unrecognized reshaping effect of the nonlinear Fano transfer function. As an example, we present a system application of a Fano structure, demonstrating its advantages by the experimental realization of 10 Gbit/s all-optical modulation with optical control power less than 1 mW.

  14. Control of resonance fluorescence of a four-level quantum emitter near a plasmonic nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreño, F.; Antón, M. A.; Yannopapas, V.; Paspalakis, E.

    2017-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the resonance fluorescence of a four-level double-V -type quantum emitter near a plasmonic nanostructure. The quantum system interacts with two orthogonal circularly polarized laser fields with the same frequency and intensity, but with different phases. For the plasmonic nanostructure we consider a two-dimensional array of metal-coated dielectric nanospheres. We show that the presence of the plasmonic nanostructure leads to strong modification of both the resonance fluorescence spectrum and the transition from antibunching to bunching for the fluorescent photons. In addition, we show that both the resonance fluorescence spectrum and the second-order correlation function are strongly phase-dependent so that the relative phase of laser fields can be used for the efficient control of the resonance fluorescence characteristics. The results are explained by using a dressed-state picture.

  15. Oscillation control of carbon nanotube mechanical resonator by electrostatic interaction induced retardation

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masaaki; Takei, Kuniharu; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Despite the superb intrinsic properties of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators, the quality factors at room temperature are 1,000 or less, even in vacuum, which is much lower than that of mechanical resonators fabricated using a top-down approach. This study demonstrates the improvement of the quality factor and the control of nonlinearity of the mechanical resonance of the cantilevered nanotube by electrostatic interaction. The apparent quality factor of the nanotube supported by insulator is improved drastically from approximately 630 to 3200 at room temperature. Results show that retardation of the electrostatic force induced by the contact resistance between the nanotube and the insulator support improves the quality factor. Finite element method calculation reveals that the nonuniform pileup charge on the insulator support strongly influences the nonlinearity of the resonance. PMID:26935657

  16. Significance of the Resonance Condition for Controlling the Seam Position in Laser-assisted TIG Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emde, B.; Huse, M.; Hermsdorf, J.; Kaierle, S.; Wesling, V.; Overmeyer, L.; Kozakov, R.; Uhrlandt, D.

    As an energy-preserving variant of laser hybrid welding, laser-assisted arc welding uses laser powers of less than 1 kW. Recent studies have shown that the electrical conductivity of a TIG welding arc changes within the arc in case of a resonant interaction between laser radiation and argon atoms. This paper presents investigations on how to control the position of the arc root on the workpiece by means of the resonant interaction. Furthermore, the influence on the welding result is demonstrated. The welding tests were carried out on a cooled copper plate and steel samples with resonant and non-resonant laser radiation. Moreover, an analysis of the weld seam is presented.

  17. Multitweezers generation control within a nanoring resonator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasakorn, Metha; Teeka, Chat; Jomtarak, Rangsan; Yupapin, Preecha P.

    2010-07-01

    We propose a novel system of dynamic potential well generation and control using light pulse control within an add/drop optical filter. The multiplexing signals of the dark solition with bright/Gaussian pulses are controlled, tuned, and amplified within the system. The optical storage rings are embedded within the add/drop optical filter system, whereas the generated optical signals can be stored and amplified within the design system. In application, the storage signals can be configured to be an optical trapping tool, which is known as an optical tweezer, where the high field peak or well can be formed. The advantages are that the dynamic well can be stored and the array of wells can be generated for multiple wells applications. The different in time of the first two dynamic wells of 1 ns is noted.

  18. Active Control of Pressure Fluctuations due to Flow Over Helmholtz Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KOOK, H.; MONGEAU, L.; FRANCHEK, M. A.

    2002-08-01

    Grazing flows over Helmholtz resonators may result in self-sustained flow oscillations at the Helmholtz acoustic resonance frequency of the cavity system. The associated pressure fluctuations may be undesirable. Many solutions have been proposed to solve this problem including, for example, leading edge spoilers, trailing edge deflectors, and leading edge flow diffusers. Most of these control devices are “passive”, i.e., they do not involve dynamic control systems. Active control methods, which do require dynamic controls, have been implemented with success for different cases of flow instabilities. Previous investigations of the control of flow-excited cavity resonance have used mainly one or more loudspeakers located within the cavity wall. In the present study, oscillated spoilers hinged near the leading edge of the cavity orifice were used. Experiments were performed using a cavity installed within the test section wall of a wind tunnel. A microphone located within the cavity was used as the feedback sensor. A loop shaping feedback control design methodology was used in order to ensure robust controller performance over varying flow conditions. Cavity pressure level attenuation of up to 20dB was achieved around the critical velocity (i.e., the velocity for which the fundamental excitation frequency matches the Helmholtz resonance frequency of the cavity), relative to the level in the presence of the spoiler held stationary. The required actuation effort was small. The spoiler peak displacement was typically only 4% of the mean spoiler angle (approximately 1‧). The control scheme was found to provide robust performance for transient operating conditions. Oscillated leading edge spoilers offer potential advantages over loudspeakers for cavity resonance control, including a reduced encumbrance (especially for low-frequency applications), and a reduced actuation effort.

  19. Temperature-controlled molecular depolarization gates in nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, Leif; Schroder, Leif; Chavez, Lana; Meldrum, Tyler; Smith, Monica; Lowery, Thomas J.; E. Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander

    2008-02-27

    Down the drain: Cryptophane cages in combination with selective radiofrequency spin labeling can be used as molecular 'transpletor' units for transferring depletion of spin polarization from a hyperpolarized 'source' spin ensemble to a 'drain' ensemble. The flow of nuclei through the gate is adjustable by the ambient temperature, thereby enabling controlled consumption of hyperpolarization.

  20. One-step resonant controlled-phase gate on distant transmon qutrits in different 1D superconducting resonators

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo; Lu Long, Gui

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme to construct the controlled-phase (c-phase) gate on distant transmon qutrits hosted in different resonators inter-coupled by a connected transmon qutrit. Different from previous works for entanglement generation and information transfer on two distant qubits in a dispersive regime in the similar systems, our gate is constructed in the resonant regime with one step. The numerical simulation shows that the fidelity of our c-phase gate is 99.5% within 86.3 ns. As an interesting application of our c-phase gate, we propose an effective scheme to complete a conventional square lattice of two-dimensional surface code layout for fault-tolerant quantum computing on the distant transmon qutrits. The four-step coupling between the nearest distant transmon qutrits, small coupling strengths of the distant transmon qutrits, and the non-population on the connection transmon qutrit can reduce the interactions among different parts of the layout effectively, which makes the layout be integrated with a large scale in an easier way. PMID:26486426

  1. Design of a simple active controller to suppress helicopter air resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, M. D.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1988-01-01

    A coupled rotor/fuselage helicopter analysis with the important effects of blade torsional flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics, and forward flight is presented. Using this mathematical model, a nominal configuration is selected that experiences an air resonance instability throughout most of its flight envelope. A simple multivariable compensator using conventional swashplate inputs and a single body roll rate measurement is then designed. The controller design is based on a linear estimator in conjunction with optimal feedback gains, and the design is done in the frequency domain using the Loop Transfer Recovery method. The controller is shown to suppress the air resonance instability throughout wide range helicopter loading conditions and forward flight speeds.

  2. Design of a simple active controller to suppress helicopter air resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, M. D.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1988-01-01

    A coupled rotor/fuselage helicopter analysis with the important effects of blade torsional flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics, and forward flight is presented. Using this mathematical model, a nominal configuration is selected that experiences an air resonance instability throughout most of its flight envelope. A simple multivariable compensator using conventional swashplate inputs and a single body roll rate measurement is then designed. The controller design is based on a linear estimator in conjunction with optimal feedback gains, and the design is done in the frequency domain using the Loop Transfer Recovery method. The controller is shown to suppress the air resonance instability throughout wide range helicopter loading conditions and forward flight speeds.

  3. Design and Verification of a Digital Controller for a 2-Piece Hemispherical Resonator Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungshin; Yun, Sung Wook; Rhim, Jaewook

    2016-01-01

    A Hemispherical Resonator Gyro (HRG) is the Coriolis Vibratory Gyro (CVG) that measures rotation angle or angular velocity using Coriolis force acting the vibrating mass. A HRG can be used as a rate gyro or integrating gyro without structural modification by simply changing the control scheme. In this paper, differential control algorithms are designed for a 2-piece HRG. To design a precision controller, the electromechanical modelling and signal processing must be pre-performed accurately. Therefore, the equations of motion for the HRG resonator with switched harmonic excitations are derived with the Duhamel Integral method. Electromechanical modeling of the resonator, electric module and charge amplifier is performed by considering the mode shape of a thin hemispherical shell. Further, signal processing and control algorithms are designed. The multi-flexing scheme of sensing, driving cycles and x, y-axis switching cycles is appropriate for high precision and low maneuverability systems. The differential control scheme is easily capable of rejecting the common mode errors of x, y-axis signals and changing the rate integrating mode on basis of these studies. In the rate gyro mode the controller is composed of Phase-Locked Loop (PLL), amplitude, quadrature and rate control loop. All controllers are designed on basis of a digital PI controller. The signal processing and control algorithms are verified through Matlab/Simulink simulations. Finally, a FPGA and DSP board with these algorithms is verified through experiments. PMID:27104539

  4. Design and Verification of a Digital Controller for a 2-Piece Hemispherical Resonator Gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungshin; Yun, Sung Wook; Rhim, Jaewook

    2016-04-20

    A Hemispherical Resonator Gyro (HRG) is the Coriolis Vibratory Gyro (CVG) that measures rotation angle or angular velocity using Coriolis force acting the vibrating mass. A HRG can be used as a rate gyro or integrating gyro without structural modification by simply changing the control scheme. In this paper, differential control algorithms are designed for a 2-piece HRG. To design a precision controller, the electromechanical modelling and signal processing must be pre-performed accurately. Therefore, the equations of motion for the HRG resonator with switched harmonic excitations are derived with the Duhamel Integral method. Electromechanical modeling of the resonator, electric module and charge amplifier is performed by considering the mode shape of a thin hemispherical shell. Further, signal processing and control algorithms are designed. The multi-flexing scheme of sensing, driving cycles and x, y-axis switching cycles is appropriate for high precision and low maneuverability systems. The differential control scheme is easily capable of rejecting the common mode errors of x, y-axis signals and changing the rate integrating mode on basis of these studies. In the rate gyro mode the controller is composed of Phase-Locked Loop (PLL), amplitude, quadrature and rate control loop. All controllers are designed on basis of a digital PI controller. The signal processing and control algorithms are verified through Matlab/Simulink simulations. Finally, a FPGA and DSP board with these algorithms is verified through experiments.

  5. Heralded quantum controlled-phase gates with dissipative dynamics in macroscopically distant resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wei; Wang, Xin; Miranowicz, Adam; Zhong, Zhirong; Nori, Franco

    2017-07-01

    Heralded near-deterministic multiqubit controlled-phase gates with integrated error detection have recently been proposed by Borregaard et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 110502 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.110502]. This protocol is based on a single four-level atom (a heralding quartit) and N three-level atoms (operational qutrits) coupled to a single-resonator mode acting as a cavity bus. Here we generalize this method for two distant resonators without the cavity bus between the heralding and operational atoms. Specifically, we analyze the two-qubit controlled-Z gate and its multiqubit-controlled generalization (i.e., a Toffoli-like gate) acting on the two-lowest levels of N qutrits inside one resonator, with their successful actions being heralded by an auxiliary microwave-driven quartit inside the other resonator. Moreover, we propose a circuit-quantum-electrodynamics realization of the protocol with flux and phase qudits in linearly coupled transmission-line resonators with dissipation. These methods offer a quadratic fidelity improvement compared to cavity-assisted deterministic gates.

  6. Self-Other Resonance, Its Control and Prosocial Inclinations: Brain-Behavior Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Christov-Moore, Leonardo; Iacoboni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Humans seem to place a positive reward value on prosocial behavior. Evidence suggests that this prosocial inclination is driven by our reflexive tendency to share in the observed sensations, emotions and behavior of others, or “self-other resonance”. In this study, we examine how neural correlates of self-other resonance relate to prosocial decision-making. Subjects performed two tasks while undergoing fMRI: Observation of a human hand pierced by a needle, and observation and imitation of emotional facial expressions. Outside the scanner, subjects played the Dictator Game with players of low or high income (represented by neutral-expression headshots). Subjects’ offers in the Dictator Game were correlated with activity in neural systems associated with self-other resonance and anticorrelated with activity in systems implicated in the control of pain, affect and imitation. Activity in these latter systems was specifically correlated with subjects’ diminished sharing towards players of high incomes. Functional connectivity between areas involved in self-other resonance and top-down control was negatively correlated with subjects’ offers. This study suggests that the interaction between self-other resonance and top-down control processes are an important component of prosocial inclinations towards others, even when biological stimuli associated with self-other resonance are limited. These findings support a view of prosocial decision-making that is grounded in embodied cognition. PMID:26954937

  7. Bandwidth-limited control and ringdown suppression in high-Q resonators.

    PubMed

    Borneman, Troy W; Cory, David G

    2012-12-01

    We describe how the transient behavior of a tuned and matched resonator circuit and a ringdown suppression pulse may be integrated into an optimal control theory (OCT) pulse-design algorithm to derive control sequences with limited ringdown that perform a desired quantum operation in the presence of resonator distortions of the ideal waveform. Inclusion of ringdown suppression in numerical pulse optimizations significantly reduces spectrometer deadtime when using high quality factor (high-Q) resonators, leading to increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity of inductive measurements. To demonstrate the method, we experimentally measure the free-induction decay of an inhomogeneously broadened solid-state free radical spin system at high Q. The measurement is enabled by using a numerically optimized bandwidth-limited OCT pulse, including ringdown suppression, robust to variations in static and microwave field strengths. We also discuss the applications of pulse design in high-Q resonators to universal control of anisotropic-hyperfine coupled electron-nuclear spin systems via electron-only modulation even when the bandwidth of the resonator is significantly smaller than the hyperfine coupling strength. These results demonstrate how limitations imposed by linear response theory may be vastly exceeded when using a sufficiently accurate system model to optimize pulses of high complexity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Universal quantum control in zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Ji; Jiang, Min; Cui, Jiangyu; Liu, Xiaomei; Chen, Botao; Ji, Yunlan; Zhang, Bo; Blanchard, John; Peng, Xinhua; Du, Jiangfeng

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes a general method for the manipulation of nuclear spins in zero magnetic field. In the absence of magnetic fields, the spins lose the individual information on chemical shifts and inequivalent spins can only be distinguished by nuclear gyromagnetic ratios and spin-spin couplings. For spin-1/2 nuclei with different gyromagnetic ratios (i.e., different species) in zero magnetic field, we describe the scheme to realize a set of universal quantum logic gates, e.g., arbitrary single-qubit gates and a two-qubit controlled-not gate. This method allows for universal quantum control in systems which might provide promising applications in materials science, chemistry, biology, quantum information processing, and fundamental physics.

  9. Interfering resonance as an underlying mechanism in the adaptive feedback control of radiationless transitions: Retinal isomerization.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Cyrille; Brumer, Paul

    2017-09-21

    Control of molecular processes via adaptive feedback often yields highly structured laser pulses that have eluded physical explanation. By contrast, coherent control approaches propose physically transparent mechanisms but are not readily visible in experimental results. Here, an analysis of a condensed phase adaptive feedback control experiment on retinal isomerization shows that it manifests a quantum interference based coherent control mechanism: control via interfering resonances. The result promises deep insight into the physical basis for the adaptive feedback control of a broad class of bound state processes.

  10. Interfering resonance as an underlying mechanism in the adaptive feedback control of radiationless transitions: Retinal isomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, Cyrille; Brumer, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Control of molecular processes via adaptive feedback often yields highly structured laser pulses that have eluded physical explanation. By contrast, coherent control approaches propose physically transparent mechanisms but are not readily visible in experimental results. Here, an analysis of a condensed phase adaptive feedback control experiment on retinal isomerization shows that it manifests a quantum interference based coherent control mechanism: control via interfering resonances. The result promises deep insight into the physical basis for the adaptive feedback control of a broad class of bound state processes.

  11. A low-level rf control system for a quarter-wave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwon; Hwang, Churlkew

    2012-06-01

    A low-level rf control system was designed and built for an rf deflector, which is a quarter wave resonator, and was designed to deflect a secondary electron beam to measure the bunch length of an ion beam. The deflector has a resonance frequency near 88 MHz, its required phase stability is approximately ±1° and its amplitude stability is less than ±1%. The control system consists of analog input and output components and a digital system based on a field-programmable gate array for signal processing. The system is cost effective, while meeting the stability requirements. Some basic properties of the control system were measured. Then, the capability of the rf control was tested using a mechanical vibrator made of a dielectric rod attached to an audio speaker system, which could induce regulated perturbations in the electric fields of the resonator. The control system was flexible so that its parameters could be easily configured to compensate for the disturbance induced in the resonator.

  12. Synaptic Plasticity Controls Sensory Responses through Frequency-Dependent Gamma Oscillation Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Se-Bum; Glaser, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    Synchronized gamma frequency oscillations in neural networks are thought to be important to sensory information processing, and their effects have been intensively studied. Here we describe a mechanism by which the nervous system can readily control gamma oscillation effects, depending selectively on visual stimuli. Using a model neural network simulation, we found that sensory response in the primary visual cortex is significantly modulated by the resonance between “spontaneous” and “stimulus-driven” oscillations. This gamma resonance can be precisely controlled by the synaptic plasticity of thalamocortical connections, and cortical response is regulated differentially according to the resonance condition. The mechanism produces a selective synchronization between the afferent and downstream neural population. Our simulation results explain experimental observations such as stimulus-dependent synchronization between the thalamus and the cortex at different oscillation frequencies. The model generally shows how sensory information can be selectively routed depending on its frequency components. PMID:20838581

  13. A simple active controller to suppress helicopter air resonance in hover and forward flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Takahashi, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    A coupled rotor/fuselage helicopter analysis with the important effects of blade torsional flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics, and forward flight is presented. This model is used to illustrate the effect of unsteady aerodynamics, forward flight, and torsional flexibility on air resonance. Next, a nominal configuration, which experiences air resonance in forward flight, is selected. A simple multivariable compensator using conventional swashplate inputs and a single body roll rate measurement is then designed. The controller design is based on a linear estimator in conjunction with optimal feedback gains, and the design is done in the frequency domain using the loop-transfer recovery method. The controller is shown to suppress the air resonance instability throughout wide range helicopter loading conditions and forward flight speeds.

  14. A simple active controller to suppress helicopter air resonance in hover and forward flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Takahashi, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    A coupled rotor/fuselage helicopter analysis with the important effects of blade torsional flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics, and forward flight is presented. This model is used to illustrate the effect of unsteady aerodynamics, forward flight, and torsional flexibility on air resonance. Next, a nominal configuration, which experiences air resonance in forward flight, is selected. A simple multivariable compensator using conventional swashplate inputs and a single body roll rate measurement is then designed. The controller design is based on a linear estimator in conjunction with optimal feedback gains, and the design is done in the frequency domain using the loop-transfer recovery method. The controller is shown to suppress the air resonance instability throughout wide range helicopter loading conditions and forward flight speeds.

  15. Ionization branching ratio control with a resonance attosecond clock.

    PubMed

    Argenti, Luca; Lindroth, Eva

    2010-07-30

    We investigate the possibility to monitor the dynamics of autoionizing states in real-time and control the yields of different ionization channels in helium by simulating extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pump IR-probe experiments focused on the N=2 threshold. The XUV pulse creates a coherent superposition of doubly excited states which is found to decay by ejecting electrons in bursts. Prominent interference fringes in the photoelectron angular distribution of the 2s and 2p ionization channels are observed, along with significant out-of-phase quantum beats in the yields of the corresponding parent ions.

  16. Ionization Branching Ratio Control with a Resonance Attosecond Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenti, Luca; Lindroth, Eva

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the possibility to monitor the dynamics of autoionizing states in real-time and control the yields of different ionization channels in helium by simulating extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pump IR-probe experiments focused on the N=2 threshold. The XUV pulse creates a coherent superposition of doubly excited states which is found to decay by ejecting electrons in bursts. Prominent interference fringes in the photoelectron angular distribution of the 2s and 2p ionization channels are observed, along with significant out-of-phase quantum beats in the yields of the corresponding parent ions.

  17. Ionization and transient absorption control with a resonant attosecond clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenti, Luca

    2014-04-01

    Metastable states are important actors in the ionisation of atoms and molecules. Sub-femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses can coherently populate several transiently bound states at once, thus starting the attosecond clocks which are required to monitor and control ultrafast electronic evolution above the ionisation threshold. Here we illustrate, from a theoretical point of view, the effects coherent superpositions of 1Po doubly excited states in the helium atom have on channel-resolved photoelectron spectra as well as on the transient absorption spectrum of the atom in the extreme ultraviolet region, when they are created by a single-attosecond pulse in the presence of a strong few-cycle near-infrared/visible pulse which acts as a probe. Interference fringes varying rapidly with the pump-probe time delay are visible in both photoelectron and transient absorption spectra. From such fringes, the wave packet itself can conceivably be reconstructed. Conversely, all observables are modulated by the characteristic beating periods of the wave packet, so that control of partial ionisation yields, branching ratios, and light absorption or amplification can be achieved.

  18. Adaptive Helmholtz resonators and passive vibration absorbers for cylinder interior noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estève, Simon J.; Johnson, Marty E.

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents an adaptive-passive solution to control the broadband sound transmission into rocket payload fairings. The treatment is composed of passive distributed vibration absorbers (DVAs) and adaptive Helmholtz resonators (HR). Both the frequency domain and time-domain model of a simply supported cylinder excited by an external plane wave are developed. To tune vibration absorbers to tonal excitation, a tuning strategy, based on the phase information between the velocity of the absorber mass and the velocity of the host structure is used here in a new fashion to tune resonators to peaks in the broadband acoustic spectrum of a cavity. This tuning law, called the dot-product method, only uses two microphone signals local to each HR, which allows the adaptive Helmholtz resonator (AHR) to be manufactured as an autonomous device with power supply, sensor, actuator and controller integrated. Numerical simulations corresponding to a 2.8 m long 2.5 m diameter composite cylinder prototype demonstrate that, as long as the structure modes, which strongly couple to the acoustic cavity, are damped with a DVA treatment, the dot-product method tune multiple HRs to a near-optimal solution over a broad frequency range (40-160 Hz). An adaptive HR prototype with variable opening is built and characterized. Experiments conducted on the cylinder prototype with eight AHRs demonstrate the ability of resonators adapted with the dot-product method to converge to near-optimal noise attenuation in a frequency band including multiple resonances.

  19. Dual-Functional Energy-Harvesting and Vibration Control: Electromagnetic Resonant Shunt Series Tuned Mass Dampers.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lei; Cui, Wen

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel retrofittable approach for dual-functional energy-harvesting and robust vibration control by integrating the tuned mass damper (TMD) and electromagnetic shunted resonant damping. The viscous dissipative element between the TMD and primary system is replaced by an electromagnetic transducer shunted with a resonant RLC circuit. An efficient gradient based numeric method is presented for the parameter optimization in the control framework for vibration suppression and energy harvesting. A case study is performed based on the Taipei 101 TMD. It is found that by tuning the TMD resonance and circuit resonance close to that of the primary structure, the electromagnetic resonant-shunt TMD achieves the enhanced effectiveness and robustness of double-mass series TMDs, without suffering from the significantly amplified motion stroke. It is also observed that the parameters and performances optimized for vibration suppression are close to those optimized for energy harvesting, and the performance is not sensitive to the resistance of the charging circuit or electrical load.

  20. Double-way spectral tunability for the control of optical nanocavity resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baida, Fadi I.; Grosjean, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy (SNOM) has been successful in finely tuning the optical properties of photonic crystal (PC) nanocavities. The SNOM nanoprobes proposed so far allowed for either redshifting or blueshifting the resonance peak of the PC structures. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate the possibility of a redshifting (up to +0.65 nm) and a blueshifting (up to -5 nm) the PC cavity resonance wavelength with a single perturbation element. As an example, a fiber bowtie-aperture nano-antenna (BNA) engraved at the apex of a SNOM tip is proposed to play this role. The double-way tunability is the result of a competition between an induced electric dipole (BNA at resonance) leading to a redshift and an induced magnetic dipole (the tip metalcoating) giving rise to a blueshift of the resonance wavelength. We demonstrate that the sign of the spectral shift can be simply controlled through the tip-to-cavity distance. This study opens the way to the full postproduction control of the resonance wavelength of high quality-factor optical cavities.

  1. Double-way spectral tunability for the control of optical nanocavity resonance.

    PubMed

    Baida, Fadi I; Grosjean, Thierry

    2015-12-08

    Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy (SNOM) has been successful in finely tuning the optical properties of photonic crystal (PC) nanocavities. The SNOM nanoprobes proposed so far allowed for either redshifting or blueshifting the resonance peak of the PC structures. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate the possibility of a redshifting (up to +0.65 nm) and a blueshifting (up to -5 nm) the PC cavity resonance wavelength with a single perturbation element. As an example, a fiber bowtie-aperture nano-antenna (BNA) engraved at the apex of a SNOM tip is proposed to play this role. The double-way tunability is the result of a competition between an induced electric dipole (BNA at resonance) leading to a redshift and an induced magnetic dipole (the tip metalcoating) giving rise to a blueshift of the resonance wavelength. We demonstrate that the sign of the spectral shift can be simply controlled through the tip-to-cavity distance. This study opens the way to the full postproduction control of the resonance wavelength of high quality-factor optical cavities.

  2. Computer Controlled Resonator Measurements with a 12-Liter Pyrex Sphere and a 100-Liter Titanium Sphere.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-30

    AD-A102 705 CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIV CLEVELAND 09N CASE LASS FOR--ETC F/S 20/1 COMPUTER CONTROLLED RESONATOR MEASUREMENTS WITH A 12-LITER PYRE--ETC...California P.O. Box 808 Livermore, CAlifornia Q4SO Harry Diamond Laboratories I copy Technical Library 2800 Powder Mill Road Adelphi, Maryland 20783

  3. Phase control of the transient resonance of the automatic ball balancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalczyk, Jerzy; Pakuła, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    Hazards related to undesired increases of vibration amplitudes in transient resonance of vibroinsulated rotor systems with automatic ball balancer (ABB) are discussed in the paper. The application of the phase control method with taking into account the limited drive power is proposed for these amplitudes reduction. The high efficiency of this approach is indicated.

  4. Fan Noise Control Using Herschel-Quincke Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Ng, Wing F.

    2003-01-01

    The research effort proposed for this NASA NRA is mainly experimental. In addition, Virginia Tech is working in partnership with Goodrich Aerospace, Aerostructures Group for the analytical development needed to support the experimental endeavor, i.e. model development, design, and system studies. In this project, Herschel-Quincke (HQ)liner technology experiments will be performed at the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) facility. A schematic of both inlet and aft HQ-liner systems installed in the ANCF rig as well as a picture of the Glenn facility is shown. The main goal is to simultaneously test in both the inlet and bypass duct sections. The by-pass duct will have HQ-systems in both the inner and outer duct walls. The main advantages of performing tests at the ANCF facility are that the effect of the inlet HQ-system on the by-pass HQ-system and vice versa, can be accurately determined from the in-duct modal data. Another significant advantage is that it offers the opportunity to assess (on a common basis) the proposed noise reduction concept on the ANCF rig which in the past has been used for assessing other active and passive noise reduction strategies.

  5. Low Cost Embedded Controlled Full Bridge LC Parallel Resonant Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar, P.; Reddy, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the converter requirements for an optimum control of an electrolyser linked with a DC bus are analyzed and discussed. An electrolyser is a part of renewable energy system which generates hydrogen from water electrolysis. The hydrogen generating device is part of a complex system constituted by a supplying photovoltaic plant, the grid and a fuel cell battery. The characterization in several operative conditions of an actual industrial electrolyser is carried out in order to design and optimize the DC/DC converter. A dedicated zero voltage switching DC/DC converter is presented and simulated inside the context of the distributed energy production and storage system. The proposed supplying converter gives a stable output voltage and high circuit efficiency in all the proposed simulated scenarios. The adopted DC/DC converter is realized in a full-bridge topology technique in order to achieve zero voltage switching for the power switches and to regulate the output voltage. This converter has advantages like high power density, low EMI and reduced switching stresses. The simulation results are verified with the experimental results.

  6. Fan Noise Control Using Herschel-quincke Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Ng, Wing F.; Provenza, Andrew (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The research effort proposed for this NASA NRA is mainly experimental. In addition, Virginia Tech is working in partnership with Goodrich Aerospace, Aerostructures Group for the analytical development needed to support the experimental endeavor, i.e. model development, design, and system studies. In this project, Herschel-Quincke (HQ)liner technology experiments will be performed at the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) facility. A schematic of both inlet and aft HQ-liner systems installed in the ANCF rig as well as a picture of the Glenn facility is shown. The main goal is to simultaneously test in both the inlet and bypass duct sections. The by-pass duct will have HQ-systems in both the inner and outer duct walls. The main advantages of performing tests at the ANCF facility are that the effect of the inlet HQ-system on the by-pass HQ-system and vice versa, can be accurately determined from the in-duct modal data. Another significant advantage is that it offers the opportunity to assess (on a common basis) the proposed noise reduction concept on the ANCF rig which in the past has been used for assessing other active and passive noise reduction strategies.

  7. Control Schemes for Auxiliary Switches of Three-Phase PWM Resonant Snubber Inverters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Nobukazu; Oguchi, Kuniomi

    Control schemes for auxiliary switches of PWM controlled three-phase resonant snubber inverters (RSIs) are proposed. The control schemes proposed in this paper are based on a conventional PWM technique. To avoid zero voltage switching lost conditions, the conventional PWM technique is modified in the proposed schemes. The proposed control schemes are so simple that they are suitable for digital control. In this paper, a CPLD (Complex Programmable Logic Device)-based control IC, which realizes the proposed control schemes, for three-phase auxiliary RSIs is also proposed and implemented. The IC generates gate-signals for main- and auxiliary-devices of the three-phase RSI based on the proposed control schemes. The effectiveness of the proposed control schemes were verified through the experiments. As the results, ZVS (Zero Voltage Switching) turn-on at the main devices was achieved and a smooth sinusoidal output current was obtained by use of the control IC.

  8. Coherent phase control of resonance-mediated two-photon absorption in rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shian Lu, Chenhui; Jia, Tianqing; Sun, Zhenrong; Qiu, Jianrong

    2013-11-04

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the quantum coherent control of the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption in rare-earth ions by the phase-shaped femtosecond laser pulse. Our theoretical results show that the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption can be effectively controlled, but the control efficiency depends on the laser repetition rate in real experiment due to the long lifetime and the short decoherence time of the excited state, and the larger laser repetition rate yields the lower control efficiency. These theoretical results are experimentally confirmed in glass sample doped with Er{sup 3+} by utilizing the femtosecond lasers with low repetition rate of 1 kHz and high repetition rate of 80 MHz.

  9. Voltage-controlled spin selection in a magnetic resonant tunneling diode.

    PubMed

    Slobodskyy, A; Gould, C; Slobodskyy, T; Becker, C R; Schmidt, G; Molenkamp, L W

    2003-06-20

    We have fabricated all II-VI semiconductor resonant tunneling diodes based on the (Zn,Mn,Be)Se material system, containing dilute magnetic material in the quantum well, and studied their current-voltage characteristics. When subjected to an external magnetic field the resulting spin splitting of the levels in the quantum well leads to a splitting of the transmission resonance into two separate peaks. This is interpreted as evidence of tunneling transport through spin polarized levels, and could be the first step towards a voltage controlled spin filter.

  10. Model-Based Feedback Control of Cavity Resonance: An Experimental and Computational Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-24

    cavity flow control as well as for other closed-loop flow control applications. Theo - retical models are presented for temporally developing shear layers...smoothening. J. Sound Vib., 253(4):807-831, 2002. [52] L. S. Ukeiley, M. K. Ponton, J. S. Seiner, and B. Jansen . Suppression of pressure loads in cavity flows...AIAA Paper 2002-0661, 2002. [53] L. S. Ukeiley, M. K. Ponton, J. S. Seiner, and B. Jansen . Suppression of pressure loads in resonating cavities

  11. Passive control of flow-excited acoustic resonance in rectangular cavities using upstream mounted blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaaban, Mahmoud; Mohany, Atef

    2015-04-01

    A passive method for controlling the flow-excited acoustic resonance resulting from subsonic flows over rectangular cavities in channels is investigated. A cavity with length to depth ratio of is tested in air flow of Mach number up to 0.45. When the acoustic resonance is excited, the sound pressure level in the cavity reaches 162 dB. Square blocks are attached to the surface of the channel and centred upstream of the cavity leading edge to suppress the flow-excited acoustic resonance in the cavity. Six blocks of different widths are tested at three different upstream distances. The results show that significant attenuation of up to 30 dB of the excited sound pressure level is achieved using a block with a width to height ratio of 3, while blocks that fill the whole width of the channel amplify the pressure of the excited acoustic resonance. Moreover, it is found that placing the block upstream of the cavity causes the onset of the acoustic resonance to occur at higher flow velocities. In order to investigate the nature of the interactions that lead to suppression of the acoustic resonance and to identify the changes in flow patterns due to the placement of the block, 2D measurements of turbulence intensity in the shear layer and the block wake region are performed. The location of the flow reattachment point downstream of the block relative to the shear layer separation point has a major influence on the suppression level of the excited acoustic resonance. Furthermore, higher attenuation of noise is related to lower span-wise correlation of the shear-layer perturbation.

  12. Single-photon switch: Controllable scattering of photons inside a one-dimensional resonator waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Gong, Z. R.; Liu, Y. X.; Sun, C. P.; Nori, F.

    2010-03-01

    We analyze the coherent transport of a single photon, which propagates in a one-dimensional coupled-resonator waveguide and is scattered by a controllable two-level system located inside one of the resonators of this waveguide. Our approach, which uses discrete coordinates, unifies low and high energy effective theories for single-photon scattering. We show that the controllable two-level system can behave as a quantum switch for the coherent transport of a single photon. This study may inspire new electro-optical single-photon quantum devices. We also suggest an experimental setup based on superconducting transmission line resonators and qubits. References: L. Zhou, Z.R. Gong, Y.X. Liu, C.P. Sun, F. Nori, Controllable scattering of photons inside a one-dimensional resonator waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 100501 (2008). L. Zhou, H. Dong, Y.X. Liu, C.P. Sun, F. Nori, Quantum super-cavity with atomic mirrors, Phys. Rev. A 78, 063827 (2008).

  13. Resonant optical control of the spin of a single Cr atom in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente-Sampietro, A.; Utsumi, H.; Boukari, H.; Kuroda, S.; Besombes, L.

    2017-01-01

    A Cr atom in a semiconductor host carries a localized spin with an intrinsic large spin to strain coupling, which is particularly promising for the development of hybrid spin-mechanical systems and coherent mechanical spin driving. We demonstrate here that the spin of an individual Cr atom inserted in a semiconductor quantum dot can be controlled optically. We first show that a Cr spin can be prepared by resonant optical pumping. Monitoring the time dependence of the intensity of the resonant fluorescence of the quantum dot during this process permits us to probe the dynamics of the optical initialization of the Cr spin. Using this initialization and readout technique we measured a Cr spin relaxation time at T =5 K in the microsecond range. We finally demonstrate that, under a resonant single-mode laser field, the energy of any spin state of an individual Cr atom can be independently tuned by using the optical Stark effect.

  14. Mode Q factor and lasing spectrum controls for deformed square resonator microlasers with circular sides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Hai-Zhong; Huang, Yong-Zhen; Yang, Yue-De; Ma, Xiu-Wen; Xiao, Jin-Long; Du, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Stable dual-mode lasing semiconductor lasers can be used as a seed source for photonic generation of optical frequency comb and terahertz carrier. Normal square resonator microlasers can support dual-mode lasing with frequency interval up to 100 GHz. Here we demonstrate ultrahigh Q deformed square resonators with the flat sides replaced by circular sides for further increasing transverse mode intervals. The stable condition of dual-mode lasing is verified based on nonlinear gain analysis. Furthermore, the beating signals of 0.43, 0.31, and 0.16 THz are obtained by the autocorrelation measurement, which indicate the deformed microlasers as an architecture for THz radiation generation. The deformed square resonators pave the way for controlling the lasing spectrum and serve as ultrahigh Q microresonators for photonic integrated circuits.

  15. Acoustic control in a tractor cabin using two optimally designed Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driesch, Patricia L.; Koopmann, Gary H.

    2003-10-01

    A virtual design methodology is developed to minimize the noise in enclosures with optimally designed, passive, 20 acoustic absorbers (Helmholtz resonators). A series expansion of eigenfunctions is used to represent the acoustic=20 absorbers as external volume velocities, eliminating the need for a solution of large matrix eigenvalue problems. A determination of this type (efficient model/reevaluation approach) significantly increases the design possibilities when optimization techniques are implemented. As a full-scale demonstration, the acoustic response from 90-190 Hz of a tractor cabin was investigated. The lowest cabin mode proposes a significant challenge to a noise control engineer since its anti-node is located near the head of the operator and often generates unacceptable sound-pressure levels. Exploiting the low-frequency capability of Helmholtz resonators, lumped parameter models of these resonators were coupled to the enclosure via an experimentally determined acoustic model of the tractor cabin. The virtual design methodology uses gradient optimization techniques as a post-processor for the modeling and analysis of the unmodified acoustic interior to determine optimal resonator characteristics. Using two optimally designed Helmholtz resonators, potential energy was experimentally reduced by 3.4 and 10.3 dB at 117 and 167 Hz, respectively.

  16. Robust control of linear ceramic motor drive with LLCC resonant technique.

    PubMed

    Wai, Rong-Jong

    2003-07-01

    This study presents a robust control system for a linear ceramic motor (LCM) that is driven by a high-frequency voltage source inverter using two-inductance two-capacitance (LLCC) resonant technique. The structure and driving principle of the LCM are introduced. Because the dynamic characteristics and motor parameters of the LCM are nonlinear and time varying, a robust control system is designed based on the hypothetical dynamic model to achieve high-precision position control. The presentation of robust control for the LCM drive system is divided into three parts, which comprise state feedback controller, feed-forward controller, and uncertainty controller. The adaptation laws of control gains in the robust control system are derived in the sense of Lyapunov stability theorem such that the stability of the control system can be guaranteed. It not only has the learning ability similar to intelligent control, but also its control framework is more simple than intelligent control. With the proposed robust control system, the controlled LCM drive possesses the advantages of good tracking control performance and robustness to uncertainties. The effectiveness of the proposed robust control system is verified by experimental results in the presence of uncertainties. In addition, the advantages of the proposed control system are indicated in comparison with the traditional integral-proportional (IP) position control system.

  17. Vibration Control Of A Flexible Beam Using A Rotational Internal Resonance Controller, Part I: Theoretical Development And Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuer, K. L.; Duquette, A. P.; Golnaraghi, M. F.

    1993-10-01

    In this paper, an unconventional technique to control the vibrations of a cantilevered flexible beam, based on a non-linear dynamics phenomenon known as internal resonance , is proposed. The controller consists of a DC motor, itself a part of a simple regulated feedback system, with a rigid beam/tip mass configuration attached to the motor shaft. The addition of the controller to the tip of the flexible beam introduces quadratic, dynamic non-linearities into an otherwise linear system. Under the proper circumstances, these non-linearities can be used to generate a coupling effect between the modes of vibration of the system.An internally resonant state exists if the equations of motion are characterized by frequency-amplitude interactions and the first two natural frequencies of the linear portion of the non-linear equations of motion are commensurable or nearly commensurable. Once a resonance condition is established, a transfer of energy transpires between the modes of vibration. Thus, due to modal coupling, energy is, in effect, transferred from the flexible beam to the secondary beam, where it is dissipated through velocity feedback of the motor.Theoretical analysis predicts that the planar oscillations of a cantilevered beam displaced at its tip a distance equal to 18 percent of its length can be reduced to a relatively small amplitude in approximately four cycles. This controller has proven to be most effective in controlling large amplitude, low frequency oscillations which are typical for large flexible structures.

  18. Control of crystallographic orientation in diamond synthesis through laser resonant vibrational excitation of precursor molecules

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhi Qiang; Bai, Jaeil; Zhou, Yun Shen; Gao, Yi; Park, Jongbok; Guillemet, Thomas; Jiang, Lan; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Lu, Yong Feng

    2014-01-01

    Crystallographic orientations determine the optical, electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of crystals. Control of crystallographic orientations has been studied by changing the growth parameters, including temperature, pressure, proportion of precursors, and surface conditions. However, molecular dynamic mechanisms underlying these controls remain largely unknown. Here we achieved control of crystallographic orientations in diamond growth through a joint experimental and theoretical study of laser resonant vibrational excitation of precursor molecules (ethylene). Resonant vibrational excitation of the ethylene molecules using a wavelength-tunable CO2 laser steers the chemical reactions and promotes proportion of intermediate oxide species, which results in preferential growth of {100}-oriented diamond films and diamond single crystals in open air. Quantum molecular dynamic simulations and calculations of chemisorption energies of radicals detected from our mass-spectroscopy experiment provide an in-depth understanding of molecular reaction mechanisms in the steering of chemical reactions and control of crystallographic orientations. This finding opens up a new avenue for controlled chemical vapor deposition of crystals through resonant vibrational excitations to steer surface chemistry. PMID:24694918

  19. Evaluation of Focal Ablation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Defined Prostate Cancer Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Controlled Transurethral Ultrasound Therapy with Prostatectomy as the Reference Standard.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Elizabeth; Mougenot, Charles; Staruch, Robert; Boyes, Aaron; Kazem, Mohammad; Bronskill, Michael; Foster, Harry; Sugar, Linda; Haider, Masoom; Klotz, Laurence; Chopra, Rajiv

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated magnetic resonance imaging controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy as a treatment for magnetic resonance imaging defined focal prostate cancer using subsequent prostatectomy and histology as the reference standard. Five men completed this pilot study, which was approved by the institutional review board. Prior to radical prostatectomy focal tumors identified by magnetic resonance imaging were treated by coagulating targeted subtotal 3-dimensional volumes of prostate tissue using magnetic resonance imaging controlled transurethral focused ultrasound. Treatment was performed with a 3 Tesla clinical magnetic resonance imaging unit combined with modified clinical planning software for high intensity focused ultrasound therapy. After prostatectomy whole mount histological sections parallel to the magnetic resonance imaging treatment planes were used to compare magnetic resonance imaging measurements with thermal damage at the cellular level and, thus, evaluate treatment and target accuracy. Three-dimensional target volumes of 4 to 20 cc and with radii up to 35 mm from the urethra were treated successfully. Mean ± SD temperature control accuracy at the target boundary was -1.6 ± 4.8C and the mean spatial targeting accuracy achieved was -1.5 ± 2.8 mm. Mean treatment accuracy with respect to histology was -0.4 ± 1.7 mm with all index tumors falling inside the histological outer limit of thermal injury. Magnetic resonance imaging guided transurethral ultrasound therapy is capable of generating thermal coagulation and tumor destruction in targeted 3-dimensional angular sectors out to the prostate capsule for prostate glands up to 70 cc in volume. Ultrasound parameters needed to achieve ablation at the prostate capsule were determined, providing a foundation for future studies. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quiescence of magnetic braking and control of 3D non-resonance in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.-K.; in, Y.; Jeon, Y. M.; Logan, N. C.; Wang, Z. R.; Menard, J. E.; Kim, J. H.; Ko, W. H.; Kstar Team

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic braking using non-axisymmetric (3D) field is a promising tool to control rotation in tokamaks and thereby micro-to-macro instabilities. Ideally magnetic braking should induce only neoclassical momentum transport, without provoking resonant instabilities or unnecessary perturbations in particle or heat transport. Indeed in KSTAR, it was shown that the 3 rows of internal coils could be used to generate highly non-resonant n =1 with backward-helicity field distribution, called -90 phasing, and to change rotation without any perturbations to other transport channels. Recent KSTAR experiments, however, have also shown that the broad-wavelength field distribution, called 0 phasing, is rather more quiescent whereas -90 phasing can be highly degrading especially in high q95 plasmas. IPEC and NTV modeling are consistent with both observations, and further provide the optimal point in coil phasing and amplitude space. Additional experiments and comparisons with modeling all imply the sensitivity of plasma response to remnant resonant field, and thus importance of non-resonance control, to accomplish quiescent magnetic braking. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. A Resonant Pulse Detonation Actuator for High-Speed Boundary Layer Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, B. T.; Cutler, A. D.; Drummond, J. P.; Jones, S. B.

    2004-01-01

    A variety of different types of actuators have been previously investigated as flow control devices. Potential applications include the control of boundary layer separation in external flows, as well as jet engine inlet and diffuser flow control. The operating principles for such devices are typically based on either mechanical deflection of control surfaces (which include MEMS flap devices), mass injection (which includes combustion driven jet actuators), or through the use of synthetic jets (diaphragm devices which produce a pulsating jet with no net mass flow). This paper introduces some of the initial flow visualization work related to the development of a relatively new type of combustion-driven jet actuator that has been proposed based on a pulse detonation principle. The device is designed to utilize localized detonation of a premixed fuel (Hydrogen)-air mixture to periodically inject a jet of gas transversely into the primary flow. Initial testing with airflow successfully demonstrated resonant conditions within the range of acoustic frequencies expected for the design. Schlieren visualization of the pulsating air jet structure revealed axially symmetric vortex flow, along with the formation of shocks. Flow visualization of the first successful sustained oscillation condition is also demonstrated for one configuration of the current test section. Future testing will explore in more detail the onset of resonant combustion and the approach to conditions of sustained resonant detonation.

  2. Duffing revisited: phase-shift control and internal resonance in self-sustained oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, Sebastián I.; Zanette, Damián H.

    2016-01-01

    We address two aspects of the dynamics of the forced Duffing oscillator which are relevant to the technology of micromechanical devices and, at the same time, have intrinsic significance to the field of nonlinear oscillating systems. First, we study the stability of periodic motion when the phase shift between the external force and the oscillation is controlled - contrary to the standard case, where the control parameter is the frequency of the force. Phase-shift control is the operational configuration under which self-sustained oscillators - and, in particular, micromechanical oscillators - provide a frequency reference useful for time keeping. We show that, contrary to the standard forced Duffing oscillator, under phase-shift control oscillations are stable over the whole resonance curve, and provide analytical approximate expressions for the time dependence of the oscillation amplitude and frequency during transients. Second, we analyze a model for the internal resonance between the main Duffing oscillation mode and a higher-harmonic mode of a vibrating solid bar clamped at its two ends. We focus on the stabilization of the oscillation frequency when the resonance takes place, and present preliminary experimental results that illustrate the phenomenon. This synchronization process has been proposed to counteract the undesirable frequency-amplitude interdependence in nonlinear time-keeping micromechanical devices. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file and one gif file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2015-60517-3

  3. Magnetic resonance velocity imaging derived pressure differential using control volume analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is hindered by a lack of systemic understanding of the interrelationships between pressures and flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. Control volume analysis provides a fluid physics approach to quantify and relate pressure and flow information. The objective of this study was to use control volume analysis and magnetic resonance velocity imaging to non-invasively estimate pressure differentials in vitro. Method A flow phantom was constructed and water was the experimental fluid. The phantom was connected to a high-resolution differential pressure sensor and a computer controlled pump producing sinusoidal flow. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements were taken and subsequently analyzed to derive pressure differential waveforms using momentum conservation principles. Independent sensor measurements were obtained for comparison. Results Using magnetic resonance data the momentum balance in the phantom was computed. The measured differential pressure force had amplitude of 14.4 dynes (pressure gradient amplitude 0.30 Pa/cm). A 12.5% normalized root mean square deviation between derived and directly measured pressure differential was obtained. These experiments demonstrate one example of the potential utility of control volume analysis and the concepts involved in its application. Conclusions This study validates a non-invasive measurement technique for relating velocity measurements to pressure differential. These methods may be applied to clinical measurements to estimate pressure differentials in vivo which could not be obtained with current clinical sensors. PMID:21414222

  4. Vibration reduction on a nonlinear flexible structure through resonant control and disturbance estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzulani, Gabriele; Resta, Ferruccio; Ripamonti, Francesco

    2012-04-01

    Large mechanical structures are often affected by high level vibrations due to their flexibility. These vibrations can reduce the system performances and lifetime and the use of active vibration control strategies becomes very attractive. In this paper a combination of resonant control and a disturbance estimator is proposed. This solution is able to improve the system performances during the transient motion and also to reject the disturbance forces acting on the system. Both control logics are based on a modal approach, since it allows to describe the structure dynamics considering only few degrees of freedom.

  5. Vibrations in MagAO: resonance sources identification and first approaches for modeling and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcés, Javier; Zúñiga, Sebastián.; Close, Laird; Males, Jared; Morzinski, Katie; Escárate, Pedro; Castro, Mario; Marchioni, José; Rojas, Diego

    2016-07-01

    The Magellan Telescope Adaptive Optics System (MagAO) is subject to resonance effects induced by elements within the system instrumentation, such as fans and cooling pumps. Normalized PSDs are obtained through frequency-based analysis of closed-loop on-sky data, detecting and measuring vibration effects. Subsequently, a space-state model for the AO loop is obtained, using a standard AO loop scheme with an integrator-based controller and including the vibration effects as disturbances. Finally, a new control alternative is proposed, focusing on residual phase variance minimization through the design and simulation of an optimal LQG control approach.

  6. Fast electron spin resonance controlled manipulation of spin injection into quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, Andreas Siller, Jan; Schittny, Robert; Krämmer, Christoph; Kalt, Heinz; Hetterich, Michael

    2014-06-23

    In our spin-injection light-emitting diodes, electrons are spin-polarized in a semimagnetic ZnMnSe spin aligner and then injected into InGaAs quantum dots. The resulting electron spin state can be read out by measuring the circular polarization state of the emitted light. Here, we resonantly excite the Mn 3d electron spin system with microwave pulses and perform time-resolved measurements of the spin dynamics. We find that we are able to control the spin polarization of the injected electrons on a microsecond timescale. This electron spin resonance induced spin control could be one of the ingredients required to utilize the quantum dot electrons or the Mn spins as qubits.

  7. Acoustic Resonators for Far-Field Control of Sound on a Subwavelength Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoult, Fabrice; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2011-08-01

    We prove experimentally that broadband sounds can be controlled and focused at will on a subwavelength scale by using acoustic resonators. We demonstrate our approach in the audible range with soda cans, that is, Helmholtz resonators, and commercial computer speakers. We show that diffraction-limited sound fields convert efficiently into subdiffraction modes in the collection of cans that can be controlled coherently in order to obtain focal spots as thin as 1/25 of a wavelength in air. We establish that subwavelength acoustic pressure spots are responsible for a strong enhancement of the acoustic displacement at focus, which permits us to conclude with a visual experiment exemplifying the interest of our concept for subwavelength sensors and actuators.

