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Sample records for resonant thermal noise

  1. A second generation of low thermal noise cryogenic silicon resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, D. G.; Legero, T.; Grebing, Ch; Häfner, S.; Lisdat, Ch; Weyrich, R.; Zhang, W.; Sonderhouse, L.; Robinson, J. M.; Riehle, F.; Ye, J.; Sterr, U.

    2016-06-01

    We have set up an improved vertically mounted silicon cavity operating at the zero-crossing temperature of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) near 123 K with estimated thermal noise limited instability of 4 x 10-17 in the modified Allan deviation. Owing to the anisotropic elasticity of single-crystal silicon, the vertical acceleration sensitivity was minimized in situ by axially rotating the resonator with respect to the mounting frame. The control of the resonator temperature is greatly improved by using a combination of two thermal shields, monitoring with several temperature sensors, and employing low-thermal conductivity materials. The instability of the resonator stabilized laser was characterized by comparing with another low-noise system based on a 48 cm long room temperature cavity of PTB's strontium lattice clock, resulting in a modified Allan deviation of 7 x 10-17 at 100 s.

  2. Resonant activation in a colored multiplicative thermal noise driven closed system

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Somrita; Bag, Bidhan Chandra; Mondal, Debasish

    2014-05-28

    In this paper, we have demonstrated that resonant activation (RA) is possible even in a thermodynamically closed system where the particle experiences a random force and a spatio-temporal frictional coefficient from the thermal bath. For this stochastic process, we have observed a hallmark of RA phenomena in terms of a turnover behavior of the barrier-crossing rate as a function of noise correlation time at a fixed noise variance. Variance can be fixed either by changing temperature or damping strength as a function of noise correlation time. Our another observation is that the barrier crossing rate passes through a maximum with increase in coupling strength of the multiplicative noise. If the damping strength is appreciably large, then the maximum may disappear. Finally, we compare simulation results with the analytical calculation. It shows that there is a good agreement between analytical and numerical results.

  3. Audio-band coating thermal noise measurement for Advanced LIGO with a multimode optical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gras, S.; Yu, H.; Yam, W.; Martynov, D.; Evans, M.

    2017-01-01

    In modern high precision optical instruments, such as in gravitational wave detectors or frequency references, thermally induced fluctuations in the reflective coatings can be a limiting noise source. This noise, known as coating thermal noise, can be reduced by choosing materials with low mechanical loss. Examination of new materials becomes a necessity in order to further minimize the coating thermal noise and thus improve sensitivity of next generation instruments. We present a novel approach to directly measure coating thermal noise using a high finesse folded cavity in which multiple Hermite-Gaussian modes coresonate. This method is used to probe surface fluctuations on the order 10-17 m /√{Hz } in the frequency range 30-400 Hz. We applied this technique to measure thermal noise and loss angle of the coating used in Advanced LIGO.

  4. Uncertainty in least-squares fits to the thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators with applications to the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Yousefi, Morteza; Friend, James R.

    2014-02-15

    Thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators are used widely to characterize their physical properties. These spectra typically exhibit a Lorentzian response, with additional white noise due to extraneous processes. Least-squares fits of these measurements enable extraction of key parameters of the resonator, including its resonant frequency, quality factor, and stiffness. Here, we present general formulas for the uncertainties in these fit parameters due to sampling noise inherent in all thermal noise spectra. Good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation of synthetic data and measurements of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever is demonstrated. These formulas enable robust interpretation of thermal noise spectra measurements commonly performed in the AFM and adaptive control of fitting procedures with specified tolerances.

  5. Resonant paramagnetic enhancement of the thermal and zero-point Nyquist noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    França, H. M.; Santos, R. B. B.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction between a very thin macroscopic solenoid, and a single magnetic particle precessing in a external magnetic field B0, is described by taking into account the thermal and the zero-point fluctuations of stochastic electrodynamics. The inductor belongs to a RLC circuit without batteries and the random motion of the magnetic dipole generates in the solenoid a fluctuating current Idip( t), and a fluctuating voltage εdip( t), with spectral distribution quite different from the Nyquist noise. We show that the mean square value < Idip2> presents an enormous variation when the frequency of precession approaches the frequency of the circuit, but it is still much smaller than the Nyquist current in the circuit. However, we also show that < Idip2> can reach measurable values if the inductor is interacting with a macroscopic sample of magnetic particles (atoms or nuclei) which are close enough to its coils.

  6. Towards thermal noise free optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Michael A.; Zhao, Chunnong; Blair, David G.; Ju, Li; Ma, Yiqiu; Pan, Huang-Wei; Chao, Shiuh; Mitrofanov, Valery P.; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2016-11-01

    Thermal noise generally greatly exceeds quantum noise in optomechanical devices unless the mechanical frequency is very high or the thermodynamic temperature is very low. This paper addresses the design concept for a novel optomechanical device capable of ultrahigh quality factors in the audio frequency band with negligible thermal noise. The proposed system consists of a minimally supported millimeter scale pendulum mounted in a double end-mirror sloshing cavity that is topologically equivalent to a membrane-in-the-middle cavity. The radiation pressure inside the high-finesse cavity allows for high optical stiffness, cancellation of terms which lead to unwanted negative damping and suppression of quantum radiation pressure noise. We solve the optical spring dynamics of the system using the Hamiltonian, find the noise spectral density and show that stable optical trapping is possible. We also assess various loss mechanisms, one of the most important being the acceleration loss due to the optical spring. We show that practical devices, starting from a centre-of-mass pendulum frequency of 0.1 Hz, could achieve a maximum quality factor of (1014) with optical spring stiffened frequency 1-10 kHz. Small resonators of mass 1 ≤ft(μ \\right) g or less could achieve a Q-factor of (1011) at a frequency of 100 kHz. Applications for such devices include white light cavities for improvement of gravitational wave detectors, or sensors able to operate near the quantum limit.

  7. Noise in nonlinear nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Noise limits the sensitivity of linear sensors, in a manner that is well understood, but also limits nonlinear systems in a less trivial way. Nonlinear nanomechanical resonators present interesting possibilities for the sensitive detection of forces and masses, but the noise limitations have not been explored much to date. Here we report on noise effects on nonlinear resonators operated in regimes where they have either one or two stable attractors. We have made quantitative measurements of the nonlinear response of a radiofrequency mechanical resonator with very high quality factor, measuring the noise-free transitions between the two attractors, and find good agreement with theory. We measure the transition rate response to controlled levels of white noise, and extract the basin activation energy. This allows us to obtain precise values for the relevant frequencies and the cubic nonlinearity in the Duffing oscillator, with applications to parametric sensing, in particular mass sensing. References: ``Noise-enabled precision measurements of a Duffing nanomechanical resonator,'' J.S. Aldridge and A.N. Cleland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 156403 (2005). ``Thermomechanical noise limits on parametric sensing with nanomechanical resonators,'' A.N. Cleland, New J. Phys. 7, 235 (2005).

  8. Noise in nonlinear nanoelectromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra Vidal, Diego N.

    Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems (NEMS), due to their nanometer scale size, possess a number of desirable attributes: high sensitivity to applied forces, fast response times, high resonance frequencies and low power consumption. However, ultra small size and low power handling result in unwanted consequences: smaller signal size and higher dissipation, making the NEMS devices more susceptible to external and intrinsic noise. The simplest version of a NEMS, a suspended nanomechanical structure with two distinct excitation states, can be used as an archetypal two state system to study a plethora of fundamental phenomena such as Duffing nonlinearity, stochastic resonance, and macroscopic quantum tunneling at low temperatures. From a technical perspective, there are numerous applications such nanomechanical memory elements, microwave switches and nanomechanical computation. The control and manipulation of the mechanical response of these two state systems can be realized by exploiting a (seemingly) counterintuitive physical phenomenon, Stochastic Resonance: in a noisy nonlinear mechanical system, the presence of noise can enhance the system response to an external stimulus. This Thesis is mainly dedicated to study possible applications of Stochastic Resonance in two-state nanomechanical systems. First, on chip signal amplification by 1/falpha is observed. The effectiveness of the noise assisted amplification is observed to decrease with increasing a. Experimental evidence shows an increase in asymmetry between the two states with increasing noise color. Considering the prevalence of 1/f alpha noise in the materials in integrated circuits, the signal enhancement demonstrated here, suggests beneficial use of the otherwise detrimental noise. Finally, a nanomechanical device, operating as a reprogrammable logic gate, and performing fundamental logic functions such as AND/OR and NAND/NOR is presented. The logic function can be programmed (from AND to OR) dynamically, by

  9. Low-frequency noise in gallium nitride nanowire mechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jason M.; Bertness, Kris A.; Sanford, Norman A.; Rogers, Charles T.

    2012-12-01

    We report on the low-frequency 1/f (flicker) parameter noise displayed by the resonance frequency of doubly clamped c-axis gallium nitride nanowire (NW) mechanical resonators. The resonators are electrostatically driven and their mechanical response is electronically detected via NW piezoresistance. With an applied dc voltage bias, a NW driven near its mechanical resonance generates a dc and Lorentzian rf current that both display 1/f noise. The rf current noise is proportional to the square of the derivative of the Lorentzian lineshape with a magnitude highly dependent on NW dc bias voltage conditions, consistent with a model wherein noise in the NW's electrical impedance leads to temperature noise from local Joule heating, which in turn generates resonance frequency noise via thermal expansion and the temperature-dependent Young's modulus. An example device with a 27.8 MHz resonance frequency experiences an approximate resonance frequency shift of -1.4 Hz/nW. The resonance frequency noise increases as the square of the bias voltage, indicating specific operating conditions that optimize the signal-to-noise ratio in proposed NW sensors.

  10. Thermal Noise in the Initial LIGO Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Aaron D.

    1995-01-01

    Gravitational wave detectors capable of detecting broadband gravitational wave bursts with a strain amplitude sensitivity near 10^{-21} at frequencies around 100 Hz are currently under construction by the LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) and VIRGO groups. One challenge facing these groups is how to detect the motion of the center of an inertial mass to a precision of 10^{-18} m when the mass consists of atoms each of which individually moves much more than that due to thermal energy. The uncertainty in the interferometer's measurement due to these thermal motions is called thermal noise. This thesis describes the thermal noise of the initial LIGO detectors. The thermal noise was analyzed by modelling the normal modes of the test mass suspension system as harmonic oscillators with dissipation and applying the fluctuation dissipation theorem. The dissipation of all modes which contribute significant thermal noise to the interferometer was measured and from these measurements the total thermal noise was estimated. The frequency dependence of the dissipation of the pendulum mode was characterized from measurements of the violin modes. A steel music wire suspension system was found to meet the goals of the initial LIGO detectors. A mathematical technique was developed which relates the energy in each vibrational mode to the motion of the mirror surface measured by the interferometer. Modes with acoustic wavelengths greater than the laser beam spot size can contribute significant thermal noise to the interferometer measurements. The dissipation of the test masses of LIGO's 40 -m interferometer at Caltech was investigated, and a technique for suspending and controlling the test masses which lowered the dissipation and met the thermal noise goals of the initial LIGO detector was developed. New test masses were installed in the 40-m interferometer resulting in improved noise performance. The implications of thermal noise to detecting gravitational

  11. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, M E; Melcher, J R; Kiang, N Y

    2000-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 microPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager's permanent magnet and the room air-handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions.

  12. Excess quantum noise fluctuations in unstable-resonator lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuh-Jen; Mussche, Paul; Fanning, Geoff; Siegman, A. E.

    1996-12-01

    Experiments completed during the past year confirm the existence of a sizable excess quantum noise factor in lasers using unstable optical resonators or, more generally, resonators with nonorthogonal oscillation modes. Schawlow and Townes predicted in 1958, before the first laser was built, that even an ideal laser should exhibit a finite linewidth resulting from spontaneous emission by the laser atoms.1 Lamb and others, using standard techniques of cavity mode expansion and second quantization, then showed that the spontaneous emission in any laser should have a magnitude equal to the downward stimulated emission due to one additional quantum of signal energy acting on the inverted laser medium.2 This "one extra noise photon" approach to quantum noise has since become conventional wisdom in the field. Petermann noted in 1979, however, that spontaneous emission into the oscillating mode of a gain-guided semiconductor laser could be significantly larger than one photon per mode, leading to potentially measurable consequences for such lasers.3 In 1985, Haus and Kawakami showed that there would be partial coherence between the excess noise emission into different cavity modes, thus avoiding apparent conflicts between this excess emission and basic concepts of thermal equilibrium.4 One of us then showed in 1989 that this excess quantum noise was actually associated with the nonhermitian or biorthogonal character of the modes in certain laser structures rather than with gain guiding per se, so that large excess quantum noise effects should be observed in unstable resonator lasers in particular.5

  13. Low noise cryogenic dielectric resonator oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A microwave oscillator is provided which can operate at a temperature of many degrees above absolute zero while providing very low phase noise that has heretofore generally required temperatures within a few degrees K. The oscillator includes a ring-shaped resonant element of ruby (sapphire plus chromium) or iron sapphire crystal, lying adjacent to a resonator element of sapphire, so that the regenerator element lies directly in the magnetic field of the resonator element. The resonator element is substantially devoid of contact with electrically conductive material. Microwave energy of a pump frequency (e.g., 31 GHz) is outputted from the regenerator element, while signal energy (e.g., 10 GHz) is outputted from the resonator element.

  14. Thermal-Mechanical Noise Based CMUT Characterization and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Gurun, Gokce; Hochman, Michael; Hasler, Paul; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2012-01-01

    When capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) are monolithically integrated with custom-designed low-noise electronics, the output noise of the system can be dominated by the CMUT thermal-mechanical noise both in air and in immersion even for devices with low capacitance. Since the thermal-mechanical noise can be related to the electrical admittance of the CMUTs, this provides an effective means of device characterization. This approach yields a novel method to test the functionality and uniformity of CMUT arrays and the integrated electronics where a direct connection to CMUT array element terminals is not available. These measurements can be performed in air at the wafer level, suitable for batch manufacturing and testing. We demonstrate this method on the elements of an 800-μm diameter CMUT-on-CMOS array designed for intravascular imaging in the 10-20 MHz range. Noise measurements in air show the expected resonance behavior and spring softening effects. Noise measurements in immersion for the same array provide useful information on both the acoustic cross talk and radiation properties of the CMUT array elements. The good agreement between a CMUT model based on finite difference and boundary element method and the noise measurements validates the model and indicates that the output noise is indeed dominated by thermal-mechanical noise. The measurement method can be exploited to implement CMUT based passive sensors to measure immersion medium properties, or other parameters affecting the electro-mechanics of the CMUT structure. PMID:22718877

  15. Thermally actuated resonant silicon crystal nanobalances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajjam, Arash

    As the potential emerging technology for next generation integrated resonant sensors and frequency references as well as electronic filters, micro-electro-mechanical resonators have attracted a lot of attention over the past decade. As a result, a wide variety of high frequency micro/nanoscale electromechanical resonators have recently been presented. MEMS resonators, as low-cost highly integrated and ultra-sensitive mass sensors, can potentially provide new opportunities and unprecedented capabilities in the area of mass sensing. Such devices can provide orders of magnitude higher mass sensitivity and resolution compared to Film Bulk Acoustic resonators (FBAR) or the conventional quartz and Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) resonators due to their much smaller sizes and can be batch-fabricated and utilized in highly integrated large arrays at a very low cost. In this research, comprehensive experimental studies on the performance and durability of thermally actuated micromechanical resonant sensors with frequencies up to tens of MHz have been performed. The suitability and robustness of the devices have been demonstrated for mass sensing applications related to air-borne particles and organic gases. In addition, due to the internal thermo-electro-mechanical interactions, the active resonators can turn some of the consumed electronic power back into the mechanical structure and compensate for the mechanical losses. Therefore, such resonators can provide self-sustained-oscillation without the need for any electronic circuitry. This unique property has been deployed to demonstrate a prototype self-sustained sensor for air-borne particle monitoring. I have managed to overcome one of the obstacles for MEMS resonators, which is their relatively poor temperature stability. This is a major drawback when compared with the conventional quartz crystals. A significant decrease of the large negative TCF for the resonators has been attained by doping the devices with a high

  16. Noise-free logical stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Animesh; Sohane, Aman; Kohar, Vivek; Murali, K; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2011-11-01

    The phenomena of logical stochastic resonance (LSR) was demonstrated recently [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 104101 (2009)]: namely, when a bistable system is driven by two inputs it consistently yields a response mirroring a logic function of the two inputs in an optimal window of moderate noise. Here we examine the intriguing possibility of obtaining dynamical behavior equivalent to LSR in a noise-free bistable system, subjected only to periodic forcing, such as sinusoidal driving or rectangular pulse trains. We find that such a system, despite having no stochastic influence, also yields phenomena analogous to LSR, in an appropriate window of frequency and amplitude of the periodic forcing. The results are corroborated by circuit experiments.

  17. Thermal Brillouin noise observed in silicon optomechanical waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Laer, Raphaël; Sarabalis, Christopher J.; Baets, Roel; Van Thourhout, Dries; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.

    2017-04-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering was recently observed in nanoscale silicon waveguides. Surprisingly, thermally-driven photon–phonon conversion in these structures had not yet been reported. Here, we inject an optical probe in a suspended silicon waveguide and measure its phase fluctuations at the output. We observe mechanical resonances around 8 GHz with a scattering efficiency of {10}-5 {{{m}}}-1 and a signal-to-noise ratio of 2. The observations are in agreement with a theory of noise in these waveguides as well as with stimulated measurements. Our scheme may simplify measurements of mechanical signatures in nanoscale waveguides and is a step towards a better grasp of thermal noise in these new continuum optomechanical systems.

  18. Thermal Properties of Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-22

    F01m 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 ABSTRACT Number of Papers published in peer-reviewed journals: Thermal Properties of Whispering...Gallery Mode Resonators Report Title In this project, we studied the thermal properties of ultra-high-quality whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid...resonators. More specifically, we measured the thermal relaxation time of the resonator to estimate the response time of the resonator based infrared (IR

  19. Brownian Ratchets: Transport Controlled by Thermal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kula, J.; Czernik, T.; Łuczka, J.

    1998-02-01

    We analyze directed transport of overdamped Brownian particles in a 1D spatially periodic potential that are subjected to both zero-mean thermal equilibrium Nyquist noise and zero-mean exponentially correlated dichotomous fluctuations. We show that particles can reverse the direction of average motion upon a variation of noise parameters if two fundamental symmetries, namely, the reflection symmetry of the spatial periodic structure, and the statistical symmetry of dichotomous fluctuations, are broken. There is a critical thermal noise intensity Dc, or equivalently a critical temperature Tc, at which the mean velocity of particles is zero. Below Tc and above Tc particles move in opposite directions. At fixed temperature, there is a region of noise parameters in which particles of different linear size are transported in opposite directions.

  20. Proposal of using slot-waveguide cavity to reduce noises in resonant integrated optical gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi; Kong, Mei; Xu, Yameng

    2016-10-01

    Resonant optical gyroscopes suffer serious performance degradation induced by noises. We propose using an air-gap silicon-on-silica slot waveguide ring resonator as the resonant cavity of a resonant integrated optical gyroscope. We estimate possible backscattering, Kerr effect, polarization fluctuation, and thermal drift in the air-gap slot waveguide. It is shown that the backscattering, Kerr nonlinearity, and thermal instabilities can decrease significantly compared to those in a common solid-core silicon waveguide cavity, and perturbations of the polarization fluctuation may be eliminated. In addition, a slot-waveguide cavity is more beneficial for integration than a photonic bandgap fiber cavity.

  1. Stochastic resonance with colored noise for neural signal detection.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2014-01-01

    We analyze signal detection with nonlinear test statistics in the presence of colored noise. In the limits of small signal and weak noise correlation, the optimal test statistic and its performance are derived under general conditions, especially concerning the type of noise. We also analyze, for a threshold nonlinearity-a key component of a neural model, the conditions for noise-enhanced performance, establishing that colored noise is superior to white noise for detection. For a parallel array of nonlinear elements, approximating neurons, we demonstrate even broader conditions allowing noise-enhanced detection, via a form of suprathreshold stochastic resonance.

  2. Majorana Braiding with Thermal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrocchi, Fabio L.; DiVincenzo, David P.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the self-correcting properties of a network of Majorana wires, in the form of a trijunction, in contact with a parity-preserving thermal environment. As opposed to the case where Majorana bound states are immobile, braiding Majorana bound states within a trijunction introduces dangerous error processes that we identify. Such errors prevent the lifetime of the memory from increasing with the size of the system. We confirm our predictions with Monte Carlo simulations. Our findings put a restriction on the degree of self-correction of this specific quantum computing architecture.

  3. Thermal nonlinearity in silicon microcylindrical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, Natasha; Healy, Noel; Mehta, Priyanth; Day, Todd D.; Sazio, Pier J. A.; Badding, John V.; Peacock, Anna C.

    2012-04-01

    We explore the thermally induced nonlinearity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon microcylindrical resonators that are fabricated from the silicon optical fiber platform. In particular, we use a pump-probe technique to experimentally demonstrate thermally induced optical modulation and determine the response time. Through characterization of the thermal properties and the associated resonance wavelength shifts, we will show that it is possible to infer the material absorption coefficient for a range of whispering gallery mode resonators.

  4. Noise control using a plate radiator and an acoustic resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control subassembly for reducing noise caused by a source (such as an aircraft engine) independent of the subassembly. A noise radiating panel is bendably vibratable to generate a panel noise canceling at least a portion of the source noise. A piezoceramic actuator plate is connected to the panel. A front plate is spaced apart from the panel and the first plate, is positioned generally between the source noise and the panel, and has a sound exit port. A first pair of spaced-apart side walls each generally abut the panel and the front plate so as to generally enclose a front cavity to define a resonator.

  5. Low-frequency noise in gallium nitride nanowire mechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jason; Bertness, Kris; Sanford, Norman; Rogers, Charles

    2012-02-01

    We report on the low-frequency 1/f (flicker) parameter noise displayed by the resonance frequency and resistance of doubly clamped c-axis gallium nitride nanowire (NW) mechanical resonators. The resonators are electrostatically driven and their mechanical response is electronically detected via NW piezoresistance. With an applied dc voltage bias, an NW driven near its mechanical resonance generates a dc and Lorentzian rf current that both display 1/f noise. The rf current noise is proportional to the square of the derivative of the Lorentzian lineshape with a magnitude highly dependent on NW dc bias voltage conditions, consistent with noise in the NW's resistance leading to temperature noise from local Joule heating, which in turn generates resonance frequency noise. An example device with a 27.8 MHz resonance frequency and 220 kφ resistance experiences an approximate resonance frequency shift of -5.8 Hz/nW. In terms of NW resistance change, this corresponds with shifts of 0.1 Hz/φ and 2.6 Hz/φ at 1 V bias and 4 V bias, respectively, with an average resistance fluctuation of 1 kφ in a 1-second bandwidth.

  6. Controlling of stochastic resonance and noise enhanced stability induced by harmonic noises in a bistable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao-Jie; Long, Fei; Zhang, Pei; Nie, Lin-Ru

    2017-04-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) and noise enhanced stability (NES) in a bistable system driven by an additive harmonic noise and a multiplicative harmonic noise is investigated. Through numerical simulation, we obtained the power spectrum by the Fourier transformation on time series. The results indicate that (i) for certain values of the parameters of additive harmonic noise Γ, Ω and the noise intensity D, the SR phenomenon occurs. It means we can control the SR phenomenon by modulating the parameters of harmonic noise; (ii) the NES phenomenon occurs at certain values of the parameters of multiplicative harmonic noise Γ, Ω and the multiplicative noise intensity Q. Most important, the NES phenomenon can also be controlled by modulating the parameters of harmonic noise.

  7. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stiffness variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by a plurality of force transmitting mechanisms which contact the noise radiating element. Each one of the force transmitting mechanisms includes an expandable element and a spring in contact with the noise radiating element so that excitation of the element varies the spring force applied to the noise radiating element. The elements are actuated by a controller which receives input of a signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the elements and causes the spring force applied to the noise radiating element to be varied. The force transmitting mechanisms can be arranged to either produce bending or linear stiffness variations in the noise radiating element.

  8. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stress variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by an expandable ring embedded in the noise radiating element. Excitation of the ring causes expansion or contraction of the ring, thereby varying the stress in the noise radiating element. The ring is actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the ring, causing the ring to expand or contract. Instead of a single ring embedded in the noise radiating panel, a first expandable ring can be bonded to one side of the noise radiating element, and a second expandable ring can be bonded to the other side.

  9. Coating thermal noise of a finite-size cylindrical mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somiya, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2009-05-01

    Thermal noise of a mirror is one of the limiting noise sources in the high-precision measurement such as gravitational-wave detection, and the modeling of thermal noise has been developed and refined over a decade. In this paper, we present a derivation of coating thermal noise of a finite-size cylindrical mirror based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The result agrees to a previous result with an infinite-size mirror in the limit of large thickness, and also agrees to an independent result based on the modal-expansion method with a thin-mirror approximation. Our study will play an important role not only to accurately estimate the thermal-noise level of gravitational-wave detectors but also to help in analyzing thermal noise in quantum-measurement experiments with lighter mirrors.

  10. Noise control zone for a periodic ducted Helmholtz resonator system.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chenzhi; Mak, Cheuk Ming

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the dispersion characteristics of sound wave propagation in a periodic ducted Helmholtz resonator (HR) system. The predicted result fits well with a numerical simulation using a finite element method. This study indicates that for the same system, no matter how many HRs are connected or what the periodic distance is, the area under average transmission loss T L¯ curves is always the same. The broader the noise attenuation band, the lower the peak attenuation amplitude. A noise control zone compromising the attenuation bandwidth or peak amplitude is proposed for noise control optimization.

  11. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through variable ring loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of noise radiating structure is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating structure is tuned by a plurality of drivers arranged to contact the noise radiating structure. Excitation of the drivers causes expansion or contraction of the drivers, thereby varying the edge loading applied to the noise radiating structure. The drivers are actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the drivers, causing them to expand or contract. The noise radiating structure may be either the outer shroud of the engine or a ring mounted flush with an inner wall of the shroud or disposed in the interior of the shroud.

  12. Thermally tunable quadruple Vernier racetrack resonators.

    PubMed

    Boeck, Robert; Chrostowski, Lukas; Jaeger, Nicolas A F

    2013-07-15

    The spectral responses of series-coupled racetrack resonators exhibiting the Vernier effect have many attractive features as compared to the spectral responses of identical series-coupled racetrack resonators, such as free spectral range (FSR) extension and enhanced wavelength tunability. Here we present experimental results of a thermally tunable quadruple series-coupled silicon racetrack resonator exhibiting the Vernier effect. We thermally tune two of the four racetrack resonators to enable discrete switching of the major peak by 15.54 nm. Also, our device has an interstitial peak suppression of 35.4 dB, a 3 dB bandwidth of 0.45 nm, and an extended FSR of 37.66 nm.

  13. Thermal noise can facilitate energy conversion by a ratchet system.

    PubMed

    Takagi, F; Hondou, T

    1999-10-01

    Molecular motors in biological systems are expected to use ambient fluctuation. In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 5251 (1998)], it was shown that the following question was unanswered: Can thermal noise facilitate energy conversion by ratchet system? We consider it using stochastic energetics, and show that there exist systems where thermal noise helps the energy conversion.

  14. Estimation of Frequency Noise in Semiconductor Lasers Due to Mechanical Thermal Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate mechanical thermal noise in semiconductor lasers, applying a methodology developed for fixed-spacer cavities for laser frequency stabilization. Our simple model determines an underlying fundamental limit for the frequency noise of free-running semiconductor laser, and provides a framework: where the noise may be potentially reduced with improved design.

  15. Atmospheric thermal lensing in laser resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Thomas, Milfred E.; Koch, Grady J.; Marsh, Waverly D.

    1995-01-01

    Atmospheric absorption degrades laser performance both by absorbing laser energy within the laser resonator, which increases the loss, and by inducing a thermal lens in the atmosphere. Atmospheric thermal lensing can be quite severe, even when the absorption coefficient is quite modest. A model is developed which describes atmospheric thermal lensing; time constants, which are associated with the establishment and decay of the atmospheric thermal lens, are determined; experiments are performed using an injection seeded Ti:Al2O3 laser tuned to the H2O absorption lines near 0.815 microns to validate the model; dependence of the atmospheric thermal lens on the laser energy and absorption coefficient were measured and found to agree with the model. In addition, the decay of the atmospheric thermal lens with time was measured and also found to agree with the model predictions.

  16. Resonant and Time-Resolved Spin Noise Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xinlin; Pursley, Brennan; Sih, Vanessa

    Spin noise spectroscopy is a technique which can probe the system while it remains in equilibrium. It was first demonstrated in atomic gases and then in solid state systems. Most existing spin noise measurement setups digitize the spin fluctuation signal and then analyze the power spectrum. Recently, pulsed lasers have been used to expand the bandwidth of accessible dynamics and allow direct time-domain correlation measurements. Here we develop and test a model for ultrafast pulsed laser spin noise measurements as well as a scheme to measure spin lifetimes longer than the laser repetition period. For the resonant spin noise technique, analog electronics are used to capture correlations from the extended pulse train, and the signal at a fixed time delay is measured as a function of applied magnetic field.

  17. Fundamental Limit of 1/f Frequency Noise in Semiconductor Lasers Due to Mechanical Thermal Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, K.; Camp, J.

    2011-01-01

    So-called 1/f noise has power spectral density inversely proportional to frequency, and is observed in many physical processes. Single longitudinal-mode semiconductor lasers, used in variety of interferometric sensing applications, as well as coherent communications, exhibit 1/f frequency noise at low frequency (typically below 100kHz). Here we evaluate mechanical thermal noise due to mechanical dissipation in semiconductor laser components and give a plausible explanation for the widely-observed 1/f frequency noise, applying a methodology developed for fixed-spacer cavities for laser frequency stabilization. Semiconductor-laser's short cavity, small beam radius, and lossy components are expected to emphasize thermal-noise-limited frequency noise. Our simple model largely explains the different 1/f noise levels observed in various semiconductor lasers, and provides a framework where the noise may be reduced with proper design.

  18. Inverse stochastic resonance in electroconvection by multiplicative colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2016-11-01

    A kind of inverse stochastic resonance (ISR) observed in ac-driven electroconvection (EC) in a nematic liquid crystal is presented. In successive pattern evolutions by increasing noise intensity VN, a typical EC (with a normalized amplitude A0=1 at VN=0 ) disappears (A0→0 ) , and then the rest state (A0=0 ) reenters into the EC (A0=1 ); eventually, it develops into complicated EC (A0>1 ) . The reversed bell-shaped behavior of A0(VN) is evidence of ISR. The present ISR may be explained by taking into account colored noise characterized by its intensity and correlation time.

  19. Period doubling induced by thermal noise amplification in genetic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruocco, G.; Fratalocchi, A.

    2014-11-01

    Rhythms of life are dictated by oscillations, which take place in a wide rage of biological scales. In bacteria, for example, oscillations have been proven to control many fundamental processes, ranging from gene expression to cell divisions. In genetic circuits, oscillations originate from elemental block such as autorepressors and toggle switches, which produce robust and noise-free cycles with well defined frequency. In some circumstances, the oscillation period of biological functions may double, thus generating bistable behaviors whose ultimate origin is at the basis of intense investigations. Motivated by brain studies, we here study an ``elemental'' genetic circuit, where a simple nonlinear process interacts with a noisy environment. In the proposed system, nonlinearity naturally arises from the mechanism of cooperative stability, which regulates the concentration of a protein produced during a transcription process. In this elemental model, bistability results from the coherent amplification of environmental fluctuations due to a stochastic resonance of nonlinear origin. This suggests that the period doubling observed in many biological functions might result from the intrinsic interplay between nonlinearity and thermal noise.

  20. Period doubling induced by thermal noise amplification in genetic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Ruocco, G.; Fratalocchi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Rhythms of life are dictated by oscillations, which take place in a wide rage of biological scales. In bacteria, for example, oscillations have been proven to control many fundamental processes, ranging from gene expression to cell divisions. In genetic circuits, oscillations originate from elemental block such as autorepressors and toggle switches, which produce robust and noise-free cycles with well defined frequency. In some circumstances, the oscillation period of biological functions may double, thus generating bistable behaviors whose ultimate origin is at the basis of intense investigations. Motivated by brain studies, we here study an “elemental” genetic circuit, where a simple nonlinear process interacts with a noisy environment. In the proposed system, nonlinearity naturally arises from the mechanism of cooperative stability, which regulates the concentration of a protein produced during a transcription process. In this elemental model, bistability results from the coherent amplification of environmental fluctuations due to a stochastic resonance of nonlinear origin. This suggests that the period doubling observed in many biological functions might result from the intrinsic interplay between nonlinearity and thermal noise. PMID:25404210

  1. Period doubling induced by thermal noise amplification in genetic circuits.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, G; Fratalocchi, A

    2014-11-18

    Rhythms of life are dictated by oscillations, which take place in a wide rage of biological scales. In bacteria, for example, oscillations have been proven to control many fundamental processes, ranging from gene expression to cell divisions. In genetic circuits, oscillations originate from elemental block such as autorepressors and toggle switches, which produce robust and noise-free cycles with well defined frequency. In some circumstances, the oscillation period of biological functions may double, thus generating bistable behaviors whose ultimate origin is at the basis of intense investigations. Motivated by brain studies, we here study an "elemental" genetic circuit, where a simple nonlinear process interacts with a noisy environment. In the proposed system, nonlinearity naturally arises from the mechanism of cooperative stability, which regulates the concentration of a protein produced during a transcription process. In this elemental model, bistability results from the coherent amplification of environmental fluctuations due to a stochastic resonance of nonlinear origin. This suggests that the period doubling observed in many biological functions might result from the intrinsic interplay between nonlinearity and thermal noise.

  2. Conversion of Laser Phase Noise to Amplitude Noise in a Resonant Atomic Vapor: The Role of Laser Linewidth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    fiber optic sensors ; atomic frequency standards, applied laser spectroscopy, laser chemistry, atmospheric propagation and beam control, LIDAR/LADAR...SMC-TR-99-11 AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TR-98(8555)-14 Conversion of Laser Phase Noise to Amplitude Noise in a Resonant Atomic Vapor: The Role of Laser ...1999 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Conversion of Laser Phase Noise to Amplitude Noise in a Resonant Atomic Vapor: The Role

  3. Ultralow-phase-noise oscillators based on BAW resonators.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingdong; Seok, Seonho; Rolland, Nathalie; Rolland, Paul; El Aabbaoui, Hassan; de Foucauld, Emeric; Vincent, Pierre; Giordano, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents two 2.1-GHz low-phase noise oscillators based on BAW resonators. Both a single-ended common base structure and a differential Colpitts structure have been implemented in a 0.25-μm BiCMOS process. The detailed design methods including the realization, optimization, and test are reported. The differential Colpitts structure exhibits a phase noise 6.5 dB lower than the single-ended structure because of its good performance of power noise immunity. Comparison between the two structures is also carried out. The differential Colpitts structure shows a phase noise level of -87 dBc/Hz at 1-kHz offset frequency and a phase noise floor of -162 dBc/Hz, with an output power close to -6.5 dBm and a core consumption of 21.6 mW. Furthermore, with the proposed optimization methods, both proposed devices have achieved promising phase noise performance compared with state-of-the-art oscillators described in the literature. Finally, we briefly present the application of the proposed BAW oscillator to a micro-atomic clock.

  4. Stochastic Resonance in crayfish hydrodynamic receptors stimulated with external noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, J. K.; Wilkens, L. A.; Pantazelou, E.; Moss, F.

    1993-08-01

    Stochastic Resonance (SR) is a statistical process occurring only in nonlinear dynamical systems whereby a subthreshold coherent stimulus or signal can be enhanced by noise. The signal alone is too weak to cause a state change of the system. State changes are the carriers of information through the system. In the presence of random noise, however, the system can change state, more-or-less randomly, but with some degree of coherence with the signal. A measure of this coherence at the output shows a maximum at an optimal value of the noise intensity as the signature of SR. SR is the object of recent and continued experimental and theoretical research in statistical physics. While SR has been demonstrated in a variety of physical systems, it has not yet been discovered in any naturally occurring system. This paper was stimulated by the idea that the sensory nervous system might be an appropriate setting for a search for naturally occurring SR. The detection of weak stimuli, often in the presence of noise, is, after all, the first business of the sensory system. Moreover, the system is evolved, which admits the possibility that the process of natural selection might have resulted in an optimization with respect to the (inevitable) noise. This paper describes an experiment designed to observe SR in the mechanoreceptor cells of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii, shown on the left in Fig. 1, using external noise plus a weak coherent signal as the stimulus.

  5. Aircraft interior noise reduction by alternate resonance tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.; Gottwald, James A.; Srinivasan, Ramakrishna; Gustaveson, Mark B.

    1990-01-01

    Existing interior noise reduction techniques for aircraft fuselages perform reasonably well at higher frequencies, but are inadequate at lower frequencies, particularly with respect to the low blade passage harmonics with high forcing levels found in propeller aircraft. A method is being studied which considers aircraft fuselage lined with panels alternately tuned to frequencies above and below the frequency that must be attenuated. Adjacent panels would oscillate at equal amplitude, to give equal source strength, but with opposite phase. Provided these adjacent panels are acoustically compact, the resulting cancellation causes the interior acoustic modes to become cutoff, and therefore be non-propagating and evanescent. This interior noise reduction method, called Alternate Resonance Tuning (ART), is currently being investigated both theoretically and experimentally. This new concept has potential application to reducing interior noise due to the propellers in advanced turboprop aircraft as well as for existing aircraft configurations.

  6. Transport driven by biharmonic forces: Impact of correlated thermal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machura, L.; Łuczka, J.

    2010-09-01

    We study an inertial Brownian particle moving in a symmetric periodic substrate, driven by a zero-mean biharmonic force and correlated thermal noise. The Brownian motion is described in terms of a generalized Langevin equation with an exponentially correlated Gaussian noise term, obeying the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We analyze impact of nonzero correlation time of thermal noise on transport properties of the Brownian particle. We identify regimes where the increase of the correlation time intensifies long-time transport of the Brownian particle. The opposite effect is also found: longer correlation time reduces the stationary velocity of the particle. The correlation time induced multiple current reversal is detected. We reveal that thermal noise of nonzero correlation time can radically enhance long-time velocity of the Brownian particle in regimes where in the white noise limit the velocity is extremely small. All transport properties can be tested in the setup consisting of a resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junction device.

  7. Transition from double coherence resonances to single coherence resonance in a neuronal network with phase noise.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanbing; Gu, Huaguang

    2015-12-01

    The effect of phase noise on the coherence dynamics of a neuronal network composed of FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) neurons is investigated. Phase noise can induce dissimilar coherence resonance (CR) effects for different coupling strength regimes. When the coupling strength is small, phase noise can induce double CRs. One corresponds to the average frequency of phase noise, and the other corresponds to the intrinsic firing frequency of the FHN neuron. When the coupling strength is large enough, phase noise can only induce single CR, and the CR corresponds to the intrinsic firing frequency of the FHN neuron. The results show a transition from double CRs to single CR with the increase in the coupling strength. The transition can be well interpreted based on the dynamics of a single neuron stimulated by both phase noise and the coupling current. When the coupling strength is small, the coupling current is weak, and phase noise mainly determines the dynamics of the neuron. Moreover, the phase-noise-induced double CRs in the neuronal network are similar to the phase-noise-induced double CRs in an isolated FHN neuron. When the coupling strength is large enough, the coupling current is strong and plays a key role in the occurrence of the single CR in the network. The results provide a novel phenomenon and may have important implications in understanding the dynamics of neuronal networks.

  8. Dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in coupled ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chenguang; Fan, Jiahua; Zhu, Lin

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in a photonic system of two coupled ring resonators. A bus waveguide is used to couple light in and out of one of the coupled resonators. Based on the coupling from the bus to the resonator, the coupling between the resonators and the intrinsic loss of each individual resonator, the system transmission spectrum can be classified by three different categories: coupled-resonator-induced absorption, coupled-resonator-induced transparency and over coupled resonance splitting. Dynamic thermal optical effects due to linear absorption have been analyzed for each category as a function of the input power. The heat power in each resonator determines the thermal dynamics in this coupled resonator system. Multiple "shark fins" and power competition between resonators can be foreseen. Also, the nonlinear absorption induced thermal effects have been discussed.

  9. A mechanical-thermal noise analysis of a nonlinear microgyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajimi, S. A. M.; Heppler, G. R.; Abdel-Rahman, E. M.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical-thermal noise (MTN) equivalent rotation rate (Ωn) is computed by using the linear approximation of the system response and the nonlinear "slow" system. The slow system, which is obtained using the method of multiple scales, is used to identify the linear single-valued response of the system. The linear estimate of the noise equivalent rate fails as the drive direction stroke increases. It becomes imperative in these conditions to use a more complex nonlinear estimate of the noise equivalent rate developed here for the first time in literature. The proposed design achieves a high performance regarding noise equivalent rotation rate.

  10. Contribution of off-resonant states to the phase noise of quantum dot lasers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Zhuang, Jun-Ping; Grillot, Frédéric; Chan, Sze-Chun

    2016-12-26

    The phase noise of quantum dot lasers is investigated theoretically by coupling the Langevin noise sources into the rate equations. The off-resonant populations in the excited state and in the carrier reservoir contribute to the phase noise of ground-state emission lasers through the phase-amplitude coupling effect. This effect arises from the optical-noise induced carrier fluctuations in the off-resonant states. In addition, the phase noise has low sensitivity to the carrier scattering rates.

  11. Stochastic resonance in tristable system induced by dichotomous noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Peiming; Su, Xiao; Han, Dongying

    2016-11-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) of a tristable system driven by dichotomous noise (DN) is investigated firstly by the mean signal-to-noise ratio gain (SNR-GM). Utilizing an efficiently numerical algorithm, we acquire the asymmetric DN accurately. Then the system responses and the SNR-GM as the signatures of the stochastic resonance are calculated by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm. It is founded that the change of system parameters a and c in a certain range can induce SR phenomenon. Moreover, with the increase of parameter c, the amplitude of SNR-GM increases and shows the trend of moving to the left. For the different state values of the symmetric DN, the SNR-GM will increase with the increase of state value a1 and b1 but only a highest peak and the interval of SR shift to the left. However, with the increase of forcing frequency, the SNR-GM decreases and the interval of SR moves to right. In addition to, the highest peak of SNR-GM will decrease with the increase of periodic signal amplitude. These results provide a reliable basis for how to realize the parameter selection of stochastic resonance in tristable system driven by DN.

  12. Two Stochastic Resonances Induced by Two Different Multiplicative Telegraphic Noises for an Electric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-Hui

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, an electric system with two dichotomous resistors is investigated. It is shown that this system can display two stochastic resonances, which are the amplitude of the periodic response as the functions of the two dichotomous resistors strengthes respectively. In the limits of Gaussian white noise and shot white noise (i.e., the two noises are both Gaussian white noise or shot white noise), no phenomena of resonance appear. By further study, we find that when the system is with three or more multiplicative telegraphic noises, there are three or more stochastic resonances.

  13. Temperature-induced transient noise of pyroelectric thermal detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Muno; Bae, Seong-Ho

    2000-11-01

    An analysis of temperature-induced transient noise for a thermal detector prepared with Pb(Zr,Ti)O3-Pb(Sb0.5Nb0.5)O3 (PZT-PSN) pyroelectric ceramics as the sensing element is conducted by measuring its oven noise as a function of the junction field-effect transistor (JFET) characteristics, gate resistance, low-temperature heat treatment, chemical composition and the grain size of the pyroelectric ceramic. Pyroelectric wafers are prepared by the mixed oxide technique, and thermal sensors are fabricated with a PZT-PSN ceramic wafer, JFET, chip-type gate resistor, alumina PCB (printed circuit board) and a TO- 5 package with antireflective (AR)-coated Si window. Thermal detector noise depends on the chemical composition of the pyroelectric sensing element. The temperature-induced transient JFET noise varies with its characteristics and gate resistance and is reduced by connecting a pyroelectric sensing element with high capacitance. The pyroelectric ceramic sensing element generates burst noise in the region from 7 to -10 degree(s)C during cooling, which is remarkably reduced by reducing the grain size of the pyroelectric ceramic and/or by cyclic heat treatment at a low temperature. Thus, burst noise as a strong relationship with the elastic energies within the ceramic sensing element and the bonding material between the sensing wafer and the PCB, originating in the different thermal expansion between pyroelectric sensing wafer and alumina PCB.

  14. Simulation of Thin-Film Damping and Thermal Mechanical Noise Spectra for Advanced Micromachined Microphone Structures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Neal A.; Okandan, Murat; Littrell, Robert; Bicen, Baris; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2008-01-01

    In many micromachined sensors the thin (2–10 μm thick) air film between a compliant diaphragm and backplate electrode plays a dominant role in shaping both the dynamic and thermal noise characteristics of the device. Silicon microphone structures used in grating-based optical-interference microphones have recently been introduced that employ backplates with minimal area to achieve low damping and low thermal noise levels. Finite-element based modeling procedures based on 2-D discretization of the governing Reynolds equation are ideally suited for studying thin-film dynamics in such structures which utilize relatively complex backplate geometries. In this paper, the dynamic properties of both the diaphragm and thin air film are studied using a modal projection procedure in a commonly used finite element software and the results are used to simulate the dynamic frequency response of the coupled structure to internally generated electrostatic actuation pressure. The model is also extended to simulate thermal mechanical noise spectra of these advanced sensing structures. In all cases simulations are compared with measured data and show excellent agreement—demonstrating 0.8 pN/√Hz and 1.8 μPa/√Hz thermal force and thermal pressure noise levels, respectively, for the 1.5 mm diameter structures under study which have a fundamental diaphragm resonance-limited bandwidth near 20 kHz. PMID:19081811

  15. Simulation of Thin-Film Damping and Thermal Mechanical Noise Spectra for Advanced Micromachined Microphone Structures.

    PubMed

    Hall, Neal A; Okandan, Murat; Littrell, Robert; Bicen, Baris; Degertekin, F Levent

    2008-06-01

    In many micromachined sensors the thin (2-10 μm thick) air film between a compliant diaphragm and backplate electrode plays a dominant role in shaping both the dynamic and thermal noise characteristics of the device. Silicon microphone structures used in grating-based optical-interference microphones have recently been introduced that employ backplates with minimal area to achieve low damping and low thermal noise levels. Finite-element based modeling procedures based on 2-D discretization of the governing Reynolds equation are ideally suited for studying thin-film dynamics in such structures which utilize relatively complex backplate geometries. In this paper, the dynamic properties of both the diaphragm and thin air film are studied using a modal projection procedure in a commonly used finite element software and the results are used to simulate the dynamic frequency response of the coupled structure to internally generated electrostatic actuation pressure. The model is also extended to simulate thermal mechanical noise spectra of these advanced sensing structures. In all cases simulations are compared with measured data and show excellent agreement-demonstrating 0.8 pN/√Hz and 1.8 μPa/√Hz thermal force and thermal pressure noise levels, respectively, for the 1.5 mm diameter structures under study which have a fundamental diaphragm resonance-limited bandwidth near 20 kHz.

  16. Noise-hidden signal recovery via stochastic resonance in the SOI waveguide resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Heng; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan; Wang, Zhaolu; Han, Jing; Li, Shaopeng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a method to recover weak pulse signals buried in noise via stochastic resonance (SR) based on optical bistability induced by the free-carrier dispersion effect in the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide resonator. The bistable system threshold is determined by the resonator parameters including the waveguide length, mirror reflectivity, and the free-carrier lifetime. A signal with different power levels can be detected by changing the free-carrier lifetime using a reverse-biased p-i-n junction embedded in the SOI waveguide. The influence of the system parameters on the SR is quantitatively analyzed by calculating the cross-correlation coefficient between the input and output signals. A cross-correlation gain of 5.6 is obtained by optimizing the system parameters of the SOI waveguide resonator. The results show the potential of using this structure to reconstruct and extract weak signals in all-optical integrated systems.