  8. Combat Hardened Communications: High Precision Frequency Control Using Resonators Immune to Acceleration and Stress Fields,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    cancel. Compensation of thermal transients cores about by Ci2 use of a special, doubly rotated orientation of cut . We show that all ........... .. ... 1...laboratory standard of conventional design, using an AT cut crystal, and protected to the greatest possible extent from environmental disturbances. Its...frequency control element commonly used is the AT cut quartz resonator, a singly rotated plate, shown in Figure 3, with 01,+350. Its traditional

  9. Resonant control of stochastic spatiotemporal dynamics in a tunnel diode by multiple time-delayed feedback.

    PubMed

    Majer, Niels; Schöll, Eckehard

    2009-01-01

    We study the control of noise-induced spatiotemporal current density patterns in a semiconductor nanostructure (double-barrier resonant tunneling diode) by multiple time-delayed feedback. We find much more pronounced resonant features of noise-induced oscillations compared to single time feedback, rendering the system more sensitive to variations in the delay time tau . The coherence of noise-induced oscillations measured by the correlation time exhibits sharp resonances as a function of tau , and can be strongly increased by optimal choices of tau . Similarly, the peaks in the power spectral density are sharpened. We provide analytical insight into the control mechanism by relating the correlation times and mean frequencies of noise-induced breathing oscillations to the stability properties of the deterministic stationary current density filaments under the influence of the control loop. Moreover, we demonstrate that the use of multiple time delays enlarges the regime in which the deterministic dynamical properties of the system are not changed by delay-induced bifurcations.

  10. Plasmon resonant gold-coated liposomes for spectrally controlled content release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Sarah J.; Bobnick, Michael C.; Romanowski, Marek

    2010-02-01

    We recently demonstrated that liposome-supported plasmon resonant gold nanoshells are degradable into components of a size compatible with renal clearance, potentially enabling their use as multifunctional agents in applications in nanomedicine, including imaging, diagnostics, therapy, and drug delivery (Troutman et al., Adv. Mater. 2008, 20, 2604-2608). When illuminated with laser light at the wavelength matching their plasmon resonance band, gold-coated liposomes rapidly release their encapsulated substances, which can include therapeutic and diagnostic agents. The present research demonstrates that release of encapsulated agents from gold-coated liposomes can be spectrally controlled by varying the location of the plasmon resonance band; this spectral tuning is accomplished by varying the concentration of gold deposited on the surface of liposomes. Furthermore, the amount of laser energy required for release is qualitatively explained using the concept of thermal confinement (Jacques, Appl. Opt. 1993, 32(3), 2447-2454). Overlapping thermal confinement zones can be avoided by minimizing the laser pulse width, resulting in lower energy requirements for liposomal content release and less global heating of the sample. Control of heating is especially important in drug delivery applications, where it enables spatial and spectral control of delivery and prevents thermal damage to tissue.

  11. Controlled Fano resonances via symmetry breaking in metamaterials for high-sensitive infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Shuhei; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Tanaka, Takuo; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Tsuruta, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    A high-sensitive polarized surface-enhanced infrared absorption (polarized SEIRA) is proposed and demonstrated by utilizing the resonant coupling of Fano-resonant mode of the asymmetric metamaterials and IR vibrational mode of a polymer nano-film. The asymmetric metamaterials consisting of an Au nano-rod pair with a coupling nano-antenna were fabricated and characterized to demonstrate the controlled Fano resonances at 1730 cm-1, which spectrally overlapped with the C=O stretching vibrational mode. In the co-polarized SEIRA measurement, the C=O mode of the PMMA nano-film was clearly observed as a conventional anti-resonant peak within the Fano line-shape of the metamaterial. For the cross-polarized case, on the other hand, a distinctive dip appeared within a cross-polarized transmission peak of the metamaterial. Since the unwanted background is strongly suppressed in the cross-polarized detection scheme, the signal contrast was dramatically improved, allowing for the attomole detection of the C=O bond in the far-field measurement. Our metamaterial approach achieves the significant improvement of signal-to-background ratio in the far-field measurement, thus paving the way toward the high-sensitive analysis of functional group in direct IR spectroscopy.

  12. Control of Fano resonances and slow light using Bose-Einstein condensates in a nanocavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, M. Javed; Ghafoor, Fazal; Khan, M. Miskeen; Saif, Farhan

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a standing wave in an optical nanocavity with Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) constitutes a one-dimensional optical lattice potential in the presence of a finite two bodies atomic interaction. We report that the interaction of a BEC with a standing field in an optical cavity coherently evolves to exhibit Fano resonances in the output field at the probe frequency. The behavior of the reported resonance shows an excellent compatibility with the original formulation of asymmetric resonance as discovered by Fano [U. Fano, Phys. Rev. 124, 1866 (1961), 10.1103/PhysRev.124.1866]. Based on our analytical and numerical results, we find that the Fano resonances and subsequently electromagnetically induced transparency of the probe pulse can be controlled through the intensity of the cavity standing wave field and the strength of the atom-atom interaction in the BEC. In addition, enhancement of the slow light effect by the strength of the atom-atom interaction and its robustness against the condensate fluctuations are realizable using presently available technology.

  13. Vibroacoustic modeling of an acoustic resonator tuned by dielectric elastomer membrane with voltage control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiang; Lu, Zhenbo; Cheng, Li; Cui, Fangsen

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the acoustic properties of a duct resonator tuned by an electro-active membrane. The resonator takes the form of a side-branch cavity which is attached to a rigid duct and covered by a pre-stretched Dielectric Elastomer (DE) in the neck area. A three-dimensional, analytical model based on the sub-structuring approach is developed to characterize the complex structure-acoustic coupling between the DE membrane and its surrounding acoustic media. We show that such resonator provides sound attenuation in the medium frequency range mainly by means of sound reflection, as a result of the membrane vibration. The prediction accuracy of the proposed model is validated against experimental test. The pre-stretched DE membrane with fixed edges responds to applied voltage change with a varying inner stress and, by the same token, its natural frequency and vibrational response can be tuned to suit particular frequencies of interest. The peaks in the transmission loss (TL) curves can be shifted towards lower frequencies when the voltage applied to the DE membrane is increased. Through simulations on the effect of increasing the voltage level, the TL shifting mechanism and its possible tuning range are analyzed. This paves the way for applying such resonator device for adaptive-passive noise control.

  14. A design procedure for the phase-controlled parallel-loaded resonant inverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Roger J.

    1989-01-01

    High-frequency-link power conversion and distribution based on a resonant inverter (RI) has been recently proposed. The design of several topologies is reviewed, and a simple approximate design procedure is developed for the phase-controlled parallel-loaded RI. This design procedure seeks to ensure the benefits of resonant conversion and is verified by data from a laboratory 2.5 kVA, 20-kHz converter. A simple phasor analysis is introduced as a useful approximation for design purposes. The load is considered to be a linear impedance (or an ac current sink). The design procedure is verified using a 2.5-kVA 20-kHz RI. Also obtained are predictable worst-case ratings for each component of the resonant tank circuit and the inverter switches. For a given load VA requirement, below-resonance operation is found to result in a significantly lower tank VA requirement. Under transient conditions such as load short-circuit, a reversal of the expected commutation sequence is possible.

  15. Active control of the ion resonance instability by ion removing fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bettega, G.; Cavaliere, F.; Cavenago, M.; De Luca, F.; Illiberi, A.; Pozzoli, R.; Rome, M.

    2006-11-15

    The off-axis bulk rotation (l=1 diocotron mode) of an electron plasma column confined in a Malmberg-Penning trap is strongly destabilized by a small population of positive ions formed by energetic electron-neutral collisions. The instability, known as ion resonance instability, drives the plasma against the wall, destroying the confinement. A new experimental technique based on the static or time dependent application of low voltages to the inner conductors of the trap is shown to be effective in controlling the instability. The efficiency of the control technique is experimentally investigated by a systematic variation of the amplitudes, time duration, and periodicity of the additional potentials.

  16. Controllable frequency comb generation in a tunable superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, J. Q.; Wang, Shuaipeng; Wang, Yipu; Zhang, Dengke; Luo, Xiaoqing; Chen, Zhen; Li, Tiefu

    Frequency combs have attracted considerable interest because they are extremely useful in a wide range of applications, such as optical metrology and high precision spectroscopy. Here we report the design and characterization of a controllable frequency comb generated in a tunable superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator in the microwave regime. Both the center frequency and teeth density of the comb are precisely controllable. The teeth spacing can be adjusted from Hz to MHz. The experimental results can be well explained via theoretical analysis. This work is supported by the NSAF Grant No. U1330201, the NSFC Grant No. 91421102, and the MOST 973 Program Grant Nos. 2014CB848700 and 2014CB921401.

  17. Flow control using audio tones in resonant microfluidic networks: towards cell-phone controlled lab-on-a-chip devices.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Reid H; Jain, Rahil; Browning, Yoni; Shah, Rachana; Kauffman, Peter; Dinh, Doan; Lutz, Barry R

    2016-08-16

    Fluid control remains a challenge in development of portable lab-on-a-chip devices. Here, we show that microfluidic networks driven by single-frequency audio tones create resonant oscillating flow that is predicted by equivalent electrical circuit models. We fabricated microfluidic devices with fluidic resistors (R), inductors (L), and capacitors (C) to create RLC networks with band-pass resonance in the audible frequency range available on portable audio devices. Microfluidic devices were fabricated from laser-cut adhesive plastic, and a "buzzer" was glued to a diaphragm (capacitor) to integrate the actuator on the device. The AC flowrate magnitude was measured by imaging oscillation of bead tracers to allow direct comparison to the RLC circuit model across the frequency range. We present a systematic build-up from single-channel systems to multi-channel (3-channel) networks, and show that RLC circuit models predict complex frequency-dependent interactions within multi-channel networks. Finally, we show that adding flow rectifying valves to the network creates pumps that can be driven by amplified and non-amplified audio tones from common audio devices (iPod and iPhone). This work shows that RLC circuit models predict resonant flow responses in multi-channel fluidic networks as a step towards microfluidic devices controlled by audio tones.

  18. Resonant hopping of a robot controlled by an artificial neural oscillator.

    PubMed

    Pelc, Evan H; Daley, Monica A; Ferris, Daniel P

    2008-06-01

    The bouncing gaits of terrestrial animals (hopping, running, trotting) can be modeled as a hybrid dynamic system, with spring-mass dynamics during stance and ballistic motion during the aerial phase. We used a simple hopping robot controlled by an artificial neural oscillator to test the ability of the neural oscillator to adaptively drive this hybrid dynamic system. The robot had a single joint, actuated by an artificial pneumatic muscle in series with a tendon spring. We examined how the oscillator-robot system responded to variation in two neural control parameters: descending neural drive and neuromuscular gain. We also tested the ability of the oscillator-robot system to adapt to variations in mechanical properties by changing the series and parallel spring stiffnesses. Across a 100-fold variation in both supraspinal gain and muscle gain, hopping frequency changed by less than 10%. The neural oscillator consistently drove the system at the resonant half-period for the stance phase, and adapted to a new resonant half-period when the muscle series and parallel stiffnesses were altered. Passive cycling of elastic energy in the tendon accounted for 70-79% of the mechanical work done during each hop cycle. Our results demonstrate that hopping dynamics were largely determined by the intrinsic properties of the mechanical system, not the specific choice of neural oscillator parameters. The findings provide the first evidence that an artificial neural oscillator will drive a hybrid dynamic system at partial resonance.

  19. Experimental investigation of shaping disturbance observer design for motion control of precision mechatronic stages with resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Hu, Chuxiong; Zhu, Yu; Wang, Ze; Zhang, Ming

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, shaping disturbance observer (SDOB) is investigated for precision mechatronic stages with middle-frequency zero/pole type resonance to achieve good motion control performance in practical manufacturing situations. Compared with traditional standard disturbance observer (DOB), in SDOB a pole-zero cancellation based shaping filter is cascaded to the mechatronic stage plant to meet the challenge of motion control performance deterioration caused by actual resonance. Noting that pole-zero cancellation is inevitably imperfect and the controller may even consequently become unstable in practice, frequency domain stability analysis is conducted to find out how each parameter of the shaping filter affects the control stability. Moreover, the robust design criterion of the shaping filter, and the design procedure of SDOB, are both proposed to guide the actual design and facilitate practical implementation. The SDOB with the proposed design criterion is applied to a linear motor driven stage and a voice motor driven stage, respectively. Experimental results consistently validate the effectiveness nature of the proposed SDOB scheme in practical mechatronics motion applications. The proposed SDOB design actually could be an effective unit in the controller design for motion stages of mechanical manufacture equipments.

  20. Start-up and control method and apparatus for resonant free piston Stirling engine

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, Michael M.

    1984-01-01

    A resonant free-piston Stirling engine having a new and improved start-up and control method and system. A displacer linear electrodynamic machine is provided having an armature secured to and movable with the displacer and having a stator supported by the Stirling engine housing in juxtaposition to the armature. A control excitation circuit is provided for electrically exciting the displacer linear electrodynamic machine with electrical excitation signals having substantially the same frequency as the desired frequency of operation of the Stirling engine. The excitation control circuit is designed so that it selectively and controllably causes the displacer electrodynamic machine to function either as a generator load to extract power from the displacer or the control circuit selectively can be operated to cause the displacer electrodynamic machine to operate as an electric drive motor to apply additional input power to the displacer in addition to the thermodynamic power feedback to the displacer whereby the displacer linear electrodynamic machine also is used in the electric drive motor mode as a means for initially starting the resonant free-piston Stirling engine.

  1. Experimental control of transport resonances in a coherent quantum rocking ratchet

    PubMed Central

    Grossert, Christopher; Leder, Martin; Denisov, Sergey; Hänggi, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ratchet phenomenon is a means to get directed transport without net forces. Originally conceived to rectify stochastic motion and describe operational principles of biological motors, the ratchet effect can be used to achieve controllable coherent quantum transport. This transport is an ingredient of several perspective quantum devices including atomic chips. Here we examine coherent transport of ultra-cold atoms in a rocking quantum ratchet. This is realized by loading a rubidium atomic Bose–Einstein condensate into a periodic optical potential subjected to a biharmonic temporal drive. The achieved long-time coherence allows us to resolve resonance enhancement of the atom transport induced by avoided crossings in the Floquet spectrum of the system. By tuning the strength of the temporal modulations, we observe a bifurcation of a single resonance into a doublet. Our measurements reveal the role of interactions among Floquet eigenstates for quantum ratchet transport. PMID:26852803

  2. Clutter sensitivity test under controlled field conditions Resonant Microstrip Patch Antenna (RMPA) sensor technology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-27

    Theoretical research, controlled laboratory tests, and these field test results show that nonmetallic (and metallic) shallowly buried objects can be detected and imaged with the Resonant Microstrip Patch Antenna (RMPA) sensor. The sensor can be modeled as a high Q cavity which capitalizes on its resonant condition sensitivity to scattered waves from buried objects. When the RMPA sensor is swept over a shallowly buried object, the RMPA fed-point impedance (resistance), measured with a Maxwell bridge, changes by tens of percent. The significant change in unprocessed impedance data can be presented in two-dimensional and three-dimensional graphical displays over the survey area. This forms silhouette images of the objects without the application of computationally intensive data processing algorithms. Because RMPA employed electromagnetic waves to illuminate the shallowly buried object, a number of questions and issues arise in the decision to fund or deny funding of the reconfiguration of the RMPA technology into a nonmetallic (metallic) land mine detector.

  3. Electrical tuning of mechanical characteristics in qPlus sensor: Active Q and resonance frequency control

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Manhee; Hwang, Jong Geun; Jahng, Junghoon; Kim, QHwan; Noh, Hanaul; An, Sangmin; Jhe, Wonho

    2016-08-21

    We present an electrical feedback method for independent and simultaneous tuning of both the resonance frequency and the quality factor of a harmonic oscillator, the so called “qPlus” configuration of quartz tuning forks. We incorporate a feedback circuit with two electronic gain parameters into the original actuation-detection system, and systematically demonstrate the control of the original resonance frequency of 32 592 Hz from 32 572 Hz to 32 610 Hz and the original quality factor 952 from 408 up to 20 000. This tunable module can be used for enhancing and optimizing the oscillator performance in compliance with specifics of applications.

  4. Molecular alignment using coherent resonant excitation: A new proposal for stereodynamic control of chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Nandini

    2009-10-28

    For the mode-selective control of chemical reaction, we present a new approach of molecular alignment using coherent resonant interaction with low intensity midinfrared optical pulses. Under coherent excitation, the alignment of vibrationally excited molecules becomes a function of the optical pulse area. Depending on the type of transition, with certain values of the pulse areas, a narrow group of magnetic substates are selectively excited, which results in aligning the rotational axis of the molecular ensemble. It is shown that for a P-type transition, significant alignment in the excited vibrational state can be realized using a resonant midinfrared pulse of area approximately 2pi. Under the steady state excitation (pulse duration longer than the vibrational relaxation time), the molecular alignment is destroyed due to saturation. We design a polarization spectroscopy experiment to coherently excite and probe the molecular alignment in real time.

  5. Broadband wavelength control for optical parametric oscillation in radially-poled whispering gallery resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisenheimer, Sarah-Katharina; Fürst, Josef U.; Schiller, Annelie; Buse, Karsten; Breunig, Ingo

    2016-03-01

    Broadband infrared spectroscopy employing optical parametric oscillation in bow-tie cavities, including a periodically- poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal, is well known. We demonstrate, however, that such spectroscopy is also possible using 2-mm-size monolithic whispering gallery resonators (WGRs). This is achieved in a radially-poled WGR by controlling wavelength tuning despite triple resonance of pump, signal, and idler light. Simulated and measured tuning characteristics of the Type-0 OPOs, pumped at about 1 μm wavelength, coincide. Tuning branches, which are crossed or curved at degeneracy, are present over a spectral range of up to 0.9 µm. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we show that all spectroscopic features of ethanol can be resolved using the idler light between 2.2 and 2.55 μm.

  6. Double active control of the plasmonic resonance of a gold nanoparticle array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sio, Luciano; Cunningham, Alastair; Verrina, Vanessa; Tone, Caterina Maria; Caputo, Roberto; Bürgi, Thomas; Umeton, Cesare

    2012-11-01

    A two-fold active control of the plasmonic resonance of randomly distributed gold nanoparticles (GNPs) has been achieved. GNPs have been immobilized on an Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate and then covered with a liquid crystalline compound. The system has been investigated by means of atomic force and scanning electron microscopy, revealing the presence of isolated and well distributed GNPs. The application of an external electric field to the sample has a two-fold consequence: the re-orientation of the hybrid-aligned liquid crystal layer and the formation of a carrier accumulation layer in the proximity of the ITO substrate. The refractive indices of both liquid crystal and accumulation layers are influenced by the applied field in a competitive way and produce a ``dancing behavior'' of the GNP's plasmonic resonance spectral position.

  7. Controlling resonant photonic transport along optical waveguides by two-level atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Conghua; Wei Lianfu; Jia Wenzhi; Shen, Jung-Tsung

    2011-10-15

    Recent works [Shen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 213001 (2005); Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 100501 (2008)] showed that the incident photons cannot transmit along an optical waveguide containing a resonant two-level atom (TLA). Here we propose an approach to overcome such a difficulty by using asymmetric couplings between the photons and a TLA. Our numerical results show that the transmission spectrum of the photon depends on both the frequency of the incident photons and the photon-TLA couplings. Consequently, this system can serve as a controllable photon attenuator, by which the transmission probability of the resonantly incident photons can be changed from 0% to 100%. A possible application to explain the recent experimental observations [Astafiev et al., Science 327, 840 (2010)] is also discussed.

  8. Control system renewal for efficient operation in RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, A. Ozeki, K.; Higurashi, Y.; Kidera, M.; Komiyama, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    2016-02-15

    A RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (18 GHz ECRIS) is used as an external ion source at the Radioactive Ion Beam Factory (RIBF) accelerator complex to produce an intense beam of medium-mass heavy ions (e.g., Ca and Ar). In most components that comprise the RIBF, the control systems (CSs) are integrated by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). On the other hand, a non-EPICS-based system has hardwired controllers, and it is used in the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as an independent system. In terms of efficient and effective operation, the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as well as the RIBF CS should be renewed using EPICS. Therefore, we constructed an 18 GHz ECRIS CS by using programmable logic controllers with embedded EPICS technology. In the renewed system, an operational log system was developed as a new feature, for supporting of the 18 GHz ECRIS operation.

  9. n-qubit-controlled phase gate with superconducting quantum-interference devices coupled to a resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Chuiping; Han Siyuan

    2005-09-15

    We present a way to realize an n-qubit controlled phase gate with superconducting quantum-interference devices (SQUIDs) by coupling them to a superconducting resonator. In this proposal, the two logical states of a qubit are represented by the two lowest levels of a SQUID. An intermediate level of each SQUID is utilized to facilitate coherent control and manipulation of quantum states of the qubits. It is interesting to note that an n-qubit controlled phase gate can be achieved with n SQUIDs by successively applying a {pi}/2 Jaynes-Cummings pulse to each of the n-1 control SQUIDs before and after a {pi} Jaynes-Cummings pulse on the target SQUID.

  10. Control system renewal for efficient operation in RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, A.; Ozeki, K.; Higurashi, Y.; Kidera, M.; Komiyama, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    2016-02-01

    A RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (18 GHz ECRIS) is used as an external ion source at the Radioactive Ion Beam Factory (RIBF) accelerator complex to produce an intense beam of medium-mass heavy ions (e.g., Ca and Ar). In most components that comprise the RIBF, the control systems (CSs) are integrated by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). On the other hand, a non-EPICS-based system has hardwired controllers, and it is used in the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as an independent system. In terms of efficient and effective operation, the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as well as the RIBF CS should be renewed using EPICS. Therefore, we constructed an 18 GHz ECRIS CS by using programmable logic controllers with embedded EPICS technology. In the renewed system, an operational log system was developed as a new feature, for supporting of the 18 GHz ECRIS operation.

  11. Recurrent neural network control for LCC-resonant ultrasonic motor drive.

    PubMed

    Lin, F J; Wai, R J; Hong, C M

    2000-01-01

    A newly designed driving circuit for the traveling wave-type ultrasonic motor (USM), which consists of a push-pull DC-DC power converter and a two-phase voltage source inverter using one inductance and two capacitances (LCC) resonant technique, is presented in this study. Moreover, because the dynamic characteristics of the USM are difficult to obtain and the motor parameters are time varying, a recurrent neural network (RNN) controller is proposed to control the USM drive system. In the proposed controller, the dynamic backpropagation algorithm is adopted to train the RNN on-line using the proposed delta adaptation law. Furthermore, to guarantee the convergence of tracking error, analytical methods based on a discrete-type Lyapunov function are proposed to determine the varied learning rates for the training of the RNN. Finally, the effectiveness of the RNN-controlled USM drive system is demonstrated by some experimental results.

  12. Control of multiple resonant power processors in a multi-source system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, James; Silverman, Albert; Kenny, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    Analysis and test results show that phasor-regulated, Mapham-derived resonant inverters can be paralleled to provide standardizing interfaces for multiple sources on a utility-type, aerospace power distribution bus. The basic sources do not require matching in any way, and may have grossly different characteristics. Fully stable system architectures with multiple sources, parallel/redundant distribution buses, and a wide variety of loads can be easily constructed and controlled. The commands and parameters available for system control allow for tight tolerance bus voltage control, and absolute power-sharing control from the various sources over the full range of possible source and load variations. That level of control enables simplified load power processing hardware and the distribution of losses to optimally load the source thermal control system. Positive control of all system performance and allocation of losses are not required by all missions or vehicles, and overall vehicle considerations do not always require the loads on vehicle energy sources and thermal control systems to be balanced. In those cases, power system control can be simplified, and a hierarchical set of defaults can be substituted for computer-generated or supervisory input commands to allow for stable, fully autonomous system operation.

  13. Control of multiple resonant power processors in a multi-source system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, James; Silverman, Albert; Kenny, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    Analysis and test results show that phasor-regulated, Mapham-derived resonant inverters can be paralleled to provide standardizing interfaces for multiple sources on a utility-type, aerospace power distribution bus. The basic sources do not require matching in any way, and may have grossly different characteristics. Fully stable system architectures with multiple sources, parallel/redundant distribution buses, and a wide variety of loads can be easily constructed and controlled. The commands and parameters available for system control allow for tight tolerance bus voltage control, and absolute power-sharing control from the various sources over the full range of possible source and load variations. That level of control enables simplified load power processing hardware and the distribution of losses to optimally load the source thermal control system. Positive control of all system performance and allocation of losses are not required by all missions or vehicles, and overall vehicle considerations do not always require the loads on vehicle energy sources and thermal control systems to be balanced. In those cases, power system control can be simplified, and a hierarchical set of defaults can be substituted for computer-generated or supervisory input commands to allow for stable, fully autonomous system operation.

  14. Control of Magnetic Bearings for Rotor Unbalance With Plug-In Time-Varying Resonators.

    PubMed

    Kang, Christopher; Tsao, Tsu-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Rotor unbalance, common phenomenon of rotational systems, manifests itself as a periodic disturbance synchronized with the rotor's angular velocity. In active magnetic bearing (AMB) systems, feedback control is required to stabilize the open-loop unstable electromagnetic levitation. Further, feedback action can be added to suppress the repeatable runout but maintain closed-loop stability. In this paper, a plug-in time-varying resonator is designed by inverting cascaded notch filters. This formulation allows flexibility in designing the internal model for appropriate disturbance rejection. The plug-in structure ensures that stability can be maintained for varying rotor speeds. Experimental results of an AMB-rotor system are presented.

  15. Double threshold behavior in a resonance-controlled ZnO random laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyuki, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hideki; Nakamura, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Yoshie; Koshizaki, Naoto; Tsuji, Takeshi; Sasaki, Keiji

    2017-03-01

    We observed unusual lasing characteristics, such as double thresholds and blue-shift of lasing peak, in a resonance-controlled ZnO random laser. From the analysis of lasing threshold carrier density, we found that the lasing at 1st and 2nd thresholds possibly arises from different mechanisms; the lasing at 1st threshold involves exciton recombination, whereas the lasing at 2nd threshold is caused by electron-hole plasma recombination, which is the typical origin of conventional random lasers. These phenomena are very similar to the transition from polariton lasing to photon lasing observed in a well-defined cavity laser.

  16. Control of Magnetic Bearings for Rotor Unbalance With Plug-In Time-Varying Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Christopher; Tsao, Tsu-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Rotor unbalance, common phenomenon of rotational systems, manifests itself as a periodic disturbance synchronized with the rotor's angular velocity. In active magnetic bearing (AMB) systems, feedback control is required to stabilize the open-loop unstable electromagnetic levitation. Further, feedback action can be added to suppress the repeatable runout but maintain closed-loop stability. In this paper, a plug-in time-varying resonator is designed by inverting cascaded notch filters. This formulation allows flexibility in designing the internal model for appropriate disturbance rejection. The plug-in structure ensures that stability can be maintained for varying rotor speeds. Experimental results of an AMB–rotor system are presented. PMID:27222600

  17. Liquid crystal control of the plasmon resonances at terahertz frequencies in graphene microribbon gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, V. Yu.; Zadorozhnii, V. I.; Pinkevych, I. P.; Evans, D. R.

    2017-08-01

    We theoretically study the influence of the liquid crystal (LC) orientational state on the absorption, reflection, and transmission spectra of a graphene microribbon grating placed between a nematic LC and an isotropic dielectric substrate. We calculate the absorption, reflection, and transmission coefficients at normal incidence of a far-infrared transverse magnetic wave (THz) and show that control of the orientational state of the LC layer enables the manipulation of the magnitude of the absorption and reflection maxima. The influence the LC orientational state on the plasmonic resonance increases with increasing the isotropic substrate dielectric constant and the graphene microribbon width to grating spacing ratio.

  18. Controlling resonance energy transfer in nanostructure emitters by positioning near a mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeraddana, Dilusha; Premaratne, Malin; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Andrews, David L.

    2017-08-01

    The ability to control light-matter interactions in quantum objects opens up many avenues for new applications. We look at this issue within a fully quantized framework using a fundamental theory to describe mirror-assisted resonance energy transfer (RET) in nanostructures. The process of RET communicates electronic excitation between suitably disposed donor and acceptor particles in close proximity, activated by the initial excitation of the donor. Here, we demonstrate that the energy transfer rate can be significantly controlled by careful positioning of the RET emitters near a mirror. The results deliver equations that elicit new insights into the associated modification of virtual photon behavior, based on the quantum nature of light. In particular, our results indicate that energy transfer efficiency in nanostructures can be explicitly expedited or suppressed by a suitably positioned neighboring mirror, depending on the relative spacing and the dimensionality of the nanostructure. Interestingly, the resonance energy transfer between emitters is observed to "switch off" abruptly under suitable conditions of the RET system. This allows one to quantitatively control RET systems in a new way.

  19. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stress variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by an expandable ring embedded in the noise radiating element. Excitation of the ring causes expansion or contraction of the ring, thereby varying the stress in the noise radiating element. The ring is actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the ring, causing the ring to expand or contract. Instead of a single ring embedded in the noise radiating panel, a first expandable ring can be bonded to one side of the noise radiating element, and a second expandable ring can be bonded to the other side.

  20. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through variable ring loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of noise radiating structure is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating structure is tuned by a plurality of drivers arranged to contact the noise radiating structure. Excitation of the drivers causes expansion or contraction of the drivers, thereby varying the edge loading applied to the noise radiating structure. The drivers are actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the drivers, causing them to expand or contract. The noise radiating structure may be either the outer shroud of the engine or a ring mounted flush with an inner wall of the shroud or disposed in the interior of the shroud.

  1. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stiffness variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by a plurality of force transmitting mechanisms which contact the noise radiating element. Each one of the force transmitting mechanisms includes an expandable element and a spring in contact with the noise radiating element so that excitation of the element varies the spring force applied to the noise radiating element. The elements are actuated by a controller which receives input of a signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the elements and causes the spring force applied to the noise radiating element to be varied. The force transmitting mechanisms can be arranged to either produce bending or linear stiffness variations in the noise radiating element.

  2. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances

    PubMed Central

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Photonic qubits lie at the heart of quantum information technology, often encoding information in their polarization state. So far, only low-frequency optical and infrared photons have been employed as flying qubits, as the resources that are at present easiest to control. With their essentially different way of interacting with matter, x-ray qubits would bear however relevant advantages: they are extremely robust, penetrate deep through materials, and can be focused down to few-nm waveguides, allowing unprecedented miniaturization. Also, x-rays are resonant to nuclear transitions, which are very well isolated from the environment and present long coherence times. Here, we show theoretically that x-ray polarization qubits can be dynamically controlled by nuclear Mössbauer resonances. The control knob is played by nuclear hyperfine magnetic fields, that allow via fast rotations precise processing of single x-ray quanta polarization. With such rotations, single-qubit and binary logical operations such as a destructive C-NOT gate can be implemented. PMID:27118340

  3. Quality control and health monitoring of aerospace composites via quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Catherine; Vierkoetter, Stephanie A.

    2005-05-01

    Techniques for quality control and health monitoring of aerospace composite structures must be reliable, nonintrusive and preferably, non-contacting. Quadrupole resonance (QR) spectroscopy can fill this need. Previously, we have demonstrated that Quadrupole Resonance can be used for nondestructive inspection of polymeric fiber-reinforced composites, which can be exploited for both in-service inspection and on-going structural health monitoring.1-6 In this paper we present an extension of this work, applying the QR method to the quality control of composite parts manufactured via pultrusion. In order to use the QR method for quality control of composite parts they must contain a small amount of tiny crystals of a QR active compound. These crystals are embedded in the part during the manufacture by blending it into the uncured resin. The QR active crystals sense any residual strains that may form inside the part during the manufacturing process. The crystals are interrogated via a single-side coil detector head, which transmits radio frequency (RF) pulses into the composite part. The strain-dependent QR response from the crystals is picked up by the same detector head. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that the QR method is very successful at distinguishing composites parts manufactured under optimal conditions from those that were manufactured with a misaligned die or at reduced temperatures. Both QR frequency and line widths were used as a distinguishing parameter.

  4. Optical-bistability-enabled control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The control of light transmission through a standing-wave Fabry-Pérot cavity containing atoms is theoretically and numerically investigated, when the cavity mode beam and an intersecting control beam are both close to specific atomic resonances. A four-level atomic system is considered and its interaction with the cavity mode is studied by solving for the cavity field and atomic state populations. The conditions for optical bistability of the atom-cavity system are obtained. The response of the intracavity intensity to an intersecting beam on atomic resonance is understood in the presence of stationary atoms (closed system) and nonstatic atoms (open system) in the cavity. The nonstatic system of atoms is modelled by adjusting the atomic state populations to represent the exchange of atoms in the cavity mode, which corresponds to a thermal environment where atoms are moving in and out of the cavity mode volume. The control behavior with three- and two-level atomic systems is also studied, and the rich physics arising out of these systems for closed and open atomic systems is discussed. The solutions to the models are used to interpret the steady-state and transient behavior observed by Sharma et al. [Phys. Rev. A 91, 043824 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.043824.

  5. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-04-01

    Photonic qubits lie at the heart of quantum information technology, often encoding information in their polarization state. So far, only low-frequency optical and infrared photons have been employed as flying qubits, as the resources that are at present easiest to control. With their essentially different way of interacting with matter, x-ray qubits would bear however relevant advantages: they are extremely robust, penetrate deep through materials, and can be focused down to few-nm waveguides, allowing unprecedented miniaturization. Also, x-rays are resonant to nuclear transitions, which are very well isolated from the environment and present long coherence times. Here, we show theoretically that x-ray polarization qubits can be dynamically controlled by nuclear Mössbauer resonances. The control knob is played by nuclear hyperfine magnetic fields, that allow via fast rotations precise processing of single x-ray quanta polarization. With such rotations, single-qubit and binary logical operations such as a destructive C-NOT gate can be implemented.

  6. Experimental exploration over a quantum control landscape through nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiuyang; Pelczer, István; Riviello, Gregory; Wu, Re-Bing; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-03-01

    The growing successes in performing quantum control experiments motivated the development of control landscape analysis as a basis to explain these findings. When a quantum system is controlled by an electromagnetic field, the observable as a functional of the control field forms a landscape. Theoretical analyses have revealed many properties of control landscapes, especially regarding their slopes, curvatures, and topologies. A full experimental assessment of the landscape predictions is important for future consideration of controlling quantum phenomena. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is exploited here as an ideal laboratory setting for quantitative testing of the landscape principles. The experiments are performed on a simple two-level proton system in a H2O-D2O sample. We report a variety of NMR experiments roving over the control landscape based on estimation of the gradient and Hessian, including ascent or descent of the landscape, level set exploration, and an assessment of the theoretical predictions on the structure of the Hessian. The experimental results are fully consistent with the theoretical predictions. The procedures employed in this study provide the basis for future multispin control landscape exploration where additional features are predicted to exist.

  7. Fractional-order PI based STATCOM and UPFC controller to diminish subsynchronous resonance.

    PubMed

    Koteswara Raju, D; Umre, Bhimrao S; Junghare, Anjali S; Thakre, Mohan P; Motamarri, Rambabu; Somu, Chaitanya

    2016-01-01

    This research article proposes a powerful fractional-order PI controller to mitigate the subsynchronous oscillations in turbine-generator shaft due to subsynchronous resonance (SSR) with flexible AC transmission system devices such as static synchronous compensator (STATCOM) and unified power flow controller (UPFC). The diminution of SSR is achieved by the raising of network damping at those frequencies which are proximate to the torsional mode frequency of the turbine-generator shaft. The increase of network damping is obtained with the injection of subsynchronous frequency component of current and both current and voltage into the line. The subsynchronous component of current and voltage are derived from the measured signal of the system and further the same amount of shunt current is injected with STATCOM and simultaneous injection of current and voltage with UPFC into the transmission line to make the subsynchronous current to zero which is the prime source of turbine shaft oscillations. The insertion and proper tuning of Fractional-order PI controller in the control scheme, the subsynchronous oscillations are reduced to 92 % in case of STATCOM and 98 % in case of UPFC as compared to without controller and 14 % as compared with the results of conventional PI controller. The IEEE first benchmark model has adopted for analyze the effectiveness and speed of the proposed control scheme using MATLAB-Simulink and the corresponding results illustrates the precision and robustness of the proposed controller.

  8. Chirp control of multi-photon resonance ionization and charge-resonance enhanced ionization on molecular harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hang; Li, Wenliang; Feng, Liqiang

    2017-05-01

    The effects of the multi-photon resonance ionization (MPRI) and the charge-resonance enhanced ionization (CREI) on the molecular high-order harmonic generation (MHHG) from H2+ have been investigated by using the chirped pulses. It is found that the MHHG only comes from the MPRI in the shorter pulse duration. As the pulse duration increases, both the MPRI and the CREI contribute to the MHHG. But the MPRI plays the main role in the generations of the above-threshold harmonics and the CREI mainly contributes to the below-threshold harmonics. With the introductions of the up-chirped and the down-chirped pulses, the contributions of the MHHG from the CREI and the MPRI can be enhanced, respectively. Finally, the isotopic investigation (e.g. T2+) shows that due to the slower nuclear motion of the heavy nuclei, the contributions of MHHG from the CERI can be suppressed in the heavy nuclei.

  9. Quantum state transfer and controlled-phase gate on one-dimensional superconducting resonators assisted by a quantum bus

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a quantum processor for the scalable quantum computation on microwave photons in distant one-dimensional superconducting resonators. It is composed of a common resonator R acting as a quantum bus and some distant resonators rj coupled to the bus in different positions assisted by superconducting quantum interferometer devices (SQUID), different from previous processors. R is coupled to one transmon qutrit, and the coupling strengths between rj and R can be fully tuned by the external flux through the SQUID. To show the processor can be used to achieve universal quantum computation effectively, we present a scheme to complete the high-fidelity quantum state transfer between two distant microwave-photon resonators and another one for the high-fidelity controlled-phase gate on them. By using the technique for catching and releasing the microwave photons from resonators, our processor may play an important role in quantum communication as well. PMID:26907366

  10. Quantum state transfer and controlled-phase gate on one-dimensional superconducting resonators assisted by a quantum bus.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-02-24

    We propose a quantum processor for the scalable quantum computation on microwave photons in distant one-dimensional superconducting resonators. It is composed of a common resonator R acting as a quantum bus and some distant resonators rj coupled to the bus in different positions assisted by superconducting quantum interferometer devices (SQUID), different from previous processors. R is coupled to one transmon qutrit, and the coupling strengths between rj and R can be fully tuned by the external flux through the SQUID. To show the processor can be used to achieve universal quantum computation effectively, we present a scheme to complete the high-fidelity quantum state transfer between two distant microwave-photon resonators and another one for the high-fidelity controlled-phase gate on them. By using the technique for catching and releasing the microwave photons from resonators, our processor may play an important role in quantum communication as well.

  11. An adaptive fuzzy-neural-network controller for ultrasonic motor drive using the LLCC resonant technique.

    PubMed

    Lin, F J; Wai, R J; Lin, H H

    1999-01-01

    In this study an adaptive fuzzy-neural-network controller (AFNNC) is proposed to control a rotary traveling wave-type ultrasonic motor (USM) drive system. The USM is derived by a newly designed, high frequency, two-phase voltage source inverter using two inductances and two capacitances (LLCC) resonant technique. Then, because the dynamic characteristics of the USM are complicated and the motor parameters are time varying, an AFNNC is proposed to control the rotor position of the USM. In the proposed controller, the USM drive system is identified by a fuzzy-neural-network identifier (FNNI) to provide the sensitivity information of the drive system to an adaptive controller. The backpropagation algorithm is used to train the FNNI on line. Moreover, to guarantee the convergence of identification and tracking errors, analytical methods based on a discrete-type Lyapunov function are proposed to determine the varied learning rates of the FNNI and the optimal learning rate of the adaptive controller. In addition, the effectiveness of the adaptive fuzzy-neural-network (AFNN) controlled USM drive system is demonstrated by some experimental results.

  12. Resonant Frequency Control For the PIP-II Injector Test RFQ: Control Framework and Initial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Milton, S. V.; Bowring, D.; Chase, B. E.; Edelen, J. P.; Nicklaus, D.; Steimel, J.

    2016-12-16

    For the PIP-II Injector Test (PI-Test) at Fermilab, a four-vane radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is designed to accelerate a 30-keV, 1-mA to 10-mA, H- beam to 2.1 MeV under both pulsed and continuous wave (CW) RF operation. The available headroom of the RF amplifiers limits the maximum allowable detuning to 3 kHz, and the detuning is controlled entirely via thermal regulation. Fine control over the detuning, minimal manual intervention, and fast trip recovery is desired. In addition, having active control over both the walls and vanes provides a wider tuning range. For this, we intend to use model predictive control (MPC). To facilitate these objectives, we developed a dedicated control framework that handles higher-level system decisions as well as executes control calculations. It is written in Python in a modular fashion for easy adjustments, readability, and portability. Here we describe the framework and present the first control results for the PI-Test RFQ under pulsed and CW operation.

  13. Large enhancement of fully resonant sum-frequency generation through quantum control via continuum states

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A.K.; Kimberg, V.V.; George, Thomas F.

    2004-04-01

    A theory of quantum control of short-wavelength sum-frequency generation, which employs the continuum states, is developed. The proposed scheme employs all-resonant coupling and trade-off optimization of the accompanying constructive and destructive quantum interference effects in the lower-order and higher-order polarizations controlled by the overlap of two autoionizinglike laser-induced continuum structures. The scheme does not rely on adiabatic passage, coherent population trapping or maximum atomic coherence as a means to facilitate maximum output. The opportunities for manipulating transparency of the medium and refractive index for the fundamental and generated radiations, as well as nonlinear polarization in the multiple-resonant medium, are shown. This opens the feasibility of creating frequency-tunable narrowband filters, polarization rotators, and dispersive elements for vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The features specific for quantum interference in Doppler-broadened media are investigated. The feasibility of almost complete conversion of long-wavelength fundamental radiation into generated short-wavelength radiation, and of a dramatic decrease in the intensity of required fundamental radiations, is shown.

  14. Control of resonant frequency by currents in graphene: Effect of Dirac field on deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Soodchomshom, Bumned E-mail: fscibns@ku.ac.th

    2014-09-21

    To construct Lagrangian based on plate theory and tight-binding model, deflection-field coupling to Dirac fermions in graphene can be investigated. As have been known, deflection-induced strain may cause an effect on motion of electron, like a pseudo gauge field. In the work, we will investigate the effect of the Dirac field on the motion of the deflection-field in graphene derived from Lagrangian density. Due to the interaction of the deflection- and Dirac-fields, the current-induced surface-tension up to about 4×10⁻³ N/m in graphene membrane is predicted. This result may lead to controllable resonant frequency by currents in graphene. The high resonant frequency is found to be perfectly linearly controlled by both charge and valley currents. Our work reveals the potential of graphene for application of nano-electro-mechanical device and the physics of interaction of electron and deflection-filed in graphene system is investigated.

  15. Self-oscillation of standing spin wave in ring resonator with proportional-integral-derivative control

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, B.; Urazuka, Y.; Chen, H.; Oyabu, S.; Otsuki, H.; Tanaka, T. Matsuyama, K.

    2014-05-07

    We report on numerical analysis on self-oscillation of standing spin wave excited in a nanostructured active ring resonator, consists of a ferromagnetic nanowire with perpendicular anisotropy. The confined resonant modes are along the nanowire length. A positive feedback with proportional-integral-derivative gain control was adopted in the active ring. Stable excitation of the 1st order standing spin wave has been demonstrated with micromagnetic simulations, taking into account the thermal effect with a random field model. The stationary standing spin wave with a pre-determined set variable of precession amplitude was attained within 20 ns by optimizing the proportional-integral-derivative gain control parameters. The result indicates that a monochromatic oscillation frequency f{sub osc} is extracted from the initial thermal fluctuation state and selectively amplified with the positive feedback loop. The obtained f{sub osc} value of 5.22 GHz practically agrees with the theoretical prediction from dispersion relation of the magneto static forward volume wave. It was also confirmed that the f{sub osc} change due to the temperature rise can be compensated with an external perpendicular bias field H{sub b}. The observed quick compensation time with an order of nano second suggests the fast operation speed in the practical device application.

  16. Production of electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using multifrequencies microwaves and active beam profile control on a large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Watanabe, Takeyoshi; Matsui, Yuuki; Hirai, Yoshiaki; Kutsumi, Osamu; Sakamoto, Naoki; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    A new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed to enhance efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for broad and dense ion beam source under the low pressure. The magnetic field configuration is constructed by a pair of magnets assembly, i.e., comb-shaped magnet which cylindrically surrounds the plasma chamber. The resonance zones corresponding to the fundamental ECR for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are constructed at different positions. The profiles of the plasma parameters in the ECR ion source are different from each frequency of microwave. Large bore extractor is set at the opposite side against the microwave feeds. It is found that differences of their profiles also appear at those of ion beam profiles. We conducted to launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves controlled individually, and tried to control the profiles of the plasma parameters and then those of extracted ion beam.

  17. Coherent control of magnetization precession in electrically detected time domain ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wid, O.; Wahler, M.; Homonnay, N.; Richter, T.; Schmidt, G.

    2015-11-15

    We demonstrate coherent control of time domain ferromagnetic resonance by all electrical excitation and detection. Using two ultrashort magnetic field steps with variable time delay we control the induction decay in yttrium iron garnet (YIG). By setting suitable delay times between the two steps the precession of the magnetization can either be enhanced or completely stopped. The method allows for a determination of the precession frequency within a few precession periods and with an accuracy much higher than can be achieved using fast fourier transformation. Moreover it holds the promise to massively increase precession amplitudes in pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry (PIMM) using low amplitude finite pulse trains. Our experiments are supported by micromagnetic simulations which nicely confirm the experimental results.

  18. Controlling of stochastic resonance and noise enhanced stability induced by harmonic noises in a bistable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao-Jie; Long, Fei; Zhang, Pei; Nie, Lin-Ru

    2017-04-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) and noise enhanced stability (NES) in a bistable system driven by an additive harmonic noise and a multiplicative harmonic noise is investigated. Through numerical simulation, we obtained the power spectrum by the Fourier transformation on time series. The results indicate that (i) for certain values of the parameters of additive harmonic noise Γ, Ω and the noise intensity D, the SR phenomenon occurs. It means we can control the SR phenomenon by modulating the parameters of harmonic noise; (ii) the NES phenomenon occurs at certain values of the parameters of multiplicative harmonic noise Γ, Ω and the multiplicative noise intensity Q. Most important, the NES phenomenon can also be controlled by modulating the parameters of harmonic noise.

  19. Enhancement and control of surface plasmon resonance sensitivity using grating in conical mounting configuration.

    PubMed

    Perino, M; Pasqualotto, E; Scaramuzza, M; De Toni, A; Paccagnella, A

    2015-01-15

    In this work we propose a method to enhance and control the angular sensitivity of a grating coupled surface plasmon resonance (GCSPR) sensor. We lighted a silver grating, mounted in conical configuration, with a laser source and we measured the transmittance of the grating as a function of the azimuthal angle. To evaluate the sensitivity, grating surface was functionalized with four different alkanethiol self assembled monolayers (SAM) and the correspondent azimuthal transmittance peak shifts were measured. The sensitivity control was performed by simply change the light incident angle. This method offers the possibility to design dynamic GCSPR sensor benches that can be used to amplify the SPR angle shift at any step of a biological detection process.

  20. Polarization control efficiency manipulation in resonance-mediated two-photon absorption by femtosecond spectral frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yunhua; Cheng, Wenjing; Zheng, Ye; Xu, Cheng; Liu, Pei; Jia, Tianqing; Qiu, Jianrong; Sun, Zhenrong; Zhang, Shian

    2017-04-01

    The femtosecond laser polarization modulation is considered as a very simple and efficient method to control the multi-photon absorption process. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally show that the polarization control efficiency in the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption can be artificially manipulated by modulating the femtosecond spectral frequency components. We theoretically demonstrate that the on- and near-resonant parts in the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption process depend on the different femtosecond spectral frequency components, and therefore their contributions in the whole excitation process can be controlled by properly designing the femtosecond spectral frequency components. The near-resonant two-photon absorption is correlated with the femtosecond laser polarization while the on-resonant two-photon absorption is independent of it, and thus the polarization control efficiency in the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption can be manipulated by the femtosecond spectral frequency modulation. We experimentally verify these theoretical results by performing the laser polarization control experiment in the Dy3+-doped glass sample under the modulated femtosecond spectral frequency components, and the experimental results show that the polarization control efficiency can be increased when the central spectral frequency components are cut off, while it is decreased when both the low and high spectral frequency components are cut off, which is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. Our works can provide a feasible pathway to understand and control the resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process under the femtosecond laser field excitation, and also may open a new opportunity to the related application areas.

  1. Multiple controls of oxidative metabolism in living tissues as studied by phosphorus magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Chance, B; Leigh, J S; Kent, J; McCully, K; Nioka, S; Clark, B J; Maris, J M; Graham, T

    1986-01-01

    Three types of metabolic control of oxidative metabolism are observed in the various tissues that have been studied by phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The principal control of oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle is by ADP (or Pi/phosphocreatine). This conclusion is based upon studies of arm muscles of humans during steady-state exercise. A work-cost (Vm vs. Pi/phosphocreatine) relationship follows a Michaelis-Menten rectangular hyperbola, where Km values from 0.5 to 0.6 and Vmax values from 50 to 200 (at nearly constant pH) are found in linearized plots of the equation V/Vmax = 1/(1 + 0.6 phosphocreatine/Pi) where V is work level (which is equal to the velocity of the enzymatic reaction) and Vmax is the maximal work capacity that is a measure of the enzyme activity (E) of oxidative metabolism. Adaptation to exercise enhances the slope of the work-cost relationship and causes large changes in Vmax or E. A second metabolic control may enhance the slope of the work-cost relationship but not Vmax. For example, the initiation of exercise can lead to an improved characteristic that can be explained by 2-fold increased substrate delivery, for example, increased oxygen delivery by microcirculatory control. Cardiac tissue of the adult dog affords an example of optimal endurance performance adaptation and exhibits the steepest work-cost relationship observed and is attributed to a coordinated control of substrate delivery that may involve Ca2+ and inorganic phosphate control of NADH; control of O2 delivery may also be involved. The calculated work-cost relationship is similar to that observed in the beagle heart. The theoretical curve illustrates that the liability of multiple controls is a sharp break point in metabolic control at the end of the multiple control range--a possible cause of instability of cardiac performance at high V/Vmax. PMID:3467315

  2. The method of controlling the thickness of the deposited film on the basis of the surface plasmon resonance effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komlev, A. E.; Dyukin, R. V.; Shutova, E. S.

    2017-07-01

    New method, based on surface plasmon resonance, for thickness control of thin films deposition in vacuum is offered by authors. This method allows to determine with high accuracy thickness of nanoscale optical coatings. Numerical simulation of surface plasmon resonance conditions in Kretchman geometry and it’s frequency changes during deposition of different thickness Ta2O5 films are presented. Modeling was given in WinSpall program.

  3. High-frequency, resonance-enhanced microactuators with active structures for high-speed flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreth, Phillip Andrew

    The need for actuators that are adaptable for use in a wide array of applications has been the motivation behind actuator development research over the past few years. Recent developments at the Advanced Aero-Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at Florida State University have produced a microactuator that uses the unsteadiness of a small-scale impinging jet to produce pulsed, supersonic microjets -- this is referred to as the Resonance-Enhanced Microjet (REM) actuator. Prior studies on these actuators at AAPL have been somewhat limited in that the actuator response has only been characterized through pressure/acoustic measurements and qualitative flow visualizations. Highly-magnified particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed to measure the velocity fields of both a 1 mm underexpanded jet and an REM actuator. The results demonstrate that this type of microactuator is capable of producing pulsed, supersonic microjets that have velocities of approximately 400 m/s that are sustained for significant portions of their cycles (> 60 %). These are the first direct velocity measurements of these flowfields, and they allow for a greater understanding of the flow physics associated with this microactuator. The previous studies on the REM actuators have shown that the microactuator volume is among the principal parameters in determining the actuator's maximum-amplitude frequency component. In order to use this actuator in a closed-loop, feedback control system, a modified design that incorporates smart materials is studied. The smart materials (specifically piezoelectric ceramic stack actuators) have been implemented into the microactuator to actively change its geometry, thus permitting controllable changes in the microactuator's resonant frequency. The distinct feature of this design is that the smart materials are not used to produce the primary perturbation or flow from the actuator (which has in the past limited the control authority of other designs) but to

  4. Noninvasive control of stochastic resonance and an analysis of multistable oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Jonathan Peter

    2001-08-01

    In this work, we look at two different types of dynamical systems. In the first type, we investigate a group of techniques with the goal of enhancing stochastic resonance in a bistable system. These methods involve adding external feedback into the system to make the transitions between the two wells in the bistable system more likely. In the second type, we also investigate adding pulsatile input into a dynamical system. This system is a second order linear differential equation, but the addition of the pulses to it makes behave in a nonlinear fashion. The combination of the natural ``ringing down'' of the system with the pulses act as a ``stretching and folding'' that leads to global stability and a number of coexisting multistable orbits. In studying the bistable system exhibiting stochastic resonance, we note that external feedback can enhance (or depress) the response of a noisy bistable system to monochromatic signals, significantly magnifying its natural stochastic resonance. We compare and contrast a variety of such feedback strategies, using both numerical simulations and analog electronic experiments. These noninvasive control techniques are especially valuable for noisy bistable systems that are difficult or impossible to modify internally, such as in neuronal systems. In our analysis of multistable oscillators, a model system is proposed which possesses numerous stable coexisting oscillatory solutions and does not require delayed feedback. This system is inspired by a study of multistable dynamics in biological models of electrical activity in bursting neurons. The model is a second-order underdamped linear system that receives periodic pulsatile input over a sub region of the circuit variables' state-space. Numerical methods are presented for determining the existence and stability of these oscillatory solutions and the scaling properties of the number of coexisting periodic solutions are investigated.

  5. Near-infrared resonance-mediated chirp control of a coherently generated broadband deep-ultraviolet spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Rybak, Leonid; Chuntonov, Lev; Gandman, Andrey; Shakour, Naser; Amitay, Zohar

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the use of shaped near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond pulses to control the generation of coherent broadband deep-ultraviolet (DUV) radiation in an atomic resonance-mediated (2+1) three-photon excitation to a broad far-from-resonance continuum. Previously, we have shown control over the total emitted DUV yield. Here, we experimentally demonstrate phase control over the spectral characteristics (central frequency and bandwidth) of the emitted broadband DUV radiation. It is achieved by tuning the linear chirp applied to the exciting NIR femtosecond pulse. The study is conducted with Na vapor.

  6. Optically-controlled extinction ratio and Q-factor tunable silicon microring resonators based on optical forces.

    PubMed

    Long, Yun; Wang, Jian

    2014-06-24

    Tunability is a desirable property of microring resonators to facilitate superior performance. Using light to control light, we present an alternative simple approach to tuning the extinction ratio (ER) and Q-factor of silicon microring resonators based on optical forces. We design an opto-mechanical tunable silicon microring resonator consisting of an add-drop microring resonator and a control-light-carrying waveguide ("controlling" waveguide). One of the two bus waveguides of the microring resonator is a deformable nanostring put in parallel with the "controlling" waveguide. The tuning mechanism relies on the optical force induced deflection of suspended nanostring, leading to the change of coupling coefficient of microring and resultant tuning of ER and Q-factor. Two possible geometries, i.e. double-clamped nanostring and cantilever nanostring, are studied in detail for comparison. The obtained results imply a favorable structure with the microring positioned at the end of the cantilever nanostring. It features a wide tuning range of ER from 5.6 to 39.9 dB and Q-factor from 309 to 639 as changing the control power from 0 to 1.4 mW.

  7. Optically-controlled extinction ratio and Q-factor tunable silicon microring resonators based on optical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yun; Wang, Jian

    2014-06-01

    Tunability is a desirable property of microring resonators to facilitate superior performance. Using light to control light, we present an alternative simple approach to tuning the extinction ratio (ER) and Q-factor of silicon microring resonators based on optical forces. We design an opto-mechanical tunable silicon microring resonator consisting of an add-drop microring resonator and a control-light-carrying waveguide (``controlling'' waveguide). One of the two bus waveguides of the microring resonator is a deformable nanostring put in parallel with the ``controlling'' waveguide. The tuning mechanism relies on the optical force induced deflection of suspended nanostring, leading to the change of coupling coefficient of microring and resultant tuning of ER and Q-factor. Two possible geometries, i.e. double-clamped nanostring and cantilever nanostring, are studied in detail for comparison. The obtained results imply a favorable structure with the microring positioned at the end of the cantilever nanostring. It features a wide tuning range of ER from 5.6 to 39.9 dB and Q-factor from 309 to 639 as changing the control power from 0 to 1.4 mW.

  8. Observation and coherent control of interface-induced electronic resonances in a field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenorio-Pearl, J. O.; Herbschleb, E. D.; Fleming, S.; Creatore, C.; Oda, S.; Milne, W. I.; Chin, A. W.

    2017-02-01

    Electronic defect states at material interfaces provide highly deleterious sources of noise in solid-state nanostructures, and even a single trapped charge can qualitatively alter the properties of short one-dimensional nanowire field-effect transistors (FET) and quantum bit (qubit) devices. Understanding the dynamics of trapped charge is thus essential for future nanotechnologies, but their direct detection and manipulation is rather challenging. Here, a transistor-based set-up is used to create and probe individual electronic defect states that can be coherently driven with microwave (MW) pulses. Strikingly, we resolve a large number of very high quality (Q ~ 1 × 105) resonances in the transistor current as a function of MW frequency and demonstrate both long decoherence times (~1 μs--40 μs) and coherent control of the defect-induced dynamics. Efficiently characterizing over 800 individually addressable resonances across two separate defect-hosting materials, we propose that their properties are consistent with weakly driven two-level systems.

  9. Dynamic control over nanoparticle plasmon resonance through variation of refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Hari P.; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2011-03-01

    In a semiconductor material it is possible to vary the index of refraction by exciting electron-hole pairs through a laser pulse. Generally the change in refractive index changes linearly with the carrier density and also increases with the lattice temperature. We present our results on the variation in index of refraction in the TiO2 shell of an Ag/TiO2 core-shell nanoparticle by exciting electron-hole pairs in TiO2 through a laser pulse. We performed bandstructure calculations using VASP to determine the variation of the optical dielectric tensor as a function of photon frequency. This change in refractive index not only affects the refraction of photons with frequency below bandgap, but also affects strongly the resonance peaks of the surface plasmons due to the Ag core. This effect can be used to dynamically control the plasmon resonance of a hybrid metal-semiconductor nanoparticle, for example for use in cancer therapy or nanoplasmonic circuits. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant No. ECCS-0901784 and AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-09-1-0450.

  10. Control of Nonadiabatic Passage through a Conical Intersection by a Dynamic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Epshtein, Michael; Yifrach, Yair; Portnov, Alexander; Bar, Ilana

    2016-05-05

    Nonadiabatic processes, dominated by dynamic passage of reactive fluxes through conical intersections (CIs), are considered to be appealing means for manipulating reaction paths, particularly via initial vibrational preparation. Nevertheless, obtaining direct experimental evidence of whether specific-mode excitation affects the passage at the CI is challenging, requiring well-resolved time- or frequency-domain experiments. Here promotion of methylamine-d2 (CH3ND2) molecules to spectral-resolved rovibronic states on the excited S1 potential energy surface, coupled to sensitive D photofragment probing, allowed us to follow the N-D bond fission dynamics. The branching ratios between slow and fast D photofragments and the internal energies of the CH3ND(X̃) photofragments confirm correlated anomalies for predissociation initiated from specific rovibronic states. These anomalies reflect the existence of a dynamic resonance that strongly depends on the energy of the initially excited rovibronic states, the evolving vibrational mode on the repulsive S1 part during N-D bond elongation, and the manipulated passage through the CI that leads to CH3ND radicals excited with C-N-D bending. This resonance plays an important role in the bifurcation dynamics at the CI and can be foreseen to exist in other photoinitiated processes and to control their outcome.

  11. Twist-controlled resonant tunnelling in graphene/boron nitride/graphene heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, A.; Tu, J. S.; Cao, Y.; Gorbachev, R. V.; Wallbank, J. R.; Greenaway, M. T.; Morozov, V. E.; Morozov, S. V.; Zhu, M. J.; Wong, S. L.; Withers, F.; Woods, C. R.; Kim, Y.-J.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Vdovin, E. E.; Makarovsky, O.; Fromhold, T. M.; Fal'Ko, V. I.; Geim, A. K.; Eaves, L.; Novoselov, K. S.

    2014-10-01

    Recent developments in the technology of van der Waals heterostructures made from two-dimensional atomic crystals have already led to the observation of new physical phenomena, such as the metal-insulator transition and Coulomb drag, and to the realization of functional devices, such as tunnel diodes, tunnel transistors and photovoltaic sensors. An unprecedented degree of control of the electronic properties is available not only by means of the selection of materials in the stack, but also through the additional fine-tuning achievable by adjusting the built-in strain and relative orientation of the component layers. Here we demonstrate how careful alignment of the crystallographic orientation of two graphene electrodes separated by a layer of hexagonal boron nitride in a transistor device can achieve resonant tunnelling with conservation of electron energy, momentum and, potentially, chirality. We show how the resonance peak and negative differential conductance in the device characteristics induce a tunable radiofrequency oscillatory current that has potential for future high-frequency technology.

  12. Implementation of advanced feedback control algorithms for controlled resonant magnetic perturbation physics studies on EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    The EXTRAP T2R feedback system (active coils, sensor coils and controller) is used to study and develop new tools for advanced control of the MHD instabilities in fusion plasmas. New feedback algorithms developed in EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch allow flexible and independent control of each magnetic harmonic. Methods developed in control theory and applied to EXTRAP T2R allow a closed-loop identification of the machine plant and of the resistive wall modes growth rates. The plant identification is the starting point for the development of output-tracking algorithms which enable the generation of external magnetic perturbations. These algorithms will then be used to study the effect of a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) on the tearing mode (TM) dynamics. It will be shown that the stationary RMP can induce oscillations in the amplitude and jumps in the phase of the rotating TM. It will be shown that the RMP strongly affects the magnetic island position.

  13. Mitigation of Subsynchronous Resonance with Fractional-order PI based UPFC controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, D. Koteswara; Umre, Bhimrao S.; Junghare, Anjali S.; Babu, B. Chitti

    2017-02-01

    Due to incorporation of series capacitor compensation in transmission line for stability improvement, subsynchronous oscillations are generated at turbine-generator shaft. These oscillations can damage the shaft system if these are not well suppressed. In order to damp out these oscillations, usually power system network should have sufficient damping and the increase of network damping is obtained by the injection of subsynchronous component of voltage and current into the line, which are extracted from the measured signal of the system. However, the effectiveness of damp out of these subsynchronous oscillations is possibly by incorporating UPFC in the transmission line network is of high interest and it should be further investigated. This research article proposes the mitigation of subsynchronous resonance (SSR) using fractional-order PI (FOPI) based unified power flow controller (UPFC). The robustness of the proposed controller is tested for 25%, 55% and 70% series compensation with a symmetrical fault (L-L-L fault). Further, Eigenvalue analysis and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis against operating point variations and uncertainties in the system are also examined. The IEEE first benchmark model is adopted for this study and the superiority of the FOPI based UPFC controller over PI based UPFC controller is discussed by comparing the results with various performance indices.

  14. Microelectromechanical accelerometer with resonance-cancelling control circuit including an idle state

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Dahlon D.; Thelen, Jr., Donald C.; Campbell, David V.

    2001-01-01

    A digital feedback control circuit is disclosed for use in an accelerometer (e.g. a microelectromechanical accelerometer). The digital feedback control circuit, which periodically re-centers a proof mass in response to a sensed acceleration, is based on a sigma-delta (.SIGMA..DELTA.) configuration that includes a notch filter (e.g. a digital switched-capacitor filter) for rejecting signals due to mechanical resonances of the proof mass and further includes a comparator (e.g. a three-level comparator). The comparator generates one of three possible feedback states, with two of the feedback states acting to re-center the proof mass when that is needed, and with a third feedback state being an "idle" state which does not act to move the proof mass when no re-centering is needed. Additionally, the digital feedback control system includes an auto-zero trim capability for calibration of the accelerometer for accurate sensing of acceleration. The digital feedback control circuit can be fabricated using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, bi-CMOS technology or bipolar technology and used in single- and dual-proof-mass accelerometers.

  15. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Enhancement of the efficiency and control of emission parameters of an unstable-resonator chemical oxygen—iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreisho, A. S.; Lobachev, V. V.; Savin, A. V.; Strakhov, S. Yu; Trilis, A. V.

    2007-07-01

    The outlook is considered for the development of a high-power supersonic flowing chemical oxygen—iodine laser operating as an amplifier and controlled by radiation from a master oscillator by using an unstable resonator with a hole-coupled mirror. The influence of the seed radiation intensity, the coupling-hole diameter, the active-medium length, and the magnification factor on the parameters of laser radiation is analysed. It is shown that the use of such resonators is most advisable in medium-power oxygen—iodine lasers for which classical unstable resonators are inefficient because of their low magnification factors. The use of unstable resonators with a hole-coupled mirror and injection provides the control of radiation parameters and a considerable increase in the output power and brightness of laser radiation.

  16. Electrically controlled plasmonic lasing resonances with silver nanoparticles embedded in amplifying nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chin; Deng, Luogen

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrated an electrical control of coherent plasmonic random lasing with very diluted Ag nanoparticles dispersed in a dye-doped nematic liquid crystal (NLC), in which the external electric field dependent emission intensity and frequency-splitting were recorded. A modified rate equation model is proposed to interpret the observed coherent lasing, which is a manifestation of the double enhancements caused by the plasmon-polariton near-fields of Ag particles on the population inversion of laser dye molecules and on the optical energy density of lasing modes. The featured laser quenching as weakening the applied field indicates that the present lasing resonances are very sensitive to the fluctuant dielectric perturbations in the NLC host, and are thus most likely associated with some coupled plasmonic oscillations among the metal nanoparticles.

  17. Delayed feedback control of stochastic spatiotemporal dynamics in a resonant tunneling diode.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, G; Balanov, A G; Schöll, E

    2006-01-01

    The influence of time-delayed feedback upon the spatiotemporal current density patterns is investigated in a model of a semiconductor nanostructure, namely a double-barrier resonant tunneling diode. The parameters are chosen below the Hopf bifurcation, where the only stable state of the system is a spatially inhomogeneous "filamentary" steady state. The addition of weak Gaussian white noise to the system gives rise to spatially inhomogeneous self-sustained temporal oscillations that can be quite coherent. We show that applying a time-delayed feedback can either increase or decrease the regularity of the noise-induced dynamics in this spatially extended system. Using linear stability analysis, we can explain these effects, depending on the length of the delay interval. Furthermore, we study the influence of this additional control term upon the deterministic behavior of the system, which can change significantly depending on the choice of parameters.

  18. Controllable quantum dynamics of inhomogeneous nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles coupled to superconducting resonators

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wan-lu; Yang, Wan-li; Yin, Zhang-qi; Chen, Chang-yong; Feng, Mang

    2016-01-01

    We explore controllable quantum dynamics of a hybrid system, which consists of an array of mutually coupled superconducting resonators (SRs) with each containing a nitrogen-vacancy center spin ensemble (NVE) in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening. We focus on a three-site model, which compared with the two-site case, shows more complicated and richer dynamical behavior, and displays a series of damped oscillations under various experimental situations, reflecting the intricate balance and competition between the NVE-SR collective coupling and the adjacent-site photon hopping. Particularly, we find that the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble can suppress the population transfer between the SR and the local NVE. In this context, although the inhomogeneous broadening of the spin ensemble diminishes entanglement among the NVEs, optimal entanglement, characterized by averaging the lower bound of concurrence, could be achieved through accurately adjusting the tunable parameters. PMID:27627994

  19. Enhancement of VUV and EUV generation by field-controlled resonance structures of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-06-01

    Below- and near-threshold harmonic generation provides a potential approach to achieve a high conversion efficiency of vacuum-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet sources for the advancement of spectroscopy. Here, we perform a time-dependent density functional theory study for the nonperturbative treatment of below- and near-threshold harmonic generation of CO and N2 diatomic molecules subject to short near-infrared laser pulses and aligned parallel to the laser field polarization. We find that with the use of different driving laser pulse shapes, we can control and enhance harmonic generation through the excited-state resonance structures. Depending on the pulse shape, the enhancement can reach five to seven orders of magnitude as compared to the reference sine-squared laser pulse of the same duration. The results for different driving laser intensities are also presented and discussed in detail.

  20. Enhancement of VUV and EUV generation by field-controlled resonance structures of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-05-01

    Below- and near-threshold harmonic generation provides a potential approach to achieve a high conversion efficiency of vacuum-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet sources for the advancement of spectroscopy. Here we perform an all-electron time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) study for the nonperturbative treatment of below- and near-threshold harmonic generation of CO and N2 diatomic molecules subject to short near-infrared laser pulses and aligned parallel to the laser field polarization. We find that with the use of different driving laser pulse shapes we can control and enhance harmonic generation through the excited state resonance structures. Our analysis reveals several novel features where the HHG signal is enhanced, boosting the conversion efficiency on the microscopic level. Depending on the pulse shape, the enhancement can reach 5 to 7 orders of magnitude as compared to the reference sine-squared laser pulse of the same duration. This work was partially supported by DOE.

  1. Optical Control of the Resonant Dipole-Dipole Interaction between Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Léséleuc, Sylvain; Barredo, Daniel; Lienhard, Vincent; Browaeys, Antoine; Lahaye, Thierry

    2017-08-01

    We report on the local control of the transition frequency of a spin 1 /2 encoded in two Rydberg levels of an individual atom by applying a state-selective light shift using an addressing beam. With this tool, we first study the spectrum of an elementary system of two spins, tuning it from a nonresonant to a resonant regime, where "bright" (super-radiant) and "dark" (subradiant) states emerge. We observe the collective enhancement of the microwave coupling to the bright state. We then show that after preparing an initial single spin excitation and letting it hop due to the spin-exchange interaction, we can freeze the dynamics at will with the addressing laser, while preserving the coherence of the system. In the context of quantum simulation, this scheme opens exciting prospects for engineering inhomogeneous X Y spin Hamiltonians or preparing spin-imbalanced initial states.

  2. Switching individual quantum dot emission through electrically controlling resonant energy transfer to graphene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiye; Bao, Wei; Ju, Long; Schuck, P James; Wang, Feng; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander

    2014-12-10

    Electrically controlling resonant energy transfer of optical emitters provides a novel mechanism to switch nanoscale light sources on and off individually for optoelectronic applications. Graphene's optical transitions are tunable through electrostatic gating over a broad wavelength spectrum, making it possible to modulate energy transfer from a variety of nanoemitters to graphene at room temperature. We demonstrate photoluminescence switching of individual colloidal quantum dots by electrically tuning their energy transfer to graphene. The gate dependence of energy transfer modulation confirms that the transition occurs when the Fermi level is shifted over half the emitter's excitation energy. The modulation magnitude decreases rapidly with increasing emitter-graphene distance (d), following the 1/d(4) rate trend unique to the energy transfer process to two-dimensional materials.

  3. Hidden possibilities in controlling optical soliton in fiber guided doped resonant medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Anjan

    2011-06-01

    Fiber guided optical signal propagating in a Erbium doped nonlinear resonant medium is known to produce cleaner solitonic pulse, described by the self induced transparency (SIT) coupled to nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We discover two new possibilities hidden in its integrable structure, for amplification and control of the optical pulse. Using the variable soliton width permitted by the integrability of this model, the broadening pulse can be regulated by adjusting the initial population inversion of the dopant atoms. The effect can be enhanced by another innovative application of its constrained integrable hierarchy, proposing a system of multiple SIT media. These theoretical predictions are workable analytically in details, correcting a well known result.

  4. Magnetic resonance therapy for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized, double blind placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gökşen, Nurgül; Çaliş, Mustafa; Doğan, Serap; Çaliş, Havva T; Özgöçmen, Salih

    2016-08-01

    Therapeutic nuclear magnetic resonance therapy (MRT) works based on the electromagnetic fields. To investigate efficacy of MRT in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial. Outpatient clinic, university hospital. Patients who had mild to moderate knee OA at a single knee joint and between 30-75-years-old were randomized by blinded chip cards (1:1). The treatment group received ten sessions of one hour daily MRT, controls received placebo MRT. All patients underwent clinical examination at baseline, after 2 weeks, and 12 weeks. Imaging included blindly assessed ultrasonography and magnetic resonance (MR) of the knee. Ninety-seven patients completed the study. Both groups improved significantly but the average change from baseline in outcome parameters was similar in MRT group (on VAS-pain,-2.6; WOMAC-pain, -2.09; WOMAC-stiffness, -1.81; WOMAC-physical, -1.96) compared to placebo after two weeks (VAS-pain,-1.6; WOMAC-pain, -1.91; WOMAC-stiffness, -1.27; WOMAC-physical, -1.54). Also changes were quite similar at the 12th week after the treatment. SF-36 components at 12th week improved but changes were not significant. Imaging arm also failed to show significant differences between groups in terms of cartilage thickness on US and MR scores. No adverse events were recorded. MRT is safe, but not superior to placebo in terms of improvement in clinical or imaging parameters after a 10-day course of treatment in mild to moderate knee OA. The present study does not promote use of a 10-day course of MRT in mild to moderate knee OA.

  5. Numerical simulation on edge localized mode control capability of resonant magnetic perturbation in the KSTAR tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doohyun; Han, Hyunsun; Kim, Ki Min; Park, Jong Kyu; Jeon, Young Mu; Na, Yong-Su; Hong, Sang Hee

    2010-09-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the applicability of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) to KSTAR plasmas for a possible control of edge localized mode (ELM) to suppress or mitigate its damages to divertor materials. For the verification of the feasibility of RMP application, magnetic island configurations, resonant normal fields, magnetic island widths and Chirikov parameters are calculated for two types of KSTAR operation scenarios: steady state and hybrid. Field error correction (FEC) coils in KSTAR are considered to produce externally perturbed magnetic fields for RMP, and the directions of coil currents determine the toroidal mode n and the parity (even or odd). The RMP configurations are described by vacuum superposition of the equilibrium magnetic fields and the perturbed ones induced by FEC coils. The numerical simulations for n = 2 toroidal mode in both operation scenarios show that when the pitches of the equilibrium and perturbed magnetic fields are well aligned, magnetic islands are formed for a series of m poloidal modes and the adjacent islands are overlapped to generate a stochastic layer in the edge region. Even parity turns out to be more effective in making the magnetic islands overlapped to become stochastic field lines in the steady-state operation, while odd parity in the hybrid operation. The formation of the stochastic layer is verified by the calculated Chirikov parameters, which also give basic information on the current requirement of FEC coils. Additionally, lobe structures of stochastic field lines are found in the edge region extended to the divertor plate in the hybrid scenario. Based on the standard vacuum criteria for RMP, the simulation results indicate that the FEC coils will be feasible for control of ELMs and mitigation of divertor heat load by RMP in both steady-state and hybrid operation scenarios.

  6. Resonance fluorescence of a site-controlled quantum dot realized by the buried-stressor growth technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauß, Max; Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Voigt, Robert; Schnauber, Peter; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Rodt, Sven; Strittmatter, André; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    Site-controlled growth of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) represents a major advancement to achieve scalable quantum technology platforms. One immediate benefit is the deterministic integration of quantum emitters into optical microcavities. However, site-controlled growth of QDs is usually achieved at the cost of reduced optical quality. Here, we show that the buried-stressor growth technique enables the realization of high-quality site-controlled QDs with attractive optical and quantum optical properties. This is evidenced by performing excitation power dependent resonance fluorescence experiments at cryogenic temperatures showing QD emission linewidths down to 10 μeV. Resonant excitation leads to the observation of the Mollow triplet under CW excitation and enables coherent state preparation under pulsed excitation. Under resonant π-pulse excitation we observe clean single-photon emission associated with g(2)(0) = 0.12 limited by non-ideal laser suppression.

  7. Surface plasmon resonance induced excellent solar control for VO₂@SiO₂ nanorods-based thermochromic foils.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yijie; Huang, Aibin; Li, Yamei; Ji, Shidong; Gao, Yanfeng; Jin, Ping

    2013-10-07

    Transition-metal oxide nanocrystals are novel candidates for being used as the hosts of localized surface plasmon resonance because they exhibit fascinating properties arising from the unique characteristics of their outer-d valence electrons. VO₂(M) nanocrystal is well-known due to its reversible metal-insulator transition (MIT) temperature near room temperature (∼68 °C) corresponding to the appearance/disappearance of localized surface plasmon resonance across the MIT. In this study, a microemulsion-based method was introduced to synthesize VO₂(M)@SiO₂ nanoparticles which were applied to prepare VO₂-based thermochromic foils owing to a strong and tunable surface plasmon resonance in the metallic state. The optical transmittance spectra demonstrates that the employment of surface plasmon resonance in VO₂-based thermochromic foils greatly improves their solar regulating efficiency up to 18.54%, and provides an unprecedented insight in optimizing VO₂-based thermochromic windows for solar control.

  8. Controlled Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Fano Resonances in Hybrid BEC-Optomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Yasir, Kashif Ammar; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cavity-optomechanics, a tool to manipulate mechanical effects of light to couple optical field with other physical objects, is the subject of increasing investigations, especially with regards to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). EIT, a result of Fano interference among different atomic transition levels, has acquired a significant importance in many areas of physics, such as atomic physics and quantum optics. However, controllability of such multi-dimensional systems has remained a crucial issue. In this report, we investigate the controllability of EIT and Fano resonances in hybrid optomechanical system composed of cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), trapped inside high-finesse Fabry-Pérot cavity with one vibrational mirror, driven by a single mode optical field and a transverse pump field. The transverse field is used to control the phenomenon of EIT. It is detected that the strength of transverse field is not only efficiently amplifying or attenuating out-going optical mode but also providing an opportunity to enhance the strength of Fano-interactions which leads to the amplification of EIT-window. To observe these phenomena in laboratory, we suggest a certain set of experimental parameters. The results provide a route for tunable manipulation of optical phenomena, like EIT, which could be a significant step in quantum engineering. PMID:26955789

  9. Abnormal fear circuitry in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A controlled magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Andrea E; Marin, Marie-France; Milad, Mohammed R; Spencer, Thomas J; Bogucki, Olivia E; Pope, Amanda L; Plasencia, Natalie; Hughes, Brittany; Pace-Schott, Edward F; Fitzgerald, Maura; Uchida, Mai; Biederman, Joseph

    2017-04-30

    We examined whether non-traumatized subjects with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have dysfunctional activation in brain structures mediating fear extinction, possibly explaining the statistical association between ADHD and other disorders characterized by aberrant fear processing such as PTSD. Medication naïve, non-traumatized young adult subjects with (N=27) and without (N=20) ADHD underwent a 2-day fear conditioning and extinction protocol in a 3T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanner. Skin conductance response (SCR) was recorded as a measure of conditioned response. Compared to healthy controls, ADHD subjects had significantly greater insular cortex activation during early extinction, lesser dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) activation during late extinction, lesser ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) activation during late extinction learning and extinction recall, and greater hippocampal activation during extinction recall. Hippocampal and vmPFC deficits were similar to those documented in PTSD subjects compared to traumatized controls without PTSD. Non-traumatized, medication naive adults with ADHD had abnormalities in fear circuits during extinction learning and extinction recall, and some findings were consistent with those previously documented in subjects with PTSD compared to traumatized controls without PTSD. These findings could explain the significant association between ADHD and PTSD as well as impaired emotion regulation in ADHD.

  10. Surface-Tunable Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer via Geometry-Controlled ZnO Nanorod Coordination.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun Hyung; Park, Geun Chul; Lee, Seung Muk; Lee, Jung Heon; Lim, Butaek; Hwang, Soo Min; Kim, Jung Ho; Park, Hansoo; Joo, Jinho; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-07-01

    The use of ZnO nanorods (NRs) as an effective coordinator and biosensing platform to create bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is reported. Herein, a hydrothermal approach is applied to obtain morphologically controlled ZnO NRs, which are directly bound to luciferase (Luc) and carboxy-modified quantum dot (QD) acting as a donor-acceptor pair for BRET. BRET efficiency varies significantly with the geometry of ZnO NRs, which modulates the coordination between hexahistidine-tagged Luc (Luc-His6 ) and QD, owing to the combined effect of the total surface area consisting of (001) and (100) planes and their surface polarities. Unlike typical QD-BRET reactions with metal ions (e.g., zinc ions), a geometry-controlled ZnO NR platform can facilitate the design of surface-initiated BRET sensors without being supplemented by copious metal ions: the geometry-controlled ZnO NR platform can therefore pave the way for nanostructure-based biosensors with enhanced analytical performance. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Controlled Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Fano Resonances in Hybrid BEC-Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasir, Kashif Ammar; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Cavity-optomechanics, a tool to manipulate mechanical effects of light to couple optical field with other physical objects, is the subject of increasing investigations, especially with regards to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). EIT, a result of Fano interference among different atomic transition levels, has acquired a significant importance in many areas of physics, such as atomic physics and quantum optics. However, controllability of such multi-dimensional systems has remained a crucial issue. In this report, we investigate the controllability of EIT and Fano resonances in hybrid optomechanical system composed of cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), trapped inside high-finesse Fabry-Pérot cavity with one vibrational mirror, driven by a single mode optical field and a transverse pump field. The transverse field is used to control the phenomenon of EIT. It is detected that the strength of transverse field is not only efficiently amplifying or attenuating out-going optical mode but also providing an opportunity to enhance the strength of Fano-interactions which leads to the amplification of EIT-window. To observe these phenomena in laboratory, we suggest a certain set of experimental parameters. The results provide a route for tunable manipulation of optical phenomena, like EIT, which could be a significant step in quantum engineering.

  12. Understanding and Controlling Intrinsic Dissipation in Driven Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Rajamani; Greaney, P. Alex; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2011-03-01

    A ``Phonostat'' algorithm that can regulate total energy in a given internal degree of freedom within a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is presented. The algorithm computes modal energies at every MD timestep, controls energy in a chosen vibrational mode with an external driving force and an internal damping. Using a test case of driven damped anharmonic oscillator, two different approaches of force correction are presented and various parameters that control the phonostat algorithm are analyzed. This algorithm is then employed to drive a chosen vibrational mode in carbon nanotube resonator to understand intrinsic dissipation under continuous driving, simultaneously computing its quality factor to mimic experimental conditions. The gateway modes that couple the driven mode to the thermal background are identified. Regulating these gateway modes hold the key to control intrinsic dissipation and improve quality factor for mass sensing application. The authors acknowledge funding from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency-Joint Science and Technology O?ce for Chemical and Biological Defense (Grant HDTRA1-09-1-0006).

  13. Predictors of unsuccessful magnetic resonance imaging scanning in older generalized anxiety disorder patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Mohlman, Jan; Eldreth, Dana A; Price, Rebecca B; Chazin, Daniel; Glover, Dorie A

    2012-02-01

    A thorough understanding of the neurobiology of late life anxiety is likely to depend on the use of brain imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is one of the most prevalent anxiety disorders in older adults, and is thus a focus for neurobiological studies using MRI. This study tested 1-3 weeks predictors of unsuccessful scan outcomes (i.e., scan trials in which the participant moved excessively or prematurely terminated the scan) in older adults with GAD (n = 39) and age- and sex-matched nonanxious controls (n = 21). It was hypothesized that successful completion of a prior MRI scan, clinical status (GAD versus control), and scores on the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI; Peterson et al. 1986), a measure tapping psychological aspects of medical interventions, would predict scan outcome when current diagnoses of claustrophobia were controlled. In logistic regression analyses, unsuccessful scan outcome was predicted by prior MRI completion and ASI Mental Concerns subscale scores, but not clinical status. This model correctly classified 91% of successful and 71% of unsuccessful scans. An alternative model that included a single ASI item rather than Mental Concerns subscale scores showed similar performance, and a model including categorical anxiety sensitivity groups was also effective but slightly less accurate. Implications for improving the success rates of MRI with older adults are discussed.

  14. Altered Neural Substrates of Cognitive Control in Childhood ADHD: Evidence From Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Chandan J.; Bunge, Silvia A.; Dudukovic, Nicole M.; Zalecki, Christine A.; Elliott, Glen R.; Gabrieli, John D.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The study compared the neural bases of two cognitive control operations, interference suppression and response inhibition, between children with and children without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method Ten children (7–11 years of age) with combined-type ADHD and 10 comparison subjects matched for age and gender underwent rapid event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during performance of a modified flanker task. Functional maps were generated through group averaging and performance-based correlational analyses. Results Interference suppression in ADHD subjects was characterized by reduced engagement of a frontal-striatal-temporal-parietal network that subserved healthy performance. In contrast, response inhibition performance relied upon different regions in the two groups, frontal-striatal in comparison subjects but right superior temporal in ADHD children. Conclusions Alteration in the neural basis of two cognitive control operations in childhood ADHD was characterized by distinct, rather than unitary, patterns of functional abnormality. Greater between-group overlap in the neural network activated for interference suppression than in response inhibition suggests that components of cognitive control are differentially sensitive to ADHD. The ADHD children's inability to activate the caudate nucleus constitutes a core abnormality in ADHD. Observed functional abnormalities did not result from prolonged stimulant exposure, since most children were medication naive. PMID:16135618

  15. Controlling vibrational cooling with zero-width resonances: An adiabatic Floquet approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, Arnaud; Viennot, David; Jolicard, Georges; Lefebvre, Roland; Atabek, Osman

    2016-10-01

    In molecular photodissociation, some specific combinations of laser parameters (wavelength and intensity) lead to unexpected zero-width resonances (ZWRs) with, in principle, infinite lifetimes. Their potential to induce basic quenching mechanisms has recently been devised in the laser control of vibrational cooling through filtration strategies [O. Atabek et al., Phys. Rev. A 87, 031403(R) (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.031403]. A full quantum adiabatic control theory based on the adiabatic Floquet Hamiltonian is developed to show how a laser pulse could be envelope-shaped and frequency-chirped so as to protect a given initial vibrational state against dissociation, taking advantage of its continuous transport on the corresponding ZWR all along the pulse duration. As compared with previous control scenarios that actually suffered from nonadiabatic contamination, drastically different and much more efficient filtration goals are achieved. A semiclassical analysis helps us to find and interpret a complete map of ZWRs in the laser parameter plane. In addition, the choice of a given ZWR path, among the complete series identified by the semiclassical approach, turns out to be crucial for the cooling scheme, targeting a single vibrational state population left at the end of the pulse, while all others have almost completely decayed. The illustrative example, which has the potential to be transposed to other diatomics, is Na2 prepared by photoassociation in vibrationally hot but translationally and rotationally cold states.

  16. Understanding and controlling spin-systems using electron spin resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Mathew

    Single molecule magnets (SMMs) posses multi-level energy structures with properties that make them attractive candidates for implementation into quantum information technologies. However there are some major hurdles that need to be overcome if these systems are to be used as the fundamental components of an eventual quantum computer. One such hurdle is the relatively short coherence times these systems display which severely limits the amount of time quantum information can remain encoded within them. In this dissertation, recent experiments conducted with the intent of bringing this technology closer to realization are presented. The detailed knowledge of the spin Hamiltonian and mechanisms of decoherence in SMMs are absolutely essential if these systems are to be used in technologies. To that effect, experiments were done on a particularly promising SMM, the complex K6[VIV15AsIII 6O42(H2O)] · 8H2O, known as V15. High-field electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements were performed on this system at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. The resulting spectra allowed for detailed analysis of the V15 spin Hamiltonian which will be presented as well as the most precise values yet reported for the g-factors of this system. Additionally, the line widths of the ESR spectra are studied in depth and found to reveal that fluctuations within the spin-orbit interaction are a mechanism for decoherence in V15. A new model for decoherence is presented that describes very well both the temperature and field orientation dependences of the measured ESR line widths. Also essential is the ability to control spin-states of SMMs. Presented in this dissertation as well is the demonstration of the coherent manipulation of the multi-state spin system Mn2+ diluted in MgO by means of a two-tone pulse drive. Through the detuning between the excitation and readout radio frequency pulses it is possible to select the number of photons involved in a Rabi oscillation as well as increase

  17. Vibrational resonances and CuB displacement controlled by proton motion in cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Farantos, Stavros C; Guallar, Victor; Varotsis, Constantinos

    2010-01-21

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), found in the inner mitochondrial membranes or in many bacteria, catalyzes the four-electron reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Four protons are pumped across the inner mitochondrial membrane through CcO. In this study, quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics calculations are used to probe the spectroscopic characteristics of the ferryl intermediates in the aa(3) CcO/O(2) reaction. These highly elaborate calculations, supported by several calculations on smaller model systems, demonstrate the sensitivity of vibrational frequencies on the Coulombic field of heme a(3) and their dependence on the distance of the adjacent Cu(B) to the heme a(3)-Fe atom. This distance seems to be associated with the protonation state of the heme a(3) propionate A, and we propose that it plays a crucial role on the mechanism of action of CcO. In detail, we link proton pumping activity in CcO enzyme (a) to a multiple (1:1:2) resonance among the frequencies of Fe(IV)=O bond stretching, the breathing mode of Histidine 411, and a bending mode of the His411-Fe(IV)=O species (aa(3) from Paracoccus denitrificans numbering) and (b) to Cu(B) displacement by electrostatic interactions toward the heme a(3) iron. We find that the vibrations of the His411-Fe(IV)=O unit become highly coupled depending on the protonation state of the heme a(3) ring A propionate/Asp399 pair, and we propose a mechanism for the resonance Raman enhancement of the bending mode delta(His411-Fe(IV)=O). Calculations on model systems demonstrate that the position of Cu(B) in relation to heme a(3) iron-oxo plays a crucial role in regulating that resonance. We also discuss the origin of the coupling between bending, delta(His411-Fe(IV)=O) and nu(Fe=O) stretching modes, and the role played by such vibrational coupling interactions or Cu(B) position in controlling functional properties of the enzyme, including electron/proton coupling as well as experimental spectra.

  18. Precessing cylinders at the second and third resonance: Turbulence controlled by geostrophic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jianfei; Kong, Dali; Zhu, Rixiang; Zhang, Keke

    2015-09-01

    We investigate, via both asymptotic analysis and direct numerical simulation, precessionally driven flow of a homogeneous fluid confined in fluid-filled circular cylinders that rotate rapidly about their symmetry axis and precess about a different axis and that are marked by radius-height aspect ratios Γ =1.045 945 and Γ =1.611 089 . At these radius-height aspect ratios, the Poincaré force resonates directly with the two special inertial modes that have the simplest vertical structure. An asymptotic analytical solution in closed form describing weakly precessing flow is derived in the mantle frame of reference for asymptotically small Ekman numbers, showing quantitative agreement with the result of direct nonlinear numerical simulation. Our numerical simulation makes use of a finite-element method with the three-dimensional tetrahedralization of a cylindrical cavity that allows the construction of dense nodes in the vicinity of the bounding surface of the cavity for resolving the thin viscous boundary layer. It is found that axisymmetric geostrophic flow in the alternating eastward and westward direction can be generated and maintained by nonlinear and viscous effects in the viscous boundary layer. It is also found that, when the precessing rate is moderate and, consequently, the geostrophic flow is weak, nonlinear interaction between the resonant inertial mode and the nonesonant inertial modes driven by the Poincaré force and the boundary-layer influx leads to strongly turbulent flow with irregular temporal-spatial fluctuation. When the cylinders are strongly precessing such that the geostrophic flow becomes predominant, however, the effect of the geostrophic flow controls/stabilizes its nonlinear dynamics, leading to weakly turbulent flow that can be largely described by a dominant quasisteady geostrophic component and a weak nonaxisymmetric component localized in the region where the geostrophic flow is weak.

  19. Beam position controlling method for 3D optical system and its application in non-planar ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jie; Chen, Meixiong; Long, Xingwu; Tan, Yanyang; Kang, Zhenglong; Li, Yingying

    2012-08-13

    A novel theoretical beam position controlling method for 3D optical system has been proposed in this paper. Non-planar ring resonator, which is a typical 3D optical system, has been chosen as an example to show its application. To the best of our knowledge, the generalized ray matrices, augmented 5 × 5 ray matrices for paraxial dielectric interface transmission and paraxial optical-wedge transmission, and their detailed deducing process have been proposed in this paper for the first time. By utilizing the novel coordinate system for Gaussian beam reflection and the generalized ray matrix of paraxial optical-wedge transmission, the rules and some novel results of the optical-axis perturbations of non-planar ring resonators have been obtained. Wedge angle-induced mismatching errors of non-planar ring resonators have been found out and two experimental beam position controlling methods to effectively eliminate the wedge angle-induced mismatching errors have been proposed. All those results have been confirmed by related alignment experiments and the experimental results have been described with diagrammatic representation. These findings are important to the beam control, cavity design, and cavity alignment of high precision non-planar ring laser gyroscopes. Those generalized ray matrices and their deducing methods are valuable for ray analysis of various kinds of paraxial optical-elements and resonators. This novel theoretical beam position controlling method for 3D optical system is valuable for the controlling of various kinds of 3D optical systems.

  20. Constraint-induced therapy versus control intervention in patients with stroke: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Keh-Chung; Chung, Hsin-Ying; Wu, Ching-Yi; Liu, Ho-Ling; Hsieh, Yu-Wei; Chen, I-Hsuan; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chuang, Li-Ling; Liu, Jung-Sen; Wai, Yau-Yau

    2010-03-01

    This study compared the effects of a distributed form of constraint-induced therapy with control intervention in motor recovery and brain reorganization after stroke. A two-group randomized controlled trial with pretreatment and posttreatment measures was conducted. Thirteen patients with stroke were randomly assigned to the distributed form of constraint-induced therapy (n = 5) or the control intervention group (n = 8). Outcome measures included the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, the Motor Activity Log, and functional magnetic resonance imaging examination. The number of activation voxels and laterality index were determined from the functional magnetic resonance imaging data for the study of brain reorganization. The distributed form of constraint-induced therapy group exhibited significantly greater improvements in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Motor Activity Log than the control intervention group. The functional magnetic resonance imaging data showed that distributed form of constraint-induced therapy significantly increased activation in the contralesional hemisphere during movement of the affected and unaffected hand. The control intervention group showed a decrease in primary sensorimotor cortex activation of the ipsilesional hemisphere during movement of the affected hand. The preliminary findings indicate that brain adaptation may be modulated by specific rehabilitation practices, although generalization of the functional magnetic resonance imaging findings is limited by sample size. Further research is needed to identify the specific neural correlates of the behavioral gains achieved after rehabilitation therapies.

  1. Control considerations for high frequency, resonant, power processing equipment used in large systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, J. W.; Schreiner, K. E.; Wolff, F.

    1987-01-01

    Addressed is a class of resonant power processing equipment designed to be used in an integrated high frequency (20 KHz domain), utility power system for large, multi-user spacecraft and other aerospace vehicles. It describes a hardware approach, which has been the basis for parametric and physical data used to justify the selection of high frequency ac as the PMAD baseline for the space station. This paper is part of a larger effort undertaken by NASA and General Dynamics to be sure that all potential space station contractors and other aerospace power system designers understand and can comfortably use this technology, which is now widely used in the commercial sector. In this paper, we will examine control requirements, stability, and operational modes; and their hardware impacts from an integrated system point of view. The current space station PMAD system will provide the overall requirements model to develop an understanding of the performance of this type of system with regard to: (1) regulation; (2) power bus stability and voltage control; (3) source impedance; (4) transient response; (5) power factor effects; and (6) limits and overloads.

  2. Control considerations for high frequency, resonant, power processing equipment used in large systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, J. W.; Schreiner, K. E.; Wolff, F.

    1987-01-01

    Addressed is a class of resonant power processing equipment designed to be used in an integrated high frequency (20 KHz domain), utility power system for large, multi-user spacecraft and other aerospace vehicles. It describes a hardware approach, which has been the basis for parametric and physical data used to justify the selection of high frequency ac as the PMAD baseline for the space station. This paper is part of a larger effort undertaken by NASA and General Dynamics to be sure that all potential space station contractors and other aerospace power system designers understand and can comfortably use this technology, which is now widely used in the commercial sector. In this paper, we will examine control requirements, stability, and operational modes; and their hardware impacts from an integrated system point of view. The current space station PMAD system will provide the overall requirements model to develop an understanding of the performance of this type of system with regard to: (1) regulation; (2) power bus stability and voltage control; (3) source impedance; (4) transient response; (5) power factor effects, and (6) limits and overloads.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in patellar lateral femoral friction syndrome (PLFFS): prospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Barbier-Brion, B; Lerais, J-M; Aubry, S; Lepage, D; Vidal, C; Delabrousse, E; Runge, M; Kastler, B

    2012-03-01

    To describe morphologic abnormalities and signs of patellar lateral femoral friction syndrome (PLFFS) detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Prospective study of 56 knees (21 patients and 30 controls) studied by 3Tesla MRI. Comparative analysis of clinical data, quantitative and qualitative imaging criteria in a population of patients with anterior knee pain associated with an abnormal MRI signal along the lateral alar folds of the infrapatellar fat pad, a characteristic sign of PLFFS, and a control population with no anterior knee pain or abnormal signal from the infrapatellar fat pad. Patients with PLFFS have anterior and/or lateral knee pain. Their knee has anatomical predispositions for instability, primarily with patella alta (P<0.0001), patellar tilt more than 13.5° (P<0.0001), a patellar nose length less than 9 mm (P=0.0037), a patellar nose ratio less than 0.25 (P<0.0001), a TT-TG distance more than 10 mm (P<0.0001), and a trochlear prominence more than 4 mm (P=0.0056). In 35% of patients, patellar chondropathy is visible, and 48% of patients have patellar or trochlear subchondral abnormalities. Anterior, lateral, and medial knee pain may be related to PLFFS. Anatomical predispositions contributing to instability are found in these patients. There may be associated chondropathies and osteochondropathies. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Coping strategies of panic and control subjects undergoing lactate infusion during magnetic resonance imaging confinement.

    PubMed

    Nazemi, Hamid; Dager, Stephen R

    2003-01-01

    The psychological reactions and coping strategies used in response to a behavioral contingency (confinement in a magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] scanner) during a biological challenge (sodium lactate infusion) were systematically studied in 13 subjects with panic disorder (PD) and 11 control subjects using the Claustrophobia Questionnaire (CQ) and the Revised Ways of Coping Checklist (RWCCL). All participants were able to successfully complete the experimental procedure. Findings suggest between-group coping strategy differences in response to general stressors, but relative convergence of coping strategies in response to the experimental procedure, with relatively greater emphasis on problem-focused coping approaches. These observations suggest that PD patients are able to engage in effective coping strategies in response to stressful but highly structured experimental situations. An overall pre-post MR scanning reduction in the fear of restriction but not suffocation was observed for the combined sample, primarily reflecting changes in the control group. Among PD subjects, higher levels of suffocation fears were maintained despite emergence of more problem-focused coping in the experimental situation.

  5. Multiparametric Classification of Skin from Osteogenesis Imperfecta Patients and Controls by Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Microimaging.

    PubMed

    Ashinsky, Beth G; Fishbein, Kenneth W; Carter, Erin M; Lin, Ping-Chang; Pleshko, Nancy; Raggio, Cathleen L; Spencer, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to discriminate between skin biopsies from individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and skin biopsies from individuals without OI. Skin biopsies from nine controls (unaffected) and nine OI patients were imaged to generate maps of five separate MR parameters, T1, T2, km, MTR and ADC. Parameter values were calculated over the dermal region and used for univariate and multiparametric classification analysis. A substantial degree of overlap of individual MR parameters was observed between control and OI groups, which limited the sensitivity and specificity of univariate classification. Classification accuracies ranging between 39% and 67% were found depending on the variable of investigation, with T2 yielding the best accuracy of 67%. When several MR parameters were considered simultaneously in a multivariate analysis, the classification accuracies improved up to 89% for specific combinations, including the combination of T2 and km. These results indicate that multiparametric classification by quantitative MRI is able to detect differences between the skin of OI patients and of unaffected individuals, which motivates further study of quantitative MRI for the clinical diagnosis of OI.

  6. Spirometer-controlled cine magnetic resonance imaging used to diagnose tracheobronchomalacia in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Wielopolski, Piotr; Manniesing, Rashindra; Lever, Sandra; de Bruijne, Marleen; Morana, Giovanni; Muzzio, Pier Carlo; Lequin, Maarten H; Tiddens, Harm A W M

    2014-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) is defined as an excessive collapse of the intrathoracic trachea. Bronchoscopy is the gold standard for diagnosing TBM; however it has major disadvantages, such as general anaesthesia. Cine computed tomography (CT) is a noninvasive alternative used to diagnose TBM, but its use in children is restricted by ionising radiation. Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of spirometer-controlled cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an alternative to cine-CT in a retrospective study. 12 children with a mean age (range) of 12 years (7-17 years), suspected of having TBM, underwent cine-MRI. Static scans were acquired at end-inspiration and expiration covering the thorax using a three-dimensional spoiled gradient echo sequence. Three-dimensional dynamic scans were performed covering only the central airways. TBM was defined as a decrease of the trachea or bronchi diameter >50% at end-expiration in the static and dynamic scans. The success rate of the cine-MRI protocol was 92%. Cine-MRI was compared with bronchoscopy or chest CT in seven subjects. TBM was diagnosed by cine-MRI in seven (58%) out of 12 children and was confirmed by bronchoscopy or CT. In four patients, cine-MRI demonstrated tracheal narrowing that was not present in the static scans. Spirometer controlled cine-MRI is a promising technique to assess TBM in children and has the potential to replace bronchoscopy.