  17. Thermal Noise Behavior of the Bridge Circuit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    is Gaussian white noise. 37 References [1] C.A. Desoer and E.S. Kuh, Basic Circuit Theory, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1969. [2] E. Polak and E. Wong...86, no. 5, pp. 702-710, 1952. [7] L.O. Chua, C.A. Desoer , and E.S. Kuh, Linear and Nonlinear Circuits, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1987. See in

  18. On the thermal noise limit of cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Vincze, Gy; Szasz, N; Szasz, A

    2005-01-01

    Comparison of thermal noise limits and the effects of low frequency electromagnetic fields (LFEMF) on the cellular membrane have important implications for the study of bioelectro-magnetism in this regime. Over a decade ago, Weaver and Astumian developed a model to show that thermal noise can limit the efficacy of LFEMF. A recent report by Kaune [Kaune (2002) Bioelectromagnetics 23:622-628], however, contradicted their findings. Kaune assumes that the conductance noise current of cell membrane can be decomposed into two components, where one of them is identical regarding all segments (coherent), while the other is different (incoherent). Besides, this decomposition is not unequivocal and contradicts to the statistical independence of the segment noise currents, and therefore to the second law of thermodynamics as well. We suggest the procedure based on the method of symmetrical components, by the means of which we can re-interpret the result of Kaune in a correct way.

  19. Spin noise spectroscopy of rubidium atomic gas under resonant and non-resonant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Shi, Ping; Qian, Xuan; Li, Wei; Ji, Yang

    2016-11-01

    The spin fluctuation in rubidium atom gas is studied via all-optical spin noise spectroscopy (SNS). Experimental results show that the integrated SNS signal and its full width at half maximum (FWHM) strongly depend on the frequency detuning of the probe light under resonant and non-resonant conditions. The total integrated SNS signal can be well fitted with a single squared Faraday rotation spectrum and the FWHM dependence may be related to the absorption profile of the sample. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91321310 and 11404325) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922304).

  20. Aircraft interior noise reduction by alternate resonance tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottwald, James A.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1990-01-01

    The focus is on a noise control method which considers aircraft fuselages lined with panels alternately tuned to frequencies above and below the frequency that must be attenuated. An interior noise reduction called alternate resonance tuning (ART) is described both theoretically and experimentally. Problems dealing with tuning single paneled wall structures for optimum noise reduction using the ART methodology are presented, and three theoretical problems are analyzed. The first analysis is a three dimensional, full acoustic solution for tuning a panel wall composed of repeating sections with four different panel tunings within that section, where the panels are modeled as idealized spring-mass-damper systems. The second analysis is a two dimensional, full acoustic solution for a panel geometry influenced by the effect of a propagating external pressure field such as that which might be associated with propeller passage by a fuselage. To reduce the analysis complexity, idealized spring-mass-damper panels are again employed. The final theoretical analysis presents the general four panel problem with real panel sections, where the effect of higher structural modes is discussed. Results from an experimental program highlight real applications of the ART concept and show the effectiveness of the tuning on real structures.

  1. Determining the thermal noise floor of graphene biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosser, Michael; Brown, Morgan; Minot, Ethan

    2015-03-01

    The use of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) as biosensors in aqueous environments is fundamentally limited by voltage noise. In many GFET devices, noise is dominated by the fluctuating occupancy of charge traps in the substrate. Fabrication techniques have been found to reduce this substrate effect, but thermally-driven charge transfer across the graphene liquid interface has yet to be quantified and addressed. In this report we present the first characterization of this noise source. We show that the power spectral density of this noise scales inversely with frequency and inversely with interface area. Our results are in quantitative agreement with recent measurements of voltage noise in clean, suspended graphene. This work is supported by NSF Award Number 1450967.

  2. Determination of the Thermal Noise Limit of Graphene Biotransistors.

    PubMed

    Crosser, Michael S; Brown, Morgan A; McEuen, Paul L; Minot, Ethan D

    2015-08-12

    To determine the thermal noise limit of graphene biotransistors, we have measured the complex impedance between the basal plane of single-layer graphene and an aqueous electrolyte. The impedance is dominated by an imaginary component but has a finite real component. Invoking the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we determine the power spectral density of thermally driven voltage fluctuations at the graphene/electrolyte interface. The fluctuations have 1/f(p) dependence, with p = 0.75-0.85, and the magnitude of fluctuations scales inversely with area. Our results explain noise spectra previously measured in liquid-gated suspended graphene devices and provide realistic targets for future device performance.

  3. Numerical generation of laser-resonance phase noise for optical communication simulators.

    PubMed

    Ó Dúill, Seán P; Anthur, Aravind P; Huynh, Tam N; Naimi, Sepideh T; Nguyen, Lim; Venkitesh, Deepa; Barry, Liam P

    2015-04-10

    We generate random numerical waveforms that mimic laser phase noise incorporating laser-resonance enhanced phase noise. The phase noise waveforms are employed in system simulators to estimate the resulting bit error rate penalties for differential quadrature phase shift keying signals. The results show that baudrate dependence of the bit error rate performance arises from laser-resonance phase noise. In addition, we show with supporting experimental results that the laser-resonance phase noise on the pumps in four-wave-mixing-based wavelength converters is responsible for large bit error rate floors.

  4. Thermally tunable slot-coupled dielectric resonator antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Ke; Chen, Cong; Wang, Qingmin; Liu, Wenjun; Hao, Yanan; Gao, Xinlu; Huang, Shanguo; Lei, Ming

    2017-02-01

    A thermally tunable slot-coupled dielectric resonator antenna (DRA) has been designed and prepared by placing a thermosensitive ceramic resonator onto the slot. Typical magnetic resonance occurs in the resonator, which is closely related to its dielectric constant. Because the dielectric constant of the ceramic resonator decreases as the temperature increases, the resonance frequency of the proposed DRA increases as the temperature increases. The simulated results are in good agreement with the measured ones, which confirms the thermally tunable behavior. This approach provides a way for designing the frequency tunable antennas.

  5. Perfect Thermal Emission by Nanoscale Transmission Line Resonators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoan; Gong, Wei; Yu, Bowen; Li, Pengfei; Shen, Sheng

    2017-02-08

    Thermal radiation with a narrow-band emission spectrum is of great importance in a variety of applications such as infrared sensing, thermophotovoltaics, radiation cooling, and thermal circuits. Although resonant nanophotonic structures such as metamaterials and nanocavities have been demonstrated to achieve the narrow-band thermal emission, maximizing their radiation power toward perfect emission still remains challenging. Here, based on the recently developed quasi-normal mode theory, we prove that thermal emission from a nanoscale transmission line resonator can always be maximized by tuning the waveguiding loss of the resonator or bending the structure. By use of nanoscale transmission line resonators as basic building blocks, we experimentally demonstrate a new type of macroscopic perfect and tunable thermal emitters. Our experimental demonstration in conjunction with the general theoretical framework from the quasi-normal mode theory lays the foundation for designing tunable narrow-band thermal emitters with applications in thermal infrared light sources, thermal management, and infrared sensing and imaging.

  6. Thermal ratchets driven by Poissonian white shot noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernik, T.; Kula, J.; Łuczka, J.; Häautnggi, P.

    1997-04-01

    We investigate the overdamped transport of Brownian particles that are placed in spatially periodic potentials (without and with reflection symmetry) that are subjected to both Poissonian white shot noise and thermal, i.e., Gaussian, white equilibrium fluctuations. The probability current of the output process, which is shown to obey a second-order ordinary differential equation, is analyzed. The limit of strong Poissonian white shot noise is studied analytically; the resulting current is given in closed form in terms of two quadratures. For general forms of the periodic potential we present asymptotic expansions in terms of the ratio between the thermal and the shot noise intensity. Analytic results are presented for the class of piecewise linear, sawtoothlike ratchet potentials. Under specific conditions, the current exhibits a distinctive nonmonotonic dependence on such parameters as temperature and/or asymmetry of the periodic potential.

  7. Electrical Noise in the Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Setting

    PubMed Central

    Dzwonczyk, Roger; Fujii, Jeffrey T; Simonetti, Orlando; Nieves-Ramos, Ricardo; Bergese, Sergio D

    2013-01-01

    Background Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) is a tool now commonly used in neurosurgery. Safe and reliable patient care in this (or any other) operating room setting depends on an environment where electrical noise (EN) does not interfere with the operation of the electronic monitoring or imaging equipment. In this investigation, we evaluated the EN generated by the iMRI system and the anesthesia patient monitor used at this institution that impacts the performance of these 2 devices. Methods We measured the EN generated by our iMRI-compatible anesthesia patient monitor as detected by the EN analysis algorithm in our iMRI system. We measured the EN generated by our iMRI system during scanning as detected in the electrocardiogram (ECG) waveform of our patient monitor. We analyzed the effects on EN reduction and signal quality of the ECG noise filters provided in our iMRI-compatible anesthesia patient monitor. Results Our patient monitor generated EN that was detectable by the iMRI EN analysis algorithm; however, this interference was within the iMRI manufacturer’s acceptable limits for an iMRI scan (<10% more than background system level noise). In the clinical case analyzed, the iMRI generated a narrow-band low-frequency (20Hz) relatively high-energy EN that interfered with the ECG signal of our patient monitor during an iMRI scan. This EN was correlated with the acoustic noise from the iMRI system during the scan and was associated with the radio frequency and magnetic gradient pulsations of the iMRI system. The integrity of the ECG waveform was nearly entirely lost during a scan. The filters of the ECG monitor diminished but did not entirely eliminate this 20Hz interference. We found that the filters alter the morphology of the ECG signal, which may make it difficult to identify clinically relevant ECG changes. Conclusion The EN generated by our anesthesia patient monitor is within acceptable limits for the iMRI system. The iMRI generates EN

  8. Stochastic resonance in a piecewise nonlinear model driven by multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and additive white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yongfeng; Shen, Yajun; Tan, Jianguo

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a piecewise nonlinear model driven by a periodic signal and correlated noises for the cases of a multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and an additive Gaussian white noise is investigated. Applying the path integral approach, the unified colored noise approximation and the two-state model theory, the analytical expression of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is derived. It is found that conventional stochastic resonance exists in this system. From numerical computations we obtain that: (i) As a function of the non-Gaussian noise intensity, the SNR is increased when the non-Gaussian noise deviation parameter q is increased. (ii) As a function of the Gaussian noise intensity, the SNR is decreased when q is increased. This demonstrates that the effect of the non-Gaussian noise on SNR is different from that of the Gaussian noise in this system. Moreover, we further discuss the effect of the correlation time of the non-Gaussian noise, cross-correlation strength, the amplitude and frequency of the periodic signal on SR.

  9. Thermal detection of flux-flow noise in type-II superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaçais, B.; Simon, Y.

    1989-02-01

    In this paper we present an original method for the observation of flux-flow noise. A superconducting slab, placed in a normal magnetic field, and immersed in He II, constitutes one of the walls of a rectangular second-sound resonator. As is well known, the voltage observed in the flux-flow regime is noisy, due to irregularities in the vortex motion. Therefore, noise in Joule dissipation is expected to occur, making the slab act as a noisy second-sound transmitter. Second-sound noise is then amplified selectively on the different modes of the resonator, with amplitudes depending, in general, on the spatial distribution and coherence of the fluctuating heat sources on the sample. Thus careful and detailed second-sound analysis should provide valuable information on vortex motion and pinning, that is not necessarily given by the usual voltage noise measurements. Preliminary experiments reported in this paper are merely intended to demonstrate that we are able to detect and identify the thermal flux-flow noise, in spite of its minuteness (~10-15 W2/Hz), while obtaining reliable quantitative results.

  10. Signal amplification by 1/f noise in silicon-based nanomechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Diego N; Dunn, Tyler; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2009-09-01

    We report signal amplification by 1/f(alpha) noise with stochastic resonance in a nonlinear nanomechanical resonator. The addition of 1/f(alpha) noise to a subthreshold modulation signal enhances the probability of an electrostatically driven resonator switching between its two vibrational states in the hysteretic region. Considering the prevalence of 1/f noise in the materials in integrated circuits, signal enhancement demonstrated here, using a fully on-chip electronic actuation/detection scheme, suggests beneficial use of the otherwise detrimental noise.

  11. Pulse noise-hidden image reconstruction and visualization via stochastic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qibing; Liu, Hongjun; Huang, Nan; Wang, Zhaolu; Han, Jing

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the nanosecond pulse noise-hidden image reconstruction and visualization using stochastic resonance implemented by modulation instability. In particular, this dynamical stochastic resonance holds with coupling between the pulse incoherent noise and pulse coherent signal, and provides a substantial enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio and cross-correlation. This means that the pulse noise-hidden image can be effectively reconstructed with high visibility and fidelity via stochastic resonance at appropriate system parameters. Such a simple and convenient method has potential applications in image processing under noisy environment. PMID:27824152

  12. Effect of thermal noise on noncontact rack and pinion device.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Mojtaba; Miri, MirFaez

    2012-04-01

    We study a nanoscale system composed of one corrugated plate (rack) and one corrugated cylinder (pinion) coupled via the lateral Casimir force. We assume that the rack moves uniformly. The axle of the pinion experiences frictional torque and random torque due to a surrounding fluid. We show that even in the presence of thermal noise, the device can work against external loads: The pinion rotates with a nonzero average velocity. The device operation becomes less influenced by the noise as the gap between rack and pinion decreases.

  13. Reduction of diesel engine exhaust noise in the petroleum mining industry. [by resonator type diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinov, T.

    1974-01-01

    An important noise source in a drilling plant is Diesel engine exhaust. In order to reduce this noise, a reactive silencer of the derivative resonator type was proposed, calculated from the acoustic and design point of view and applied. As a result of applying such a silencer on the exhaust conduit of a Diesel engine the noise level dropped down to 18 db.

  14. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP. PMID:26156387

  15. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP.

  16. Waterborne noise due to ocean thermal energy conversion plants

    SciTech Connect

    Janota, C.P.; Thompson, D.E.

    1983-07-01

    Public law reflects a United States national commitment to the rapid development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) as an alternate energy source. OTEC plants extract the stored solar energy from the world's tropical seas and in so doing pose a potential for altering the character of the ambient noise there. The sources of noise from an OTEC plant are analyzed in the context of four configurations, two of which were built and tested, and two which are concepts for future full-scale moored facilities. The analysis indicates that the noise resulting from the interaction of turbulence with the seawater pumps is expected to dominate in the frequency range 10 Hz to 1 kHz. Measured radiated noise data from the OTEC-I research plant, located near the island of Hawaii, are compared with the analysis. The measured data diverge from the predicted levels at frequencies above about 60 Hz because of dominant non-OTEC noise sources on this platform. However, at low frequency, the measured broadband noise is comparable to that predicted.

  17. Influence of spin-transfer torque on thermally activated ferromagnetic resonance excitations in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, S.; de Mestier, N.; Baraduc, C.; Thirion, C.; Liu, Y.; Li, M.; Wang, P.; Dieny, B.

    2008-11-01

    Voltage noise measurements on magnetic tunnel junctions show that thermal fluctuations of the magnetization are either amplified or quenched by subcritical spin-transfer torque depending on the current direction. We present an analytical model that describes the dependence of thermally activated ferromagnetic resonance on bias current. The evolution of the peak amplitude and linewidth with the applied current is directly related to the longitudinal torque, whereas the shift of the resonance frequency is sensitive to the transverse torque. Both spin torque terms are independently extracted from the measured noise spectra. Our results support the general idea that it is more pertinent to describe spin torque in terms of voltage rather than current in magnetic tunnel junctions.

  18. Noise control for a ChamberCore cylindrical structure using long T-shaped acoustic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deyu; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    2003-10-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate has developed a new advanced composite launch vehicle fairing (referred to as ``ChamberCore''). The ChamberCore is sandwich-type structure fabricated from multi-layered composite face sheets separated by channels that form passive acoustic chambers. These acoustic chambers have a potential to create an acoustic resonator network that can be used to attenuate noise inside the closed ChamberCore cylindrical structure. In this study, first, the feasibility of using cylindrical Helmholtz resonators to control noise in a mock-scale ChamberCore composite cylinder is investigated. The targeted frequencies for noise control are the first four acoustic cavity resonances of the ChamberCore cylinder. The optimal position of the Helmholtz resonators for controlling each targeted cavity mode is discussed, and the effects of resonator spacing on noise attenuation are also experimentally evaluated. Next, six long T-shaped acoustic resonators are designed and constructed within the acoustic chambers of the structure and investigated. Several tests are conducted to evaluate the noise control ability of the resonators in the ChamberCore cylinder. Reductions ranging from 3.2 to 6.0 dB were observed in the overall mean-square noise reduction spectrum at the targeted inner cavity resonance frequencies. [Work supported by AFRL/DV.

  19. Logic signals driven stochastic resonance in bistable dynamics subjected to 1/f noise floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Song, A. G.; He, J.

    2011-03-01

    In the presence of 1/ f β noise, we investigate the logical stochastic resonance (LSR) in an asymmetric bistable model driven by various cycling combinations of two logic inputs. The probability of correct logic outputs is calculated according to true table of logic relationships. Two major results are presented. Firstly, it is shown that the LSR effect can be obtained by changing noise strength. Over entire range of noise variance, white noise can be considered to be better than 1/ f noise or 1/ f 2 noise to obtain clean logic operation. At a smaller noise level, 1/ f noise can realize higher output probability than white noise or 1/ f 2 noise. In the sense, 1/ f noise can be considered to be better than white noise or 1/ f 2. On the other hand, the correct probability can evolves nonmonotonically as noise exponent β increases, and a kind of SR-like effect can be obtained as a result of β. At certain intermediate noise variance, the output probability is able to attain its minimum at β = 1. It is also shown that actually some finite β sometime can be better than β = 0 at small range of noise variance. The study might provide some potential complement to LSR effect in the presence of 1/ f β noise.

  20. Parameter optimization analysis to minimize the polarization error in a localized thermal tunable fiber ring resonator gyro.

    PubMed

    Bobbili, Prasada Rao; Nayak, Jagannath; Pinnoji, Prerana Dabral; Rama Koti Reddy, D V

    2016-03-10

    The accuracy of the resonant frequency servo loop is a major concern for the high-performance operation of a resonant fiber optic gyro. For instance, a bias error as large as tens or even hundreds of degrees/hour has been observed at the demodulated output of the resonant frequency servo loop. The traditional frequency servo mechanism is not an efficient tool to address this problem. In our previous work, we proposed a novel method to minimize the laser frequency noise to the level of the shot noise by refractive index modulation by a thermally tunable resonator. In this paper, we performed the parameter optimization for the resonator coil, multifunction integrated-optics chip, and couplers by the transition matrix using the Jones matrix methodology to minimize the polarization error. With the optimized parameter values, we achieved the bias value of the resonator fiber optic gyro to 1.924°/h.

  1. Thermal effects on isoscalar giant resonance energies in hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, W.; Dai, G.; Jin, G.

    1995-07-01

    The thermal effects on the energies of the isoscalar giant multipole resonances of hot nuclei are discussed and an approximate formula for the energy as a function of temperature is derived via a hydrodynamic theory. The energy difference between the isoscalar giant multipole resonance of a hot nucleus and its ground-state resonance depends on the competition between the volume expansion and the increase of the average kinetic energy per nucleon of hot nuclei, which lower and raise the resonance energy, respectively, and nearly counteract each other in magnitude. The variaiton of the isoscalar giant resonance energy with temperature is very small.

  2. Quantum reading capacity under thermal and correlated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Pirandola, Stefano; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Mancini, Stefano

    2013-06-01

    Quantum communication theory sets the maximum rates at which information can be encoded and decoded reliably given the physical properties of the information carriers. Here we consider the problem of readout of a digital optical memory, where information is stored by means of the optical properties of the memory cells that are in turn probed by shining a laser beam on them. Interesting features arise in the regime in which the probing light has to be treated quantum mechanically. The maximum rate of reliable readout defines the quantum reading capacity, which is proven to overcome the classical reading capacity—obtained by probing with classical light—in several relevant settings. We consider a model of optical memory in which information is encoded in the (complex-valued) attenuation factor and study the effects on the reading rates of thermal and correlated noise. The latter type of noise arises when the effects of wave diffraction on the probing light beam are taken into account. We discuss the advantages of quantum reading over the classical one and show that the former is substantially more robust than the latter under thermal noise in the regime of low power per pulse.

  3. Noise from Two-Level Systems in Superconducting Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, C.; Barends, R.; Chen, Y.; Chiaro, B.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mariantoni, M.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Ohya, S.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    Two-level systems (TLSs) present in amorphous dielectrics and surface interfaces are a significant source of decoherence in superconducting qubits. Linear microwave resonators offer a valuable instrument for characterizing the strongly power-dependent response of these TLSs. Using quarter-wavelength coplanar waveguide resonators, we monitored the microwave response of the resonator at a single near-resonant frequency versus time at varying microwave drive powers. We observe a time dependent variation of the resonator's internal dissipation and resonance frequency. The amplitude of these variations saturates with power in a manner similar to loss from TLSs. These results provide a means for quantifying the number and distribution of TLSs.

  4. Stochastic Resonance in a Simple Threshold Sensor System with Alpha Stable Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Rui; Kang, Yan-Mei; Xie, Yong

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the effect of alpha stable noise on stochastic resonance in a single-threshold sensor system by analytic deduction and stochastic simulation. It is shown that stochastic resonance occurs in the threshold system in alpha stable noise environment, but the resonant effect becomes weakened as the alpha stable index decreases or the skewness parameter of alpha stable distribution increases. In particular, for Cauchy noise a nonlinear relation among the optimal noise deviation parameter, the signal amplitude and the threshold is analytically obtained and illustrated by using the extreme value condition for the output signal-to-noise ratio. The results presented in this communication should have application in signal detection and image restoration in the non-Gaussian noisy environment.

  5. A stochastic resonator is able to greatly improve signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loerincz, K.; Gingl, Z.; Kiss, L. B.

    1996-02-01

    After a decade of doubts, for the first time in the history of stochastic resonance (SR), we demonstrate that a simple stochastic resonator does greatly improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a periodic signal with additive Gaussian noise. The particular stochastic resonator is a level-crossing detector (LCD) driven by the sum of a periodic spike train signal and a band-limited Gaussian white noise. To reach the improvement of the SNR, the stochastic resonator has to work in the strongly nonlinear response limit and the noise has to have a high cut-off frequency compared to the reciprocal duration of the spikes. We demonstrate by analog and computer simulations that the SNR gain goes beyond four orders of magnitude at practical conditions. These findings get a particular importance due the fact that simplest neurone models behave very similarly to our arrangement, so the results might have direct applications in neural systems.

  6. Photon-induced thermal effects in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiwen; Zhou, Pinjia; Wei, Lianfu; Li, Haijie; Zhang, Beihong; Zhang, Miao; Wei, Qiang; Fang, Yurong; Cao, Chunhai

    2013-10-01

    We experimentally investigated the optical responses of a superconducting niobium resonator. It was found that, with increasing radiation power, the resonance frequency increases monotonically below around 500 mK, decreases monotonically above around 1 K, and exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior at around 700 mK. These observations show that one can operate the irradiated resonator in three temperature regimes, depending on whether two-level system (TLS) effects or kinetic inductance effects dominate. Furthermore, we found that the optical responses at ultra-low temperatures can be qualitatively regarded as a photon-induced thermalization effect of TLSs, which could be utilized to achieve thermal sensitive photon detections.

  7. Analysis of the impedance field of saturated MOSFETs and drain thermal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kie-Young

    2017-04-01

    The effect of the velocity saturation region (VSR) on the impedance field of proto-type MOSFET devices, which operate in the saturation region, was investigated to analyze the drain thermal noise. An enhanced impedance field for the drain thermal noise was derived based on the well-known physical analyses of MOSFET noise. The mechanism of the VSR in inducing the drain thermal noise has been explicated by using a self-consistent equivalent circuit model of the saturated MOSFETs. This alternative description was found to be consistent with the analytical derivation. The present analysis has been demonstrated to be consistent with the behavior of empirical drain thermal noise.

  8. Functional Stochastic Resonance in the Human Brain: Noise Induced Sensitization of Baroreflex System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidaka, Ichiro; Nozaki, Daichi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2000-10-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that noise can enhance the homeostatic function in the human blood pressure regulatory system. The results show that the compensatory heart rate response to the weak periodic signal introduced at the venous blood pressure receptor is optimized by adding noise to the arterial blood pressure receptor. We conclude that this functional stochastic resonance most likely results from the interaction of noise with signal in the brain stem, where the neuronal inputs from these two different receptors first join together.

  9. Thermal noise in aqueous quadrupole micro- and nano-traps

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jae; Krstić, Predrag S.

    2012-01-01

    Recent simulations and experiments with aqueous quadrupole micro-traps have confirmed a possibility for control and localization of motion of a charged particle in a water environment, also predicting a possibility of further reduction of the trap size to tens of nano-meters for trapping charged bio-molecules and DNA segments. We study the random thermal noise due to Brownian motion in water which significantly influences the trapping of particles in an aqueous environment. We derive the exact, closed-form expressions for the thermal fluctuations of position and velocity of a trapped particle and thoroughly examine the properties of the rms for the fluctuations as functions of the system parameters and time. The instantaneous signal transferring mechanism between the velocity and position fluctuations could not be achieved in the previous phase-average approaches.

  10. Thermal noise in aqueous quadrupole micro- and nano-traps

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Jae; Krstić, Predrag S.

    2012-01-01

    Recent simulations and experiments with aqueous quadrupole micro-traps have confirmed a possibility for control and localization of motion of a charged particle in a water environment, also predicting a possibility of further reduction of the trap size to tens of nano-meters for trapping charged bio-molecules and DNA segments. We study the random thermal noise due to Brownian motion in water which significantly influences the trapping of particles in an aqueous environment. We derive the exact, closed-form expressions for the thermal fluctuations of position and velocity of a trapped particle and thoroughly examine the properties of the rms for the fluctuationsmore » as functions of the system parameters and time. The instantaneous signal transferring mechanism between the velocity and position fluctuations could not be achieved in the previous phase-average approaches.« less

  11. Brownian ratchets: How stronger thermal noise can reduce diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiechowicz, Jakub; Kostur, Marcin; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2017-02-01

    We study diffusion properties of an inertial Brownian motor moving on a ratchet substrate, i.e., a periodic structure with broken reflection symmetry. The motor is driven by an unbiased time-periodic symmetric force that takes the system out of thermal equilibrium. For selected parameter sets, the system is in a non-chaotic regime in which we can identify a non-monotonic dependence of the diffusion coefficient on temperature: for low temperature, it initially increases as the temperature grows, passes through its local maximum, next starts to diminish reaching its local minimum, and finally it monotonically increases in accordance with the Einstein linear relation. Particularly interesting is the temperature interval in which diffusion is suppressed by the thermal noise, and we explain this effect in terms of transition rates of a three-state stochastic model.

  12. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Felipe Aguilar; Sepúlveda, Manuel; Bellon, Ludovic; Melo, Francisco

    2015-11-03

    An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD) of thermal fluctuations together with Sader's model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0:03mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL.

  13. A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method for thermal conductivities based on thermal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, Takamichi; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2005-02-01

    We developed a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) method for calculating thermal conductivities. In contrast to other NEMD algorithms, here only the heat sink is localized, whereas the heat source can be uniformly distributed throughout the system. The noise due to cutting off the pair forces or to integration errors is such a uniform heat source. In traditional NEMD methods it is normally considered a nuisance factor. The new algorithm accounts for it and uses it. The algorithm is easy to derive, analyse and implement. Moreover, it circumvents the need to calculate energy fluxes. It is tested on the enhanced simple-point charge model for liquid water and reproduces the known thermal conductivity of this model liquid of 0.81Wm-1K-1. It can be generalized to situations, where the thermal noise is replaced by another uniform heat source, or to the inverse situation, where the heat source is localized but the heat sink extends over the entire system.

  14. A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method for thermal conductivities based on thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Terao, Takamichi; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2005-02-22

    We developed a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) method for calculating thermal conductivities. In contrast to other NEMD algorithms, here only the heat sink is localized, whereas the heat source can be uniformly distributed throughout the system. The noise due to cutting off the pair forces or to integration errors is such a uniform heat source. In traditional NEMD methods it is normally considered a nuisance factor. The new algorithm accounts for it and uses it. The algorithm is easy to derive, analyse and implement. Moreover, it circumvents the need to calculate energy fluxes. It is tested on the enhanced simple-point charge model for liquid water and reproduces the known thermal conductivity of this model liquid of 0.81 W m(-1) K(-1). It can be generalized to situations, where the thermal noise is replaced by another uniform heat source, or to the inverse situation, where the heat source is localized but the heat sink extends over the entire system.

  15. Phase-noise-induced resonance in arrays of coupled excitable neural models.

    PubMed

    Xiaoming Liang; Liang Zhao

    2013-08-01

    Recently, it is observed that, in a single neural model, phase noise (time-varying signal phase) arising from an external stimulating signal can induce regular spiking activities even if the signal is subthreshold. In addition, it is also uncovered that there exists an optimal phase noise intensity at which the spiking rhythm coincides with the frequency of the subthreshold signal, resulting in a phase-noise-induced resonance phenomenon. However, neurons usually do not work alone, but are connected in the form of arrays or blocks. Therefore, we study the spiking activity induced by phase noise in arrays of globally and locally coupled excitable neural models. We find that there also exists an optimal phase noise intensity for generating large neural response and such an optimal value is significantly decreased compared to an isolated single neuron case, which means the detectability in response to the subthreshold signal of neurons is sharply improved because of the coupling. In addition, we reveal two new resonance behaviors in the neuron ensemble with the presence of phase noise: there exist optimal values of both coupling strength and system size, where the coupled neurons generate regular spikes under subthreshold stimulations, which are called as coupling strength and system size resonance, respectively. Finally, the dependence of phase-noise-induced resonance on signal frequency is also examined.

  16. Possible breakthrough: Significant improvement of signal to noise ratio by stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, L. B.

    1996-06-01

    The simplest stochastic resonator is used, a level crossing detector (LCD), to investigate key properties of stochastic resonance (SR). It is pointed out that successful signal processing and biological applications of SR require to work in the large signal limit (nonlinear transfer limit) which requires a completely new approach: wide band input signal and a new, generalised definition of output noise. The new way of approach is illustrated by a new arrangement. The arrangement employs a special LCD, white input noise and a special, large, subthreshold wide band signal. First time in the history of SR (for a wide band input noise), the signal to noise ratio becomes much higher at the output of a stochastic resonator than at its input. In that way, SR is proven to have a potential to improve signal transfer. Note, that the new arrangement seems to have resemblance to neurone models, therefore, it has a potential also for biological applications.

  17. Stochastic resonance in a fractional oscillator driven by multiplicative quadratic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ruibin; Luo, Maokang; Deng, Ke

    2017-02-01

    Stochastic resonance of a fractional oscillator subject to an external periodic field as well as to multiplicative and additive noise is investigated. The fluctuations of the eigenfrequency are modeled as the quadratic function of the trichotomous noise. Applying the moment equation method and Shapiro–Loginov formula, we obtain the exact expression of the complex susceptibility and related stability criteria. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations indicate that the spectral amplification (SPA) depends non-monotonicly both on the external driving frequency and the parameters of the quadratic noise. In addition, the investigations into fractional stochastic systems have suggested that both the noise parameters and the memory effect can induce the phenomenon of stochastic multi-resonance (SMR), which is previously reported and believed to be absent in the case of the multiplicative noise with only a linear term.

  18. Reduction of Return Current Noise Using Double-Series Resonant Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Satoshi; Itoh, Daisuke; Sugahara, Kengo

    A novel double-series resonant filter is implemented in order to reduce the high-frequency return current noise generated by AC-powered electric cars with AC/DC PWM converters and inverters. The double-series resonant filter is placed between a main transformer and a converter. The resonant filter is tuned so that the noise signal due to the return current is attenuated at the exact noise frequency; for example, the 105-kHz component of an ATS (Automatic Train Stop) signal is attenuated by this filter. The filter has two LCR resonant circuits, one of which is in parallel with a resistance. This filter design helps achieve good attenuation at the noise frequency and helps limit unnecessary amplification at other frequencies. First, a test filter is realized, and the inductance and capacitance of this filter are in good agreement with the corresponding values in the filter design. Then, the filter is included in a full-scale test system with a main transformer and a converter. Then it is confirmed that a 5-dB reduction in the return current noise is achieved by using the proposed filter. Finally, the return current noise in the test system is confirmed to be well below the desired regulation level. This is expected to help realize simple methods for dealing with the effects of impedance at high frequencies in the main transformer.

  19. Modeling Thermal Noise From Crystalline Coatings For Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demos, Nicholas; Lovelace, Geoffrey; LSC Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, Advanced LIGO made the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The sensitivity of current and future ground-based gravitational-wave detectors is limited by thermal noise in each detector's test mass substrate and coating. This noise can be modeled using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, which relates thermal noise to an auxiliary elastic problem. I will present results from a new code that numerically models thermal noise for different crystalline mirror coatings. The thermal noise in crystalline mirror coatings could be significantly lower but is challenging to model analytically. The code uses a finite element method with adaptive mesh refinement to model the auxiliary elastic problem which is then related to thermal noise. Specifically, I will show results for a crystal coating on an amorphous substrate of varying sizes and elastic properties. This and future work will help develop the next generation of ground-based gravitational-wave detectors.

  20. 239Pu Resonance Evaluation for Thermal Benchmark System Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Noguere, G; De Saint Jean, C; Kahler, A.

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of thermal plutonium solution critical benchmark systems have indicated a deciency in the 239Pu resonance evaluation. To investigate possible solutions to this issue, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party for Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) established Subgroup 34 to focus on the reevaluation of the 239Pu resolved resonance parameters. In addition, the impacts of the prompt neutron multiplication (nubar) and the prompt neutron ssion spectrum (PFNS) have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the 239Pu resolved resonance evaluation eort.

  1. 239Pu Resonance Evaluation for Thermal Benchmark System Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, L. C.; Noguere, G.; de Saint Jean, C.; Kahler, A. C.

    2014-04-01

    Analyses of thermal plutonium solution critical benchmark systems have indicated a deficiency in the 239Pu resonance evaluation. To investigate possible solutions to this issue, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party for Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) established Subgroup 34 to focus on the reevaluation of the 239Pu resolved resonance parameters. In addition, the impacts of the prompt neutron multiplicity (νbar) and the prompt neutron fission spectrum (PFNS) have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the 239Pu resolved resonance evaluation effort.

  2. Thermally tunable silicon racetrack resonators with ultralow tuning power.

    PubMed

    Dong, Po; Qian, Wei; Liang, Hong; Shafiiha, Roshanak; Feng, Dazeng; Li, Guoliang; Cunningham, John E; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V; Asghari, Mehdi

    2010-09-13

    We present thermally tunable silicon racetrack resonators with an ultralow tuning power of 2.4 mW per free spectral range. The use of free-standing silicon racetrack resonators with undercut structures significantly enhances the tuning efficiency, with one order of magnitude improvement of that for previously demonstrated thermo-optic devices without undercuts. The 10%-90% switching time is demonstrated to be ~170 µs. Such low-power tunable micro-resonators are particularly useful as multiplexing devices and wavelength-tunable silicon microcavity modulators.

  3. Thermal and Quantum Mechanical Noise of a Superfluid Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin

    2004-01-01

    A potential application of a superfluid gyroscope is for real-time measurements of the small variations in the rotational speed of the Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Such rotational jitter, if not measured and corrected for, will be a limiting factor on the resolution potential of a GPS system. This limitation will prevent many automation concepts in navigation, construction, and biomedical examination from being realized. We present the calculation of thermal and quantum-mechanical phase noise across the Josephson junction of a superfluid gyroscope. This allows us to derive the fundamental limits on the performance of a superfluid gyroscope. We show that the fundamental limit on real-time GPS due to rotational jitter can be reduced to well below 1 millimeter/day. Other limitations and their potential mitigation will also be discussed.

  4. Laser phase noise effects on the dynamics of optomechanical resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, Gregory A.; Meystre, Pierre

    2011-06-15

    We investigate theoretically the influence of laser phase noise on the cooling and heating of a generic cavity optomechanical system. We derive the back-action damping and heating rates and the mechanical frequency shift of the radiation-pressure-driven oscillating mirror, and derive the minimum phonon occupation number for small laser linewidths. We find that, in practice, laser phase noise does not pose serious limitations to ground-state cooling. Additionally, we explore the regime of parametric amplification where coherent oscillations of the mirror are realizable. It is found that heating from laser phase noise is of significance and can cause the onset of instabilities. We then consider the effects of laser phase noise in a parametric cavity driving scheme that minimizes the back-action heating of one of the quadratures of the mechanical oscillator motion. Laser linewidths, narrow compared to the decay rate of the cavity field, do not pose any significant problems in an experimental setting, but broader linewidths limit the practicality of this back-action evasion method.

  5. Stochastic resonance, coherence resonance, and spike timing reliability of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with ion-channel noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Galán, Roberto F.; Wang, Jiang; Cao, Yibin; Liu, Jing

    2017-04-01

    The random transitions of ion channels between open and closed states are a major source of noise in neurons. In this study, we investigate the stochastic dynamics of a single Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuron with realistic, physiological channel noise, which depends on the channel number and the voltage potential of the membrane. Without external input, the stochastic HH model can generate spontaneous spikes induced by ion-channel noise, and the variability of inter-spike intervals attains a minimum for an optimal membrane area, a phenomenon known as coherence resonance. When a subthreshold periodic input current is added, the neuron can optimally detect the input frequency for an intermediate membrane area, corresponding to the phenomenon of stochastic resonance. We also investigate spike timing reliability of neuronal responses to repeated presentations of the same stimulus with different realizations of channel noise. We show that, with increasing membrane area, the reliability of neuronal response decreases for subthreshold periodic inputs, and attains a minimum for suprathreshold inputs. Furthermore, Arnold tongues of high reliability arise in a two-dimensional plot of frequency and amplitude of the sinusoidal input current, resulting from the resonance effect of spike timing reliability.

  6. An analytical channel thermal noise model for deep-submicron MOSFETs with short channel effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jongwook; Lee, Jong Duk; Park, Byung-Gook; Shin, Hyungcheol

    2007-07-01

    In this work, an analytical channel thermal noise model for short channel MOSFETs is derived. The transfer function of the noise was derived by following the Tsividis' method. The proposed model takes into account the channel length modulation, velocity saturation, and carrier heating effects in the gradual channel region. Modeling results show good agreements with the measured noise data.

  7. Enhanced visibility of two-mode thermal squeezed states via degenerate parametric amplification and resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahboob, I.; Okamoto, H.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2016-08-01

    Two-mode squeezed states, generated via non-degenerate parametric down-conversion, are invariably revealed via their entangled vacuum or correlated thermal fluctuations. Here, two-mode thermal squeezed states, generated in an electromechanical system, are made bright by means of degenerate parametric amplification of their constituent modes to the point where they are almost perfect, even when seeded from low intensity non-degenerate parametric down-conversion. More dramatically, activating the degenerate parametric resonances of the underlying modes yields perfect correlations which can be resolved via the coordinated switching of their phase bi-stable vibrations, without recourse to monitoring their thermal fluctuations. This ability to enhance the two-mode squeezed states and to decipher them without needing to observe their intrinsic noise is supported by both analytical and numerical modelling and it suggests that the technical constraints to making this phenomenon more widely available can be dramatically relaxed.

  8. Laser phase noise effects on the dynamics of optomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, Gregory; Meystre, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the effects of laser phase noise on the sideband cooling of opto-mechanical oscillators, demonstrating how it limits the minimum occupation number of the phonon mode being cooled and how it modifies optical cooling rate and mechanical frequency shift of the mechanical element. We also comment on the effects of laser phase noise on coherent oscillations of the mechanical element in the blue detuned regime and on the back-action evasion detection method where an additional drive is used to prevent heating of one quadrature of motion of the oscillator. This work was supported by the US Office of Naval Research, the US National Science Foundation, the US Army Research Office and the DARPA ORCHID program through a grant from AFOSR.

  9. Fan Noise Control Using Herschel-quincke Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Ng, Wing F.; Provenza, Andrew (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The research effort proposed for this NASA NRA is mainly experimental. In addition, Virginia Tech is working in partnership with Goodrich Aerospace, Aerostructures Group for the analytical development needed to support the experimental endeavor, i.e. model development, design, and system studies. In this project, Herschel-Quincke (HQ)liner technology experiments will be performed at the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) facility. A schematic of both inlet and aft HQ-liner systems installed in the ANCF rig as well as a picture of the Glenn facility is shown. The main goal is to simultaneously test in both the inlet and bypass duct sections. The by-pass duct will have HQ-systems in both the inner and outer duct walls. The main advantages of performing tests at the ANCF facility are that the effect of the inlet HQ-system on the by-pass HQ-system and vice versa, can be accurately determined from the in-duct modal data. Another significant advantage is that it offers the opportunity to assess (on a common basis) the proposed noise reduction concept on the ANCF rig which in the past has been used for assessing other active and passive noise reduction strategies.

  10. Tailoring photonic metamaterial resonances for thermal radiation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Selective solar absorbers generally have limited effectiveness in unconcentrated sunlight, because of reradiation losses over a broad range of wavelengths and angles. However, metamaterials offer the potential to limit radiation exchange to a proscribed range of angles and wavelengths, which has the potential to dramatically boost performance. After globally optimizing one particular class of such designs, we find thermal transfer efficiencies of 78% at temperatures over 1,000°C, with overall system energy conversion efficiencies of 37%, exceeding the Shockley-Quiesser efficiency limit of 31% for photovoltaic conversion under unconcentrated sunlight. This represents a 250% increase in efficiency and 94% decrease in selective emitter area compared to a standard, angular-insensitive selective absorber. PACS: 42.70.Qs; 81.05.Xj; 78.67.Pt; 42.79.Ek PMID:21978732

  11. Remote vibrotactile noise improves light touch sensation in stroke survivors’ fingertips via stochastic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Stroke rehabilitation does not often integrate both sensory and motor recovery. While subthreshold noise was shown to enhance sensory signal detection at the site of noise application, having a noise-generating device at the fingertip to enhance fingertip sensation and potentially enhance dexterity for stroke survivors is impractical, since the device would interfere with object manipulation. This study determined if remote application of subthreshold vibrotactile noise (away from the fingertips) improves fingertip tactile sensation with potential to enhance dexterity for stroke survivors. Methods Index finger and thumb pad sensation was measured for ten stroke survivors with fingertip sensory deficit using the Semmes-Weinstein Monofilament and Two-Point Discrimination Tests. Sensation scores were measured with noise applied at one of three intensities (40%, 60%, 80% of the sensory threshold) to one of four locations of the paretic upper extremity (dorsal hand proximal to the index finger knuckle, dorsal hand proximal to the thumb knuckle, dorsal wrist, volar wrist) in a random order, as well as without noise at beginning (Pre) and end (Post) of the testing session. Results Vibrotactile noise of all intensities and locations instantaneously and significantly improved Monofilament scores of the index fingertip and thumb tip (p < .01). No significant effect of the noise was seen for the Two-Point Discrimination Test scores. Conclusions Remote application of subthreshold (imperceptible) vibrotactile noise at the wrist and dorsal hand instantaneously improved stroke survivors’ light touch sensation, independent of noise location and intensity. Vibrotactile noise at the wrist and dorsal hand may have enhanced the fingertips’ light touch sensation via stochastic resonance and interneuronal connections. While long-term benefits of noise in stroke patients warrants further investigation, this result demonstrates potential that a wearable

  12. Ultra-Narrow Bandwidth Optical Resonators for Integrated Low Frequency Noise Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Daryl T.

    The development of narrowband resonators has far reaching applications in integrated optics. As a precise reference of wavelength, filters can be used in sensors, metrology, nonlinear optics, microwave photonics, and laser stabilization. In this work, we develop record high quality factor (Q) Si 3N4 waveguide resonators, and utilize them to stabilize a heterogeneously integrated Si/III V laser. To increase the Q factor of waveguide resonators, particular attention is given to loss mechanisms. Propagation loss of <0.1 dB/m is demonstrated on the ultra low loss waveguide platform, a low index contrast, high aspect ratio Si3N4 waveguide geometry fabricated with high quality materials and high temperature anneals. Ideality in the directional couplers used for coupling to the resonators is studied and losses are reduced such that 81 million intrinsic Q factor is achieved. Additional results include 1x16 resonant splitters, low ? narrowband gratings, and a dual layer waveguide technology for low loss and low bend radius in separate regions of the same device layer. We then combine an ultra high Q resonator and a heterogeneous Si/III V laser in a Pound Drever Hall (PDH) frequency stabilization system to yield narrow linewidth characteristics for a stable on chip laser reference. The high frequency noise filtering is performed with Si resonant mirrors in the laser cavity. A 30 million Q factor Si3N4 resonator is used with electrical feedback to reduce close in noise and frequency walk off. The laser shows high frequency noise levels of 60x103 Hz2/Hz corresponding to 160 kHz linewidth, and the low frequency noise is suppressed 33 dB to 103 Hz2/Hz with the PDH system.

  13. Stochastic resonance in a fractional harmonic oscillator subject to random mass and signal-modulated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Zhu, Cheng-Yin; Cheng, Xiao-Feng; Li, Heng

    2016-10-01

    Stochastic resonance in a fractional harmonic oscillator with random mass and signal-modulated noise is investigated. Applying linear system theory and the characteristics of the noises, the analysis expression of the mean output-amplitude-gain (OAG) is obtained. It is shown that the OAG varies non-monotonically with the increase of the intensity of the multiplicative dichotomous noise, with the increase of the frequency of the driving force, as well as with the increase of the system frequency. In addition, the OAG is a non-monotonic function of the system friction coefficient, as a function of the viscous damping coefficient, as a function of the fractional exponent.

  14. Noise-induced transitions and resonant effects in nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikin, Alexei

    2003-02-01

    Our every-day experience is connected with different acoustical noise or music. Usually noise plays the role of nuisance in any communication and destroys any order in a system. Similar optical effects are known: strong snowing or raining decreases quality of a vision. In contrast to these situations noisy stimuli can also play a positive constructive role, e.g. a driver can be more concentrated in a presence of quiet music. Transmission processes in neural systems are of especial interest from this point of view: excitation or information will be transmitted only in the case if a signal overcomes a threshold. Dr. Alexei Zaikin from the Potsdam University studies noise-induced phenomena in nonlinear systems from a theoretical point of view. Especially he is interested in the processes, in which noise influences the behaviour of a system twice: if the intensity of noise is over a threshold, it induces some regular structure that will be synchronized with the behaviour of neighbour elements. To obtain such a system with a threshold one needs one more noise source. Dr. Zaikin has analyzed further examples of such doubly stochastic effects and developed a concept of these new phenomena. These theoretical findings are important, because such processes can play a crucial role in neurophysics, technical communication devices and living sciences. Unsere alltägliche Erfahrung ist mit verschiedenen akustischen Einfluessen wie Lärm, aber auch Musik verbunden. Jeder weiss, wie Lärm stören kann und Kommunikation behindert oder gar unterbindet. Ähnliche optische Effekte sind bekannt: starkes Schneetreiben oder Regengüsse verschlechtern die Sicht und lassen uns Umrisse nur noch schemenhaft erkennen. Jedoch koennen ähnliche Stimuli auch sehr positive Auswirkungen haben: Autofahrer fahren bei leiser Musik konzentrierter -- die Behauptung von Schulkindern, nur bei dröhnenden Bässen die Mathehausaufgaben richtig rechnen zu können, ist allerdings nicht wissenschaftlich

  15. Noise-Induced Sensitization of Human Brain: Toward the Neurological Application of Stochastic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Soma, Rika; Hidaka, Ichiro; Nozaki, Daichi; Iso-o, Noriko; Kwak, Shin

    2003-05-01

    In the past decade, it has been recognized that noise can enhance the response of nonlinear systems to weak signals, via a mechanism known as stochastic resonance (SR). Particularly, the concept of SR has generated considerable interest in sensory biology, because it has been shown in several experimental studies that noise can assist neural systems in detecting weak signals which could not be detected in its absence. Recently, we have shown a similar type of noise-induced sensitization of human brain; externally added noise to the brain stem baroreflex centers sensitized their responses in maintaining adequate blood perfusion to the brain itself. Furthermore, the addition of noise has also shown to be useful in compensating for dysfunctions of the baroreflex centers in certain neurological diseases. It is concluded that the statistical physics concept of SR could be useful in sensitizing human brain in health and disease.