  7. Multiparametric Classification of Skin from Osteogenesis Imperfecta Patients and Controls by Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Erin M.; Lin, Ping-Chang; Pleshko, Nancy; Raggio, Cathleen L.; Spencer, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to discriminate between skin biopsies from individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and skin biopsies from individuals without OI. Skin biopsies from nine controls (unaffected) and nine OI patients were imaged to generate maps of five separate MR parameters, T1, T2, km, MTR and ADC. Parameter values were calculated over the dermal region and used for univariate and multiparametric classification analysis. A substantial degree of overlap of individual MR parameters was observed between control and OI groups, which limited the sensitivity and specificity of univariate classification. Classification accuracies ranging between 39% and 67% were found depending on the variable of investigation, with T2 yielding the best accuracy of 67%. When several MR parameters were considered simultaneously in a multivariate analysis, the classification accuracies improved up to 89% for specific combinations, including the combination of T2 and km. These results indicate that multiparametric classification by quantitative MRI is able to detect differences between the skin of OI patients and of unaffected individuals, which motivates further study of quantitative MRI for the clinical diagnosis of OI. PMID:27416032

  8. NOESY-WaterControl: a new NOESY sequence for the observation of under-water protein resonances.

    PubMed

    Torres, Allan M; Zheng, Gang; Price, William S

    2017-03-07

    Highly selective and efficient water signal suppression is indispensable in biomolecular 2D nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. However, the application of conventional water suppression schemes can cause a significant or complete loss of the biomolecular resonances at and around the water chemical shift (ω2). In this study, a new sequence, NOESY-WaterControl, was developed to address this issue. The new sequence was tested on lysozyme and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), demonstrating its efficiency in both water suppression and, more excitingly, preserving water-proximate biomolecular resonances in ω2. The 2D NOESY maps obtained using the new sequence thus provide more information than the maps obtained with conventional water suppression, thereby lessening the number of experiments needed to complete resonance assignments of biomolecules. The 2D NOESY-WaterControl map of BPTI showed strong bound water and exchangeable proton signals in ω1 but these signals were absent in ω2, indicating the possibility of using the new sequence to discriminate bound water and exchangeable proton resonances from non-labile proton resonances with similar chemical shifts to water.

  9. The Effects of Methylphenidate on Cognitive Control in Active Methamphetamine Dependence Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Reem K.; Lin, Joanne C.; McLaren, Donald G.; Kirk, Ian J.; Kydd, Rob R.; Russell, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) dependence is associated with cognitive deficits. Methylphenidate (MPH) has been shown to improve inhibitory control in healthy and cocaine-dependent subjects. This study aimed to understand the neurophysiological effects before and after acute MPH administration in active MA-dependent and control subjects. Fifteen MA-dependent and 18 control subjects aged 18–46 years were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging before and after either a single oral dose of MPH (18 mg) or placebo while performing a color-word Stroop task. Baseline accuracy was lower (p = 0.026) and response time (RT) was longer (p < 0.0001) for the incongruent compared to congruent condition, demonstrating the task probed cognitive control. Increased activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and parietal cortex during the incongruent and Stroop effect conditions, respectively was observed in MA-dependent compared to control subjects (p < 0.05), suggesting the need to recruit neural resources within these regions for conflict resolution. Post- compared to pre-MPH treatment, increased RT and DLPFC activation for the Stroop effect were observed in MA-dependent subjects (p < 0.05). In comparison to MPH-treated controls and placebo-treated MA-dependent subjects, MPH-treated MA-dependent subjects showed decreased activation of parietal and occipital regions during the incongruent and Stroop effect conditions (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that in MA-dependent subjects, MPH facilitated increased recruitment of the DLPFC for Stroop conflict resolution, and a decreased need for recruitment of neural resources in parietal and occipital regions compared to the other groups, while maintaining a comparable level of task performance to that achieved pre-drug administration. Due to the small sample size, the results from this study are preliminary; however, they inform us about the effects of MPH on the neural correlates of cognitive

  10. Pineal gland volume in primary insomnia and healthy controls: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Bumb, Jan M; Schilling, Claudia; Enning, Frank; Haddad, Leila; Paul, Franc; Lederbogen, Florian; Deuschle, Michael; Schredl, Michael; Nolte, Ingo

    2014-06-01

    Little is known about the relation between pineal volume and insomnia. Melatonin promotes sleep processes and, administered as a drug, it is suitable to improve primary and secondary sleep disorders in humans. Recent magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that human plasma and saliva melatonin levels are partially determined by the pineal gland volume. This study compares the pineal volume in a group of patients with primary insomnia to a group of healthy people without sleep disturbance. Pineal gland volume (PGV) was measured on the basis of high-resolution 3 Tesla MRI (T1-magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo) in 23 patients and 27 controls, matched for age, gender and educational status. Volume measurements were performed conventionally by manual delineation of the pineal borders in multi-planar reconstructed images. Pineal gland volume was significantly smaller (P < 0.001) in patients (48.9 ± 26.6 mm(3) ) than in controls (79 ± 30.2 mm(3) ). In patients PGV correlated negatively with age (r = -0.532; P = 0.026). Adjusting for the effect of age, PGV and rapid eye movement (REM) latency showed a significant positive correlation (rS  = 0.711, P < 0.001) in patients. Pineal volume appears to be reduced in patients with primary insomnia compared to healthy controls. Further studies are needed to clarify whether low pineal volume is the basis or the consequence of functional sleep changes to elucidate the molecular pathology for the pineal volume loss in primary insomnia.

  11. Double-finger-gate controlled spin-resolved resonant quantum transport in the presence of a Rashba-Zeeman gap.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chi-Shung; Tseng, Shu-Ting; Gudmundsson, Vidar; Cheng, Shun-Jen

    2015-03-04

    We investigate double finger gate (DFG) controlled spin-resolved resonant transport properties in an n-type quantum channel with a Rashba-Zeeman (RZ) subband energy gap. By appropriately tuning the DFG in the strong Rashba coupling regime, resonant state structures in conductance can be found that are sensitive to the length of the DFG system. Furthermore, a hole-like bound state feature below the RZ gap and an electron-like quasi-bound state feature at the threshold of the upper spin branch can be found that is insensitive to the length of the DFG system.

  12. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-01-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW. PMID:27485470

  13. The role of mechanical resonance in the neural control of swimming in fishes.

    PubMed

    Tytell, Eric D; Hsu, Chia-Yu; Fauci, Lisa J

    2014-02-01

    The bodies of many fishes are flexible, elastic structures; if you bend them, they spring back. Therefore, they should have a resonant frequency: a bending frequency at which the output amplitude is maximized for a particular input. Previous groups have hypothesized that swimming at this resonant frequency could maximize efficiency, and that a neural circuit called the central pattern generator might be able to entrain to a mechanical resonance. However, fishes swim in water, which may potentially damp out many resonant effects. Additionally, their bodies are elongated, which means that bending can occur in complicated ways along the length of the body. We review previous studies of the mechanical properties of fish bodies, and then present new data that demonstrate complex bending properties of elongated fish bodies. Resonant peaks in amplitude exist, but there may be many of them depending on the body wavelength. Additionally, they may not correspond to the maximum swimming speed. Next, we describe experiments using a closed-loop preparation of the lamprey, in which a preparation of the spinal cord is linked to a real-time simulation of the muscle and body properties, allowing us to examine resonance entrainment as we vary the simulated resonant frequency. We find that resonance entrainment does occur, but is rare. Gain had a significant, though weak, effect, and a nonlinear muscle model produced resonance entrainment more often than a linear filter. We speculate that resonance may not be a critical effect for efficient swimming in elongate, anguilliform swimmers, though it may be more important for stiffer carangiform and thunniform fishes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasonic resonator technology as a new quality control method evaluating gelatin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Winter, Gerhard; Coester, Conrad

    2010-05-01

    Nanomedicine is a quickly evolving field where more and more possible applications become evident and start entering clinical trials or even the market. However, the analytic methods are not always able to keep pace with the new formulations' demands. One example of a promising medical implementation is oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) delivery by gelatin nanoparticles (GNPs). Currently, quality control is dependent on either some time consuming or destructive spectrometric, chromatographic or electrophoretic methods. A possible enlargement of the portfolio by Ultrasonic Resonator Technology (URT) is investigated here by subjecting plain GNPs in various sizes and concentrations as well as ODN-loaded GNPs to URT analysis. If calibrated by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and other spectroscopy methods for each single nanoparticle system parameter, URT is an efficient and non-destructive technique and serves as a broad characterization method. URT is emphasized to play a possible future part in the size, concentration and ODN loading monitoring, e.g. of gelatin nanoparticles in the course of formulation development.

  15. Polarized linewidth-controllable double-trapping electromagnetically induced transparency spectra in a resonant plasmon nanocavity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luojia; Gu, Ying; Chen, Hongyi; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Cui, Yiping; Gerardot, Brian D.; Gong, Qihuang

    2013-01-01

    Surface plasmons with ultrasmall optical mode volume and strong near field enhancement can be used to realize nanoscale light-matter interaction. Combining surface plasmons with the quantum system provides the possibility of nanoscale realization of important quantum optical phenomena, including the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), which has many applications in nonlinear quantum optics and quantum information processing. Here, using a custom-designed resonant plasmon nanocavity, we demonstrate polarized position-dependent linewidth-controllable EIT spectra at the nanoscale. We analytically obtain the double coherent population trapping conditions in a double-Λ quantum system with crossing damping, which give two transparent points in the EIT spectra. The linewidths of the three peaks are extremely sensitive to the level spacing of the excited states, the Rabi frequencies and detunings of pump fields, and the Purcell factors. In particular the linewidth of the central peak is exceptionally narrow. The hybrid system may have potential applications in ultra-compact plasmon-quantum devices. PMID:24096943

  16. Directional thermal emission control by coupling between guided mode resonances and tunable plasmons in multilayered graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kota; Iizuka, Hideo

    2016-10-01

    Directional thermal radiation is attracting interest because of its applicability to thermal management systems and mid-infrared light sources. Plasmons in a single graphene layer are tunable by the chemical potential, while the lateral wavenumber of the plasmon dispersion is too large for the directional coupling to the far field. In this paper, we achieve directional thermal radiation by utilizing tunable plasmons in multilayered graphene. The lateral wavenumber of the plasmon is shown to be reduced as the number of graphene layers increases, and the reduction is analytically explained. The thermally excited graphene plasmon couples to the guided mode resonance in a silicon grating through evanescent waves so as to realize angular-selective far-field emission. We develop a modal analysis in order to investigate the coupling condition. In addition, the directional thermal emission including asymmetric one can be tuned by varying the chemical potential of graphene layers. The calculated emissivity obtained by changing both the chemical potential and the height of the grating suggests the control of the angular heat flux profile.

  17. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and neural network classified autism and control.

    PubMed

    Iidaka, Tetsuya

    2015-02-01

    Although the neurodevelopmental and genetic underpinnings of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been investigated, the etiology of the disorder has remained elusive, and clinical diagnosis continues to rely on symptom-based criteria. In this study, to classify both control subjects and a large sample of patients with ASD, we used resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and a neural network. Imaging data from 312 subjects with ASD and 328 subjects with typical development was downloaded from the multi-center research project. Only subjects under 20 years of age were included in this analysis. Correlation matrices computed from rs-fMRI time-series data were entered into a probabilistic neural network (PNN) for classification. The PNN classified the two groups with approximately 90% accuracy (sensitivity = 92%, specificity = 87%). The accuracy of classification did not differ among the institutes, or with respect to experimental and imaging conditions, sex, handedness, or intellectual level. Medication status and degree of head movement did not affect accuracy values. The present study indicates that an intrinsic connectivity matrix produced from rs-fMRI data could yield a possible biomarker of ASD. These results support the view that altered network connectivity within the brain contributes to the neurobiology of ASD.

  18. Phase-staggering control of a series-resonant DC-DC converter with paralleled power modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaassens, J. Ben; Moize de Chateleux, Willem L. F. H. A.; van Wesenbeeck, M. P. N.

    1988-04-01

    A method of decreasing the ripple on the output voltage of high-power AC-DC or DC-DC series-resonant converters without increasing the internal converter frequency or the capacity of the energy storage elements is discussed. This improvement is accomplished by subdividing the converter into two or more series-resonant power modules operated with a constant relative phase shift (phase-staggering control). The method of eliminating the harmonic components in the input and output currents of the conversion system, without increasing the internal pulse frequency, is justified by Fourier analysis of the current waveforms. The frequency spectra of the source and output waveforms for the continuous and discontinuous resonant current mode are shifted to higher frequency ranges, as computations show for both one single module and multiple paralleled modules. Inadequacies in the phase-staggering control method applied to series-resonant converters are indicated in relation to the dominant harmonic component, in particular for two modules and supported by experimentally acquired waveforms. High-frequency current components to the source and to the load are reduced, resulting in smaller input and output filters. This improves the resolution of the control of the flow of energy from the source to the load, resulting in a faster system response.

  19. Quantum switch in coupled-resonator array: Controlling single-photon transport by the state of two-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiao-Ke

    2016-12-01

    We present the model that two-level system (TLS) nonlocally interacts with one-dimensional coupled-resonator array (CRA). The coherent transport of single-photon inside CRA is well controlled by the state of TLS, which functions as quantum switch. Spin up and spin down correspond to switch on and switch off respectively, or vice versa, which originate from the constructive interference and the destructive interference of two coupling paths. We improve the fidelity of quantum switch by preadjusting the frequency of resonators which couple to TLS. Quantum switch realizes quantum beam splitter when TLS is in the superposition state. The single-photon wave packet would entangle with qubit and propagate to the remote resonators.

  20. Control of internal resonances in vibration isolators using passive and hybrid dynamic vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yu; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Nikolaidis, Efstratios

    2005-09-01

    This paper discusses methods to improve isolator performance by controlling Internal Resonances (IRs), also referred as wave effects, in vibration isolators. The IRs are associated with the isolators' internal elastic motions that are due to the inertia existing in practical vibration isolators. It is well known that the IRs degrade the isolator performance as predicted by ideal massless isolator models. This degradation could be as high as 20-30 dB in the force transmissibility at the IR frequencies and 10-20 dB in the overall noise radiation from the foundation in the audible frequency range. This paper proposes two approaches of using dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs) directly embedded into the isolator to attenuate the IRs. The first approach uses passive DVAs (PDVA). The effectiveness of this approach is investigated analytically using a 3 dof vibration model. It is shown that the PDVAs are very effective in attenuating the IRs and improve the isolator's performance at high frequencies. However, the PDVAs are less effective at low frequencies. To complement the effectiveness of the PDVA, an active control force is added, forming the hybrid DVA (HDVA) approach. The effectiveness of both the PDVA and the HDVA approaches, as well as the significance of the IRs in a commercial rubber mount, is also demonstrated experimentally. It is shown that an enhanced isolator with DVAs outperforms the original isolator without DVAs. Compared to the original isolator, in the isolation region of the experimental system, the PDVA approach reduces force transmissibility by 18.5% and overall noise radiation by 4.3 dB. The HDVA approach reduces the force transmissibility and radiated noise by 92.2% and 9.1 dB, respectively.

  1. Randomized controlled trial for intermittent versus continuous propofol sedation for pediatric brain and spine magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Nabil E; Betz, Bradford W; Cole, Morgan R; Wincek, Jeni; Reischman, Diann; Sanfilippo, Dominic J; Winterhalter-Rzeszutko, Kim M; Kopec, John S

    2011-11-01

    Intermittent bolus propofol is an effective agent for pediatric magnetic resonance imaging sedation but requires constant vigilance and dose titration. Magnetic resonance imaging-compatible infusion pumps may make it possible to continuously infuse propofol, achieving a steady level of sedation at a lower total dose. This study investigates total propofol dose, recovery time, and magnetic resonance image quality in children receiving intermittent vs. continuously infused propofol sedation in children undergoing brain and spine magnetic resonance imaging studies. An open-label, prospective, randomized, controlled study. A single-blinded radiologist rated the quality of magnetic resonance images. Children's hospital pediatric radiology sedation center. One hundred seventy children age 1 month to 18 yrs undergoing deep sedation for brain, spine, or both brain and spine magnetic resonance imaging. After informed consent, patients were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (intermittent) received a propofol bolus of 2-4 mg/kg, followed by repeat boluses of 0.5-2 mg/kg/dose as needed. Group C (continuous) received a bolus of propofol 2-4 mg/kg, followed by a continuous infusion of 100 μg/kg/min with 1-mg/kg/dose boluses with drip titration to effect. Patient demographics, sedation risk assessment, propofol dose, sedation recovery times, incidence of complications, and quality of the magnetic resonance imaging studies were measured. A total of 170 children were enrolled in the study, with 75 in group C and 95 in group I. Both groups were similar with regard to age, weight, gender, and magnetic resonance imaging study type. Group C required a lesser dose of propofol (132 ± 54 μg/kg/min) compared to (162 ± 74 μg/kg/min) in that required in group I (p = .018). There were no differences between the two groups with regard to quality of the imaging study, recovery time, or incidence of complications. Compared to intermittent bolus dosing, continuous propofol infusion

  2. Fabrication and characterisation of nanocrystalline graphite MEMS resonators using a geometric design to control buckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishlock, S. J.; O'Shea, S. J.; McBride, J. W.; Chong, H. M. H.; Pu, S. H.

    2017-09-01

    The simulation, fabrication and characterisation of nanographite MEMS resonators is reported in this paper. The deposition of nanographite is achieved using plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition directly onto numerous substrates such as commercial silicon wafers. As a result, many of the reliability issues of devices based on transferred graphene are avoided. The fabrication of the resonators is presented along with a simple undercutting method to overcome buckling, by changing the effective stress of the structure from ~436 MPa compressive, to ~13 MPa tensile. The characterisation of the resonators using electrostatic actuation and laser Doppler vibrometry is reported, demonstrating resonator frequencies from 5-640 kHz and quality factor above 1819 in vacuum obtained.

  3. Ultrafast optical control using the Kerr nonlinearity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon microcylindrical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, N.; Healy, N.; Suhailin, F. H.; Mehta, P.; Day, T. D.; Badding, J. V.; Peacock, A. C.

    2013-10-01

    Microresonators are ideal systems for probing nonlinear phenomena at low thresholds due to their small mode volumes and high quality (Q) factors. As such, they have found use both for fundamental studies of light-matter interactions as well as for applications in areas ranging from telecommunications to medicine. In particular, semiconductor-based resonators with large Kerr nonlinearities have great potential for high speed, low power all-optical processing. Here we present experiments to characterize the size of the Kerr induced resonance wavelength shifting in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon resonator and demonstrate its potential for ultrafast all-optical modulation and switching. Large wavelength shifts are observed for low pump powers due to the high nonlinearity of the amorphous silicon material and the strong mode confinement in the microcylindrical resonator. The threshold energy for switching is less than a picojoule, representing a significant step towards advantageous low power silicon-based photonic technologies.

  4. Frequency-selective control of ferromagnetic resonance linewidth in magnetic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, S.; Pachauri, N.; Mewes, C. K. A.; Mewes, T.; Kaiser, C.; Leng, Q.; Pakala, M.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a frequency-specific linewidth broadening of the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) mode of a NiFe free layer within a magnetic multilayer stack. The FMR studies reveal a significant broadening of the FMR linewidth of the free layer at frequencies where this resonance is degenerate with FMR modes stemming from other layers within the multilayer stack. By pinning part of the magnetic multilayer to an antiferromagnet, we tailor a ferromagnetic linewidth behavior that is anisotropic for a specific frequency.

  5. Brain glutamate in anorexia nervosa: a magnetic resonance spectroscopy case control study at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Beata R; Pike, Alexandra; Sharpley, Ann L; Ayton, Agnes; Park, Rebecca J; Cowen, Philip J; Emir, Uzay E

    2017-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric disorder with high morbidity and mortality. There are no established pharmacological treatments and the neurobiology of the condition is poorly understood. Previous studies using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have shown that AN may be associated with reductions in indices of brain glutamate; however, at conventional field strengths (≤3 T), it is difficult to separate glutamate from its precursor and metabolite, glutamine. The objective of the present study was to use high field (7 T) MRS to measure concentrations of glutamate, in three separate brain voxels, in women with AN. We studied 13 female participants with AN and 12 healthy female controls who underwent MRS scanning at 7 T with voxels placed in anterior cingulate cortex, occipital cortex and putamen. Neurometabolites were calculated using the unsuppressed water signal as a reference and corrected for individual cerebrospinal fluid concentration in the voxel. We found that participants with AN had significantly lower concentrations of glutamate in all three voxels (mean reduction 8%, p = 0.002) but glutamine levels were not altered. Concentrations of N-acetylaspartate, creatine, GABA and glutathione were also unchanged. However, inositol was lower in AN participants in anterior cingulate (p = 0.022) and occipital cortex (p = 0.002). Women with AN apparently have widespread reductions in brain glutamate. Further work will be needed to assess if this change has pathophysiological relevance or whether it is a consequence of the many physical changes produced in AN by food restriction.

  6. Reduction of claustrophobia during magnetic resonance imaging: methods and design of the "CLAUSTRO" randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Enders, Judith; Zimmermann, Elke; Rief, Matthias; Martus, Peter; Klingebiel, Randolf; Asbach, Patrick; Klessen, Christian; Diederichs, Gerd; Bengner, Thomas; Teichgräber, Ulf; Hamm, Bernd; Dewey, Marc

    2011-02-10

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been described as the most important medical innovation in the last 25 years. Over 80 million MR procedures are now performed each year and on average 2.3% (95% confidence interval: 2.0 to 2.5%) of all patients scheduled for MR imaging suffer from claustrophobia. Thus, prevention of MR imaging by claustrophobia is a common problem and approximately 2,000,000 MR procedures worldwide cannot be completed due to this situation. Patients with claustrophobic anxiety are more likely to be frightened and experience a feeling of confinement or being closed in during MR imaging. In these patients, conscious sedation and additional sequences (after sedation) may be necessary to complete the examinations. Further improvements in MR design appear to be essential to alleviate this situation and broaden the applicability of MR imaging. A more open scanner configuration might help reduce claustrophobic reactions while maintaining image quality and diagnostic accuracy. We propose to analyze the rate of claustrophobic reactions, clinical utility, image quality, patient acceptance, and cost-effectiveness of an open MR scanner in a randomized comparison with a recently designed short-bore but closed scanner with 97% noise reduction. The primary aim of this study is thus to determine whether an open MR scanner can reduce claustrophobic reactions, thereby enabling more examinations of claustrophobic patients without incurring the safety issues associated with conscious sedation. In this manuscript we detail the methods and design of the prospective "CLAUSTRO" trial. This randomized controlled trial will be the first direct comparison of open vertical and closed short-bore MR systems in regards to claustrophobia and image quality as well as diagnostic utility. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00715806.

  7. Reduction of claustrophobia during magnetic resonance imaging: methods and design of the "CLAUSTRO" randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been described as the most important medical innovation in the last 25 years. Over 80 million MR procedures are now performed each year and on average 2.3% (95% confidence interval: 2.0 to 2.5%) of all patients scheduled for MR imaging suffer from claustrophobia. Thus, prevention of MR imaging by claustrophobia is a common problem and approximately 2,000,000 MR procedures worldwide cannot be completed due to this situation. Patients with claustrophobic anxiety are more likely to be frightened and experience a feeling of confinement or being closed in during MR imaging. In these patients, conscious sedation and additional sequences (after sedation) may be necessary to complete the examinations. Further improvements in MR design appear to be essential to alleviate this situation and broaden the applicability of MR imaging. A more open scanner configuration might help reduce claustrophobic reactions while maintaining image quality and diagnostic accuracy. Methods/Design We propose to analyze the rate of claustrophobic reactions, clinical utility, image quality, patient acceptance, and cost-effectiveness of an open MR scanner in a randomized comparison with a recently designed short-bore but closed scanner with 97% noise reduction. The primary aim of this study is thus to determine whether an open MR scanner can reduce claustrophobic reactions, thereby enabling more examinations of claustrophobic patients without incurring the safety issues associated with conscious sedation. In this manuscript we detail the methods and design of the prospective "CLAUSTRO" trial. Discussion This randomized controlled trial will be the first direct comparison of open vertical and closed short-bore MR systems in regards to claustrophobia and image quality as well as diagnostic utility. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00715806 PMID:21310075

  8. Active control of the volume acquisition noise in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Method and psychoacoustical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, John; Akeroyd, Michael A.; Summerfield, A. Quentin; Palmer, Alan R.

    2001-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a noninvasive tool for observing correlates of neural activity in the brain while a subject listens to sound. However, intense acoustic noise is generated in the process of capturing MR images. This noise stimulates the auditory nervous system, limiting the dynamic range available for displaying stimulus-driven activity. The noise is potentially damaging to hearing and is distracting for the subject. In an active noise control (ANC) system, a reference sample of a noise is processed to form a sound which adds destructively with the noise at the listener's ear. We describe an implementation of ANC in the electromagnetically hostile and physically compact MRI scanning environment. First, a prototype system was evaluated psychoacoustically in the laboratory, using the electrical drive to a noise-generating loudspeaker as the reference. This system produced 10-20 dB of subjective noise-reduction between 250 Hz and 1 kHz, and smaller amounts at higher frequencies. The system was modified to operate in a real MR scanner where the reference was obtained by recording the acoustic scanner noise. Objective reduction by 30-40 dB of the most intense component in scanner noises was realized between 500 Hz and 3500 Hz, and subjective reduction of 12 dB and 5 dB in tests at frequencies of 600 Hz and at 1.9 kHz, respectively. Although the benefit of ANC is limited by transmission paths to the cochlea other than air-conduction routes from the auditory meatus, ANC achieves worthwhile attenuation even in the frequency range of maximum bone conduction (1.5-2 kHz). ANC should, therefore, be generally useful during auditory fMRI.

  9. Adaptive Feedforward Compensation by Specified Step Settling Considering Resonance Frequency Variation and Constraint on Control Input Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshihiro; Wada, Masatake; Iwasaki, Makoto; Hirai, Hiromu

    This paper presents an adaptive feedfowad (FF) compensation method based on a deadbeat control framework for fast and precise positioning in mechatronic systems. The conventional FF compensation approach can design a FF compensator by considering both the frequency shaping and amplitude of FF control input, to suppress the response variations due to the perturbations in plant resonance frequency. However, since the conventional approach is not adaptive against frequency variations, an overshoot and/or undershoot response at the settling region would deteriorate the positioning performance. In this research, therefore, the proposed FF compensation approach with an adaptive identification system for the resonance frequency is adopted to achieve the desired positioning performance. The effectiveness of the proposed FF compensation approach has been verified by experiments using a prototype of an industrial positioning device.

  10. CONTROLLING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF LASER LIGHT: Effect of a resonant medium on the polarization of a light pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abesadze, T. Sh; Tsikoridze, Z. A.

    1993-07-01

    The propagation of a 2π pulse in an ensemble of paramagnetic ions in a magnetic field is analyzed. The paramagnetic part of the magnetooptic activity of the medium contributes to the rotation of the polarization of the light pulse. The Faraday-rotation angle for a 2π pulse which has passed through the medium can be controlled by varying the saturation of the magnetic resonance.

  11. Coupling a single electron spin to a microwave resonator: controlling transverse and longitudinal couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Félix; Lachance-Quirion, Dany; Coish, W. A.; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2016-11-01

    Microwave-frequency superconducting resonators are ideally suited to perform dispersive qubit readout, to mediate two-qubit gates, and to shuttle states between distant quantum systems. A prerequisite for these applications is a strong qubit-resonator coupling. Strong coupling between an electron-spin qubit and a microwave resonator can be achieved by correlating spin- and orbital degrees of freedom. This correlation can be achieved through the Zeeman coupling of a single electron in a double quantum dot to a spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field generated by a nearby nanomagnet. In this paper, we consider such a device and estimate spin-resonator couplings of order ˜1 MHz with realistic parameters. Further, through realistic simulations, we show that precise placement of the double-dot relative to the nanomagnet allows to select between a purely longitudinal coupling (commuting with the bare spin Hamiltonian) and a purely transverse (spin non-conserving) coupling. Additionally, we suggest methods to mitigate dephasing and relaxation channels that are introduced in this coupling scheme. This analysis gives a clear route toward the realization of coherent state transfer between a microwave resonator and a single electron spin in a GaAs double quantum dot with a fidelity above 90%. Improved dynamical decoupling sequences, low-noise environments, and longer-lived microwave cavity modes may lead to substantially higher fidelities in the near future.

  12. A film bulk acoustic resonator-based high-performance pressure sensor integrated with temperature control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mengying; Zhao, Zhan; Du, Lidong; Fang, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    This paper presented a high-performance pressure sensor based on a film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR). The support film of the FBAR chip was made of silicon nitride and the part under the resonator area was etched to enhance the sensitivity and improve the linearity of the pressure sensor. A micro resistor temperature sensor and a micro resistor heater were integrated in the chip to monitor and control the operating temperature. The sensor chip was fabricated, and packaged in an oscillator circuit for differential pressure detection. When the detected pressure ranged from  ‑100 hPa to 600 hPa, the sensitivity of the improved FBAR pressure sensor was  ‑0.967 kHz hPa‑1, namely  ‑0.69 ppm hPa‑1, which was 19% higher than that of existing sensors with a complete support film. The nonlinearity of the improved sensor was less than  ±0.35%, while that of the existing sensor was  ±5%. To eliminate measurement errors from humidity, the temperature control system integrated in the sensor chip controlled the temperature of the resonator up to 75 °C, with accuracy of  ±0.015 °C and power of 20 mW.

  13. Dynamic control of the asymmetric Fano resonance in side-coupled Fabry–Pérot and photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tong; Chau, Fook Siong; Zhou, Guangya; Deng, Jie

    2015-11-30

    Fano resonance is a prevailing interference phenomenon that stems from the intersection between discrete and continuum states in many fields. We theoretically and experimentally characterize the asymmetric Fano lineshape in side-coupled waveguide Fabry–Pérot and photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. The measured quality-factor of the Fano resonance before tuning is 28 100. A nanoelectromechanical systems bidirectional actuator is integrated seamlessly to control the shape of the Fano resonance through in-plane translations in two directions without sacrificing the quality-factor. The peak intensity level of the Fano resonance can be increased by 8.5 dB from 60 nW to 409 nW while the corresponding dip intensity is increased by 12.8 dB from 1 nW to 18 nW. The maximum recorded quality-factor throughout the tuning procedure is up to 32 500. Potential applications of the proposed structure include enhancing the sensitivity of sensing, reconfigurable nanophotonics devices, and on-chip intensity modulator.

  14. Resonant optical absorption and defect control in Ta3N5 photoanodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabirian, A.; van de Krol, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explore resonance-enhanced optical absorption in Ta3N5 photoanodes for water splitting. By using a reflecting Pt back-contact and appropriate Ta3N5 film thickness, the resonance frequency can be tuned to energies just above the bandgap, where the optical absorption is normally weak. The resonance results in a significant improvement in the photoanode's incident photon-to-current efficiency. The Ta3N5 films are made by high-temperature nitridation of Ta2O5. The nitridation time is found to be critical, as extended nitridation result in the formation of nitrogen vacancies through thermal reduction. These insights give important clues for the development of efficient (oxy)nitride-based photoelectrodes.

  15. Energy losses of nanomechanical resonators induced by atomic force microscopy-controlled mechanical impedance mismatching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Johannes; Isacsson, Andreas; Seitner, Maximilian J.; Kotthaus, Jörg P.; Weig, Eva M.

    2014-03-01

    Clamping losses are a widely discussed damping mechanism in nanoelectromechanical systems, limiting the performance of these devices. Here we present a method to investigate this dissipation channel. Using an atomic force microscope tip as a local perturbation in the clamping region of a nanoelectromechanical resonator, we increase the energy loss of its flexural modes by at least one order of magnitude. We explain this by a transfer of vibrational energy into the cantilever, which is theoretically described by a reduced mechanical impedance mismatch between the resonator and its environment. A theoretical model for this mismatch, in conjunction with finite element simulations of the evanescent strain field of the mechanical modes in the clamping region, allows us to quantitatively analyse data on position and force dependence of the tip-induced damping. Our experiments yield insights into the damping of nanoelectromechanical systems with the prospect of engineering the energy exchange in resonator networks.

  16. Energy losses of nanomechanical resonators induced by atomic force microscopy-controlled mechanical impedance mismatching

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Johannes; Isacsson, Andreas; Seitner, Maximilian J.; Kotthaus, Jörg P.; Weig, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Clamping losses are a widely discussed damping mechanism in nanoelectromechanical systems, limiting the performance of these devices. Here we present a method to investigate this dissipation channel. Using an atomic force microscope tip as a local perturbation in the clamping region of a nanoelectromechanical resonator, we increase the energy loss of its flexural modes by at least one order of magnitude. We explain this by a transfer of vibrational energy into the cantilever, which is theoretically described by a reduced mechanical impedance mismatch between the resonator and its environment. A theoretical model for this mismatch, in conjunction with finite element simulations of the evanescent strain field of the mechanical modes in the clamping region, allows us to quantitatively analyse data on position and force dependence of the tip-induced damping. Our experiments yield insights into the damping of nanoelectromechanical systems with the prospect of engineering the energy exchange in resonator networks. PMID:24594876

  17. Controlling magnetic Feshbach resonances in polar open-shell molecules with nonresonant light.

    PubMed

    Tomza, Michał; González-Férez, Rosario; Koch, Christiane P; Moszynski, Robert

    2014-03-21

    Magnetically tunable Feshbach resonances for polar paramagnetic ground-state diatomics are too narrow to allow for magnetoassociation starting from trapped, ultracold atoms. We show that nonresonant light can be used to engineer the Feshbach resonances in their position and width. For nonresonant field intensities of the order of 10(9) W/cm(2), we find the width to be increased by 3 orders of magnitude, reaching a few Gauss. This opens the way for producing ultracold molecules with sizable electric and magnetic dipole moments and thus for many-body quantum simulations with such particles.

  18. Electron spin resonance of ultraviolet radiation induced defects in ZnO thermal control coating pigment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T.

    1972-01-01

    Electron spin resonance measurements on variously treated zinc oxide powders reveal that the resonance signal at g = 1.956 is due to one electron trapped oxygen ion vacancy level, at a depth of (0.31 plus or minus 0.02) eV below the conduction band. The electrons at this level are delocalized. Schottky barrier influences nearly the entire bulk of the powder sample, and the bending of the bands caused by chemisorbed oxygen puts the vacancy level above the Fermi level almost through the entire bulk.

  19. Microchip-laser polarization control by destructive-interference resonant-grating mirror.

    PubMed

    Pigeon, F; Pommier, J C; Reynaud, S; Parriaux, O; Abdou Ahmed, M; Tonchev, S; Landru, N; Fève, J P

    2007-03-05

    An output coupler comprising a resonant grating submirror monolithically associated with a standard multilayer submirror polarizes the emission of a Nd:YAG microchip laser linearly over its full emission bandwidth by intra-mirror destructive interference for the undesired polarization. A polarization extinction ratio of more than 25 dB is obtained up to 6.1microJ pulse energy. This passively Q-switched laser performance is almost identical to that of a gratingless non-polarized microchip laser. The design and fabrication of the resonant grating mirror are described.

  20. Electron spin resonance of ultraviolet radiation induced defects in ZnO thermal control coating pigment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T.

    1972-01-01

    Electron spin resonance measurements on variously treated zinc oxide powders reveal that the resonance signal at g = 1.956 is due to one electron trapped oxygen ion vacancy level, at a depth of (0.31 plus or minus 0.02) eV below the conduction band. The electrons at this level are delocalized. Schottky barrier influences nearly the entire bulk of the powder sample, and the bending of the bands caused by chemisorbed oxygen puts the vacancy level above the Fermi level almost through the entire bulk.

  1. Detecting Intracranial Vessel Wall Lesions With 7T-Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Patients With Posterior Circulation Ischemia Versus Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Harteveld, Anita A; van der Kolk, Anja G; van der Worp, H Bart; Dieleman, Nikki; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Luijten, Peter R; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2017-09-01

    Vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging sequences have been developed to directly visualize the intracranial vessel wall, enabling detection of vessel wall changes, including those that have not yet caused luminal narrowing. In this study, vessel wall lesion burden was assessed in patients with recent posterior circulation ischemia using 7T-magnetic resonance imaging and compared with matched healthy controls. Fifty subjects (25 patients and 25 matched healthy controls) underwent 7T-magnetic resonance imaging with an intracranial vessel wall sequence before and after contrast administration. Two raters scored the presence and contrast enhancement of arterial wall lesions in individual segments of the circle of Willis and its primary branches. Total burden and distribution of vessel wall lesions and lesion characteristics (configuration, thickening pattern, and contrast enhancement) were compared both between and within both groups. Overall, vessel wall lesion burden and distribution were comparable between patients and controls. Regarding individual arterial segments, only vessel wall lesions in the posterior cerebral artery were more frequently observed in patients (18.0%) than in controls (5.4%; P=0.003). Many of these lesions showed enhancement, both in patients (48.9%) and in controls (43.5%; P=0.41). In patients, the proportion of enhancing lesions was higher in the posterior circulation (53.3%) than in the anterior circulation (20.6%; P=0.008). Although overall intracranial vessel wall lesion burden and contrast enhancement were comparable between patients with recent posterior circulation ischemia and healthy controls, this study also revealed significant differences between the 2 groups, suggesting an association between posterior circulation lesion burden/enhancement and ischemic events. URL: http://www.trialregister.nl. Unique identifier: NTR5688. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Experimental demonstration of two methods for controlling the group delay in a system with photonic-crystal resonators coupled to a waveguide.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yijie; Sandhu, Sunil; Pan, Jun; Stuhrmann, Norbert; Povinelli, Michelle L; Kahn, Joseph M; Harris, James S; Fejer, Martin M; Fan, Shanhui

    2011-04-15

    We measure the group delay in an on-chip photonic-crystal device with two resonators side coupled to a waveguide. We demonstrate that such a group delay can be controlled by tuning either the propagation phase of the waveguide or the frequency of the resonators.

  3. Preliminary design of a SIMO fuzzy controller for steering microparticles inside blood vessels by using a magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ke; Martel, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a Single-Input-Multiple-Output (SIMO) fuzzy controller is designed to drive an upgraded clinical real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system to provide steering forces for an aggregation of ferromagnetic microparticles in the human cardiovascular system according to a pre-set pathway. This kind of endovascular navigation is considered as an important procedure of the catheter-based method for medical treatments against diseases such as some particular types of cancers. The validity of the fuzzy controller has been tested by preliminary simulation results.

  4. Macroscopic tuning of nanomechanics: substrate bending for reversible control of frequency and quality factor of nanostring resonators.

    PubMed

    Verbridge, Scott S; Shapiro, Daniel Finkelstein; Craighead, Harold G; Parpia, Jeevak M

    2007-06-01

    We have employed a chip-bending method to exert continuous and reversible control over the tensile stress in doubly clamped nanomechanical beam resonators. Tensile stress is shown to increase the quality factor of both silicon nitride and single-crystal silicon resonators, implying that added tension can be used as a general, material-independent route to increased quality factor. With this direct stretching technique, we demonstrate beam resonators with unprecedented tunability of both frequency and quality factor. Devices can be tuned back and forth between a high and low stress state, with frequency tunability as large as several hundred percent demonstrated. Over this wide range of frequency, quality factor is also tuned by as much as several hundred percent, providing insights into the loss mechanisms in these materials and this class of nanoresonator. Devices with frequencies in the 1-100 MHz range are studied, with quality factor as high as 390,000 achieved at room temperature, for a silicon nitride device with cross-sectional dimensions below 1 microm, operating in a high stress state. This direct stretching technique may prove useful for the identification of loss mechanisms that contribute to the energy balance in nanomechanical resonators, allowing for the development of new designs that would display higher quality factors. Such devices would have the ability to resolve smaller addendum masses and thus allow more sensitive detection and offer the potential for providing access to previously inaccessible dissipation regimes at low temperatures. This technique provides the ability to dramatically tune both frequency and quality factor, enabling future mechanical resonators to be used as variable frequency references as well as variable band-pass filters in signal-processing applications.

  5. Time-delayed feedback control of coherence resonance near subcritical Hopf bifurcation: Theory versus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Vladimir; Feoktistov, Alexey; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Schöll, Eckehard Zakharova, Anna

    2015-03-15

    Using the model of a generalized Van der Pol oscillator in the regime of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, we investigate the influence of time delay on noise-induced oscillations. It is shown that for appropriate choices of time delay, either suppression or enhancement of coherence resonance can be achieved. Analytical calculations are combined with numerical simulations and experiments on an electronic circuit.

  6. Quasi-phase-matched second harmonic generation in silicon nitride ring resonators controlled by static electric field.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rafael E P; de Matos, Christiano J S

    2013-12-30

    Actively-controlled second harmonic generation in a silicon nitride ring resonator is proposed and simulated. The ring was designed to resonate at both pump and second harmonic wavelengths and quasi-phase-matched frequency conversion is induced by a periodic static electric field generated by voltage applied to electrodes arranged along the ring. Nonlinear propagation simulations were undertaken and an efficiency of -21.67 dB was calculated for 60 mW of pump power at 1550 nm and for a 30V applied voltage, which compares favorably with demonstrated all-optical second harmonic generation in integrated microresonators. Transient effects were also evaluated. The proposed design can be exploited for the construction of electro-optical devices based on nonlinear effects in CMOS compatible circuits.

  7. Chaos control of the micro-electro-mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shaohua; Sun, Quanping; Cheng, Wei

    2016-04-01

    This paper addresses chaos control of the micro-electro- mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer. To reveal the mechanism of the micro- electro-mechanical resonator, the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are given to research the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior, and Homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos which relate closely with the appearance of chaos are presented based on the potential function. To eliminate the effect of chaos, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme with extended state observer is designed to convert random motion into regular motion without precise system model parameters and measured variables. Putting tracking differentiator into chaos controller solves the `explosion of complexity' of backstepping and poor precision of the first-order filters. Meanwhile, to obtain high performance, a neural network with adaptive law is employed to approximate unknown nonlinear function in the process of controller design. The boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is proved in theoretical analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are executed and extensive results illustrate effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  8. Chaos control of the micro-electro-mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shaohua; Sun, Quanping; Cheng, Wei

    2016-04-15

    This paper addresses chaos control of the micro-electro- mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer. To reveal the mechanism of the micro- electro-mechanical resonator, the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are given to research the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior, and Homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos which relate closely with the appearance of chaos are presented based on the potential function. To eliminate the effect of chaos, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme with extended state observer is designed to convert random motion into regular motion without precise system model parameters and measured variables. Putting tracking differentiator into chaos controller solves the ‘explosion of complexity’ of backstepping and poor precision of the first-order filters. Meanwhile, to obtain high performance, a neural network with adaptive law is employed to approximate unknown nonlinear function in the process of controller design. The boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is proved in theoretical analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are executed and extensive results illustrate effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  9. Controllable optical response by modifying the gain and loss of a mechanical resonator and cavity mode in an optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Long; Wu, Rebing; Zhang, Jing; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco; Liu, Yu-xi

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study a strongly driven optomechanical system which consists of a passive optical cavity and an active mechanical resonator. When the optomechanical coupling strength is varied, phase transitions, which are similar to those observed in PT -symmetric systems, are observed. We show that the optical transmission can be controlled by changing the gain of the mechanical resonator and loss of the optical cavity mode. Especially, we find that (i) for balanced gain and loss, optical amplification and absorption can be tuned by changing the optomechanical coupling strength through a control field; (ii) for unbalanced gain and loss, even with a tiny mechanical gain, both optomechanically induced transparency and anomalous dispersion can be observed around a critical point, which exhibits an ultralong group delay. The time delay τ can be optimized by regulating the optomechanical coupling strength through the control field, and it can be improved up to several orders of magnitude (τ ˜2 ms ) compared to that of conventional optomechanical systems (τ ˜1 μ s ). The presence of mechanical gain makes the group delay more robust to environmental perturbations. Our proposal provides a powerful platform to control light transport using a PT -symmetric-like optomechanical system.

  10. Reconfigurable silicon thermo-optical ring resonator switch based on Vernier effect control.

    PubMed

    Fegadolli, William S; Vargas, German; Wang, Xuan; Valini, Felipe; Barea, Luis A M; Oliveira, José E B; Frateschi, Newton; Scherer, Axel; Almeida, Vilson R; Panepucci, Roberto R

    2012-06-18

    A proof-of-concept for a new and entirely CMOS compatible thermo-optic reconfigurable switch based on a coupled ring resonator structure is experimentally demonstrated in this paper. Preliminary results show that a single optical device is capable of combining several functionalities, such as tunable filtering, non-blocking switching and reconfigurability, in a single device with compact footprint (~50 μm x 30 μm).

  11. Gold Nanoparticles with Externally Controlled, Reversible Shifts of Local Surface Plasmon Resonance Bands

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Mustafa S.; Jensen, Gary C.; Penaloza, David P.; Seery, Thomas A. P.; Pendergraph, Samuel A.; Rusling, James F.; Sotzing, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    We have achieved reversible tunability of local surface plasmon resonance in conjugated polymer functionalized gold nanoparticles. This property was facilitated by the preparation of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) containing polynorbornene brushes on gold nanoparticles via surface-initiated ring-opening metathesis polymerization. Reversible tuning of the surface plasmon band was achieved by electrochemically switching the EDOT polymer between its reduced and oxidized states. PMID:19839619

  12. Controlling charge transport mechanisms in molecular junctions: Distilling thermally induced hopping from coherent-resonant conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyehwang; Segal, Dvira

    2017-04-01

    The electrical conductance of molecular junctions may depend strongly on the temperature and weakly on molecular length, under two distinct mechanisms: phase-coherent resonant conduction, with charges proceeding via delocalized molecular orbitals, and incoherent thermally assisted multi-step hopping. While in the case of coherent conduction, the temperature dependence arises from the broadening of the Fermi distribution in the metal electrodes, in the latter case it corresponds to electron-vibration interaction effects on the junction. With the objective to distill the thermally activated hopping component, thus exposing intrinsic electron-vibration interaction phenomena on the junction, we suggest the design of molecular junctions with "spacers," extended anchoring groups that act to filter out phase-coherent resonant electrons. Specifically, we study the electrical conductance of fixed-gap and variable-gap junctions that include a tunneling block, with spacers at the boundaries. Using numerical simulations and analytical considerations, we demonstrate that in our design, resonant conduction is suppressed. As a result, the electrical conductance is dominated by two (rather than three) mechanisms: superexchange (deep tunneling) and multi-step thermally induced hopping. We further exemplify our analysis on DNA junctions with an A:T block serving as a tunneling barrier. Here, we show that the electrical conductance is insensitive to the number of G:C base-pairs at the boundaries. This indicates that the tunneling-to-hopping crossover revealed in such sequences truly corresponds to the properties of the A:T barrier.

  13. Optical whispering-gallery mode resonators for applications in optical communication and frequency control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutter, Karen Esther

    High quality factor (Q) optical whispering gallery mode resonators are a key component in many on-chip optical systems, such as delay lines, modulators, and add-drop filters. They are also a convenient, compact structure for studying optomechanical interactions on-chip. In all these applications, optical Q is an important factor for high performance. For optomechanical reference oscillators in particular, high mechanical Q is also necessary. Previously, optical microresonators have been made in a wide variety of materials, but it has proven challenging to demonstrate high optical Q and high mechanical Q in a single, integrated device. This work demonstrates a new technique for achieving high optical Q on chip, a fully-integrated tunable filter with ultra-narrow minimum bandwidth, and the effect of material choice and device design on optical Q, mechanical Q and phase noise in microring optomechanical oscillators. To achieve a high optical Q, phosphosilicate glass (PSG) is studied as a resonator material. The low melting point of PSG enables wafer-scale reflow, which reduces sidewall roughness without significantly changing lithographically-defined dimensions. With this process, optical Qs up to 1.5 x 10. 7 are achieved, overten times higher than typical silicon optical resonators. These high-Q PSG resonators are then integrated with MEMS-actuated waveguides in a tunable-bandwidth filter. Due to the high Q of the PSG resonator, this device has a best-to-date minimum bandwidth of 0.8 GHz, with a tuning range of 0.8 to 8.5GHz. Finally, microring optomechanical oscillators (OMOs) in PSG, stoichiometric silicon nitride, and silicon are fabricated, and their performance is compared after characterization via a tapered optical fiber in vacuum. The silicon nitride device has the best performance, with a mechanical Q of more than 1 x 10. 4and record-breaking OMO phase noise of -102 dBc/Hz at a 1 kHz offset from a 72 MHz carrier.

  14. Controlling a resonant transmission across the δ‧-potential: the inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotaryuk, A. V.; Zolotaryuk, Y.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the non-zero transmission of a quantum particle through the one-dimensional singular potential given in the form of the derivative of Dirac’s delta function, λδ‧(x), with \\lambda \\in { {R}}, being a potential strength constant, has been discussed by several authors. The transmission occurs at certain discrete values of λ forming a resonance set {λn}∞n = 1. For λ∉{λn}∞n = 1 this potential has been shown to be a perfectly reflecting wall. However, this resonant transmission takes place only in the case when the regularization of the distribution δ‧(x) is constructed in a specific way. Otherwise, the δ‧-potential is fully non-transparent. Moreover, when the transmission is non-zero, the structure of a resonant set depends on a regularizing sequence Δ‧ɛ(x) that tends to δ‧(x) in the sense of distributions as ɛ → 0. Therefore, from a practical point of view, it would be interesting to have an inverse solution, i.e. for a given \\bar{\\lambda } \\in { {R}}, to construct such a regularizing sequence Δ‧ɛ(x) that the δ‧-potential at this value is transparent. If such a procedure is possible, then this value \\bar{\\lambda } has to belong to a corresponding resonance set. This paper is devoted to solving this problem and, as a result, the family of regularizing sequences is constructed by tuning adjustable parameters in the equations that provide a resonance transmission across the δ‧-potential. This construction can be realized if each regularizing sequence Δ‧ɛ(x) depends on \\lambda \\in { {R}} and this is a key point of our approach. Next, we can solve the inverse problem if the regularization is constructed from rectangles. Since in some cases the renormalization procedure Δ‧ɛ(x) → δ‧(x) leads to the existence of an effective δ-interaction, it is reasonable from the beginning to consider the linear combination V(x) = ηδ(x) + λδ‧(x) with (\\eta , \\lambda ) \\in { {R}}^2.

  15. Novel aspect in grain size control of nanocrystalline diamond film for thin film waveguide mode resonance sensor application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Cho, Jung-Min; Lee, Taek-Sung; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Wook-Seong

    2013-11-27

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin film growth was systematically investigated for application for the thin film waveguide mode resonance sensor. The NCD thin film was grown on the Si wafer or on the SiO2-coated sapphire substrate using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). The structural/optical properties of the samples were characterized by the high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy. The waveguide modes of the NCD layer were studied by prism coupler technique using laser (wavelength: 632.8 nm) with varying incident angle. A novel aspect was disclosed in the grain size dependence on the growth temperature at the relatively low methane concentration in the precursor gas, which was important for optical property: the grain size increased with decreasing growth temperature, which was contrary to the conventional knowledge prevailing in the microcrystalline diamond (MCD) domain. We have provided discussions to reconcile such observation. An optical waveguide mode resonance was demonstrated in the visible region using the microstructure-controlled transparent NCD thin film waveguide, which provided a strong potential for the waveguide mode resonance sensor applications.