  16. Location optimization of a long T-shaped acoustic resonator array in noise control of enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ganghua; Cheng, Li

    2009-11-01

    Acoustic resonators are widely used in various noise control applications. In the pursuit of better performance and broad band control, multiple resonators or a resonator array are usually needed. The interaction among resonators significantly impacts on the control performance and leads to the requirement for a systematic design tool to determine their locations. In this work, simulated annealing (SA) algorithm is employed to optimize the locations of a set of long T-shaped acoustic resonators (TARs) for noise control inside an enclosure. Multiple optimal configurations are shown to exist. The control performance in terms of sound pressure level reduction, however, seems to be independent of the initial resonator-locations. Optimal solutions obtained from the SA approach are shown to outperform other existing methods for a TAR array design. Numerical simulations are systematically verified by experiments. Optimal locations are then synthesized, leading to a set of criteria, applicable to the present configuration, to guide engineering applications. It is concluded that the proposed optimization approach provides a systematic and effective tool to optimize the locations of TARs in noise control inside enclosures.

  17. Electrical noise modulates perception of electrical pulses in humans: sensation enhancement via stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulos, Fivos; Nierhaus, Till; Villringer, Arno

    2014-03-01

    Although noise is usually considered to be harmful for signal detection and information transmission, stochastic resonance (SR) describes the counterintuitive phenomenon of noise enhancing the detection and transmission of weak input signals. In mammalian sensory systems, SR-related phenomena may arise both in the peripheral and the central nervous system. Here, we investigate behavioral SR effects of subliminal electrical noise stimulation on the perception of somatosensory stimuli in humans. We compare the likelihood to detect near-threshold pulses of different intensities applied on the left index finger during presence vs. absence of subliminal noise on the same or an adjacent finger. We show that (low-pass) noise can enhance signal detection when applied on the same finger. This enhancement is strong for near-threshold pulses below the 50% detection threshold and becomes stronger when near-threshold pulses are applied as brief trains. The effect reverses at pulse intensities above threshold, especially when noise is replaced by subliminal sinusoidal stimulation, arguing for a peripheral direct current addition. Unfiltered noise applied on longer pulses enhances detection of all pulse intensities. Noise applied to an adjacent finger has two opposing effects: an inhibiting effect (presumably due to lateral inhibition) and an enhancing effect (most likely due to SR in the central nervous system). In summary, we demonstrate that subliminal noise can significantly modulate detection performance of near-threshold stimuli. Our results indicate SR effects in the peripheral and central nervous system.

  18. Stochastic resonance subject to multiplicative and additive noise: The influence of potential asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Zijian; Lei, Yaguo; Lin, Jing; Niu, Shantao

    2016-11-01

    The influence of potential asymmetries on stochastic resonance (SR) subject to both multiplicative and additive noise is studied by using two-state theory, where three types of asymmetries are introduced in double-well potential by varying the depth, the width, and both the depth and the width of the left well alone. The characteristics of SR in the asymmetric cases are different from symmetric ones, where asymmetry has a strong influence on output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and optimal noise intensity. Even optimal noise intensity is also associated with the steepness of the potential-barrier wall, which is generally ignored. Moreover, the largest SNR in asymmetric SR is found to be relatively larger than the symmetric one, which also closely depends on noise intensity ratio. In addition, a moderate cross-correlation intensity between two noises is good for improving the output SNR. More interestingly, a double SR phenomenon is observed in certain cases for two correlated noises, whereas it disappears for two independent noises. The above clues are helpful in achieving weak signal detection under heavy background noise.

  19. Removal of correlated noise online for in situ measurements by using multichannel magnetic resonance sounding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tingting; Zhang, Siyuan; Zhang, Yang; Wan, Ling; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the other geophysical approaches, magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) technique is direct and nondestructive in subsurface water exploration. It provides water content distribution and estimates hydrogeological properties. The biggest challenge is that MRS measurement always suffers bad signal-to-noise ratio, and it can be carried out only far from sources of noise. To solve this problem, a series of de-noising methods are developed. However, most of them are post-processing, leading the data quality uncontrolled for in situ measurements. In the present study, a new approach that removal of correlated noise online is found to overcome the restriction. Based on LabVIEW, a method is provided to enable online data quality control by the way of realizing signal acquisition and noise filtering simultaneously. Using one or more reference coils, adaptive noise cancellation based on LabVIEW to eliminate the correlated noise is available for in situ measurements. The approach was examined through numerical simulation and field measurements. The correlated noise is mitigated effectively and the application of MRS measurements is feasible in high-level noise environment. The method shortens the measurement time and improves the measurement efficiency.

  20. Multiscale noise tuning of stochastic resonance for enhanced fault diagnosis in rotating machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingbo; Wang, Jun; Liu, Yongbin; Dai, Daoyi; Kong, Fanrang

    2012-04-01

    The interference from background noise makes it difficult to identify incipient faults of a rotating machine via vibration analysis. By the aid of stochastic resonance (SR), the unavoidable noise can, however, be applied to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a system output. The classical SR phenomenon requires small parameters, which is not suited for rotating machine fault diagnosis as the defect-induced fault characteristic frequency is usually much higher than 1 Hz. This paper investigates an improved SR approach with parameter tuning for identifying the defect-induced rotating machine faults. A new method of multiscale noise tuning is developed to realize the SR at a fixed noise level by transforming the noise at multiple scales to be distributed in an approximate 1/f form. The proposed SR approach overcomes the limitation of small parameter requirement of the classical SR, and takes advantage of the multiscale noise for an improved SR performance. Thus the method is well-suited for enhancement of rotating machine fault identification when the noise is present at different scales. A new scheme of rotating machine fault diagnosis is hence proposed based on the SR with multiscale noise tuning and has been verified by means of practical vibration signals carrying fault information from bearings and a gearbox. An enhanced performance of the proposed fault diagnosis method is confirmed as compared to several traditional methods.

  1. Highly-efficient thermally-tuned resonant optical filters.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, John E; Shubin, Ivan; Zheng, Xuezhe; Pinguet, Thierry; Mekis, Attila; Luo, Ying; Thacker, Hiren; Li, Guoliang; Yao, Jin; Raj, Kannan; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V

    2010-08-30

    We demonstrate spectral tunability for microphotonic add-drop filters manufactured as ring resonators in a commercial 130 nm SOI CMOS technology. The filters are provisioned with integrated heaters built in CMOS for thermal tuning. Their thermal impedance has been dramatically increased by the selective removal of the SOI handler substrate under the device footprint using a bulk silicon micromachining process. An overall ~20x increase in the tuning efficiency has been demonstrated with a 100 µm radius ring as compared to a pre-micromachined device. A total of 3.9 mW of applied tuning power shifts the filter resonant peak across one free spectral node of the device. The Q-factor of the resonator remains unchanged after the co-integration process and hence this device geometry proves to be fully CMOS compatible. Additionally, after the cointegration process our result of 2π shift with 3.9 mW power is among the best tuning performances for this class of devices. Finally, we examine scaling the tuning efficiency versus device footprint to develop a different performance criterion for an easier comparison to evaluate thermal tuning. Our criterion is defined as the unit of power to shift the device resonance by a full 2π phase shift.

  2. Theory of thermal phase noise in Michelson and Sagnac fiber interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanser, Keith H.

    1994-09-01

    The intrinsic thermal phase noise spectra of the Michelson, Michelson with phase conjugate mirrors, and Sagnac fiber optic interferometers are presented. The thermal phase noise is maximum at dc and zero at the loop frequency for the Michelson with ordinary mirrors. Thermal phase noise eliminates the factor of two transducer phase sensitivity advantage of the Michelson over a comparable length Mach Zehnder. The Michelson with two phase conjugate mirrors exhibits identical noise to a Sagnac interferometer with the same total fiber length. The Sagnac exhibits common mode phase noise rejection at low frequencies and a broad maximum in the phase noise at the loop frequency of approximately 1 (mu) rad rms/(root)Hz for a 1 km fiber loop at 1319 nm.

  3. Observation of fundamental thermal noise in optical fibers down to infrasonic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jing; Huang, Junchao; Li, Tang; Liu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic thermal noise in optical fibers represents the ultimate limit for fiber-based systems. However, at infrasonic frequencies, the spectral behavior of the intrinsic thermal noise is still unclear. In this letter, we present measurements of the fundamental thermal noise in optical fibers that are obtained using a balanced fiber Michelson interferometer. When an ultra-stable laser is used as the laser source and other noise sources are carefully controlled, the 1/f spectral density of the thermal noise is observed down to infrasonic frequencies, and the measured magnitude is consistent with the results of theoretical predictions at frequencies over the range from 0.2 Hz to 20 kHz. Moreover, as observed experimentally, the level of the 1/f thermal noise can be reduced by changing the coatings of the optical fibers. This therefore indicates one possible way to reduce thermal noise in optical fibers at low Fourier frequencies. Finally, the inconsistency between the experimental data and the existing theory for thermomechanical noise is discussed.

  4. Lévy stable noise-induced transitions: stochastic resonance, resonant activation and dynamic hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2009-05-01

    A standard approach to analysis of noise-induced effects in stochastic dynamics assumes a Gaussian character of the noise term describing interaction of the analyzed system with its complex surroundings. An additional assumption about the existence of timescale separation between the dynamics of the measured observable and the typical timescale of the noise allows external fluctuations to be modeled as temporally uncorrelated and therefore white. However, in many natural phenomena the assumptions concerning the above mentioned properties of 'Gaussianity' and 'whiteness' of the noise can be violated. In this context, in contrast to the spatiotemporal coupling characterizing general forms of non-Markovian or semi-Markovian Lévy walks, so called Lévy flights correspond to the class of Markov processes which can still be interpreted as white, but distributed according to a more general, infinitely divisible, stable and non-Gaussian law. Lévy noise-driven non-equilibrium systems are known to manifest interesting physical properties and have been addressed in various scenarios of physical transport exhibiting a superdiffusive behavior. Here we present a brief overview of our recent investigations aimed at understanding features of stochastic dynamics under the influence of Lévy white noise perturbations. We find that the archetypal phenomena of noise-induced ordering are robust and can be detected also in systems driven by memoryless, non-Gaussian, heavy-tailed fluctuations with infinite variance.

  5. Effects of auditory noise on the psychophysical detection of visual signals: cross-modal stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Manjarrez, Elias; Mendez, Ignacio; Martinez, Lourdes; Flores, Amira; Mirasso, Claudio R

    2007-03-30

    Harper [D.W. Harper, Signal detection analysis of effect of white noise intensity on sensitivity to visual flicker, Percept. Mot. Skills 48 (1979) 791-798] demonstrated that the visual flicker sensitivity was an inverted U-like function of the intensity of different levels of auditory noise from 50 to 90dB (SPL), without concomitant changes in the response bias. The aim of the present study was to extend these observations in the context of the stochastic resonance, a counterintuitive phenomenon in which a particular level of noise enhances the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal. We show psychophysical evidence in a yes-no paradigm for the existence of a stochastic resonance-like phenomenon in the auditory-visual interactions. We show that the detection of a weak visual signal was an inverted U-like function of the intensity of different levels of auditory noise. Nevertheless, for a strong visual signal the auditory noise acts in detriment of the ability of visual detection. Our results suggest that auditory noise could be employed in vision rehabilitation interventions in order to improve the detection of weak visual signals.

  6. Aircraft interior noise reduction by alternate resonance tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.; Gottwald, James A.; Gustaveson, Mark B.; Burton, James R., III

    1988-01-01

    Model problem development and analysis continues with the Alternate Resonance Tuning (ART) concept. The various topics described are presently at different stages of completion: investigation of the effectiveness of the ART concept under an external propagating pressure field associated with propeller passage by the fuselage; analysis of ART performance with a double panel wall mounted in a flexible frame model; development of a data fitting scheme using a branch analysis with a Newton-Raphson scheme in multiple dimensions to determine values of critical parameters in the actual experimental apparatus; and investigation of the ART effect with real panels as opposed to the spring-mass-damper systems currently used in much of the theory.

  7. Thermal Wave Resonator Cavity Applied to the Study of the Thermal Diffusivity of Coffee Infusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepepa, B. Briseño; Marín, E.; Martín-Martínez, E. San; Orea, A. Cruz

    2009-10-01

    Among the photothermal methods, the photopyroelectric technique, in its several experimental configurations, has been extensively used to measure the thermal properties of liquids, mainly the thermal effusivity and diffusivity. In this paper, the use of the so-called thermal wave resonator cavity method, in the cavity-length-scan mode, to measure the thermal diffusivity of commercial coffee infusions with samples at different concentrations and degrees of degradation induced by heating cycles is reported. A linear relationship between the logarithm of the pyroelectric signal amplitude and the sample thickness was observed, in agreement with the basic theory for the experimental configuration used here, from which the thermal diffusivity values of the samples were obtained. The thermal diffusivity was found to be almost independent of the coffee concentration in water but that this parameter is sensitive to sample modifications induced by degradation. This work represents another step to demonstrate the capability of the used method for characterization of the thermal properties of liquids.

  8. Modulating resonance behaviors by noise recycling in bistable systems with time delay.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongkui; Yang, Xiaoli; Xiao, Yuzhu; Xu, Wei

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the impact of noise recycling on resonance behaviors is studied theoretically and numerically in a prototypical bistable system with delayed feedback. According to the interior cooperating and interacting activity of noise recycling, a theory has been proposed by reducing the non-Markovian problem into a two-state model, wherein both the master equation and the transition rates depend on not only the current state but also the earlier two states due to the recycling lag and the feedback delay. By virtue of this theory, the formulae of the power spectrum density and the linear response function have been found analytically. And the theoretical results are well verified by numerical simulations. It has been demonstrated that both the recycling lag and the feedback delay play a crucial role in the resonance behaviors. In addition, the results also suggest an alternative scheme to modulate or control the coherence or stochastic resonance in bistable systems with time delay.

  9. Modulating resonance behaviors by noise recycling in bistable systems with time delay

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhongkui Xu, Wei; Yang, Xiaoli; Xiao, Yuzhu

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the impact of noise recycling on resonance behaviors is studied theoretically and numerically in a prototypical bistable system with delayed feedback. According to the interior cooperating and interacting activity of noise recycling, a theory has been proposed by reducing the non-Markovian problem into a two-state model, wherein both the master equation and the transition rates depend on not only the current state but also the earlier two states due to the recycling lag and the feedback delay. By virtue of this theory, the formulae of the power spectrum density and the linear response function have been found analytically. And the theoretical results are well verified by numerical simulations. It has been demonstrated that both the recycling lag and the feedback delay play a crucial role in the resonance behaviors. In addition, the results also suggest an alternative scheme to modulate or control the coherence or stochastic resonance in bistable systems with time delay.

  10. Finite-difference time-domain simulation of thermal noise in open cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Andreasen, Jonathan; Cao Hui; Taflove, Allen; Kumar, Prem |; Cao Changqi

    2008-02-15

    A numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is developed to simulate thermal noise in open cavities owing to output coupling. The absorbing boundary of the FDTD grid is treated as a blackbody, whose thermal radiation penetrates the cavity in the grid. The calculated amount of thermal noise in a one-dimensional dielectric cavity recovers the standard result of the quantum Langevin equation in the Markovian regime. Our FDTD simulation also demonstrates that in the non-Markovian regime the buildup of the intracavity noise field depends on the ratio of the cavity photon lifetime to the coherence time of thermal radiation. The advantage of our numerical method is that the thermal noise is introduced in the time domain without prior knowledge of cavity modes.

  11. Effects of cavity resonances on sound transmission into a thin cylindrical shell. [noise reduction in aircraft fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koval, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    In the context of the transmission of airborne noise into an aircraft fuselage, a mathematical model is presented for the effects of internal cavity resonances on sound transmission into a thin cylindrical shell. The 'noise reduction' of the cylinder is defined and computed, with and without including the effects of internal cavity resonances. As would be expected, the noise reduction in the absence of cavity resonances follows the same qualitative pattern as does transmission loss. Numerical results show that cavity resonances lead to wide fluctuations and a general decrease of noise reduction, especially at cavity resonances. Modest internal absorption is shown to greatly reduce the effect of cavity resonances. The effects of external airflow, internal cabin pressurization, and different acoustical properties inside and outside the cylinder are also included and briefly examined.

  12. Phase stability in fMRI time series: effect of noise regression, off-resonance correction and spatial filtering techniques.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Gisela E; Bianciardi, Marta; Brainovich, Valentina; Cassara, Antonino Mario; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2012-02-15

    Although the majority of fMRI studies exploit magnitude changes only, there is an increasing interest regarding the potential additive information conveyed by the phase signal. This integrated part of the complex number furnished by the MR scanners can also be used for exploring direct detection of neuronal activity and for thermography. Few studies have explicitly addressed the issue of the available signal stability in the context of phase time-series, and therefore we explored the spatial pattern of frequency specific phase fluctuations, and evaluated the effect of physiological noise components (heart beat and respiration) on the phase signal. Three categories of retrospective noise reduction techniques were explored and the temporal signal stability was evaluated in terms of a physiologic noise model, for seven fMRI measurement protocols in eight healthy subjects at 3T, for segmented CSF, gray and white matter voxels. We confirmed that for most processing methods, an efficient use of the phase information is hampered by the fact that noise from physiological and instrumental sources contributes significantly more to the phase than to the magnitude instability. Noise regression based on the phase evolution of the central k-space point, RETROICOR, or an orthonormalized combination of these were able to reduce their impact, but without bringing phase stability down to levels expected from the magnitude signal. Similar results were obtained after targeted removal of scan-to-scan variations in the bulk magnetic field by the dynamic off-resonance in k-space (DORK) method and by the temporal off-resonance alignment of single-echo time series technique (TOAST). We found that spatial high-pass filtering was necessary, and in vivo a Gaussian filter width of 20mm was sufficient to suppress physiological noise and bring the phase fluctuations to magnitude levels. Stronger filters brought the fluctuations down to levels dictated by thermal noise contributions, and for 62

  13. Synchronized and noise-robust audio recordings during realtime magnetic resonance imaging scans (L)

    PubMed Central

    Bresch, Erik; Nielsen, Jon; Nayak, Krishna; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2007-01-01

    This letter describes a data acquisition setup for recording, and processing, running speech from a person in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The main focus is on ensuring synchronicity between image and audio acquisition, and in obtaining good signal to noise ratio to facilitate further speech analysis and modeling. A field-programmable gate array based hardware design for synchronizing the scanner image acquisition to other external data such as audio is described. The audio setup itself features two fiber optical microphones and a noise-canceling filter. Two noise cancellation methods are described including a novel approach using a pulse sequence specific model of the gradient noise of the MRI scanner. The setup is useful for scientific speech production studies. Sample results of speech and singing data acquired and processed using the proposed method are given. PMID:17069275

  14. Stochastic resonance in a time-delayed bistable system driven by trichotomous noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bingchang; Lin, Dandan

    2017-03-01

    This paper studies the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a bistable system with time delay driven by trichotomous noise. Firstly, a method of numerical simulation for trichotomous noise is presented and its accuracy is checked using normalized autocorrelation function. Then the effects of feedback strength and time delay on the system responses and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are studied. The results show that negative feedback strength is more beneficial than positive to promote SR. The effect of time delay on SR is related to the value of feedback strength. The influence of the signal amplitude and frequency on SR is also investigated. It is found that large amplitude and small frequency of the signal can promote the occurrence of SR. Finally, the influence of the amplitude and stationary probability of trichotomous noise on SNR are discussed.

  15. Living Organisms Coupling to Electromagnetic Radiation Below Thermal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Freund, Friedemann

    2013-04-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) and extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic (EM) radiation is part of the natural environment. Prior to major earthquakes the local ULF and global ELF radiation field is often markedly perturbed. This has detrimental effects on living organisms. We are studying the mechanism of these effects on the biochemical, cellular and organismal levels. The transfer of electrons along the Electron Transfer Chain (ETC) controls the universal reduction-oxidation reactions that are essential for fundamental biochemical processes in living cells. In order for these processes to work properly, the ETC has to maintain some form of synchronization, or coherence with all biochemical reactions in the living cells, including energy production, RNA transcription, and DNA replication. As a consequence of this synchronization, harmful chemical conflict between the reductive and the oxidative partial reactions can be minimized or avoided. At the same time we note that the synchronization allows for a transfer of energy, coherent or interfering, via coupling to the natural ambient EM field. Extremely weak high frequency EM fields, well below the thermal noise level, tuned in frequency to the electron spins of certain steps in the ETC, have already been shown to cause aberrant cell growth and disorientation among plants and animals with respect to the magnetic and gravity vectors. We investigate EM fields over a much wider frequency range, including ULF known to be generated deep in the Earth prior to major earthquakes locally, and ELF known to be fed by lightning discharges, traveling around the globe in the cavity formed between the Earth's surface and the ionosphere. This ULF/ELF radiation can control the timing of the biochemical redox cycle and thereby have a universal effect on physiology of organisms. The timing can even have a detrimental influence, via increased oxidative damage, on the DNA replication, which controls heredity.

  16. Modeling Thermal Noise from Crystaline Coatings for Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demos, Nicholas; Lovelace, Geoffrey; LSC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The sensitivity of current and future ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are, in part, limited in sensitivity by Brownian and thermoelastic noise in each detector's mirror substrate and coating. Crystalline mirror coatings could potentially reduce thermal noise, but thermal noise is challenging to model analytically in the case of crystalline materials. Thermal noise can be modeled using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, which relates thermal noise to an auxiliary elastic problem. In this poster, I will present results from a new code that numerically models thermal noise by numerically solving the auxiliary elastic problem for various types of crystalline mirror coatings. The code uses a finite element method with adaptive mesh refinement to model the auxiliary elastic problem which is then related to thermal noise. I will present preliminary results for a crystal coating on a fused silica substrate of varying sizes and elastic properties. This and future work will help develop the next generation of ground-based gravitational-wave detectors.

  17. Symmetry based frequency domain processing to remove harmonic noise from surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Annette; Larsen, Jakob Juul; Parsekian, Andrew D.

    2017-02-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a unique geophysical method due to its direct sensitivity to water. A key limitation to overcome is the difficulty of making surface NMR measurements in environments with anthropogenic electromagnetic noise, particularly constant frequency sources such as powerlines. Here we present a method of removing harmonic noise by utilizing frequency domain symmetry of surface NMR signals to reconstruct portions of the spectrum corrupted by frequency-domain noise peaks. This method supplements the existing NMR processing workflow and is applicable after despiking, coherent noise cancellation, and stacking. The symmetry based correction is simple, grounded in mathematical theory describing NMR signals, does not introduce errors into the data set, and requires no prior knowledge about the harmonics. Modelling and field examples show that symmetry based noise removal reduces the effects of harmonics. In one modelling example, symmetry based noise removal improved signal-to-noise ratio in the data by 10 per cent. This improvement had noticeable effects on inversion parameters including water content and the decay constant T2*. Within water content profiles, aquifer boundaries and water content are more accurate after harmonics are removed. Fewer spurious water content spikes appear within aquifers, which is especially useful for resolving multilayered structures. Within T2* profiles, estimates are more accurate after harmonics are removed, especially in the lower half of profiles.

  18. Noise Improves Visual Motion Discrimination via a Stochastic Resonance-Like Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario; De la Torre-Valdovinos, Braniff; Manjarrez, Elias

    2016-01-01

    The stochastic resonance (SR) is a phenomenon in which adding a moderate amount of noise can improve the signal-to-noise ratio and performance of non-linear systems. SR occurs in all sensory modalities including the visual system in which noise can enhance contrast detection sensitivity and the perception of ambiguous figures embedded in static scenes. Here, we explored how adding background white pixel-noise to a random dot motion (RDM) stimulus produced changes in visual motion discrimination in healthy human adults. We found that, although the average reaction times (RTs) remained constant, an intermediate level of noise improved the subjects’ ability to discriminate motion direction in the RDM task. The psychophysical responses followed an inverted U-like function of the input noise, whereas the incorrect responses with short RTs did not exhibit such modulation by external noise. Moreover, by applying stimulus and noisy signals to different eyes, we found that the SR phenomenon occurred presumably in the primary visual cortex, where these two signals first converge. Our results suggest that a SR-like phenomenon mediates the improvement of visual motion perception in the RDM task. PMID:27932960

  19. Symmetry based frequency domain processing to remove harmonic noise from surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Annette; Larsen, Jakob Juul; Parsekian, Andrew D.

    2016-11-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a unique geophysical method due to its direct sensitivity to water. A key limitation to overcome is the difficulty of making surface NMR measurements in environments with anthropogenic electromagnetic noise, particularly constant frequency sources such as powerlines. Here we present a method of removing harmonic noise by utilizing frequency domain symmetry of surface NMR signals to reconstruct portions of the spectrum corrupted by frequency-domain noise peaks. This method supplements the existing NMR processing workflow and is applicable after despiking, coherent noise cancellation, and stacking. The symmetry based correction is simple, grounded in mathematical theory describing NMR signals, does not introduce errors into the dataset, and requires no prior knowledge about the harmonics. Modeling and field examples show that symmetry based noise removal reduces the effects of harmonics. In one modeling example, symmetry based noise removal improved signal to noise ratio in the data by 10%. This improvement had noticeable effects on inversion parameters including water content and the decay constant T2*. Within water content profiles, aquifer boundaries and water content are more accurate after harmonics are removed. Fewer spurious water content spikes appear within aquifers, which is especially useful for resolving multi-layered structures. Within T2* profiles, estimates are more accurate after harmonics are removed, especially in the lower half of profiles.

  20. Possible breakthrough: Significant improvement of signal to noise ratio by stochastic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, L.B.

    1996-06-01

    The {ital simplest} {ital stochastic} {ital resonator} {ital is} {ital used}, {ital a} {ital level} {ital crossing} {ital detector} (LCD), to investigate key properties of stochastic resonance (SR). It is pointed out that successful signal processing and biological applications of SR require to work in the {ital large} {ital signal} {ital limit} (nonlinear transfer limit) which requires a completely new approach: {ital wide} {ital band} {ital input} {ital signal} and a {ital new}, {ital generalised} {ital definition} {ital of} {ital output} {ital noise}. The new way of approach is illustrated by a new arrangement. The arrangement employs a special LCD, white input noise and a special, large, subthreshold wide band signal. {ital First} {ital time} {ital in} {ital the} {ital history} {ital of} {ital SR} (for a wide band input noise), the {ital signal} {ital to} {ital noise} {ital ratio} {ital becomes} {ital much} {ital higher} {ital at} {ital the} {ital output} of a stochastic resonator than {ital at} {ital its} {ital input}. In that way, SR is proven to have a potential to improve signal transfer. Note, that the new arrangement seems to have resemblance to {ital neurone} {ital models}, therefore, it has a potential also for biological applications. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Resonant bonding leads to low lattice thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangyeop; Esfarjani, Keivan; Luo, Tengfei; Zhou, Jiawei; Tian, Zhiting; Chen, Gang

    2014-04-28

    Understanding the lattice dynamics and low thermal conductivities of IV-VI, V2-VI3 and V materials is critical to the development of better thermoelectric and phase-change materials. Here we provide a link between chemical bonding and low thermal conductivity. Our first-principles calculations reveal that long-ranged interaction along the 〈100〉 direction of the rocksalt structure exist in lead chalcogenides, SnTe, Bi2Te3, Bi and Sb due to the resonant bonding that is common to all of them. This long-ranged interaction in lead chalcogenides and SnTe cause optical phonon softening, strong anharmonic scattering and large phase space for three-phonon scattering processes, which explain why rocksalt IV-VI compounds have much lower thermal conductivities than zincblende III-V compounds. The new insights on the relationship between resonant bonding and low thermal conductivity will help in the development of better thermoelectric and phase change materials.

  2. Thermally tunable resonator using directly integrated metallic heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruobing; Li, Xinbai; Deng, Qingzhong; Michel, Jurgen; Zhou, Zhiping

    2015-08-01

    A thermally tunable half-disk resonator (HDR) with directly-integrated metallic heater is presented. The proposed resonator is based on the structure of HDR, which allows direct electrical contacts in HDR region without causing extra loss. The metallic heater is designed to be directly integrated on the silicon devices, and single-mode operation can be retained simultaneously. Metallic heater deposited on inner side of the ring, which cannot realize before because of weakened light confinement resulting in substantial leakage and loss, guides most heat power to the waveguide. This thermal localization enhances tuning efficiency. The simulation result shows a wavelength shift of 0.855 nm under ultralow driving voltage of 0.02V, corresponding to high thermal tuning efficiency of 2.831 nm/mW. The structure possesses both the advantages of high thermal tuning efficiency and low resistance, hence requiring smaller voltage and energy to drive, desirable for optical interconnects applications. Moreover, the proposed structure also eliminates the need to use doped silicon slab for electrical contacts, as widely used in conventional directly integrated heaters. Undoped strip waveguide in HDR enables higher Q-factor and improves optical performance.

  3. Mean First Passage Time and Stochastic Resonance in a Transcriptional Regulatory System with Non-Gaussian Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yan-Mei; Chen, Xi; Lin, Xu-Dong; Tan, Ning

    The mean first passage time (MFPT) in a phenomenological gene transcriptional regulatory model with non-Gaussian noise is analytically investigated based on the singular perturbation technique. The effect of the non-Gaussian noise on the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) is then disclosed based on a new combination of adiabatic elimination and linear response approximation. Compared with the results in the Gaussian noise case, it is found that bounded non-Gaussian noise inhibits the transition between different concentrations of protein, while heavy-tailed non-Gaussian noise accelerates the transition. It is also found that the optimal noise intensity for SR in the heavy-tailed noise case is smaller, while the optimal noise intensity in the bounded noise case is larger. These observations can be explained by the heavy-tailed noise easing random transitions.

  4. Ultra-stable, low phase noise dielectric resonator stabilized oscillators for military and commercial systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizan, Muhammad; Higgins, Thomas; Sturzebecher, Dana

    1993-01-01

    EPSD has designed, fabricated and tested, ultra-stable, low phase noise microwave dielectric resonator oscillators (DRO's) at S, X, Ku, and K-bands, for potential application to high dynamic range and low radar cross section target detection radar systems. The phase noise and the temperature stability surpass commercially available DROs. Low phase noise signals are critical for CW Doppler radars, at both very close-in and large offset frequencies from the carrier. The oscillators were built without any temperature compensation techniques and exhibited a temperature stability of 25 parts per million (ppm) over an extended temperature range. The oscillators are lightweight, small and low cost compared to BAW & SAW oscillators, and can impact commercial systems such as telecommunications, built-in-test equipment, cellular phone and satellite communications systems. The key to obtaining this performance was a high Q factor resonant structure (RS) and careful circuit design techniques. The high Q RS consists of a dielectric resonator (DR) supported by a low loss spacer inside a metal cavity. The S and the X-band resonant structures demonstrated loaded Q values of 20,300 and 12,700, respectively.

  5. Zero Thermal Noise in Resistors at Zero Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes-Göran

    2016-06-01

    The bandwidth of transistors in logic devices approaches the quantum limit, where Johnson noise and associated error rates are supposed to be strongly enhanced. However, the related theory — asserting a temperature-independent quantum zero-point (ZP) contribution to Johnson noise, which dominates the quantum regime — is controversial and resolution of the controversy is essential to determine the real error rate and fundamental energy dissipation limits of logic gates in the quantum limit. The Callen-Welton formula (fluctuation-dissipation theorem) of voltage and current noise for a resistance is the sum of Nyquist’s classical Johnson noise equation and a quantum ZP term with a power density spectrum proportional to frequency and independent of temperature. The classical Johnson-Nyquist formula vanishes at the approach of zero temperature, but the quantum ZP term still predicts non-zero noise voltage and current. Here, we show that this noise cannot be reconciled with the Fermi-Dirac distribution, which defines the thermodynamics of electrons according to quantum-statistical physics. Consequently, Johnson noise must be nil at zero temperature, and non-zero noise found for certain experimental arrangements may be a measurement artifact, such as the one mentioned in Kleen’s uncertainty relation argument.

  6. Bifurcation, mode coupling and noise in a nonlinear multimode superconducting microwave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancredi, G.; Ithier, G.; Meeson, P. J.

    2013-08-01

    The addition of nonlinearity to an harmonic resonator provides a route to complex dynamical behaviour of resonant modes, including coupling between them. We present a superconducting device that makes use of the nonlinearity of Josephson junctions to introduce a controlled, tunable, nonlinear inductance to a thin film coplanar waveguide resonator. Considering the device as a potential quantum optical component in the microwave regime, we create a sensitive bifurcation amplifier and then demonstrate spectroscopy of other resonant modes via the intermode coupling. We find that the sensitivity of the device approaches within a factor two quantitative agreement with a quantum model by Dykman but is limited by a noise that has its source(s) on-chip.

  7. Thermal noise limit for ultra-high vacuum noncontact atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lübbe, Jannis; Temmen, Matthias; Rode, Sebastian; Rahe, Philipp; Kühnle, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    Summary The noise of the frequency-shift signal Δf in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) consists of cantilever thermal noise, tip–surface-interaction noise and instrumental noise from the detection and signal processing systems. We investigate how the displacement-noise spectral density d z at the input of the frequency demodulator propagates to the frequency-shift-noise spectral density d Δ f at the demodulator output in dependence of cantilever properties and settings of the signal processing electronics in the limit of a negligible tip–surface interaction and a measurement under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. For a quantification of the noise figures, we calibrate the cantilever displacement signal and determine the transfer function of the signal-processing electronics. From the transfer function and the measured d z, we predict d Δ f for specific filter settings, a given level of detection-system noise spectral density d z ds and the cantilever-thermal-noise spectral density d z th. We find an excellent agreement between the calculated and measured values for d Δ f. Furthermore, we demonstrate that thermal noise in d Δ f, defining the ultimate limit in NC-AFM signal detection, can be kept low by a proper choice of the cantilever whereby its Q-factor should be given most attention. A system with a low-noise signal detection and a suitable cantilever, operated with appropriate filter and feedback-loop settings allows room temperature NC-AFM measurements at a low thermal-noise limit with a significant bandwidth. PMID:23400758

  8. Thermal noise limit for ultra-high vacuum noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lübbe, Jannis; Temmen, Matthias; Rode, Sebastian; Rahe, Philipp; Kühnle, Angelika; Reichling, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The noise of the frequency-shift signal Δf in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) consists of cantilever thermal noise, tip-surface-interaction noise and instrumental noise from the detection and signal processing systems. We investigate how the displacement-noise spectral density d(z) at the input of the frequency demodulator propagates to the frequency-shift-noise spectral density d(Δ) (f) at the demodulator output in dependence of cantilever properties and settings of the signal processing electronics in the limit of a negligible tip-surface interaction and a measurement under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. For a quantification of the noise figures, we calibrate the cantilever displacement signal and determine the transfer function of the signal-processing electronics. From the transfer function and the measured d(z), we predict d(Δ) (f) for specific filter settings, a given level of detection-system noise spectral density d(z) (ds) and the cantilever-thermal-noise spectral density d(z) (th). We find an excellent agreement between the calculated and measured values for d(Δ) (f). Furthermore, we demonstrate that thermal noise in d(Δ) (f), defining the ultimate limit in NC-AFM signal detection, can be kept low by a proper choice of the cantilever whereby its Q-factor should be given most attention. A system with a low-noise signal detection and a suitable cantilever, operated with appropriate filter and feedback-loop settings allows room temperature NC-AFM measurements at a low thermal-noise limit with a significant bandwidth.

  9. Z-matrix formalism for quantitative noise assessment of covariance nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.

    PubMed

    Snyder, David A; Ghosh, Arindam; Zhang, Fengli; Szyperski, Thomas; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2008-09-14

    Due to the limited sensitivity of many nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications, careful consideration must be given to the effect of NMR data processing on spectral noise. This work presents analytical relationships as well as simulated and experimental results characterizing the propagation of noise by unsymmetric covariance NMR processing, which concatenates two NMR spectra along a common dimension, resulting in a new spectrum showing spin correlations as cross peaks that are not directly measured in either of the two input spectra. It is shown how the unsymmetric covariance spectrum possesses an inhomogeneous noise distribution across the spectrum with the least amount of noise in regions whose rows and columns do not contain any cross or diagonal peaks and with the largest amount of noise on top of signal peaks. Therefore, methods of noise estimation commonly used in Fourier transform spectroscopy underestimate the amount of uncertainty in unsymmetric covariance spectra. Different data processing procedures, including the Z-matrix formalism, thresholding, and maxima ratio scaling, are described to assess noise contributions and to reduce noise inhomogeneity. In particular, determination of a Z score, which measures the difference in standard deviations of a statistic from its mean, for each spectral point yields a Z matrix, which indicates whether a given peak intensity above a threshold arises from the covariance of signals in the input spectra or whether it is likely to be caused by noise. Application to an unsymmetric covariance spectrum, obtained by concatenating two 2D (13)C-(1)H heteronuclear, single quantum coherence (HSQC) and (13)C-(1)H heteronuclear, multiple bond correlation (HMBC) spectra of a metabolite mixture along their common proton dimension, reveals that for sufficiently sensitive input spectra the reduction in sensitivity due to covariance processing is modest.

  10. Suppression of thermal frequency noise in erbium-doped fiber random lasers.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Bhavaye; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Liang

    2014-02-15

    Frequency and intensity noise are characterized for erbium-doped fiber (EDF) random lasers based on Rayleigh distributed feedback mechanism. We propose a theoretical model for the frequency noise of such random lasers using the property of random phase modulations from multiple scattering points in ultralong fibers. We find that the Rayleigh feedback suppresses the noise at higher frequencies by introducing a Lorentzian envelope over the thermal frequency noise of a long fiber cavity. The theoretical model and measured frequency noise agree quantitatively with two fitting parameters. The random laser exhibits a noise level of 6  Hz²/Hz at 2 kHz, which is lower than what is found in conventional narrow-linewidth EDF fiber lasers and nonplanar ring laser oscillators (NPROs) by a factor of 166 and 2, respectively. The frequency noise has a minimum value for an optimum length of the Rayleigh scattering fiber.

  11. A study of tyre cavity resonance and noise reduction using inner trim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Zamri; Wang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    A study of tyre inner trim as a method for reducing tyre cavity resonance noise is presented. The tyre is modelled as a rectangular toroid where only the outside shell is flexible. A modal series solution of the sound pressure frequency response inside the tyre cavity is derived from the wave equation using modal superposition. In the solution with the rigid and flexible wall boundary condition, the effect of placing a trim layer onto the inner surface of the tyre tread plate wall is reflected by adding a damping loss term in the sound pressure frequency response function. The numerical simulation result was then compared with the result obtained from a roving impact test performed on a tyre. The results show that selective trim material may be effective for reducing the structure-borne noise magnitude resulting from the tyre cavity resonance.

  12. Coupling thermal atomic vapor to an integrated ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, R.; Gruhler, N.; Pernice, W. H. P.; Kübler, H.; Pfau, T.; Löw, R.

    2016-10-01

    Strongly interacting atom-cavity systems within a network with many nodes constitute a possible realization for a quantum internet which allows for quantum communication and computation on the same platform. To implement such large-scale quantum networks, nanophotonic resonators are promising candidates because they can be scalably fabricated and interconnected with waveguides and optical fibers. By integrating arrays of ring resonators into a vapor cell we show that thermal rubidium atoms above room temperature can be coupled to photonic cavities as building blocks for chip-scale hybrid circuits. Although strong coupling is not yet achieved in this first realization, our approach provides a key step towards miniaturization and scalability of atom-cavity systems.

  13. Resonant behavior of a harmonic oscillator with fluctuating mass driven by a Mittag-Leffler noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Suchuan; Yang, Jianqiang; Zhang, Lu; Ma, Hong; Luo, Maokang

    2017-02-01

    The resonant behavior of a generalized Langevin equation (GLE) in the presence of a Mittag-Leffler noise is studied analytically in this paper. Considering that a GLE with a Mittag-Leffler friction kernel is very useful for modeling anomalous diffusion processes with long-memory and long-range dependence, and the surrounding molecules do not only collide with the Brownian particle but also adhere to the Brownian particle for random time. Thus, we consider the Brownian particle with fluctuating mass, and the fluctuations of the mass are modelled as a dichotomous noise. Applying the stochastic averaging method, we obtain the exact expression of the output amplitude gain of the system. By studying the impact of the driving frequency and the noise parameters, we find the non-monotonic behaviors of the output amplitude gain. The results indicate that the bona fide SR, the wide sense SR and the conventional SR phenomena occur in the proposed harmonic oscillator with fluctuating mass driven by Mittag-Leffler noise. It is found that when we consider the output amplitude gain versus the driving frequency, the phenomena of stochastic multi-resonance (SMR) with two, three and four peaks are observed, and the quadruple-peaks SR phenomenon had never been observed in previous literature. Besides, when we investigate the dependence of output amplitude gain on the memory exponent, the inverse stochastic resonance (ISR) phenomenon takes place, in contrast to the well-known phenomenon of stochastic resonance. Furthermore, we compare the corresponding ordinary harmonic oscillator without memory to our generalized model, and found that the properties of long-memory and long-range dependence endows our generalized model with more abundant dynamic behaviors than the ordinary harmonic oscillator without memory.

  14. Projection method for improving signal to noise ratio of localized surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Abumazwed, Ahmed; Kubo, Wakana; Shen, Chen; Tanaka, Takuo; Kirk, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a simple and accurate method (the projection method) to improve the signal to noise ratio of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The nanostructures presented in the paper can be readily fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. The finite difference time domain method is used to simulate the structures and generate a reference matrix for the method. The results are validated against experimental data and the proposed method is compared against several other recently published signal processing techniques. We also apply the projection method to biotin-streptavidin binding experimental data and determine the limit of detection (LoD). The method improves the signal to noise ratio (SNR) by one order of magnitude, and hence decreases the limit of detection when compared to the direct measurement of the transmission-dip. The projection method outperforms the established methods in terms of accuracy and achieves the best combination of signal to noise ratio and limit of detection. PMID:28101430

  15. Electron concentrations calculated from the lower hybrid resonance noise band observed by Ogo 3.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burtis, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    A noise band at the lower hybrid resonance (LHR) is often detected by the VLF and ELF receivers on Ogo 3, using the electric antenna. In some cases the noise band is at the geometric mean gyrofrequency as measured by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) magnetometer, and local LHR in a dense H(+) plasma is indicated; in such cases, electron concentration can be calculated, if it is assumed that heavy ions are negligible. Observations at midlatitudes and altitudes of a few earth radii show local concentrations as low as 1.4 electrons/cu cm. In one case the concentrations obtained from the LHR noise band agree with those measured simultaneously by the GSFC ion mass spectrometer within a factor of 2. In another case the concentration is observed to fall by a factor of 2 in 150 km and then to decrease roughly as R to the minus fourth power, in agreement with whistler measurements outside the plasmapause.

  16. Strong quantum memory at resonant Fermi edges revealed by shot noise.

    PubMed

    Ubbelohde, N; Roszak, K; Hohls, F; Maire, N; Haug, R J; Novotný, T

    2012-01-01

    Studies of non-equilibrium current fluctuations enable assessing correlations involved in quantum transport through nanoscale conductors. They provide additional information to the mean current on charge statistics and the presence of coherence, dissipation, disorder, or entanglement. Shot noise, being a temporal integral of the current autocorrelation function, reveals dynamical information. In particular, it detects presence of non-Markovian dynamics, i.e., memory, within open systems, which has been subject of many current theoretical studies. We report on low-temperature shot noise measurements of electronic transport through InAs quantum dots in the Fermi-edge singularity regime and show that it exhibits strong memory effects caused by quantum correlations between the dot and fermionic reservoirs. Our work, apart from addressing noise in archetypical strongly correlated system of prime interest, discloses generic quantum dynamical mechanism occurring at interacting resonant Fermi edges.

  17. Noise suppression of on-chip mechanical resonators by chaotic coherent feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Hui; Liu, Yu-xi; Wu, Re-Bing; Liu, Lian-qing; Li, Chun-Wen; Nori, Franco

    2015-09-01

    We propose a method to decouple the nanomechanical resonator in optomechanical systems from the environmental noise by introducing a chaotic coherent feedback loop. We find that the chaotic controller in the feedback loop can modulate the dynamics of the controlled optomechanical system and induce a broadband response of the mechanical mode. This broadband response of the mechanical mode will cut off the coupling between the mechanical mode and the environment and thus suppress the environmental noise of the mechanical modes. As an application, we use the protected optomechanical system to act as a quantum memory. It is shown that the noise-decoupled optomechanical quantum memory is efficient for storing information transferred from coherent or squeezed light.

  18. Quantum δ-kicked rotor: the effect of amplitude noise on the quantum resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouard, S.; Plata, J.

    2003-04-01

    We study analytically the effect of amplitude noise on the quantum resonances of an atom optics realization of the delta-kicked rotor. Noise is shown to add a time growth to the 'deterministic' energy and to induce a time increasing spreading in the momentum distribution; exact results are given for both effects. The ballistic peaks characteristic of the noiseless distribution for particular initial conditions broaden and eventually vanish, whereas the associated quadratic growth of energy persists; at large times, the survival probability decays as t-1. Moreover, the nonexponential 'localization' linked to different initial conditions is gradually destroyed. Features specific to Gaussian noise, white and coloured, are analysed. The feasibility of experimental tests of these effects is discussed.

  19. Strong quantum memory at resonant Fermi edges revealed by shot noise

    PubMed Central

    Ubbelohde, N.; Roszak, K.; Hohls, F.; Maire, N.; Haug, R. J.; Novotný, T.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of non-equilibrium current fluctuations enable assessing correlations involved in quantum transport through nanoscale conductors. They provide additional information to the mean current on charge statistics and the presence of coherence, dissipation, disorder, or entanglement. Shot noise, being a temporal integral of the current autocorrelation function, reveals dynamical information. In particular, it detects presence of non-Markovian dynamics, i.e., memory, within open systems, which has been subject of many current theoretical studies. We report on low-temperature shot noise measurements of electronic transport through InAs quantum dots in the Fermi-edge singularity regime and show that it exhibits strong memory effects caused by quantum correlations between the dot and fermionic reservoirs. Our work, apart from addressing noise in archetypical strongly correlated system of prime interest, discloses generic quantum dynamical mechanism occurring at interacting resonant Fermi edges. PMID:22530093

  20. Channel noise enhances signal detectability in a model of acoustic neuron through the stochastic resonance paradigm.

    PubMed

    Liberti, M; Paffi, A; Maggio, F; De Angelis, A; Apollonio, F; d'Inzeo, G

    2009-01-01

    A number of experimental investigations have evidenced the extraordinary sensitivity of neuronal cells to weak input stimulations, including electromagnetic (EM) fields. Moreover, it has been shown that biological noise, due to random channels gating, acts as a tuning factor in neuronal processing, according to the stochastic resonant (SR) paradigm. In this work the attention is focused on noise arising from the stochastic gating of ionic channels in a model of Ranvier node of acoustic fibers. The small number of channels gives rise to a high noise level, which is able to cause a spike train generation even in the absence of stimulations. A SR behavior has been observed in the model for the detection of sinusoidal signals at frequencies typical of the speech.

  1. Parametric noise squeezing and parametric resonance of microcantilevers in air and liquid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Gyan; Raman, Arvind; Rhoads, Jeffrey; Reifenberger, Ronald G.

    2012-06-01

    In this work, parametric noise squeezing and parametric resonance are realized through the use of an electronic feedback circuit to excite a microcantilever with a signal proportional to the product of the microcantilever's displacement and a harmonic signal. The cantilever's displacement is monitored using an optical lever technique. By adjusting the gain of an amplifier in the feedback circuit, regimes of parametric noise squeezing/amplification and the principal and secondary parametric resonances of fundamental and higher order eigenmodes can be easily accessed. The exceptionally symmetric amplitude response of the microcantilever in the narrow frequency bandwidth is traced to a nonlinear parametric excitation term that arises due to the cubic nonlinearity in the output of the position-sensitive photodiode. The feedback circuit, working in both the regimes of parametric resonance and noise squeezing, allows an enhancement of the microcantilever's effective quality-factor (Q-factor) by two orders of magnitude under ambient conditions, extending the mass sensing capabilities of a conventional microcantilever into the sub-picogram regime. Likewise, experiments designed to parametrically oscillate a microcantilever in water using electronic feedback also show an increase in the microcantilever's effective Q-factor by two orders of magnitude, opening the field to high-sensitivity mass sensing in liquid environments.

  2. Parametric noise squeezing and parametric resonance of microcantilevers in air and liquid environments.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Gyan; Raman, Arvind; Rhoads, Jeffrey; Reifenberger, Ronald G

    2012-06-01

    In this work, parametric noise squeezing and parametric resonance are realized through the use of an electronic feedback circuit to excite a microcantilever with a signal proportional to the product of the microcantilever's displacement and a harmonic signal. The cantilever's displacement is monitored using an optical lever technique. By adjusting the gain of an amplifier in the feedback circuit, regimes of parametric noise squeezing/amplification and the principal and secondary parametric resonances of fundamental and higher order eigenmodes can be easily accessed. The exceptionally symmetric amplitude response of the microcantilever in the narrow frequency bandwidth is traced to a nonlinear parametric excitation term that arises due to the cubic nonlinearity in the output of the position-sensitive photodiode. The feedback circuit, working in both the regimes of parametric resonance and noise squeezing, allows an enhancement of the microcantilever's effective quality-factor (Q-factor) by two orders of magnitude under ambient conditions, extending the mass sensing capabilities of a conventional microcantilever into the sub-picogram regime. Likewise, experiments designed to parametrically oscillate a microcantilever in water using electronic feedback also show an increase in the microcantilever's effective Q-factor by two orders of magnitude, opening the field to high-sensitivity mass sensing in liquid environments.

  3. Study on the origin of 1/f noise in quartz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sthal, F.; Devel, M.; Imbaud, J.; Bourquin, R.; Ghosh, S.; Cibiel, G.

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic frequency fluctuations with a 1/f power spectral density limit the short-term stability in quartz crystal ultra-stable oscillators. The physical origin of this 1/f noise remains not clearly explained. In this paper, a review of an experimental study on numerous ultra-stable quartz crystal resonators is presented. A comparison with past measurements is given. A theoretical approach, based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, is used in order to put numerical constraints on a model of 1/f noise caused by an internal (or structural) dissipation proportional to the amplitude and not to the speed, in the limit of low frequencies. The order of the magnitude of the noise is then discussed using a candidate physical process. Comparisons between theoretical and experimental results show that internal damping of thickness fluctuations by any internal friction force proportional to strain and independent of frequency may not be the dominant noise mechanism for the best SC-cut quartz resonators. Finally, we conclude on the work that could be done to solve the remaining open problems.

  4. Synchronization of electrically coupled stochastic magnetic oscillators induced by thermal and electrical noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrahi, A.; Locatelli, N.; Grollier, J.; Querlioz, D.

    2016-08-01

    Superparamagnetic tunnel junctions are nanostructures that auto-oscillate stochastically under the effect of thermal noise. Recent works showed that despite their stochasticity, such junctions possess a capability to synchronize to subthreshold voltage drives, in a way that can be enhanced or controlled by adding noise. In this work, we investigate a system composed of two electrically coupled junctions, connected in series to a periodic voltage source. We make use of numerical simulations and of an analytical model to demonstrate that both junctions can be phase locked to the drive, in phase or in antiphase. This synchronization phenomenon can be controlled by both thermal and electrical noises, although the two types of noises induce qualitatively different behaviors. Namely, thermal noise can stabilize a regime where one junction is phase locked to the drive voltage while the other is blocked in one state; on the contrary, electrical noise causes the junctions to have highly correlated behaviors and thus cannot induce the latter. These results open the way for the design of superparamagnetic tunnel junctions that can perform computation through synchronization, and which harvest the largest part of their energy consumption from thermal noise.

  5. Vacuum-isolation vessel and method for measurement of thermal noise in microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Ngo, Kim Chi T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The vacuum isolation vessel and method in accordance with the present invention are used to accurately measure thermal noise in microphones. The apparatus and method could be used in a microphone calibration facility or any facility used for testing microphones. Thermal noise is measured to determine the minimum detectable sound pressure by the microphone. Conventional isolation apparatus and methods have been unable to provide an acoustically quiet and substantially vibration free environment for accurately measuring thermal noise. In the present invention, an isolation vessel assembly comprises a vacuum sealed outer vessel, a vacuum sealed inner vessel, and an interior suspension assembly coupled between the outer and inner vessels for suspending the inner vessel within the outer vessel. A noise measurement system records thermal noise data from the isolation vessel assembly. A vacuum system creates a vacuum between an internal surface of the outer vessel and an external surface of the inner vessel. The present invention thus provides an acoustically quiet environment due to the vacuum created between the inner and outer vessels and a substantially vibration free environment due to the suspension assembly suspending the inner vessel within the outer vessel. The thermal noise in the microphone, effectively isolated according to the invention, can be accurately measured.

  6. Simple Nanoimprinted Polymer Nanostructures for Uncooled Thermal Detection by Direct Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hong, Brandon; Vallini, Felipe; Fang, Cheng-Yi; Alasaad, Amr; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2017-03-08

    We experimentally demonstrate the uncooled detection of long wavelength infrared (IR) radiation by thermal surface plasmon sensing using an all optical readout format. Thermal infrared radiation absorbed by an IR-sensitive material with high thermo-optic coefficient coated on a metal grating creates a refractive index change detectable by the shift of the supported surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measured optically in the visible spectrum. The interface localization of SPR modes and optical readout allow for submicrometer thin film transducers and eliminate complex readout integrated circuits, respectively, reducing form factor, leveraging robust visible detectors, and enabling low-cost imaging cameras. We experimentally present the radiative heat induced thermo-optic action detectable by SPR shift through imaging of a thermal source onto a bulk metal grating substrate with IR-absorptive silicon nitride coating. Toward focal plane array integration, a route to facile fabrication of pixelated metal grating structures by nanoimprint lithography is developed, where a stable polymer, parylene-C, serves as an IR-absorptive layer with a high thermo-optic coefficient. Experimental detection of IR radiation from real thermal sources imaged at infinity is demonstrated by our nanoimprinted polymer-SPR pixels with an estimated noise equivalent temperature difference of 21.9 K.

  7. Temperature dependence of viscosity and density of viscous liquids determined from thermal noise spectra of uncalibrated atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, Neal; Lee, Stephen L; Hähner, Georg

    2007-08-01

    We demonstrate that the thermal response of uncalibrated atomic force microscope cantilevers can be used to extract the density and the viscosity of viscous liquids with good accuracy. Temperature dependent thermal noise spectra were measured in water/poly(ethylene glycol) mixtures. Empirical parameters characteristic of the resonance behavior of the system were extracted from data recorded for one of the solutions at room temperature. These parameters were then employed to determine both viscosity and density values of the solutions simultaneously at different temperatures. In addition, activation energies for viscous flow were determined from the viscosity values obtained. The method presented is both fast and reliable and has the potential to be applied in connection with microfluidic systems, making macroscopic amounts of liquid and separate measurements with a viscometer and a densimeter redundant.

  8. Theoretical Investigation of Large-Signal Noise in Nanometric Schottky-Barrier Diodes Operating in External Resonant Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiktorov, P.; Starikov, E.; Gružinskis, V.; Varani, L.; Vaissière, J. C.; Reggiani, L.; Pérez, S.; González, T.

    2005-02-01

    We report Monte Carlo simulations of electronic noise in heavily doped nanometric GaAs Schottky-barrier diodes operating in series with a parallel resonant circuit when a high-frequency large-signal voltage is applied to the whole system. Significant modifications of the noise spectrum with respect to the unloaded diode are found to occur in the THz-region.

  9. Noise-resilient multi-frequency surface sensor for nuclear quadrupole resonance.

    PubMed

    Peshkovsky, A S; Cattena, C J; Cerioni, L M; Osán, T M; Forguez, J G; Peresson, W J; Pusiol, D J

    2008-10-01

    A planar nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) sensor has been developed. The sensor is resilient to environmental noise and is capable of simultaneous independent multi-frequency operation. The device was constructed as an open multimodal birdcage structure, in which the higher modes, generally not used in magnetic resonance, are utilized for NQR detection. These modes have smooth distributions of the amplitudes of the corresponding radiofrequency magnetic fields everywhere along the sensor's surface. The phases of the fields, on the other hand, are cyclically shifted across the sensor's surface. Noise signals coming from distant sources, therefore, induce equal-magnitude cyclically phase-shifted currents in different parts of the sensor. When such cyclically phase-shifted currents arrive at the mode connection point, they destructively interfere with each other and are cancelled out. NQR signals of polycrystalline or disordered substances, however, are efficiently detected by these modes because they are insensitive to the phases of the excitation/detection. No blind spots exist along the sensor's surface. The sensor can be used for simultaneous detection of one or more substances in locations with environmental noise.

  10. The complementarity and similarity of magnetorelaxometry and thermal magnetic noise spectroscopy for magnetic nanoparticle characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leliaert, J.; Eberbeck, D.; Liebl, M.; Coene, A.; Steinhoff, U.; Wiekhorst, F.; Van Waeyenberge, B.; Dupré, L.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetorelaxometry and thermal magnetic noise spectroscopy are two magnetic characterization techniques enabling one to estimate the magnetic nanoparticle hydrodynamic size distribution. Both techniques are based on the same physical principle, i.e. the thermal fluctuations of the magnetic moment. In the case of magnetorelaxometry these fluctuations give rise to a relaxing magnetic moment after an externally applied magnetic field is switched off, whereas thermal magnetic noise spectra are measured in the absence of any external excitation. Hence, thermal magnetic noise spectroscopy is an equilibrium measurement technique. Here, we compare the similarity and complementarity of both methods and conclude that, for particles within both methods’ sensitivity range, they give the same estimate for the size distribution. For small particles (or samples with low viscosities), the used setup is not sufficiently sensitive to accurately estimate the size distribution from the relaxometry signal whereas this is still possible with thermal magnetic noise spectroscopy. For larger particles, however, magnetorelaxometry is the preferred method because of its higher signal to noise ratio and faster measurement time.

  11. Adaptive Helmholtz resonators and passive vibration absorbers for cylinder interior noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estève, Simon J.; Johnson, Marty E.

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents an adaptive-passive solution to control the broadband sound transmission into rocket payload fairings. The treatment is composed of passive distributed vibration absorbers (DVAs) and adaptive Helmholtz resonators (HR). Both the frequency domain and time-domain model of a simply supported cylinder excited by an external plane wave are developed. To tune vibration absorbers to tonal excitation, a tuning strategy, based on the phase information between the velocity of the absorber mass and the velocity of the host structure is used here in a new fashion to tune resonators to peaks in the broadband acoustic spectrum of a cavity. This tuning law, called the dot-product method, only uses two microphone signals local to each HR, which allows the adaptive Helmholtz resonator (AHR) to be manufactured as an autonomous device with power supply, sensor, actuator and controller integrated. Numerical simulations corresponding to a 2.8 m long 2.5 m diameter composite cylinder prototype demonstrate that, as long as the structure modes, which strongly couple to the acoustic cavity, are damped with a DVA treatment, the dot-product method tune multiple HRs to a near-optimal solution over a broad frequency range (40-160 Hz). An adaptive HR prototype with variable opening is built and characterized. Experiments conducted on the cylinder prototype with eight AHRs demonstrate the ability of resonators adapted with the dot-product method to converge to near-optimal noise attenuation in a frequency band including multiple resonances.

  12. Comment on "Ratchet universality in the presence of thermal noise".

    PubMed

    Quintero, Niurka R; Alvarez-Nodarse, Renato; Cuesta, José A

    2013-12-01

    A recent paper [P. J. Martínez and R. Chacón, Phys. Rev. E 87, 062114 (2013)] presents numerical simulations on a system exhibiting directed ratchet transport of a driven overdamped Brownian particle subjected to a spatially periodic, symmetric potential. The authors claim that their simulations prove the existence of a universal waveform of the external force that optimally enhances directed transport, hence confirming the validity of a previous conjecture put forth by one of them in the limit of vanishing noise intensity. With minor corrections due to noise, the conjecture holds even in the presence of noise, according to the authors. On the basis of their results the authors claim that all previous theories, which predict a different optimal force waveform, are incorrect. In this Comment we provide sufficient numerical evidence showing that there is no such universal force waveform and that the evidence obtained by the authors otherwise is due to their particular choice of parameters. Our simulations also suggest that previous theories correctly predict the shape of the optimal waveform within their validity regime, namely, when the forcing is weak. On the contrary, the aforementioned conjecture does not hold.

  13. Phase Noise Enhancement of the GaAs High Electron Mobility Transistors Using Micromachined Cavity Resonators at Ka-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Insang; Kim, Chungwoo; Kwon, Youngwoo; Cheon, Changyul; Song, Cimoo

    1999-06-01

    We introduce a new structure of the micromachined cavity resonator coupled GaAs-based oscillator to enhance the phase noise and the frequency stability. The oscillator and the cavity are designed for Ka-band applications. Compared to the free running oscillator, the cavity resonator coupled oscillator showed the phase noise enhancement of about 20 dB. The phase noises of about -110 and -85 dBc/Hz are obtained at 1 MHz and 100 kHz offset frequency, respectively. The frequency pushing for the gate bias of the cavity coupled oscillator is about two order of magnitude less than that of the free running oscillator.

  14. Stochastic resonance in a tumor-immune system subject to bounded noises and time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most recent approaches in cancer therapy. A mathematical model of tumor-immune interaction, subject to a periodic immunotherapy treatment (imitated by a periodic signal), correlative and bounded stochastic fluctuations and time delays, is investigated by numerical simulations for its signal power amplification (SPA). Within the tailored parameter regime, the synchronous response of tumor growth to the immunotherapy, stochastic resonance (SR), versus both the noises and delays is obtained. The details are as follows (i) the peak values of SPA versus the noise intensity (A) in the proliferation term of tumor cells decrease as the frequency of periodic signal increases, i.e. an increase of the frequency restrains the SR; (ii) an increase of the amplitude of periodic signal restrains the SR versus A, but boosts up the SR versus the noise intensity B in the immune term; (iii) there is an optimum cross-correlated degree between the two bounded noises, at which the system exhibits the strongest SR versus the delay time τα(the reaction time of tumor cell population to their surrounding environment constraints); (iv) upon increasing the delay time τα, double SR versus the delay time τβ (the time taken by both the tumor antigen identification and tumor-stimulated proliferation of effectors) emerges. These results may be helpful for an immunotherapy treatment for the sufferer.

  15. The effect of magnetic resonance imaging noise on cochlear function in dogs.

    PubMed

    Venn, R E; McBrearty, A R; McKeegan, D; Penderis, J

    2014-10-01

    Noise produced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners (which can peak at a sound pressure level of 131 dB) has been shown to cause noise-induced cochlear dysfunction in people. The aim of this study was to investigate whether noise produced during MRI had a deleterious effect on cochlear function in dogs, using distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) testing, which allows frequency specific, non-invasive assessment of cochlear function. DPOAE testing was performed before and after MRI in one or both ears under general anaesthesia at 14 frequency pairs (f2 frequency ranging from 0.84 kHz to 8.0 kHz). A control group comprised dogs undergoing anaesthesia of a similar duration for quiet procedures. Thirty-six dogs (66 ears) and 17 dogs (28 ears) were included in the MRI and control groups respectively. There was a reduction in DPOAE at all frequencies tested in the MRI group; a similar effect was not evident in the control group. This reduction in the MRI group was statistically significant in five of the 14 frequencies assessed (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that exposure to MRI noise results in a significant reduction in frequency-specific cochlear function in dogs, although it is not known whether this is reversible or permanent. This suggests that all dogs undergoing MRI studies should be provided with ear protection as a routine precautionary measure.

  16. A new multiscale noise tuning stochastic resonance for enhanced fault diagnosis in wind turbine drivetrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bingbing; Li, Bing

    2016-02-01

    It is very difficult to detect weak fault signatures due to the large amount of noise in a wind turbine system. Multiscale noise tuning stochastic resonance (MSTSR) has proved to be an effective way to extract weak signals buried in strong noise. However, the MSTSR method originally based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has disadvantages such as shift variance and the aliasing effects in engineering application. In this paper, the dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT) is introduced into the MSTSR method, which makes it possible to further improve the system output signal-to-noise ratio and the accuracy of fault diagnosis by the merits of DTCWT (nearly shift invariant and reduced aliasing effects). Moreover, this method utilizes the relationship between the two dual-tree wavelet basis functions, instead of matching the single wavelet basis function to the signal being analyzed, which may speed up the signal processing and be employed in on-line engineering monitoring. The proposed method is applied to the analysis of bearing outer ring and shaft coupling vibration signals carrying fault information. The results confirm that the method performs better in extracting the fault features than the original DWT-based MSTSR, the wavelet transform with post spectral analysis, and EMD-based spectral analysis methods.

  17. Theoretical investigation of Schottky-barrier diode noise performance in external resonant circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiktorov, P.; Starikov, E.; Gruzinskis, V.; Pérez, S.; González, T.; Reggiani, L.; Varani, L.; Vaissière, J. C.

    2006-04-01

    We report Monte Carlo simulations of electronic noise in heavily doped nanometric GaAs Schottky-barrier diodes (SBDs) recently proposed as promising devices for THz applications. We consider a SBD operating in series with a parallel output resonant circuit when a high-frequency large-signal voltage is applied to the whole system. Significant modifications of the noise spectrum with respect to the diode subjected to a constant applied voltage are found to occur in the THz-region. To interpret such behaviour, we have developed a simple analytical approach based on the static I-V and C-V relations as well as on the series resistance of the SBD.

  18. CP40: Improved Estimation of the Thermal Noise in the SAMOSA retracker.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Francisco; Repucci, Antonio; Egido, Alejandro; Cotton, David; Beneviste, Jerome

    2016-04-01

    Estimation of the thermal noise is a key parameter in the retracking of the SAR altimeter waveforms, since it affects directly the estimation of the Significant Wave Height (SWH). Originally the noise level was obtained as the average value of the early part of the waveform prior to the leading edge, l typically gates 11-21 for a waveform with 128 gates. However, this fixed approach does not consider the impact that the SWH can have on the leading edge and on the amplitude of the averaged SAR waveform. In fact, the range position of the first gate of the leading edge, depends on the SWH, and can vary considerably. Thus using the "fixed-gate" (11-21) approach can lead on erroneous noise floor estimation. In the framework of the CP40 project, an empirical model was proposed for the computation of the thermal noise, attending to the leading edge position variability, as part of an modified implementation of the SAMOSA re-tracker. However, analysis of a test data set generated with this modified re-tracker, revealed that further optimisation of this model was need . In this work the authors presents an improved estimation of the Thermal Noise, where an approach based on the uncorrelated characteristics of the thermal noise have been used as supplementary tool. Data from Cryosat-2 CNES-CPP L1b (v14) have been used as input to evaluate this optimised version of the thermal noise estimation. The analysis has been focused on the area where in situ data (wave buoy data) are available (30°-65°N and 20°-0° W). Main results, as well the main characteristics of the approach followed, will be presented. .

  19. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to 'internal photons' inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350-700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation.

  20. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to ‘internal photons’ inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350–700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation. PMID:26950936

  1. Reducing the Effects of Background Noise during Auditory Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Speech Processing: Qualitative and Quantitative Comparisons between Two Image Acquisition Schemes and Noise Cancellation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Graham A.; Hall, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The intense sound generated during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) complicates studies of speech and hearing. This experiment evaluated the benefits of using active noise cancellation (ANC), which attenuates the level of the scanner sound at the participant's ear by up to 35 dB around the peak at 600 Hz. Method: Speech and…

  2. Object reconstruction from thermal and shot noises corrupted block-based compressive ultra-low-light-level imaging measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Sen; Ke, Jun

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, block-based compressive ultra low-light-level imaging (BCU-imaging) is studied. Objects are divided into blocks. Features, or linear combinations of block pixels, instead of pixels, are measured for each block to improve system measurement SNR and thus object reconstructions. Thermal noise and shot noise are discussed for object reconstruction. The former is modeled as Gaussian noise. The latter is modeled as Poisson noise. Linear Wiener operator and linearized iterative Bregman algorithm are used to reconstruct objects from measurements corrupted by thermal noise. SPIRAL algorithm is used to reconstruct object from measurements with shot noise. Linear Wiener operator is also studied for measurements with shot noise, because Poisson noise is similar to Gaussian noise at large signal level and feature values are large enough to make this assumption feasible. Root mean square error (RMSE) is used to quantify system reconstruction quality.

  3. Coherent population trapping resonances in the presence of the frequency-phase noises of an exciting field

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A V; Matveev, A N; Samokotin, A Yu; Akimov, A V; Sorokin, Vadim N; Kolachevsky, Nikolai N

    2009-05-31

    The influence of noises of the frequency and phase difference of an exciting bichromatic field on the parameters of coherent population trapping resonances is studied experimentally. When the phase difference fluctuates within a limited interval near its average value with a short correlation time, the resonance contrast decreases proportionally to exp({phi}{sup 2}{sub rms}), where {phi}{sup 2}{sub rms} is the phase dispersion (in rad{sup 2}). In this case, the spectral width of the resonance remains constant. In another limiting case, when the phase noise has a long correlation time, the resonance contour broadens, the area under the contour being invariable. Experiments were performed with the Zeeman sublevels of the ground state of {sup 87}Rb by exciting rubidium vapour in a glass cell at the resonance wavelength of 795 nm. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  4. Heating and thermal squeezing in parametrically driven oscillators with added noise.

    PubMed

    Batista, Adriano A

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we report a theoretical model based on Green's functions, Floquet theory, and averaging techniques up to second order that describes the dynamics of parametrically driven oscillators with added thermal noise. Quantitative estimates for heating and quadrature thermal noise squeezing near and below the transition line of the first parametric instability zone of the oscillator are given. Furthermore, we give an intuitive explanation as to why heating and thermal squeezing occur. For small amplitudes of the parametric pump the Floquet multipliers are complex conjugate of each other with a constant magnitude. As the pump amplitude is increased past a threshold value in the stable zone near the first parametric instability, the two Floquet multipliers become real and have different magnitudes. This creates two different effective dissipation rates (one smaller and the other larger than the real dissipation rate) along the stable manifolds of the first-return Poincaré map. We also show that the statistical average of the input power due to thermal noise is constant and independent of the pump amplitude and frequency. The combination of these effects causes most of heating and thermal squeezing. Very good agreement between analytical and numerical estimates of the thermal fluctuations is achieved.

  5. Observation of natural noise near upper hybrid resonance in terrestrial magnetosphere by Prognoz-5 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyeva, G. M.; Grigoryeva, V. P.; Ivanov, V. N.; Pisareva, V. V.; Tarasov, A. F.; Feklicheva, I. F.; Shavshina, V. I.

    1984-12-01

    Results are presented and analyzed from a study of natural magnetospheric noise near the upper hybrid resonance made using the Prognoz-5 satellite, launched 25 Nov 76 with an orbital period of 95 hours, perigee 500 km, apogee 200,000 km, orbital inclination 65 deg. Natural noise was studied by an apparatus designed to measure long-wave cosmic radial radiation in the 50-1000 KHz band using both a rod and a frame antenna. The results indicate that the dimensions of the plasmasphere are significantly less than those obtained in earlier works, its shape more nearly circular. Electron concentration is also lower than earlier reported. These changes apparently are related to the solar activity cycle. The high-frequency natural noise of the plasmasphere in the polar diagram of invariant latitude relative to local geomagnetic time reveals a maximum intensity in the morning and evening sectors between invariant latitudes 40 and 62 deg, which may result from the asymmetric distribution of mild particle fluxes in the nighttime plasma layer.

  6. Adaptive Resonance Theory Neural Networks for Astronomical Region of Interest Detection and Noise Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, R. J.; Ritthaler, M. Healy, M.; Caudell, T. P. Zimmer, P.; McGraw, J.

    2007-10-01

    While learning algorithms have been used for astronomical data analysis, the vast majority of those algorithms have used supervised learning. We examine the use of two types of Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) (Carpenter & Grossberg 1987) neural networks which use unsupervised learning for this task. Using synthetic astronomical data from SkyMaker which was designed to mimic the dynamic range of the CTI-II telescope, we compared the ability of the ART-1 neural network and the ART-1 neural network with a category theoretic modification to detect regions of interest and to characterize noise. We use the program SExtractor to pinpoint clusters that contain either many or no object hits. We then show that there are more targets in the clusters with many SExtractor hits than SExtractor finds. We also show that ART clusters together input regions that are dominated by noise that can be used to characterize the noise in an image. The results provided show that unsupervised learning algorithms should not be overlooked for astronomical data analysis.

  7. Thermal and athermal crackling noise in ferroelastic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z; Ding, X; Sun, J; Salje, E K H

    2014-04-09

    The evolution of ferroelastic microstructures under external shear is determined by large-scale molecular dynamics simulations in two and three dimensions. Ferroelastic pattern formation was found to be almost identical in two and three dimensions, with only the ferroelastic transition temperature changing. The twin patterns generated by shear deformation depend strongly on temperature, with high wall densities nucleating under optimized temperature conditions. The dynamical tweed and mobile kink movement inside the twin walls is continuous and thermally activated at high temperatures, and becomes jerky and athermal at low temperatures. With decreasing temperature, the statistical distributions of dynamical tweed and kinks vary from a Vogel-Fulcher law P(E)~exp-(E/(T-TVF)) to an athermal power-law distribution P(E)~E-E. During the yield event, the nucleation of needles and kinks is always jerky, and the energy of the jerks is power-law distributed. Low-temperature yield proceeds via one large avalanche. With increasing temperature, the large avalanche is thermally broken up into a multitude of small segments. The power-law exponents reflect the changes in temperature, even in the athermal regime.

  8. Enhanced coding in a cochlear-implant model using additive noise: Aperiodic stochastic resonance with tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Robert P.; Roper, Peter

    2000-05-01

    Analog electrical stimulation of the cochlear nerve (the nerve of hearing) by a cochlear implant is an effective method of providing functional hearing to profoundly deaf people. Recent physiological and computational experiments have shown that analog cochlear implants are unlikely to convey certain speech cues by the temporal pattern of evoked nerve discharges. However, these experiments have also shown that the optimal addition of noise to cochlear implant signals can enhance the temporal representation of speech cues [R. P. Morse and E. F. Evans, Nature Medicine 2, 928 (1996)]. We present a simple model to explain this enhancement of temporal representation. Our model derives from a rate equation for the mean threshold-crossing rate of an infinite set of parallel discriminators (level-crossing detectors); a system that well describes the time coding of information by a set of nerve fibers. Our results show that the optimal transfer of information occurs when the threshold level of each discriminator is equal to the root-mean-square noise level. The optimal transfer of information by a cochlear implant is therefore expected to occur when the internal root-mean-square noise level of each stimulated fiber is approximately equal to the nerve threshold. When interpreted within the framework of aperiodic stochastic resonance, our results indicate therefore that for an infinite array of discriminators, a tuning of the noise is still necessary for optimal performance. This is in contrast to previous results [Collins, Chow, and Imhoff, Nature 376, 236 (1995); Chialvo, Longtin, and Müller-Gerking, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1798 (1997)] on arrays of FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons.

  9. Critical assessment of thermal/acoustical insulation for pipe and duct noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Marlund E.

    2005-09-01

    Piping and duct networks are among the major sources and distributors of noise in power plants. This noise is generated primarily by large rotating equipment and devices, primarily valves, with a large pressure drop. Piping and duct noise controls include silencers, thermal/acoustical insulation (lagging), and special treatments (e.g., low noise valve trims and diffusers). The effectiveness of acoustical lagging for pipe and duct noise depends on the type of source, coupling of the piping to sources or support structures, and the frequency spectra radiated. The acoustical performance of pipe lagging systems has been reported by a number of researchers over the past several decades. Today both ASTM and ISO have issued testing standards for the evaluation of pipe lagging systems, and the ISO standard also provides pipe lagging design guidance. Current technology for measuring the TL of lagging, predicting pipe and duct noise, and predicting the IL of lagging is critically assessed. This paper reviews the methods and results of the two standards and compares several laboratory test results with field measurements. Some challenges are presented along with suggestions for improving prediction of piping and ductwork noise abatement within power plants and in the community.

  10. Nano-Kelvin thermometry and temperature control: beyond the thermal noise limit.

    PubMed

    Weng, Wenle; Anstie, James D; Stace, Thomas M; Campbell, Geoff; Baynes, Fred N; Luiten, Andre N

    2014-04-25

    We demonstrate thermometry with a resolution of 80  nK/Hz using an isotropic crystalline whispering-gallery mode resonator based on a dichroic dual-mode technique. We simultaneously excite two modes that have a mode frequency ratio that is very close to two (±0.3  ppm). The wavelength and temperature dependence of the refractive index means that the frequency difference between these modes is an ultrasensitive proxy of the resonator temperature. This approach to temperature sensing automatically suppresses sensitivity to thermal expansion and vibrationally induced changes of the resonator. We also demonstrate active suppression of temperature fluctuations in the resonator by controlling the intensity of the driving laser. The residual temperature fluctuations are shown to be below the limits set by fundamental thermodynamic fluctuations of the resonator material.

  11. Thermal Noise Reduction of Mechanical Oscillators by Actively Controlled External Dissipative Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan; Medich, David; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Sheng, Sitong; Yuan, Jian-Yang; Shao, Zhifeng

    1999-01-01

    We show that the thermal fluctuations of very soft mechanical oscillators, such as the cantilever in an atomic force microscope (AFM), can be reduced without changing the stiffness of the spring or having to lower the environment temperature. We derive a theoretical relationship between the thermal fluctuations of an oscillator and an actively external-dissipative force. This relationship is verified by experiments with an AFM cantilever where the external active force is coupled through a magnetic field. With simple instrumentation, we have reduced the thermal noise amplitude of the cantilever by a factor of 3.4, achieving an apparent temperature of 25 K with the environment at 295K. This active noise reduction approach can significantly improve the accuracy of static position or static force measurements in a number of practical applications.

  12. Stochastic resonance in biology. How noise can enhance detection of weak signals and help improve biological information processing.

    PubMed

    Hänggi, Peter

    2002-03-12

    Noise is usually thought of as the enemy of order rather than as a constructive influence. In nonlinear systems that possess some sort of threshold, random noise plays a beneficial role in enhancing the detection of weak information-carrying signals. This phenomenon, termed stochastic resonance, does find useful applications in physical, biological, and biomedical contexts. Certain biological systems may even use this effect for optimizing function and behavior.

  13. Thermo-optically tuned photonic resonators with concurrent electrical connection and thermal isolation

    DOEpatents

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Kekatpure, Rohan Deodatta; Zortman, William A.; Savignon, Daniel J.

    2016-06-14

    A photonic resonator system is designed to use thermal tuning to adjust the resonant wavelength of each resonator in the system, with a separate tuning circuit associated with each resonator so that individual adjustments may be made. The common electrical ground connection between the tuning circuits is particularly formed to provide thermal isolation between adjacent resonators by including a capacitor along each return path to ground, where the presence of the capacitor's dielectric material provides the thermal isolation. The use of capacitively coupling necessarily requires the use of an AC current as an input to the heater element (conductor/resistor) of each resonator, where the RMS value of the AC signal is indicative of the amount of heat that is generated along the element and the degree of wavelength tuning that is obtained.

  14. Proposed Use of Zero Bias Diode Arrays as Thermal Electric Noise Rectifiers and Non-Thermal Energy Harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valone, Thomas F.

    2009-03-01

    The well known built-in voltage potential for some select semiconductor p-n junctions and various rectifying devices is proposed to be favorable for generating DC electricity at "zero bias" (with no DC bias voltage applied) in the presence of Johnson noise or 1/f noise which originates from the quantum vacuum (Koch et al., 1982). The 1982 Koch discovery that certain solid state devices exhibit measurable quantum noise has also recently been labeled a finding of dark energy in the lab (Beck and Mackey, 2004). Tunnel diodes are a class of rectifiers that are qualified and some have been credited with conducting only because of quantum fluctuations. Microwave diodes are also good choices since many are designed for zero bias operation. A completely passive, unamplified zero bias diode converter/detector for millimeter (GHz) waves was developed by HRL Labs in 2006 under a DARPA contract, utilizing a Sb-based "backward tunnel diode" (BTD). It is reported to be a "true zero-bias diode." It was developed for a "field radiometer" to "collect thermally radiated power" (in other words, 'night vision'). The diode array mounting allows a feed from horn antenna, which functions as a passive concentrating amplifier. An important clue is the "noise equivalent power" of 1.1 pW per root hertz and the "noise equivalent temperature difference" of 10° K, which indicate sensitivity to Johnson noise (Lynch, et al., 2006). There also have been other inventions such as "single electron transistors" that also have "the highest signal to noise ratio" near zero bias. Furthermore, "ultrasensitive" devices that convert radio frequencies have been invented that operate at outer space temperatures (3 degrees above zero point: 3° K). These devices are tiny nanotech devices which are suitable for assembly in parallel circuits (such as a 2-D array) to possibly produce zero point energy direct current electricity with significant power density (Brenning et al., 2006). Photovoltaic p-n junction

  15. Stacked phased array coils for increasing the signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dandan Liang; Hon Tat Hui; Tat Soon Yeo; Bing Keong Li

    2013-02-01

    A new concept of using a stacked phased coil array to increase the signal-to-circuit noise ratio (SCNR) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is introduced. Unlike conventional phased coil arrays, the proposed stacked phased coil array is constructed by stacking the coil elements closely together in the vertical direction. Through a proper combination of the coil terminal voltages, the SCNR is shown to increase with the square root of the number of coil elements. A prototype two-element array is constructed and an experimental method is designed to determine the combiner coefficients in a simulated MRI electromagnetic field environment. The experimental results show that the mutual coupling effect among the array coils can be totally removed and the combiner output voltage increases with the number of coil elements. This demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed method.

  16. Logical stochastic resonance with correlated internal and external noises in a synthetic biological logic block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dari, Anna; Kia, Behnam; Bulsara, Adi R.; Ditto, William L.

    2011-12-01

    Following the advent of synthetic biology, several gene networks have been engineered to emulate digital devices, with the ability to program cells for different applications. In this work, we adapt the concept of logical stochastic resonance to a synthetic gene network derived from a bacteriophage λ. The intriguing results of this study show that it is possible to build a biological logic block that can emulate or switch from the AND to the OR gate functionalities through externally tuning the system parameters. Moreover, this behavior and the robustness of the logic gate are underpinned by the presence of an optimal amount of random fluctuations. We extend our earlier work in this field, by taking into account the effects of correlated external (additive) and internal (multiplicative or state-dependent) noise. Results obtained through analytical calculations as well as numerical simulations are presented.

  17. Nonlinear Response of Bio-Polymers Subject to Stretching Flow with Thermal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Mingge; Grinberg, Leopold; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of elastic filaments subject to hydrodynamic forces exhibits complex nonlinear dynamics in the neighborhood of stagnation points in the flow. Here, the motion of a single in-extensible bio-polymer with an-isotropic friction tensor subjected to a stretching flow is modeled with stochastic differential equations as well as dissipative particle dynamics simulations. Our results show that the negative tension induces a stretch-coil transition beyond a critical value, where the noise is amplificated due to the interaction between thermal noise and nonlinear effects.

  18. Thermal Noise Limit in Frequency Stabilization of Lasers with Rigid Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with t.he direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency- reference cavity of order 1 Hz/square root Hz(0.01 Hz/square root Hz) at 10 mHz (100 Hz) at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results.

  19. Thermal Noise Limit in Frequency Stabilization of Lasers with Rigid Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity Used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with the direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency-reference cavity of order 1 Hz/rtHz at 10mHz at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results.

  20. Compensating thermal drift of hybrid silicon and lithium niobate ring resonances.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Wood, Michael G; Reano, Ronald M

    2015-04-01

    We present low-power compensation of thermal drift of resonance wavelengths in hybrid silicon and lithium niobate ring resonators based on the linear electro-optic effect. Fabricated devices demonstrate a resonance wavelength tunability of 12.5  pm/V and a tuning range of 1 nm. A capacitive geometry and low thermal sensitivity result in the compensation of 17°C of temperature variation using tuning powers at sub-nanowatt levels. The method establishes a route for stabilizing high-quality factor resonators in chip-scale integrated photonics subject to temperature variations.

  1. Thermally tunable electric mie resonance of dielectric cut-wire type metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuli; Chen, Lei; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Qian; He, Xuan; Chen, Ke

    2014-10-20

    In this manuscript, we present on a thermally tunable electric Mie resonance of dielectric cut-wire type metamaterial. Dielectric cut-wire exhibits Lorentz-type frequency dependent negative effective permittivity followed by zero value around its fundamental Mie resonance, resulting from dipole-oscillation of displacement currents. Furthermore, the operation frequency of electric resonance frequency can be varied by wire length and temperature variation. As environmental temperature changes by 40 °C, electric Mie resonance can be reversibly tuned by 1000 MHz, due to the thermal dependent permittivity character of ceramic.

  2. Thermal-wave resonator cavity design and measurements of the thermal diffusivity of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Mandelis, A.; Garcia, J. A.

    2000-07-01

    A liquid-ambient-compatible thermal wave resonant cavity (TWRC) has been constructed for the measurement of the thermal diffusivity of liquids. The thermal diffusivities of distilled water, glycerol, ethylene glycol, and olive oil were determined at room temperature (25 °C), with four-significant-figure precision as follows: (0.1445±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (distilled water); (0.0922±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (glycerol); (0.0918±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (ethylene glycol); and (0.0881±0.0004)×10-2 cm2/s (olive oil). The liquid-state TWRC sensor was found to be highly sensitive to various mixtures of methanol and salt in distilled water with sensitivity limits 0.5% (v/v) and 0.03% (w/v), respectively. The use of the TWRC to measure gas evolution from liquids and its potential for environmental applications has also been demonstrated.

  3. Waterborne noise due to ocean thermal energy conversion plants. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Janota, C.P.; Thompson, D.E.

    1982-06-17

    Public law reflects a United States national commitment to the rapid development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) as an alternate energy source. OTEC plants extract the stored solar energy from the world's tropical seas and in so doing pose a potential for altering the character of the ambient noise there. The sources of noise from an OTEC plant are analyzed in the context of four configurations, two of which were built and tested, and two which are concepts for future full-scale moored facilities. The analysis indicates that the noise resulting from the interaction of turbulence with the sea-water pumps is expected to dominate in the frequency range 10 Hz to 1 kHZ. Measured radiated noise data from the OTEC-I research plant, located near the island of Hawaii, are compared with the analysis. The measured data diverge from the predicted levels at frequencies above about 60 Hz because of dominant non-OTEC noise sources on this platform. However, at low frequency, the measured broadband noise is comparable to that predicted.

  4. Noise-tunable nonlinearity in a dispersively coupled diffusion-resonator system using superconducting circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhén, Christin; Isacsson, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The harmonic oscillator is one of the most widely used model systems in physics: an indispensable theoretical tool in a variety of fields. It is well known that an otherwise linear oscillator can attain novel and nonlinear features through interaction with another dynamical system. We investigate such an interacting system: a superconducting LC-circuit dispersively coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). We find that the SQUID phase behaves as a classical two-level system, whose two states correspond to one linear and one nonlinear regime for the LC-resonator. As a result, the circuit’s response to forcing can become multistable. The strength of the nonlinearity is tuned by the level of noise in the system, and increases with decreasing noise. This tunable nonlinearity could potentially find application in the field of sensitive detection, whereas increased understanding of the classical harmonic oscillator is relevant for studies of the quantum-to-classical crossover of Jaynes-Cummings systems.

  5. Noise-tunable nonlinearity in a dispersively coupled diffusion-resonator system using superconducting circuits

    PubMed Central

    Rhén, Christin; Isacsson, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The harmonic oscillator is one of the most widely used model systems in physics: an indispensable theoretical tool in a variety of fields. It is well known that an otherwise linear oscillator can attain novel and nonlinear features through interaction with another dynamical system. We investigate such an interacting system: a superconducting LC-circuit dispersively coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). We find that the SQUID phase behaves as a classical two-level system, whose two states correspond to one linear and one nonlinear regime for the LC-resonator. As a result, the circuit’s response to forcing can become multistable. The strength of the nonlinearity is tuned by the level of noise in the system, and increases with decreasing noise. This tunable nonlinearity could potentially find application in the field of sensitive detection, whereas increased understanding of the classical harmonic oscillator is relevant for studies of the quantum-to-classical crossover of Jaynes-Cummings systems. PMID:28120946

  6. A digital accelerometer array utilizing suprathreshold stochastic resonance for detection of sub-Brownian noise floor accelerations.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Dustin Wade; Olsson, Roy H.

    2004-12-01

    The goal of this LDRD project was to evaluate the possibilities of utilizing Stochastic resonance in micromechanical sensor systems as a means for increasing signal to noise for physical sensors. A careful study of this field reveals that in the case of a single sensing element, stochastic resonance offers no real advantage. We have, however, identified a system that can utilize very similar concepts to stochastic resonance in order to achieve an arrayed sensor system that could be superior to existing technologies in the field of inertial sensors, and could offer a very low power technique for achieving navigation grade inertial measurement units.

  7. Noise Silencer in the Form of a Helmholtz Resonator at the Outlet of an Air Duct of Finite Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenov, D. V.; Bazhenova, L. A.; Rimskiĭ-Korsakov, A. V.

    2000-05-01

    A new type of noise silencer with the original design of the air duct-resonator system is proposed. The design is free of the disadvantages that are inherent in the conventional design with a resonator placed inside the air duct. A physical model of the silencer is developed, and its efficiency is calculated for different geometrical and physical parameters of the resonator and the air duct. A comparison between the calculated characteristics and the experimental data is performed, and their agreement is demonstrated.

  8. Observations of magnetospheric ionization enhancements using upper-hybrid resonance noise band data from the RAE-1 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    Noise bands associated with the upper-hybrid resonance were used to provide direct evidence for the existence of regions of enhanced density in the equatorial magnetosphere near L = 2. Density enhancements ranging from several percent to as high as 45 percent are observed with radial dimensions of several hundred kilometers. The enhancement characteristics strongly suggest their identification as magnetospheric whistler ducts.

  9. Estimation of neutron energy for first resonance from absorption cross section for thermal neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, Donald

    1951-01-01

    Examination of published data for some 52 isotopes indicates that the neutron energy for which the first resonance occurs is related to the magnitude of the thermal absorption cross section. The empirical relation obtained is in qualitative agreement with the results of a simplified version of the resonance theory of the nucleus of Breit-Wigner.

  10. Study of thermal conductivity of magnetorheological fluids using the thermal-wave resonant cavity and its relationship with the viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forero-Sandoval, I. Y.; Vega-Flick, A.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Medina-Esquivel, R. A.

    2017-02-01

    The thermal conductivity and viscosity of a magnetorheological suspension composed of carbonyl iron particles immerse in silicone oil were studied. Thermal wave resonant cavity was employed to measure the thermal diffusivity of the magnetorheological fluid as a function of an externally applied magnetic field. The dynamic viscosity was also measured and its relationship with the concentration of the particles and the magnetic field strength was investigated. The results show that higher concentrations of carbonyl iron particles as well as higher magnetic field intensities lead to a significant increase in thermal conductivity. The relationship between the thermal conductivity and the dynamic viscosity was explored. Our measurements were examined using an analytical relation between the thermal conductivity and the dynamic viscosity. The results show that by using highly viscous materials, the order induced in the micro particles can be kept for a relatively long time and therefore the increase in thermal conductivity can also be maintained.

  11. Study of thermal and acoustic noise interferences in low stiffness atomic force microscope cantilevers and characterization of their dynamic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Boudaoud, Mokrane; Haddab, Yassine; Le Gorrec, Yann; Lutz, Philippe

    2012-01-15

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool for the measurement of forces at the micro/nano scale when calibrated cantilevers are used. Besides many existing calibration techniques, the thermal calibration is one of the simplest and fastest methods for the dynamic characterization of an AFM cantilever. This method is efficient provided that the Brownian motion (thermal noise) is the most important source of excitation during the calibration process. Otherwise, the value of spring constant is underestimated. This paper investigates noise interference ranges in low stiffness AFM cantilevers taking into account thermal fluctuations and acoustic pressures as two main sources of noise. As a result, a preliminary knowledge about the conditions in which thermal fluctuations and acoustic pressures have closely the same effect on the AFM cantilever (noise interference) is provided with both theoretical and experimental arguments. Consequently, beyond the noise interference range, commercial low stiffness AFM cantilevers are calibrated in two ways: using the thermal noise (in a wide temperature range) and acoustic pressures generated by a loudspeaker. We then demonstrate that acoustic noises can also be used for an efficient characterization and calibration of low stiffness AFM cantilevers. The accuracy of the acoustic characterization is evaluated by comparison with results from the thermal calibration.

  12. Analytical estimation of ultrasound properties, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound temperature data

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, C R; Borasi, G; Payne, A

    2016-01-01

    For thermal modeling to play a significant role in treatment planning, monitoring, and control of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal therapies, accurate knowledge of ultrasound and thermal properties is essential. This study develops a new analytical solution for the temperature change observed in MRgFUS which can be used with experimental MR temperature data to provide estimates of the ultrasound initial heating rate, Gaussian beam variance, tissue thermal diffusivity, and Pennes perfusion parameter. Simulations demonstrate that this technique provides accurate and robust property estimates that are independent of the beam size, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion levels in the presence of realistic MR noise. The technique is also demonstrated in vivo using MRgFUS heating data in rabbit back muscle. Errors in property estimates are kept less than 5% by applying a third order Taylor series approximation of the perfusion term and ensuring the ratio of the fitting time (the duration of experimental data utilized for optimization) to the perfusion time constant remains less than one. PMID:26741344

  13. Analytical estimation of ultrasound properties, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, C. R.; Borasi, G.; Payne, A.

    2016-01-01

    For thermal modeling to play a significant role in treatment planning, monitoring, and control of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal therapies, accurate knowledge of ultrasound and thermal properties is essential. This study develops a new analytical solution for the temperature change observed in MRgFUS which can be used with experimental MR temperature data to provide estimates of the ultrasound initial heating rate, Gaussian beam variance, tissue thermal diffusivity, and Pennes perfusion parameter. Simulations demonstrate that this technique provides accurate and robust property estimates that are independent of the beam size, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion levels in the presence of realistic MR noise. The technique is also demonstrated in vivo using MRgFUS heating data in rabbit back muscle. Errors in property estimates are kept less than 5% by applying a third order Taylor series approximation of the perfusion term and ensuring the ratio of the fitting time (the duration of experimental data utilized for optimization) to the perfusion time constant remains less than one.

  14. Temperature dependence of resonance characteristics of silicon resonators and thermal stability improvement by differential operation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Amrita Kumar; Jun, Maeda; Yokoyama, Shuhei; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Yokoyama, Shin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we describe the mechanism and solution for dominating temperature effects on refractive-index-based Si optical resonator sensors such as ring resonator and photonic crystal resonator sensors. The temperature change affects the silicon refractive index and also the resonator mechanical shape. As a result, it is reported that the refractive index change is marked, whereas the mechanical deformation effect is negligible. We also demonstrated that the differential operation is effective for suppressing the temperature effect for Si ring resonator sensors.

  15. A review on the flexural mode of graphene: lattice dynamics, thermal conduction, thermal expansion, elasticity and nanomechanical resonance.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Wang, Bing-Shen; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Park, Harold S

    2015-03-04

    Single-layer graphene is so flexible that its flexural mode (also called the ZA mode, bending mode, or out-of-plane transverse acoustic mode) is important for its thermal and mechanical properties. Accordingly, this review focuses on exploring the relationship between the flexural mode and thermal and mechanical properties of graphene. We first survey the lattice dynamic properties of the flexural mode, where the rigid translational and rotational invariances play a crucial role. After that, we outline contributions from the flexural mode in four different physical properties or phenomena of graphene-its thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, Young's modulus and nanomechanical resonance. We explain how graphene's superior thermal conductivity is mainly due to its three acoustic phonon modes at room temperature, including the flexural mode. Its coefficient of thermal expansion is negative in a wide temperature range resulting from the particular vibration morphology of the flexural mode. We then describe how the Young's modulus of graphene can be extracted from its thermal fluctuations, which are dominated by the flexural mode. Finally, we discuss the effects of the flexural mode on graphene nanomechanical resonators, while also discussing how the essential properties of the resonators, including mass sensitivity and quality factor, can be enhanced.