  16. Edge localized mode control using n  =  1 resonant magnetic perturbation in the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Jia, M.; Zang, Q.; Wang, L.; Liang, Y.; Liu, Y. Q.; Yang, X.; Guo, W.; Gu, S.; Li, Y.; Lyu, B.; Zhao, H.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, T.; Li, G.; Qian, J.; Xu, L.; Chu, N.; Wang, H. H.; Shi, T.; He, K.; Chen, D.; Shen, B.; Gong, X.; Ji, X.; Wang, S.; Qi, M.; Yuan, Q.; Sheng, Z.; Gao, G.; Song, Y.; Fu, P.; Wan, B.; Contributors, EAST

    2017-03-01

    A set of in-vessel resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) coil has been recently installed in EAST. It can generate a range of spectrum, and there is a relatively large window for edge localized mode (ELM) control according to the vacuum field modeling of the edge magnetic island overlapping area. Observation of mitigation and suppression of ELM in slow rotating plasmas during the application of an n  =  1 RMP is presented in this paper. Strong ELM mitigation effect is observed in neutral beam injection heating plasmas. The ELM frequency increases by a factor of 5, and the crash amplitude and the particle flux are effectively reduced by a similar factor. Clear density pump-out and magnetic braking effects are observed during the application of RMP. Footprint splitting is observed during ELM mitigation and agrees well with vacuum field modelling. Strong ELM mitigation happens after a second sudden drop of plasma density, which indicates the possible effect due to field penetration of the resonant harmonics near the pedestal top, where the electron perpendicular rotation becomes flat and close to zero after the application of RMP. ELM suppression is achieved in a resonant window during the scan of the n  =  1 RMP spectrum in radio-frequency (RF) dominant heating plasmas. The best spectrum for ELM suppression is consistent with the resonant peak of RMP by taking into account of linear magnetohydrodynamics plasma response. There is no mode locking during the application of n  =  1 RMP in ELMy H-mode plasmas, although the maximal coil current is applied.

  17. Diagnosis of Transverse Sinus Hypoplasia in Magnetic Resonance Venography: New Insights Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Combined Dataset of Venous Outflow Impairment Case-Control Studies: Post Hoc Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Han, Ke; Chao, A-Ching; Chang, Feng-Chi; Hsu, Hung-Yi; Chung, Chih-Ping; Sheng, Wen-Yung; Chan, Lung; Wu, Jiang; Hu, Han-Hwa

    2016-03-01

    In previous studies of transverse sinus (TS) hypoplasia, discrepancies between TS diameter measured by magnetic resonance venography (MRV) and contrast T1-weighted magnetic resonance (contrast T1) were observed. To investigate these discrepancies, and considering that TS hypoplasia is associated with neurological disorders, we performed a post hoc analysis of prospectively collected data from 3 case-control studies on transient global amnesia (TGA), transient monocular blindness (TMB), and panic disorders while retaining the original inclusion and exclusion criteria. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of 131 subjects was reviewed to evaluate TS diameter and the location and degree of venous flow stenosis and obstruction.MRV without contrast revealed that TS hypoplasia was observed in 69 subjects, whom we classified into 2 subgroups according to the concordance with contrast T1 observations: concordance indicated anatomically small TS (30 subjects), and discrepancy indicated that the MRV diagnosis is in fact flow-related and that TS is not anatomically small (39 subjects). The latter subgroup was associated with at least 1 site of venous compression/stenosis in the internal jugular vein (IJV) or the left brachiocephalic vein (BCV) (P < 0.001), which was significantly larger in patients than controls. Compensatory dilatation of contralateral TS diameter was only observed with MRV, not with contrast T1 imaging.The clinical implication of these results is that using MRV only, IJV/BCV compression/stenosis may be misdiagnosed as TS hypoplasia. And contralateral TS have no compensatory dilatation in its diameter in contrast T1 imaging, just compensatory increased flow volume.

  18. A line-of-sight electron cyclotron emission receiver for electron cyclotron resonance heating feedback control of tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Oosterbeek, J. W.; Buerger, A.; Westerhof, E.; Baar, M. R. de; Berg, M. A. van den; Bongers, W. A.; Graswinckel, M. F.; Hennen, B. A.; Kruijt, O. G.; Thoen, J.; Heidinger, R.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Nielsen, S. K.

    2008-09-15

    An electron cyclotron emission (ECE) receiver inside the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) transmission line has been brought into operation. The ECE is extracted by placing a quartz plate acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer under an angle inside the electron cyclotron wave (ECW) beam. ECE measurements are obtained during high power ECRH operation. This demonstrates the successful operation of the diagnostic and, in particular, a sufficient suppression of the gyrotron component preventing it from interfering with ECE measurements. When integrated into a feedback system for the control of plasma instabilities this line-of-sight ECE diagnostic removes the need to localize the instabilities in absolute coordinates.

  19. Charge-controlled assembling of bacteriorhodopsin and semiconductor quantum dots for fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based nanophotonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Sukhanova, Alyona; Artemyev, Mikhail; Oleinikov, Vladimir A.; Troyon, Michel; Nabiev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and photochromic protein bacteriorhodopsin within its natural purple membrane (PM) is explored to monitor their assembling. It is shown that the efficiency of FRET may be controlled by variation of the surface charge and thickness of QD organic coating. Atomic force microscopy imaging revealed correlation between the surface charge of QDs and degree of their ordering on the surface of PM. The most FRET-efficient QD-PM complexes have the highest level of QDs ordering, and their assembling design may be further optimized to engineer hybrid materials with advanced biophotonic and photovoltaic properties.

  20. Control of resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization photoelectron spectroscopy by phase-shaped femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shian; Lu Chenhui; Jia Tianqing; Sun Zhenrong; Qiu Jianrong

    2012-11-07

    In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate that the (2+1+1) resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization photoelectron spectroscopy in sodium atom can be effectively controlled by shaping femtosecond laser pulse with a {pi} phase step modulation in weak laser field, involving its total photoelectron energy, maximal photoelectron intensity, and spectroscopic bandwidth. Our results show that the total photoelectron energy can be suppressed but not enhanced, the maximal photoelectron intensity can be enhanced and also suppressed, and the photoelectron spectroscopy can be tremendously narrowed. These theoretical results can provide a feasible scheme to achieve the high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy and study the excited state structure in atomic and molecular systems.

  1. Control of multilevel voltage states in a hysteretic superconducting-quantum-interference-device ring-resonator system.

    PubMed

    Stiffell, P; Everitt, M J; Clark, T D; Ralph, J F

    2005-11-01

    In this paper we study numerical solutions to the quasiclassical equations of motion for a superconducting-quantum-interference device ring-radio frequency (rf) resonator system in the regime where the ring is highly hysteretic. In line with experiment, we show that for a suitable choice of ring circuit parameters the solutions to these equations of motion comprise sets of levels in the rf voltage-current dynamics of the coupled system. We further demonstrate that transitions, both up and down, between these levels can be controlled by voltage pulses applied to the system, thus opening up the possibility of high order (e.g., 10 state), multilevel logic and memory.

  2. Multi-resonant piezoelectric shunting induced by digital controllers for subwavelength elastic wave attenuation in smart metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Cheng, Jianqing; Chen, Jingwei; He, Yunze

    2017-02-01

    Instead of analog electronic circuits and components, digital controllers that are capable of active multi-resonant piezoelectric shunting are applied to elastic metamaterials integrated with piezoelectric patches. Thanks to recently introduced digital control techniques, shunting strategies are possible now with transfer functions that can hardly be realized with analog circuits. As an example, the ‘pole-zero’ method is developed to design single- or multi-resonant bandgaps by adjusting poles and zeros in the transfer function of piezoelectric shunting directly. Large simultaneous attenuations in up to three frequency bands at deep subwavelength scale (with normalized frequency as low as 0.077) are achieved. The underlying physical mechanism is attributable to the negative group velocity of the flexural wave within bandgaps. As digital controllers can be readily adapted via wireless broadcasting, the bandgaps can be tuned easily unlike the electric components in analog shunting circuits, which must be tuned one by one manually. The theoretical results are verified experimentally with the measured vibration transmission properties, where large insulations of up to 20 dB in low-frequency ranges are observed.

  3. One-way light transport controlled by synthetic magnetic fluxes and {\\mathscr{P}}{\\mathscr{T}}-symmetric resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Controlled directional light propagation using optical nonlinearity has previously been proposed. Here, we propose a one-way optical device with linear elements controlled by synthetic magnetic fluxes. The device consists of two parity–time symmetric side-coupled resonators with balanced gain and loss. The gain and loss break the reflection symmetry and the magnetic fluxes break the transmission symmetry. Through tuning the magnetic fluxes, reflectionless full transmission in one direction and transmissionless full reflection in the opposite direction can be achieved. The device acts as a light-checking valve, preventing wave propagation in one direction. The proposed one-way transporter uses the nonreciprocity induced by non-Hermiticity and magnetic fluxes without applying nonlinearity. We anticipate that our findings will be useful for optical control and manipulation.

  4. Exchange coupling controlled ferrite with dual magnetic resonance and broad frequency bandwidth in microwave absorption

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jingguo; Liu, Chuyang; Ma, Ning; Han, Gaorong; Weng, Wenjian; Du, Piyi

    2013-01-01

    Ti-doped barium ferrite powders BaFe12−xTixO19 (x = 0, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7 and 0.8) were synthesized by the sol–gel method. The phase structure and morphology were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The powders were also studied for their magnetic properties and microwave absorption. Results show that the Ti-doped barium ferrites (BFTO) exist in single phase and exhibit hexagonal plate-like structure. The anisotropy field Ha of the BFTO decreases almost linearly with the increase in Ti concentration, which leads to a shift of the natural resonance peak toward low frequency. Two natural resonance peaks appear, which can be assigned to the double values of the Landé factor g that are found to be ∼2.0 and ∼2.3 in the system and can be essentially attributed to the existence of Fe3+ ions and the exchange coupling effect between Fe3+ and Fe2+ ions, respectively. Such a dual resonance effect contributes a broad magnetic loss peak and thus a high attenuation constant, and leads to a dual reflection loss (RL) peak over the frequency range between 26.5 and 40 GHz. The high attenuation constants are between 350 and 500 at peak position. The optimal RL reaches around −45 dB and the practicable frequency bandwidth is beyond 11 GHz. This suggests that the BFTO powders could be used as microwave absorbing materials with extraordinary properties. PMID:27877595

  5. Exchange coupling controlled ferrite with dual magnetic resonance and broad frequency bandwidth in microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jingguo; Liu, Chuyang; Ma, Ning; Han, Gaorong; Weng, Wenjian; Du, Piyi

    2013-08-01

    Ti-doped barium ferrite powders BaFe12-x Ti x O19 (x = 0, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7 and 0.8) were synthesized by the sol-gel method. The phase structure and morphology were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The powders were also studied for their magnetic properties and microwave absorption. Results show that the Ti-doped barium ferrites (BFTO) exist in single phase and exhibit hexagonal plate-like structure. The anisotropy field Ha of the BFTO decreases almost linearly with the increase in Ti concentration, which leads to a shift of the natural resonance peak toward low frequency. Two natural resonance peaks appear, which can be assigned to the double values of the Landé factor g that are found to be ∼2.0 and ∼2.3 in the system and can be essentially attributed to the existence of Fe(3+) ions and the exchange coupling effect between Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) ions, respectively. Such a dual resonance effect contributes a broad magnetic loss peak and thus a high attenuation constant, and leads to a dual reflection loss (RL) peak over the frequency range between 26.5 and 40 GHz. The high attenuation constants are between 350 and 500 at peak position. The optimal RL reaches around -45 dB and the practicable frequency bandwidth is beyond 11 GHz. This suggests that the BFTO powders could be used as microwave absorbing materials with extraordinary properties.

  6. Friction Free Force-Reflecting Type Bilateral Control Based on Twin Drive System Considering 2nd Resonant Frequency and Unbalance Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohba, Yuzuru; Ohishi, Kiyoshi; Katsura, Seiichiro

    This paper proposes a new friction free bilateral system based on twin drive control system considering it's resonant frequency. The twin drive system consists of two motors that are coupled by the differential gear. The output torque becomes a differential torque of both motors. The nonlinear friction torque of the twin drive system is easily compensated. However, this system has the resonant frequencies and the anti-resonant frequencies which are caused by the torsional vibration. This paper proposes a new three-inertial-model of twin drive system, and identifies the resonant frequencies and it's friction torque. The proposed controller can suppress the torsional vibration without high order control design. Therefore, the operationality of bilateral teleoperation is improved by the proposed system.

  7. Electronic-state-controlled reset operation in quantum dot resonant-tunneling single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Q. C.; Zhu, Z. Q.; An, Z. H.; Song, J. D.; Choi, W. J.

    2014-02-03

    The authors present a systematic study of an introduced reset operation on quantum dot (QD) single photon detectors operating at 77 K. The detectors are based on an AlAs/GaAs/AlAs double-barrier resonant tunneling diode with an adjacent layer of self-assembled InAs QDs. Sensitive single-photon detection in high (dI)/(dV) region with suppressed current fluctuations is achieved. The dynamic detection range is extended up to at least 10{sup 4} photons/s for sensitive imaging applications by keeping the device far from saturation by employing an appropriate reset frequency.

  8. Construction of 'resonant' magneto-optical lattices with controlled momentum compaction factor

    SciTech Connect

    Senichev, Yu. V. Chechenin, A. N.

    2007-12-15

    On the basis of the theory of 'resonant' magneto-optical lattices for synchrotrons with complex transition energy developed in [1], methods for construction of such lattices with application to various accelerators are proposed. Apart from allowing elimination of transition energy crossing by accelerated particles, these lattices should meet a number of important requirements. In particular, they must have dispersion-free straight sections intended for accommodation of RF cavities, Siberian snakes and detectors, and a large enough dynamic aperture for minimizing the effect of magnetic optics nonlinearity on the beam parameters after chromaticity correction by sextupoles.

  9. Enhancing photoassociation rates by nonresonant-light control of shape resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Férez, Rosario; Koch, Christiane P.

    2012-12-01

    Photoassociation, assembling molecules from atoms using laser light, is limited by the low density of atom pairs at sufficiently short interatomic separations. Here we show that nonresonant light with intensities of the order of 1010W/cm2 modifies the thermal cloud of atoms, enhancing the Boltzmann weight of shape resonances and pushing scattering states below the dissociation limit. This leads to an enhancement of photoassociation rates by several orders of magnitude and opens the way to significantly larger numbers of ground-state molecules in a thermal ensemble than achieved so far.

  10. Automatic Coupling Control of a Loop-Gap Resonator by a Variable Capacitor Attached Coupling Coil for EPR Measurements at 650 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Hidekastu; Sato, Toshiyuki; Ogata, Tateaki; Ohya, Hiroaki; Kamada, Hitoshi

    2001-03-01

    A coupling coil was fabricated that can electrically change the magnetic coupling with a loop-gap resonator (LGR) for EPR studies at 650 MHz. It is composed of a single-turn coil and a coupling control circuit that includes a varactor diode. The coarse control of the magnetic coupling is made by mechanically changing the distance between the LGR and single-turn coil. The fine control is obtained by changing the capacitance of the varactor diode that is connected in parallel with the single-turn coil. This capacitance is controlled by changing reverse voltage from a variable bias voltage source. Because this can be located far from the resonator, remote control of coupling of the LGR is possible. Automatic coupling control (ACC) was accomplished by negative feedback of the DC component in the radiowaves reflected from the LGR to the coupling control circuit when the LGR was irradiated precisely at its resonant frequency. To accomplish this, automatic frequency control (AFC) is used. In EPR measurements of a phantom that included a physiological saline solution containing a nitroxide radical, it was confirmed that the drifts in the coupling and resonant frequency caused by the perturbation of the resonant nature could be sufficiently compensated by the ACC and AFC systems. In the in vivo EPR studies, it was found that the deviation of coupling at the chest of a mouse is greater than that at the head of a rat, but the ACC system could compensate for the respiratory motions of a living animal.

  11. Effectiveness of T-shaped acoustic resonators in low-frequency sound transmission control of a finite double-panel partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deyu; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Cheng, Li; Yu, Ganghua

    2010-10-01

    Double-panel partitions are widely used for sound insulation purposes. Their insulation efficiency is, however, deteriorated at low frequencies due to the structural and acoustic resonances. To tackle this problem, this paper proposes the use of long T-shaped acoustic resonators in a double-panel partition embedded along the edges. In order to facilitate the design and assess the performance of the structure, a general vibro-acoustic model, characterizing the interaction between the panels, air cavity, and integrated acoustic resonators, is developed. The effectiveness of the technique as well as the optimal locations of the acoustic resonators is examined at various frequencies where the system exhibits different coupling characteristics. The measured optimal locations are also compared with the predicted ones to verify the developed theory. Finally, the performance of the acoustic resonators in broadband sound transmission control is demonstrated.

  12. Flow Control Behind Bluff Bodies through the Interaction of an Attached Resonant Flexible Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Samuel; Smith, John; Hibbins, Alastair; Sambles, Roy; Horsley, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Steady uniform flow, incident upon a bluff body can separate downstream causing a wake to form, this leads to the periodic shedding of vortices behind the body. By adding a thin flexible tail to the rear of the body one may reduce the drag as well as change the vortex shedding frequency (VSF). In this work we model the flow past a cylinder, in the Laminar flow regime, with an attached tail, varying the length and stiffness of the tail to couple the resonant frequencies of the tail to the natural VSF of the structure. We use this to explore how the drag and VSF of the system change as we couple to different vibrational modes of the tail. On increasing tail length, or decreasing tail stiffness progressively on passing where the natural VSF of the cylinder and tail resonances couple we see sharp increases in both the drag and VSF, which both gradually decrease again. The effect of changing the shape of the end of the tail is also investigated by exploring tails with square, rounded and triangular trailing edges. Experiments are being conducted in water at a higher Reynolds number using a tail made out of Neoprene to confirm these modelling results. DSTL.

  13. Polarization-Controlled Broad Color Palette Based on an Ultrathin One-Dimensional Resonant Grating Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koirala, Ishwor; Shrestha, Vivek Raj; Park, Chul-Soon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Choi, Duk-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Highly efficient polarization-tuned structural color filters, which are based on a one- dimensional resonant aluminum grating that is integrated with a silicon nitride waveguide, are proposed and demonstrated to feature a broad color palette. For such a metallic grating structure, transmissive color filtering is only feasible for the incident transverse-magnetic (TM) polarization due to its high reflection regarding the transverse-electric (TE) case; however, polarization-tuned customized colors can be efficiently achieved by optimizing the structural parameters like the duty ratio of the metallic grating. For the fabricated color filters, the transmission peaks, which are imputed to the resonance between the incident light and the guided modes that are supported by the dielectric waveguide, provided efficiencies as high as 90% and 70% for the TM and TE polarizations, respectively, as intended. Through the tailoring of the polarization, a group of filters with different grating periods were successfully exploited to produce a broad color palette spanning the entire visible band. Lastly, a nanoscale alphabetic pattern featuring a flexible combination of colorations was practically constructed via an arrangement of horizontal and vertical gratings.

  14. Polarization-Controlled Broad Color Palette Based on an Ultrathin One-Dimensional Resonant Grating Structure

    PubMed Central

    Koirala, Ishwor; Shrestha, Vivek Raj; Park, Chul-Soon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Choi, Duk-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Highly efficient polarization-tuned structural color filters, which are based on a one- dimensional resonant aluminum grating that is integrated with a silicon nitride waveguide, are proposed and demonstrated to feature a broad color palette. For such a metallic grating structure, transmissive color filtering is only feasible for the incident transverse-magnetic (TM) polarization due to its high reflection regarding the transverse-electric (TE) case; however, polarization-tuned customized colors can be efficiently achieved by optimizing the structural parameters like the duty ratio of the metallic grating. For the fabricated color filters, the transmission peaks, which are imputed to the resonance between the incident light and the guided modes that are supported by the dielectric waveguide, provided efficiencies as high as 90% and 70% for the TM and TE polarizations, respectively, as intended. Through the tailoring of the polarization, a group of filters with different grating periods were successfully exploited to produce a broad color palette spanning the entire visible band. Lastly, a nanoscale alphabetic pattern featuring a flexible combination of colorations was practically constructed via an arrangement of horizontal and vertical gratings. PMID:28067264

  15. Closed-loop control of flow-induced sound in a flow duct with downstream resonant cavities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Z B; Halim, D; Cheng, L

    2013-03-01

    A closed-loop-controlled surface perturbation technique was developed for controlling the flow-induced sound in a flow duct and acoustic resonance inside downstream cavities. The surface perturbation was created by piezo-ceramic THUNDER (THin layer composite UNimorph Driver and sEnsoR) actuators embedded underneath the surface of a test model with a semi-circular leading edge. A modified closed-loop control scheme based on the down-sampling theory was proposed and implemented due to the practical vibration characteristic limitation of THUNDER actuators. The optimally tuned control achieved a sound pressure reduction of 17.5 dB in the duct and 22.6 dB inside the cavity at the vortex shedding frequency, respectively. Changes brought up by the control in both flow and acoustic fields were analyzed in terms of the spectrum phase shift of the flow field over the upper surface of the test model, and a shift in the vortex shedding frequency. The physical mechanism behind the control was investigated in the view of developing an optimal control strategy.

  16. Control of sound transmission into payload fairings using distributed vibration absorbers and Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteve, Simon J.

    A new passive treatment to reduce sound transmission into payload fairing at low frequency is investigated. This new solution is composed of optimally damped vibration absorbers (DVA) and optimally damped Helmholtz resonators (HR). A fully coupled structural-acoustic model of a composite cylinder excited by an external plane wave is developed as a first approximation of the system. A modal expansion method is used to describe the behavior of the cylindrical shell and the acoustic cavity; the noise reduction devices are modeled as surface impedances. All the elements are then fully coupled using an impedance matching method. This model is then refined using the digitized mode shapes and natural frequencies obtained from a fairing finite element model. For both models, the noise transmission mechanisms are highlighted and the noise reduction mechanisms are explained. Procedures to design the structural and acoustic absorbers based on single degree of freedom system are modified for the multi-mode framework. The optimization of the overall treatment parameters namely location, tuning frequency, and damping of each device is also investigated using genetic algorithm. Noise reduction of up to 9dB from 50Hz to 160Hz using 4% of the cylinder mass for the DVA and 5% of the cavity volume for the HR can be achieved. The robustness of the treatment performance to changes in the excitation, system and devices characteristics is also addressed. The model is validated by experiments done outdoors on a 10-foot long, 8-foot diameter composite cylinder. The excitation level reached 136dB at the cylinder surface comparable to real launch acoustic environment. With HRs representing 2% of the cylinder volume, the noise transmission from 50Hz to 160Hz is reduced by 3dB and the addition of DVAs representing 6.5% of the cylinder mass enhances this performance to 4.3dB. Using the fairing model, a HR+DVA treatment is designed under flight constraints and is implemented in a real Boeing

  17. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Yung Szen; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  18. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Yung Szen; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2015-06-15

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  19. Improvement of efficiency and temperature control of induction heating vapor source on electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, T; Kiriyama, R; Muramatsu, M; Kitagawa, A; Uchida, T; Kurisu, Y; Nozaki, D; Yano, K; Yoshida, Y; Sato, F; Kato, Y; Iida, T

    2012-02-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is used to generate multicharged ions for many kinds of the fields. We have developed an evaporator by using induction heating method that can generate pure vapor from solid state materials in ECRIS. We develop the new matching and protecting circuit by which we can precisely control the temperature of the induction heating evaporator. We can control the temperature within ±15 °C around 1400 °C under the operation pressure about 10(-4) Pa. We are able to use this evaporator for experiment of synthesizing process to need pure vapor under enough low pressure, e.g., experiment of generation of endohedral Fe-fullerene at the ECRIS.

  20. Improvement of efficiency and temperature control of induction heating vapor source on electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Takenaka, T.; Kiriyama, R.; Kurisu, Y.; Nozaki, D.; Yano, K.; Sato, F.; Kato, Y.; Iida, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y.

    2012-02-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is used to generate multicharged ions for many kinds of the fields. We have developed an evaporator by using induction heating method that can generate pure vapor from solid state materials in ECRIS. We develop the new matching and protecting circuit by which we can precisely control the temperature of the induction heating evaporator. We can control the temperature within {+-}15 deg. C around 1400 deg. C under the operation pressure about 10{sup -4} Pa. We are able to use this evaporator for experiment of synthesizing process to need pure vapor under enough low pressure, e.g., experiment of generation of endohedral Fe-fullerene at the ECRIS.

  1. A dual-mode bandpass filter with multiple controllable transmission-zeros using T-shaped stub-loaded resonators.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zh; Wang, C; Kim, N Y

    2014-01-01

    A dual-mode broadband bandpass filter (BPF) with multiple controllable transmission-zeros using T-shaped stub-loaded resonators (TSSLRs) is presented. Due to the symmetrical plane, the odd-even-mode theory can be adopted to characterize the BPF. The proposed filter consists of a dual-mode TSSLR and two modified feed-lines, which introduce two capacitive and inductive source-load (S-L) couplings. Five controllable transmission zeros (TZs) can be achieved for the high selectivity and the wide stopband because of the tunable amount of coupling capacitance and inductance. The center frequency of the proposed BPF is 5.8 GHz, with a 3 dB fraction bandwidth of 8.9%. The measured insertion and return losses are 1.75 and 28.18 dB, respectively. A compact size and second harmonic frequency suppression can be obtained by the proposed BPF with S-L couplings.

  2. Controllable emission of a dipolar source coupled with a magneto-dielectric resonant subwavelength scatterer

    PubMed Central

    Rolly, Brice; Geffrin, Jean-Michel; Abdeddaim, Redha; Stout, Brian; Bonod, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that a local excitation of a single scatterer of relative dielectric permittivity ε = 6 permits to excite broad dipolar and quadrupolar electric and magnetic resonances that shape the emission pattern in an unprecedented way. By suitably positioning the feed with respect to the sphere at a λ/3 distance, this compact antenna is able to spectrally sort the electromagnetic emission either in the forward or in the backward direction, together with a high gain in directivity. Materials with ε = 6 can be found in the whole spectrum of frequencies promising Mie antennas to become an enabling technology in numbers of applications, ranging from quantum single photon sources to telecommunications. PMID:24165924

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance linewidth and spin diffusion in {sup 29}Si isotopically controlled silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kohei M.; Vlasenko, Leonid S.

    2008-10-15

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study was performed with n-type silicon single crystals containing {sup 29}Si isotope abundance f ranges from 1.2% to 99.2%. The nuclear spin diffusion coefficient D has been determined from the linewidth of significantly enhanced {sup 29}Si NMR signals utilizing a developed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) method. The {sup 29}Si NMR linewidth depends linearly on f, at least when f<10%, and approaches {proportional_to}f{sup 1/2} dependence when f>50%. The estimated {sup 29}Si nuclear spin diffusion time T{sub sd} between phosphorus atoms used for DNP is more than ten times shorter than the nuclear polarization time T{sub 1}{sup p} of {sup 29}Si nuclei around phosphorus. Therefore, the regime of 'rapid spin diffusion' is realized in the DNP experiments.

  4. The Onset of Resonance-Controlled Instability in Spherical Bubble Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, R. Glynn; Gaitan, D. Felipe

    1996-01-01

    Single bubble dynamics are investigated using acoustic techniques for isolation and manipulation. The goal of the investigations is to understand the dynamic origin of the various phenomena that bubbles exhibit: light emission, enhanced mass transport, chaotic and quasiperiodic oscillations, and translations. Once understood, acoustically manipulated bubbles can serve as platforms for materials effects on free surfaces, using surfactants to alter surface rheology and observing how that affects both dynamics and also mass transport. The effects of gravity on the problem will be shown to be significant. The first set of observations from 1g experimentation are presented. These observations are of the onset conditions for instability of the spherical shape of the bubble. For the size range 55-90 microns in diameter we observe instability governed by resonant mode coupling, which is significantly affected by the buoyant force and its effects.

  5. Coherent control of atomic excitation using off-resonant strong few-cycle pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pankaj K.; Eleuch, Hichem; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2010-10-15

    We study the dynamics of a two-level system driven by an off-resonance few-cycle pulse which has a phase jump {phi} at t=t{sub 0}, in contrast to many-cycle pulses, under the nonrotating-wave approximation (NRWA). We give a closed form analytical solution for the evolution of the probability amplitude |C{sub a}(t)| for the upper level. Using the appropriate pulse parameters like the phase jump {phi}, jump time t{sub 0}, pulse width {tau}, frequency {nu}, and Rabi frequency {Omega}{sub 0} the population transfer after the pulse is gone can be optimized and, for the pulse considered here, an enhancement factor of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} was obtained.

  6. Dipolar Decoupling in Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy using Optimal Control Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, William; Haas, Holger; Budakian, Raffi

    We present data showing how a modified gradient ascent pulse engineering method can be used to design nuclear magnetic resonance pulses that perform a single unitary transformation over a large range of maximum Rabi field strengths (B1) , while decoupling the secular dipolar interactions between spins. We designed dipolar-decoupling π-pulses that perform well over spins feeling maximum B1 fields from 131 - 274 G . By combining these π-pulses into a simple multiple pulse sequence, with fields produced by a silver microwire, we have increased T2* in a polystyrene sample attached to the tip of a silicon nanowire from 11 μs to ~ 250 ms . This dipolar decoupling could be used to improve the spatial resolution of nano-MRI experiments and to allow spectroscopy of chemical shifts in nanoscale samples.

  7. A New Control Method of a Resonant Switched-Capacitor Converter and the Application for Balancing of the Split DC Voltages in a Multilevel Inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Kenichiro; Fujita, Hideaki

    This paper proposes a new voltage-balancing circuit for the split dc voltages in a diode-clamped five-level inverter. The proposed circuit is based on a resonant switched-capacitor converter (RSCC), which consists of two half-bridge inverters, a resonant inductor and a resonant capacitor. A new phase-shift control of the RSCC is proposed to improve voltage balancing performance. Theoretical analysis reveals the rating of the RSCC and stored energy in the resonant inductor. Experimental results confirm the reduction of the inductor to one tenth in volume as compared to a conventional voltage-balancing circuit based on buck-boost topology. Moreover, the proposed phase-shift control has demonstrated that it is possible to eliminate the voltage deviation between the dc capacitors.

  8. Development and characterization of high-frequency resonance-enhanced microjet actuators for control of high-speed jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Puja; Gustavsson, Jonas P. R.; Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2016-05-01

    For flow control applications requiring high-frequency excitation, very few actuators have sufficient dynamic response and/or control authority to be useful in high-speed flows. Due to this reason, experiments involving high-frequency excitation, attempted in the past, have been limited to either low-frequency actuation with reasonable control authority or moderate-frequency actuation with limited control authority. The current work expands on the previous development of the resonance-enhanced microactuators to design actuators that are capable of producing high-amplitude pulses at much higher frequencies [{O} (10 kHz)]. Using lumped element modeling, two actuators have been designed with nominal frequencies of 20 and 50 kHz. Extensive benchtop characterization using acoustic measurements as well as optical diagnostics using a high-resolution micro-schlieren setup is employed to characterize the dynamic response of these actuators. The actuators performed at a range of frequencies, 20.3-27.8 and 54.8-78.2 kHz, respectively. In addition to providing information on the actuator flow physics and performance at various operating conditions, this study serves to develop easy-to-integrate high-frequency actuators for active control of high-speed jets. Preliminary testing of these actuators is performed by implementing the 20-kHz actuator on a Mach 0.9 free jet flow field for noise reduction. Acoustic measurements in the jet near field demonstrate attenuation of radiated noise at all observation angles.

  9. Resonant optical spectroscopy and coherent control of Cr4+ spin ensembles in SiC and GaN

    DOE PAGES

    Koehl, William F.; Diler, Berk; Whiteley, Samuel J.; ...

    2017-01-15

    Spins bound to point defects are increasingly viewed as an important resource for solid-state implementations of quantum information technologies. In particular, there is a growing interest in the identification of new classes of defect spin that can be controlled optically. Here we demonstrate ensemble optical spin polarization and optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) of the S = 1 electronic ground state of chromium (Cr4+) impurities in silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN). Polarization is made possible by the narrow optical linewidths of these ensembles (< 8.5 GHz), which are similar in magnitude to the ground state zero-field spin splittingmore » energies of the ions at liquid helium temperatures. We therefore are able to optically resolve individual spin sublevels within the ensembles at low magnetic fields using resonant excitation from a cavity-stabilized, narrow-linewidth laser. Additionally, these near-infrared emitters possess exceptionally weak phonon sidebands, ensuring that > 73% of the overall optical emission is contained with the defects’ zero-phonon lines. Lastly, these characteristics make this semiconductor-based, transition metal impurity system a promising target for further study in the ongoing effort to integrate optically active quantum states within common optoelectronic materials.« less

  10. Resonant optical spectroscopy and coherent control of C r4 + spin ensembles in SiC and GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, William F.; Diler, Berk; Whiteley, Samuel J.; Bourassa, Alexandre; Son, N. T.; Janzén, Erik; Awschalom, David D.

    2017-01-01

    Spins bound to point defects are increasingly viewed as an important resource for solid-state implementations of quantum information and spintronic technologies. In particular, there is a growing interest in the identification of new classes of defect spin that can be controlled optically. Here, we demonstrate ensemble optical spin polarization and optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) of the S = 1 electronic ground state of chromium (C r4 + ) impurities in silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN). Spin polarization is made possible by the narrow optical linewidths of these ensembles (<8.5 GHz), which are similar in magnitude to the ground state zero-field spin splitting energies of the ions at liquid helium temperatures. This allows us to optically resolve individual spin sublevels within the ensembles at low magnetic fields using resonant excitation from a cavity-stabilized, narrow-linewidth laser. Additionally, these near-infrared emitters possess exceptionally weak phonon sidebands, ensuring that >73% of the overall optical emission is contained with the defects' zero-phonon lines. These characteristics make this semiconductor-based, transition metal impurity system a promising target for further study in the ongoing effort to integrate optically active quantum states within common optoelectronic materials.

  11. Observation and coherent control of interface-induced electronic resonances in a field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Tenorio-Pearl, J O; Herbschleb, E D; Fleming, S; Creatore, C; Oda, S; Milne, W I; Chin, A W

    2017-02-01

    Electronic defect states at material interfaces provide highly deleterious sources of noise in solid-state nanostructures, and even a single trapped charge can qualitatively alter the properties of short one-dimensional nanowire field-effect transistors (FET) and quantum bit (qubit) devices. Understanding the dynamics of trapped charge is thus essential for future nanotechnologies, but their direct detection and manipulation is rather challenging. Here, a transistor-based set-up is used to create and probe individual electronic defect states that can be coherently driven with microwave (MW) pulses. Strikingly, we resolve a large number of very high quality (Q ∼ 1 × 10(5)) resonances in the transistor current as a function of MW frequency and demonstrate both long decoherence times (∼1 μs-40 μs) and coherent control of the defect-induced dynamics. Efficiently characterizing over 800 individually addressable resonances across two separate defect-hosting materials, we propose that their properties are consistent with weakly driven two-level systems.

  12. Force Sensor-less Workspace Virtual Impedance Control Considering Resonant Vibration for Industrial Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tungpataratanawong, Somsawas; Ohishi, Kiyoshi; Miyazaki, Toshimasa; Katsura, Seiichiro

    The motion control paradigm provides sufficient performance in many elementary industrial tasks. However, only stiff motion the robot cannot accommodate the interaction force under constrained motion. In such situation, the robot is required to perform interaction behavior with the environment. The conventional impedance control schemes require force-sensing devices to feedback force signals to the controllers. The force-sensing device is therefore indispensable and the performance of the system also depends on the quality of this device. This paper proposes a novel strategy for force sensor-less impedance control using disturbance observer and dynamic model of the robot to estimate the external force. In motion task, the robust D-PD (derivative-PD) control is used with feedforward inverse-dynamic torque compensation to ensure robustness and high-speed response with flexible joint model. When robot is in contact with environment, the proposed force sensor-less scheme impedance control with inner-loop D-PD control is utilized. D-PD control uses both position and speed as the references to implement the damping and stiffness characteristic of the virtual impedance model. In addition, the gravity and friction force-feedback compensation is computed by the same dynamic model, which is used in external force estimation. The flexible-joint robot model is utilized in both disturbance observer and motion control design. The workspace impedance control for robot interaction with human operator is implemented on the experimental setup three-degree-of-freedom (3-DOF) robot manipulator to assure the ability and performance of the proposed force sensor-less scheme for flexible-joint industrial robot.

  13. Primary pain palliation and local tumor control in bone metastases treated with magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Alessandro; Anzidei, Michele; Marincola, Beatrice Cavallo; Brachetti, Giulia; Ciolina, Federica; Cartocci, Gaia; Marsecano, Claudia; Zaccagna, Fulvio; Marchetti, Luca; Cortesi, Enrico; Catalano, Carlo

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy in pain management of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided focused ultrasound for the primary treatment of painful bone metastases and to assess its potential for local control of bone metastases. This was a prospective, single-arm research study with approval from the institutional review board. Eighteen consecutive patients (female, 8; male, 10; mean [SD] age, 62.7 [11.5] years) with painful bone metastases were enrolled. The patients were examined clinically for pain severity and pain interference in accordance with the Brief Pain Inventory-Quality of Life criteria before and at each follow-up visit. Computed tomography and MR imaging were performed before and at 1 and 3 months after the magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound treatment. The nonperfused volume (NPV) was calculated to correlate the extension of the ablated pathological tissue in the responder and nonresponder patients. No treatment-related adverse events were recorded during the study. The evaluation of pain palliation revealed a statistically significant difference between baseline and follow-up values for pain severity and pain interference (P = 0.001, both evaluations). In the evaluation of local tumor control, we observed increased bone density with restoration of cortical borders in 5 of the 18 patients (27.7%). In accordance with the MD Anderson criteria, complete and partial responses were obtained in 2 of the 18 patients (11.1%) and 4 of the 18 patients (22.2%), respectively. Nonperfused volume values ranged between 20% and 93%. Mean NPV values remained substantially stable after the treatment (P = 0.08). There was no difference in the NPV values between the responder and nonresponder patients (46.7% [24.2%] [25%-90%] versus 45% [24.9%] [20%-93%]; P = 0.7). Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound can be safely and effectively used as the primary treatment of pain palliation in patients with bone metastases and has a potential

  14. Ion cyclotron resonance heating for tungsten control in various JET H-mode scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goniche, M.; Dumont, R. J.; Bobkov, V.; Buratti, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Challis, C.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Drewelow, P.; Fedorczak, N.; Garcia, J.; Giroud, C.; Graham, M.; Graves, J. P.; Hobirk, J.; Jacquet, P.; Lerche, E.; Mantica, P.; Monakhov, I.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Nave, M. F. F.; Noble, C.; Nunes, I.; Pütterich, T.; Rimini, F.; Sertoli, M.; Valisa, M.; Van Eester, D.; Contributors, JET

    2017-05-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in the hydrogen minority scheme provides central ion heating and acts favorably on the core tungsten transport. Full wave modeling shows that, at medium power level (4 MW), after collisional redistribution, the ratio of power transferred to the ions and the electrons vary little with the minority (hydrogen) concentration n H/n e but the high-Z impurity screening provided by the fast ions temperature increases with the concentration. The power radiated by tungsten in the core of the JET discharges has been analyzed on a large database covering the 2013-2014 campaign. In the baseline scenario with moderate plasma current (I p = 2.5 MA) ICRH modifies efficiently tungsten transport to avoid its accumulation in the plasma centre and, when the ICRH power is increased, the tungsten radiation peaking evolves as predicted by the neo-classical theory. At higher current (3-4 MA), tungsten accumulation can be only avoided with 5 MW of ICRH power with high gas injection rate. For discharges in the hybrid scenario, the strong initial peaking of the density leads to strong tungsten accumulation. When this initial density peaking is slightly reduced, with an ICRH power in excess of 4 MW,very low tungsten concentration in the core (˜10-5) is maintained for 3 s. MHD activity plays a key role in tungsten transport and modulation of the tungsten radiation during a sawtooth cycle is correlated to the fishbone activity triggered by the fast ion pressure gradient.

  15. Computer-controlled stimulation for functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of the neonatal olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Arichi, T; Gordon-Williams, R; Allievi, A; Groves, A M; Burdet, E; Edwards, A D

    2013-09-01

    Olfactory sensation is highly functional early in human neonatal life, with studies suggesting that odours can influence behaviour and infant-mother bonding. Due to its good spatial properties, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has the potential to rapidly advance our understanding of the neural activity which underlies the development of olfactory perception in this key period. We aimed to design an 'olfactometer' specifically for use with neonatal subjects for fMRI studies of odour perception. We describe a fully automated and programmable, fMRI compatible system capable of presenting odorant liquids. To prevent contamination of the system and minimize between-subject infective risk, the majority of the olfactometer is constructed from single-use, readily available clinical equipment. The system was used to present the odour of infant formula milk in a validation group of seven neonatal subjects at term equivalent postmenstrual age (median age 40 weeks). A safe, reliable and reproducible pattern of stimulation was delivered leading to well-localized positive BOLD functional responses in the piriform cortex, amygdala, thalamus, insular cortex and cerebellum. The described system is therefore suitable for detailed studies of the ontology of olfactory sensation and perception during early human brain development. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Computer-controlled stimulation for functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of the neonatal olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Arichi, T; Gordon-Williams, R; Allievi, A; Groves, AM; Burdet, E; Edwards, AD

    2013-01-01

    Aim Olfactory sensation is highly functional early in human neonatal life, with studies suggesting that odours can influence behaviour and infant–mother bonding. Due to its good spatial properties, blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has the potential to rapidly advance our understanding of the neural activity which underlies the development of olfactory perception in this key period. We aimed to design an ‘olfactometer’ specifically for use with neonatal subjects for fMRI studies of odour perception. Methods We describe a fully automated and programmable, fMRI compatible system capable of presenting odorant liquids. To prevent contamination of the system and minimize between-subject infective risk, the majority of the olfactometer is constructed from single-use, readily available clinical equipment. The system was used to present the odour of infant formula milk in a validation group of seven neonatal subjects at term equivalent postmenstrual age (median age 40 weeks). Results A safe, reliable and reproducible pattern of stimulation was delivered leading to well-localized positive BOLD functional responses in the piriform cortex, amygdala, thalamus, insular cortex and cerebellum. Conclusions The described system is therefore suitable for detailed studies of the ontology of olfactory sensation and perception during early human brain development. PMID:23789919

  17. Wavelength-controlled manipulation of colloidal quasi-resonant quantum dots under pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsipotan, Aleksey S.; Aleksandrovsky, Aleksandr S.; Slabko, Vitaliy V.

    2016-11-01

    Production of nanostructures consisting of semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) is of interest for number of applications. Development of new methods of NPs' manipulation and aggregation of NPs into nanostructures with pre-defined geometry is also of considerable interest from the fundamental point of view. Under laser irradiation with properly chosen wavelengths excitonic excitations of semiconductor NPs will be induced. Electrodynamical interaction between excited NPs is rather universal and allows formation of wide variety of nanostructures both of homo- and heterogeneous content. Theoretical approach for study of interaction of NPs' ensembles with laser light includes dipole-dipole approximation for NPs' attraction. Experimental results are obtained for TGA stabilized CdTe QDs with the excitonic resonance at 520 nm. Six different samples of the same colloid solution were irradiated at wavelengths from 540 to 570 nm. Modifications of absorption spectra of solutions after irradiation was detected, being most prominent at 555 and 560 nm irradiation wavelengths. Analysis of spectra shows that up to 47% of QDs were assembled into pairs with 10 nm inter-QD distance. Therefore, possibility of precise QDs manipulation via laser-induced electrodynamical interaction is demonstrated.

  18. M4ARC: multi-model multi-mode adaptive resonant control for dynamically loaded flexible beam structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjahyadi, H.; He, F.; Sammut, K.

    2008-08-01

    A hybrid multi-model-multi-mode adaptive resonant control (M4ARC) approach is proposed for dynamically loaded flexible beam structures to provide superior vibration damping performance as compared to its fixed-model and adaptive counterparts. The proposed approach uses a configurable controller, the parameters of which are updated using a fast and accurate on-line frequency identification method for N modes of interest. This method incorporates a simple supervision scheme that selects between the output of an N-mode filter bank (representing the multiple-fixed-model set) and the output of an estimator bank (representing the accurate model of the plant). The estimator bank comprises a multi-rate set of parallel N second-order recursive-least-squares estimators to achieve rapid parameter convergence. While the estimators are still in transition, the supervisor provides the configurable controller with an intermediate set of frequencies that correspond to the closest fixed model. Once the estimators converge, the supervisor selects the estimated frequency set to provide the configurable controller with an accurate representation of the current plant. This supervisor scheme significantly reduces the computational complexity as compared with existing counterparts. Experiments reveal that the proposed M4ARC approach offers the best compromise in terms of adapting to sudden and highly variable loading condition changes (within a bounded domain) while, at the same time, achieving fast transient performance.

  19. More Specific Signal Detection in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging by False Discovery Rate Control for Hierarchically Structured Systems of Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Schildknecht, Konstantin; Tabelow, Karsten; Dickhaus, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Signal detection in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) inherently involves the problem of testing a large number of hypotheses. A popular strategy to address this multiplicity is the control of the false discovery rate (FDR). In this work we consider the case where prior knowledge is available to partition the set of all hypotheses into disjoint subsets or families, e. g., by a-priori knowledge on the functionality of certain regions of interest. If the proportion of true null hypotheses differs between families, this structural information can be used to increase statistical power. We propose a two-stage multiple test procedure which first excludes those families from the analysis for which there is no strong evidence for containing true alternatives. We show control of the family-wise error rate at this first stage of testing. Then, at the second stage, we proceed to test the hypotheses within each non-excluded family and obtain asymptotic control of the FDR within each family at this second stage. Our main mathematical result is that this two-stage strategy implies asymptotic control of the FDR with respect to all hypotheses. In simulations we demonstrate the increased power of this new procedure in comparison with established procedures in situations with highly unbalanced families. Finally, we apply the proposed method to simulated and to real fMRI data. PMID:26914144

  20. A study of the water molecule using frequency control over nuclear dynamics in resonant X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Vaz da Cruz, Vinícius; Ertan, Emelie; Couto, Rafael C; Eckert, Sebastian; Fondell, Mattis; Dantz, Marcus; Kennedy, Brian; Schmitt, Thorsten; Pietzsch, Annette; Guimarães, Freddy F; Ågren, Hans; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Odelius, Michael; Föhlisch, Alexander; Kimberg, Victor

    2017-03-29

    In this combined theoretical and experimental study we report a full analysis of the resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra of H2O, D2O and HDO. We demonstrate that electronically-elastic RIXS has an inherent capability to map the potential energy surface and to perform vibrational analysis of the electronic ground state in multimode systems. We show that the control and selection of vibrational excitation can be performed by tuning the X-ray frequency across core-excited molecular bands and that this is clearly reflected in the RIXS spectra. Using high level ab initio electronic structure and quantum nuclear wave packet calculations together with high resolution RIXS measurements, we discuss in detail the mode coupling, mode localization and anharmonicity in the studied systems.

  1. High performance microring resonator (MRR)-based optical filter with reduced group delay and simplified center-wavelength control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingel, Benjamin; Ye, Bo; Cui, Weili; Madamopoulos, Nicholas

    2013-06-01

    We present a new microring resonator (MRR)-based optical filter that takes advantage of the improvements that can be gained from cascading two (or more) MRR elements while physically using only one MRR element due to its unique looped-back configuration. This approach avoids the costly problem associated with dynamic control of matching (or aligning) the center-wavelengths coming from the two MRR elements. This new optical filter is a generalization of our previously reported filter (called LOBOUR) based on the Cascaded Over- and Under-coupling Resonator (COUR) architecture. Here, we compare the performance of our filter to four different configurations under the following criteria: (1) lower group delay (GD), and (2) simplified solution to wavelength-drift problem, (3) lower power consumption, (4) narrower linewidth, and (5) better extinction ratio (ER).

  2. Efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of penile fracture: A controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Tarhan, Fatih; Hamarat, Mustafa B.; Can, Utku; Coskun, Alper; Camur, Emre; Sarica, Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with suspected penile fracture. Materials and Methods A total of 122 patients admitted to our inpatient clinic with a suspicion of penile fracture following a recent history of penile trauma and who underwent surgical exploration were included this study. A thorough physical examination, a detailed medical history, description of the trauma, and preoperative International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores were obtained for each patient prior to surgery. Thirty-eight of these patients were evaluated with MRI before the surgical exploration. Intraoperative findings were also recorded. Physical findings and IIEF scores were also recorded at postoperative 6 months. Results The mean age of our patient group was 36.5±12.3 years. Penile fracture was detected in 105 of 122 patients in whom surgical exploration was performed owing to a suspected diagnosis. The mean time interval from penile trauma to hospital admittance was 9.9±15.1 hours. No cavernosal defect was detected in 9 of 84 patients (10.7%) who were not evaluated with MRI prior to surgery. Compared with surgical exploration, MRI findings showed 100% (30 of 30) sensitivity and 87.5% (7 of 8) specificity in the diagnosis of penile fracture. MRI had a high negative predictive value of 100% (7 of 7) and a positive predictive value of 96.7% (30 of 31) with just 1 misdiagnosed patient. Conclusions MRI is a reliable diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of penile fractures. Compared to history and physical findings taken all together, the high sensitivity and specificity of this imaging technique can decrease the number of unnecessary surgical explorations. PMID:28681035

  3. Oven controlled N++ [1 0 0] length-extensional mode silicon resonator with frequency stability of 1 ppm over industrial temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Weilong; Pei, Binbin; Sun, Ke; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Heng; Li, Xinxin

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents an oven controlled N++ [1 0 0] length-extensional mode silicon resonator, with a lookup-table based control algorithm. The temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (TCF) of the N++ doped resonator is nonlinear, and there is a turnover temperature point at which the TCF is equal to zero. The resonator is maintained at the turnover point by Joule heating; this temperature is a little higher than the upper limit of the industrial temperature range. It is demonstrated that the control algorithm based on the thermoresistor on the substrate and the lookup table for heating voltage versus chip temperature is sufficiently accurate to achieve a frequency stability of  ±0.5 ppm over the industrial temperature range. Because only two leads are required for electrical heating and piezoresistive sensing, the power required for heating of this resonator can be potentially lower than that of the oscillators with closed-loop oven control algorithm. It is also shown that the phase noise can be suppressed at the turnover temperature because of the very low value of the TCF, which justifies the usage of the heating voltage as the excitation voltage of the Wheatstone half-bridge.

  4. Effects of aging and tactile stochastic resonance on postural performance and postural control in a sensory conflict task.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Marius; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Lee, Beom-Chan; Layne, Charles S

    2015-01-01

    Postural control in certain situations depends on functioning of tactile or proprioceptive receptors and their respective dynamic integration. Loss of sensory functioning can lead to increased risk of falls in challenging postural tasks, especially in older adults. Stochastic resonance, a concept describing better function of systems with addition of optimal levels of noise, has shown to be beneficial for balance performance in certain populations and simple postural tasks. In this study, we tested the effects of aging and a tactile stochastic resonance stimulus (TSRS) on balance of adults in a sensory conflict task. Nineteen older (71-84 years of age) and younger participants (22-29 years of age) stood on a force plate for repeated trials of 20 s duration, while foot sole stimulation was either turned on or off, and the visual surrounding was sway-referenced. Balance performance was evaluated by computing an Equilibrium Score (ES) and anterior-posterior sway path length (APPlength). For postural control evaluation, strategy scores and approximate entropy (ApEn) were computed. Repeated-measures ANOVA, Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, and Mann-Whitney U-tests were conducted for statistical analysis. Our results showed that balance performance differed between older and younger adults as indicated by ES (p = 0.01) and APPlength (0.01), and addition of vibration only improved performance in the older group significantly (p = 0.012). Strategy scores differed between both age groups, whereas vibration only affected the older group (p = 0.025). Our results indicate that aging affects specific postural outcomes and that TSRS is beneficial for older adults in a visual sensory conflict task, but more research is needed to investigate the effectiveness in individuals with more severe balance problems, for example, due to neuropathy.