  16. Adapting non-local means of de-noising in intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for brain tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Mizukuchi, Takashi; Fujii, Masazumi; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Tsuzaka, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    In image-guided brain tumor surgery, intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) is a powerful tool for updating navigational information after brain shift, controlling the resection of brain tumors, and evaluating intraoperative complications. Low-field iMRI scans occasionally generate a lot of noise, the reason for which is yet to be determined. This noise adversely affects the neurosurgeons' interpretations. In this study, in order to improve the image quality of iMR images, we optimized and adapted an unbiased non-local means (UNLM) filter to iMR images. This noise appears to occur at a specific frequency-encoding band. In order to adapt the UNLM filter to the noise, we improved the UNLM, so that de-noising can be performed at different noise levels that occur at different frequency-encoding bands. As a result, clinical iMR images can be de-noised adequately while preserving crucial information, such as edges. The UNLM filter preserved the edges more clearly than did other classical filters attached to an anisotropic diffusion filter. In addition, UNLM de-noising can improve the signal-to-noise ratio of clinical iMR images by more than 2 times (p < 0.01). Although the computational time of the UNLM processing is very long, post-processing of UNLM filter images, for which the parameters were optimized, can be performed during other MRI scans. Therefore, The UNLM filter was more effective than increasing the number of signal averages. The iMR image quality was improved without extension of the MR scanning time. UNLM de-noising in post-processing is expected to improve the diagnosability of low-field iMR images.

  17. A joint resonance frequency estimation and in-band noise reduction method for enhancing the detectability of bearing fault signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozchalooi, I. Soltani; Liang, Ming

    2008-05-01

    The vibration signal measured from a bearing contains vital information for the prognostic and health assessment purposes. However, when bearings are installed as part of a complex mechanical system, the measured signal is often heavily clouded by various noises due to the compounded effect of interferences of other machine elements and background noises present in the measuring device. As such, reliable condition monitoring would not be possible without proper de-noising. This is particularly true for incipient bearing faults with very weak signature signals. A new de-noising scheme is proposed in this paper to enhance the vibration signals acquired from faulty bearings. This de-noising scheme features a spectral subtraction to trim down the in-band noise prior to wavelet filtering. The Gabor wavelet is used in the wavelet transform and its parameters, i.e., scale and shape factor are selected in separate steps. The proper scale is found based on a novel resonance estimation algorithm. This algorithm makes use of the information derived from the variable shaft rotational speed though such variation is highly undesirable in fault detection since it complicates the process substantially. The shape factor value is then selected by minimizing a smoothness index. This index is defined as the ratio of the geometric mean to the arithmetic mean of the wavelet coefficient moduli. De-noising results are presented for simulated signals and experimental data acquired from both normal and faulty bearings with defective outer race, inner race, and rolling element.

  18. Dependence of radial thermal diffusivity on parameters of toroidal plasma affected by resonant magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Ryutaro; Nunami, Masanori; Satake, Shinsuke; Takamaru, Hisanori; Okamoto, Masao

    2013-06-01

    We investigate how the neoclassical thermal diffusivity of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma is modified by the effect of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), using a drift-kinetic simulation code for calculating the radial thermal diffusivity of ion in the perturbed region under an assumption of zero electric field. Here, the perturbed region is assumed to be generated on and near the resonance surfaces, and is wedged in between the regular closed magnetic surfaces. We find that the dependence of the radial thermal diffusivity on parameters of the toroidal plasma is represented as \\chi_r=\\chi_r^{(0)} \\{1+ c_0\\,(\\omega_b/\

  19. Thermal oscillatory behavior analysis and dynamic modulation of refractive index in microspherical resonator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanlong; Wang, Yue; Guo, Zhen; Wu, Junfeng; Wu, Yihui

    2015-04-01

    The thermal nonlinear effects in whispering-gallery-mode resonators are characterized by oscillatory behavior in the transmission spectrum. Although the thermal linewidth broadening is proven to be practical in mode-locking and dynamic control of the optical path, the oscillatory behavior always leads to instability of mode-locking and influences the control accuracy. We theoretically and experimentally illustrate the thermal oscillatory behavior using a model that combines slow and fast thermal relaxation processes of the microsphere and fluctuations of the pump wavelength. We also report dynamic modulation of the refractive index based on the fast thermal relaxation process.

  20. A method to analyze low signal-to-noise ratio functional magnetic resonance imaging data.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xi; Kayali, M Amin; Jansen, Ben H

    2015-09-01

    The current practice of using a single, representative hemodynamic response function (canonical HRF) to model functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is questionable given the trial-to-trial variability of the brain's responses. In addition, the changes in blood-oxygenation level due to sensory stimulation may be small, especially when auditory stimuli are used. Here we introduce a correlation-based single trial analysis method for fMRI data analysis to deal with the low signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio and variability of the HRF in response to repeated, identical auditory stimuli. The correlation technique identifies the "active" trials, i.e., those showing a robust hemodynamic response among all single trials. Using data collected from 14 healthy subjects, it was found that the correlation method can find significant differences between brain areas and brain states in actual fMRI data. Also, the correlation-based method confirmed that the superior temporal gyrus (STG), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and thalamus (THA) are involved in auditory information processing in general, and the involvement of the bilateral STG, right THA and left DLPFC in sensory gating. In contrast, conventional analysis failed to find any regions involved in sensory gating. The findings suggest that our single trial analysis method can increase the sensitivity of fMRI data analysis.

  1. Constraints of thermal noise on the effects of weak 60-Hz magnetic fields acting on biological magnetite.

    PubMed Central

    Adair, R K

    1994-01-01

    Previous calculations of limits imposed by thermal noise on the effects of weak 60-Hz magnetic fields on biological magnetite are generalized and extended to consider multiple signals, the possibility of anomalously large magnetosome structures, and the possibility of anomalously small cytoplasm viscosities. The results indicate that the energies transmitted to the magnetite elements by fields less than 5 microT, characteristic of the electric power distribution system, will be much less than thermal noise energies. Hence, the effects of such weak fields will be masked by that noise and cannot be expected to affect biology or, therefore, the health of populations. PMID:8159681

  2. Modulation of thermal noise and spectral sensitivity in Lake Baikal cottoid fish rhodopsins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Montisci, Fabio; Morrow, James M.; Melaccio, Federico; Wada, Akimori; Sheves, Mudi; Fanelli, Francesca; Chang, Belinda S. W.; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    Lake Baikal is the deepest and one of the most ancient lakes in the world. Its unique ecology has resulted in the colonization of a diversity of depth habitats by a unique fauna that includes a group of teleost fish of the sub-order Cottoidei. This relatively recent radiation of cottoid fishes shows a gradual blue-shift in the wavelength of the absorption maximum of their visual pigments with increasing habitat depth. Here we combine homology modeling and quantum chemical calculations with experimental in vitro measurements of rhodopsins to investigate dim-light adaptation. The calculations, which were able to reproduce the trend of observed absorption maxima in both A1 and A2 rhodopsins, reveal a Barlow-type relationship between the absorption maxima and the thermal isomerization rate suggesting a link between the observed blue-shift and a thermal noise decrease. A Nakanishi point-charge analysis of the electrostatic effects of non-conserved and conserved amino acid residues surrounding the rhodopsin chromophore identified both close and distant sites affecting simultaneously spectral tuning and visual sensitivity. We propose that natural variation at these sites modulate both the thermal noise and spectral shifting in Baikal cottoid visual pigments resulting in adaptations that enable vision in deep water light environments.

  3. Modulation of thermal noise and spectral sensitivity in Lake Baikal cottoid fish rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Montisci, Fabio; Morrow, James M.; Melaccio, Federico; Wada, Akimori; Sheves, Mudi; Fanelli, Francesca; Chang, Belinda S. W.; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Lake Baikal is the deepest and one of the most ancient lakes in the world. Its unique ecology has resulted in the colonization of a diversity of depth habitats by a unique fauna that includes a group of teleost fish of the sub-order Cottoidei. This relatively recent radiation of cottoid fishes shows a gradual blue-shift in the wavelength of the absorption maximum of their visual pigments with increasing habitat depth. Here we combine homology modeling and quantum chemical calculations with experimental in vitro measurements of rhodopsins to investigate dim-light adaptation. The calculations, which were able to reproduce the trend of observed absorption maxima in both A1 and A2 rhodopsins, reveal a Barlow-type relationship between the absorption maxima and the thermal isomerization rate suggesting a link between the observed blue-shift and a thermal noise decrease. A Nakanishi point-charge analysis of the electrostatic effects of non-conserved and conserved amino acid residues surrounding the rhodopsin chromophore identified both close and distant sites affecting simultaneously spectral tuning and visual sensitivity. We propose that natural variation at these sites modulate both the thermal noise and spectral shifting in Baikal cottoid visual pigments resulting in adaptations that enable vision in deep water light environments. PMID:27934935

  4. Modulation of thermal noise and spectral sensitivity in Lake Baikal cottoid fish rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Montisci, Fabio; Morrow, James M; Melaccio, Federico; Wada, Akimori; Sheves, Mudi; Fanelli, Francesca; Chang, Belinda S W; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-12-09

    Lake Baikal is the deepest and one of the most ancient lakes in the world. Its unique ecology has resulted in the colonization of a diversity of depth habitats by a unique fauna that includes a group of teleost fish of the sub-order Cottoidei. This relatively recent radiation of cottoid fishes shows a gradual blue-shift in the wavelength of the absorption maximum of their visual pigments with increasing habitat depth. Here we combine homology modeling and quantum chemical calculations with experimental in vitro measurements of rhodopsins to investigate dim-light adaptation. The calculations, which were able to reproduce the trend of observed absorption maxima in both A1 and A2 rhodopsins, reveal a Barlow-type relationship between the absorption maxima and the thermal isomerization rate suggesting a link between the observed blue-shift and a thermal noise decrease. A Nakanishi point-charge analysis of the electrostatic effects of non-conserved and conserved amino acid residues surrounding the rhodopsin chromophore identified both close and distant sites affecting simultaneously spectral tuning and visual sensitivity. We propose that natural variation at these sites modulate both the thermal noise and spectral shifting in Baikal cottoid visual pigments resulting in adaptations that enable vision in deep water light environments.

  5. Collisional Dephasing and the Reduction of Laser Phase-Noise to Amplitude-Noise Conversion in a Resonant Atomic Vapor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Further, since the samev alue of P, is obtained for both curves, this statement ap- Here, keg and iAeg are the transition wavelength and dipole pears to be...pressure to have no effect on the signal-to- 1 noise ratio and to simply increase Av, thereby degrading A 10-4 spectroscopic sensitivity. However, as shown...and evaluation. Space Materials Laboratory: Evaluation and characterizations of new materials and processing techniques: metals, alloys , ceramics

  6. Brownian Thermal Noise in Interferometric Gravitational Wave Detectors and Single Photon Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ting

    The Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is designed to detect the Gravitational Waves (GW) predicted by Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The advanced LIGO project is ongoing an upgrade to increase the detection sensitivity by more than a factor of 10, which will make the events detection a routine occurrence. In addition to using higher power lasers, heavier test mass, and better isolation systems, several new designs and techniques are proposed in the long-term upgrade, such as modifying the optics configuration to reduce the quantum noise, active noise cancellation of the Newtonian noise, optimizing the coating structure, and employing non-Guassian laser beams etc. In the first part of my thesis (Chapters 2 and 3), I apply statistical mechanics and elastostatics to the LIGO coated mirrors, and study the thermal fluctuations that dominate advanced LIGO's most sensitive frequency band from 40 Hz to 200 Hz. In particular, in Chapter 2, I study the so-called coating Brownian noise, fluctuations of mirrors coated with multiple layers of dielectrics due to internal friction. Assuming coating materials to be isotropic and homogeneous, I calculate the cross spectra of Brownian fluctuations in the bulk and shear strains of the coating layers, as well as fluctuations in the height of the coating-substrate interface. The additional phase shifting and back-scattering caused by photo elastic effects are also considered for the first time. In Chapter 3, I study whether it is realistic to adopt higher-order Laguerre-Gauss modes in LIGO, in order to mitigate the effect of mirror thermal noise. We investigate the effect on the detector's contrast defect caused by the mode degeneracy. With both analytical calculation and numerical simulation, we show that with this approach, the detector's susceptibility to mirror figure errors is reduced greatly compared to using the nondegenerate modes, therefore making it unacceptable for LIGO requirements

  7. Isolating the auditory system from acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaging: Examination of noise conduction through the ear canal, head, and bodya)

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Melcher, Jennifer R.

    2007-01-01

    Approaches were examined for reducing acoustic noise levels heard by subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a technique for localizing brain activation in humans. Specifically, it was examined whether a device for isolating the head and ear canal from sound (a “helmet”) could add to the isolation provided by conventional hearing protection devices (i.e., earmuffs and earplugs). Both subjective attenuation (the difference in hearing threshold with versus without isolation devices in place) and objective attenuation (difference in ear-canal sound pressure) were measured. In the frequency range of the most intense fMRI noise (1–1.4 kHz), a helmet, earmuffs, and earplugs used together attenuated perceived sound by 55–63 dB, whereas the attenuation provided by the conventional devices alone was substantially less: 30–37 dB for earmuffs, 25–28 dB for earplugs, and 39–41 dB for earmuffs and earplugs used together. The data enabled the clarification of the relative importance of ear canal, head, and body conduction routes to the cochlea under different conditions: At low frequencies (≤500 Hz), the ear canal was the dominant route of sound conduction to the cochlea for all of the device combinations considered. At higher frequencies (>500 Hz), the ear canal was the dominant route when either earmuffs or earplugs were worn. However, the dominant route of sound conduction was through the head when both earmuffs and earplugs were worn, through both ear canal and body when a helmet and earmuffs were worn, and through the body when a helmet, earmuffs, and earplugs were worn. It is estimated that a helmet, earmuffs, and earplugs together will reduce the most intense fMRI noise levels experienced by a subject to 60–65 dB SPL. Even greater reductions in noise should be achievable by isolating the body from the surrounding noise field. PMID:11206150

  8. Statistical Properties of Thermal Noise Driving the Brownian Particles in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóthová, Jana; Lisý, Vladimír

    2016-02-01

    In several recent works high-resolution interferometric detection allowed to study the Brownian motion of optically trapped microparticles in air and fluids. The observed positional fluctuations of the particles are well described by the generalized Langevin equation with the Boussinesq-Basset "history force" instead of the Stokes friction, which is valid only for the steady motion. Recently, also the time correlation function of the thermal random force Fth driving the Brownian particles through collisions with the surrounding molecules has been measured. In the present contribution we propose a method to describe the statistical properties of Fth in incompressible fluids. Our calculations show that the time decay of the correlator is significantly slower than that found in the literature. It is also shown how the "color" of the thermal noise can be determined from the measured positions of the Brownian particles.

  9. In-flight thermal experiments for LISA Pathfinder: Simulating temperature noise at the Inertial Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, Ll; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Maghami, P.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-04-01

    Thermal Diagnostics experiments to be carried out on board LISA Pathfinder (LPF) will yield a detailed characterisation of how temperature fluctuations affect the LTP (LISA Technology Package) instrument performance, a crucial information for future space based gravitational wave detectors as the proposed eLISA. Amongst them, the study of temperature gradient fluctuations around the test masses of the Inertial Sensors will provide as well information regarding the contribution of the Brownian noise, which is expected to limit the LTP sensitivity at frequencies close to 1 mHz during some LTP experiments. In this paper we report on how these kind of Thermal Diagnostics experiments were simulated in the last LPF Simulation Campaign (November, 2013) involving all the LPF Data Analysis team and using an end-to-end simulator of the whole spacecraft. Such simulation campaign was conducted under the framework of the preparation for LPF operations.

  10. In-flight thermal experiments for LISA Pathfinder: Simulating temperature noise at the Inertial Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, F.; Nofrarias, M.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, Ll; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Maghami, P.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal Diagnostics experiments to be carried out on board LISA Pathfinder (LPF) will yield a detailed characterisation of how temperature fluctuations affect the LTP (LISA Technology Package) instrument performance, a crucial information for future space based gravitational wave detectors as the proposed eLISA. Amongst them, the study of temperature gradient fluctuations around the test masses of the Inertial Sensors will provide as well information regarding the contribution of the Brownian noise, which is expected to limit the LTP sensitivity at frequencies close to 1 mHz during some LTP experiments. In this paper we report on how these kind of Thermal Diagnostics experiments were simulated in the last LPF Simulation Campaign (November, 2013) involving all the LPF Data Analysis team and using an end-to-end simulator of the whole spacecraft. Such simulation campaign was conducted under the framework of the preparation for LPF operations.

  11. Effects of Thermal Noise on the Transitional Dynamics of an Inextensible Elastic Filament in Stagnation Flow

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Mingge; Grinberg, Leopold; Caswell, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a single inextensible elastic filament subject to anisotropic friction in a viscous stagnation-point flow, by employing both a continuum model represented by Langevin type stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) and a Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method. Unlike previous works1, the filament is free to rotate and the tension along the filament is determined by the local inextensible constraint. The kinematics of the filament is recorded and studied with normal modes analysis. The results show that the filament displays an instability induced by negative tension, which is analogous to Euler buckling of a beam. Symmetry breaking of normal modes dynamics and stretch-coil transitions are observed above the threshold of the buckling instability point. Furthermore, both temporal and spatial noise are amplified resulting from the interaction of thermal fluctuations and nonlinear filament dynamics. Specifically, the spatial noise is amplified with even normal modes being excited due to symmetry breaking, while the temporal noise is amplified with increasing time correlation length and variance. PMID:26023834

  12. Effects of thermal noise on the transitional dynamics of an inextensible elastic filament in stagnation flow.

    PubMed

    Deng, Mingge; Grinberg, Leopold; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-06-28

    We investigate the dynamics of a single inextensible elastic filament subject to anisotropic friction in a viscous stagnation-point flow, by employing both a continuum model represented by Langevin type stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) and a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. Unlike previous works, the filament is free to rotate and the tension along the filament is determined by the local inextensible constraint. The kinematics of the filament is recorded and studied with normal modes analysis. The results show that the filament displays an instability induced by negative tension, which is analogous to Euler buckling of a beam. Symmetry breaking of normal modes dynamics and stretch-coil transitions are observed above the threshold of the buckling instability point. Furthermore, both temporal and spatial noise are amplified resulting from the interaction of thermal fluctuations and nonlinear filament dynamics. Specifically, the spatial noise is amplified with even normal modes being excited due to symmetry breaking, while the temporal noise is amplified with increasing time correlation length and variance.

  13. Spectroscopy of electronic thermal noise as a direct probe of absolute thermoelectric coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrity, Patrick L.

    2011-04-01

    The utilization of thermal fluctuations or Johnson/Nyquist noise as a generalized spectroscopic technique to experimentally measure transport properties is applied to Pt and W metal films. Through cross-correlation and autocorrelation functions obtained from voltage power spectral density measurements, multiple transport coefficients are obtained through the Green-Kubo formalism. Supported rigorously by the underlying fluctuation-dissipation theorem and Green-Kubo transport theory, this novel experimental technique provides a direct measurement of absolute Seebeck and Peltier coefficients in addition to the electrical resistivity, electronic contribution to thermal conductivity, and Lorenz number. This work reports the validation results of the experiment accomplished through the use of materials with thermoelectric properties widely accepted by the thermoelectric community, Pt and W. Further validation of the data was accomplished by comparing the resistivity results to standard collinear four-probe resistivity measurements. Spectroscopic results for resistivity at 300 K resulted in 5.3% and 2.5% agreement with four-probe resistivity measurements for Pt and W, respectively. The Seebeck coefficient measurements at 300 K showed agreement with published values within 3.8% and 7.5% for Pt and W, respectively. The electronic thermal conductivity measured 66% and 75% of the total thermal conductivity for Pt and W, respectively, at 300 K.

  14. Effect of temperature variations and thermal noise on the static and dynamic behavior of straintronics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barangi, Mahmood; Mazumder, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    A theoretical model quantifying the effect of temperature variations on the magnetic properties and static and dynamic behavior of the straintronics magnetic tunneling junction is presented. Four common magnetostrictive materials (Nickel, Cobalt, Terfenol-D, and Galfenol) are analyzed to determine their temperature sensitivity and to provide a comprehensive database for different applications. The variations of magnetic anisotropies are studied in detail for temperature levels up to the Curie temperature. The energy barrier of the free layer and the critical voltage required for flipping the magnetization vector are inspected as important metrics that dominate the energy requirements and noise immunity when the device is incorporated into large systems. To study the dynamic thermal noise, the effect of the Langevin thermal field on the free layer's magnetization vector is incorporated into the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The switching energy, flipping delay, write, and hold error probabilities are studied, which are important metrics for nonvolatile memories, an important application of the straintronics magnetic tunneling junctions.

  15. Noise Estimation and Reduction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a New Multispectral Nonlocal Maximum-likelihood Filter.

    PubMed

    Bouhrara, Mustapha; Bonny, Jean-Marie; Ashinsky, Beth G; Maring, Michael C; Spencer, Richard G

    2017-01-01

    Denoising of magnetic resonance (MR) images enhances diagnostic accuracy, the quality of image manipulations such as registration and segmentation, and parameter estimation. The first objective of this paper is to introduce a new, high-performance, nonlocal filter for noise reduction in MR image sets consisting of progressively-weighted, that is, multispectral, images. This filter is a multispectral extension of the nonlocal maximum likelihood filter (NLML). Performance was evaluated on synthetic and in-vivo T2 - and T1 -weighted brain imaging data, and compared to the nonlocal-means (NLM) and its multispectral version, that is, MS-NLM, and the nonlocal maximum likelihood (NLML) filters. Visual inspection of filtered images and quantitative analyses showed that all filters provided substantial reduction of noise. Further, as expected, the use of multispectral information improves filtering quality. In addition, numerical and experimental analyses indicated that the new multispectral NLML filter, MS-NLML, demonstrated markedly less blurring and loss of image detail than seen with the other filters evaluated. In addition, since noise standard deviation (SD) is an important parameter for all of these nonlocal filters, a multispectral extension of the method of maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) of noise amplitude is presented and compared to both local and nonlocal MLE methods. Numerical and experimental analyses indicated the superior performance of this multispectral method for estimation of noise SD.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of thermal oxidation of polyisoprene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, M. A.; Hsu, M. S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted concerning the microstructural changes occurring in cis- and trans-1,4-polyisoprenes during uncatalized thermal oxidation in the solid phase. The investigation made use of approaches based on proton and carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy. The oxidation of squalene and dihydromyrcene in the liquid phase was also studied. The studies provide the first NMR spectroscopic evidence for the presence of epoxy and peroxide, hydroperoxide, and alcohol groups within the oxidized polyisoprene chain.

  17. Frequency-dependent hydrodynamic inductance and the determination of the thermal and quantum noise of a superfluid gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin

    2005-04-01

    We reexamine mass flow in a superfluid gyroscope containing a superfluid Josephson weak link. We introduce a frequency-dependent hydrodynamic inductance to account for an oscillatory flow of the normal fluid component in the sensing loop. With this hydrodynamic inductance, we derive the thermal phase noise, and hence the thermal rotational noise of the gyroscope. We examine the thermodynamic stability of the system based on an analysis of the free energy. We derive a quantum phase noise, which is analogous to the zero-point motion of a simple harmonic oscillator. The configuration of the studied gyroscope is analogous to a conventional superconducting RF SQUID. We show that the gyroscope has very low intrinsic noise (1.9x10{sup -13} rad s{sup -1}/{radical}(Hz)), and it can potentially be applied to study general relativity, Earth science, and to improve global positioning systems (GPS)

  18. Effect of negative emotions evoked by light, noise and taste on trigeminal thermal sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with migraine often have impaired somatosensory function and experience headache attacks triggered by exogenous stimulus, such as light, sound or taste. This study aimed to assess the influence of three controlled conditioning stimuli (visual, auditory and gustatory stimuli and combined stimuli) on affective state and thermal sensitivity in healthy human participants. Methods All participants attended four experimental sessions with visual, auditory and gustatory conditioning stimuli and combination of all stimuli, in a randomized sequence. In each session, the somatosensory sensitivity was tested in the perioral region with use of thermal stimuli with and without the conditioning stimuli. Positive and Negative Affect States (PANAS) were assessed before and after the tests. Subject based ratings of the conditioning and test stimuli in addition to skin temperature and heart rate as indicators of arousal responses were collected in real time during the tests. Results The three conditioning stimuli all induced significant increases in negative PANAS scores (paired t-test, P ≤0.016). Compared with baseline, the increases were in a near dose-dependent manner during visual and auditory conditioning stimulation. No significant effects of any single conditioning stimuli were observed on trigeminal thermal sensitivity (P ≥0.051) or arousal parameters (P ≥0.057). The effects of combined conditioning stimuli on subjective ratings (P ≤0.038) and negative affect (P = 0.011) were stronger than those of single stimuli. Conclusions All three conditioning stimuli provided a simple way to evoke a negative affective state without physical arousal or influence on trigeminal thermal sensitivity. Multisensory conditioning had stronger effects but also failed to modulate thermal sensitivity, suggesting that so-called exogenous trigger stimuli e.g. bright light, noise, unpleasant taste in patients with migraine may require a predisposed or sensitized nervous

  19. Thermal History of Archaeological Objects, Studied by Electron Spin Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoll, Jens; Tani, Atsushi

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is a sensitive tool for distinguishing between "burned" and "unburned" states of archaeological objects. Prehistoric heating conditions, such as the temperature, atmosphere, time of exposure to heat, and when the heating took place, can be studied by this method with some success. ESR "reporters," such as (a) radiation defects, (b) pyrolytic defects, and (c) transition metal ions, can even reflect changes induced at relatively low temperatures (e.g., in the range of 200° C for objects containing organic compounds). Several ESR heating markers are so stable that samples dating back to the ages when fire first began to be used can be analyzed today. An overview is presented of the literature concerning objects, such as stone, soil, pottery, and plant and animal products.

  20. Thermal energy transfer by plasmon-resonant composite nanoparticles at pulse laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Avetisyan, Yuri A; Yakunin, Alexander N; Tuchin, Valery V

    2012-04-01

    Heating of composite plasmon-resonant nanoparticles (spherical gold nanoshells) under pulse laser illumination is considered. The numerical solution of the time-dependent heat conduction equation accounting for spatial inhomogeneities of absorbed laser radiation is performed. Important features of temperature kinetics and thermal flux inside nanoparticles are analyzed. Possible applications of the observed effects in nanotechnology and medicine are discussed.

  1. Rician noise reduction in magnetic resonance images using adaptive non-local mean and guided image filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Muhammad Tariq; Chu, Yeon-Ho; Choi, Young-Kyu

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a Rician noise reduction method for magnetic resonance (MR) images. The proposed method is based on adaptive non-local mean and guided image filtering techniques. In the first phase, a guidance image is obtained from the noisy image through an adaptive non-local mean filter. Sobel operators are applied to compute the strength of edges which is further used to control the spread of the kernel in non-local mean filtering. In the second phase, the noisy and the guidance images are provided to the guided image filter as input to restore the noise-free image. The improved performance of the proposed method is investigated using the simulated and real data sets of MR images. Its performance is also compared with the previously proposed state-of-the art methods. Comparative analysis demonstrates the superiority of the proposed scheme over the existing approaches.

  2. Partially coherent scattering in stellar chromospheres. I - Effects on resonance line thermalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayley, Kenneth G.

    1992-01-01

    The conditions necessary for partially coherent scattering to influence the thermalization depth are investigated, and the effects of partial redistribution in homogeneous slab atmospheres are approximated using several common resonance lines as examples. For electron densities above 10 exp 10/cu cm, it is concluded that even when coherent scattering dominates the escape process, the thermalization depths of the strongest resonance lines of H, Ca II, and Mg II agree roughly with the Doppler diffusion in frequency. No elastic scattering effects on the thermalization of Mg II h and k and Ca II H and K are found. At lower densities, such as for giant star chromospheres and QSO models, the results deviate strongly from the Doppler complete redistribution case.

  3. Resonant enhancement in nanostructured thermoelectric performance via electronic thermal conductivity engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Urvesh; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran

    2017-01-01

    The use of an asymmetric broadening in the transport distribution, a characteristic of resonant structures, is proposed as a route to engineer a decrease in electronic thermal conductivity thereby enhancing the electronic figure of merit in nanostructured thermoelectrics. Using toy models, we first demonstrate that a decrease in thermal conductivity resulting from such an asymmetric broadening may indeed lead to an electronic figure of merit well in excess of 1000 in an idealized situation and in excess of 10 in a realistic situation. We then substantiate with realistic resonant structures designed using graphene nano-ribbons by employing a tight binding framework with edge correction that match density functional theory calculations under the local density approximation. The calculated figure of merit exceeding 10 in such realistic structures further reinforces the concept and sets a promising direction to use nano-ribbon structures to engineer a favorable decrease in the electronic thermal conductivity.

  4. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Hwan

    2003-01-01

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  5. Correspondence behavior of classical and quantum dissipative directed transport via thermal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo, Gabriel G.; Ermann, Leonardo; Rivas, Alejandro M. F.; Spina, María E.

    2016-04-01

    We systematically study several classical-quantum correspondence properties of the dissipative modified kicked rotator, a paradigmatic ratchet model. We explore the behavior of the asymptotic currents for finite ℏeff values in a wide range of the parameter space. We find that the correspondence between the classical currents with thermal noise providing fluctuations of size ℏeff and the quantum ones without it is very good in general with the exception of specific regions. We systematically consider the spectra of the corresponding classical Perron-Frobenius operators and quantum superoperators. By means of an average distance between the classical and quantum sets of eigenvalues we find that the correspondence is unexpectedly quite uniform. This apparent contradiction is solved with the help of the Weyl-Wigner distributions of the equilibrium eigenvectors, which reveal the key role of quantum effects by showing surviving coherences in the asymptotic states.

  6. Correspondence behavior of classical and quantum dissipative directed transport via thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Gabriel G; Ermann, Leonardo; Rivas, Alejandro M F; Spina, María E

    2016-04-01

    We systematically study several classical-quantum correspondence properties of the dissipative modified kicked rotator, a paradigmatic ratchet model. We explore the behavior of the asymptotic currents for finite ℏ_{eff} values in a wide range of the parameter space. We find that the correspondence between the classical currents with thermal noise providing fluctuations of size ℏ_{eff} and the quantum ones without it is very good in general with the exception of specific regions. We systematically consider the spectra of the corresponding classical Perron-Frobenius operators and quantum superoperators. By means of an average distance between the classical and quantum sets of eigenvalues we find that the correspondence is unexpectedly quite uniform. This apparent contradiction is solved with the help of the Weyl-Wigner distributions of the equilibrium eigenvectors, which reveal the key role of quantum effects by showing surviving coherences in the asymptotic states.

  7. Visualization of Au Nanoparticles Buried in a Polymer Matrix by Scanning Thermal Noise Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Kei; Nosaka, Shunta; Kimura, Kuniko; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2017-02-17

    Several researchers have recently demonstrated visualization of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale resolution using various imaging schemes based on atomic force microscopy. Since all these subsurface imaging techniques require excitation of the oscillation of the cantilever and/or sample surface, it has been difficult to identify a key imaging mechanism. Here we demonstrate visualization of Au nanoparticles buried 300 nm into a polymer matrix by measurement of the thermal noise spectrum of a microcantilever with a tip in contact to the polymer surface. We show that the subsurface Au nanoparticles are detected as the variation in the contact stiffness and damping reflecting the viscoelastic properties of the polymer surface. The variation in the contact stiffness well agrees with the effective stiffness of a simple one-dimensional model, which is consistent with the fact that the maximum depth range of the technique is far beyond the extent of the contact stress field.

  8. Reply to "Comment on 'Ratchet universality in the presence of thermal noise' ".

    PubMed

    Martínez, Pedro J; Chacón, Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    The Comment by Quintero et al. [preceding Comment, Phys. Rev. E 88, 066101 (2013)] does not dispute the central result of our paper [Martínez and Chacón, Phys. Rev. E 87, 062114 (2013)], which is a theory explaining the interplay between thermal noise and symmetry breaking in the ratchet transport of a Brownian particle moving on a periodic substrate subjected to a temporal biharmonic excitation γ[ηsin(ωt)+α(1-η)sin(2ωt+φ)]. In the Comment, the authors claim, on the sole basis of their numerical simulations for the particular case α=2, that "there is no such universal force waveform and that the evidence obtained by the authors otherwise is due to their particular choice of parameters." Here we demonstrate by means of theoretical arguments and additional numerical simulations that all the conclusions of our original article are preserved.

  9. Visualization of Au Nanoparticles Buried in a Polymer Matrix by Scanning Thermal Noise Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Kei; Nosaka, Shunta; Kimura, Kuniko; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2017-01-01

    Several researchers have recently demonstrated visualization of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale resolution using various imaging schemes based on atomic force microscopy. Since all these subsurface imaging techniques require excitation of the oscillation of the cantilever and/or sample surface, it has been difficult to identify a key imaging mechanism. Here we demonstrate visualization of Au nanoparticles buried 300 nm into a polymer matrix by measurement of the thermal noise spectrum of a microcantilever with a tip in contact to the polymer surface. We show that the subsurface Au nanoparticles are detected as the variation in the contact stiffness and damping reflecting the viscoelastic properties of the polymer surface. The variation in the contact stiffness well agrees with the effective stiffness of a simple one-dimensional model, which is consistent with the fact that the maximum depth range of the technique is far beyond the extent of the contact stress field. PMID:28210001

  10. Visualization of Au Nanoparticles Buried in a Polymer Matrix by Scanning Thermal Noise Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Kei; Nosaka, Shunta; Kimura, Kuniko; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2017-02-01

    Several researchers have recently demonstrated visualization of subsurface features with a nanometer-scale resolution using various imaging schemes based on atomic force microscopy. Since all these subsurface imaging techniques require excitation of the oscillation of the cantilever and/or sample surface, it has been difficult to identify a key imaging mechanism. Here we demonstrate visualization of Au nanoparticles buried 300 nm into a polymer matrix by measurement of the thermal noise spectrum of a microcantilever with a tip in contact to the polymer surface. We show that the subsurface Au nanoparticles are detected as the variation in the contact stiffness and damping reflecting the viscoelastic properties of the polymer surface. The variation in the contact stiffness well agrees with the effective stiffness of a simple one-dimensional model, which is consistent with the fact that the maximum depth range of the technique is far beyond the extent of the contact stress field.

  11. Acoustic resonators for noise control in enclosures: Modelling, design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ganghua

    This work systematically investigates the acoustic interaction between an enclosure and resonators, and establishes systematic design tools based upon the interaction theory to optimize the physical characteristics and the locations of resonators. A general theoretical model is first established to predict the acoustic performance of multiple resonators placed in an acoustic enclosure of arbitrary shape. Analytical solutions for the sound pressure inside the enclosure are obtained when a single resonator is installed, which provide insight into the physics of the acoustic interaction between the enclosure and resonators. The theoretical model is experimentally validated, showing the effectiveness and reliability of the theoretical model. Using the validated acoustic interaction model and the analytical solutions, the internal resistance of a resonator is optimized to improve its performance in a frequency band enclosing acoustic resonances. An energy reduction index is defined to conduct the optimization. The dual process of the energy dissipation and radiation of the resonator is quantified. Optimal resistance and its physical effect on the enclosure-resonator interaction are numerically evaluated and categorized in terms of frequency bandwidths. Predictions on the resonator performance are confirmed by experiments. Comparisons with existing models based on different optimization criteria are also performed. It is shown that the proposed model serves as an effective design tool to determine the optimal internal-resistance of the resonator in a chosen frequency band. Due to the multi-modal coupling, the resonator performance is also affected by its location besides its physical characteristics. When multiple resonators are used, the mutual interaction among resonators leads to the requirement of a systematic optimization tool to determine their locations. In the present work, different optimization methodologies are explored. These include a sequential design

  12. A low noise and high precision linear power supply with thermal foldback protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Pessina, G.

    2016-05-01

    A low noise and high precision linear power supply was designed for use in rare event search experiments with macrobolometers. The circuit accepts at the input a "noisy" dual supply voltage up to ±15 V and gives at the output precise, low noise, and stable voltages that can be set between ±3.75 V and ±12.5 V in eight 1.25 V steps. Particular care in circuit design, component selection, and proper filtering results in a noise spectral density of 50 nV / √{ Hz } at 1 Hz and 20 nV / √{ Hz } white when the output is set to ±5 V. This corresponds to 125 nV RMS (0.8 μV peak to peak) between 0.1 Hz and 10 Hz, and 240 nV RMS (1.6 μV peak to peak) between 0.1 Hz and 100 Hz. The power supply rejection ratio (PSRR) of the circuit is 100 dB at low frequency, and larger than 40 dB up to high frequency, thanks to a proper compensation design. Calibration allows to reach a precision in the absolute value of the output voltage of ±70 ppm, or ±350 μV at ±5 V, and to reduce thermal drifts below ±1 ppm/∘C in the expected operating range. The maximum peak output current is about 6 A from each output. An original foldback protection scheme was developed that dynamically limits the maximum output current to keep the temperature of the output transistors within their safe operating range. An add-on card based on an ARM Cortex-M3 microcontroller is devoted to the monitoring and control of all circuit functionalities and provides remote communication via CAN bus.

  13. Thermal noise limitations to force measurements with torsion pendulums: Applications to the measurement of the Casimir force and its thermal correction

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoreaux, S.K.; Buttler, W.T.

    2005-03-01

    A general analysis of thermal noise in torsion pendulums is presented. The specific case where the torsion angle is kept fixed by electronic feedback is analyzed. This analysis is applied to a recent experiment that employed a torsion pendulum to measure the Casimir force. The ultimate limit to the distance at which the Casimir force can be measured to high accuracy is discussed, and in particular we elaborate on the prospects for measuring the thermal correction.

  14. Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy Technology, Physics of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Thermometry, and Technical Considerations for Proper Catheter Placement During Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nitesh V; Mian, Matthew; Stafford, R Jason; Nahed, Brian V; Willie, Jon T; Gross, Robert E; Danish, Shabbar F

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced thermal therapy has become a powerful tool in the neurosurgical armamentarium. The physics of laser therapy are complex, but a sound understanding of this topic is clinically relevant, as many centers have incorporated it into their treatment algorithm, and educated patients are demanding consideration of its use for their disease. Laser ablation has been used for a wide array of intracranial lesions. Laser catheter placement is guided by stereotactic planning; however, as the procedure has popularized, the number of ways in which the catheter can be inserted has also increased. There are many technical nuances for laser placement, and, to date, there is not a clear understanding of whether any one technique is better than the other. In this review, we describe the basic physics of magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy and describe the several common techniques for accurate Visualase laser catheter placement in a stepwise fashion.

  15. Evaluation of Silicon Neutron Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 1800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2002-09-30

    The evaluation of the neutron cross sections of the three stable isotopes of silicon in the energy range thermal to 20 MeV was performed by Hetrick et al. for ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File). Resonance parameters were obtained in the energy range thermal to 1500 keV from a SAMMY analysis of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory experimental neutron transmission data. A new measurement of the capture cross section of natural silicon in the energy range 1 to 700 keV has recently been performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Results of this measurement were used in a SAMMY reevaluation of the resonance parameters, allowing determination of the capture width of a large number of resonances. The experimental data base is described; properties of the resonance parameters are given. For the first time the direct neutron capture component has been taken into account from the calculation by Rauscher et al. in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. Results of benchmark calculations are also given. The new evaluation is available in the ENDF/B-VI format.

  16. Thermal tuning of infrared resonant absorbers based on hybrid gold-VO{sub 2} nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kocer, Hasan; Butun, Serkan; Aydin, Koray; Banar, Berker; Wang, Kevin; Wu, Junqiao; Tongay, Sefaatttin

    2015-04-20

    Resonant absorbers based on plasmonic materials, metamaterials, and thin films enable spectrally selective absorption filters, where absorption is maximized at the resonance wavelength. By controlling the geometrical parameters of nano/microstructures and materials' refractive indices, resonant absorbers are designed to operate at wide range of wavelengths for applications including absorption filters, thermal emitters, thermophotovoltaic devices, and sensors. However, once resonant absorbers are fabricated, it is rather challenging to control and tune the spectral absorption response. Here, we propose and demonstrate thermally tunable infrared resonant absorbers using hybrid gold-vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) nanostructure arrays. Absorption intensity is tuned from 90% to 20% and 96% to 32% using hybrid gold-VO{sub 2} nanowire and nanodisc arrays, respectively, by heating up the absorbers above the phase transition temperature of VO{sub 2} (68 °C). Phase change materials such as VO{sub 2} deliver useful means of altering optical properties as a function of temperature. Absorbers with tunable spectral response can find applications in sensor and detector applications, in which external stimulus such as heat, electrical signal, or light results in a change in the absorption spectrum and intensity.

  17. Thermal tuning of infrared resonant absorbers based on hybrid gold-VO2 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocer, Hasan; Butun, Serkan; Banar, Berker; Wang, Kevin; Tongay, Sefaatttin; Wu, Junqiao; Aydin, Koray

    2015-04-01

    Resonant absorbers based on plasmonic materials, metamaterials, and thin films enable spectrally selective absorption filters, where absorption is maximized at the resonance wavelength. By controlling the geometrical parameters of nano/microstructures and materials' refractive indices, resonant absorbers are designed to operate at wide range of wavelengths for applications including absorption filters, thermal emitters, thermophotovoltaic devices, and sensors. However, once resonant absorbers are fabricated, it is rather challenging to control and tune the spectral absorption response. Here, we propose and demonstrate thermally tunable infrared resonant absorbers using hybrid gold-vanadium dioxide (VO2) nanostructure arrays. Absorption intensity is tuned from 90% to 20% and 96% to 32% using hybrid gold-VO2 nanowire and nanodisc arrays, respectively, by heating up the absorbers above the phase transition temperature of VO2 (68 °C). Phase change materials such as VO2 deliver useful means of altering optical properties as a function of temperature. Absorbers with tunable spectral response can find applications in sensor and detector applications, in which external stimulus such as heat, electrical signal, or light results in a change in the absorption spectrum and intensity.

  18. Carnot cycle for interacting particles in the absence of thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Curado, Evaldo M F; Souza, Andre M C; Nobre, Fernando D; Andrade, Roberto F S

    2014-02-01

    A thermodynamic formalism is developed for a system of interacting particles under overdamped motion, which has been recently analyzed within the framework of nonextensive statistical mechanics. It amounts to expressing the interaction energy of the system in terms of a temperature θ, conjugated to a generalized entropy s(q), with q = 2. Since θ assumes much higher values than those of typical room temperatures T ≪ θ, the thermal noise can be neglected for this system (T/θ ≃ 0). This framework is now extended by the introduction of a work term δW which, together with the formerly defined heat contribution (δ Q = θ ds(q)), allows for the statement of a proper energy conservation law that is analogous to the first law of thermodynamics. These definitions lead to the derivation of an equation of state and to the characterization of s(q) adiabatic and θ isothermic transformations. On this basis, a Carnot cycle is constructed, whose efficiency is shown to be η = 1-(θ(2)/θ(1)), where θ(1) and θ(2) are the effective temperatures of the two isothermic transformations, with θ(1)>θ(2). The results for a generalized thermodynamic description of this system open the possibility for further physical consequences, like the realization of a thermal engine based on energy exchanges gauged by the temperature θ.

  19. Some highlights in the evaluations of the thermal cross sections and resonance parameters of the actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Divadeenam, M.

    1981-01-01

    The resonance parameters and thermal cross sections of /sup 235/ /sup 238/U and /sup 239/ /sup 240/ /sup 241/ /sup 242/Pu are reevaluated by considering the measurements carried out since 1973. Capture, scattering, fission cross sections as well as resonance integrals are calculated from the parameters and are compared with experimental values with the objective of achieving consistency between calculations and measurements. The Dyson-Metha ..delta../sub 3/ statistical analysis was applied in order to calculate average level spacings. Calculations of average radiative widths based on systematics are carried out and are compared with experimental values as well as with Moore's and Lynn's estimates.

  20. Effect of neck geometry of resonance cells on noise reduction efficiency in sound-absorbing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarev, P. V.; Anoshkin, A. N.; Pan'kov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The present work formulates the physical and mathematical models capable to forecast acoustic properties of resonance cells in sound absorbing structures. Distribution of acoustic pressure inside the duct and on sidewall cell was found, loss factor of output acoustic pressure wave was calculated for variety of geometric forms of cell's chamber and neck for monochromatic wave in 100-600Hz frequency range. Analysis of the acoustic pressure fields revealed that cell neck geometry strongly influences on cell resonant frequency and on outlet acoustic pressure loss factor. The effectiveness of the proposed by the authors biconical design of the resonant cell was proved, which increased acoustic radiation at the resonance frequency resulting significant increase of loss ratio of wave acoustic pressure at duct outlet.

  1. A Low-Noise, Wideband Preamplifier for a Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Raman; Knepper, Ronald W.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    FTMS performance parameters such as limits of detection, dynamic range, sensitivity, and even mass accuracy and resolution can be greatly improved by enhancing its detection circuit. An extended investigation of significant design considerations for optimal signal-to-noise ratio in an FTMS detection circuit are presented. A low noise amplifier for an FTMS is developed based on the discussed design rules. The amplifier has a gain of ≈ 3500 and a bandwidth of 10 kHz - 1 MHz corresponding to m/z range of 100 Da to 10 kDa (at 7 Tesla). The performance of the amplifier was tested on a MALDI-FTMS, and has demonstrated a 25-fold reduction in noise in a mass spectrum of C60 compared to that of a commercial amplifier. PMID:18029195

  2. Automatic computation of signal-to-noise ratio for magnetic resonances images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. F.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2012-10-01

    An automatic method to measure the signal-to-noise ratio of images is proposed. The region of interest in a phantom image is reliably determined by the image contour by the Sobel operator. With these data, the signal-to-noise ratio was computed using two phantom images. Results showed very good agreement with those reported in the literature. This scheme can be implemented in line to save a great deal of effort and time when assessing the performance of RF coils, B0 uniformity, image quality, etc.

  3. Lorentz approach to static magnetic field effects on bound-ion dynamics and binding kinetics: Thermal noise considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Muehsam, D.J.; Pilla, A.A.

    1996-05-01

    The present study characterizes an ion-binding site, a molecular cleft in a signaling molecule such as calmodulin or troponin C, as a damped linear isotropic oscillator potential for small displacements about the origin. Quantitative assessments of the effects of thermal noise and exogenous static magnetic fields are made through a statistical mechanical treatment of the Lorentz-Langevin equation for an ion bound in a molecular cleft. Thermal noise causes a bound ion to e ejected from the site after a bound life-time dependent upon the thermal noise spectral density. It is shown that the Lorentz-Langevin model requires values of the viscous damping parameter many orders of magnitude below those for bulk water in order to characterize the binding site and to obtain realistic lifetimes for a bound ion. The model predicts that milliTesla-range magnetic fields are required for static field effects on dissociation kinetics. The Lorentz equation also yields a classic coherent solution describing precession of the bound-ion oscillator orientation at the Larmor frequency. The bound-ion dynamics described by this coherent solution are sensitive to microTesla-range static magnetic fields in the presence of thermal noise. Numerical integration of the contribution of thermal noise forces to these dynamics is in good agreement with the results of statistical mechanical analysis, also producing realistic bound lifetimes for only very low viscous damping values. The mechanisms by which modulation of precessional motion might enable a signaling molecule such as calmodulin to detect an exogenous magnetic field are presently unclear.

  4. Evaluation of thermal effects on the beam quality of disk laser with unstable resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayganmanesh, Mahdi; Beirami, Reza

    2017-01-01

    In this paper thermal effects of the disk active medium and associated effects on the beam quality of laser are investigated. Using Collins integral and iterative method, transverse mode of an unstable resonator including a Yb:YAG active medium in disk geometry is calculated. After that the beam quality of the laser is calculated based on the generalized beam characterization method. Thermal lensing of the disk is calculated based on the OPD (Optical Path Difference) concept. Five factors influencing the OPD including temperature gradient, disk thermal expansion, photo-elastic effect, electronic lens and disk deformation are considered in our calculations. The calculations show that the effect of disk deformation factor on the quality of laser beam in the resonator is strong. However the total effect of all the thermal factors on the internal beam quality is fewer. Also it is shown that thermal effects degrade the output power, beam profile and beam quality of the output laser beam severely. As well the magnitude of each of affecting factors is evaluated distinctly.