  5. Controllable generation of two-mode-entangled states in two-resonator circuit QED with a single gap-tunable superconducting qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Sheng-Li; Li, Zhen; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Peng-Bo; Gao, Shao-Yan; Li, Fu-Li

    2014-12-01

    We study controllable generation of two-mode-entangled states in a circuit QED setup, which consists of two spatially separated superconducting transmission line resonators and a single gap-tunable superconducting qubit. Two sharp coupling sidebands are induced when the artificial atom is suitably driven by a bichromatic microwave field. The two resonators can have squeezing-type interactions with the qubit via the coupling sidebands. If the two resonators are not degenerate, we show that the two resonators can be cooled down into the two-mode squeezed vacuum via dissipation of the qubit. The generation of the two-mode squeezed state is based on a dissipative state-engineering process, which explores the energy relaxation of the qubit as a resource. Moreover, the scheme does not need both the specific preparation of the initial state and the designed special dynamical process of the system. If the resonators are degenerate, we show that entangled coherent states of the resonators can be generated by use of the unitary dynamical evolution process of the system and the state-projection measurement. Moreover, macro entangled coherent states of the resonators with huge photons can in principle be created if the resonators and the qubit have sufficiently long lifetimes. The present scheme has two remarkable features: (1) only a single qubit is used in the generation of the two-mode squeezed state; and (2) the ultrastrong coupling condition and initializing the resonators in coherent states are not required. These make the present scheme more simple and feasible in experimental implementation.

  6. Reduction of claustrophobia with short-bore versus open magnetic resonance imaging: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Enders, Judith; Zimmermann, Elke; Rief, Matthias; Martus, Peter; Klingebiel, Randolf; Asbach, Patrick; Klessen, Christian; Diederichs, Gerd; Wagner, Moritz; Teichgräber, Ulf; Bengner, Thomas; Hamm, Bernd; Dewey, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Claustrophobia is a common problem precluding MR imaging. The purpose of the present study was to assess whether a short-bore or an open magnetic resonance (MR) scanner is superior in alleviating claustrophobia. Institutional review board approval and patient informed consent were obtained to compare short-bore versus open MR. From June 2008 to August 2009, 174 patients (139 women; mean age = 53.1 [SD 12.8]) with an overall mean score of 2.4 (SD 0.7, range 0 to 4) on the Claustrophobia Questionnaire (CLQ) and a clinical indication for imaging, were randomly assigned to receive evaluation by open or by short-bore MR. The primary outcomes were incomplete MR examinations due to a claustrophobic event. Follow-up was conducted 7 months after MR imaging. The primary analysis was performed according to the intention-to-treat strategy. With 33 claustrophobic events in the short-bore group (39% [95% confidence interval [CI] 28% to 50%) versus 23 in the open scanner group (26% [95% CI 18% to 37%]; P = 0.08) the difference was not significant. Patients with an event were in the examination room for 3.8 min (SD 4.4) in the short-bore and for 8.5 min (SD 7) in the open group (P = 0.004). This was due to an earlier occurrence of events in the short-bore group. The CLQ suffocation subscale was significantly associated with the occurrence of claustrophobic events (P = 0.003). New findings that explained symptoms were found in 69% of MR examinations and led to changes in medical treatment in 47% and surgery in 10% of patients. After 7 months, perceived claustrophobia increased in 32% of patients with events versus in only 11% of patients without events (P = 0.004). Even recent MR cannot prevent claustrophobia suggesting that further developments to create a more patient-centered MR scanner environment are needed. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00715806.

  7. Reduction of Claustrophobia with Short-Bore versus Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rief, Matthias; Martus, Peter; Klingebiel, Randolf; Asbach, Patrick; Klessen, Christian; Diederichs, Gerd; Wagner, Moritz; Teichgräber, Ulf; Bengner, Thomas; Hamm, Bernd; Dewey, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Background Claustrophobia is a common problem precluding MR imaging. The purpose of the present study was to assess whether a short-bore or an open magnetic resonance (MR) scanner is superior in alleviating claustrophobia. Methods Institutional review board approval and patient informed consent were obtained to compare short-bore versus open MR. From June 2008 to August 2009, 174 patients (139 women; mean age = 53.1 [SD 12.8]) with an overall mean score of 2.4 (SD 0.7, range 0 to 4) on the Claustrophobia Questionnaire (CLQ) and a clinical indication for imaging, were randomly assigned to receive evaluation by open or by short-bore MR. The primary outcomes were incomplete MR examinations due to a claustrophobic event. Follow-up was conducted 7 months after MR imaging. The primary analysis was performed according to the intention-to-treat strategy. Results With 33 claustrophobic events in the short-bore group (39% [95% confidence interval [CI] 28% to 50%) versus 23 in the open scanner group (26% [95% CI 18% to 37%]; P = 0.08) the difference was not significant. Patients with an event were in the examination room for 3.8 min (SD 4.4) in the short-bore and for 8.5 min (SD 7) in the open group (P = 0.004). This was due to an earlier occurrence of events in the short-bore group. The CLQ suffocation subscale was significantly associated with the occurrence of claustrophobic events (P = 0.003). New findings that explained symptoms were found in 69% of MR examinations and led to changes in medical treatment in 47% and surgery in 10% of patients. After 7 months, perceived claustrophobia increased in 32% of patients with events versus in only 11% of patients without events (P = 0.004). Conclusions Even recent MR cannot prevent claustrophobia suggesting that further developments to create a more patient-centered MR scanner environment are needed. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00715806 PMID:21887259

  8. A case-control proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study confirms cerebellar dysfunction in benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Long, Lili; Song, Yanmin; Zhang, Linlin; Hu, Chongyu; Gong, Jian; Xu, Lin; Long, Hongyu; Zhou, Luo; Zhang, Yunci; Zhang, Yong; Xiao, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background Benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy (BAFME) is a rare form of epilepsy syndrome. The pathogenesis of BAFME remains unclear, though it seems to involve dysfunction of the cerebellum. Objectives The purpose of this study was to use proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to investigate whether neurochemical changes underlie abnormal brain function in BAFME. Methods Twelve BAFME patients from one family and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The ratios of NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, Cho/Cr, and NAA/(Cr+Cho) were analyzed. Results The BAFME patients exhibited a decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/choline (Cho) ratio in the cerebellar cortex, whereas there were no significant differences in the NAA/creatine (Cr), Cho/Cr, and NAA/(Cr+Cho) ratios compared with healthy controls. There were no significant differences in 1H-MRS values in the frontal cortex or thalamus between the BAFME patients and controls. No correlation was detected between the NAA/Cho ratio in the cerebellar cortex and disease duration, myoclonus severity, or tremor severity. Conclusion Our results indicate clear cerebellar dysfunction in BAFME. 1H-MRS is a useful tool for the diagnosis of BAFME in combination with family history and electrophysiological examination. PMID:25750529

  9. Controlled manipulation of elastomers with radiation: Insights from multiquantum nuclear-magnetic-resonance data and mechanical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Weisgraber, T.; Dinh, L. N.; Gee, R. H.; Wilson, T.; Chinn, S.; Maxwell, R. S.

    2011-03-15

    Filled and cross-linked elastomeric rubbers are versatile network materials with a multitude of applications ranging from artificial organs and biomedical devices to cushions, coatings, adhesives, interconnects, and seismic-isolation, thermal, and electrical barriers. External factors such as mechanical stress, temperature fluctuations, or radiation are known to create chemical changes in such materials that can directly affect the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of the polymer between cross-links and alter the structural and mechanical properties. From a materials science point of view it is highly desirable to understand, affect, and manipulate such property changes in a controlled manner. Unfortunately, that has not yet been possible due to the lack of experimental characterization of such networks under controlled environments. In this work we expose a known rubber material to controlled dosages of {gamma} radiation and utilize a newly developed multiquantum nuclear-magnetic-resonance technique to characterize the MWD as a function of radiation. We show that such data along with mechanical stress-strain measurements are amenable to accurate analysis by simple network models and yield important insights into radiation-induced molecular-level processes.

  10. Value of serial magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of brain metastases volume control during stereotactic radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Sparacia, Gianvincenzo; Agnello, Francesco; Banco, Aurelia; Bencivinni, Francesco; Anastasi, Andrea; Giordano, Giovanna; Taibbi, Adele; Galia, Massimo; Bartolotta, Tommaso Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate brain metastases volume control capabilities of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) through serial magnetic resonance (MR) imaging follow-up. METHODS MR examinations of 54 brain metastases in 31 patients before and after SRS were reviewed. Patients were included in this study if they had a pre-treatment MR examination and serial follow-up MR examinations at 6 wk, 9 wk, 12 wk, and 12 mo after SRS. The metastasis volume change was categorized at each follow-up as increased (> 20% of the initial volume), stable (± 20% of the initial volume) or decreased (< 20% of the initial volume). RESULTS A local tumor control with a significant (P < 0.05) volume decrease was observed in 25 metastases at 6-wk follow-up. Not significant volume change was observed in 23 metastases and a significant volume increase was observed in 6 metastases. At 9-wk follow-up, 15 out of 25 metastases that decreased in size at 6 wk had a transient tumor volume increase, followed by tumor regression at 12 wk. At 12-wk follow-up there was a significant reduction in volume in 45 metastases, and a significant volume increase in 4 metastases. At 12-mo follow-up, 19 metastases increased significantly in size (up to 41% of the initial volume). Volume tumor reduction was correlated to histopathologic subtype. CONCLUSION SRS provided an effective local brain metastases volume control that was demonstrated at follow-up MR imaging. PMID:28070243

  11. Drifts and Environmental Disturbances in Atomic Clock Subsystems: Quantifying Local Oscillator, Control Loop, and Ion Resonance Interactions.

    PubMed

    Enzer, Daphna G; Diener, William A; Murphy, David W; Rao, Shanti R; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2017-03-01

    Linear ion trap frequency standards are among the most stable continuously operating frequency references and clocks. Depending on the application, they have been operated with a variety of local oscillators (LOs), including quartz ultrastable oscillators, hydrogen-masers, and cryogenic sapphire oscillators. The short-, intermediate-, and long-term stability of the frequency output is a complicated function of the fundamental performances, the time dependence of environmental disturbances, the atomic interrogation algorithm, the implemented control loop, and the environmental sensitivity of the LO and the atomic system components. For applications that require moving these references out of controlled lab spaces and into less stable environments, such as fieldwork or spaceflight, a deeper understanding is needed of how disturbances at different timescales impact the various subsystems of the clock and ultimately the output stability. In this paper, we analyze which perturbations have an impact and to what degree. We also report on a computational model of a control loop, which keeps the microwave source locked to the ion resonance. This model is shown to agree with laboratory measurements of how well the feedback removes various disturbances and also with a useful analytic approach we developed for predicting these impacts.

  12. Cortical Recruitment Patterns in Children Born Prematurely Compared with Control Subjects During a Passive Listening Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Task

    PubMed Central

    Ment, Laura R.; Peterson, Bradley S.; Vohr, Betty; Allan, Walter; Schneider, Karen C.; Lacadie, Cheryl; Katz, Karol H.; Maller-Kesselman, Jill; Pugh, Kenneth; Duncan, Charles C.; Makuch, Robert W.; Constable, R. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test the hypothesis that subjects who were born prematurely develop alternative systems for processing language. Study design Subjects who were born prematurely (n = 14; 600-1250 g birthweight) without neonatal brain injury and 10 matched term control subjects were examined with a fMRI passive listening task of language, the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals (CELF) and portions of the Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing (CTOPP). The fMRI task was evaluated for both phonologic and semantic processing. Results Although there were differences in CELF scores between the subjects born prematurely and control subjects, there were no significant differences in the CTOPP measures in the 2 groups. fMRI studies demonstrated that the groups differentially engaged neural systems known to process language. Children born at term were significantly more likely to activate systems for the semantic processing of language, whereas subjects born prematurely preferentially engaged regions that subserve phonology. Conclusions At 12 years of age, children born prematurely and children born at term activate neural systems for the auditory processing of language differently. Subjects born prematurely engage different networks for phonologic processing; this strategy is associated with phonologic language scores that are similar to those of control subjects. These biologically based developmental strategies may provide the substrate for the improving language skills noted in children who are born prematurely. PMID:17011320

  13. Brain Changes in Long-Term Zen Meditators Using Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Fayed, Nicolás; Lopez del Hoyo, Yolanda; Andres, Eva; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Bellón, Juan; Aguilar, Keyla; Cebolla, Ausias; Garcia-Campayo, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This work aimed to determine whether 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are correlated with years of meditation and psychological variables in long-term Zen meditators compared to healthy non-meditator controls. Materials and Methods Design. Controlled, cross-sectional study. Sample. Meditators were recruited from a Zen Buddhist monastery. The control group was recruited from hospital staff. Meditators were administered questionnaires on anxiety, depression, cognitive impairment and mindfulness. 1H-MRS (1.5 T) of the brain was carried out by exploring four areas: both thalami, both hippocampi, the posterior superior parietal lobule (PSPL) and posterior cingulate gyrus. Predefined areas of the brain were measured for diffusivity (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) by MR-DTI. Results Myo-inositol (mI) was increased in the posterior cingulate gyrus and Glutamate (Glu), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and N-acetyl-aspartate/Creatine (NAA/Cr) was reduced in the left thalamus in meditators. We found a significant positive correlation between mI in the posterior cingulate and years of meditation (r = 0.518; p = .019). We also found significant negative correlations between Glu (r = −0.452; p = .045), NAA (r = −0.617; p = .003) and NAA/Cr (r = −0.448; P = .047) in the left thalamus and years of meditation. Meditators showed a lower Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) in the left posterior parietal white matter than did controls, and the ADC was negatively correlated with years of meditation (r = −0.4850, p = .0066). Conclusions The results are consistent with the view that mI, Glu and NAA are the most important altered metabolites. This study provides evidence of subtle abnormalities in neuronal function in regions of the white matter in meditators. PMID:23536796

  14. Attenuation of wall disturbances in an electron cyclotron resonance oxygen–argon plasma using real time control

    SciTech Connect

    Keville, Bernard Gaman, Cezar; Turner, Miles M.; Zhang, Yang; Daniels, Stephen; Holohan, Anthony M.

    2014-07-01

    Present practice in plasma-assisted semiconductor manufacturing specifies recipes in terms of inputs such as gas flow rates, power and pressure. However, ostensibly identical chambers running identical recipes may produce very different results. Extensive chamber matching, i.e., initial iterative, empirical tuning of the process recipe, which entails time-consuming, ex situ statistical analysis of process metrics such as etch depth, uniformity, anisotropy and selectivity, is required to ensure acceptable results. Once matched, chambers are run open loop and are thus sensitive to disturbances such as actuator drift, wall seasoning and substrate loading, which may impact negatively on process reproducibility. An alternative approach, which may obviate the need for chamber matching and reduce the sensitivity of process metrics to exogenous disturbances, would be to specify a recipe in terms of quantities such as active species densities, and to regulate these in real time by adjusting the inputs with a suitable control algorithm. In this work, real time control of an electron cyclotron resonance O{sub 2}/Ar plasma used for photoresist ashing has been implemented. The design of elementary, model-based algorithms for the control of the argon 750 and oxygen 844 line intensities measured by optical emission spectroscopy is described. Fluorination of the chamber walls by means of an SF{sub 6} plasma prior to ashing inhibits wall recombination of oxygen radicals resulting in an approximately 20% increase in ash rate in the open loop case. However, closed loop control almost completely attenuates the effect of fluorination, thus demonstrating the efficacy of the control algorithms in ensuring a reproducible ash rate in the face of a wall disturbance.

  15. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Gulf War Illness Revealed by 31Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Koslik, Hayley J.; Hamilton, Gavin; Golomb, Beatrice A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Approximately 1/3 of 1990-1 Gulf War veterans developed chronic multisymptom health problems. Implicated exposures bear mechanisms that adversely affect mitochondria. Symptoms emphasize fatigue, cognition and muscle (brain and muscle are aerobically demanding); with protean additional domains affected, compatible with mitochondrial impairment. Recent evidence supports treatments targeting cell bioenergetics (coenzyme10) to benefit Gulf War illness symptoms. However, no evidence has directly documented mitochondrial or bioenergetic impairment in Gulf War illness. Objective We sought to objectively assess for mitochondrial dysfunction, examining post-exercise phosphocreatine-recovery time constant (PCr-R) using 31Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P-MRS), in Gulf War veterans with Gulf War illness compared to matched healthy controls. PCr-R has been described as a “robust and practical” index of mitochondrial status. Design and Participants Case-control study from 2012–2013. Fourteen community-dwelling Gulf War veterans and matched controls from the San Diego area comprised 7 men meeting CDC and Kansas criteria for Gulf War illness, and 7 non-deployed healthy controls matched 1∶1 to cases on age, sex, and ethnicity. Outcome Measure Calf muscle phosphocreatine was evaluated by 31P-MRS at rest, through 5 minutes of foot pedal depression exercise, and in recovery, to assess PCr-R. Paired t-tests compared cases to matched controls. Results PCr-R was significantly prolonged in Gulf War illness cases vs their matched controls: control values, mean±SD, 29.0±8.7 seconds; case values 46.1±18.0 seconds; difference 17.1±14.9 seconds; p = 0.023. PCr-R was longer for cases relative to their matched controls for all but one pair; moreover while values clustered under 31 seconds for all but one control, they exceeded 35 seconds (with a spread up to 70 seconds) for all but one case. Discussion These data provide the first direct evidence

  16. Surface plasmon resonance-based infrared biosensor for cell studies with simultaneous control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilbershtein, Alexander; Bein, Amir; Lirtsman, Vladislav; Schwartz, Betty; Golosovsky, Michael; Davidov, Dan

    2014-11-01

    We report a label-free infrared surface plasmon biosensor with a double-chamber flow cell for continuous monitoring of morphological changes in cell culture exposed to various stimuli. In this technique, the monolayer of cultured cells is divided into two halves by a barrier, allowing the treatment of one half while the other serves as control. We demonstrate the advantages of this setup in test experiments that track kinetics of the IEC-18 cell layer response to variations in extracellular Ca2+ concentration. The sensitivity of the presented method was found to be an order of magnitude higher compared to the single-chamber biosensor.

  17. Quantum computers based on electron spins controlled by ultrafast off-resonant single optical pulses.

    PubMed

    Clark, Susan M; Fu, Kai-Mei C; Ladd, Thaddeus D; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-07-27

    We describe a fast quantum computer based on optically controlled electron spins in charged quantum dots that are coupled to microcavities. This scheme uses broadband optical pulses to rotate electron spins and provide the clock signal to the system. Nonlocal two-qubit gates are performed by phase shifts induced by electron spins on laser pulses propagating along a shared waveguide. Numerical simulations of this scheme demonstrate high-fidelity single-qubit and two-qubit gates with operation times comparable to the inverse Zeeman frequency.

  18. Self-organised aggregation of a pair of particles with different resonant frequencies and electric dipole moments of transitions, controlled by an external quasi-resonant field

    SciTech Connect

    Slabko, V V; Tsipotan, A S; Aleksandrovsky, A S

    2013-05-31

    The influence of the oscillation phases of the dipole moments induced in metal nanoparticles and quantum dots by an external laser field on their interaction energy is considered. It is shown that a difference in resonant frequencies leads to the formation of additional minima and maxima, which are absent in the spectral dependence of the interaction energy of identical particles at similar orientations of the pair of particles with respect to the plane of polarisation of radiation. These features are due to the fact that the oscillation phase difference of the induced dipole moments of particles reaches values close to {pi}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  19. Magnetically-Assisted Remote Controlled Microcatheter Tip Deflection under Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hetts, Steven W; Saeed, Maythem; Martin, Alastair; Lillaney, Prasheel; Losey, Aaron; Yee, Erin Jeannie; Sincic, Ryan; Do, Loi; Evans, Lee; Malba, Vincent; Bernhardt, Anthony F; Wilson, Mark W; Patel, Anand; Arenson, Ronald L; Caton, Curtis; Cooke, Daniel L

    2013-04-04

    X-ray fluoroscopy-guided endovascular procedures have several significant limitations, including difficult catheter navigation and use of ionizing radiation, which can potentially be overcome using a magnetically steerable catheter under MR guidance. The main goal of this work is to develop a microcatheter whose tip can be remotely controlled using the magnetic field of the MR scanner. This protocol aims to describe the procedures for applying current to the microcoil-tipped microcatheter to produce consistent and controllable deflections. A microcoil was fabricated using laser lathe lithography onto a polyimide-tipped endovascular catheter. In vitro testing was performed in a waterbath and vessel phantom under the guidance of a 1.5-T MR system using steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequencing. Various amounts of current were applied to the coils of the microcatheter to produce measureable tip deflections and navigate in vascular phantoms. The development of this device provides a platform for future testing and opportunity to revolutionize the endovascular interventional MRI environment.

  20. Systematic control of edge length, tip sharpness, thickness, and localized surface plasmon resonance of triangular Au nanoprisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Yuta; Hayakawa, Tomokatsu

    2016-10-01

    Triangular gold (Au) nanoprisms of various sizes were synthesized in a controlled way using a modified three-step seed-mediated method with different volumes of starting seed solution and subsequent first step's growth solution. The structures and optical properties of the triangular Au nanoprisms were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy, and UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometry. The Au nanoprisms synthesized also varied in optical response frequency of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) owing to electric dipole polarizations of the Au nanoprisms. This variation depended nonlinearly on the volume of the seed solution. From optical extinction spectra and careful TEM observations, the dipole LSPR peak frequency was found to be linearly proportional to the edge length of the Au nanoprisms. Consequently, it was experimentally shown that the LSPR optical response frequency of their colloidal solutions could be controlled in the near-infrared region (700-1200 nm), corresponding to an edge length of 40-180 nm of the Au nanoprisms. It was also demonstrated that the tip sharpness of triangular Au nanoprisms was improved by using fine Au seeds instead of coarse Au seeds, and the resulting Au nanoprisms were smaller and thinner. A formation mechanism of triangular Au nanoprisms shall also be discussed with a prospect of synthesizing very tiny Au nanoprisms.

  1. A Dual-Mode Bandpass Filter with Multiple Controllable Transmission-Zeros Using T-Shaped Stub-Loaded Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zh.; Wang, C.; Kim, N. Y.

    2014-01-01

    A dual-mode broadband bandpass filter (BPF) with multiple controllable transmission-zeros using T-shaped stub-loaded resonators (TSSLRs) is presented. Due to the symmetrical plane, the odd-even-mode theory can be adopted to characterize the BPF. The proposed filter consists of a dual-mode TSSLR and two modified feed-lines, which introduce two capacitive and inductive source-load (S-L) couplings. Five controllable transmission zeros (TZs) can be achieved for the high selectivity and the wide stopband because of the tunable amount of coupling capacitance and inductance. The center frequency of the proposed BPF is 5.8 GHz, with a 3 dB fraction bandwidth of 8.9%. The measured insertion and return losses are 1.75 and 28.18 dB, respectively. A compact size and second harmonic frequency suppression can be obtained by the proposed BPF with S-L couplings. PMID:24688406

  2. Quantum memory node based on a semiconductor double quantum dot in a laser-controlled optical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukanov, A. V.; Kateev, I. Yu

    2017-08-01

    The concept of a quantum node consisting of a memory qubit and a frequency convertor is proposed and analysed. The memory qubit is presented by a semiconductor four-level double quantum dot (DQD) placed in an optical microresonator (MR). The DQD contains an electron in the quantised part of the conduction band and the MR can be populated by a certain number of photons. The DQD and MR states are controlled be applying the laser and electrostatic fields. The difference between the telecommunication frequency of the photon (transport qubit) supplied to the system through a waveguide and the frequency of the electronic transition in the DQD is compensated for using an auxiliary element, i.e. a frequency convertor based on a single quantum dot (QD). This design allows the electron – photon state of the hybrid system to be controlled by an appropriate variation of the field parameters and the switching between resonance and nonresonance DQD and MR interaction regimes. As an example, a GaAs DQD placed in a microdisk MR is studied. A numerical technique for modelling an optical spectrum of a microdisk MR with an additional layer (AL) deposited on its surface is developed. Using this technique, the effect of the AL on the MR eigenmode properties is investigated and the possibility of tuning its frequency to the QD electronic transition frequency by depositing an AL on the disk surface is demonstrated.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging arterial-spin-labelling perfusion alterations in childhood migraine with atypical aura: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Boulouis, Grégoire; Shotar, Eimad; Dangouloff-Ros, Volodia; Grévent, David; Calmon, Raphaël; Brunelle, Francis; Naggara, Olivier; Kossorotoff, Manoelle; Boddaert, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    Atypical migraine with aura can be challenging to diagnose. Arterial-spin-labelling (ASL) is able to non-invasively quantify brain perfusion. Our aim was to report cerebral blood flow (CBF) alterations using ASL, at the acute phase of atypical migraine with aura in children. Paediatric patients were retrospectively included if (1) referred for acute neurological deficit(s), (2) underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at presentation with ASL sequence, and (3) had subsequent diagnosis of migraine with aura. Neurological symptom-free controls were matched for age. Twenty-eight regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on CBF maps for each participant/control. Ten patients were included (median age 13y, range 8-16y). Eight of 10 had multiple aura symptoms during the episode. For every patient, CBF was decreased in a brain region consistent with symptoms when MRI was performed less than 14 hours after onset (n=7 patients) and increased if the MRI was performed 17 hours or more after (n=4 MRIs). MRI-ASL appears to be a promising tool for the diagnostic workup and differentials exclusion in paediatric migraine with aura. Constant and time-consistent non-territorial CBF modifications were found in our sample providing additional insight to migraine with aura pathophysiology. The authors encourage implementing this sequence at the acute phase of unexplained paediatric neurological deficits, with or without accompanying headache. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison with other inflammatory joint diseases and control subjects.

    PubMed

    Tonolli-Serabian, I; Poet, J L; Dufour, M; Carasset, S; Mattei, J P; Roux, H

    1996-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the wrist of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. MRI and plain X-ray of the wrists were performed in 15 patients with RA, 7 patients with another chronic inflammatory joint disease (CIJD), and 10 control subjects. Patients had only minor changes on plain X-ray. Coronal T1 weighted spin echo sequences were performed before and after an intravenous pulse of gadolinium (GD). Contiguous 3 mm thick slices were obtained. Synovitis was frequently objectivized in the two groups of patients. MRI detected far more erosions and central bone geodes than plain X-ray. Geodes were frequent among controls while cortical bone erosions were frequent in patients. Most of the erosions were enhanced after GD injection in the RA patients but not in the 2 other groups. Thus MRI is not only useful in diagnosing inflammatory changes of the wrist but also in distinguishing early stage RA from other CIJD.

  5. Tunable surface plasmon resonance frequencies of monodisperse indium tin oxide nanoparticles by controlling composition, size, and morphology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Monodisperse indium tin oxide nanoparticles (ITO NPs) with high crystallinity have been synthesized by the rapid thermal injection method and the seed-mediated growth method. We demonstrate that the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) frequencies of ITO NPs can be manipulated from 1,600 to 1,993 nm in near-infrared band by controlling the composition, size, and morphology. The doping Sn concentration in ITO NPs could be controlled via changing the %Sn in the initial feed from 0% to 30%. The shortest SPR wavelength at 1,600 nm with 10% Sn doping concentration indicates highest free electron carrier concentration in ITO NPs, which has direct relationship with doping Sn4+ ions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the SPR peaks can also be tuned by the size of ITO NPs in the case of uniform doping. Besides, compared with the ITO NPs, single crystalline ITO with nanoflower morphology synthesized through the one-pot method exhibit SPR absorption peak features of red-shifting and broadening. PMID:25302059

  6. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy assessment of metabolite status of the anterior cingulate cortex in chronic pain patients and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Takahiro; Tanaka-Mizuno, Sachiko; Iwashita, Narihito; Tooyama, Ikuo; Shiino, Akihiko; Miura, Katsuyuki; Fukui, Sei

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is a common cause of reduced quality of life. Recent studies suggest that chronic pain patients have a different brain neurometabolic status to healthy people. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) can determine the concentrations of metabolites in a specific region of the brain without being invasive. Patients and methods We recruited 56 chronic pain patients and 60 healthy controls to compare brain metabolic characteristics. The concentrations of glutamic acid (Glu), myo-inositol (Ins), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), Glu + glutamine (Glx), and creatine + phosphocreatine (total creatine [tCr]) in the anterior cingulate cortex of participants were measured using 1H-MRS. We used age- and gender-adjusted general linear models and receiver-operating characteristic analyses for this investigation. Patients were also assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to reveal the existence of any mental health issues. Results Our analysis indicates that pain patients have statistically significantly higher levels of Glu/tCr (p=0.039) and Glx/tCr (p<0.001) and lower levels of NAA/tCr than controls, although this did not reach statistical significance (p=0.052). Receiver-operating characteristic analysis performed on the combination of Glx/tCr, Ins/tCr, and NAA/tCr effectively discriminated chronic pain patients from healthy controls. Patients with higher HADS-Depression scores had increased Glx/rCr levels (p=0.015), and those with higher HADS-Anxiety scores had increased NAA/tCr levels (p=0.018). Conclusion Chronic pain patients have a different metabolite status in the anterior cingulate cortex to controls. Within the pain patient group, HADS scores had a positive relationship with NAA/tCr and Glx/tCr levels. 1H-MRS successfully detected metabolic changes in patients’ brains in a noninvasive manner, revealing its potential as a superior diagnostic tool for pain patients. PMID:28203104

  7. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging myocardial perfusion reserve index assessment in women with microvascular coronary dysfunction and reference controls

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Louise E. J.; Goykhman, Pavel; Agarwal, Megha; Mehta, Puja K.; Sedlak, Tara; Li, Ning; Gill, Edward; Samuels, Bruce; Azabal, Babak; Kar, Saibal; Kothawade, Kamlesh; Minissian, Margo; Slomka, Piotr; Berman, Daniel S.; Bairey Merz, C. Noel

    2013-01-01

    Objective We sought to comparatively assess cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) in women with confirmed microvascular coronary dysfunction (MCD) cases and reference control women. Background Women with signs or symptoms of myocardial ischemia in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) frequently have MCD which carries an adverse prognosis. Diagnosis involves invasive coronary reactivity testing (CRT). Adenosine CMRI is a non-invasive test that may be useful for the detection of MCD. Methods Fifty-three women with MCD confirmed by CRT and 12 age- and estrogen-use matched reference controls underwent adenosine CMRI. CMRI was assessed for MPRI, calculated using the ratio of myocardial blood flow at hyperemia/rest for the whole myocardium and separately for the 16 segments as defined by the American Heart Association. Statistical analysis was performed using repeated measures ANOVA models. Results Compared to reference controls, MCD cases had lower MPRI values globally and in subendocardial and subepicardial regions (1.63±0.39 vs. 1.98±0.38, P=0.007, 1.51±0.35 vs. 1.84±0.34, P=0.0045, 1.68±0.38 vs. 2.04±0.41, P=0.005, respectively). A perfusion gradient across the myocardium with lower MPRI in the subendocardium compared to the subepicardium was observed for both groups. Conclusions Women with MCD have lower MPRI measured by perfusion CMRI compared to reference controls. CMRI may be a useful diagnostic modality for MCD. Prospective validation of a diagnostic threshold for MPRI in patients with MCD is needed. PMID:24282764

  8. A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Cognitive Control and Neurosensory Deficits in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Andrew R.; Hanlon, Faith M.; Dodd, Andrew B.; Ling, Josef M.; Klimaj, Stefan D.; Meier, Timothy B.

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury patients (mTBI) frequently report symptoms of increased distractability and sensory disturbances during mutisensory stimulation. These common post-concussive symptoms could putatively result from dysfunction within the cognitive control network (CCN; top-down) or from unisensory cortex (bottom-up) itself. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and high-resolution structural data were therefore prospectively collected during a multisensory (audio-visual) cognitive control task from 46 mTBI patients within 3 weeks of injury and 46 matched healthy controls (HC), with a subset of participants returning at 4 months. Multisensory stimuli were presented at two frequencies to manipulate cognitive and perceptual load. Patients self-reported more cognitive, emotional, somatic, vestibular and visual symptoms relative to HC, which improved, but did not entirely resolve, over the 4 month follow-up period. There were no group differences in behavior or functional activation during cognitive control (incongruent – congruent trials). In contrast, patients exhibited abnormal activation within different regions of visual cortex that depended on whether attention was focused on auditory or visual information streams. Patients also exhibited increased activation within bilateral inferior parietal lobules during higher cognitive/perceptual loads, suggesting a compensatory mechanism to achieve similar levels of behavioral performance. Functional abnormalities within the visual cortex and inferior parietal lobules were only partially resolved at 4 months post-injury, suggesting that neural abnormalities may take longer to resolve than behavioral measures used in most clinical settings. In summary, current results indicate that abnormalities within unisensory cortex (particularly visual areas) following mTBI, which likely contribute to deficits commonly reported during multisensory stimulation. PMID:26493161

  9. Nonaqueous magnetic nanoparticle suspensions with controlled particle size and nuclear magnetic resonance properties.

    PubMed

    Meledandri, Carla J; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Brougham, Dermot F

    2008-12-16

    We report the preparation of monodisperse maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticle suspensions in heptane, by thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine surfactants. By varying the surfactant/Fe precursor mole ratio during synthesis, control was exerted both over the nanocrystal core size, in the range from 3 to 6 nm, and over the magnetic properties of the resulting nanoparticle dispersions. We report field-cycling 1H NMR relaxation analysis of the superparamagnetic relaxation rate enhancement of nonaqueous suspensions for the first time. This approach permits measurement of the relaxivity and provides information on the saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy energy of the suspended particles. The saturation magnetization was found to be in the expected range for maghemite particles of this size. The anisotropy energy was found to increase significantly with decreasing particle size, which we attribute to increased shape anisotropy. This study can be used as a guide for the synthesis of maghemite nanoparticles with selected magnetic properties for a given application.

  10. Advances in 133Cs Fountains: Control of the Cold Collision Shift and Observation of Feshbach Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Bize, S.; Marion, H.; Cacciapuoti, L.; Vian, C.; Rosenbusch, P.; Pereira dos Santos, F.; Wolf, P.; Abgrall, M.; Maksimovic, I.; Gruenert, J.; Santarelli, G.; Laurent, P.; Clairon, A.; Luiten, A.; Tobar, M.; Kokkelmans, S.; Salomon, C.

    2005-05-05

    This paper describes the work performed at BNM-SYRTE (Observatoire de Paris) over the past few years toward the improvement and the use of microwave frequency standards using laser-cooled atoms. First, recent improvements of the 133Cs and 87Rb atomic fountains are described. An important advance is the achievement of a fractional frequency instability of 1.6 x 10-14{tau}-1/2 where {tau} is the measurement time in seconds, thanks to the routine use of a cryogenic sapphire oscillator as an ultra-stable local frequency reference. The second advance is a powerful method to control the frequency shift due to cold collisions. These two advances lead to a frequency stability of 2 x 10-16 at 50,000 s for the first time for primary standards. In addition, these clocks realize the SI second with an accuracy of 7 x 10-16, one order of magnitude below that of uncooled devices.

  11. Erratum: Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 123001)

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δmore » $$b_⊥^{ext}$$ ≈ $$10^{-4}$$ → $$10^{-3}$$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.« less

  12. PROMISe trial: a pilot, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound for uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Vanessa L; Kohi, Maureen P; Poder, Liina; Jacoby, Alison; Lager, Jeanette; Schembri, Michael; Rieke, Viola; Grady, Deborah; Vittinghoff, Eric; Coakley, Fergus V

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a full-scale placebo-controlled trial of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound for fibroids (MRgFUS) and obtain estimates of safety and efficacy. Pilot, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. University medical center. Premenopausal women with symptomatic uterine fibroids. Participants randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive MRgFUS or placebo procedure. change in fibroid symptoms from baseline to 4 and 12 weeks after treatment assessed by the Uterine Fibroid Symptom Quality of Life Questionnaire (UFS-QOL); secondary outcome: incidence of surgery or procedures for recurrent symptoms at 12 and 24 months. Twenty women with a mean age of 44 years (±standard deviation 5.4 years) were enrolled, and 13 were randomly assigned to MRgFUS and 7 to placebo. Four weeks after treatment, all participants reported improvement in the UFS-QOL: a mean of 10 points in the MRgFUS group and 9 points in the placebo group (for difference in change between groups). By 12 weeks, the MRgFUS group had improved more than the placebo group (mean 31 points and 13 points, respectively). The mean fibroid volume decreased 18% in the MRgFUS group with no decrease in the placebo group at 12 weeks. Two years after MRgFUS, 4 of 12 women who had a follow-up evaluation (30%) had undergone another fibroid surgery or procedure. Women with fibroids were willing to enroll in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of MRgFUS. A placebo effect may explain some of the improvement in fibroid-related symptoms observed in the first 12 weeks after MRgFUS. NCT01377519. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and Local Tumor Control in Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes Lang, Stefan; Kirisits, Christian; Fidarova, Elena F.; Berger, Daniel; Georg, Petra; Doerr, Wolfgang; Poetter, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the value of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for predicting local control in magnetic resonance (MR) image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Our study population consists of 141 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB-IVA) treated with 45-50 Gy external beam radiotherapy plus four times 7 Gy IGBT with or without cisplatin. Gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IRCTV) were contoured, and DVH parameters (minimum dose delivered to 90% of the volume of interest [D90] and D100) were assessed. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) by applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy). Groups were defined for patients with or without local recurrence (LR) in the true pelvis for tumor size at diagnosis (GTV at diagnosis [GTVD] of 2-5 cm (Group 1) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2) and for tumor size response at IGBT (HRCTV) of 2-5 cm (Group 2a) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2b). Results: Eighteen LRs were observed. The most important DVH parameters correlated with LR were the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Mean D90 and D100 values for HRCTV were 86 {+-} 16 and 65 {+-} 10 Gy, respectively. The D90 for HRCTV greater than 87 Gy resulted in an LR incidence of 4% (3 of 68) compared with 20% (15 of 73) for D90 less than 87 Gy. The effect was most pronounced in the tumor group (Group 2b). Conclusions: We showed an increase in local control in IGBT in patients with cervical cancer with the dose delivered, which can be expressed by the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Local control rates greater than 95% can be achieved if the D90 (EQD2) for HRCTV is 87 Gy or greater.

  14. Nanosecond-pulse-controlled higher-order sideband comb in a GaAs optomechanical disk resonator in the non-perturbative regime

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Hao; Si, Liu-Gang; Lü, Xin-You; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2014-10-15

    We propose an interesting scheme for tunable high-order sideband comb generation by utilizing ultrastrong optomechanical interaction in a GaAs optomechanical disk resonator beyond the perturbative approximation. We analyze the nonlinear nature of the optomechanical interaction, and give a full description of the non-perturbative effects. It is shown, within the non-perturbative regime, that high-order sideband comb with large intensities can be realized and controlled in a GaAs optomechanical disk resonator with experimentally achievable system parameters, and the non-perturbative regime leads to rich and nontrivial behavior.

  15. Modeling of divertor particle and heat loads during application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields for ELM control in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, O.; Becoulet, M.; Cahyna, P.; Evans, T. E.; Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Kirschner, A.; Kukushkin, A.; Laengner, R.; Lunt, T.; Loarte, A.; Pitts, R.; Reiser, D.; Reiter, D.; Saibene, G.; Samm, U.

    2013-07-01

    First results from three-dimensional modeling of the divertor heat and particle flux pattern during application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields as ELM control scheme in ITER with the EMC3-Eirene fluid plasma and kinetic neutral transport code are discussed. The formation of a helical magnetic footprint breaks the toroidal symmetry of the heat and particle fluxes. Expansion of the flux pattern as far as 60 cm away from the unperturbed strike line is seen with vacuum RMP fields, resulting in a preferable heat flux spreading. Inclusion of plasma response reduces the radial extension of the heat and particle fluxes and results in a heat flux peaking closer to the unperturbed level. A strong reduction of the particle confinement is found. 3D flow channels are identified as a consistent reason due to direct parallel outflow from inside of the separatrix. Their radial inward expansion and hence the level of particle pump out is shown to be dependent on the perturbation level.

  16. Optically controlled low-power on-off mode resonant tunneling oscillator with a heterojunction phototransistor switch.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kiwon; Park, Jaehong; Lee, Jooseok; Yang, Kyounghoon

    2015-03-15

    We report an optically controlled low-power on-off mode oscillator based on a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) that is monolithically integrated with a heterojunction phototransistor (HPT) optical switch. In order to achieve a low-power operation at a wavelength of 1.55 μm an InP-based quantum-effect tunneling diode is used for microwave signal generation based on a unique negative differential conductance (NDC) characteristic of the RTD at a low applied voltage. In addition, the high-gain HPT is used for converting incident optical data to an electrical data signal. The fabricated on-off mode oscillator shows a low-power consumption of 5 mW and a high-data-rate of 1  Gb/s at an oscillation frequency of 4.7 GHz. A good energy efficiency of 5  pJ/bit has been obtained due to the low DC power consumption along with high-data-rate performance of the RTD-based optoelectronic integration scheme.

  17. Near-IR (1 - 4 μm) control of plasmonic resonance wavelength in Ga-doped ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Look, David C.; Leedy, Kevin D.; Grzybowski, Gordon J.; Claflin, Bruce B.

    2017-03-01

    The plasmonic resonance wavelength λres in ZnO doped with 3wt%Ga2O3 can be controlled over the range 1 - 4 μm by simple furnace annealing in flowing Ar. For each annealing temperature TA, the reflectance Rm and transmittance Tm are measured over a wavelength range, λ = 185 - 3200 nm, (energy range, E = 6.7 - 0.387 eV), and the reflectance coefficient R is calculated from Rm and Tm. The value of λres is then determined from a Drude-theory analysis of R vs E that yields fitting parameters nopt (optical carrier concentration), μopt (optical mobility), high-frequency dielectric constant ɛ∞, and thickness d, at each annealing temperature TA. The validity of this process is confirmed by comparison of ɛ∞ with literature values, and comparison of nopt and μopt with analogous quantities n and μH measured by the Hall-effect.

  18. Controllable copper deficiency in Cu2-xSe nanocrystals with tunable localized surface plasmon resonance and enhanced chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Shao Qing; Wang, Dong Mei; Gao, Ming Xuan; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2014-08-01

    Copper chalcogenide nanocrystals (CuCNCs) as a type of semiconductor that can also act as efficient catalysts are rarely reported. Herein, we study water-soluble size-controlled Cu2-xSe nanocrystals (NCs), which are copper deficient and could be prepared by a redox reaction with the assistance of surfactants. We found them to have strong near-infrared localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties originating from the holes in the valence band, and also catalytic activity of more than a 500-fold enhancement of chemiluminescence (CL) in a luminol-H2O2 system. Investigations into the mechanisms behind these results showed that the high concentration of free carriers in Cu2-xSe NCs, which are derived from their high copper deficiencies that make Cu2-xSe NCs both good electron donors and acceptors with high ionic mobility, could greatly enhance the catalytic ability of Cu2-xSe NCs to facilitate electron-transfer processes and the decomposition of H2O2 into OH&z.rad; and O2&z.rad;-, which are the commonly accepted key intermediates in luminol CL enhancement. Thus, it can be concluded that controllable copper deficiencies that are correlated with their near-infrared LSPR are critically responsible for the effective catalysis of Cu2-xSe NCs in the enhanced CL.Copper chalcogenide nanocrystals (CuCNCs) as a type of semiconductor that can also act as efficient catalysts are rarely reported. Herein, we study water-soluble size-controlled Cu2-xSe nanocrystals (NCs), which are copper deficient and could be prepared by a redox reaction with the assistance of surfactants. We found them to have strong near-infrared localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties originating from the holes in the valence band, and also catalytic activity of more than a 500-fold enhancement of chemiluminescence (CL) in a luminol-H2O2 system. Investigations into the mechanisms behind these results showed that the high concentration of free carriers in Cu2-xSe NCs, which are derived from

  19. Experimental methods for improved spatial control of thermal lesions in magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound ablation.

    PubMed

    Viallon, Magalie; Petrusca, Lorena; Auboiroux, Vincent; Goget, Thomas; Baboi, Loredana; Becker, Christoph D; Salomir, Rares

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU, or MRgFUS) is a hybrid technology that was developed to provide efficient and tolerable thermal ablation of targeted tumors or other pathologic tissues, while preserving the normal surrounding structures. Fast 3-D ablation strategies are feasible with the newly available phased-array HIFU transducers. However, unlike fixed heating sources for interstitial ablation (radiofrequency electrode, microwave applicator, infra-red laser applicator), HIFU uses propagating waves. Therefore, the main challenge is to avoid thermo-acoustical adverse effects, such as energy deposition at reflecting interfaces and thermal drift of the focal lesion toward the near field. We report here our investigations on some novel experimental solutions to solve, or at least to alleviate, these generally known tolerability problems in HIFU-based therapy. Online multiplanar MR thermometry was the main investigational tool extensively used in this study to identify the problems and to assess the efficacy of the tested solutions. We present an improved method to cancel the beam reflection at the exit window (i.e., tissue-to-air interface) by creating a multilayer protection, to dissipate the residual HIFU beam by bulk scattering. This study evaluates selective de-activation of transducer elements to reduce the collateral heating at bone surfaces in the far field, mainly during automatically controlled volumetric ablation. We also explore, using hybrid US/MR simultaneous imaging, the feasibility of using disruptive boiling at the focus, both as a far-field self-shielding technique and as an enhanced ablation strategy (i.e., boiling core controlled HIFU ablation).

  20. Professional driving and prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging – a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T; Griffin, Michael; Ntani, Georgia; Shambrook, James; McNee, Philip; Sampson, Madeleine; Harris, E Clare; Coggon, David

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate whether whole-body vibration (WBV) is associated with prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc (PID) and nerve root entrapment among patients with low-back pain (LBP) undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods A consecutive series of patients referred for lumbar MRI because of LBP were compared with controls X-rayed for other reasons. Subjects were questioned about occupational activities loading the spine, psychosocial factors, driving, personal characteristics, mental health, and certain beliefs about LBP. Exposure to WBV was assessed by six measures, including weekly duration of professional driving, hours driven at a spell, and current 8-hour daily equivalent root-mean-square acceleration A(8). Cases were sub-classified according to whether or not PID/nerve root entrapment was present. Associations with WBV were examined separately for cases with and without these MRI findings, with adjustment for age, sex, and other potential confounders. Results Altogether, 237 cases and 820 controls were studied, including 183 professional drivers and 176 cases with PID and/or nerve root entrapment. Risks associated with WBV tended to be lower for LBP with PID/nerve root entrapment but somewhat higher for risks of LBP without these abnormalities. However, associations with the six metrics of exposure were all weak and not statistically significant. Neither exposure–response relationships nor increased risk of PID/nerve root entrapment from professional driving or exposure at an A(8) above the European Union daily exposure action level were found. Conclusions WBV may be a cause of LBP but it was not associated with PID or nerve root entrapment in this study. PMID:22249859

  1. CONTROL OF NON-RESONANT EFFECTS IN A NUCLERA SPIN QUANTUM COMPUTER WITH A LARGE NUMBER OF QUBITS

    SciTech Connect

    G. BERMAN; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    The authors discuss how to simulate simple quantum logic operations with a large number of qubits. These simulations are needed for experimental testing of scalable solid-state quantum computers. Quantum logic for remote qubits is simulated in a spin chain. Analytical estimates are presented for possible correlated errors caused by non-resonant transitions. A range of parameters is given in which non-resonant effects can be minimized.

  2. Mode jumping of split-ring resonator metamaterials controlled by high-permittivity BST and incident electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojian; Zeng, Xinxi; Cui, Tie Jun; Lan, Chuwen; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the resonant modes of split-ring resonator (SRR) metamaterials that contain high-permittivity BST block numerically and experimentally. We observe interesting mode-jumping phenomena from the BST-included SRR absorber structure as the excitation wave is incident perpendicularly to the SRR plane. Specifically, when the electric field is parallel to the SRR gap, the BST block in the gap will induce a mode jumping from the LC resonance to plasmonic resonance (horizontal electric-dipole mode), because the displacement current excited by the Mie resonance in the dielectric block acts as a current channel in the gap. When the electric field is perpendicular to the gap side, the plasmonic resonance mode (vertical electric-dipole mode) in SRR changes to two joint modes contributed simultaneously by the back layer, SRR and BST block, as a result of connected back layer and SRR layer by the displacement current in the BST dielectric block. Based on the mode jumping effect as well as temperature and electric-field dependent dielectric constant, the BST-included SRR metamaterials may have great potentials for the applications in electromagnetic switches and widely tunable metamaterial devices.

  3. Mode jumping of split-ring resonator metamaterials controlled by high-permittivity BST and incident electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaojian; Zeng, Xinxi; Cui, Tie Jun; Lan, Chuwen; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the resonant modes of split-ring resonator (SRR) metamaterials that contain high-permittivity BST block numerically and experimentally. We observe interesting mode-jumping phenomena from the BST-included SRR absorber structure as the excitation wave is incident perpendicularly to the SRR plane. Specifically, when the electric field is parallel to the SRR gap, the BST block in the gap will induce a mode jumping from the LC resonance to plasmonic resonance (horizontal electric-dipole mode), because the displacement current excited by the Mie resonance in the dielectric block acts as a current channel in the gap. When the electric field is perpendicular to the gap side, the plasmonic resonance mode (vertical electric-dipole mode) in SRR changes to two joint modes contributed simultaneously by the back layer, SRR and BST block, as a result of connected back layer and SRR layer by the displacement current in the BST dielectric block. Based on the mode jumping effect as well as temperature and electric-field dependent dielectric constant, the BST-included SRR metamaterials may have great potentials for the applications in electromagnetic switches and widely tunable metamaterial devices. PMID:27502844

  4. Polygraphy and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Lie Detection: A Controlled Blind Comparison Using the Concealed Information Test.

    PubMed

    Langleben, Daniel D; Hakun, Jonathan G; Seelig, David; Wang, An-Li; Ruparel, Kosha; Bilker, Warren B; Gur, Ruben C

    2016-10-01

    Intentional deception is a common act that often has detrimental social, legal, and clinical implications. In the last decade, brain activation patterns associated with deception have been mapped with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), significantly expanding our theoretical understanding of the phenomenon. However, despite substantial criticism, polygraphy remains the only biological method of lie detection in practical use today. We conducted a blind, prospective, and controlled within-subjects study to compare the accuracy of fMRI and polygraphy in the detection of concealed information. Data were collected between July 2008 and August 2009. Participants (N = 28) secretly wrote down a number between 3 and 8 on a slip of paper and were questioned about what number they wrote during consecutive and counterbalanced fMRI and polygraphy sessions. The Concealed Information Test (CIT) paradigm was used to evoke deceptive responses about the concealed number. Each participant's preprocessed fMRI images and 5-channel polygraph data were independently evaluated by 3 fMRI and 3 polygraph experts, who made an independent determination of the number the participant wrote down and concealed. Using a logistic regression, we found that fMRI experts were 24% more likely (relative risk = 1.24, P < .001) to detect the concealed number than the polygraphy experts. Incidentally, when 2 out of 3 raters in each modality agreed on a number (N = 17), the combined accuracy was 100%. These data justify further evaluation of fMRI as a potential alternative to polygraphy. The sequential or concurrent use of psychophysiology and neuroimaging in lie detection also deserves new consideration.