  5. A non-contact, thermal noise based method for the calibration of lateral deflection sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, Nic Hobbs, Jamie K.

    2014-11-15

    Calibration of lateral forces and displacements has been a long standing problem in lateral force microscopies. Recently, it was shown by Wagner et al. that the thermal noise spectrum of the first torsional mode may be used to calibrate the deflection sensitivity of the detector. This method is quick, non-destructive and may be performed in situ in air or liquid. Here we make a full quantitative comparison of the lateral inverse optical lever sensitivity obtained by the lateral thermal noise method and the shape independent method developed by Anderson et al. We find that the thermal method provides accurate results for a wide variety of rectangular cantilevers, provided that the geometry of the cantilever is suitable for torsional stiffness calibration by the torsional Sader method, in-plane bending of the cantilever may be eliminated or accounted for and that any scaling of the lateral deflection signal between the measurement of the lateral thermal noise and the measurement of the lateral deflection is eliminated or corrected for. We also demonstrate that the thermal method may be used to characterize the linearity of the detector signal as a function of position, and find a deviation of less than 8% for the instrument used.

  6. Thermal conductivity of silver loaded conductive epoxy from cryogenic to ambient temperature and its application for precision cryogenic noise measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amils, Ricardo I.; Gallego, Juan Daniel; Sebastián, José Luis; Muñoz, Sagrario; Martín, Agustín; Leuther, Arnulf

    2016-06-01

    The pressure to increase the sensitivity of instrumentation has pushed the use of cryogenic Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) technology into a growing number of fields. These areas range from radio astronomy and deep space communications to fundamental physics. In this context manufacturing for cryogenic environments requires a proper thermal knowledge of the materials to be able to achieve adequate design behavior. In this work, we present experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of a silver filled conductive epoxy (EPO-TEK H20E) which is widely used in cryogenic electronics applications. The characterization has been made using a sample preparation which mimics the practical use of this adhesive in the fabrication of cryogenic devices. We apply the data obtained to a detailed analysis of the effects of the conductive epoxy in a monolithic thermal noise source used for high accuracy cryogenic microwave noise measurements. In this application the epoxy plays a fundamental role since its limited thermal conductivity allows heating the chip with relatively low power. To our knowledge, the cryogenic thermal conductivity data of this epoxy has not been reported before in the literature in the 4-300 K temperature range. A second non-conductive epoxy (Gray Scotch-Weld 2216 B/A), also widely used in cryogenic applications, has been measured in order to validate the method by comparing with previous published data.

  7. All-plasmonic switching based on thermal nonlinearity in a polymer plasmonic microring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, David; Wu, Marcelo; Horvath, Cameron; Bachman, Daniel; van, Vien

    2011-07-01

    We experimentally investigated thermal nonlinear effects in a hybrid Au/SiO2/SU-8 plasmonic microring resonator for nonlinear switching. Large ohmic loss in the metal layer gave rise to a high rate of light-to-heat conversion in the plasmonic waveguide, causing an intensity-dependent thermo-optic shift in the microring resonance. We obtained 30 times larger resonance shift in the plasmonic microring than in a similar SU-8 dielectric microring. Using an in-plane pump-and-probe configuration, we also demonstrated all-plasmonic nonlinear switching in the plasmonic microring with an on--off switching contrast of 4dB over 50mW input power.

  8. Oscillations emerging from noise-driven steady state in networks with electrical synapses and subthreshold resonance

    PubMed Central

    Tchumatchenko, Tatjana; Clopath, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Oscillations play a critical role in cognitive phenomena and have been observed in many brain regions. Experimental evidence indicates that classes of neurons exhibit properties that could promote oscillations, such as subthreshold resonance and electrical gap junctions. Typically, these two properties are studied separately but it is not clear which is the dominant determinant of global network rhythms. Our aim is to provide an analytical understanding of how these two effects destabilize the fluctuation-driven state, in which neurons fire irregularly, and lead to an emergence of global synchronous oscillations. Here we show how the oscillation frequency is shaped by single neuron resonance, electrical and chemical synapses.The presence of both gap junctions and subthreshold resonance are necessary for the emergence of oscillations. Our results are in agreement with several experimental observations such as network responses to oscillatory inputs and offer a much-needed conceptual link connecting a collection of disparate effects observed in networks. PMID:25405458

  9. Oscillations emerging from noise-driven steady state in networks with electrical synapses and subthreshold resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchumatchenko, Tatjana; Clopath, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Oscillations play a critical role in cognitive phenomena and have been observed in many brain regions. Experimental evidence indicates that classes of neurons exhibit properties that could promote oscillations, such as subthreshold resonance and electrical gap junctions. Typically, these two properties are studied separately but it is not clear which is the dominant determinant of global network rhythms. Our aim is to provide an analytical understanding of how these two effects destabilize the fluctuation-driven state, in which neurons fire irregularly, and lead to an emergence of global synchronous oscillations. Here we show how the oscillation frequency is shaped by single neuron resonance, electrical and chemical synapses.The presence of both gap junctions and subthreshold resonance are necessary for the emergence of oscillations. Our results are in agreement with several experimental observations such as network responses to oscillatory inputs and offer a much-needed conceptual link connecting a collection of disparate effects observed in networks.

  10. Structural topology optimization on sound radiation at resonance frequencies in thermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, XiongWei; Li, YueMing

    2015-03-01

    Thermal and acoustic environments pose severe challenges to the structural design of hypersonic vehicles. One of them is to find optimal design that exhibits ideal acoustic characteristics in a frequency band, which is discussed in this paper through topology optimization aiming at resonance sound radiation in thermal environments. The sound radiation at resonance frequencies is the main component of response, minimization on which is likely to provide a satisfactory design. A bi-material plate subjected to uniform temperature rise and excited by harmonic loading is studied here. Thermal stress is first evaluated and considered as pre stress in the following dynamic analysis; radiated sound power is then calculated through Rayleigh integral. Sensitivity analysis is carried out through adjoint method considering the complicated relationship between stress-induced geometric stiffness and design variables. As the resonance frequency is constantly changing during the optimization, its sensitivity should be considered. It is also noticed that mode switching may occur, so mode tracking technique is employed in this work. Some numerical examples are finally discussed.

  11. Measurement of the thermal noise of a proton beam in the NAP-M storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Dement'ev, E.M.; Dikanskii, N.S.; Medvedko, A.S.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Pestrikov, D.V.

    1980-08-01

    Measurements of the spectra and power of the noise of uncooled and cooled proton beams in the NAP-M storage ring are reported. Features of the noise of the cooled beam due to particle interaction are analyzed.

  12. Synchronization and array-enhanced resonances in delayed coupled neuronal network with channel noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianchun; Ding, Shaojie; Li, Hui; He, Guolong; Zhang, Xuejuan

    2014-09-01

    This paper studies the combined effect of transmission delay and channel fluctuations on population behaviors of an excitatory Erdös-Rényi neuronal network. First, it is found that the network reaches a perfect spatial temporal coherence at a suitable membrane size. Such a coherence resonance is stimulus-free and is array-enhanced. Second, the presence of transmission delay can induce intermittent changes of the population dynamics. Besides, two resonant peaks of the population firing rate are observed as delay changes: one is at τd≈7ms for all membrane areas, which reflects the resonance between the delayed interaction and the intrinsic period of channel kinetics; the other occurs when the transmission delay equals to the mean inter-spike intervals of the population firings in the absence of delay, which reflects the resonance between the delayed interaction and the firing period of the non-delayed system. Third, concerning the impact of network topology and population size, it is found that decreasing the connection probability does not change the range of transmission delay but broadens the range of synaptic coupling that supports population neurons to generate action potentials synchronously and temporally coherently. Furthermore, there exists a critical connection probability that distinguishes the population dynamics into an asynchronous and synchronous state. All the results we obtained are based on networks of size N = 500, which are shown to be robust to further increasing the population size.

  13. a Unified Description of Time Dependence of Information Entropy Production and Flux in Thermal Broadband Noise-Driven Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majee, Pradip; Goswami, Gurupada; Barik, Debashis; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    In this paper we have studied the dynamics of thermal broadband noise-driven dynamical system in terms of information entropy at both the nonstationary and stationary states. Here, a unified description of fluctuating force is considered in a thermodynamically closed system. Based on the Fokker-Planck description of stochastic processes and the entropy balance equation, we have calculated the time-dependence of the information entropy production and entropy flux in the presence and absence of nonequilibrium constraint. Our calculation considers how the time evolution of these quantities is affected if the characteristic of noise changes from white to red or green and red to green in a unified scheme.

  14. Quasi thermal noise spectroscopy in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn with Cassini/RPWS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evgenia Gkini, Magda; Moncuquet, Michel; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

    On July 2004, the Cassini spacecraft performed its Saturn orbit insertion (SOI). Since then and for 4 years Cassini will orbit the planet nearly 80 times, with various periapsis (so called perikrones) and inclinations. This work is interested in the closest approaches of Saturn by Cassini, i.e. the trajectory part located around the perikrones, typically between 3.5Rs and 9Rs. Around each of these perikrones, the radio-HF receiver of RPWS, observed a peak at the upper-hybrid frequency and weakly banded emissions having well-defined minima at the gyroharmonics. We have studied these spectra by using the technique of the quasi-thermal noise spectroscopy in magnetized plasmas and from that we deduced the electron density, the core and the halo temperatures in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn. We present the results for 19 perikrones, which have been accomplished during the period 02/2005-02/2008. We examine the anticorrelation between the temperature and the electron density. We show the dependence of those parameters on the distance from the planet and on the inclination related to the ring plane. From the latter we will be able to have a clear view of the large scale structure of the plasma torus in this region of Saturn's magnetosphere (embedded in the dusty ring E), which is not well known, especially because it is rather cold (typically a few eV for the core electrons) and thus hardly accessible to particle analyzers.

  15. Large-scale variation of electron parameters from Quasi-Thermal Noise during WIND perigees in the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issautier, Karine; Ongala-Edoumou, Samuel; Moncuquet, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The quasi-thermal noise (QTN) method consists in measuring the electrostatic fluctuations produced by the thermal motion of the ambient particles. This noise is detected with a sensitive wave receiver and measured at the terminal of a passive electric antenna, which is immersed in a stable plasma. The analysis of the so-called QTN provides in situ measurements, mainly the total electron density, with a good accuracy, and thermal temperature in a large number of space media. We create a preliminary electron database to analyse the anti-correlation between electron density and temperature deduced from WIND perigees in the Earth's plasmasphere. We analyse the radio power spectra measured by the Thermal Noise Receiver (TNR), using the 100-m long dipole antenna, onboard WIND spacecraft. We develop a systematic routine to determine the electron density, core and halo temperature and the magnitude of the magnetic field based on QTN in Bernstein modes. Indeed, the spectra are weakly banded between gyroharmonics below the upper hybrid frequency, from which we derive the local electron density. From the gyrofrequency determination, we obtain an independent measure of the magnetic field magnitude, which is in close agreement with the onboard magnetometer.

  16. Effects of Phase Noise and Thermal Noise upon Coherent PSK Demodulation and Their Impact on Phase Noise Specifications for Terminals of the Phase II DSCS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    TDMA With PLL Noise Bandwidth of 100 Hz. Operation With Possible Phase 11 DS (S Noise Contributors and With Soft Decision (3-biti, Rate 1 2, Constraint...vith a fixed s )lh, lQ :t 11’ , it is tossilil t () ’ause the cairrier referen ce total phase error \\:i’lnt(c it) int’.cr S , ds e crease, or renain...Mod.F17 JF Lof-E(701) LOSF(’TH) LOSS(TOr) LOS1THi T/f CFF ) crp) (DB) (DB 71377k>6 >6 15rI . 7f-3 A.877PP >6 >6 300 P. 9A704 S. f7 ORd >6 >6 S,),3. 791

  17. Noise amplification in parallel whole-head ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging using 306 detectors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Vesanen, Panu T; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Zevenhoven, Koos C J; Dabek, Juhani; Parkkonen, Lauri T; Zhdanov, Andrey; Ilmoniemi, Risto J

    2013-08-01

    In ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging, arrays of up to hundreds of highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can be used to detect the weak magnetic fields emitted by the precessing magnetization. Here, we investigate the noise amplification in sensitivity-encoded ultra-low-field MRI at various acceleration rates using a SQUID array consisting of 102 magnetometers, 102 gradiometers, or 306 magnetometers and gradiometers, to cover the whole head. Our results suggest that SQUID arrays consisting of 102 magnetometers and 102 gradiometers are similar in g-factor distribution. A SQUID array of 306 sensors (102 magnetometers and 204 gradiometers) only marginally improves the g-factor. Corroborating with previous studies, the g-factor in 2D sensitivity-encoded ultra-low-field MRI with 9 to 16-fold 2D accelerations using the SQUID array studied here may be acceptable.

  18. Noise amplification in parallel whole-head ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging using 306 detectors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Vesanen, Panu T.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Koos, C.J.; Ilmoniemi, åJ.

    2012-01-01

    In ultra-low-field (ULF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), arrays of up to hundreds of highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can be used to detect the weak magnetic fields emitted by the precessing magnetization. Here we investigate the noise amplification in sensitivity encoded (SENSE) ULF MRI at various acceleration rates using a SQUID array consisting of 102 magnetometers, 102 gradiometers, or 306 magnetometers and gradiometers, to cover the whole head. Our results suggest that SQUID arrays consisting of 102 magnetometers and 102 gradiometers are similar in g-factor distribution. A SQUID array of 306 sensors (102 magnetometers and 204 gradiometers) only marginally improves the g-factor. Corroborating with previous studies, the g-factor in 2D SENSE ULF MRI with 9 to 16-fold 2D accelerations using the SQUID array studied here may be acceptable. PMID:23023497

  19. Filtering of high noise breast thermal images using fast non-local means.

    PubMed

    Suganthi, S S; Ramakrishnan, S

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of breast thermograms are still a challenging task primarily due to the limitations such as low contrast, low signal to noise ratio and absence of clear edges. Therefore, always there is a requirement for preprocessing techniques before performing any quantitative analysis. In this work, a noise removal framework using fast non-local means algorithm, method noise and median filter was used to denoise breast thermograms. The images considered were subjected to Anscombe transformation to convert the distribution from Poisson to Gaussian. The pre-denoised image was obtained by subjecting the transformed image to fast non-local means filtering. The method noise which is the difference between the original and pre-denoised image was observed with the noise component merged in few structures and fine detail of the image. The image details presented in the method noise was extracted by smoothing the noise part using the median filter. The retrieved image part was added to the pre-denoised image to obtain the final denoised image. The performance of this technique was compared with that of Wiener and SUSAN filters. The results show that all the filters considered are able to remove the noise component. The performance of the proposed denoising framework is found to be good in preserving detail and removing noise. Further, the method noise is observed with negligible image details. Similarly, denoised image with no noise and smoothed edges are observed using Wiener filter and its method noise is contained with few structures and image details. The performance results of SUSAN filter is found to be blurred denoised image with little noise and also method noise with extensive structure and image details. Hence, it appears that the proposed denoising framework is able to preserve the edge information and generate clear image that could help in enhancing the diagnostic relevance of breast thermograms. In this paper, the introduction, objectives, materials and methods

  20. Noise Properties of a Resonance-Type Spin-Torque Microwave Detector (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-17

    SNR ) of...STMD is proportional to the input microwave power PRF. In the second (low-frequency) regime Pmin is limited by the magnetic noise, and the SNR is...1 10 0 10 1 10 2 10 -2 10 -1 10 0 10 1 10 2 S N R = U D C /∆ U D C P MN2 P MN1 P min2 SNR ~ P RF f 2 P RF , µW SNR = 1 f 1 SNR ~ P 1/2 RF

  1. Combined action of time-delay and colored cross-associated multiplicative and additive noises on stability and stochastic resonance for a stochastic metapopulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang-Kang; Zong, De-Cai; Wang, Ya-Jun; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the transition between the stable state of a big density and the extinction state and stochastic resonance (SR) for a time-delayed metapopulation system disturbed by colored cross-correlated noises are investigated. By applying the fast descent method, the small time-delay approximation and McNamara and Wiesenfeld's SR theory, we investigate the impacts of time-delay, the multiplicative, additive noises and colored cross-correlated noise on the SNR and the shift between the two states of the system. Numerical results show that the multiplicative, additive noises and time-delay can all speed up the transition from the stable state to the extinction state, while the correlation noise and its correlation time can slow down the extinction process of the population system. With respect to SNR, the multiplicative noise always weakens the SR effect, while noise correlation time plays a dual role in motivating the SR phenomenon. Meanwhile, time-delay mainly plays a negative role in stimulating the SR phenomenon. Conversely, it could motivate the SR effect to increase the strength of the cross-correlation noise in the SNR-β plot, while the increase of additive noise intensity will firstly excite SR, and then suppress the SR effect.

  2. Non-destructive studies of fuel pellets by neutron resonance absorption radiography and thermal neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Vogel, S. C.; Mocko, M.; Bourke, M. A. M.; Yuan, V.; Nelson, R. O.; Brown, D. W.; Feller, W. B.

    2013-09-01

    Many isotopes in nuclear materials exhibit strong peaks in neutron absorption cross sections in the epithermal energy range (1-1000 eV). These peaks (often referred to as resonances) occur at energies specific to particular isotopes, providing a means of isotope identification and concentration measurements. The high penetration of epithermal neutrons through most materials is very useful for studies where samples consist of heavy-Z elements opaque to X-rays and sometimes to thermal neutrons as well. The characterization of nuclear fuel elements in their cladding can benefit from the development of high resolution neutron resonance absorption imaging (NRAI), enabled by recently developed spatially-resolved neutron time-of-flight detectors. In this technique the neutron transmission of the sample is measured as a function of spatial location and of neutron energy. In the region of the spectra that borders the resonance energy for a particular isotope, the reduction in transmission can be used to acquire an image revealing the 2-dimensional distribution of that isotope within the sample. Provided that the energy of each transmitted neutron is measured by the neutron detector used and the irradiated sample possesses neutron absorption resonances, then isotope-specific location maps can be acquired simultaneously for several isotopes. This can be done even in the case where samples are opaque or have very similar transmission for thermal neutrons and X-rays or where only low concentrations of particular isotopes are present (<0.1 atom% in some cases). Ultimately, such radiographs of isotope location can be utilized to measure isotope concentration, and can even be combined to produce three-dimensional distributions using tomographic methods. In this paper we present the proof-of-principle of NRAI and transmission Bragg edge imaging performed at Flight Path 5 (FP5) at the LANSCE pulsed, moderated neutron source of Los Alamos National Laboratory. A set of urania mockup

  3. Pulsed laser manipulation of an optically trapped bead: averaging thermal noise and measuring the pulsed force amplitude.

    PubMed

    Lindballe, Thue B; Kristensen, Martin V G; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Keiding, Søren R; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2013-01-28

    An experimental strategy for post-eliminating thermal noise on position measurements of optically trapped particles is presented. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser, synchronized to the detection system, to exert a periodic driving force on an optically trapped 10 μm polystyrene bead, the laser pulse-bead interaction is repeated hundreds of times. Traces with the bead position following the prompt displacement from equilibrium, induced by each laser pulse, are averaged and reveal the underlying deterministic motion of the bead, which is not visible in a single trace due to thermal noise. The motion of the bead is analyzed from the direct time-dependent position measurements and from the power spectrum. The results show that the bead is on average displaced 208 nm from the trap center and exposed to a force amplitude of 71 nanoNewton, more than five orders of magnitude larger than the trapping forces. Our experimental method may have implications for microrheology.

  4. Effects of thermal annealing of W/SiO2 multilayer Bragg reflectors on resonance characteristics of film bulk acoustic resonator devices with cobalt electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Munhyuk; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Chai, Dongkyu; Yoon, Giwan

    2004-05-01

    In this article, we present the thermal annealing effects of the W/SiO2 multilayer reflectors in ZnO-based film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) devices with cobalt (Co) electrodes in comparison with those with aluminum (Al) electrodes. Various thermal annealing conditions have been implemented on the W/SiO2 multilayer reflectors formed on p-type (100) silicon substrates. The resonance characteristics could be significantly improved due to the thermal annealing and were observed to depend strongly on the annealing conditions applied to the reflectors. Particularly, the FBAR devices with the W/SiO2 multilayer reflectors annealed at 400 °C/30 min have shown superior resonance characteristics in terms of return loss and quality factor. In addition, the use of Co electrodes has resulted in the further improvement of the resonance characteristics as compared with the Al electrodes. As a result, the combined use of both the thermal annealing and Co electrodes seems very useful to more effectively improve the resonance characteristics of the FBAR devices with the W/SiO2 multilayer reflectors. .

  5. Effect of rapid thermal annealing on the noise properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dot structures

    SciTech Connect

    Arpatzanis, N.; Tsormpatzoglou, A.; Dimitriadis, C. A.; Song, J. D.; Choi, W. J.; Lee, J. I.; Charitidis, C.

    2007-09-01

    Self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on n{sup +}-GaAs substrates, capped between 0.4 {mu}m thick n-type GaAs layers with electron concentration of 1x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. The effect of rapid thermal annealing at 700 deg. C for 60 s on the noise properties of the structure has been investigated using Au/n-GaAs Schottky diodes as test devices. In the reference sample without containing QDs, the noise spectra show a generation-recombination (g-r) noise behavior due to a discrete energy level located about 0.51 eV below the conduction band edge. This trap is ascribed to the M4 (or EL3) trap in GaAs MBE layers, related to a chemical impurity-native defect complex. In the structure with embedded QDs, the observed g-r noise spectra are due to a midgap trap level ascribed to the EL2 trap in GaAs, which is related to the InAs QDs dissolution due to the thermal treatment.

  6. Effect of rapid thermal annealing on the noise properties of InAs /GaAs quantum dot structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpatzanis, N.; Tsormpatzoglou, A.; Dimitriadis, C. A.; Song, J. D.; Choi, W. J.; Lee, J. I.; Charitidis, C.

    2007-09-01

    Self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on n+-GaAs substrates, capped between 0.4μm thick n-type GaAs layers with electron concentration of 1×1016cm-3. The effect of rapid thermal annealing at 700°C for 60s on the noise properties of the structure has been investigated using Au /n-GaAs Schottky diodes as test devices. In the reference sample without containing QDs, the noise spectra show a generation-recombination (g-r) noise behavior due to a discrete energy level located about 0.51eV below the conduction band edge. This trap is ascribed to the M4 (or EL3) trap in GaAs MBE layers, related to a chemical impurity-native defect complex. In the structure with embedded QDs, the observed g-r noise spectra are due to a midgap trap level ascribed to the EL2 trap in GaAs, which is related to the InAs QDs dissolution due to the thermal treatment.

  7. Review of pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting and new MEMs based resonant energy conversion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Scott Robert; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Mostafa, Salwa; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G

    2012-01-01

    Harvesting electrical energy from thermal energy sources using pyroelectric conversion techniques has been under investigation for over 50 years, but it has not received the attention that thermoelectric energy harvesting techniques have during this time period. This lack of interest stems from early studies which found that the energy conversion efficiencies achievable using pyroelectric materials were several times less than those potentially achievable with thermoelectrics. More recent modeling and experimental studies have shown that pyroelectric techniques can be cost competitive with thermoelectrics and, using new temperature cycling techniques, has the potential to be several times as efficient as thermoelectrics under comparable operating conditions. This paper will review the recent history in this field and describe the techniques that are being developed to increase the opportunities for pyroelectric energy harvesting. The development of a new thermal energy harvester concept, based on temperature cycled pyroelectric thermal-to-electrical energy conversion, are also outlined. The approach uses a resonantly driven, pyroelectric capacitive bimorph cantilever structure that can be used to rapidly cycle the temperature in the energy harvester. The device has been modeled using a finite element multi-physics based method, where the effect of the structure material properties and system parameters on the frequency and magnitude of temperature cycling, and the efficiency of energy recycling using the proposed structure, have been modeled. Results show that thermal contact conductance and heat source temperature differences play key roles in dominating the cantilever resonant frequency and efficiency of the energy conversion technique. This paper outlines the modeling, fabrication and testing of cantilever and pyroelectric structures and single element devices that demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of high efficiency thermal

  8. Thermal Excitation of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Using Spin Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Fridjhon, Peter; Rubin, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations into the thermal excitation of liquid paramagnetic contrast agents using the spin resonance relaxation mechanism are presented. The electronic spin-lattice relaxation time τ1e of gadolinium-based contrast agents, which is estimated at 0.1 ns, is ten orders of magnitude faster than the relaxation time of protons in water. The shorter relaxation time is found to significantly increase the rate of thermal energy deposition. To the authors’ knowledge this is the first study of gadolinium based contrast agents in a liquid state used as thermal agents. Analysis shows that when τ1e and other experimental parameters are optimally selected, a maximum theoretical heating rate of 29.4 °C.s−1 could be achieved which would suffice for clinical thermal ablation of neoplasms. The experimental results show a statistically significant thermal response for two out of the four contrast agents tested. The results are compared to the simulated estimates via analysis of a detailed model of the system. While these experimentally determined temperature rises are small and thus of no clinical utility, their presence supports the theoretical analysis and strongly suggests that the chemical structure of the selected compounds plays an important role in this mechanism of heat deposition. There exists an opportunity for the development of alternative gadolinium-based compounds with an order of magnitude longer τ1e in a diluted form to be used as an efficient hyperthermia agent for clinical use. PMID:27341338

  9. Directional thermal emission control by coupling between guided mode resonances and tunable plasmons in multilayered graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kota; Iizuka, Hideo

    2016-10-01

    Directional thermal radiation is attracting interest because of its applicability to thermal management systems and mid-infrared light sources. Plasmons in a single graphene layer are tunable by the chemical potential, while the lateral wavenumber of the plasmon dispersion is too large for the directional coupling to the far field. In this paper, we achieve directional thermal radiation by utilizing tunable plasmons in multilayered graphene. The lateral wavenumber of the plasmon is shown to be reduced as the number of graphene layers increases, and the reduction is analytically explained. The thermally excited graphene plasmon couples to the guided mode resonance in a silicon grating through evanescent waves so as to realize angular-selective far-field emission. We develop a modal analysis in order to investigate the coupling condition. In addition, the directional thermal emission including asymmetric one can be tuned by varying the chemical potential of graphene layers. The calculated emissivity obtained by changing both the chemical potential and the height of the grating suggests the control of the angular heat flux profile.

  10. Repulsive particles under a general external potential: Thermodynamics by neglecting thermal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Mauricio S.; Nobre, Fernando D.

    2016-08-01

    A recent proposal of an effective temperature θ , conjugated to a generalized entropy sq, typical of nonextensive statistical mechanics, has led to a consistent thermodynamic framework in the case q =2 . The proposal was explored for repulsively interacting vortices, currently used for modeling type-II superconductors. In these systems, the variable θ presents values much higher than those of typical room temperatures T , so that the thermal noise can be neglected (T /θ ≃0 ). The whole procedure was developed for an equilibrium state obtained after a sufficiently long-time evolution, associated with a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation and approached due to a confining external harmonic potential, ϕ (x ) =α x2/2 (α >0 ). Herein, the thermodynamic framework is extended to a quite general confining potential, namely ϕ (x ) =α|x | z/z (z >1 ). It is shown that the main results of the previous analyses hold for any z >1 : (i) The definition of the effective temperature θ conjugated to the entropy s2. (ii) The construction of a Carnot cycle, whose efficiency is shown to be η =1 -(θ2/θ1) , where θ1 and θ2 are the effective temperatures associated with two isothermal transformations, with θ1>θ2 . The special character of the Carnot cycle is indicated by analyzing another cycle that presents an efficiency depending on z . (iii) Applying Legendre transformations for a distinct pair of variables, different thermodynamic potentials are obtained, and furthermore, Maxwell relations and response functions are derived. The present approach shows a consistent thermodynamic framework, suggesting that these results should hold for a general confining potential ϕ (x ) , increasing the possibility of experimental verifications.

  11. Simulation of generation of dissipative soliton, dissipative soliton resonance and noise-like pulse in Yb-doped mode-locked fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhaochen; Li, Huihui; Wang, Pu

    2015-03-09

    we report three types of pulse generation in Yb-doped nonlinear polarization rotation mode-locked fiber lasers in all-normal-dispersion regime through simulation, including dissipative soliton, dissipative soliton resonance and noise-like pulse. We distinguish the different conditions of generating such different pulses by analyzing the transmission curve of saturable absorber, which plays a key role in pulse shaping.

  12. Resonant dipolar relaxation in poly ( ɛ -caprolactone)—A thermally stimulated depolarization current study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patidar, M. M.; Jain, D.; Nath, R.; Ganesan, V.

    2016-07-01

    Resonant dipolar relaxation in poly( ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) is reported using thermally stimulated discharge current spectroscopy. PCL is a bio-medically known shape memory polymer having a well defined γ, β, α, and α ' relaxations, respectively, centered around 125 K, 170 K, 220 K, and 270 K as seen by the measurements. By employing a new protocol variable poling temperature at constant freezing temperature, resonant dipolar relaxation in PCL could be induced, especially in the vicinity of α relaxation. Such a protocol is useful in de-convoluting the features in a more meaningful fashion. By an analysis of activation process, we could show a clear contrast enhancement of the dynamics of the participating dipoles by means of a minimum in the activation energies situated around the glass transition region. The relevant parameters of interest such as activation energies and relaxation times are estimated and discussed.

  13. Heat equation inversion framework for average SAR calculation from magnetic resonance thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Alon, Leeor; Sodickson, Daniel K; Deniz, Cem M

    2016-10-01

    Deposition of radiofrequency (RF) energy can be quantified via electric field or temperature change measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging has been used as a tool to measure three dimensional small temperature changes associated with RF radiation exposure. When duration of RF exposure is long, conversion from temperature change to specific absorption rate (SAR) is nontrivial due to prominent heat-diffusion and conduction effects. In this work, we demonstrated a method for calculation of SAR via an inversion of the heat equation including heat-diffusion and conduction effects. This method utilizes high-resolution three dimensional magnetic resonance temperature images and measured thermal properties of the phantom to achieve accurate calculation of SAR. Accuracy of the proposed method was analyzed with respect to operating frequency of a dipole antenna and parameters used in heat equation inversion. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:493-503, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Investigation of the MTC noise estimation with a coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulic dedicated model - 'Closing the loop'

    SciTech Connect

    Demaziere, C.; Larsson, V.

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the reliability of different noise estimators aimed at determining the Moderator Temperature Coefficient (MTC) of reactivity in Pressurized Water Reactors. By monitoring the inherent fluctuations in the neutron flux and moderator temperature, an on-line monitoring of the MTC without perturbing reactor operation is possible. In order to get an accurate estimation of the MTC by noise analysis, the point-kinetic component of the neutron noise and the core-averaged moderator temperature noise have to be used. Because of the scarcity of the in-core instrumentation, the determination of these quantities is difficult, and several possibilities thus exist for estimating the MTC by noise analysis. Furthermore, the effect of feedback has to be negligible at the frequency chosen for estimating the MTC in order to get a proper determination of the MTC. By using an integrated neutronic/thermal- hydraulic model specifically developed for estimating the three-dimensional distributions of the fluctuations in neutron flux, moderator properties, and fuel temperature, different approaches for estimating the MTC by noise analysis can be tested individually. It is demonstrated that a reliable MTC estimation can only be provided if the core is equipped with a sufficient number of both neutron detectors and temperature sensors, i.e. if the core contain in-core detectors monitoring both the axial and radial distributions of the fluctuations in neutron flux and moderator temperature. It is further proven that the effect of feedback is negligible for frequencies higher than 0.1 Hz, and thus the MTC noise estimations have to be performed at higher frequencies. (authors)

  15. An optimal design of thermal-actuated and piezoresistive-sensed CMOS-MEMS resonant sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Tsai, Chun-Yin; Chen, Tsung-Lin; Liao, Sin-Hao

    2013-11-01

    This paper proposes an optimal design of the thermal-actuated, piezoresistive-sensed resonator fabricated by a foundry-provided CMOS-MEMS process. The optimal design is achieved both by quantitatively comparing the mechanical properties of different composite films as well as by deriving an analytical model for determining the device dimensions. The analytical model includes a stress model of an asymmetric mechanical structure and a piezoresistivity model of the heavily doped, n-type polysilicon film. The analytical model predicts that the optimal length of the displacement sensor is 200 μm when the thermal actuator is 200 μm in length and the absorption plate is 100 μm in length. Additionally, the model predicts the resistivity of the polysilicon film of (6.8 ± 2.2) mΩ cm and the gauge factor of (6.8 ± 2.9) when the grain size is (250 ± 100) nm. Experimental results agree well with simulation results. Experimental data show that the resonant frequency of the device is 80.06 kHz and shifts to 79.8 kHz when a brick of Pt mass is deposited on the resonator. The mass of the Pt estimated from the frequency shift is 4.5419 × 10-12 kg, while estimated from the measured dimension is 4.4204 × 10-12 kg. Sensitivity of the resonant sensor is calculated to be 1.8 × 102 Hz ng-1. Experimental results further show that the polysilicon film used in the experiments has a grain size of (241 ± 105) nm, an average gauge factor of 5.56 and average resistivity of 5.5 mΩ cm.

  16. Resonant bonding driven giant phonon anharmonicity and low thermal conductivity of phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Guangzhao; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Yue, Sheng-Ying; Qin, Zhenzhen; Wang, Huimin; Han, Yang; Hu, Ming

    2016-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) phosphorene, which possesses fascinating physical and chemical properties distinctively different from other 2D materials, calls for a fundamental understanding of thermal transport properties for its rapidly growing applications in nano- and optoelectronics and thermoelectrics. However, even the basic phonon property, for example, the exact value of the lattice thermal conductivity (κ ) of phosphorene reported in the literature, can differ unacceptably by one order of magnitude. More importantly, the fundamental physics underlying its unique properties such as strong phonon anharmonicity and unusual anisotropy remains largely unknown. In this paper, based on the analysis of electronic structure and lattice dynamics from first principles, we report that the giant phonon anharmonicity in phosphorene is associated with the soft transverse optical (TO) phonon modes and arises from the long-range interactions driven by the orbital governed resonant bonding. We also provide a microscopic picture connecting the anisotropic and low κ of phosphorene to the giant directional phonon anharmonicity and long-range interactions, which are further traced back to the asymmetric resonant orbital occupations of electrons and characteristics of the hinge-like structure. The unambiguously low κ of phosphorene obtained consistently by three independent ab initio methods confirms the phonon anharmonicity to a large extent and is expected to end the confusing huge deviations in previous studies. This work further pinpoints the necessity of including van der Waals interactions to accurately describe the interatomic interactions in phosphorene. We propose in 2D material that resonant bonding leads to low thermal conductivity, despite that it is originally found in three-dimensional (3D) thermoelectric and phase-change materials. Our study offers insights into phonon transport from the view of orbital states, which would be of great significance to the design of

  17. Method and Apparatus for Thermal Spraying of Metal Coatings Using Pulsejet Resonant Pulsed Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thermal spraying a metal coating on a substrate is accomplished with a modified pulsejet and optionally an ejector to assist in preventing oxidation. Metal such as Aluminum or Magnesium may be used. A pulsejet is first initiated by applying fuel, air, and a spark. Metal is inserted continuously in a high volume of metal into a combustion chamber of the pulsejet. The combustion is thereafter controlled resonantly at high frequency and the metal is heated to a molten state. The metal is then transported from the combustion chamber into a tailpipe of said pulsejet and is expelled therefrom at high velocity and deposited on a target substrate.

  18. A deterministic and statistical energy analysis of tyre cavity resonance noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Zamri; Wang, Xu

    2016-03-01

    Tyre cavity resonance was studied using a combination of deterministic analysis and statistical energy analysis where its deterministic part was implemented using the impedance compact mobility matrix method and its statistical part was done by the statistical energy analysis method. While the impedance compact mobility matrix method can offer a deterministic solution to the cavity pressure response and the compliant wall vibration velocity response in the low frequency range, the statistical energy analysis method can offer a statistical solution of the responses in the high frequency range. In the mid frequency range, a combination of the statistical energy analysis and deterministic analysis methods can identify system coupling characteristics. Both methods have been compared to those from commercial softwares in order to validate the results. The combined analysis result has been verified by the measurement result from a tyre-cavity physical model. The analysis method developed in this study can be applied to other similar toroidal shape structural-acoustic systems.

  19. Tracking thermal degradation on passion fruit juice through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Soares, Marcia Valeria L; Alves Filho, Elenilson G; Silva, Lorena Mara A; Novotny, Etelvino Henrique; Canuto, Kirley Marques; Wurlitzer, Nedio Jair; Narain, Narendra; de Brito, Edy Sousa

    2017-03-15

    Thermal food processing mainly aims to control microorganism in order to extend its shelf life. However, it may induce chemical and nutritional changes in foodstuff. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) coupled to multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the effect of different thermal processing conditions (85 and 140°C for 4; 15; 30; and 60s) on the passion fruit juice using an Armfield pasteurizer. Through this approach it was possible to identify the changes in the juice composition. The temperature and the time lead to a hydrolysis of the sucrose to glucose and fructose. Additionally, juice submitted to 140°C for 60s results in the degradation of the sucrose and the formation of 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfural (HMF). Despite no novel chemical marker has been identified, the (1)H NMR chemometrics approach may contribute in the choice of the temperature and time to be employed in the juice processing.

  20. Hiss or equatorial noise? Ambiguities in analyzing suprathermal ion plasma wave resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno-Smith, Lois K.; Liemohn, Michael W.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Santolik, Ondrej; Morley, Steven K.; Breneman, Aaron; Larsen, Brian A.; Reeves, Geoff; Wygant, John R.; Hospodarsky, George; Kletzing, Craig; Moldwin, Mark B.; Katus, Roxanne M.; Zou, Shasha

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that low-energy ion heating occurs in the magnetosphere due to strong equatorial noise emission. Observations from the Van Allen Probes Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument recently determined that there was a depletion in the 1-10 eV ion population in the postmidnight sector of Earth during quiet times at L < 3. The diurnal variation of equatorially mirroring 1-10 eV H+ ions at 2 < L < 3 is connected with similar diurnal variation in the electric field component of plasma waves ranging between 150 and 600 Hz. Measurements from the Van Allen Probes Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) data set are used to analyze waves of this frequency in near-Earth space. However, when we examine the polarization of the waves in the 150 to 600 Hz range in the equatorial plane, the majority are right-hand polarized plasmaspheric hiss waves. The 1-10 eV H+ equatorially mirroring population does not interact with right-hand waves, despite a strong statistical relationship suggesting that the two are linked. We present evidence supporting the relationship, both in our own work and the literature, but we ultimately conclude that the 1-10 eV H+ heating is not related to the strong enhancement of 150 to 600 Hz waves.

  1. White noise of Nb-based microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers with NbN coplanar resonators for readout of transition edge sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori; Yamamori, Hirotake; Nagasawa, Shuichi; Fukuda, Daiji; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2014-06-14

    White noise of dissipationless microwave radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (RF-SQUID) multiplexers has been experimentally studied to evaluate their readout performance for transition edge sensor (TES) photon counters ranging from near infrared to gamma ray. The characterization has been carried out at 4 K, first to avoid the low-frequency fluctuations present at around 0.1 K, and second, for a feasibility study of readout operation at 4 K for extended applications. To increase the resonant Q at 4 K and maintain low noise SQUID operation, multiplexer chips consisting of niobium nitride (NbN)-based coplanar-waveguide resonators and niobium (Nb)-based RF-SQUIDs have been developed. This hybrid multiplexer exhibited 1 × 10{sup 4} ≤ Q ≤ 2 × 10{sup 4} and the square root of spectral density of current noise referred to the SQUID input √S{sub I} = 31 pA/√Hz. The former and the latter are factor-of-five and seven improvements from our previous results on Nb-based resonators, respectively. Two-directional readout on the complex plane of the transmission component of scattering matrix S{sub 21} enables us to distinguish the flux noise from noise originating from other sources, such as the cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier. Systematic noise measurements with various microwave readout powers P{sub MR} make it possible to distinguish the contribution of noise sources within the system as follows: (1) The achieved √S{sub I} is dominated by the Nyquist noise from a resistor at 4 K in parallel to the SQUID input coil which is present to prevent microwave leakage to the TES. (2) The next dominant source is either the HEMT-amplifier noise (for small values of P{sub MR}) or the quantization noise due to the resolution of 300-K electronics (for large values of P{sub MR}). By a decrease of these noise levels to a degree that is achievable by current technology, we predict that the

  2. White noise of Nb-based microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers with NbN coplanar resonators for readout of transition edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori; Yamamori, Hirotake; Nagasawa, Shuichi; Fukuda, Daiji; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2014-06-01

    White noise of dissipationless microwave radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (RF-SQUID) multiplexers has been experimentally studied to evaluate their readout performance for transition edge sensor (TES) photon counters ranging from near infrared to gamma ray. The characterization has been carried out at 4 K, first to avoid the low-frequency fluctuations present at around 0.1 K, and second, for a feasibility study of readout operation at 4 K for extended applications. To increase the resonant Q at 4 K and maintain low noise SQUID operation, multiplexer chips consisting of niobium nitride (NbN)-based coplanar-waveguide resonators and niobium (Nb)-based RF-SQUIDs have been developed. This hybrid multiplexer exhibited 1 × 104 ≤ Q ≤ 2 × 104 and the square root of spectral density of current noise referred to the SQUID input √SI = 31 pA/√Hz. The former and the latter are factor-of-five and seven improvements from our previous results on Nb-based resonators, respectively. Two-directional readout on the complex plane of the transmission component of scattering matrix S21 enables us to distinguish the flux noise from noise originating from other sources, such as the cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier. Systematic noise measurements with various microwave readout powers PMR make it possible to distinguish the contribution of noise sources within the system as follows: (1) The achieved √SI is dominated by the Nyquist noise from a resistor at 4 K in parallel to the SQUID input coil which is present to prevent microwave leakage to the TES. (2) The next dominant source is either the HEMT-amplifier noise (for small values of PMR) or the quantization noise due to the resolution of 300-K electronics (for large values of PMR). By a decrease of these noise levels to a degree that is achievable by current technology, we predict that the microwave RF-SQUID multiplexer can exhibit √SI ≤ 5 pA/√Hz, i.e., close to √SI of

  3. Fano resonance in the nonadiabatically pumped shot noise of a time-dependent quantum well in a two-dimensional electron gas and graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Rui Dai, Jiao-Hua; Guo, Yong

    2015-04-28

    Interference between different quantum paths can generate Fano resonance. One of the examples is transport through a quasibound state driven by a time-dependent scattering potential. Previously it is found that Fano resonance occurs as a result of energy matching in one-dimensional systems. In this work, we demonstrate that when transverse motion is present, Fano resonance occurs precisely at the wavevector matching situation. Using the Floquet scattering theory, we considered the transport properties of a nonadiabatic time-dependent well both in a two-dimensional electron gas and monolayer graphene structure. Dispersion of the quasibound state of a static quantum well is obtained with transverse motion present. We found that Fano resonance occurs when the wavevector in the transport direction of one of the Floquet sidebands is exactly identical to that of the quasibound state in the well at equilibrium and follows the dispersion pattern of the latter. To observe the Fano resonance phenomenon in the transmission spectrum, we also considered the pumped shot noise properties when time and spatial symmetry secures vanishing current in the considered configuration. Prominent Fano resonance is found in the differential pumped shot noise with respect to the reservoir Fermi energy.

  4. Ultrafine measurements of the thermal shift of Fabry-Perot resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, S.; Lemarquis, F.; Lequime, M.

    2008-09-01

    The wavelengths associated to the transmission peaks of a Fabry-Perot etalon are directly connected with its optical thickness. As a consequence, any change in the physical thickness or the refractive index of the cavity has a direct influence on the value of these specific wavelengths. This property can be used to determine the thermal characteristics, like the coefficient of thermal expansion or the thermo-optic coefficient, of some materials. However, to be efficient, this method needs a very high accuracy in the determination of these resonant wavelengths. We developed a dedicated measurement set-up, combining a tunable laser source around 850 nm and a high precision wavelength meter to determine with accuracy better than 0.2 pm the resonant wavelengths of a Fabry-Perot etalon. We use a temperature stabilized chamber to avoid temperature fluctuations or, on the contrary, to apply a deterministic temperature change at the cavity level. We describe the structure of our bench and present the results obtained on BK7 windows as well as on an optically contacted ULE Fabry-Perot with silver coatings.

  5. Resonance in the response of the bacterial flagellar motor to thermal oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Mahmut; Salman, Hanna

    2017-02-01

    We have studied the dynamics of the Escherichia coli flagellar motor's angular velocity in response to thermal oscillations. We find that the oscillations' amplitude of the motor's angular velocity exhibits resonance when the temperature is oscillated at frequencies around 4 Hz. This resonance appears to be due to the existence of a natural mode of oscillation in the state of the motor, specifically in the torque generated by the motor. Natural modes of oscillation in torque generation cannot result from random fluctuations in the state of the motor. Their presence points to the existence of a coupling mechanism between the magnitude of the torque generated by the motor and the rates of transition between the different states of the motor components responsible for torque generation. The results presented here show resonance response in torque generation to external perturbations. They are explained with a simple phenomenological model, which can help future studies identify the source of the feedback mechanism between the torque and the interactions responsible for its generation. It can also help us to quantitatively estimate the strength of these interactions and how they are affected by the magnitude of the torque they generate.

  6. Conjunction of standing wave and resonance in asymmetric nanowires: a mechanism for thermal rectification and remote energy accumulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-Yang; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2015-12-02

    As an important way to control and manage heat transport, thermal rectification has become an elementary issue in the field of phononics and plays a key role in the designing of thermal devices. Here we investigate systematically the standing wave and the accompanying resonance process in asymmetric nanowires to understand the standing wave itself and its great effect on thermal rectification. Results show that the standing wave is sensitive to both the structural and thermal properties of the material, and its great effect on enhancing the thermal rectification is realized not only by the energy-localization nature of the standing wave, but also by the resonance-caused large amplitude and high energy of the standing wave.

  7. Assessment of thermal effects of interstitial laser phototherapy on mammary tumors using proton resonance frequency method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Kelvin; Li, Xiaosong; Figueroa, Daniel; Towner, Rheal A.; Garteiser, Philippe; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Liu, Hong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-12-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses a synergistic approach to treat cancer systemically through local laser irradiation and immunological stimulation. Currently, LIT utilizes dye-assisted noninvasive laser irradiation to achieve selective photothermal interaction. However, LIT faces difficulties treating deeper tumors or tumors with heavily pigmented overlying skin. To circumvent these barriers, we use interstitial laser irradiation to induce the desired photothermal effects. The purpose of this study is to analyze the thermal effects of interstitial irradiation using proton resonance frequency (PRF). An 805-nm near-infrared laser with an interstitial cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors. Different power settings (1.0, 1.25, and 1.5 W) were applied with an irradiation duration of 10 min. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7 T magnetic resonance imager using PRF. We found that temperature distributions in tissue depended on both laser power and time settings, and that variance in tissue composition has a major influence in temperature elevation. The temperature elevations measured during interstitial laser irradiation by PRF and thermocouple were consistent, with some variations due to tissue composition and the positioning of the thermocouple's needle probes. Our results indicated that, for a tissue irradiation of 10 min, the elevation of rat tumor temperature ranged from 8 to 11°C for 1 W and 8 to 15°C for 1.5 W. This is the first time a 7 T magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. Our work provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside a tumor using interstitial laser treatment. Our work may lead to an optimal protocol for future cancer treatment using interstitial phototherapy in conjunction with immunotherapy.