  5. Within and between session changes in subjective and neuroendocrine stress parameters during magnetic resonance imaging: A controlled scanner training study.

    PubMed

    Lueken, Ulrike; Muehlhan, Markus; Evens, Ricarda; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2012-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner can act as a stressor, eliciting subjective and neuroendocrine stress responses. Approaches to familiarize subjects with the scanner could help minimizing unintended effects on neural activation patterns of interest. Controlled studies on the effects of a scanner training are however missing. Using a comparative design, we analyzed within- and between session changes in subjective and neuroendocrine stress parameters in 63 healthy, scanner-naïve adults who participated in a two-day training protocol in an MRI, mock, or lab environment. A habituation task was used to assess within-session changes in subjective and neuroendocrine (cortisol) stress parameters; between-session changes were indicated by differences between days. MRI and mock, but not lab training were successful in reducing subjective distress towards the scanner. In contrast, cortisol reactivity towards the training environment generally increased during day 2, and the percentage of cortisol responders particularly rose in the mock and MRI groups. Within-session habituation of subjective arousal and anxiety was observed during both days and irrespective of training condition. Present findings demonstrate that training in a scanner environment successfully reduces subjective distress, but may also induce sensitization of endocrine stress levels during repeated scanning. Subjective distress can further be stabilized by acclimating subjects to the environment prior to the MRI assessment, including a short habituation phase into the assessment protocol. If replicated, present findings should be considered by researchers employing repeated measurement designs where subjects are exposed to a scanner more than once.

  6. A tumour control probability model for radiotherapy of prostate cancer using magnetic resonance imaging-based apparent diffusion coefficient maps.

    PubMed

    Casares-Magaz, Oscar; van der Heide, Uulke A; Rørvik, Jarle; Steenbergen, Peter; Muren, Ludvig Paul

    2016-04-01

    Standard tumour control probability (TCP) models assume uniform tumour cell density across the tumour. The aim of this study was to develop an individualised TCP model by including index-tumour regions extracted form multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps-based cell density distributions. ADC maps in a series of 20 prostate cancer patients were applied to estimate the initial number of cells within each voxel, using three different approaches for the relation between ADC values and cell density: a linear, a binary and a sigmoid relation. All TCP models were based on linear-quadratic cell survival curves assuming α/β=1.93Gy (consistent with a recent meta-analysis) and α set to obtain a 70% of TCP when 77Gy was delivered to the entire prostate in 35 fractions (α=0.18Gy(-1)). Overall, TCP curves based on ADC maps showed larger differences between individuals than those assuming uniform cell densities. The range of the dose required to reach 50% TCP across the patient cohort was 20.1Gy, 18.7Gy and 13.2Gy using an MRI-based voxel density (linear, binary and sigmoid approach, respectively), compared to 4.1Gy using a constant density. Inclusion of tumour-index information together with ADC maps-based cell density increases inter-patient tumour response differentiation for use in prostate cancer RT, resulting in TCP curves with a larger range in D50% across the cohort compared with those based on uniform cell densities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Electromagnetic wave energy flow control with a tunable and reconfigurable coupled plasma split-ring resonator metamaterial: A study of basic conditions and configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtzanidis, Konstantinos; Pederson, Dylan M.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-05-01

    We propose and study numerically a tunable and reconfigurable metamaterial based on coupled split-ring resonators (SRRs) and plasma discharges. The metamaterial couples the magnetic-electric response of the SRR structure with the electric response of a controllable plasma slab discharge that occupies a volume of the metamaterial. Because the electric response of a plasma depends on its constitutive parameters (electron density and collision frequency), the plasma-based metamaterial is tunable and active. Using three-dimensional numerical simulations, we analyze the coupled plasma-SRR metamaterial in terms of transmittance, performing parametric studies on the effects of electron density, collisional frequency, and the position of the plasma slab with respect to the SRR array. We find that the resonance frequency can be controlled by the plasma position or the plasma-to-collision frequency ratio, while transmittance is highly dependent on the latter.

  8. Electromagnetic wave energy flow control with a tunable and reconfigurable coupled plasma split-ring resonator metamaterial: A study of basic conditions and configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Kourtzanidis, Konstantinos Pederson, Dylan M.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-05-28

    We propose and study numerically a tunable and reconfigurable metamaterial based on coupled split-ring resonators (SRRs) and plasma discharges. The metamaterial couples the magnetic-electric response of the SRR structure with the electric response of a controllable plasma slab discharge that occupies a volume of the metamaterial. Because the electric response of a plasma depends on its constitutive parameters (electron density and collision frequency), the plasma-based metamaterial is tunable and active. Using three-dimensional numerical simulations, we analyze the coupled plasma-SRR metamaterial in terms of transmittance, performing parametric studies on the effects of electron density, collisional frequency, and the position of the plasma slab with respect to the SRR array. We find that the resonance frequency can be controlled by the plasma position or the plasma-to-collision frequency ratio, while transmittance is highly dependent on the latter.

  9. Design and test of a resonance control system for suppressing the pump vibration effects for the PEFP 13-MHz RF cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying-Min; Cha, Sung-Su; Jang, Ji-Ho; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Song, Young-Gi; Kim, Han-Sung; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Cho, Yong-Sub; Trinh, Tu-Anh

    2013-11-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project developed a 13-MHz pulsed, RF cavity for heavy-ion implanter applications. Typically, slow changes in the room temperature and the mechanical vibrations of the vacuum device may be primary sources of disturbances, and the accelerating cavity of the implanter may not be able to operate at the resonance frequency owing to disturbance effects. We need a voltage-controlled oscillator phased-locked loop circuit to make a control system that could suppress the disturbance effects; thus, the accelerating gradient of the cavity always reached a peak level for a given input power and coupling. An analog-circuit-based RF-frequency-tracking system was developed. Next, we obtained the optimal control parameters for the key control components. Finally, we measured the system performance between an open loop and a closed loop. The key point of the system design is to control the driving frequency that is used to operate the RF source by keeping the phase at around 0 degrees with respect to the resonance peak of the cavity. The experimental results showed that the fluctuations of the control loop error signal were suppressed by about a factor of 10. The presented feedback loop is implemented as a standard proportional controller. The loop p-gain is 120 k.

  10. Dominance of Plasmonic Resonant Energy Transfer over Direct Electron Transfer in Substantially Enhanced Water Oxidation Activity of BiVO4 by Shape-Controlled Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Gyoung; Moon, Cheon Woo; Park, Hoonkee; Sohn, Woonbae; Kang, Sung Bum; Lee, Sanghan; Choi, Kyoung Jin; Jang, Ho Won

    2017-10-01

    The performance of plasmonic Au nanostructure/metal oxide heterointerface shows great promise in enhancing photoactivity, due to its ability to confine light to the small volume inside the semiconductor and modify the interfacial electronic band structure. While the shape control of Au nanoparticles (NPs) is crucial for moderate bandgap semiconductors, because plasmonic resonance by interband excitations overlaps above the absorption edge of semiconductors, its critical role in water splitting is still not fully understood. Here, first, the plasmonic effects of shape-controlled Au NPs on bismuth vanadate (BiVO4 ) are studied, and a largely enhanced photoactivity of BiVO4 is reported by introducing the octahedral Au NPs. The octahedral Au NP/BiVO4 achieves 2.4 mA cm(-2) at the 1.23 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode, which is the threefold enhancement compared to BiVO4 . It is the highest value among the previously reported plasmonic Au NPs/BiVO4 . Improved photoactivity is attributed to the localized surface plasmon resonance; direct electron transfer (DET), plasmonic resonant energy transfer (PRET). The PRET can be stressed over DET when considering the moderate bandgap semiconductor. Enhanced water oxidation induced by the shape-controlled Au NPs is applicable to moderate semiconductors, and shows a systematic study to explore new efficient plasmonic solar water splitting cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  12. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex K [Kensington, CA; Jensen, Kenneth J [Berkeley, CA; Girit, Caglar [Albany, CA; Mickelson, William E [San Francisco, CA; Grossman, Jeffrey C [Berkeley, CA

    2011-03-29

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  13. Controlling mode competition by tailoring the spatial pump distribution in a laser: a resonance-based approach.

    PubMed

    Cerjan, Alexander; Redding, Brandon; Ge, Li; Liew, Seng Fatt; Cao, Hui; Douglas Stone, A

    2016-11-14

    We introduce a simplified version of the steady-state ab initio laser theory for calculating the effects of mode competition in continuous wave lasers using the passive cavity resonances. This new theory harnesses widely available numerical methods that can efficiently calculate the passive cavity resonances, with negligible additional computational overhead. Using this theory, we demonstrate that the pump profile of the laser cavity can be optimized both for highly multi-mode and single-mode emission. An open source implementation of this method has been made available.

  14. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Phase filtering of the inphase mode of a linear laser array in the Talbot resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandidov, V. P.; Terekhova, Irina V.

    2003-06-01

    A technique for phase filtering of the inphase collective mode of a laser array in the Talbot resonator is developed. This technique is based on the formation of the phase distribution of the inphase mode field of the linear array with the finite number of channels close to that of the field of the infinite periodic structure. A simple scheme of the phase corrector, providing the increase in the selectivity of the inphase mode of the laser array in the Talbot resonator, is proposed. It is shown that the width of the principal maximum of the far-field intensity does not increase during the phase filtering.

  15. Structural brain differences between never-treated patients with schizophrenia, with and without dyskinesia, and normal control subjects: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    McCreadie, Robin G; Thara, Rangaswamy; Padmavati, Ramachandran; Srinivasan, Tirupati N; Jaipurkar, Sandeep D

    2002-04-01

    In south India, abnormal movements indistinguishable from tardive dyskinesia have been observed in chronically ill patients with schizophrenia who have never received antipsychotic medication. The present study, using magnetic resonance imaging, examines brain structure in such patients, in those without dyskinesia, and in normal control subjects. Chronically ill patients with schizophrenia with and without dyskinesia and controls were identified in villages south of Chennai, India (each group, n = 31). Patients' mental state was assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for schizophrenia, dyskinesia by the Abnormal Involuntary Movements Scale, and parkinsonism by the Simpson and Angus scale. In patients and controls, magnetic resonance imaging measured the volume of the caudate and lentiform nuclei and the lateral ventricle-hemisphere ratio. The left lentiform nucleus was significantly (11%) larger in patients with dyskinesia compared with controls, and the right lateral ventricle-hemisphere ratio was significantly (33%) larger in patients without dyskinesia compared with controls. In all 3 groups, there were significant positive correlations between age and ventricle-hemisphere ratio. In controls, but not in patients, there were significant negative correlations between age and the volume of the caudate and lentiform nuclei. Never-treated patients with dyskinesia may have striatal pathologic conditions and may represent a subgroup of patients with schizophrenia; in those without abnormal movements, cortical atrophy is more apparent. The schizophrenic process may interfere with normal age-related anatomical changes in the basal ganglia.

  16. Microcontroller based closed-loop control of a 2D quasi-static/resonant microscanner with on-chip piezo-resistive sensor feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroedter, Richard; Schwarzenberg, Markus; Dreyhaupt, André; Barth, Robert; Sandner, Thilo; Janschek, Klaus

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we present a 2D raster scanning quasi-static/resonant micro mirror being controlled in both axes in closed-loop with on-chip piezo-resistive sensor feedback. While the resonant axis oscillates with a given frequency, the quasi-static axis allows static as well as dynamic deflection up to its eigenfrequency because of its staggered vertical comb (SVC) drive arrangement. Due to the high quality factor of the very low damped spring-masssystem, an adapted trajectory planning using jerk limitation is applied for the quasi-static axis [1]. Nevertheless, inaccuracies of the applied nonlinear micro mirror model and external disturbances lead to undesired residual oscillation in open-loop control mode. To achieve high precise and fast beam positioning, we implement a flatness-based control algorithm with feedback to on-chip piezo-resistive deflection sensors. In comparison to previous work [2, 3], we developed a micro controller setup for driving the microscanner, that is equipped with an analog Bessel filter increasing the sensor signal quality significantly. In this study we demonstrate a small size and low power micro mirror driver including high-voltage generation and a microcontroller for real-time control as well as a head circuit board for high resolution sensing. We discuss experimental results of open-loop and closed-loop control for 2D raster scanning operation. Finally, the outlook is given to the intrinsic capability to compensate temperature drifts influencing the piezo-resistive sensor signal.

  17. Electromechanical actuator with controllable motion, fast response rate, and high-frequency resonance based on graphene and polydiacetylene.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiajie; Huang, Lu; Li, Na; Huang, Yi; Wu, Yingpeng; Fang, Shaoli; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail; Ma, Yanfeng; Li, Feifei; Baughman, Ray; Chen, Yongsheng

    2012-05-22

    Although widely investigated, novel electromechanical actuators with high overall actuation performance are still in urgent need for various practical and scientific applications, such as robots, prosthetic devices, sensor switches, and sonar projectors. In this work, combining the properties of unique environmental perturbations-actuated deformational isomerization of polydiacetylene (PDA) and the outstanding intrinsic features of graphene together for the first time, we design and fabricate an electromechanical bimorph actuator composed of a layer of PDA crystal and a layer of flexible graphene paper through a simple yet versatile solution approach. Under low applied direct current (dc), the graphene-PDA bimorph actuator with strong mechanical strength can generate large actuation motion (curvature is about 0.37 cm(-1) under a current density of 0.74 A/mm(2)) and produce high actuation stress (more than 160 MPa/g under an applied dc of only 0.29 A/mm(2)). When applying alternating current (ac), this actuator can display reversible swing behavior with long cycle life under high frequencies even up to 200 Hz; significantly, while the frequency and the value of applied ac and the state of the actuators reach an appropriate value, the graphene-PDA actuator can produce a strong resonance and the swing amplitude will jump to a peak value. Moreover, this stable graphene-PDA actuator also demonstrates rapidly and partially reversible electrochromatic phenomenon when applying an ac. Two mechanisms-the dominant one, electric-induced deformation, and a secondary one, thermal-induced expansion of PDA-are proposed to contribute to these interesting actuation performances of the graphene-PDA actuators. On the basis of these results, a mini-robot with controllable direction of motion based on the graphene-PDA actuator is designed to illustrate the great potential of our discoveries for practical use. Combining the unique actuation mechanism and many outstanding properties of

  18. Independently controllable multiple Fano resonances in side-coupled MDM structure and its applications for sensing and wavelength demultiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhua; Song, Xiaokang; Yang, Song; Cui, Luna; Yu, Li

    2017-08-01

    Tunable single and multiple Fano resonances are investigated theoretically and numerically in a plasmonic structure, which consists of a cavity (or cavities) side-coupled with a defective metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) waveguide. The results show the Fano resonances originate from the interference between discrete states and a continuum state. These Fano resonances can be independently tuned by adjusting the corresponding cavity parameters. This structure can be utilized to achieve ultrasensitive plasmonic sensor yields with a sensitivity of 1400 nm/RIU. The highest figure of merit (FOM) ~1.75  ×  104 is obtained by optimizing structure. Furthermore, compact and high wavelength resolution plasmonic 1  ×  2 and 1  ×  3 wavelength demultiplexers based on Fano resonances are designed and investigated. This compact and flexible structure has significant applications for sensing, switching, wavelength selecting, as well as constructing highly integrated optical circuits and complex waveguide networks.

  19. Enhanced optical nonlinearity and fiber-optical frequency comb controlled by a single atom in a whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahua; Zhang, Suzhen; Yu, Rong; Zhang, Duo; Wu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Based on a single atom coupled to a fiber-coupled, chip-based microresonator [B. Dayan et al., Science 319, 1062 (2008), 10.1126/science.1152261], we put forward a scheme to generate optical frequency combs at driving laser powers as low as a few nanowatts. Using state-of-the-art experimental parameters, we investigate in detail the influences of different atomic positions and taper-resonator coupling regimes on optical-frequency-comb generation. In addition to numerical simulations demonstrating this effect, a physical explanation of the underlying mechanism is presented. We find that the combination of the atom and the resonator can induce a large third-order nonlinearity which is significantly stronger than Kerr nonlinearity in Kerr frequency combs. Such enhanced nonlinearity can be used to generate optical frequency combs if driven with two continuous-wave control and probe lasers and significantly reduce the threshold of nonlinear optical processes. The comb spacing can be well tuned by changing the frequency beating between the driving control and probe lasers. The proposed method is versatile and can be adopted to different types of resonators, such as microdisks, microspheres, microtoroids or microrings.

  20. Improved Transient and Steady-State Performances of Series Resonant ZCS High-Frequency Inverter-Coupled Voltage Multiplier Converter with Dual Mode PFM Control Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Enhui; Gamage, Laknath; Ishitobi, Manabu; Hiraki, Eiji; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    The A variety of switched-mode high voltage DC power supplies using voltage-fed type or current-fed type high-frequency transformer resonant inverters using MOS gate bipolar power transistors; IGBTs have been recently developed so far for a medical-use X-ray high power generator. In general, the high voltage high power X-ray generator using voltage-fed high frequency inverter with a high voltage transformer link has to meet some performances such as (i) short rising period in start transient of X-ray tube voltage (ii) no overshoot transient response in tube voltage, (iii) minimized voltage ripple in periodic steady-state under extremely wide load variations and filament heater current fluctuation conditions of the X-ray tube. This paper presents two lossless inductor snubber-assisted series resonant zero current soft switching high-frequency inverter using a diode-capacitor ladder type voltage multiplier called Cockcroft-Walton circuit, which is effectively implemented for a high DC voltage X-ray power generator. This DC high voltage generator which incorporates pulse frequency modulated series resonant inverter using IGBT power module packages is based on the operation principle of zero current soft switching commutation scheme under discontinuous resonant current and continuous resonant current transition modes. This series capacitor compensated for transformer resonant power converter with a high frequency transformer linked voltage boost multiplier can efficiently work a novel selectively-changed dual mode PFM control scheme in order to improve the start transient and steady-state response characteristics and can completely achieve stable zero current soft switching commutation tube filament current dependent for wide load parameter setting values with the aid of two lossless inductor snubbers. It is proved on the basis of simulation and experimental results in which a simple and low cost control implementation based on selectively-changed dual-mode PFM for

  1. Development of a temperature-controlled phantom for magnetic resonance quality assurance of diffusion, dynamic, and relaxometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Jerome, Neil P; Papoutsaki, Marianthi-Vasiliki; Orton, Matthew R; Parkes, Harold G; Winfield, Jessica M; Boss, Michael A; Leach, Martin O; deSouza, Nandita M; Collins, David J

    2016-06-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are increasingly applied for the assessment of functional tissue biomarkers for diagnosis, lesion characterization, or for monitoring of treatment response. However, these techniques are vulnerable to the influence of various factors, so there is a necessity for a standardized MR quality assurance procedure utilizing a phantom to facilitate the reliable estimation of repeatability of these quantitative biomarkers arising from technical factors (e.g., B1 variation) affecting acquisition on scanners of different vendors and field strengths. The purpose of this study is to present a novel phantom designed for use in quality assurance for multicenter trials, and the associated repeatability measurements of functional and quantitative imaging protocols across different MR vendors and field strengths. A cylindrical acrylic phantom was manufactured containing 7 vials of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solutions of different concentrations, ranging from 0% (distilled water) to 25% w/w, to create a range of different MR contrast parameters. Temperature control was achieved by equilibration with ice-water. Repeated MR imaging measurements of the phantom were performed on four clinical scanners (two at 1.5 T, two at 3.0 T; two vendors) using the same scanning protocol to assess the long-term and short-term repeatability. The scanning protocol consisted of DW measurements, inversion recovery (IR) T1 measurements, multiecho T2 measurement, and dynamic T1-weighted sequence allowing multiple variable flip angle (VFA) estimation of T1 values over time. For each measurement, the corresponding calculated parameter maps were produced. On each calculated map, regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn within each vial and the median value of these voxels was assessed. For the dynamic data, the autocorrelation function and their variance were calculated; for the assessment of the repeatability, the

  2. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  3. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Method for calculating a negative-dispersion resonator-type multilayer mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholokhonova, Polina A.; Erg, G. V.

    2005-11-01

    A method is proposed for the calculation of negative-dispersion mirrors with resonator cavities. The mirror optimisation algorithm combines the capabilities of the gradient method and the random search method. A multilayer mirror structure with a reflectivity R>99.9% and a group delay dispersion of -60±10 fs2 in the 930-1070 nm wavelength range was calculated. The sensitivity of the obtained structure to random variations of layer thicknesses was analysed.

  4. Steady-state and dynamic characteristics of a 20-kHz spacecraft power system - Control of harmonic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasynczuk, O.; Krause, P. C.; Biess, J. J.; Kapustka, R.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed computer simulation was used to illustrate the steady-state and dynamic operating characteristics of a 20-kHz resonant spacecraft power system. The simulated system consists of a parallel-connected set of DC-inductor resonant inverters (drivers), a 440-V cable, a node transformer, a 220-V cable, and a transformer-rectifier-filter (TRF) AC-to-DC receiver load. Also included in the system are a 1-kW 0.8-pf RL load and a double-LC filter connected at the receiving end of the 20-kHz AC system. The detailed computer simulation was used to illustrate the normal steady-state operating characteristics and the dynamic system performance following, for example, TRF startup. It is shown that without any filtering the given system exhibits harmonic resonances due to an interaction between the switching of the source and/or load converters and the AC system. However, the double-LC filter at the receiving-end of the AC system and harmonic traps connected in series with each of the drivers significantly reduce the harmonic distortion of the 20-kHz bus voltage. Significant additional improvement in the waveform quality can be achieved by including a double-LC filter with each driver.

  5. Thin film resonator technology.

    PubMed

    Lakin, Kenneth M

    2005-05-01

    Advances in wireless systems have placed increased demands on high performance frequency control devices for operation into the microwave range. With spectrum crowding, high bandwidth requirements, miniaturization, and low cost requirements as a background, the thin film resonator technology has evolved into the mainstream of applications. This technology has been under development for over 40 years in one form or another, but it required significant advances in integrated circuit processing to reach microwave frequencies and practical manufacturing for high-volume applications. This paper will survey the development of the thin film resonator technology and describe the core elements that give rise to resonators and filters for today's high performance wireless applications.

  6. Snake resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Tepikian, S.

    1988-01-01

    Siberian Snakes provide a practical means of obtaining polarized proton beams in large accelerators. The effect of snakes can be understood by studying the dynamics of spin precession in an accelerator with snakes and a single spin resonance. This leads to a new class of energy independent spin depolarizing resonances, called snake resonances. In designing a large accelerator with snakes to preserve the spin polarization, there is an added constraint on the choice of the vertical betatron tune due to the snake resonances. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Pseudotumors in association with well-functioning metal-on-metal hip prostheses: a case-control study using three-dimensional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hart, Alister J; Satchithananda, Keshthra; Liddle, Alexander D; Sabah, Shiraz A; McRobbie, Donald; Henckel, Johann; Cobb, Justin P; Skinner, John A; Mitchell, Adam W

    2012-02-15

    Many papers have been published recently on the subject of pseudotumors surrounding metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and replacement prostheses. These pseudotumors are sterile, inflammatory lesions within the periprosthetic tissues and have been variously termed masses, cysts, bursae, collections, or aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesions (ALVAL). The prevalence of pseudotumors in patients with a well-functioning metal-on-metal hip prosthesis is not well known. The purpose of this study was to quantify the prevalence of pseudotumors adjacent to well-functioning and painful metal-on-metal hip prostheses, to characterize these lesions with use of magnetic resonance imaging, and to assess the relationship between their presence and acetabular cup position with use of three-dimensional computed tomography. We performed a case-control study to compare the magnetic resonance imaging findings of patients with a well-functioning unilateral metal-on-metal hip prosthesis and patients with a painful prosthesis (defined by either revision arthroplasty performed because of unexplained pain or an Oxford hip score of <30 of 48 possible points). Thirty patients with a painful hip prosthesis and twenty-eight controls with a well-functioning prosthesis were recruited consecutively. All patients also underwent computed tomography to assess the position of the acetabular component. Thirty-four patients were diagnosed with a pseudotumor. However, the prevalence of pseudotumors in patients with a painful hip (seventeen of thirty, 57%) was not significantly different from the prevalence in the control group (seventeen of twenty-eight, 61%). No objective differences in pseudotumor characteristics between the groups were identified. No clear association between the presence of a pseudotumor and acetabular component position was identified. The Oxford hip score in the group with a painful hip (mean, 20.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 12.7 to 45.8) was poorer than that in

  8. Experimental investigation of a control scheme for a zero-detuning resonant sideband extraction interferometer for next-generation gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazoe, Fumiko; Sugamoto, Akio; Leonhardt, Volker; Sato, Shuichi; Yamazaki, Toshitaka; Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Kawamura, Seiji; Miyakawa, Osamu; Somiya, Kentaro; Morioka, Tomoko; Nishizawa, Atsushi

    2008-10-01

    Some next-generation gravitational-wave detectors, such as the American Advanced LIGO project and the Japanese LCGT project, plan to use power recycled resonant sideband extraction (RSE) interferometers for their interferometer's optical configuration. A power recycled zero-detuning (PRZD) RSE interferometer, which is the default design for LCGT, has five main length degrees of freedom that need to be controlled in order to operate a gravitational-wave detector. This task is expected to be very challenging because of the complexity of optical configuration. A new control scheme for a PRZD RSE interferometer has been developed and tested with a prototype interferometer. The PRZD RSE interferometer was successfully locked with the control scheme. It is the first experimental demonstration of a PRZD RSE interferometer with suspended test masses. The result serves as an important step for the operation of LCGT.

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging study reveals differences in the habituation to psychological stress in patients with Crohn's disease versus healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Alessandro; Filippini, Nicola; Benuzzi, Francesca; Bertani, Angela; Scarcelli, Antonella; Leoni, Chiara; Farinelli, Valentina; Riso, Donatella; Tambasco, Rosy; Calabrese, Carlo; Rizzello, Fernando; Gionchetti, Paolo; Ercolani, Mauro; Nichelli, Paolo; Campieri, Massimo

    2013-10-01

    In patients with Crohn's disease (CD) stress is believed to increase the incidence of disease relapse. The brain processes stressful stimuli and triggers the stress-evoked responses. Habituation to stress is an adaptive process that allows minimizing these responses. We hypothesized inadequate habituation to stress in CD patients. The aim of this study was to compare the neural habituation between CD patients and controls. Twenty CD patients and eighteen controls underwent a functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing two repeated runs of a stress-evoking task. The task elicited different neural activity between the groups across runs in (1) amygdala, hippocampus, (2) insula, putamen (3) cerebellar regions, suggesting altered habituation to stress in patients. These structures regulate the neuroendocrine and autonomic stress-evoked responses that control the proinflammatory responses. The inadequate habituation to stress that we found in patients could play a role in the relationship between stress and inflammatory exacerbations in CD.

  10. Nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.

    This report discusses research in the area of slowly varying nonlinear oscillatory systems. Some of the topics discussed are as follows: adiabatic invariants and transient resonance in very slowly varying Hamiltonian systems; sustained resonance in very slowly varying Hamiltonian systems; free-electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillators.

  11. Nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.; Pernarowski, Mark; Bosley, David L.

    1990-04-01

    The subjects discussed are: transient and sustained resonance for systems with very slowly varying parameters; free electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillations in biological systems. Plans are discussed for: FEL applications; transient and sustained resonance; and bursting oscillations.

  12. Resonant control of spins in the quasi-one-dimensional channel by interplay of confinement and Zeeman splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, D. H.; Khodas, M.; Flatté, M. E.

    2014-10-15

    We study the spin transport in a quasi-one-dimensional channel defined in a two-dimensional electron gas. The combined action of geometrical confinement and the spin precession is analyzed. We demonstrate that for certain orientations of the in-plane magnetic field and for specific range of its magnitude the spin polarization exhibits a strong decrease referred to as ballistic spin resonance (BSR). The phenomenon is due to the commensuration of the Zeeman and inter-subband energy splitting. We show that the BSR requires a finite spin-orbit (SO) interaction although the condition for the BSR onset is independent on SO coupling.

  13. Local thermal resonance control of GaInP photonic crystal membrane cavities using ambient gas cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Sergei Lian, Jin; Yüce, Emre; Mosk, Allard P.; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaelle; De Rossi, Alfredo

    2015-04-27

    We perform spatially dependent tuning of a GaInP photonic crystal cavity using a continuous wave violet laser. Local tuning is obtained by laser heating of the photonic crystal membrane. The cavity resonance shift is measured for different pump positions and for two ambient gases: He and N{sub 2}. We find that the width of the temperature profile induced in the membrane depends strongly on the thermal conductivity of the ambient gas. For He gas, a narrow spatial width of the temperature profile of 2.8 μm is predicted and verified in experiment.

  14. Lithographic wavelength control of an external cavity laser with a silicon photonic crystal cavity-based resonant reflector.

    PubMed

    Liles, Alexandros A; Debnath, Kapil; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-03-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a new design for external cavity hybrid lasers consisting of a III-V semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with fiber reflector and a photonic crystal (PhC)-based resonant reflector on SOI. The silicon reflector is composed of an SU8 polymer bus waveguide vertically coupled to a PhC cavity and provides a wavelength-selective optical feedback to the laser cavity. This device exhibits milliwatt-level output power and side-mode suppression ratios of more than 25 dB.

  15. Comparison of advanced plasma sources for etching applications. V. Polysilicon etching rate, uniformity, profile control, and bulk plasma properties in a helical resonator plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.T.; Layadi, N.; Guinn, K.V.; Maynard, H.L.; Klemens, F.P.; Ibbotson, D.E.; Tepermeister, I.; Egan, P.O.; Richardson, R.A.

    1996-07-01

    Etching of polysilicon features using a helical resonator plasma source is evaluated. Performance metrics consist of etching rate, etching rate uniformity, and profile control using HBr/O{sub 2}{endash}He gas-phase chemistry. The effect of source power, rf-bias power, and reactor pressure on etching rate and uniformity is examined using a response surface experiment. Feature profile control is determined by examining nested and isolated lines and trenches using oxide mask/polysilicon/oxide structures. Good uniformity and vertical profiles are obtained at low reactor pressures, high source power, and rf-bias between 50 and 60 W. The operating point for best uniformity is at 3.5 mTorr, 3000 W source power, and 53 W rf-bias power. At this point, the etching rate is 3700 A/min and the nonuniformity is less than 1.0{percent}, over 125-mm-diam wafers. Radial profiles of electron temperature and ion density near the wafer surface are presented as a function of source power, rf-bias power, and reactor pressure. The ion density was found to be in the mid-10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}3} range and electron temperatures were 5{endash}7 eV. An increase in source power and reactor pressure results in an increase in ion density; however, the electron temperature shows a weaker dependence. Finally, these results are compared to those using helicon and multipole electron cyclotron resonance plasma sources evaluated in previous studies. We found that all three plasma sources provide high ion density at low pressures to meet performance demands for polysilicon etching; however, the helical resonator source offers somewhat higher etching rate and better bulk plasma uniformity. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  16. Acoustic Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2012-11-01

    Recently my collection of historical physics teaching apparatus was given a group of 19th-century tuning forks on resonant boxes. Figure 1 shows the smallest fork sitting on the largest one. The large tuning fork oscillates at 128 Hz and has a resonator that is 57.9 cm long. The small fork has a frequency 10 times higher, but its resonator has a length of 11.0 cm instead of the 5.8 cm that simple scaling would suggest. How is this possible?

  17. Controllable Fabrication of Two-Dimensional Patterned VO2 Nanoparticle, Nanodome, and Nanonet Arrays with Tunable Temperature-Dependent Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yujie; Wen, Xinglin; Zhao, Dongyuan; Che, Renchao; Xiong, Qihua; Long, Yi

    2017-07-25

    A universal approach to develop various two-dimensional ordered nanostructures, namely nanoparticle, nanonet and nanodome arrays with controllable periodicity, ranging from 100 nm to 1 μm, has been developed in centimeter-scale by nanosphere lithography technique. Hexagonally patterned vanadium dioxide (VO2) nanoparticle array with average diameter down to sub-100 nm as well as 160 nm of periodicity is fabricated, exhibiting distinct size-, media-, and temperature-dependent localized surface plasmon resonance switching behaviors, which fits well with the predication of simulations. We specifically explore their decent thermochromic performance in an energy saving smart window and develop a proof-of-concept demo which proves the effectiveness of patterned VO2 film to serve as a smart thermal radiation control. This versatile and facile approach to fabricate various ordered nanostructures integrated with attractive phase change characteristics of VO2 may inspire the study of temperature-dependent physical responses and the development of smart devices in extensive areas.

  18. Tunable resonant and non-resonant interactions between a phase qubit and LC resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allman, Michael Shane; Whittaker, Jed D.; Castellanos-Beltran, Manuel; Cicak, Katarina; da Silva, Fabio; Defeo, Michael; Lecocq, Florent; Sirois, Adam; Teufel, John; Aumentado, Jose; Simmonds, Raymond W.

    2014-03-01

    We use a flux-biased radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (rf SQUID) with an embedded flux-biased direct current (dc) SQUID to generate strong resonant and non-resonant tunable interactions between a phase qubit and a lumped-element resonator. The rf-SQUID creates a tunable magnetic susceptibility between the qubit and resonator providing resonant coupling rates from zero to near the ultra-strong coupling regime. By modulating the magnetic susceptibility, non-resonant parametric coupling achieves rates > 100 MHz . Nonlinearity of the magnetic susceptibility also leads to parametric coupling at subharmonics of the qubit-resonator detuning. Controllable coupling is generically important for constructing coupled-mode systems ubiquitous in physics, useful for both, quantum information architectures and quantum simulators. This work supported by NIST and NSA grant EAO140639.

  19. Giant Electric Field Control of Magnetism and Narrow Ferromagnetic Resonance Linewidth in FeCoSiB/Si/SiO2/PMN PT Multiferroic Heterostructures (Open Access Author’s Manuscript)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-06

    1 Giant electric field control of magnetism and narrow ferromagnetic resonance linewidth in FeCoSiB/Si/SiO2/PMN-PT multiferroic heterostructures...c) 1Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, 02115, USA 2Materials and Manufacturing...coupling and narrow ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth in multiferroic heterostructures. Electric field induced large effective field of 175Oe

  20. Analysis of brain metabolism by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder suggests a generalized differential ontogenic pattern from controls.

    PubMed

    Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Londoño, Ana C; Pineda, David A; Lopera, Francisco; Palacio, Juan David; Arbelaez, Andres; Acosta, Maria T; Vélez, Jorge I; Castellanos, Francisco Xavier; Muenke, Maximilian

    2012-12-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common behavioral disorder of childhood. Preliminary studies with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) of the brain have reported differences in brain metabolite concentration-to-Cr ratios between individuals with ADHD and unaffected controls in several frontal brain regions including anterior cingulate cortex. Using multivoxel (1)H-MRS, we compared 14 individuals affected with ADHD to 20 individuals without ADHD from the same genetic isolate. After controlling by sex, age, and multiple testing, we found significant differences at the right posterior cingulate of the Glx/Cr ratio density distribution function between ADHD cases and controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we found several interactions of metabolite concentration-to-Cr ratio, age, and ADHD status: Ins/Cr and Glx/Cr ratios at the left posterior cingulate, and NAA/Cr at the splenius, right posterior cingulate, and at the left posterior cingulate. We also found a differential metabolite ratio interaction between ADHD cases and controls for Ins/Cr and NAA/Cr at the right striatum. These results show that: (1) NAA/Cr, Glx/Cr, and Ins/Cr ratios, as reported in other studies, exhibit significant differences between ADHD cases and controls; (2) differences of these metabolite ratios between ADHD cases and controls evolve in specific and recognizable patterns throughout age, a finding that replicates previous results obtained by structural MRI, where is demonstrated that brain ontogeny follows a different program in ADHD cases and controls; (3) Ins/Cr and NAA/Cr ratios, at the right striatum, interact in a differential way between ADHD cases and controls. As a whole, these results replicate previous 1H-MRS findings and add new intriguing differential metabolic and ontogeny patterns between ADHD cases and controls that warrant further pursue.

  1. Assessing the merits of resonant magnetic perturbations with different toroidal mode numbers for controlling edge localised modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Kirk, A.; Akers, R. J.; Ham, C. J.; Harrison, J. R.; Hawke, J.; Liu, Y. Q.; McClements, K. G.; Pamela, S.; Saarelma, S.; Scannell, R.; Thornton, A. J.; The MAST Team

    2014-12-01

    An increase in ELM frequency has been demonstrated in MAST by applying resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode number, nRMP = 2, 3, 4, 6. It has been observed that the mitigated ELM frequency increases with the amplitude of the applied field provided it is above a critical threshold. This threshold value depends on the mode number of the RMP, with higher nRMP having a larger critical value. For the same ELM frequency, the reduction in the peak heat load on the divertor plates is approximately the same for all RMP configurations. The RMPs give rise to perturbations to the plasma shape, with lobe structures occurring due to the tangled magnetic fields near the X-point, and corrugations of the plasma boundary at the midplane. The X-point lobe length increases linearly with the applied field when above a threshold, with RMPs of higher toroidal mode number giving rise to longer lobes for the same applied resonant field. Similarly, the midplane displacements increase with the applied field strength, though the corrugation amplitude is less dependent upon the RMP configuration. For all nRMP, the RMPs result in enhanced particle transport and a reduction in the pedestal pressure gradient caused by an increased pedestal width, which is found to be consistent with a decrease in the critical pressure at which infinite-n ballooning modes are driven unstable in non-axisymmetric plasmas. The plasma rotation braking is strongest for lowest nRMP whilst the degradation of access to H-mode resultant from the application of RMPs are non-monotonic in nRMP, with the optimal case for both occurring for nRMP = 4. Whilst there are advantages and disadvantages for all RMP configurations, the configurations found to be optimised in terms of pedestal degradation, access to H-mode, plasma rotation and distortion to the plasma configuration in MAST are nRMP = 3 or 4, consistent with the configurations anticipated for use in ITER.

  2. Control of the plasmonic resonance of a graphene coated plasmonic nanoparticle array combined with a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sio, Luciano; Cataldi, Ugo; Bürgi, Thomas; Tabiryan, Nelson; Bunning, Timothy J.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a switchable plasmonic device based on a conductive graphene oxide (cGO) coated plasmonic nanoparticle (NP) array, layered with nematic liquid crystal (NLC) as an active medium. A monolayer of NPs has been immobilized on a glass substrate through electrostatic interaction, and then grown in place using nanochemistry. This monolayer is then coated with a thin (less then 100nm) cGO film which acts simultaneously as both an electro-conductive and active medium. The combination of the conductive NP array with a separate top cover substrate having both cGO and a standard LC alignment layer is used for aligning a NLC film in a hybrid configuration. The system is analysed in terms of morphological and electro-optical properties. The spectral response of the sample characterized after each element is added (air, cGO, NLC) reveals a red-shift of the localized plasmonic resonance (LPR) frequency of approximately 62nm with respect to the NP array surrounded by air. The application of an external voltage (8Vpp) is suitable to modulate (blue shift) the LPR frequency by approximately 22nm.

  3. Lumbo-pelvic joint protection against antigravity forces: motor control and segmental stiffness assessed with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Richardson, C A; Hides, J A; Wilson, S; Stanton, W; Snijders, C J

    2004-07-01

    The antigravity muscles of the lumbo-pelvic region, especially transversus abdominis (TrA), are important for the protection and support of the weightbearing joints. Measures of TrA function (the response to the postural cue of drawing in the abdominal wall) have been developed and quantified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cross-sections through the trunk allowed muscle contraction as well as the large fascial attachments of the TrA to be visualized. The cross sectional area (CSA) of the deep musculo-fascial system was measured at rest and in the contracted state, using static images as well as a cine sequence. In this developmental study, MRI measures were undertaken on a small sample of low back pain (LBP) and non LBP subjects. Results demonstrated that, in non LBP subjects, the draw in action produced a symmetrical deep musculo-fascial "corset" which encircles the abdomen. This study demonstrated a difference in this "corset" measure between subjects with and without LBP. These measures may also prove useful to quantify the effect of unloading in bedrest and microgravity exposure.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of a randomized controlled trial investigating predictors of recovery following psychological treatment in adolescents with moderate to severe unipolar depression: study protocol for Magnetic Resonance-Improving Mood with Psychoanalytic and Cognitive Therapies (MR-IMPACT)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorders (MDD) are a debilitating and pervasive group of mental illnesses afflicting many millions of people resulting in the loss of 110 million working days and more than 2,500 suicides per annum. Adolescent MDD patients attending NHS clinics show high rates of recurrence into adult life. A meta-analysis of recent research shows that psychological treatments are not as efficacious as previously thought. Modest treatment outcomes of approximately 65% of cases responding suggest that aetiological and clinical heterogeneity may hamper the better use of existing therapies and discovery of more effective treatments. Information with respect to optimal treatment choice for individuals is lacking, with no validated biomarkers to aid therapeutic decision-making. Methods/Design Magnetic resonance-Improving Mood with Psychoanalytic and Cognitive Therapies, the MR-IMPACT study, plans to identify brain regions implicated in the pathophysiology of depressions and examine whether there are specific behavioural or neural markers predicting remission and/or subsequent relapse in a subsample of depressed adolescents recruited to the IMPACT randomised controlled trial (Registration # ISRCTN83033550). Discussion MR-IMPACT is an investigative biomarker component of the IMPACT pragmatic effectiveness trial. The aim of this investigation is to identify neural markers and regional indicators of the pathophysiology of and treatment response for MDD in adolescents. We anticipate that these data may enable more targeted treatment delivery by identifying those patients who may be optimal candidates for therapeutic response. Trial registration Adjunctive study to IMPACT trial (Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN83033550). PMID:24094274

  5. Tunable Resonant Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagu, Jean I.

    1987-01-01

    The most attractive features of resonant scanners are high reliability and eternal life as well as extremely low wobble and jitter. Power consumption is also low, electronic drive is simple, and the device is capable of handling large beams. All of these features are delivered at a low cost in a small package. The resonant scanner's use in numerous high precision applications, however, has been limited because of the difficulty in controlling its phase and resonant frequency. This paper introduces the concept of tunable/controllable resonant scanners, discusses their features, and offers a number of tuning techniques. It describes two angular scanner designs and presents data on tunable range and life tests. It also reviews applications for these new tunable resonant scanners that preserve the desirable features of earlier models while removing the old problems with synchronization or time base flexibility. The three major types of raster scanning applications where the tunable resonant scanner may be of benefit are: 1. In systems with multiple time bases such as multiple scanner networks or with scanners keyed to a common clock (the line frequency or data source) or a machine with multiple resonant scanners. A typical application is image and text transmission, also a printer with a large data base where a buffer is uneconomical. 2. In systems sharing data processing or laser equipment for reasons of cost or capacity, typically multiple work station manufacturing processes or graphic processes. 3. In systems with extremely precise time bases where the frequency stability of conventional scanners cannot be relied upon.

  6. Meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of timing and cognitive control in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: Evidence of a primary time deficit.

    PubMed

    Alústiza, Irene; Radua, Joaquim; Pla, Marta; Martin, Raquel; Ortuño, Felipe

    2017-10-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and Bipolar Disorder (BD) are associated with deficits in both timing and cognitive control functions. However, the underlying neurological dysfunctions remain poorly understood. The main goal of this study was to identify brain structures activated both by increases in cognitive activity and during timing tasks in patients with SZ and BD relative to controls. We conducted two signed differential mapping (SDM) meta-analyses of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies assessing the brain response to increasing levels of cognitive difficulty: one concerned SZ, and the other BD patients. We conducted a similar SDM meta-analysis on neuroimaging of timing in SZ (no studies in BD could be included). Finally, we carried out a multimodal meta-analysis to identify common brain regions in the findings of the two previous meta-analyses. We found that SZ patients showed hypoactivation in timing-related cortical-subcortical areas. The dysfunction observed during timing partially coincided with deficits for cognitive control functions. We hypothesize that a dysfunctional temporal/cognitive control network underlies the persistent cognitive impairment observed in SZ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Migraine without aura is not associated with incomplete circle of Willis: a case-control study using high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Ezzatian-Ahar, Shabnam; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Obaid, Hayder Ghani; Arngrim, Nanna; Hougaard, Anders; Larsson, Henrik B W; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-05-10

    The circle of Willis is an important source of collateral blood flow to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion, particularly in the posterior circulation. Some studies report a relationship between incomplete circle of Willis and migraine, whereas other studies show no difference between the prevalence of incomplete circle of Willis in migraineurs and controls. In the present study we compared the prevalence of incomplete circle of Willis in female migraine patients without aura to female healthy non-migraine controls.Using 3-Tesla magnetic resonance angiography we recorded three-dimensional time-of-flight angiograms in 85 female participants (48 migraine patients without aura [median age 28 years] and 37 healthy controls [median age 25 years]). The images were subsequently analysed blindly by a neuroradiologist to detect incomplete circle of Willis. We found no difference between the prevalence of incomplete circle of Willis in patients, 20/47 (43%), and controls, 15/37 (41%), p = 0.252. Post hoc analysis showed a significant relationship between age and prevalence of incomplete circle of Willis, p = 0.003. We found no relationship between migraine without aura and incomplete circle of Willis.

  8. A Versatile Theranostic Delivery Platform Integrating Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Computed Tomography, pH/cis-Diol Controlled Release, and Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yu-Jui; Chou, Shang-Wei; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Lin, Shih-Yao; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-06-28

    The functions of biomedical imaging, cancer targeting, and controlled release of therapeutic agents were integrated into a drug delivery platform to proof its diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. This versatile nanocomposite is based on the strategic design of wormlike mesoporous silica nanocarriers that are decorated with extremely small iron oxide nanoparticles, having a prominent T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) signal. The controlled release function was then achieved through the grafting of polyalcohol saccharide derivative ligands onto the surfaces of mesoporous silica nanoparticles to conjugate with boronic acid functionalized gold nanoparticles, which acted as the gate and the source of computed tomography (CT) signals. This versatile platform thus exhibited a MRI/CT dual imaging property drawing on the strong points to offset the weaknesses of each, rendering more accurate diagnosis. The capping of gold nanoparticles controlled with the hydrolysis of boronate ester bonds provides the reversible opening/closing process, avoiding further release of drug once the nanocomposite leaves the cell or tissue. To endow this platform with targeting ability, protocatechuic acid was utilized as a linker to connect folic acid with the boronic acid of the gold nanoparticles. The anchor of targeting moiety, folic acid, enriched this platform and enhanced the specific cellular uptake toward cells with folate receptor. This integrated drug delivery platform was then loaded with the antitumor agent doxorubicin, demonstrating its power for targeted delivery, bioimaging, and controlled release chemotherapy to reduce the undesired side effects of chemotherapy.

  9. A high-field magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using an oven-controlled crystal oscillator as the local oscillator of its radio frequency transceiver.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao; Tang, Xin; Tang, Weinan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-09-01

    A home-made high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrometer with multiple receiving channels is described. The radio frequency (RF) transceiver of the spectrometer consists of digital intermediate frequency (IF) circuits and corresponding mixing circuits. A direct digital synthesis device is employed to generate the IF pulse; the IF signal from a down-conversion circuit is sampled and followed by digital quadrature detection. Both the IF generation and the IF sampling use a 50 MHz clock. An oven-controlled crystal oscillator, which has outstanding spectral purity and a compact circuit, is used as the local oscillator of the RF transceiver. A digital signal processor works as the pulse programmer of the spectrometer, as a result, 32 control lines can be generated simultaneously while an event is triggered. Field programmable gate array devices are utilized as the auxiliary controllers of the IF generation, IF receiving, and gradient control. High performance, including 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, 1 MHz receiving bandwidth, and 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, is achieved. High-quality images on a 1.5 T MRI system using the spectrometer are obtained.

  10. The relationship between magnetic resonance imaging findings and postural maneuver and physical examination tests in patients with thoracic outlet syndrome: results of a double-blind, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Demirbag, Derya; Unlu, Ercument; Ozdemir, Ferda; Genchellac, Hakan; Temizoz, Osman; Ozdemir, Huseyin; Demir, M Kemal

    2007-07-01

    To investigate the differences in findings from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the neutral and provocative positions, and to examine the relationship between these differences and the results of physical examination tests in patients with thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). Prospective. University physical medicine and rehabilitation outpatient and radiology clinics. Twenty-nine patients and 12 healthy controls. All of the patients had positive bilateral TOS stress tests; control group participants were symptom free and had negative TOS stress tests bilaterally. Not applicable. All participants underwent Adson's test, the Halsted maneuver, and a hyperabduction test. All were evaluated with MRI while in 2 positions: the neutral position (upper extremities adducted) and in a provocative position. Measurements were obtained at the interscalene triangle, at the costoclavicular space, and at the retropectoralis minor space. There was a significant difference in MRI findings between the neutral and provocative position in the patients (P<.05), but there were no significant differences in the control group. There was a significant difference in the positional change values in MRI between the patients and the control subjects (P<.05). The difference was found in the minimum costoclavicular distance between patients with a positive Halsted maneuver and a negative Halsted maneuver (P<.05). Our findings indicate that MRI findings in patients in a provocative position are more valuable in the diagnosis of TOS, and these findings are in accord with findings from the physical evaluation tests.