  8. Method for Thermal Spraying of Coatings Using Resonant-Pulsed Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    A method has been devised for high-volume, high-velocity surface deposition of protective metallic coatings on otherwise vulnerable surfaces. Thermal spraying is used whereby the material to be deposited is heated to the melting point by passing through a flame. Rather than the usual method of deposition from the jet formed from the combustion products, this innovation uses non-steady combustion (i.e. high-frequency, periodic, confined bursts), which generates not only higher temperatures and heat transfer rates, but exceedingly high impingement velocities an order of magnitude higher than conventional thermal systems. Higher impingement rates make for better adhesion. The high heat transfer rates developed here allow the deposition material to be introduced, not as an expensive powder with high surface-area-to-volume, but in convenient rod form, which is also easier and simpler to feed into the system. The nonsteady, resonant combustion process is self-aspirating and requires no external actuation or control and no high-pressure supply of fuel or air. The innovation has been demonstrated using a commercially available resonant combustor shown in the figure. Fuel is naturally aspirated from the tank through the lower Tygon tube and into the pulsejet. Air for starting is ported through the upper Tygon tube line. Once operation commences, this air is no longer needed as additional air is naturally aspirated through the inlet. A spark plug on the device is needed for starting, but the process carries on automatically as the operational device is resonant and reignites itself with each 220-Hz pulse.

  9. Assessment of thermal effects of interstitial laser phototherapy on mammary tumors using proton resonance frequency method

    PubMed Central

    Le, Kelvin; Li, Xiaosong; Figueroa, Daniel; Towner, Rheal A.; Garteiser, Philippe; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Liu, Hong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-01-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses a synergistic approach to treat cancer systemically through local laser irradiation and immunological stimulation. Currently, LIT utilizes dye-assisted noninvasive laser irradiation to achieve selective photothermal interaction. However, LIT faces difficulties treating deeper tumors or tumors with heavily pigmented overlying skin. To circumvent these barriers, we use interstitial laser irradiation to induce the desired photothermal effects. The purpose of this study is to analyze the thermal effects of interstitial irradiation using proton resonance frequency (PRF). An 805-nm near-infrared laser with an interstitial cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors. Different power settings (1.0, 1.25, and 1.5 W) were applied with an irradiation duration of 10 min. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7 T magnetic resonance imager using PRF. We found that temperature distributions in tissue depended on both laser power and time settings, and that variance in tissue composition has a major influence in temperature elevation. The temperature elevations measured during interstitial laser irradiation by PRF and thermocouple were consistent, with some variations due to tissue composition and the positioning of the thermocouple's needle probes. Our results indicated that, for a tissue irradiation of 10 min, the elevation of rat tumor temperature ranged from 8 to 11°C for 1 W and 8 to 15°C for 1.5 W. This is the first time a 7 T magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. Our work provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside a tumor using interstitial laser treatment. Our work may lead to an optimal protocol for future cancer treatment using interstitial phototherapy in conjunction with immunotherapy. PMID:22191937

  10. Calculation of Shear Stiffness in Noise Dominated Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) Data Based on Principal Frequency Estimation

    PubMed Central

    McGee, K. P.; Lake, D.; Mariappan, Y; Hubmayr, R. D.; Manduca, A.; Ansell, K.; Ehman, R. L.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a non invasive phase-contrast based method for quantifying the shear stiffness of biological tissues. Synchronous application of a shear wave source and motion encoding gradient waveforms within the MRE pulse sequence enable visualization of the propagating shear wave throughout the medium under investigation. Encoded shear wave induced displacements are then processed to calculate the local shear stiffness of each voxel. An important consideration in local shear stiffness estimates is that the algorithms employed typically calculate shear stiffness using relatively high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) MRE images and have difficulties at extremely low SNR. A new method of estimating shear stiffness based on the principal spatial frequency of the shear wave displacement map is presented. Finite element simulations were performed to assess the relative insensitivity of this approach to decreases in SNR. Additionally, ex vivo experiments were conducted on normal rat lungs to assess the robustness of this approach in low SNR biological tissue. Simulation and experimental results indicate that calculation of shear stiffness by the principal frequency method is less sensitive to extremely low SNR than previously reported MRE inversion methods but at the expense of loss of spatial information within the region of interest from which the principal frequency estimate is derived. PMID:21701049

  11. Noise-supported actuator: Coherent resonance in the oscillations of a micrometer-sized object under a direct current-voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurimura, Tomo; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

    2016-04-01

    Noise supported regular motion in a micro-fluidic environment is studied. Recently, it was reported that an aqueous droplet in an oil phase exhibited rhythmic back-and-forth motion under stationary direct current voltage between the cone-shaped electrodes, where the oscillating water droplet moves on a limit cycle orbital. We now confirm that a combination of the limit cycle nature and white noise supports and enhances the regular motion of the object through coherent resonance. The present result will open a way to design an efficient machinery in microfluidic and micromechanical devices.

  12. Preliminary investigation into the design of thermally responsive Forster resonance energy transfer colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, Monte Scott

    While nuclear imaging techniques (Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Computed Tomography, and Positron Emission Tomography) have proven effective for diagnosis and treatment of disease in the human body, fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging offers additional benefits. Fluorescent imaging provides high resolution with real-time response, persistent lifetime (hours to days), cell targeting, and transdermal penetration with minimal physical encumbrance. Malignant cells can be targeted by absorbance of exogenous fluorescent nanoprobe contrast agents. Imaging is improved by fluorescent enhancement, especially by energy transfer between attached dyes. Also for use against cancer are heat-active treatments, such as hyperthermal, photothermal, and chemothermal therapies. Helpful to these treatments is the thermal response from nanoprobes, within human cells, which provide real-time feedback. The present study investigates the design and feasibility of a nanoprobe molecular device, absorbable into malignant human cells, which provides real-time tracking and thermal response, as indicated by enhanced fluorescence by energy transfer. A poly(propargyl acrylate) colloidal suspension was synthesized. The particles were modified with a triblock copolymer, previously shown to be thermally responsive, and an end-attached fluorescent dye. A second dye was modeled for attachment in subsequent work. When two fluorescent dyes are brought within sufficiently close proximity, and excitation light is supplied, energy can be transferred between dyes to give enhanced fluorescence with a large Stokes shift (increase in wavelength between excitation and emission). The dye pair was modeled for overlap of emission and absorbance wavelengths, and energy transfer was demonstrated with 23% efficiency and a 209 nm Stokes shift. The quantum yield of the donor dye was determined at 70%, and the distance for 50% energy transfer was calculated at 2.9 nm, consistent with reports for similar compounds. When

  13. Thermal noise due to surface-charge effects within the Debye layer of endogenous structures in dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poznanski, Roman R.

    2010-02-01

    An assumption commonly used in cable theory is revised by taking into account electrical amplification due to intracellular capacitive effects in passive dendritic cables. A generalized cable equation for a cylindrical volume representation of a dendritic segment is derived from Maxwell’s equations under assumptions: (i) the electric-field polarization is restricted longitudinally along the cable length; (ii) extracellular isopotentiality; (iii) quasielectrostatic conditions; and (iv) homogeneous medium with constant conductivity and permittivity. The generalized cable equation is identical to Barenblatt’s equation arising in the theory of infiltration in fissured strata with a known analytical solution expressed in terms of a definite integral involving a modified Bessel function and the solution to a linear one-dimensional classical cable equation. Its solution is used to determine the impact of thermal noise on voltage attenuation with distance at any particular time. A regular perturbation expansion for the membrane potential about the linear one-dimensional classical cable equation solution is derived in terms of a Green’s function in order to describe the dynamics of free charge within the Debye layer of endogenous structures in passive dendritic cables. The asymptotic value of the first perturbative term is explicitly evaluated for small values of time to predict how the slowly fluctuating (in submillisecond range) electric field attributed to intracellular capacitive effects alters the amplitude of the membrane potential. It was found that capacitive effects are almost negligible for cables with electrotonic lengths L>0.5 , contributes up to 10% of the signal for cables with electrotonic lengths in the range between 0.25thermal noise due

  14. Blocking Phonon Transport by Structural Resonances in Alloy-Based Nanophononic Metamaterials Leads to Ultralow Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Han, Haoxue; Donadio, Davide; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the design rules to obtain materials that enable a tight control of phonon transport over a broad range of frequencies would aid major developments in thermoelectric energy harvesting, heat management in microelectronics, and information and communication technology. Using atomistic simulations we show that the metamaterials approach relying on localized resonances is very promising to engineer heat transport at the nanoscale. Combining designed resonant structures to alloying can lead to extremely low thermal conductivity in silicon nanowires. The hybridization between resonant phonons and propagating modes greatly reduces the group velocities and the phonon mean free paths in the low frequency acoustic range below 4 THz. Concurrently, alloy scattering hinders the propagation of high frequency thermal phonons. Our calculations establish a rationale between the size, shape, and period of the resonant structures, and the thermal conductivity of the nanowire, and demonstrate that this approach is even effective to block phonon transport in wavelengths much longer than the size and period of the surface resonant structures. A further consequence of using resonant structures is that they are not expected to scatter electrons, which is beneficial for thermoelectric applications.

  15. Reevaluation and Validation of the {sup 241}Pu Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 20 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Leal, L.C.; Courcelle, A.; Santamarina, A.

    2005-05-15

    A new SAMMY analysis of the {sup 241}Pu resonance parameters from thermal to 20 eV is presented. This evaluation takes into account the trends given by integral experiments [post-irradiation experiments performed in French pressurized water reactors (PWRs)]. Compared to the previous evaluations performed by Derrien and de Saussure, the capture cross section increases especially in the 0.26-eV resonance. It is shown that the new resonance parameters proposed in this work improve the prediction of the {sup 242}Pu buildup in a PWR, which was significantly underestimated with the previous evaluations.

  16. Observation of thermal spin-transfer torque via ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Bai, Lihui; Chen, Xiaobin; Guo, Hong; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.; Hu, C.-M.

    2016-08-01

    The thermal spin-transfer torque (TSTT) in magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) was systematically studied using electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Evidence for the existence of TSTT in MTJs is observed. A temperature difference was applied across an MTJ acting as a TSTT on the free layer of the MTJ. The FMR of the free layer was then excited by a microwave current and electrically detected as a dc voltage. We found that the FMR line shape was changed by the TSTT, indicated by the ratio of dispersive and Lorentz components of the FMR spectra (D /L ). D /L increases by increasing the temperature difference. In addition, we analyze the magnetization orientation dependence of TSTT and provide solid evidence that this dependence differs from the magnetization orientation dependence of spin-transfer torque driven by a dc bias.

  17. Method and Apparatus for Thermal Spraying of Metal Coatings Using Pulsejet Resonant Pulsed Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus and method [or thermal spraying a metal coating on a substrate is accomplished with a modified pulsejet and optionally an ejector to assist in preventing oxidation. Metal such a Aluminum or Magnesium may be used. A pulsejet is first initiated by applying fuel, air. and a spark. Metal is inserted continuously in a high volume of meta1 into a combustion chamber of the pulsejet. The combustion is thereafter. controlled resonantly at high frequency and the metal is heated to a molten state. The metal is then transported from the combustion chamber into a tail pipe of said pulsejet and is expelled therefrom at high velocity and deposited on a target substrate.

  18. Quantification of total pigments in citrus essential oils by thermal wave resonant cavity photopyroelectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    López-Muñoz, Gerardo A; Antonio-Pérez, Aurora; Díaz-Reyes, J

    2015-05-01

    A general theory of thermal wave resonant cavity photopyroelectric spectroscopy (TWRC-PPE) was recently proposed by Balderas-López (2012) for the thermo-optical characterisation of substances in a condensed phase. This theory is used to quantify the total carotenoids and chlorophylls in several folded and un-folded citrus essential oils to demonstrate the viability of using this technique as an alternative analytical method for the quantification of total pigments in citrus oils. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) reveals significant differences (p < 0.05) among the means of optical absorption coefficient data for the folding degree and fruit type in citrus oils. The experimental results show that TWRC-PPE spectroscopy can be used to quantify concentrations up to five times higher of total carotenoids and chlorophylls in citrus oils than UV-Vis spectroscopy without sample preparation or dilution. The optical limits of this technique and possible interference are also described.

  19. Co-occurrence of resonant activation and noise-enhanced stability in a model of cancer growth in the presence of immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Spagnolo, Bernardo; Ochab-Marcinek, Anna; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2006-10-01

    We investigate a stochastic version of a simple enzymatic reaction which follows the generic Michaelis-Menten kinetics. At sufficiently high concentrations of reacting species, that represent here populations of cells involved in cancerous proliferation and cytotoxic response of the immune system, the overall kinetics can be approximated by a one-dimensional overdamped Langevin equation. The modulating activity of the immune response is here modeled as a dichotomous random process of the relative rate of neoplastic cell destruction. We discuss physical aspects of environmental noises acting in such a system, pointing out the possibility of coexistence of dynamical regimes where noise-enhanced stability and resonant activation phenomena can be observed together. We explain the underlying mechanisms by analyzing the behavior of the variance of first passage times as a function of the noise intensity.

  20. Resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical gallium arsenide nanowires studied using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Walia, Jaspreet; Boulanger, Jonathan; Dhindsa, Navneet; LaPierre, Ray; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Saini, Simarjeet S

    2016-06-17

    Gallium arsenide nanowires have shown considerable promise for use in applications in which the absorption of light is required. When the nanowires are oriented vertically, a considerable amount of light can be absorbed, leading to significant heating effects. Thus, it is important to understand the threshold power densities that vertical GaAs nanowires can support, and how the nanowire morphology is altered under these conditions. Here, resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical GaAs nanowires was studied using both Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques. Resonant waveguiding, and subsequent absorption of the excited optical mode reduces the irradiance vertical GaAs nanowires can support relative to horizontal ones, by three orders of magnitude before the onset of structural changes occur. A power density of only 20 W mm(-2) was sufficient to induce local heating in the nanowires, resulting in the formation of arsenic species. Upon further increasing the power, a hollow nanowire morphology was realized. These findings are pertinent to all optical applications and spectroscopic measurements involving vertically oriented GaAs nanowires. Understanding the optical absorption limitations, and the effects of exceeding these limitations will help improve the development of all III-V nanowire devices.

  1. Observations of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaru, S. Kubota, H.; Yakushiji, K.; Konoto, M.; Nozaki, T.; Fukushima, A.; Imamura, H.; Taniguchi, T.; Arai, H.; Tsunegi, S.; Yuasa, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-05-07

    Measurements of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance were performed on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer and in-plane magnetized reference layer (abbreviated as PMF-STO in the following) for the purpose of obtaining magnetic properties in the PMF-STO structure. The measured spectra clearly showed a large main peak and multiple smaller peaks on the high frequency side. A Lorentzian fit on the main peak yielded Gilbert damping factor of 0.0041. The observed peaks moved in proportion to the out-of-plane bias field. From the slope of the main peak frequency as a function of the bias field, Lande g factor was estimated to be about 2.13. The mode intervals showed a clear dependence on the diameter of the PMF-STOs, i.e., intervals are larger for a smaller diameter. These results suggest that the observed peaks should correspond to eigenmodes of lateral spin wave resonance in the perpendicularly magnetized free layer.

  2. Resonant microwave absorption in thermally deposited au nanoparticle films near percolation coverage.

    PubMed

    Obrzut, Jan; Douglas, Jack F; Kirillov, Oleg; Sharifi, Fred; Liddle, J Alexander

    2013-07-16

    We observe a resonant transition in the microwave absorption of thin thermally deposited Au nanoparticle films near the geometrical percolation transition pc where the films exhibit a 'fractal' heterogeneous geometry. Absorption of incident microwave radiation increases sharply near pc, consistent with effective medium theory predictions. Both the theory and our experiments indicate that the hierarchical structure of these films makes their absorption insensitive to the microwave radiation wavelength λ, so that this singular absorption of microwave radiation is observed over a broad frequency range between 100 MHz and 20 GHz. The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with randomly distributed conductive scattering particles gives rise to localized resonant modes, and our measurements indicate that this adsorption process is significantly enhanced for microwaves in comparison to ordinary light. In particular, above the percolation transition a portion of the injected microwave power is stored within the film until dissipated. Finally, we find that the measured surface conductivity can be quantitatively described at all Au concentrations by generalized effective medium theory, where the fitted conductivity percolation exponents and pc itself are consistent with known two-dimensional estimates. Our results demonstrate that microwave measurements provide a powerful means of remotely measuring the electromagnetic properties of highly heterogeneous conducting films, enabling purposeful engineering of the electromagnetic properties of thin films in the microwave frequency range through fabrication of 'disordered' films of conducting particles such as metal nanoparticles or carbon nanotubes.

  3. Bulk viscosity for pion and nucleon thermal fluctuation in the hadron resonance gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Chatterjee, Sandeep; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2016-10-01

    We have calculated microscopically bulk viscosity of hadronic matter, where equilibrium thermodynamics for all hadrons in medium are described by the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. Considering pions and nucleons as abundant medium constituents, we have calculated their thermal widths, which inversely control the strength of bulk viscosities for respective components and represent their in-medium scattering probabilities with other mesonic and baryonic resonances, present in the medium. Our calculations show that bulk viscosity increases with both temperature and baryon chemical potential, whereas viscosity to entropy density ratio decreases with temperature and with baryon chemical potential, the ratio increases first and then decreases. The decreasing nature of the ratio with temperature has been observed in most of the earlier investigations with few exceptions. We find that the temperature dependence of bulk viscosity crucially depends on the structure of the relaxation time. Along the chemical freeze-out line in nucleus-nucleus collisions with increasing collision energy, bulk viscosity as well as the bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio decreases, which also agrees with earlier references. Our results indicate the picture of a strongly coupled hadronic medium.

  4. Quasi thermal noise spectroscopy in the inner magnetosphere of Saturn with Cassini/RPWS: Electron temperatures and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncuquet, Michel; Lecacheux, Alain; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Cecconi, Baptiste; Kurth, William S.

    2005-06-01

    On 1 July 2004, the Cassini spacecraft performed its Saturn orbit insertion, twice crossing the equatorial plane between the G and F rings. The radio HF receiver observed a peak at the upper-hybrid frequency and weakly banded emissions having well-defined minima at gyroharmonics. We show that through most of the encounter, these emissions do not result from instabilities, but instead are the quasi-thermal noise that can be calculated from the classical theory of plasma fluctuations. The spectroscopy of this noise yields the electron density, the core and the halo temperatures in the range 2.3 < L/RS < 7, -1.2 < z/RS < +0.1. For the first time, we measure the core temperature of the Kronian plasma torus to be about 0.5 eV in the ring plane at ~2.5RS, and increasing to ~6 eV at 7RS. From the noise minima at the gyroharmonics, we also deduce the magnetic field strength, which agrees with the Cassini's magnetometer data to better than 2%.

  5. Optimization and thermal ASE noise characterization of an all-fibre Sagnac interferometer via LAN for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra-Calderon, A.; Rodriguez-Novelo, J. C.; Gamez-Aviles, E.; May-Alarcon, M.; Toral-Cruz, H.; Alvarez-Chavez, J. A.

    2016-09-01

    The spectral noise characteristic and relative intensity noise of an all fibre Sagnac interferometer system consisting of a 980nm pump source at 130mW maximum output power, a 980/1550nm wavelength division multiplexer, a 10m-piece of Erbium-doped fibre, a fibre Bragg grating (FBG) centered at 1.548um, an optical circulator at 1550nm and a 50/50 fibre coupler, were measured with an optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) for fine tuning for a range of temperature between 5 and 180 degrees Celsius in step of 1 degree Celsius. At the probing end, a high-bi piece of fibre and a Peltier were employed for temperature variation of the system. Spectral and temperature response of the noise reduction due to temperature variation was performed remotely using and Arduino micro-controller and a DS18B20 digital sensor, into a local area network. Full optical and thermal characterization of the system will be included in the presentation.

  6. Hot-spot detection and calibration of a scanning thermal probe with a noise thermometry gold wire sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitas, Angelo; Wolgast, Steven; Covington, Elizabeth; Kurdak, Cagliyan

    2013-02-01

    Measuring the temperature profile of a nanoscale sample using scanning thermal microscopy is challenging due to a scanning probe's non-uniform heating. In order to address this challenge, we have developed a calibration sample consisting of a 1-μm wide gold wire, which can be heated electrically by a small bias current. The Joule heating in the calibration sample wire is characterized using noise thermometry. A thermal probe was scanned in contact over the gold wire and measured temperature changes as small as 0.4 K, corresponding to 17 ppm changes in probe resistance. The non-uniformity of the probe's temperature profile during a typical scan necessitated the introduction of a temperature conversion factor, η, which is defined as the ratio of the average temperature change of the probe with respect to the temperature change of the substrate. The conversion factor was calculated to be 0.035 ± 0.007. Finite element analysis simulations indicate a strong correlation between thermal probe sensitivity and probe tip curvature, suggesting that the sensitivity of the thermal probe can be improved by increasing the probe tip curvature, though at the expense of the spatial resolution provided by sharper tips. Simulations also indicate that a bow-tie metallization design could yield an additional 5- to 7-fold increase in sensitivity.

  7. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-15

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied – in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry – neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  8. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied - in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry - neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  9. R-MATRIX RESONANCE ANALYSIS AND STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE RESONANCE PARAMETERS OF 233U IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY RANGE FROM THERMAL TO 600 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    2001-02-27

    The R-matrix resonance analysis of experimental neutron transmission and cross sections of {sup 233}U, with the Reich-Moore Bayesian code SAMMY, was extended up to the neutron energy of 600 eV by taking advantage of new high resolution neutron transmission and fission cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). The experimental data base is described. In addition to the microscopic data (time-of-flight measurements of transmission and cross sections), some experimental and evaluated integral quantities were included in the data base. Tabulated and graphical comparisons between the experimental data and the SAMMY calculated cross sections are given. The ability of the calculated cross sections to reproduce the effective multiplication factors k{sub eff} for various thermal, intermediate, and fast systems was tested. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters were examined and recommended values of the average s-wave resonance parameters are given.

  10. Stochastic Resonance Controlled Upregulation of Internal Noise after Hearing Loss as a Putative Cause of Tinnitus-Related Neuronal Hyperactivity

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Patrick; Tziridis, Konstantin; Metzner, Claus; Schilling, Achim; Hoppe, Ulrich; Schulze, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus is generally assumed to be a consequence of hearing loss. In animal studies it has been demonstrated that acoustic trauma induced cochlear damage can lead to behavioral signs of tinnitus. In addition it was shown that noise trauma may lead to deafferentation of cochlear inner hair cells (IHC) even in the absence of elevated hearing thresholds, and it seems conceivable that such hidden hearing loss may be sufficient to cause tinnitus. Numerous studies have indicated that tinnitus is correlated with pathologically increased spontaneous firing rates and hyperactivity of neurons along the auditory pathway. It has been proposed that this hyperactivity is the consequence of a mechanism aiming to compensate for reduced input to the auditory system by increasing central neuronal gain, a mechanism referred to as homeostatic plasticity (HP), thereby maintaining mean firing rates over longer timescales for stabilization of neuronal processing. Here we propose an alternative, new interpretation of tinnitus-related development of neuronal hyperactivity in terms of information theory. In particular, we suggest that stochastic resonance (SR) plays a key role in both short- and long-term plasticity within the auditory system and that SR is the primary cause of neuronal hyperactivity and tinnitus. We argue that following hearing loss, SR serves to lift signals above the increased neuronal thresholds, thereby partly compensating for the hearing loss. In our model, the increased amount of internal noise—which is crucial for SR to work—corresponds to neuronal hyperactivity which subsequently causes neuronal plasticity along the auditory pathway and finally may lead to the development of a phantom percept, i.e., subjective tinnitus. We demonstrate the plausibility of our hypothesis using a computational model and provide exemplary findings in human patients that are consistent with that model. Finally we discuss the observed asymmetry in human tinnitus pitch

  11. Effects of thermal shape fluctuations and pairing fluctuations on the giant dipole resonance in warm nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhine Kumar, A. K.; Arumugam, P.; Dang, N. Dinh

    2015-04-01

    Apart from the higher limits of isospin and temperature, the properties of atomic nuclei are intriguing and less explored at the limits of lowest but finite temperatures. At very low temperatures there is a strong interplay between the shell (quantal fluctuations), statistical (thermal fluctuations), and residual pairing effects as evidenced from the studies on giant dipole resonance (GDR). In our recent work [Phys. Rev. C 90, 044308 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevC.90.044308], we have outlined some of our results from a theoretical approach for such warm nuclei where all these effects are incorporated along within the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) extended to include the fluctuations in the pairing field. In this article, we present the complete formalism based on the microscopic-macroscopic approach for determining the deformation energies and a macroscopic approach which links the deformation to GDR observables. We discuss our results for the nuclei 97Tc,120Sn,179Au, and 208Pb, and corroborate with the experimental data available. The TSFM could explain the data successfully at low temperature only with a proper treatment of pairing and its fluctuations. More measurements with better precision could yield rich information about several phase transitions that can happen in warm nuclei.

  12. Resonance lidar observations of thermal tides in the polar summer mesopause region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübken, Franz-Josef; Hoeffner, Josef

    Observations of thermal tides in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere (UMLT) at po-lar latitudes are notoriously difficult to perform since they require quasi-continuous profiling at daylight conditions. Passive ground based optical techniques suffer from solar background and operate in darkness only, whereas satellite based observations are hampered by solar ra-diation and, furthermore, are limited due to insufficient spatial and temporal coverage. Only sophisticated lidars can perform temperature measurements with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution to obtain information about tides in the summer UMLT region. The limitation is, of course, that measurements at a single station are performed. We present first measurements of thermal tides in the summer UMLT applying an iron resonance lidar being located at ALO-MAR (69N). We analyze data from a total of 22 days in the period June until August obtained in the summer of 2008. The amplitudes of the diurnal and semidiurnal tide are significantly larger compared to models like, for example, the global scale wave model (GSWM). Diurnal tidal amplitudes are generally larger compared to semidiurnal tides in the entire height range of observations (approximately 84-96 km). The phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal tide are generally consistent with GSWM, however, significant deviations are also present at some heights. Amplitudes and phases both vary substantially in time. We compare our results with wind measurements obtained from radars, and also with tidal signatures detected in noctilucent clouds.

  13. Electron spin resonance study of thermal instability reactions in jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeldes, H.; Livingston, R.

    1984-01-01

    Free radicals were studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) using model compounds that are representative of constituents of jet fuels. Radical formation was initiated with peroxides and hydroperoxides by using UV photolysis at and near room temperature and thermal initiation at higher temperatures. Both oxygen free and air saturated systems were studied. N-Dodecane was frequently used as a solvent, and a mixture of n-dodecyl radicals was made with a peroxide initiator in n-dodecane (free of oxygen) thermally at 212 C and photolytically at room temperature. Hydrogen abstraction from the 3,4,5 and 6-positions gives radicals that are sufficiently alike that their spectra are essentially superimposed. The radical formed by abstract of hydrogen from the 2-position gives a different spectrum. ESR parameters for these radicals were measured. The radical formed by abstraction of a primary hydrogen was not observed. Similar radicals are formed from n-decane. A variety of exploratory experiments were carried out with systems that give free radical spectra to which was added small amounts of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole.

  14. Laser neurosurgery: A systematic analysis of magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapies.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Carlito; Chung, Lawrance K; Pelargos, Panayiotis E; Ung, Nolan; Bui, Timothy T; Lee, Seung J; Voth, Brittany L; Yang, Isaac

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a novel minimally invasive modality that uses heat from laser probes to destroy tissue. Advances in probe design, cooling mechanisms, and real-time MR thermography have increased laser utilization in neurosurgery. The authors perform a systematic analysis of two commercially available MRgLITT systems used in neurosurgery: the Visualase® thermal therapy and NeuroBlate® Systems. Data extraction was performed in a blinded fashion. Twenty-two articles were included in the quantitative synthesis. A total of 223 patients were identified with the majority having undergone treatment with Visualase (n=154, 69%). Epilepsy was the most common indication for Visualase therapy (n=8 studies, 47%). Brain mass was the most common indication for NeuroBlate therapy (n=3 studies, 60%). There were no significant differences, except in age, wherein the NeuroBlate group was nearly twice as old as the Visualase group (p<0.001). Frame, total complications, and length-of-stay (LOS) were non-significant when adjusted for age and number of patients. Laser neurosurgery has evolved over recent decades. Clinical indications are currently being defined and will continue to emerge as laser technologies become more sophisticated. Head-to-head comparison of these systems was difficult given the variance in indications (and therefore patient population) and disparate literature.

  15. Thermal Actuation Based 3-DoF Non-Resonant Microgyroscope Using MetalMUMPs.

    PubMed

    Shakoor, Rana Iqtidar; Bazaz, Shafaat Ahmed; Kraft, Michael; Lai, Yongjun; Masood Ul Hassan, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    High force, large displacement and low voltage consumption are a primary concern for microgyroscopes. The chevron-shaped thermal actuators are unique in terms of high force generation combined with the large displacements at a low operating voltage in comparison with traditional electrostatic actuators. A Nickel based 3-DoF micromachined gyroscope comprising 2-DoF drive mode and 1-DoF sense mode oscillator utilizing the chevron-shaped thermal actuators is presented here. Analytical derivations and finite element simulations are carried out to predict the performance of the proposed device using the thermo-physical properties of electroplated nickel. The device sensitivity is improved by utilizing the dynamical amplification of the oscillation in 2-DoF drive mode using an active-passive mass configuration. A comprehensive theoretical description, dynamics and mechanical design considerations of the proposed gyroscopes model are discussed in detail. Parametric optimization of gyroscope, its prototype modeling and fabrication using MetalMUMPs has also been investigated. Dynamic transient simulation results predicted that the sense mass of the proposed device achieved a drive displacement of 4.1μm when a sinusoidal voltage of 0.5V is applied at 1.77 kHz exhibiting a mechanical sensitivity of 1.7μm /°/s in vacuum. The wide bandwidth frequency response of the 2-DoF drive mode oscillator consists of two resonant peaks and a flat region of 2.11 kHz between the peaks defining the operational frequency region. The sense mode resonant frequency can lie anywhere within this region and therefore the amplitude of the response is insensitive to structural parameter variations, enhancing device robustness against such variations. The proposed device has a size of 2.2 × 2.6 mm(2), almost one third in comparison with existing M-DoF vibratory gyroscope with an estimated power consumption of 0.26 Watts. These predicted results illustrate that the chevron-shaped thermal actuator

  16. Thermal Actuation Based 3-DoF Non-Resonant Microgyroscope Using MetalMUMPs

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Rana Iqtidar; Bazaz, Shafaat Ahmed; Kraft, Michael; Lai, Yongjun; Masood ul Hassan, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    High force, large displacement and low voltage consumption are a primary concern for microgyroscopes. The chevron-shaped thermal actuators are unique in terms of high force generation combined with the large displacements at a low operating voltage in comparison with traditional electrostatic actuators. A Nickel based 3-DoF micromachined gyroscope comprising 2-DoF drive mode and 1-DoF sense mode oscillator utilizing the chevron-shaped thermal actuators is presented here. Analytical derivations and finite element simulations are carried out to predict the performance of the proposed device using the thermo-physical properties of electroplated nickel. The device sensitivity is improved by utilizing the dynamical amplification of the oscillation in 2-DoF drive mode using an active-passive mass configuration. A comprehensive theoretical description, dynamics and mechanical design considerations of the proposed gyroscopes model are discussed in detail. Parametric optimization of gyroscope, its prototype modeling and fabrication using MetalMUMPs has also been investigated. Dynamic transient simulation results predicted that the sense mass of the proposed device achieved a drive displacement of 4.1μm when a sinusoidal voltage of 0.5V is applied at 1.77 kHz exhibiting a mechanical sensitivity of 1.7μm /°/s in vacuum. The wide bandwidth frequency response of the 2-DoF drive mode oscillator consists of two resonant peaks and a flat region of 2.11 kHz between the peaks defining the operational frequency region. The sense mode resonant frequency can lie anywhere within this region and therefore the amplitude of the response is insensitive to structural parameter variations, enhancing device robustness against such variations. The proposed device has a size of 2.2 × 2.6 mm2, almost one third in comparison with existing M-DoF vibratory gyroscope with an estimated power consumption of 0.26 Watts. These predicted results illustrate that the chevron-shaped thermal actuator has

  17. Statistical Modeling of Low SNR Magnetic Resonance Images in Wavelet Domain Using Laplacian Prior and Two-Sided Rayleigh Noise for Visual Quality Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbani, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new wavelet-based image denoising algorithm using maximum a posteriori (MAP) criterion. For this reason we propose Laplace distribution with local variance for clean image and two-sided Rayleigh model for noise in wavelet domain. The local Laplace probability density function (pdf) is able to simultaneously model the heavy-tailed nature of marginal distribution and intrascale dependency between spatial adjacent coefficients. Using local Laplace prior and two-sided Rayleigh noise, we derive a new shrinkage function for image denoising in the wavelet domain. We propose our new spatially adaptive wavelet-based image denoising algorithm for several low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) magnetic resonance (MR) images and compare the results with other methods. The simulation results show that this algorithm is able to truly improve the visual quality of noisy MR images with very low computational cost. In case the input MR image is blurred, a blind deconvolution (BD) algorithm is necessary for visual quality improvement. Since BD techniques are usually sensitive to noise, in this paper we also apply a BD algorithm to an appropriate subband in the wavelet domain to eliminate the effect of noise in the BD procedure and to further improve visual quality.

  18. A new high-precision furnace for paleomagnetic and paleointensity studies: Minimizing magnetic noise generated by heater currents inside traditional thermal demagnetizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhong; Zhao, Xixi; Horng, Chorng-Shern

    2010-04-01

    Although magnetic noise fields generated by heater currents in thermal demagnetizers have been noticed for a long time, no satisfactory tests have been conducted to quantify their effects. Toward this end, we have developed a new high-precision thermal demagnetizer that greatly reduces the magnetic noise field. We show the data quality generated by the new oven and the comparative results on several real samples that demonstrate the effects of the magnetic noise field due to heater currents. The properties of the spurious magnetization emanating from the heater currents critically depend on the decay rate of amplitude and its waveform of electric power which is delivered to oven coils at the end of the heating stage of thermal demagnetization. These results also illustrate the potential applications of this new instrument in paleomagnetism and paleointensity studies.

  19. Optimal feedback control of linear quantum systems in the presence of thermal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genoni, Marco G.; Mancini, Stefano; Serafini, Alessio

    2013-04-01

    We study the possibility of taking bosonic systems subject to quadratic Hamiltonians and a noisy thermal environment to nonclassical stationary states by feedback loops based on weak measurements and conditioned linear driving. We derive general analytical upper bounds for the single-mode squeezing and multimode entanglement at steady state, depending only on the Hamiltonian parameters and on the number of thermal excitations of the bath. Our findings show that, rather surprisingly, larger number of thermal excitations in the bath allow for larger steady-state squeezing and entanglement if the efficiency of the optimal continuous measurements conditioning the feedback loop is high enough. We also consider the performance of feedback strategies based on homodyne detection and show that, at variance with the optimal measurements, it degrades with increasing temperature.

  20. Phase-dependent deterministic switching of magnetoelectric spin wave detector in the presence of thermal noise via compensation of demagnetization

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Sourav Naeemi, Azad; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2015-11-09

    The possibility of achieving phase-dependent deterministic switching of the magnetoelectric spin wave detector in the presence of thermal noise has been discussed. The proposed idea relies on the modification of the energy landscape by partially canceling the out-of-plane demagnetizing field and the resultant change in the intrinsic magnetization dynamics to drive the nanomagnet towards a preferential final magnetization state. The remarkable increase in the probability of successful switching can be accounted for by the shift in the location of the saddle point in the energy landscape and a resultant change in the nature of the relaxation dynamics of the magnetization from a highly precessional to a fairly damped one and an increased dependence on the initial magnetization values, a crucial requirement for phase-dependent spin wave detection.

  1. Properties of the solar wind electrons between 1 and 3.3 AU from Ulysses thermal noise measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maksimovic, M.; Hoang, S.; Bougeret, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    In order to describe the distribution function f(v) of the solar wind electrons, the simplest model which is commonly used consists of the sum of two Maxwellians representing two distinct populations: a core (density n(sub c), temperature T(sub c)) and a halo (density n(sub h), temperature T(sub h)). It is possible, with the latter assumptions on the electron f(v), to determine the quasi-thermal noise (QTN) induced on an antenna by the motion of the ambient electrons in the solar wind. Using this distribution and the spectroscopy of thermal noise measurements from the radio receiver on Ulysses in the ecliptic plane, we deduce the total electron density N(sub e), the core temperature T(sub c), and the core and halo kinetic pressures N(sub c)T(sub c) and N(sub h)T(sub h). From these electron parameters, we can define a 'global' electron temperature as T(sub e) = (N(sub c)T(sub c) + N(sub h)T(sub h))/N(sub e). Here we present different radial gradients of T(sub e), between 1 and 3.3 AU, as a function of three classes of N(sub e) at 1 AU: low, intermediate, and high densities. In general all these gradients are found to be positive with different polytrope power law indexes between N(sub e) and T(sub e), which are in general lower than unity. We also show different behaviors of the ratio N(sub h)T(sub h)/N(sub c)T(sub c) for each density class considered. Some possible interpretations for these observations are discussed.

  2. Microwave measurements of the length and thermal expansion of a cylindrical resonator for primary acoustic gas thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Feng, X. J.; Zhang, J. T.; Lin, H.; Duan, Y. N.; Duan, Y. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In the application of acoustic gas thermometry to determine the Boltzmann constant and thermodynamic temperatures using resonant cavities, the internal dimensions or the thermal expansion of the cavity have to be known accurately. For this purpose, measurement of the microwave resonances has proved to be an accurate and convenient experimental technique for dimensional measurement of acoustic resonators. We report measurements of the length and longitudinal thermal expansion of a prototype cylindrical cavity made of oxygen-free copper. We studied four non-degenerate transverse magnetic modes for three isotherms at 243, 258 and 273 K. Two procedures were investigated for calculating the length and longitudinal thermal expansion of the cavity at the temperatures examined. The results from both methods agree well. The relative standard uncertainties for the measurements of length and longitudinal thermal expansion are less than 0.47  ×  10-6 and 0.04  ×  10-6, respectively, from 243 to 273 K. The low uncertainty achieved here provides confidence to pursue a determination of the Boltzmann constant and thermodynamic temperature with a cylindrical cavity and microwave techniques.

  3. Efficient HOMO-LUMO separation by multiple resonance effect toward ultrapure blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Takuji; Ikuta, Toshiaki; Shiren, Kazushi; Nakajima, Kiichi; Nomura, Shintaro; Ni, Jingping

    2016-09-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) play an important role in the new generation of flat-panel displays. Conventional OLEDs employing fluorescent materials together with triplet-triplet annihilation suffer from a relatively low internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of 62.5%. On the other hand, the IQE of OLEDs employing phosphorescent or thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials can reach 100%. However, these materials exhibit very broad peaks with a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 70-100 nm and cannot satisfy the color-purity requirements for displays. Therefore, the latest commercial OLED displays employ blue fluorescent materials with a relatively low IQE, and efficient blue emitters with a small FWHM are highly needed. In our manuscript, we present organic molecules that exhibit ultrapure blue fluorescence based on TADF. These molecules consist of three benzene rings connected by one boron and two nitrogen atoms, which establish a rigid polycyclic framework and significant localization of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals by a multiple resonance effect. An OLED device based on the new emitter exhibits ultrapure blue emission at 467 nm with an FWHM of 28 nm, Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.12, 0.13), and an IQE of 100%, which represent record-setting performance for blue OLED devices.

  4. Electron spin resonance study of point defects in thermal GaAs/GaAs-oxide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, S.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Stesmans, A.

    2012-12-01

    In an attempt to atomically assess interface and oxide-related point defects, a first basic multifrequency low-temperature electron spin resonance study has been carried out on semi-insulating (Fe compensated) GaAs/oxide structures, implying both powders and (100)GaAs/oxide slices, thermally grown in the range Tox=350-615 °C. Various spectra are observed: As for powders, this includes the 4-line EL2 defect spectrum centered at g~2.043 and characterized by the isotropic hyperfine constant Aiso~ 910 G, ascribed to the 75AsGa+ antisite defect. Observed in freshly crushed powder, it substantially increases in density with oxidation, in line with theoretical expectation; A maximum appears reached for at Tox~440 °C. It is not observed in the parent c-GaAs wafer. A second isotropic signal is observed at g~1.937 in powders for Tox in the range 510-615 °C, but only after additional VUV irradiation; it may correspond to As clusters. In bulk (100)GaAs, we observe the 5-branch spectrum of substitutional Fe impurities (spin S=5/2) in GaAs, with inferred crystal field constant a ≈ 360 G, well in line with previous observations. The results are discussed within the framework of advanced theoretical interface and defect models and previous experimental assessment.

  5. Method to Produce Flexible Ceramic Thermal Protection System Resistant to High Aeroacoustic Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor); Calamito, Dominic P. (Inventor); Jong, Anthony (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method of producing a three dimensional angle interlock ceramic fiber which is stable to high aeroacoustic noise of about 170 decibels and to high temperatures of about 2500 F is disclosed. The method uses multiple separate strands of a ceramic fiber or ceramic tow suitable for weaving having multiple warp fibers and multiple fill fibers woven with a modified fly-shuttle loom or rapier shuttleless loom which has nip rolls, a modified fabric advancement mechanism and at least eight harnesses in connection with a Dobby pattern chain utilizing sufficient heddles for each warp fiber and a reed which accommodates at least 168 ends per inch. The method produces a multilayered top fabric, rib fabric and single-layered bottom fabric.

  6. Terahertz bolometric detection by thermal noise in graphene field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoub, Akram M.; Suzuki, Shinichi; Ouchi, Takahiro; Aoki, Nobuyuki; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Omatsu, Takashige; Ishibashi, Koji; Ochiai, Yuichi

    2015-08-01

    Monolayer (MLG) and bilayer (BLG) graphene devices have been fabricated with integrated antennas and have been investigated for a wideband terahertz (THz) detection at room temperature (RT). The devices show opposite (metallic vs. semiconducting, respectively) temperature coefficients of their resistance, which enable us to achieve a reproducible THz response via bolometric heating. The bolometric nature of this response is inferred by determining the spectral density of the 1/f resistance noise exhibited by the devices, as a function of the incident THz power. With increasing power, the spectral density varies in the two devices in a manner that reflects the opposite signs of their resistance temperature coefficients. The bolometric response is furthermore confirmed for both devices by the variation of their Hooge parameter as a function of the THz power. Overall, these observations confirm the capacity of graphene devices for sensitive broadband THz detection near RT.

  7. A partial differential equation-based general framework adapted to Rayleigh's, Rician's and Gaussian's distributed noise for restoration and enhancement of magnetic resonance image.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ram Bharos; Srivastava, Subodh; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    The proposed framework is obtained by casting the noise removal problem into a variational framework. This framework automatically identifies the various types of noise present in the magnetic resonance image and filters them by choosing an appropriate filter. This filter includes two terms: the first term is a data likelihood term and the second term is a prior function. The first term is obtained by minimizing the negative log likelihood of the corresponding probability density functions: Gaussian or Rayleigh or Rician. Further, due to the ill-posedness of the likelihood term, a prior function is needed. This paper examines three partial differential equation based priors which include total variation based prior, anisotropic diffusion based prior, and a complex diffusion (CD) based prior. A regularization parameter is used to balance the trade-off between data fidelity term and prior. The finite difference scheme is used for discretization of the proposed method. The performance analysis and comparative study of the proposed method with other standard methods is presented for brain web dataset at varying noise levels in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean square error, structure similarity index map, and correlation parameter. From the simulation results, it is observed that the proposed framework with CD based prior is performing better in comparison to other priors in consideration.

  8. A partial differential equation-based general framework adapted to Rayleigh's, Rician's and Gaussian's distributed noise for restoration and enhancement of magnetic resonance image

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ram Bharos; Srivastava, Subodh; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    The proposed framework is obtained by casting the noise removal problem into a variational framework. This framework automatically identifies the various types of noise present in the magnetic resonance image and filters them by choosing an appropriate filter. This filter includes two terms: the first term is a data likelihood term and the second term is a prior function. The first term is obtained by minimizing the negative log likelihood of the corresponding probability density functions: Gaussian or Rayleigh or Rician. Further, due to the ill-posedness of the likelihood term, a prior function is needed. This paper examines three partial differential equation based priors which include total variation based prior, anisotropic diffusion based prior, and a complex diffusion (CD) based prior. A regularization parameter is used to balance the trade-off between data fidelity term and prior. The finite difference scheme is used for discretization of the proposed method. The performance analysis and comparative study of the proposed method with other standard methods is presented for brain web dataset at varying noise levels in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean square error, structure similarity index map, and correlation parameter. From the simulation results, it is observed that the proposed framework with CD based prior is performing better in comparison to other priors in consideration. PMID:28144118

  9. Attainable entanglement of unitary transformed thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with the chemical shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Yukihiro; Mikami, Shuji; Yoshida, Motoyuki; Ohba, Ichiro

    2007-11-01

    Yu, Brown and Chuang investigated the entanglement attainable from unitary transformed thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Their research gave insight into the role of entanglement in a liquid-state NMR quantum computer. However, they assumed that the Zeeman energy of each nuclear spin which corresponds to a qubit takes a common value for all; there is no chemical shift. In this paper, we research a model with chemical shifts and analytically derive the physical parameter region where unitary transformed thermal states are entangled, by employing the positive partial transposition (PPT) criterion with respect to any bipartition. The analysis taking account of the chemical shift reveals how the difference between quantum gates reflects on the physical parameter region where unitary transformed thermal states are entangled. In addition, we examine the distillability of unitary transformed thermal states and the effect of the chemical shifts on the boundary between the separability and the nonseparability.

  10. An analytical study on excitation of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability due to seismically induced resonance in BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Masashi

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a scoping study on seismically induced resonance of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability in BWRs, which was conducted by using TRAC-BF1 within a framework of a point kinetics model. As a result of the analysis, it is shown that a reactivity insertion could occur accompanied by in-surge of coolant into the core resulted from the excitation of the nuclear-coupled instability by the external acceleration. In order to analyze this phenomenon more in detail, it is necessary to couple a thermal-hydraulic code with a three-dimensional nuclear kinetics code.

  11. {sup 57}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 58}Co reaction cross section: Thermal and resonance integral measurements and energy dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Maidana, Nora L.; Mesa, Joel; Vanin, Vito R.; Castro, Ruy M.; Dias, Mauro S.; Koskinas, Marina F.

    2004-07-01

    The {sup 57}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 58}Co thermal and resonance integral cross section were measured as 51(5) b and 20.0(19) b, respectively, by irradiating aliquots of {sup 57}Co solution sealed inside quartz bottles near the core of the IEA-R1 IPEN research reactor and counting the gamma-ray residual activity. The irradiations were monitored using Au-Al alloy foils, with and without Cd cover. The gamma-ray measurements were performed with a shielded HPGe detector. Westcott formalism was applied for the average neutron flux determination. The cross section energy dependence was evaluated using the multilevel Breit-Wigner expression considering the first two resonances and the statistical model for energies above the second resonance. Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross section with neutron temperatures between 5 and 100 keV were also evaluated.

  12. Probing of local structures of thermal and photoinduced phases in rubidium manganese hexacyanoferrate by resonant Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Ryo; Asahara, Akifumi; Ishige, Shun; Nakajima, Makoto; Tokoro, Hiroko; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi; Suemoto, Tohru

    2013-08-28

    Resonant couplings of the electronic states and the stretching vibrations of CN(-) ligands, which bridges metal ions, is investigated by resonance Raman spectroscopy for Rb(0.94)Mn[Fe(CN)6](0.98)·0.2H2O. Large excitation wavelength dependences over one order of magnitude were found for Raman peaks corresponding to different valence pairs of metal ions in the excitation wavelength range between 350 and 632 nm. In the thermal low-temperature phase, the CN(-) stretching modes due to the low-temperature-phase configuration (Fe(2+)-Mn(3+)) and the phase-boundary configuration (Fe(3+)-Mn(3+)) are coupled to the Fe(2+)-to-Mn(3+) intervalence transfer band and Jahn-Teller distorted Mn(3+) d-d transition band, respectively. In the photoinduced low-temperature phase, the Fe(3+)-Mn(3+) mode shows strong resonant enhancement with the CN(-)-to-Fe(3+) charge-transfer band, which exists in the high-temperature phase with a cubic structure. From these resonance behaviors, we conclude that the local lattice symmetry of the photoinduced phase is cubic in contrast with the tetragonal symmetry in the thermal low-temperature phase.