  11. Hippocampal volume and hippocampal angle (a more practical marker) in mild cognitive impairment: A case-control magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Basiratnia, Reza; Amini, Ehsan; Sharbafchi, Mohammad Reza; Maracy, Mohammad; Barekatain, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) accompanies brain atrophy in neuroimaging investigations. The aim of this study was to compare MCI patients with the normal population for hippocampal volume (HV) and hippocampal angle (HA), and to assess the correlation between HV and HA. Materials and Methods: In a case-control study on 2014, in Kashani Hospital (Isfahan, Iran), 20 MCI patients were compared with 20 normal controls for HV and HA. Subjects were diagnosed with MCI or normal control, based on neuropsychiatry interview, which was confirmed by neuropsychiatry unit cognitive assessment tool (NUCOG). All magnetic resonance imaging scans were processed using the Free-Surfer software package for HV assessment. The HA was measured on the most rostral slice in which the uncal sulcus could be identified on a coronal plane. The data were analyzed using multiple analysis of co-variance and Pearson correlation. Results: The mean (standard deviation [SD]) score of NUCOG in control and case group were 91.05 (3.01) and 82.42 (3.57), respectively. Comparison of HV and HA scores in two groups, showed that mean (SD) HV and HA were not different between control and case groups, significantly, (P = 0.094 and P = 0.394, respectively). There was a negative correlation between the adjusted HV and the HA in case (r = −0.642, P = 0.004), and control groups (r = −0.654, P = 0.003). Conclusion: HV and HA were not different between MCI patients and normal controls; however, HA is correlated with HV negatively and may be used as an alternative factor because of more feasibility and availability in clinical settings in compared to HV. PMID:26605231

  12. Resonant scanning mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John; Newman, Mike; Gutierrez, Homero; Hoffman, Charlie; Quakenbush, Tim; Waldeck, Dan; Leone, Christopher; Ostaszewski, Miro

    2014-10-01

    Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. developed a Resonant Scanning Mechanism (RSM) capable of combining a 250- Hz resonant scan about one axis with a two-hertz triangular scan about the orthogonal axis. The RSM enables a rapid, high-density scan over a significant field of regard (FOR) while minimizing size, weight, and power requirements. The azimuth scan axis is bearing mounted allowing for 30° of mechanical travel, while the resonant elevation axis is flexure and spring mounted with five degrees of mechanical travel. Pointing-knowledge error during quiescent static pointing at room temperature across the full range is better than 100 μrad RMS per axis. The compact design of the RSM, roughly the size of a soda can, makes it an ideal mechanism for use on low-altitude aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles. Unique aspects of the opto-mechanical design include i) resonant springs which allow for a high-frequency scan axis with low power consumption; and ii) an independent lower-frequency scan axis allowing for a wide FOR. The pointing control system operates each axis independently and employs i) a position loop for the azimuth axis; and ii) a unique combination of parallel frequency and amplitude control loops for the elevation axis. All control and pointing algorithms are hosted on a 200-MHz microcontroller with 516 KB of RAM on a compact 3"×4" digital controller, also of Ball design.

  13. Generation of squeezed light with a monolithic optical parametric oscillator: simultaneous achievement of phase matching and cavity resonance by temperature control.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Nagashima, Koyo; Furusawa, Akira

    2010-09-13

    We generate squeezed state of light at 860 nm with a monolithic optical parametric oscillator. The optical parametric oscillator consists of a periodically poled KTiOPO(4) crystal, both ends of which are spherically polished and mirror-coated. We achieve both phase matching and cavity resonance by controlling only the temperature of the crystal. We observe up to -8.0±0.2 dB of squeezing with the bandwidth of 142 MHz. Our technique makes it possible to drive many monolithic cavities simultaneously by a single laser. Hence our monolithic optical parametric oscillator is quite suitable to continuous-variable quantum information experiments where we need a large number of highly squeezed light beams.

  14. Multiquark resonances

    DOE PAGES

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, Antonio D.

    2016-12-02

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building.more » Lastly, data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.« less

  15. Multiquark resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  16. Multiquark resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, Antonio D.

    2016-12-02

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Lastly, data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  17. Stochastic Resonance Controlled Upregulation of Internal Noise after Hearing Loss as a Putative Cause of Tinnitus-Related Neuronal Hyperactivity

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Patrick; Tziridis, Konstantin; Metzner, Claus; Schilling, Achim; Hoppe, Ulrich; Schulze, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus is generally assumed to be a consequence of hearing loss. In animal studies it has been demonstrated that acoustic trauma induced cochlear damage can lead to behavioral signs of tinnitus. In addition it was shown that noise trauma may lead to deafferentation of cochlear inner hair cells (IHC) even in the absence of elevated hearing thresholds, and it seems conceivable that such hidden hearing loss may be sufficient to cause tinnitus. Numerous studies have indicated that tinnitus is correlated with pathologically increased spontaneous firing rates and hyperactivity of neurons along the auditory pathway. It has been proposed that this hyperactivity is the consequence of a mechanism aiming to compensate for reduced input to the auditory system by increasing central neuronal gain, a mechanism referred to as homeostatic plasticity (HP), thereby maintaining mean firing rates over longer timescales for stabilization of neuronal processing. Here we propose an alternative, new interpretation of tinnitus-related development of neuronal hyperactivity in terms of information theory. In particular, we suggest that stochastic resonance (SR) plays a key role in both short- and long-term plasticity within the auditory system and that SR is the primary cause of neuronal hyperactivity and tinnitus. We argue that following hearing loss, SR serves to lift signals above the increased neuronal thresholds, thereby partly compensating for the hearing loss. In our model, the increased amount of internal noise—which is crucial for SR to work—corresponds to neuronal hyperactivity which subsequently causes neuronal plasticity along the auditory pathway and finally may lead to the development of a phantom percept, i.e., subjective tinnitus. We demonstrate the plausibility of our hypothesis using a computational model and provide exemplary findings in human patients that are consistent with that model. Finally we discuss the observed asymmetry in human tinnitus pitch

  18. Synaesthetic Colour in the Brain: Beyond Colour Areas. A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Synaesthetes and Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Tessa M.; Petersson, Karl Magnus; Hagoort, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background In synaesthesia, sensations in a particular modality cause additional experiences in a second, unstimulated modality (e.g., letters elicit colour). Understanding how synaesthesia is mediated in the brain can help to understand normal processes of perceptual awareness and multisensory integration. In several neuroimaging studies, enhanced brain activity for grapheme-colour synaesthesia has been found in ventral-occipital areas that are also involved in real colour processing. Our question was whether the neural correlates of synaesthetically induced colour and real colour experience are truly shared. Methodology/Principal Findings First, in a free viewing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment, we located main effects of synaesthesia in left superior parietal lobule and in colour related areas. In the left superior parietal lobe, individual differences between synaesthetes (projector-associator distinction) also influenced brain activity, confirming the importance of the left superior parietal lobe for synaesthesia. Next, we applied a repetition suppression paradigm in fMRI, in which a decrease in the BOLD (blood-oxygenated-level-dependent) response is generally observed for repeated stimuli. We hypothesized that synaesthetically induced colours would lead to a reduction in BOLD response for subsequently presented real colours, if the neural correlates were overlapping. We did find BOLD suppression effects induced by synaesthesia, but not within the colour areas. Conclusions/Significance Because synaesthetically induced colours were not able to suppress BOLD effects for real colour, we conclude that the neural correlates of synaesthetic colour experience and real colour experience are not fully shared. We propose that synaesthetic colour experiences are mediated by higher-order visual pathways that lie beyond the scope of classical, ventral-occipital visual areas. Feedback from these areas, in which the left parietal cortex is likely to

  19. Stochastic resonance whole body vibration increases perceived muscle relaxation but not cardiovascular activation: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Elfering, Achim; Burger, Christian; Schade, Volker; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the acute effects of stochastic resonance whole body vibration (SR-WBV), including muscle relaxation and cardiovascular activation. METHODS Sixty-four healthy students participated. The participants were randomly assigned to sham SR-WBV training at a low intensity (1.5 Hz) or a verum SR-WBV training at a higher intensity (5 Hz). Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR) and self-reported muscle relaxation were assessed before and immediately after SR-WBV. RESULTS Two factorial analyses of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant interaction between pre- vs post-SR-WBV measurements and SR-WBV conditions for muscle relaxation in the neck and back [F(1,55) = 3.35, P = 0.048, η2 = 0.07]. Muscle relaxation in the neck and back increased in verum SR-WBV, but not in sham SR-WBV. No significant changes between pre- and post-training levels of SBD, DBD and HR were observed either in sham or verum SR-WBV conditions. With verum SR-WBV, improved muscle relaxation was the most significant in participants who reported the experience of back, neck or shoulder pain more than once a month (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION A single session of SR-WBV increased muscle relaxation in young healthy individuals, while cardiovascular load was low. An increase in musculoskeletal relaxation in the neck and back is a potential mediator of pain reduction in preventive worksite SR-WBV trials. PMID:27900274

  20. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  1. Robust vibration control at critical resonant modes using indirect-driven self-sensing actuation in mechatronic systems.

    PubMed

    Hong, Fan; Pang, Chee Khiang

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents an improved indirect-driven self-sensing actuation circuit for robust vibration control of piezoelectrically-actuated flexible structures in mechatronic systems. The circuit acts as a high-pass filter and provides better self-sensing strain signals with wider sensing bandwidth and higher signal-to-noise ratio. An adaptive non-model-based control is used to compensate for the structural vibrations using the strain signals from the circuit. The proposed scheme is implemented in a PZT-actuated suspension of a commercial dual-stage hard disk drive. Experimental results show improvements of 50% and 75% in the vibration suppression at 5.4kHz and 21kHz respectively, compared to the conventional PI control.

  2. Resonant enhancement of a single attosecond pulse in a gas medium by a time-delayed control field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wei-Chun; Lin, C. D.

    2012-10-01

    An optical coherent control scheme has been proposed and theoretically investigated where an extreme ultraviolet single attosecond pulse (SAP) propagates through dense helium gas dressed by a time-delayed femtosecond laser pulse. The laser pulse couples the 2s2p(1P) and 2s2(1S) autoionizing states when the SAP excites the 2s2p state. After going through the gas, the spectral and temporal profiles of the SAP are strongly distorted. A narrowed but enhanced spike in the spectrum shows up for specific intensities and time delays of the laser, which exemplifies the control of a broadband photon wave packet by an ultrashort dressing field for the first time. We analyse the photon and electron dynamics and determine the dressing condition that maximizes this enhancement. The result demonstrates new possibilities of attosecond optical control.

  3. Controlled drug release from an ocular implant: an evaluation using dynamic three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyuncheol; Robinson, Michael R; Lizak, Martin J; Tansey, Ginger; Lutz, Robert J; Yuan, Peng; Wang, Nam S; Csaky, Karl G

    2004-08-01

    The ability of an episcleral implant at the equator of the eye to deliver drugs to the posterior segment was evaluated, using a sustained-release implant containing gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA). The movement of this drug surrogate was assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the rabbit eye. The results were compared with a similar implant placed in the vitreous cavity through a scleral incision at the equator. Polymer-based implants releasing Gd-DTPA were manufactured and placed in the subconjunctival space on the episclera or in the vitreous cavity in live rabbit eyes (in vivo) and in freshly enucleated eyes (ex vivo). Release rates of implants in vitro were also determined. Dynamic three-dimensional MRI was performed using a 4.7-Tesla MRI system for 8 hours. MR images were developed and analyzed on computer. Episcleral implants in vivo delivered a mean total of 2.7 microg Gd-DTPA into the vitreous, representing only 0.12% of the total amount of compound released from the implant in vitro. No Gd-DTPA was detected in the posterior segment of the eye. Ex vivo, the Gd-DTPA concentration in the vitreous was 30 times higher. In vivo eyes with intravitreal implants placed at the equator delivered Gd-DTPA throughout the vitreous cavity and posterior segment. Compartmental analysis of the ocular drug distribution from an episcleral implant showed that the elimination rate constant of Gd-DTPA from the subconjunctival space into the episcleral veins and conjunctival lymphatics was 3-log units higher than the transport rate constant for Gd-DTPA movement into the vitreous. In vivo, episcleral implants at the equator of the eye did not deliver a significant amount of Gd-DTPA into the vitreous, and no compound was identified in the posterior segment. A 30-fold increase in vitreous Gd-DTPA concentration occurred in the enucleated eyes, suggesting that there are significant barriers to the movement of drugs from the episcleral space into the vitreous in vivo. Dynamic three

  4. Low Temperature Locally-Controlled Growth of Wide Bandgap Nitride and Diamond Films via Plasmon Resonance-Excited Kinetic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-18

    generation of low -temperature, electrochemical and photochemical potentials within the optical near-field of nanoscale plasmonic structures. We have...worked to develop a plasmon-driven source for controlled deposition of nitrogen precursors for low temperature nitride film growth using...cryogenically cooled, plasmonically active patterned substracts . Separately, we have also performed theoretical and experimental identification of a newly

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of facial information processing in children with autistic disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and typically developing controls.

    PubMed

    Malisza, Krisztina L; Clancy, Christine; Shiloff, Deborah; Holden, Jeanette; Jones, Cheryl; Paulson, Kristjan; Yu, Dickie C T; Summers, Randy; Chudley, Albert E

    2011-01-01

    The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare the neural activation patterns of children diagnosed with autistic disorder (AD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and typically developing controls (TCs) in response to a task involving evaluation of facial expressions. Substantially greater functional activity was noted in TCs compared to both subjects diagnosed with AD and ADHD. Consistent with previous studies, differences in functional activation of the amygdala, fusiform gyrus, cerebellum, mesolimbic, and temporal lobe cortical regions of the brain during a task evaluating facial expressions were noted in AD compared to TCs. Differences in the neural activity in these brain regions were also observed in children diagnosed with AD compared to those diagnosed with ADHD. Overall decreased neural activity was observed during the faces task performance in the AD group compared to the other two groups, a finding consistent with studies using adults. Both TC and ADHD control groups showed increased inferior frontal cortex activity compared to the AD group. Significant activity was present in both TC and ADHD control groups in the insula which was absent in the AD group; this is consistent with other studies showing dysfunction of the mesolimbic system in children with AD. Although frontostriatal and mesolimbic systems appear to be affected in AD, these deficits were not in the same attentional networks which are dysfunctional in children diagnosed with ADHD.

  6. Acute knee injuries in military personnel: A case-control study of the effectiveness of direct-access magnetic resonance imaging in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Geary, Kathryn G; Croft, Ashley M

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate magnetic resonance (MR) imaging as a direct-access diagnostic tool for primary care physicians. Prospective, case-control study in a Royal Air Force setting. We obtained institutional review board approval and informed consent. Cases consisted of patients with acute knee injury and a physician-ordered MR scan. Controls were matched for gender, age, and knee injury and had MR investigation ordered by an orthopedic specialist. MR imaging cost $341 U.S. dollars per scan. Sixteen patients were enrolled, ages 17 to 44 years, and there were 48 controls. There was a significant intergroup difference for time to MR scan (p < 0.001), and no difference in time to specialist orthopedic assessment (p = 0.39). There was a significant intergroup difference (p < 0.001) in time to return to full fitness. Used as a primary care diagnostic tool and in settings where times to surgery are unacceptably long, direct-access MR imaging significantly decreases the amount of time to definitive treatment for military personnel with acute knee injuries. It may also improve clinical outcomes. MR imaging technology should be made more widely available in military primary care, including during mature combat missions.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Analysis of Peroneal Tendon Pathology Associated With Low-Lying Peroneus Brevis Muscle Belly: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Highlander, Peter; Pearson, Kyle T; Burns, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Low-lying peroneus brevis tendon muscle belly has been speculated to be an associated factor with symptomatic peroneal tendon pathology. Multiple studies have analyzed normal and anomalous anatomy associated with peroneal tendon pathology; however, no study has confirmed the clinical association between peroneal tendon pathology and low-lying peroneus brevis muscle belly. To identify the correlation of low-lying peroneus brevis muscle belly with peroneal tendon pathology. Case-control study; Level of evidence 3. The level of peroneus brevis muscle belly was compared between patients with symptomatic peroneal tendon pathology (experimental group) and asymptomatic individuals with otherwise normal lateral ankle using magnetic resonance images. Of the 32 consecutive patients with symptomatic peroneal tendon pathology, 28 (87.5%) demonstrated peroneus brevis muscle distal to the fibular groove while 53.8% of control patients demonstrated such findings (P = .022). The most common diagnosis associated with peroneal tendon pathology was ankle instability and osteochondral defect of the talus or tibial plafond. Peroneal tendon pathology in isolation was less common. Peroneal tendon pathology is often associated with lateral ankle instability and osteochondral defects of the ankle joint. Low-lying peroneus brevis muscle belly may be a common anatomic variant, but in the setting of instability it can become a source of pain and pathology secondary to overcrowding. Diagnostic, level III: Case-control study. © 2015 The Author(s).

  8. Autostereogram resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging based morphologic evaluation of the pineal gland for suspected pineoblastoma in retinoblastoma patients and age-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Thai Hien; Siebert, Eberhard; Asbach, Patrick; Willerding, Gregor; Erb-Eigner, Katharina

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the morphologic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of the pineal gland in retinoblastoma (Rb) patients without and with pineoblastoma in comparison to age-matched controls to improve early identification of pineoblastomas (trilateral retinoblastoma, TRb). 80 patients with retinoblastoma and 80 age-matched controls who had undergone brain MRI were included in this retrospective institutional review board approved cohort study. Two readers analyzed the following MR characteristics of the pineal gland: signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images, enhancement pattern, delineation of the gland, presence of cystic component, size of pineal gland and size of pineal cysts, respectively. A third reader assessed all images for the presence or absence of pineoblastoma. 3 patients were positive (TRb cohort) and 77 negative for pineoblastoma (non-TRb cohort). The mean maximum diameter of the pineal gland was 6.4mm in Rb patients and 6.3mm in age-matched controls. The mean volume of the pineal gland in Rb patients was 93.1mm(3) and was 87.6mm(3) in age-matched controls. Considering all available MRI scans the mean maximum diameter of the pineal gland in TRb patients was 11.2mm and the mean volume in TRb patients was 453.3mm(3). The third reader identified pineoblastomas with a sensitivity of 100% (3 of 3) and a specificity of 94% (72 of 77). Our non-TRb patients did not show significant differences in the size of the pineal gland and pineal gland cysts compared to age-matched controls. The presented data can serve as a reference for the volume of normal pineal glands and pineal cysts in the diagnostic work-up of Rb patients with suspected pineoblastoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation of motor control in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome during imagined and executed movements.

    PubMed

    Zapparoli, Laura; Porta, Mauro; Gandola, Martina; Invernizzi, Paola; Colajanni, Valeria; Servello, Domenico; Zerbi, Alberto; Banfi, Giuseppe; Paulesu, Eraldo

    2016-02-01

    The current study investigated the neural correlates of voluntary motor control in 24 adult Gilles de la Tourette (GTS) patients. We examined whether imagination and the execution of the same voluntary movement - finger oppositions with either hand - were associated with specific patterns of activation. We also explored whether these patterns correlated with the severity of the syndrome, as measured by the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) for motor tics. The presence of brain morphometric abnormalities was also assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Crucial to our experiment was the manipulation of the presence of an explicit motor outflow in the tasks. We anticipated a reduction in the ticking manifestation during the explicit motor task and brain activation differences between GTS patients and 24 age/gender-matched normal controls. The anticipated differences were all evident in the form of hyperactivations in the GTS patients in the premotor and prefrontal areas for both motor tasks for both hands; however, the motor imagery hyperactivations also involved rostral pre-frontal and temporo-parietal regions of the right hemisphere. The blood oxygen level-dependent responses of the premotor cortices during the motor imagery task were significantly correlated with the YGTSS scores. In contrast, no significant brain morphometric differences were found. This study provides evidence of a different neurofunctional organisation of motor control between adult patients with GTS and healthy controls that is independent from the actual execution of motor acts. The presence of an explicit motor outflow in GTS mitigates the manifestation of tics and the need for compensatory brain activity in the brain regions showing task-dependent hyperactivations.

  11. Electro-mechanical energy conversion system having a permanent magnet machine with stator, resonant transfer link and energy converter controls

    DOEpatents

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2006-01-10

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load comprising an energy converter device including a permanent magnet induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer to control the flow of power or energy through the permanent magnetic induction machine.

  12. Surface Plasmon Resonances in 1D and 2D Arrays of Metal Nanoparticles for the Control of Enhanced Spectroscopies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-24

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2 . REPORT TYPE 3. DATES...SPECTROSCOPIES FA9550-09-1-0579 Noguez, Cecilia Roman-Velazquez, Carlos E. Angulo, Ali M. Instituto de Fisica Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico...representation, nanoshells, nanospheres U U U SAR 2 Cecilia Noguez +52 (55) 5622 5106 Final Technical Report Grant/Contract Title: SURFACE PLASMON

  13. All-optical control of weak-light transport and Fano-like resonance using control-probe technique in a quantum-dot-pillar microcavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rong; Ding, Chunling; Zhang, Duo; Zhang, Suzhen

    2017-04-01

    Control of light by light is a current research topic and is important for a variety of fundamental studies and practical applications. Here, we put forward a chip-scale scheme for all-optical control of small-signal photon transport and Fano-like lineshape in a coupled quantum-dot-pillar microcavity system based on a control-probe technique. Specifically, a bichromatic input light field, which consists of a weak probe field and a tunable control field, is applied to simultaneously drive the pillar cavity mode (called the control-probe technique) and both its reflectivity from and transmittivity through the pillar cavity constitute two output channels (i.e., a reflectivity signal channel and a transmittivity signal channel). We derive full analytical expressions for the reflectivity and transmittivity coefficients via a perturbation method. Using experimentally realistic parameters, theoretical analysis shows that the output probe light of the reflectivity and transmittivity channels can be switched on or off by simply turning on or off the control light field. Hence, the present system can be utilized to realize all-optical switching of the probe light by the control light with high switching contrast ˜ 1 by means of these two output channels. Interestingly, the reflectivity channel and the transmittivity channel are complementary and offer versatile applications in a two-channel switching. In addition, it is shown that the strong asymmetric Fano lineshape can be generated by properly tuning the frequency of the control light field in this control-probe scheme. The present investigation may be used for developing novel all-optical switching and tunable Fano devices on-chip.

  14. Comprehensive Echocardiographic and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Evaluation Differentiates Among Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction Patients, Hypertensive Patients, and Healthy Control Subjects.

    PubMed

    Mordi, Ify R; Singh, Satnam; Rudd, Amelia; Srinivasan, Janaki; Frenneaux, Michael; Tzemos, Nikolaos; Dawson, Dana K

    2017-08-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of a comprehensive imaging protocol including echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance in the diagnosis and differentiation of hypertensive heart disease and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Hypertension is present in up to 90% of patients with HFpEF and is a major etiological component. Despite current recommendations and diagnostic criteria for HFpEF, no noninvasive imaging technique has as yet shown the ability to identify any structural differences between patients with hypertensive heart disease and HFpEF. We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of 112 well-characterized patients (62 with HFpEF, 22 with hypertension, and 28 healthy control subjects). All patients underwent cardiopulmonary exercise and biomarker testing and an imaging protocol including echocardiography with speckle-tracking analysis and cardiac magnetic resonance including T1 mapping pre- and post-contrast. Echocardiographic global longitudinal strain (GLS) and extracellular volume (ECV) measured by cardiac magnetic resonance were the only variables able to independently stratify among the 3 groups of patients. ECV was the best technique for differentiation between hypertensive heart disease and HFpEF (ECV area under the curve: 0.88; GLS area under the curve: 0.78; p < 0.001 for both). Using ECV, an optimal cutoff of 31.2% gave 100% sensitivity and 75% specificity. ECV was significantly higher and GLS was significantly reduced in subjects with reduced exercise capacity (lower peak oxygen consumption and higher minute ventilation-carbon dioxide production) (p < 0.001 for both ECV and GLS). Both GLS and ECV are able to independently discriminate between hypertensive heart disease and HFpEF and identify patients with prognostically significant functional limitation. ECV is the best diagnostic discriminatory marker of HFpEF and could be used as a surrogate endpoint for therapeutic studies. Copyright

  15. Magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) of bone metastases: From primary pain palliation to local tumor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, A.; Leonardi, A.; Andrani, F.; Boni, F.; Anzidei, M.; Catalano, C.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical performance of MRgFUS in primary pain palliation of painful bone metastases and in local tumor control. Materials and Methods: We enrolled 26 consecutive patients (female/male 12/14; age: 64.7±7.5yrs) with painful bone metastases. Before and 3 months after MRgFUS treatment pain severity and pain interference scores were assessed according to Brief Pain Inventory-Quality of Life (BPI-QoL) criteria and patients underwent both CT and MRI. Local tumor control was evaluated according to lesion size, density and perfusion at CT, dynamic contrast enhancement at MRI (Discovery 750HD, GE; Gd-Bopta, Bracco) and metabolic activity at PET or scintigraphy. Patients were classified as responders or non-responders. Results: No treatment-related adverse events were recorded during the study. As statistically significant difference between baseline and follow-up values for both pain severity and pain interference scores was observed (p<0.05). Increased bone density was observed in 9/26 (34.6%) patients. Non-Perfused Volume values ranged between 20% and 92%. There was no difference in NPV values between responders and non-responders (46.7±24.2% [25 - 90 %] vs. 45±24.9% [20 - 93 %]; p=0.7). In 6 patients (5 prostate and 1 breast primary cancer) there was nearly absence of metabolic activity after treatment (mean SUV=1.2). Conclusion: MRgFUS can be safely and effectively used as the primary treatment for pain palliation in patients with painful bone metastases; moreover our experience demonstrated also a potential role for the MRgFUS in local tumor control.

  16. Antisocial and psychopathic personalities in a sample of addicted subjects: differences in psychological resources, symptoms, alexithymia and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Gori, Alessio; Craparo, Giuseppe; Sareri, Giuseppe Iraci; Caretti, Vincenzo; Giannini, Marco; Meringolo, Patrizia

    2014-10-01

    Psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) are two constructs not interchangeable. Compared to the ASPD, psychopathy is characterized by lack of anxiety, low withdrawal, and high levels of attention seeking. The sample of this study included 76 subjects with a substance use disorder. Subjects were aged between 18 and 59 years old (M=32.87, SD=9.36). With respect to level of education 3 subjects are elementary school graduates, 49 have a middle school diploma, 21 own a high school diploma, and 3 participants have a bachelor's degree. We administered the following measures: a) Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R); b) Psychological Treatment Inventory (PTI); c) 20-Item-Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20); d) Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS). Most of the significant correlations between the Psychopathic Index (PPI-R total score), and the measures administered are listed below: PPI-R total score and Deviance (r=.482, p<.001), PPI-R total score and Hypomania (r=.369, p < .001), PPI-R total score and Unresolved attachment (r=.293, p<.001), PPI-R total score and Manipulativeness (r=.550, p<.001), PPI-R total score and the TAS-20 total score (r=.230; p<.001), PPI-R total score and Difficulty in Identifying Feelings (DIF) factor (r=.250, p<.001), PPI-R total score and Attentional Impulsiveness (r=.409, p<.001); PPI-R total score and Motor Impulsiveness (r=.526, p<.001). Results of MANOVAs between the two groups also revealed significant differences on several variables analyzed. Our study showed that addicted subjects with psychopathic tendencies are more likely to experience negative emotions and have a peculiar cognitive style with respect to antisocial addicts. These results partially confirm those ones of previous studies underlining that psychopathic population is generally characterized for a major need for stimulation, poor behavioral controls, lack of realistic long-term goals, impulsivity, irresponsibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc

  17. Modern multidisciplinary treatment of rectal cancer based on staging with magnetic resonance imaging leads to excellent local control, but distant control remains a challenge.

    PubMed

    Engelen, S M E; Maas, M; Lahaye, M J; Leijtens, J W A; van Berlo, C L H; Jansen, R L H; Breukink, S O; Dejong, C H C; van de Velde, C J H; Beets-Tan, R G H; Beets, G L

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this multicenter cohort study was to evaluate whether a differentiated treatment of primary rectal cancer based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reduce the number of incomplete resections and local recurrences and improve recurrence-free and overall survival. From February 2003 until January 2008, 296 patients with rectal cancer underwent preoperative MRI using a lymph node specific contrast agent to predict circumferential resection margin (CRM), T- and N-stage. Based on expert reading of the MRI, patients were stratified in: (a) low risk for local recurrence (CRM>2mm and N0 status), (b) intermediate risk and (c) high risk (close/involved CRM, N2 status or distal tumours). Mainly based on this MRI risk assessment patients were treated with (a) surgery only (TME or local excision), (b) preoperative 5 × 5 Gy+TME and (c) a long course of chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery after a 6-8 week interval. Overall 228 patients underwent treatment with curative intent: 49 with surgery only, 86 with 5 × 5 Gy and surgery and 93 with chemoradiation and surgery. The number of complete resections (margin>1mm) was 218 (95.6%). At a median follow-up of 41 months the three-year local recurrence rate, disease-free survival rate and overall survival rate is 2.2%, 80% and 84.5%, respectively. With a differentiated multimodality treatment based on dedicated preoperative MR imaging, local recurrence is no longer the main problem in rectal cancer treatment. The new challenges are early diagnosis and treatment, reducing morbidity of treatment and preferably prevention of metastatic disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Right and Left Ventricular Function and Mass in Male Elite Master Athletes: A Controlled Contrast-Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Study.

    PubMed

    Bohm, Philipp; Schneider, Günther; Linneweber, Lutz; Rentzsch, Axel; Krämer, Nadine; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Kindermann, Wilfried; Meyer, Tim; Scharhag, Jürgen

    2016-05-17

    It is under debate whether the cumulative effects of intensive endurance exercise induce chronic cardiac damage, mainly involving the right heart. The aim of this study was to examine the cardiac structure and function in long-term elite master endurance athletes with special focus on the right ventricle by contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Thirty-three healthy white competitive elite male master endurance athletes (age range, 30-60 years) with a training history of 29±8 years, and 33 white control subjects pair-matched for age, height, and weight underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing, echocardiography including tissue-Doppler imaging and speckle tracking, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Indexed left ventricular mass and right ventricular mass (left ventricular mass/body surface area, 96±13 and 62±10 g/m(2); P<0.001; right ventricular mass/body surface area, 36±7 and 24±5 g/m(2); P<0.001) and indexed left ventricular end-diastolic volume and right ventricular end-diastolic volume (left ventricular end-diastolic volume/body surface area, 104±13 and 69±18 mL/m(2); P<0.001; right ventricular end-diastolic volume/body surface area, 110±22 and 66±16 mL/m(2); P<0.001) were significantly increased in athletes in comparison with control subjects. Right ventricular ejection fraction did not differ between athletes and control subjects (52±8 and 54±6%; P=0.26). Pathological late enhancement was detected in 1 athlete. No correlations were found for left ventricular and right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction with N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, and high-sensitive troponin was negative in all subjects. Based on our results, chronic right ventricular damage in elite endurance master athletes with lifelong high training volumes seems to be unlikely. Thus, the hypothesis of an exercise-induced arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy has to be questioned. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Strongly Coupled Nanotube Electromechanical Resonators.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guang-Wei; Zhu, Dong; Wang, Xin-He; Zou, Chang-Ling; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Liu, Di; Li, Yan; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Kai-Li; Dai, Xing-Can; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2016-09-14

    Coupling an electromechanical resonator with carbon-nanotube quantum dots is a significant method to control both the electronic charge and the spin quantum states. By exploiting a novel microtransfer technique, we fabricate two separate strongly coupled and electrically tunable mechanical resonators for the first time. The frequency of the two resonators can be individually tuned by the bottom gates, and in each resonator, the electron transport through the quantum dot can be strongly affected by the phonon mode and vice versa. Furthermore, the conductance of either resonator can be nonlocally modulated by the other resonator through phonon-phonon interaction between the two resonators. Strong coupling is observed between the phonon modes of the two resonators, where the coupling strength larger than 200 kHz can be reached. This strongly coupled nanotube electromechanical resonator array provides an experimental platform for future studies of the coherent electron-phonon interaction, the phonon-mediated long-distance electron interaction, and entanglement state generation.

  20. High-Field Open versus Short-Bore Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Spine: A Randomized Controlled Comparison of Image Quality

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Elke; Asbach, Patrick; Diederichs, Gerd; Wetz, Christoph; Siebert, Eberhard; Wagner, Moritz; Hamm, Bernd; Dewey, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to compare the image quality of spinal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed on a high-field horizontal open versus a short-bore MR scanner in a randomized controlled study setup. Methods Altogether, 93 (80% women, mean age 53) consecutive patients underwent spine imaging after random assignement to a 1-T horizontal open MR scanner with a vertical magnetic field or a 1.5-T short-bore MR scanner. This patient subset was part of a larger cohort. Image quality was assessed by determining qualitative parameters, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR), and quantitative contour sharpness. Results The image quality parameters were higher for short-bore MR imaging. Regarding all sequences, the relative differences were 39% for the mean overall qualitative image quality, 53% for the mean SNR values, and 34–37% for the quantitative contour sharpness (P<0.0001). The CNR values were also higher for images obtained with the short-bore MR scanner. No sequence was of very poor (nondiagnostic) image quality. Scanning times were significantly longer for examinations performed on the open MR scanner (mean: 32±22 min versus 20±9 min; P<0.0001). Conclusions In this randomized controlled comparison of spinal MR imaging with an open versus a short-bore scanner, short-bore MR imaging revealed considerably higher image quality with shorter scanning times. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00715806 PMID:24391767

  1. A new method to record and control for 2D-movement kinematics during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, Bjoern; Sosnik, Ronen; Smikt, Oded; Okon, Eli; Manor, David; Kushnir, Tammar; Flash, Tamar; Karni, Avi

    2009-03-01

    The recording of movement kinematics during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is complicated due to technical constraints of the imaging environment. Nevertheless, to study the functions of brain areas related to motor control, reliable and accurate records of movement trajectories and speed profiles are needed. We present a method designed to record and characterize the kinematic properties of drawing- and handwriting-like forearm movements during fMRI studies by recording pen stroke trajectories. The recording system consists of a translucent plastic board, a plastic pen containing fiber optics and a halogen light power source, a CCD camera, a video monitor and a PC with a video grabber card. Control experiments using a commercially available digitizer tablet have demonstrated the reliability of the data recorded during fMRI. Since the movement tracking signal is purely optical, there is no interaction with the MR (echoplanar) images. Thus, the method allows to obtain movement records with high spatial and temporal resolution which are suitable for the kinematic analysis of hand movements in fMRI studies.

  2. Design, analysis and control of a novel tendon-driven magnetic resonance-guided robotic system for minimally invasive breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Lou, Jinlong; Yang, Zhiyong; Dai, Jiansheng; Yu, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Biopsy and brachytherapy for small core breast cancer are always difficult medical problems in the field of cancer treatment. This research mainly develops a magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-precision robotic system for breast puncture treatment. First, a 5-degree-of-freedom tendon-based surgical robotic system is introduced in detail. What follows are the kinematic analysis and dynamical modeling of the robotic system, where a mathematic dynamic model is established using the Lagrange method and a lumped parameter tendon model is used to identify the nonlinear gain of the tendon-sheath transmission system. Based on the dynamical models, an adaptive proportional-integral-derivative controller with friction compensation is proposed for accurate position control. Through simulations using different sinusoidal input signals, we observe that the sinusoidal tracking error at 1/2π Hz is 0.41 mm. Finally, the experiments on tendon-sheath transmission and needle insertion performance are conducted, which show that the insertion precision is 0.68 mm in laboratory environment.

  3. Levels of Cognitive Control: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Test of an RDoC Domain Across Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Smucny, Jason; Lesh, Tyler A; Newton, Keith; Niendam, Tara; Ragland, J Daniel; Carter, Cameron S

    2017-09-26

    In recent years, the boundaries of psychopathology as defined by diagnostic categories have been criticized as inadequately 'carving nature at its joints' with respect to the neurobiology of major mental disorders. In 2010 the NIMH launched the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) framework for understanding mental illnesses as brain circuit disorders that extend beyond DSM-defined diagnoses. In the present study we focus on cognitive dysfunction, a core feature of schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BPD), and use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a cognitive control (CC) task in recent onset patients to test the hypothesis that at a behavioral and underlying neural circuitry level these deficits exist on a continuum (as opposed to showing categorical differences) across the two disorders. 53 healthy controls, 24 recent (<1 y) onset patients with BPD Type I with psychotic features, and 70 recent onset patients with SZ performed the AX-Continuous Performance Task while undergoing event-related fMRI at 1.5 T. In addition to behavior, task-associated response was examined in frontoparietal regions-of-interest. In an a priori contrast-based analysis, significant deficits across patient groups (vs controls) were observed on CC-associated performance as well as frontoparietal response. These analyses further revealed a continuum of deficits in which BPD showed intermediate levels of CC relative to controls and SZ. Poor CC was associated with poverty and disorganization symptoms across patient groups. These results support the hypothesis that CC dysfunction in BPD and SZ reflects a continuum of deficits that cuts across traditional, DSM-based classification. Implications for the neurobiology of these diseases are discussed.Neuropsychopharmacology accepted article preview online, 26 September 2017. doi:10.1038/npp.2017.233.

  4. Enhanced control of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex neurophysiology with real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback training and working memory practice.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Matthew S; Kane, Jessica H; Weisend, Michael P; Parker, Jason G

    2016-01-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback can be used to train localized, conscious regulation of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals. As a therapeutic technique, rt-fMRI neurofeedback reduces the symptoms of a variety of neurologic disorders. To date, few studies have investigated the use of self-regulation training using rt-fMRI neurofeedback to enhance cognitive performance. This work investigates the utility of rt-fMRI neurofeedback as a tool to enhance human cognition by training healthy individuals to consciously control activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). A cohort of 18 healthy participants in the experimental group underwent rt-fMRI neurofeedback from the left DLPFC in five training sessions across two weeks while 7 participants in the control group underwent similar training outside the MRI and without rt-fMRI neurofeedback. Working memory (WM) performance was evaluated on two testing days separated by the five rt-fMRI neurofeedback sessions using two computerized tests. We investigated the ability to control the BOLD signal across training sessions and WM performance across the two testing days. The group with rt-fMRI neurofeedback demonstrated a significant increase in the ability to self-regulate the BOLD signal in the left DLPFC across sessions. WM performance showed differential improvement between testing days one and two across the groups with the highest increases observed in the rt-fMRI neurofeedback group. These results provide evidence that individuals can quickly gain the ability to consciously control the left DLPFC, and this training results in improvements of WM performance beyond that of training alone.

  5. Controlling precise magnetic field configuration around electron cyclotron resonance zone for enhancing plasma parameters and beam current.

    PubMed

    Yano, Keisuke; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Kimura, Daiju; Imai, Youta; Kumakura, Sho; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    Multi-charged ion source which has wide operating conditions is required in various application fields. We have constructed tandem type ECR ion source (ECRIS); one of the features of its main stage is an additional coil for controlling magnetic field distribution around the mirror bottom precisely. Here the effect of magnetic field variation caused by the additional coil is experimentally considered in terms of plasma parameters and beam current as the first investigation of the main stage plasma. Furthermore, behavior of magnetic lines of force flowing from the ECR zone is calculated, and is compared with measurement results aiming for better understanding of interrelationship between plasma production and ion beam generation on the ECRIS.

  6. Slope tunable Fano resonances in asymmetric embedded microring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gencheng; Dai, Tingge; Jiang, Jianfei; Yu, Hui; Hao, Yinlei; Wang, Yuehai; Li, Yubo; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jianyi

    2017-02-01

    An asymmetric embedded microring resonant system is proposed and fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) to achieve slope tunable Fano resonances. The Fano resonances originate from the nonlinear phase shift produced by adding an inner ring coupling with the outer ring. The slope of the Fano resonance can be well tuned to be ultra-high by controlling the microheaters to adjust the phase condition. Experimentally, we observe Fano resonance with a maximum extinction ratio of about 40 dB, and the slope can be tuned from -35 dB nm-1 to -93 dB nm-1, which shows good agreement with the theoretical analysis. This device could find potential applications in ultra-high sensitivity sensing systems.

  7. Erratum: Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 123001)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ$b_⊥^{ext}$ ≈ $10^{-4}$ → $10^{-3}$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  8. Case-control study of low-back pain referred for magnetic resonance imaging, with special focus on whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Keith T; Harris, Clare E; Harris, E Claire; Griffin, Michael J; Bennett, James; Reading, Isabel; Sampson, Madelaine; Coggon, David

    2008-10-01

    This study investigated risk factors for low-back pain among patients referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with special focus on whole-body vibration. A case-control approach was used. The study population comprised working-aged persons from a catchment area for radiology services. The cases were those in a consecutive series referred for a lumbar MRI because of low-back pain. The controls were age- and gender-matched persons X-rayed for other reasons. Altogether, 252 cases and 820 controls were studied, including 185 professional drivers. The participants were questioned about physical factors loading the spine, psychosocial factors, driving, personal characteristics, mental health, and certain beliefs about low-back pain. Exposure to whole-body vibration was assessed by six measures, including weekly duration of professional driving, hours driven in one period, and current root mean square A(8). Associations with whole-body vibration were examined with adjustment for age, gender, and other potential confounders. Strong associations were found with poor mental health and belief in work as a causal factor for low-back pain, and with occupational sitting for > or =3 hours while not driving. Associations were also found for taller stature, consulting propensity, body mass index, smoking history, fear-avoidance beliefs, frequent twisting, low decision latitude, and low support at work. However, the associations with the six metrics of whole-body vibration were weak and not statistically significant, and no exposure-response relationships were found. Little evidence of a risk from professional driving or whole-body vibration was found. Drivers were substantially less heavily exposed to whole-body vibration than in some earlier surveys. Nonetheless, it seems that, at the population level, whole-body vibration is not an important cause of low-back pain among those referred for MRI.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging and Volumetric Measurements of the Brain in Patients with Postcancer Fatigue: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Prinsen, Hetty; Heerschap, Arend; Bleijenberg, Gijs; Zwarts, Machiel J.; Leer, Jan Willem H.; van Asten, Jack J.; van der Graaf, Marinette; Rijpkema, Mark; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Postcancer fatigue is a frequently occurring problem, impairing quality of life. Until now, little is known about (neuro) physiological factors determining postcancer fatigue. For non-cancer patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, certain characteristics of brain morphology and metabolism have been identified in previous studies. We investigated whether these volumetric and metabolic traits are a reflection of fatigue in general and thus also of importance for postcancer fatigue. Methods Fatigued patients were randomly assigned to either the intervention condition (cognitive behavior therapy) or the waiting list condition. Twenty-five patients in the intervention condition and fourteen patients in the waiting list condition were assessed twice, at baseline and six months later. Baseline measurements of 20 fatigued patients were compared with 20 matched non-fatigued controls. All participants had completed treatment of a malignant, solid tumor minimal one year earlier. Global brain volumes, subcortical brain volumes, metabolite tissue concentrations, and metabolite ratios were primary outcome measures. Results Volumetric and metabolic parameters were not significantly different between fatigued and non-fatigued patients. Change scores of volumetric and metabolic parameters from baseline to follow-up were not significantly different between patients in the therapy and the waiting list group. Patients in the therapy group reported a significant larger decrease in fatigue scores than patients in the waiting list group. Conclusions No relation was found between postcancer fatigue and the studied volumetric and metabolic markers. This may suggest that, although postcancer fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome show strong resemblances as a clinical syndrome, the underlying physiology is different. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01096641 PMID:24040301

  10. If It's Resonance, What is Resonating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon under the name "resonance," which, is based on the mathematical analogy between mechanical resonance and the behavior of wave functions in quantum mechanical exchange phenomena was described. The resonating system does not have a structure intermediate between those involved in the resonance, but instead a structure which is further…

  11. Cross resonant optical antenna.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, P; Huang, J S; Duò, L; Finazzi, M; Hecht, B

    2009-06-26

    We propose a novel cross resonant optical antenna consisting of two perpendicular nanosized gold dipole antennas with a common feed gap. We demonstrate that the cross antenna is able to convert propagating fields of any polarization state into correspondingly polarized, localized, and enhanced fields and vice versa. The cross antenna structure therefore opens the road towards the control of light-matter interactions based on polarized light as well as the analysis of polarized fields on the nanometer scale.

  12. An integrated system for dissolution studies and magnetic resonance imaging of controlled release, polymer-based dosage forms-a tool for quantitative assessment of hydrogel formation processes.

    PubMed

    Kulinowski, Piotr; Dorozyński, Przemysław; Jachowicz, Renata; Weglarz, Władysław P

    2008-11-04

    Controlled release (CR) dosage forms are often based on polymeric matrices, e.g., sustained-release tablets and capsules. It is crucial to visualise and quantify processes of the hydrogel formation during the standard dissolution study. A method for imaging of CR, polymer-based dosage forms during dissolution study in vitro is presented. Imaging was performed in a non-invasive way by means of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study was designed to simulate in vivo conditions regarding temperature, volume, state and composition of dissolution media. Two formulations of hydrodynamically balanced systems (HBS) were chosen as model CR dosage forms. HBS release active substance in stomach while floating on the surface of the gastric content. Time evolutions of the diffusion region, hydrogel formation region and "dry core" region were obtained during a dissolution study of L-dopa as a model drug in two simulated gastric fluids (i.e. in fed and fasted state). This method seems to be a very promising tool for examining properties of new formulations of CR, polymer-based dosage forms or for comparison of generic and originator dosage forms before carrying out bioequivalence studies.

  13. In Vivo magnetic resonance imaging of xenografted tumors using FTH1 reporter gene expression controlled by a tet-on switch

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoya; Cai, Jinhua; Li, Hao; Liu, Bo; Qin, Yong; Zhong, Yi; Wang, Longlun; Liao, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    As a promising magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reporter, ferritin has been used to track cells in vivo; however, its continuous overexpression can be cytotoxic, which restricts its application. In this study, we aimed to develop a switch to turn this genetic reporter “on” or “off” while monitoring cell grafts via MRI. To accomplish this, we genetically modified the ferritin heavy chain (FTH1) with a Tet-On switch and assessed the expression of FTH1 in transduced neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) in vitro and in xenografted tumors in vivo. We found that FTH1 expression induced by doxycycline (Dox) in SK-N-SH-FTH1 cells depended on treatment dose and duration. We successfully detected T2-weighted MRI contrast in cell grafts after switching “on” the reporter gene using Dox, and this contrast disappeared when we switched it “off”. The genetic reporter FTH1 can thus be switched “on” or “off” throughout longitudinal monitoring of cell grafts, limiting expression to when MRI contrast is needed. The controllable imaging system we have developed minimizes risks from constitutive reporter gene overexpression and facilitates tumor cell monitoring in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27732930

  14. Near-infrared (1 to 4 μm) control of plasmonic resonance wavelength in Ga-doped ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Look, David C.; Leedy, Kevin D.; Grzybowski, Gordon J.; Claflin, Bruce B.

    2017-05-01

    The plasmonic resonance wavelength λres in ZnO doped with 3 wt.% Ga2O3 can be controlled over the range 1 to 4 μm by simple furnace annealing in flowing Ar. For each annealing temperature TA, the reflectance Rm and transmittance Tm are measured over a wavelength range, λ=185 to 3200 nm, (energy range, E=6.7 to 0.387 eV), and the reflectance coefficient R is calculated from Rm and Tm. The value of λres is then determined from a Drude-theory analysis of R versus E that yields fitting parameters nopt (optical carrier concentration), μopt (optical mobility), high-frequency dielectric constant ɛ∞, and thickness d at each annealing temperature TA. The validity of this process is confirmed by comparison of ɛ∞ with literature values and comparison of nopt and μopt with analogous quantities n and μH measured by the Hall effect.

  15. Growth of Silver Nanowires from Controlled Silver Chloride Seeds and Their Application for Fluorescence Enhancement Based on Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sunwoong; Han, Hyeji; Bae, Jin Gook; Lee, Eun Yeol; Im, Sang Hyuk; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2017-04-07

    A "Polyol" method has granted low-cost and facile process-controllability for silver-nanowire (Ag-NW) synthesis. Although homogenous and heterogeneous nucleation and growth during Ag-NW synthesis are possible using polyol methods, heterogeneous nucleation and growth of Ag NW guarantees highly selective growth of nanostructures using silver chloride (AgCl) seeds, which provides a stable source of chloride ions (Cl-) and thermodynamic reversibility. In this paper, a microdroplet has been adopted to synthesize uniform AgCl seeds with different diameter that are used for seed-mediated Ag-NW synthesis. The concentration of two precursors (AgNO3 and NaCl) in the droplets is modulated to produce different sizes of AgCl seeds, which determines the diameter and length of Ag NWs. The process of the seed-mediated growth of Ag NWs has been monitored by observing the peak shift in the time-resolved UV-vis extinction spectrum. Furthermore, the distinct plasmonic property of Ag NWs for transverse and longitudinal localized-surface-plasmon-resonance (LSPR)-mediated fluorescence enhancement is utilized. The high aspect ratio and sharp tips work as simple antennas that induce the enhanced fluorescence emission intensity of a fluorophore, which can be applied in the fields of biological tissue imaging and therapy.

  16. Apparatus for investigating resonance with application to magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Sytil; Jones, Dyan L.; Gross, Josh; Zollman, Dean

    2015-11-01

    Resonance is typically studied in the context of either a pendulum or a mass on a spring. We have developed an apparatus that enables beginning students to investigate resonant behavior of changing magnetic fields, in addition to the properties of the magnetic field due to a wire and the superposition of magnetic fields. In this resonant system, a compass oscillates at a frequency determined by the compass's physical properties and an external magnetic field. While the analysis is mathematically similar to that of the pendulum, this apparatus has an advantage that the magnetic field is easily controlled, while it is difficult to control the strength of gravity. This apparatus has been incorporated into a teaching module on magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Resonating feathers produce courtship song.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Kimberly S; Elias, Damian O; Mason, Andrew; Montealegre-Z, Fernando

    2010-03-22

    Male Club-winged Manakins, Machaeropterus deliciosus (Aves: Pipridae), produce a sustained tonal sound with specialized wing feathers. The fundamental frequency of the sound produced in nature is approximately 1500 Hz and is hypothesized to result from excitation of resonance in the feathers' hypertrophied shafts. We used laser Doppler vibrometry to determine the resonant properties of male Club-winged Manakin's wing feathers, as well as those of two unspecialized manakin species. The modified wing feathers exhibit a response peak near 1500 Hz, and unusually high Q-values (a measure of resonant tuning) for biological objects (Q up to 27). The unmodified wing feathers of the Club-winged Manakin do not exhibit strong resonant properties when measured in isolation. However, when measured still attached to the modified feathers (nine feathers held adjacent by an intact ligament), they resonate together as a unit near 1500 Hz, and the wing produces a second harmonic of similar or greater amplitude than the fundamental. The feathers of the control species also exhibit resonant peaks around 1500 Hz, but these are significantly weaker, the wing does not resonate as a unit and no harmonics are produced. These results lend critical support to the resonant stridulation hypothesis of sound production in M. deliciosus.

  18. Single spin magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  19. Single spin magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Modulation of Intracellular Quantum Dot to Fluorescent Protein Förster Resonance Energy Transfer via Customized Ligands and Spatial Control of Donor–Acceptor Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Field, Lauren D.; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Oh, Eunkeu; Medintz, Igor L.; Delehanty, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how to controllably modulate the efficiency of energy transfer in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assemblies is critical to their implementation as sensing modalities. This is particularly true for sensing assemblies that are to be used as the basis for real time intracellular sensing of intracellular processes and events. We use a quantum dot (QD) donor -mCherry acceptor platform that is engineered to self-assemble in situ wherein the protein acceptor is expressed via transient transfection and the QD donor is microinjected into the cell. QD-protein assembly is driven by metal-affinity interactions where a terminal polyhistidine tag on the protein binds to the QD surface. Using this system, we show the ability to modulate the efficiency of the donor–acceptor energy transfer process by controllably altering either the ligand coating on the QD surface or the precise location where the QD-protein assembly process occurs. Intracellularly, a short, zwitterionic ligand mediates more efficient FRET relative to longer ligand species that are based on the solubilizing polymer, poly(ethylene glycol). We further show that a greater FRET efficiency is achieved when the QD-protein assembly occurs free in the cytosol compared to when the mCherry acceptor is expressed tethered to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. In the latter case, the lower FRET efficiency is likely attributable to a lower expression level of the mCherry acceptor at the membrane combined with steric hindrance. Our work points to some of the design considerations that one must be mindful of when developing FRET-based sensing schemes for use in intracellular sensing. PMID:26690153