  13. Numerical modelling of thermal effects in rats due to high-field magnetic resonance imaging (0.5 1 GHz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakic, Adnan; Crozier, Stuart; Liu, Feng

    2004-12-01

    A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) thermal model has been developed to compute the temperature elevation in the Sprague Dawley rat due to electromagnetic energy deposition in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The field strengths examined ranged from 11.75-23.5 T (corresponding to 1H resonances of 0.5-1 GHz) and an N-stub birdcage resonator was used to both transmit radio-frequency energy and receive the MRI signals. With an in-plane resolution of 1.95 mm, the inhomogeneous rat phantom forms a segmented model of 12 different tissue types, each having its electrical and thermal parameters assigned. The steady-state temperature distribution was calculated using a Pennes 'bioheat' approach. The numerical algorithm used to calculate the induced temperature distribution has been successfully validated against analytical solutions in the form of simplified spherical models with electrical and thermal properties of rat muscle. As well as assisting with the design of MRI experiments and apparatus, the numerical procedures developed in this study could help in future research and design of tumour-treating hyperthermia applicators to be used on rats in vivo.

  14. Numerical modelling of thermal effects in rats due to high-field magnetic resonance imaging (0.5-1 GHZ).

    PubMed

    Trakic, Adnan; Crozier, Stuart; Liu, Feng

    2004-12-21

    A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) thermal model has been developed to compute the temperature elevation in the Sprague Dawley rat due to electromagnetic energy deposition in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The field strengths examined ranged from 11.75-23.5 T (corresponding to 1H resonances of 0.5-1 GHz) and an N-stub birdcage resonator was used to both transmit radio-frequency energy and receive the MRI signals. With an in-plane resolution of 1.95 mm, the inhomogeneous rat phantom forms a segmented model of 12 different tissue types, each having its electrical and thermal parameters assigned. The steady-state temperature distribution was calculated using a Pennes 'bioheat' approach. The numerical algorithm used to calculate the induced temperature distribution has been successfully validated against analytical solutions in the form of simplified spherical models with electrical and thermal properties of rat muscle. As well as assisting with the design of MRI experiments and apparatus, the numerical procedures developed in this study could help in future research and design of tumour-treating hyperthermia applicators to be used on rats in vivo.

  15. Technical Note: Compact three-tesla magnetic resonance imager with high-performance gradients passes ACR image quality and acoustic noise tests

    PubMed Central

    Weavers, Paul T.; Shu, Yunhong; Tao, Shengzhen; Huston, John; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Graziani, Dominic; Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Foo, Thomas K.-F.; Bernstein, Matt A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A compact, three-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been developed. It features a 37 cm patient aperture, allowing the use of commercial receiver coils. Its design allows simultaneously for gradient amplitudes of 85 millitesla per meter (mT/m) sustained and 700 tesla per meter per second (T/m/s) slew rates. The size of the gradient system allows for these simultaneous performance targets to be achieved with little or no peripheral nerve stimulation, but also raises a concern about the geometric distortion as much of the imaging will be done near the system’s maximum 26 cm field-of-view. Additionally, the fast switching capability raises acoustic noise concerns. This work evaluates the system for both the American College of Radiology’s (ACR) MRI image quality protocol and the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) nonsignificant risk (NSR) acoustic noise limits for MR. Passing these two tests is critical for clinical acceptance. Methods: In this work, the gradient system was operated at the maximum amplitude and slew rate of 80 mT/m and 500 T/m/s, respectively. The geometric distortion correction was accomplished by iteratively determining up to the tenth order spherical harmonic coefficients using a fiducial phantom and position-tracking software, with seventh order correction utilized in the ACR test. Acoustic noise was measured with several standard clinical pulse sequences. Results: The system passes all the ACR image quality tests. The acoustic noise as measured when the gradient coil was inserted into a whole-body MRI system conforms to the FDA NSR limits. Conclusions: The compact system simultaneously allows for high gradient amplitude and high slew rate. Geometric distortion concerns have been mitigated by extending the spherical harmonic correction to higher orders. Acoustic noise is within the FDA limits. PMID:26936710

  16. Post-processing noise removal algorithm for magnetic resonance imaging based on edge detection and wavelet analysis.

    PubMed

    Placidi, Giuseppe; Alecci, Marcello; Sotgiu, Antonello

    2003-07-07

    A post-processing noise suppression technique for biomedical MRI images is presented. The described procedure recovers both sharp edges and smooth surfaces from a given noisy MRI image; it does not blur the edges and does not introduce spikes or other artefacts. The fine details of the image are also preserved. The proposed algorithm first extracts the edges from the original image and then performs noise reduction by using a wavelet de-noise method. After the application of the wavelet method, the edges are restored to the filtered image. The result is the original image with less noise, fine detail and sharp edges. Edge extraction is performed by using an algorithm based on Sobel operators. The wavelet de-noise method is based on the calculation of the correlation factor between wavelet coefficients belonging to different scales. The algorithm was tested on several MRI images and, as an example of its application, we report the results obtained from a spin echo (multi echo) MRI image of a human wrist collected with a low field experimental scanner (the signal-to-noise ratio, SNR, of the experimental image was 12). Other filtering operations have been performed after the addition of white noise on both channels of the experimental image, before the magnitude calculation. The results at SNR = 7, SNR = 5 and SNR = 3 are also reported. For SNR values between 5 and 12, the improvement in SNR was substantial and the fine details were preserved, the edges were not blurred and no spikes or other artefacts were evident, demonstrating the good performances of our method. At very low SNR (SNR = 3) our result is worse than that obtained by a simpler filtering procedure.

  17. Post-processing noise removal algorithm for magnetic resonance imaging based on edge detection and wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, Giuseppe; Alecci, Marcello; Sotgiu, Antonello

    2003-07-01

    A post-processing noise suppression technique for biomedical MRI images is presented. The described procedure recovers both sharp edges and smooth surfaces from a given noisy MRI image; it does not blur the edges and does not introduce spikes or other artefacts. The fine details of the image are also preserved. The proposed algorithm first extracts the edges from the original image and then performs noise reduction by using a wavelet de-noise method. After the application of the wavelet method, the edges are restored to the filtered image. The result is the original image with less noise, fine detail and sharp edges. Edge extraction is performed by using an algorithm based on Sobel operators. The wavelet de-noise method is based on the calculation of the correlation factor between wavelet coefficients belonging to different scales. The algorithm was tested on several MRI images and, as an example of its application, we report the results obtained from a spin echo (multi echo) MRI image of a human wrist collected with a low field experimental scanner (the signal-to-noise ratio, SNR, of the experimental image was 12). Other filtering operations have been performed after the addition of white noise on both channels of the experimental image, before the magnitude calculation. The results at SNR = 7, SNR = 5 and SNR = 3 are also reported. For SNR values between 5 and 12, the improvement in SNR was substantial and the fine details were preserved, the edges were not blurred and no spikes or other artefacts were evident, demonstrating the good performances of our method. At very low SNR (SNR = 3) our result is worse than that obtained by a simpler filtering procedure.

  18. Thermal noise of mechanical oscillators in steady states with a heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Livia; Lazzaro, Claudia; Karapetyan, Gagik; Bonaldi, Michele; Pegoraro, Matteo; Thakur, Ram-Krishna; De Gregorio, Paolo; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2014-09-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the statistical properties of the position fluctuations of low-loss oscillators in nonequilibrium steady states. The oscillators are coupled to a heat bath, and a nonequilibrium steady state is produced by flowing a constant heat flux, setting a temperature difference across the oscillators. We investigated the distribution of the measurements of the square of the oscillator position and searched for signs of changes with respect to the equilibrium case. We found that, after normalization by the mean value, the second, third, and fourth standardized statistical moments are not modified by the underlying thermodynamic state. This differs from the behavior of the absolute, i.e., not normalized, second moment, which is strongly affected by temperature gradients and heat fluxes. We illustrate this with a numerical experiment in which we study via molecular dynamics the fluctuations of the length of a one-dimensional chain of identical particles interacting via anharmonic interparticle potentials, with the extremes thermostated at different temperatures: we use the variance of the length in correspondence to its first elastic mode of resonance to define an effective temperature which we observe to depart from the thermodynamic one in the nonequilibrium states. We investigate the effect of changing the interparticle potential and show that the qualitative behavior of the nonequilibrium excess is unchanged. Our numerical results are consistent with the chain length being Gaussian distributed in the nonequilibrium states. Our experimental investigation reveals that the position variance is the only, and crucially easily accessible, observable for distinguishing equilibrium from nonequilibrium steady states. The consequences of this fact for the design of interferometric gravitational wave detectors are discussed.

  19. Using active resonator impedance matching for shot-noise limited, cavity enhanced amplitude modulated laser absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chow, Jong H; Littler, Ian C M; Rabeling, David S; McClelland, David E; Gray, Malcolm B

    2008-05-26

    We introduce a closed-loop feedback technique to actively control the coupling condition of an optical cavity, by employing amplitude modulation of the interrogating laser. We show that active impedance matching of the cavity facilitates optimal shot-noise sensing performance in a cavity enhanced system, while its control error signal can be used for intra-cavity absorption or loss signal extraction. We present the first demonstration of this technique with a fiber ring cavity, and achieved shot-noise limited loss sensitivity. We also briefly discuss further use of impedance matching control as a tool for other applications.

  20. 13C Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of kerogen from Cretaceous black shales thermally altered by basaltic intrusions and laboratory simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dennis, L.W.; Maciel, G.E.; Hatcher, P.G.; Simoneit, B.R.T.

    1982-01-01

    Cretaceous black shales from DSDP Leg 41, Site 368 in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean were thermally altered during the Miocene by an intrusive basalt. The sediments overlying and underlying the intrusive body were subjected to high temperatures (up to ~ 500??C) and, as a result, their kerogen was significantly altered. The extent of this alteration has been determined by examination by means of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, using cross polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS). Results indicate that the kerogen becomes progressively more aromatic in the vicinity of the intrusive body. Laboratory heating experiments, simulating the thermal effects of the basaltic intrusion, produced similar results on unaltered shale from the drill core. The 13C CP/MAS results appear to provide a good measure of thermal alteration. ?? 1982.

  1. RF noise induced laser perturbation for improving the performance of non-resonant cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ciaffoni, Luca; Couper, John; Hancock, Gus; Peverall, Robert; Robbins, Peter A; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2014-07-14

    We present a novel strategy for suppressing mode structure which often degrades off-axis cavity enhanced absorption spectra. This strategy relies on promoting small, random fluctuations in the optical frequency by perturbing the injection current of the diode laser source with radio frequency (RF) bandwidth-limited white noise. A fast and compact oxygen sensor, constructed from a 764 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and an optical cavity with re-entrant configuration, is employed to demonstrate the potential of this scheme for improving the sensitivity and robustness of a field-deployable cavity spectrometer. The RF spectral density of the current noise injected into the VCSEL has been measured, and correlated to the effects on the optical spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and laser linewidth for a range of re-entrant geometries. A fourfold gain in the SNR has been achieved using the RF noise perturbation for the optimal off-axis alignment, which led to a minimum detectable absorption (MDA) predicted from an Allan variance study as low as 4.3 × 10(-5) at 1 s averaging. For the optically forbidden oxygen transition under investigation, a limit of detection (SNR = 1) of 810 ppm was achieved for a 10 ms acquisition time. This performance level paves the way for a fast, sensitive, in-line oxygen spectrometer that lends itself to a range of applications in respiratory medicine.

  2. Nano-domains of high viscosity and stiffness mapped in the cell membrane by thermal noise imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yunhsiang; Pralle, Arnd

    2012-02-01

    The cell membrane is thought to contain spatial domains, created by cholesterol-lipid clusters and by interactions with the membrane cytoskeleton. The influence of these domains on membrane protein mobility and cell signaling has clearly been demonstrate. Yet, due to their small size and transient nature, the cholesterol stabilized domains cannot be visualized directly. We show here that thermal noise imaging (TNI) which tracks the diffusion of a colloid labeled membrane protein with microsecond and nanometer precision, can visualize cholesterol stabilized domains, also know as lipid raft, in intact cells. Using TNI to confine a single membrane protein to diffuse for seconds in an area of 300nm x 300nm provides sufficient data for high resolutions maps of the local diffusion, local attraction potentials and membrane stiffness. Using a GPI-anchored GFP molecule to probe the membrane of PtK2 cells we detect domains of increased membrane stiffness, which also show increase viscosity and are the preferred location for the GPI-anchored protein. These domains are further stabilized by addition of ganglioside cross linking toxins and disappear after removal of the cholesterol.

  3. Liquid-phase exfoliated graphene self-assembled films: Low-frequency noise and thermal-electric characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubon Usca, G.; Hernandez-Ambato, J.; Pace, C.; Caputi, L. S.; Tavolaro, A.

    2016-09-01

    In few years, graphene has become a revolutionary material, leading not only to applications in various fields such as electronics, medicine and environment, but also to the production of new types of 2D materials. In this work, Liquid Phase Exfoliation (LPE) was applied to natural graphite by brief sonication or mixer treatment in suitable solvents, in order to produce Few Layers Graphene (FLG) suspensions. Additionally, zeolite 4A (Z4A) was added during the production of FLG flakes-based inks, with the aim of aiding the exfoliation process. Conductive films were obtained by drop casting three types of suspensions over Al2O3 substrates with interdigitated electrodes, with total channel surface of 1.39 mm2. The morphology characterization resulted in the verification of the presence of thin self-assembled flakes. Raman studies gave evidence of 4 to 10 layers graphene flakes. Electrical measurements were performed to state the Low-Frequency Noise and Thermal-Electric characteristics of the samples. We observe interesting relations between sample preparation procedures and electrical properties.

  4. A multi-nano-dot circuit and structure using thermal-noise-assisted tunneling for stochastic associative processing.

    PubMed

    Morie, Takashi; Matsuura, Tomohiro; Nagata, Makoto; Iwata, Atsushi

    2002-01-01

    The single-electron circuit and nanostructure described in this paper are designed for stochastic associative processing, which is an expanded version of ordinary associative memory processing. In stochastic associative processing, the association probability of each stored pattern depends on the similarity between the stored pattern and the input pattern. Such unique processing is useful for sequential stochastic association and for clustering for vector quantization. Conventional single-electron circuits operate only at very low temperature for practical junction capacitance (i.e., 30 K for 0.1 aF) because the charging energy in these circuits is directly related to the tunnel junction capacitance. Our multi-nano-dot circuit and structure operate at room temperature with a junction capacitance around 0.1 aF through tunneling processes assisted by thermal noise. We analyze the operation of this circuit in detail and propose for it a stochastic associative processing operation, where the detection timing of the electron position controls the association probability distribution.

  5. Thermal-neutron cross sections and resonance integrals of 138Ba and 141Pr using Am-Be neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Mohanakrishnan, P.

    2016-09-01

    The thermal-neutron capture cross sections and resonance integrals of 138Ba(n, γ)139Ba and 141Pr(n, γ)142Pr were measured by activation method using an isotopic Am-Be neutron source. The estimations were with respect to that of 55Mn(n, γ)56Mn and 197Au(n, γ)198Au reference monitors. The measured thermal-capture cross section of 138 Ba with respect to 55 Mn is 0.410±0.023 b and with respect to 197 Au is 0.386±0.019 b. The measured thermal-capture cross section of 141 Pr with respect to 55 Mn is 11.36±1.29 b and with respect to 197 Au is 10.43±1.14 b. The resonance integrals for 138 Ba are 0.380±0.033 b (55 Mn) and 0.364±0.027 b (197 Au) and for 141 Pr are 21.05±2.88 b (55 Mn) and 15.27±1.87 b (197 Au). The comparison between the present measurements and various reported values are discussed. The cross sections corresponding to the selected isotopes are measured using an Am-Be source facility for the first time.

  6. Surface plasmon resonances, optical properties, and electrical conductivity thermal hystersis of silver nanofibers produced by the electrospinning technique.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Nasser A M; Woo, Kee-Do; Kanjwal, Muzafar A; Choi, Kyung Eun; Khil, Myung Seob; Kim, Hak Yong

    2008-10-21

    In the present study, silver metal nanofibers have been successfully prepared by using the electrospinning technique. Silver nanofibers have been produced by electrospinning a sol-gel consisting of poly(vinyl alcohol) and silver nitrate. The dried nanofiber mats have been calcined at 850 degrees C in an argon atmosphere. The produced nanofibers do have distinct plasmon resonance compared with the reported silver nanoparticles. Contrary to the introduced shapes of silver nanoparticles, the nanofibers have a blue-shifted plasmon resonance at 330 nm. Moreover, the optical properties study indicated that the synthesized nanofibers have two band gap energies of 0.75 and 2.34 eV. An investigation of the electrical conductivity behavior of the obtained nanofibers shows thermal hystersis. These privileged physical features greatly widen the applications of the prepared nanofibers in various fields.

  7. Local thermal resonance control of GaInP photonic crystal membrane cavities using ambient gas cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Sergei Lian, Jin; Yüce, Emre; Mosk, Allard P.; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaelle; De Rossi, Alfredo

    2015-04-27

    We perform spatially dependent tuning of a GaInP photonic crystal cavity using a continuous wave violet laser. Local tuning is obtained by laser heating of the photonic crystal membrane. The cavity resonance shift is measured for different pump positions and for two ambient gases: He and N{sub 2}. We find that the width of the temperature profile induced in the membrane depends strongly on the thermal conductivity of the ambient gas. For He gas, a narrow spatial width of the temperature profile of 2.8 μm is predicted and verified in experiment.

  8. Increasing the signal-to-noise ratio by using vertically stacked phased array coils for low-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dandan; Hui, Hon Tat; Yeo, Tat Soon

    2012-11-01

    A new method is introduced to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems by using a vertically stacked phased coil array. It is shown theoretically that the SNR is increased with the square root of the number of coils in the array if the array signals are properly combined to remove the mutual coupling effect. Based on this, a number of vertically stacked phased coil arrays have been designed and characterized by a numerical simulation method. The performance of these arrays confirms the significant increase of SNR by increasing the number of coils in the arrays. This provides a simple and efficient method to improve the SNR for low-field MRI systems.

  9. 1-D and 2-D resonances in an Alpine valley identified from ambient noise measurements and 3-D modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Olivier; Cornou, Cécile; Jongmans, Denis; Schwartz, Stéphane

    2012-09-01

    H/V spectral ratios are regularly used for estimating the bedrock depth in 1-D like basins exhibiting smooth lateral variations. In the case of 2-D or 3-D pronounced geometries, observational and numerical studies have shown that H/V curves exhibit peculiar shapes and that the H/V frequency generally overestimates 1-D theoretical resonance frequency. To investigate the capabilities of the H/V method in complex structures, a detailed comparison between measured and 3-D-simulated ambient vibrations was performed in the small-size lower Romanche valley (French Alps), which shows significant variations in geometry, downstream and upstream the Séchilienne basin. Analysing the H/V curve characteristics, two different wave propagation modes were identified along the valley. Relying on previous geophysical investigation, a power-law relationship was derived between the bedrock depth and the H/V peak frequency, which was used for building a 3-D model of the valley geometry. Simulated and experimental H/V curves were found to exhibit quite similar features in terms of curve shape and peak frequency values, validating the 3-D structure. This good agreement also evidenced two different propagation modes in the valley: 2-D resonance in the Séchilienne basin and 1-D resonance in the external parts. This study underlines the interest of H/V curves for investigating complex basin structures.

  10. Exploring single-molecule interactions through 3D optical trapping and tracking: From thermal noise to protein refolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley Philip

    The focus of this thesis is the development and application of a novel technique for investigating the structure and dynamics of weak interactions between and within single-molecules. This approach is designed to explore unusual features in bi-directional transitions near equilibrium. The basic idea is to infer molecular events by observing changes in the three-dimensional Brownian fluctuations of a functionalized microsphere held weakly near a reactive substrate. Experimentally, I have developed a unique optical tweezers system that combines an interference technique for accurate 3D tracking (˜1 nm vertically, and ˜2-3 nm laterally) with a continuous autofocus system which stabilizes the trap height to within 1-2 mn over hours. A number of different physical and biological systems were investigated with this instrument. Data interpretation was assisted by a multi-scale Brownian Dynamics simulation that I have developed. I have explored the 3D signatures of different molecular tethers, distinguishing between single and multiple attachments, as well as between stiff and soft linkages. As well, I have developed a technique for measuring the force-dependent compliance of molecular tethers from thermal noise fluctuations and demonstrated this with a short ssDNA oligomer. Another practical approach that I have developed for extracting information from fluctuation measurements is Inverse Brownian Dynamics, which yields the underlying potential of mean force and position dependent diffusion coefficient from the Brownian motion of a particle. I have also developed a new force calibration method that takes into account video motion blur, and that uses this information to measure bead dynamics. Perhaps most significantly, I have trade the first direct observations of the refolding of spectrin repeats under mechanical force, and investigated the force-dependent kinetics of this transition.

  11. The radio waves and thermal electrostatic noise spectroscopy (SORBET) experiment on BEPICOLOMBO/MMO/PWI: Scientific objectives and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncuquet, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Blomberg, L. G.; Issautier, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Kojima, H.; Maksimovic, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Zarka, P.

    2006-01-01

    SORBET ( Spectroscopie des Ondes Radio and du Bruit Electrostatique Thermique) is a radio HF spectrometer designed for the radio and Plasma Waves Instrument onboard BepiColombo/Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), which performs remote and in situ measurements of waves (electromagnetic and electrostatic). Technically, SORBET includes a plasma wave spectrometer, with two E-field inputs from the two perpendicular electric antennas and one B-field input from a search coil, in the range 2.5-640 kHz. This frequency band includes the local gyrofrequency and plasma frequency expected on most part of the MMO orbits. SORBET also includes a higher frequency radio receiver for remote sensing in the range 500 kHz-10.2 MHz. Owing to its capabilities, SORBET will be able to address the following scientific objectives: High resolution mapping (˜30 km) of electron density and temperature in the solar wind and in the Hermean magnetosphere and exo-ionosphere, via the technique of Quasi-Thermal Noise (QTN) spectroscopy. These QTN measurements will be determinant for the dynamic modeling of the magnetosphere and will provide a fundamental input for the chemistry of cold ionized species (Na, K, O, …) in Mercury's environment. Detection and study of Hermean radio emissions, including possible cyclotron emissions (up to ˜10-20 kHz) from mildly energetic electrons in most highly magnetized (polar?) regions, and possible synchrotron radiation (up to a few MHz?) from more energetic electrons. Monitoring of solar radio emissions up to ˜10 MHz in order to create a solar activity index from the view point of Mercury, allowing to correlate it with the Hermean magnetospheric response. We especially discuss the capabilities of SORBET for performing the QTN spectroscopy in Mercury's magnetosphere, using the two electric dipole antennas equipping MMO, called MEFISTO and WPT.

  12. Helmholtz Resonances in Photoacoustic Experiment with Laser-Sintered Polyamide Including Thermal Memory of Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, M. N.; Nesic, M. V.; Ciric-Kostic, S.; Zivanov, M.; Markushev, D. D.; Rabasovic, M. D.; Galovic, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    A minimum volume photoacoustic (PA) cell, employed as an acoustic resonator, is presented. A model of the PA cell transfer function, as a combination of two Helmholtz resonators, is derived. Frequency PA response is described as the product of theoretically derived pressure variation and the transfer function of the PA cell. The derived model is applied to the frequency PA measurements, performed on laser-sintered polyamide. It is shown that the derived model explains the occurrence of resonant peaks in the high-frequency domain ({>}10 kHz), in both amplitude and phase measurements, obtained by a gas-microphone minimal volume PA cell. The implementation of the model in the growing possibilities of sample characterization using gas-microphone PA cell is discussed.

  13. Electron spin resonance of ultraviolet radiation induced defects in ZnO thermal control coating pigment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T.

    1972-01-01

    Electron spin resonance measurements on variously treated zinc oxide powders reveal that the resonance signal at g = 1.956 is due to one electron trapped oxygen ion vacancy level, at a depth of (0.31 plus or minus 0.02) eV below the conduction band. The electrons at this level are delocalized. Schottky barrier influences nearly the entire bulk of the powder sample, and the bending of the bands caused by chemisorbed oxygen puts the vacancy level above the Fermi level almost through the entire bulk.

  14. Thermal shift of the resonance between an electron gas and quantum dots: what is the origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinks, Fabian; Wieck, Andreas D.; Ludwig, Arne

    2016-12-01

    The operation of quantum dots (QDs) at highest possible temperatures is desirable for many applications. Capacitance-voltage spectroscopy (C(V)-spectroscopy) measurements are an established instrument to analyse the electronic structure and energy levels of self-assembled QDs. We perform C(V) in the dark and C(V) under the influence of non-resonant illumination, probing exciton states up to {X}4+ on InAs QDs embedded in a GaAs matrix for temperatures ranging from 2.5 to 120 K. While a small shift in the charging spectra resonance is observed for the two spin degenerate electron s-state charging voltages with increasing temperature, a huge shift is visible for the electron-hole excitonic states resonance voltages. The s2-peak moves to slightly higher, the s1-peak to slightly lower charging voltages. In contrast, the excitonic states are surprisingly charged at much lower voltages upon increasing temperature. We derive a rate-model allowing to attribute and value different contributions to these shifts. Resonant tunnelling, state degeneracy and hole generation rate in combination with the Fermi distribution function turn out to be of great importance for the observed effects. The differences in the shifting behaviour is connected to different equilibria schemes for the peaks--s-peaks arise when tunnelling-in- and out-rates become equal, while excitonic peaks occur, when electron tunnelling-in- and hole-generation rates are balanced.

  15. Evaluation of silicon neutron resonance parameters in the thermal to 1800 keV energy range.

    PubMed

    Derrien, H; Leal, L C; Guber, K H; Larson, N M

    2005-01-01

    Because silicon is a major constituent of concrete and soil, neutron and gamma ray information on silicon is important for reactor shielding and criticality safety calculations. Therefore, much effort was put into the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for the three stable isotopes of silicon. The neutron capture cross section of natural silicon was recently measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the energy range 1-700 keV. Using the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for initial values, a new evaluation of the resonance parameters was performed by adding the results of the ORELA capture measurements to the experimental database. The computer code SAMMY was used for the analysis of the experimental data; the new version of SAMMY allows accurate calculations of the self-shielding and multiple scattering effects in the capture measurements. The accuracy of the radiative capture widths of the resonances was improved by this analysis. Accurate values of the s-, p- and d-wave neutron strength functions were also obtained. Although the resonance capture component of the present evaluation is 2-3 times smaller than that in ENDF/B-VI, the total capture cross section is much larger, at least for energies >250 keV, because the direct capture component contributes values of the same order of magnitude as the resonance component. The direct component was not taken into account in the ENDF/B-VI evaluation and was calculated for the first time in the present evaluation.

  16. Comparison of force sensors for atomic force microscopy based on quartz tuning forks and length-extensional resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Pielmeier, Florian; Eguchi, Toyoaki; An, Toshu; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2011-09-01

    The force sensor is key to the performance of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nowadays, most atomic force microscopes use micromachined force sensors made from silicon, but piezoelectric quartz sensors are being applied at an increasing rate, mainly in vacuum. These self-sensing force sensors allow a relatively easy upgrade of a scanning tunneling microscope to a combined scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope. Two fundamentally different types of quartz sensors have achieved atomic resolution: the “needle sensor,” which is based on a length-extensional resonator, and the “qPlus sensor,” which is based on a tuning fork. Here, we calculate and measure the noise characteristics of these sensors. We find four noise sources: deflection detector noise, thermal noise, oscillator noise, and thermal drift noise. We calculate the effect of these noise sources as a factor of sensor stiffness, bandwidth, and oscillation amplitude. We find that for self-sensing quartz sensors, the deflection detector noise is independent of sensor stiffness, while the remaining three noise sources increase strongly with sensor stiffness. Deflection detector noise increases with bandwidth to the power of 1.5, while thermal noise and oscillator noise are proportional to the square root of the bandwidth. Thermal drift noise, however, is inversely proportional to bandwidth. The first three noise sources are inversely proportional to amplitude while thermal drift noise is independent of the amplitude. Thus, we show that the earlier finding that quoted an optimal signal-to-noise ratio for oscillation amplitudes similar to the range of the forces is still correct when considering all four frequency noise contributions. Finally, we suggest how the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensors can be improved further, we briefly discuss the challenges of mounting tips, and we compare the noise performance of self-sensing quartz sensors and optically detected Si cantilevers.

  17. Influence of temporal noise on the skin blood flow measurements performed by cooled thermal imaging camera: limit possibilities within each physiological frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagaidachnyi, A. A.; Volkov, I. U.; Fomin, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes limit possibilities of modern cooled thermal imaging cameras as a tool for estimation of blood flow oscillations at the surface of living body. Skin temperature oscillations, as we assumed, are a consequence of the blood flow oscillations. We considered the temperature sensitivity 0.01-0.02 °C as a typical for the most of modern cooled long wave thermal imaging cameras. Fourier filter used to investigate the temperature signal separately within endothelial, neurogenic, myogenic, respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges. The level of temporal noise has been estimated during measurements of no living body with stabilized temperature ~ 24°C. The level of temperature oscillations has been calculated for the group of healthy subjects within each frequency range. Thus, we were able to determine signal-to-noise ratio within frequency band [0.001, 1] Hz. As a result, we determine that skin temperature oscillations measured by thermal imaging camera with sensitivity 0.02°C have the upper frequency limit ~ 0.2 Hz. In other words, within the respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges of blood flow oscillations the noise level exceeds signal one, and temperature measurements at the skin surface are practically useless. The endothelial, neurogenic and myogenic components of the temperature oscillations contain ~98% of the total spectral power of the signal. We have plot the empirical extrapolated curve of sensitivity of thermal imaging camera vs. frequency of the temperature oscillations. The data analysis shows that measurements of skin temperature oscillations within respiratory and cardiac ranges require the temperature sensitivity at least ~ 0.01°C and 0.001°C, respectively.

  18. Noise effects in two different biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolo, B.; Spezia, S.; Curcio, L.; Pizzolato, N.; Fiasconaro, A.; Valenti, D.; Lo Bue, P.; Peri, E.; Colazza, S.

    2009-05-01

    We investigate the role of the colored noise in two biological systems: (i) adults of Nezara viridula (L.) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), and (ii) polymer translocation. In the first system we analyze, by directionality tests, the response of N. viridula individuals to subthreshold signals plus noise in their mating behaviour. The percentage of insects that react to the subthreshold signal shows a nonmonotonic behaviour, characterized by the presence of a maximum, as a function of the noise intensity. This is the signature of the non-dynamical stochastic resonance phenomenon. By using a “soft” threshold model we find that the maximum of the input-output cross correlation occurs in the same range of noise intensity values for which the behavioural activation of the insects has a maximum. Moreover this maximum value is lowered and shifted towards higher noise intensities, compared to the case of white noise. In the second biological system the noise driven translocation of short polymers in crowded solutions is analyzed. An improved version of the Rouse model for a flexible polymer is adopted to mimic the molecular dynamics by taking into account both the interactions between adjacent monomers and the effects of a Lennard-Jones potential between all beads. The polymer dynamics is simulated in a two-dimensional domain by numerically solving the Langevin equations of motion in the presence of thermal fluctuations and a colored noise source. At low temperatures or for strong colored noise intensities the translocation process of the polymer chain is delayed. At low noise intensity, as the polymer length increases, we find a nonmonotonic behaviour for the mean first translocation time of the polymer centre of inertia. We show how colored noise influences the motion of short polymers, by inducing two different regimes of translocation in the dynamics of molecule transport.

  19. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Laser Induced Thermal Therapy for Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Norred, Sarah E.; Johnson, Jacqueline Anne

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided laser induced thermotherapy (MRgLITT) has become an increasingly relevant therapy for tumor ablation due to its minimally invasive approach and broad applicability across many tissue types. The current state of the art applies laser irradiation via cooled optical fiber applicators in order to generate ablative heat and necrosis in tumor tissue. Magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) is used concurrently with this therapy to plan treatments and visualize tumor necrosis. Though application in neurosurgery remains in its infancy, MRgLITT has been found to be a promising therapy for many types of brain tumors. This review examines the current use of MRgLITT with regard to the special clinical challenge of glioblastoma multiforme and examines the potential applications of next-generation nanotherapy specific to the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:24527455

  20. Contrast Enhancement for Thermal Acoustic Breast Cancer Imaging via Resonant Stimulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Wang, “Time-domain reconstruction for thermoa- coustic tomography in a speherical geometry,” IEEE Trans. Med. Imag., vol. 21, no. 7, pp. 814–822, Jul...comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS...excited into resonance via EM stimulation, the effective acoustic scattering cross-section may increase by a factor in excess of 100 based on

  1. Wiedemann-Franz-type relation between shot noise and thermal conduction of Majorana surface states in a three-dimensional topological superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnezdilov, N. V.; Diez, M.; Pacholski, M. J.; Beenakker, C. W. J.

    2016-09-01

    We compare the thermal conductance Gthermal (at temperature T ) and the electrical shot-noise power Pshot (at bias voltage V ≫kBT /e ) of Majorana fermions on the two-dimensional surface of a three-dimensional topological superconductor. We present analytical and numerical calculations to demonstrate that, for a local coupling between the superconductor and metal contacts, Gthermal/Pshot=L T /e V (with L the Lorenz number). This relation is ensured by the combination of electron-hole and time-reversal symmetries, irrespective of the microscopics of the surface Hamiltonian, and provides for a purely electrical way to detect the charge-neutral Majorana surface states. A surface of aspect ratio W /L ≫1 has the universal shot-noise power Pshot=(W /L ) ×(e2/h ) ×(e V /2 π ) .

  2. Thermally activated charge transfer in a Prussian blue derivative probed by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrige, I.; Cai, Y. Q.; Ishii, H.; Hiraoka, N.; Bleuzen, A.

    2008-08-01

    Charge-transfer excitation is at the source of the photoinduced magnetism observed in several Prussian blue molecule-based magnets. Using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy, we probe directly the thermally activated charge transfer in a photomagnetic Fe-Co cyanide, Cs0.7Co4[Fe(CN)6]2.9[◻]1.1.16H2O, where [◻] represents [Fe(CN)6] vacancies. The temperature dependence of both Co and Fe valence ratios is estimated for the first time in one cooling run, thus yielding a more complete picture of the temperature-induced cooperative electronic modifications. This novel approach, benefiting from relatively short acquisition times, opens the possibility for realtime characterization of the photoinduced magnetism in molecule-based magnets.

  3. Wide-range and fast thermally-tunable silicon photonic microring resonators using the junction field effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxi; Lentine, Anthony; DeRose, Christopher; Starbuck, Andrew L; Trotter, Douglas; Pomerene, Andrew; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2016-10-03

    Tunable silicon microring resonators with small, integrated micro-heaters which exhibit a junction field effect were made using a conventional silicon-on-insulator (SOI) photonic foundry fabrication process. The design of the resistive tuning section in the microrings included a "pinched" p-n junction, which limited the current at higher voltages and inhibited damage even when driven by a pre-emphasized voltage waveform. Dual-ring filters were studied for both large (>4.9 THz) and small (850 GHz) free-spectral ranges. Thermal red-shifting was demonstrated with microsecond-scale time constants, e.g., a dual-ring filter was tuned over 25 nm in 0.6 μs 10%-90% transition time, and with efficiency of 3.2 μW/GHz.

  4. Cooling of nanomechanical resonators by thermally activated single-electron transport.

    PubMed

    Santandrea, F; Gorelik, L Y; Shekhter, R I; Jonson, M

    2011-05-06

    We show that the vibrations of a nanomechanical resonator can be cooled to near its quantum ground state by tunneling injection of electrons from a scanning tunneling microscope tip. The interplay between two mechanisms for coupling the electronic and mechanical degrees of freedom results in a bias-voltage-dependent difference between the probability amplitudes for vibron emission and absorption during tunneling. For a bias voltage just below the Coulomb blockade threshold, we find that absorption dominates, which leads to cooling corresponding to an average vibron population of the fundamental bending mode of 0.2.

  5. Contrast Enhancement for Thermal Acoustic Breast Cancer Imaging via Resonant Stimulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    data-independent and suf- fer from low -resolution, high sidelobe levels , and poor interference rejection capabilities. The data-adaptive ARMOR can...high-resolution, low sidelobe level , and much improved inter- ference suppression capability. APPENDIX THERMAL ACOUSTIC SIMULATIONS We consider the...dB main beam is matched to the tumor region well, and the sidelobe level is low . Fig. 2(b) is the DAS beampattern which is calculated using (16). It

  6. Accuracy of Young's Modulus of Thermal Barrier Coating Layer Determined by Bending Resonance of a Multilayered Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waki, Hiroyuki; Takizawa, Kensuke; Kato, Masahiko; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-04-01

    The Young's modulus of individual layer in thermal barrier coating (TBC) system is an important mechanical property because it allows determining the parameters of materials mechanics in the TBC system. In this study, we investigated the accuracy of the evaluation method for the Young's modulus of a TBC layer according to the first bending resonance of a multilayered specimen comprising a substrate, bond coating, and TBC. First, we derived a closed-form solution for the Young's modulus of the TBC layer using the equation of motion for the bending vibration of a composite beam. The solution for the three-layered model provided the Young's modulus of the TBC layer according to the measured resonance frequency and the known values for the dimensions, mass, and Young's moduli of all the other layers. Next, we analyzed the sensitivity of these input errors to the evaluated Young's modulus and revealed the important inputs for accurate evaluation. Finally, we experimentally confirmed that the Young's modulus of the TBC layer was obtained accurately by the developed method.

  7. Solid-state effects on thermal-neutron cross sections and on low-energy resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, J.A.; Mook, H.A.; Hill, N.W.; Shahal, O.

    1982-01-01

    The neutron total cross sections of several single crystals (Si, Cu, sapphire), several polycrystalline samples (Cu, Fe, Be, C, Bi, Ta), and a fine-powder copper sample have been measured from 0.002 to 5 eV. The Cu powder and polycrystalline Fe, Be and C data exhibit the expected abrupt changes in cross section. The cross section of the single crystal of Si is smooth with only small broad fluctuations. The data on two single Cu crystals, the sapphire crystal, cast Bi, and rolled samples of Ta and Cu have many narrow peaks approx. 10/sup -3/ eV wide. High resolution (0.3%) transmission measurements were made on the 1.057-eV resonance in /sup 240/Pu and the 0.433-eV resonance in /sup 180/Ta, both at room and low temperatures to study the effects of crystal binding. Although the changes in Doppler broadening with temperature were apparent, no asymmetries due to a recoilless contribution were observed.

  8. Nonlinear mechanical resonators for ultra-sensitive mass detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datskos, P. G.; Lavrik, N. V.

    2014-10-01

    The fundamental sensitivity limit of an appropriately scaled down mechanical resonator can approach one atomic mass unit when only thermal noise is present in the system. However, operation of such nanoscale mechanical resonators is very challenging due to minuteness of their oscillation amplitudes and presence of multiple noise sources in real experimental environments. In order to surmount these challenges, we use microscale cantilever resonators driven to large amplitudes, far beyond their nonlinear instability onset. Our experiments show that such a nonlinear cantilever resonator, described analytically as a Duffing oscillator, has mass sensing performance comparable to that of much smaller resonators operating in a linear regime. We demonstrate femtogram level mass sensing that relies on a bifurcation point tracking that does not require any complex readout means. Our approaches enable straightforward detection of mass changes that are near the fundamental limit imposed by thermo-mechanical fluctuations.

  9. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  10. Comment on "Thermal shape fluctuation model study of the giant dipole resonance in 152Gd"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, D. R.; Datar, V. M.

    2016-10-01

    A recent paper [A. K. Rhine Kumar and P. Arumugam, Phys. Rev. C 92, 044314 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.044314] presented calculations of the giant dipole resonance width and γ -ray absorption cross sections for 152Gd at various temperatures and angular momenta and compared these with the experimental data. In the comparison of the cross sections, the authors used the linearized representations of the experimental spectra which actually represent the absorption cross sections divided by the γ -ray energy. In this Comment we make the comparison with the appropriate absorption cross sections derived from the data. The comparison shows a reasonable agreement if the higher value of the dipole-dipole interaction parameter, mentioned in the paper, is used in the calculation.

  11. Irreversible change in the T1 temperature dependence with thermal dose using the proton resonance frequency-T1 technique.

    PubMed

    Diakite, Mahamadou; Payne, Allison; Todd, Nick; Parker, Dennis L

    2013-04-01

    Denaturation of macromolecules within the tissues is believed to be the major factor contributing to the damage of tissues upon hyperthermia. As a result, the value of the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of the tissue water, which is related to the translational and rotational rates of water, represents an intrinsic probe for investigating structural changes in tissues at high temperature. Therefore, the goal of this work is to investigate whether the simultaneous measurement of temperature and T1 using a hybrid proton resonance frequency (PRF)-T1 measurement technique can be used to detect irreversible changes in T1 that might be indicative of tissue damage. A new hybrid PRF-T1 sequence was implemented based on the variable flip angle driven-equilibrium single-pulse observation (DESPOT)1 method from a standard three dimensional segmented echo-planar imaging sequence by alternating two flip angles from measurement to measurement. The structural changes of the heated tissue volumes were analyzed based on the derived T1 values and the corresponding PRF temperatures. Using the hybrid PRF-T1 technique, we demonstrate that the change of spin lattice relaxation time T1 is reversible with temperature for low thermal dose (thermal dose ≤ 240 cumulative equivalent minutes [CEM] 43°C) and irreversible with temperature after significant accumulation of thermal dose in ex vivo chicken breast tissue. These results suggest that the hybrid PRF-T1 method may be a potentially powerful tool to investigate the extent and mechanism of heat damage of biological tissues.

  12. Optimal operating points of oscillators using nonlinear resonators.

    PubMed

    Kenig, Eyal; Cross, M C; Villanueva, L G; Karabalin, R B; Matheny, M H; Lifshitz, Ron; Roukes, M L

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate an analytical method for calculating the phase sensitivity of a class of oscillators whose phase does not affect the time evolution of the other dynamic variables. We show that such oscillators possess the possibility for complete phase noise elimination. We apply the method to a feedback oscillator which employs a high Q weakly nonlinear resonator and provide explicit parameter values for which the feedback phase noise is completely eliminated and others for which there is no amplitude-phase noise conversion. We then establish an operational mode of the oscillator which optimizes its performance by diminishing the feedback noise in both quadratures, thermal noise, and quality factor fluctuations. We also study the spectrum of the oscillator and provide specific results for the case of 1/f noise sources.

  13. The influence of thermal and free carrier dispersion effects on all-optical wavelength conversion in a silicon racetrack-shaped microring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaolu; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan; Li, Shaopeng; Han, Jing

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate ultra-low pump power wavelength conversion based on four-wave mixing in a silicon racetrack-shaped microring resonator. When the pump and signal are located at the resonance wavelengths, wavelength conversion with a pump power of only 1 mW can be realized in this microring resonator because of the resonant enhancement of the device. However, saturation of the conversion efficiency occurs because of the shift of the resonance peak, which is caused by the change of the effective refractive index induced by a combination of thermal and free carrier dispersion effects, and it is demonstrated that the thermal effect is the leading-order factor for the change of the refractive index. The maximum conversion efficiency of  -21 dB is obtained when the pump power is less than 12 mW. This ultra-low-power on-chip wavelength convertor based on a silicon microring resonator can find important potential applications in highly integrated optical circuits for all-optical signal processing.

  14. Optical Johnson noise thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, R. L.; Blalock, T. V.; Maxey, L. C.; Roberts, M. J.; Simpson, M. L.

    1989-01-01

    A concept is being explored that an optical analog of the electrical Johnson noise may be used to measure temperature independently of emissivity. The concept is that a laser beam may be modulated on reflection from a hot surface by interaction of the laser photons with the thermally agitated conduction electrons or the lattice phonons, thereby adding noise to the reflected laser beam. If the reflectance noise can be detected and quantified in a background of other noise in the optical and signal processing systems, the reflectance noise may provide a noncontact measurement of the absolute surface temperature and may be independent of the surface's emissivity.

  15. Assessment of heavy metals exposure, noise and thermal safety in the ambiance of a vacuum metallurgy separation system for recycling heavy metals from crushed e-wastes.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Lu; Xu, Zhenming

    2014-12-01

    Vacuum metallurgy separation (VMS) is a technically feasible method to recover Pb, Cd and other heavy metals from crushed e-wastes. To further determine the environmental impacts and safety of this method, heavy metals exposure, noise and thermal safety in the ambiance of a vacuum metallurgy separation system are evaluated in this article. The mass concentrations of total suspended particulate (TSP) and PM10 are 0.1503 and 0.0973 mg m(-3) near the facilities. The concentrations of Pb, Cd and Sn in TSP samples are 0.0104, 0.1283 and 0.0961 μg m(-3), respectively. Health risk assessments show that the hazard index of Pb is 3.25 × 10(-1) and that of Cd is 1.09 × 10(-1). Carcinogenic risk of Cd through inhalation is 1.08 × 10(-5). The values of the hazard index and risk indicate that Pb and Cd will not cause non-cancerous effects or carcinogenic risk on workers. The noise sources are mainly the mechanical vacuum pump and the water cooling pump. Both of them have the noise levels below 80 dB (A). The thermal safety assessment shows that the temperatures of the vacuum metallurgy separation system surface are all below 303 K after adopting the circulated water cooling and heat insulation measures. This study provides the environmental information of the vacuum metallurgy separation system, which is of assistance to promote the industrialisation of vacuum metallurgy separation for recovering heavy metals from e-wastes.

  16. Magnetic Field Strength Dependence of Transverse Relaxation and Signal-to-Noise Ratio for Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 and Helium-3 Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez-Viqueira, William

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases (HNG), 3He or 129Xe, has become a promising approach for studying lung anatomy and function. Unlike conventional MR imaging, the magnetization in HNG MR is independent of the magnetic field strength. This means that no improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is expected with increasing clinical field strength above ˜0.25T. Furthermore, it has been predicted that the SNR may decline at clinical field strength due to decreases in the apparent transverse relaxation time (T2*), caused by the increased magnetic susceptibility induced field gradients at the air-tissue interface. In this thesis the magnetic field strength dependence of T2* and SNR in HNG MR is investigated experimentally in rodent and human lungs. For rodent imaging, a novel broad-band (0.1-100MHz) variable field strength MR imaging system for rodents was built. This system permitted imaging of 129Xe, 3He and 1H at low magnetic field strengths (3-73.5mT) to experimentally investigate the field dependence of HNG imaging SNR in rodent lungs. In vivo 129Xe and 3He signals were acquired at 73.5mT and T 2* was estimated to be approximately 180+/-8 ms, in good agreement with previously reported values. At 73.5mT, image noise is dominated by losses originated from the radiofrequency (RF) coils. To address this issue, RF coils were built using different types of copper wire and compared in phantoms and in vivo in rat lungs using hyperpolarized 3He and 129Xe gas. An SNR improvement of up to 200% was obtained with Litz wire compared to conventional copper wire. This improvement demonstrated the feasibility of HNG lung imaging in rodents at 73.5mT with SNR comparable to that obtained at clinical field strengths. To verify the SNR field dependence in humans, hyperpolarized 3He lung imaging at two commonly used clinical field strengths (1.5T and 3T) was performed in the same volunteers and compared. No significant differences in SNR were obtained

  17. Retrieving the ground state of spin glasses using thermal noise: Performance of quantum annealing at finite temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kohji; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Ochoa, Andrew J; Katzgraber, Helmut G

    2016-09-01

    We study the problem to infer the ground state of a spin-glass Hamiltonian using data from another Hamiltonian with interactions disturbed by noise from the original Hamiltonian, motivated by the ground-state inference in quantum annealing on a noisy device. It is shown that the average Hamming distance between the inferred spin configuration and the true ground state is minimized when the temperature of the noisy system is kept at a finite value, and not at zero temperature. We present a spin-glass generalization of a well-established result that the ground state of a purely ferromagnetic Hamiltonian is best inferred at a finite temperature in the sense of smallest Hamming distance when the original ferromagnetic interactions are disturbed by noise. We use the numerical transfer-matrix method to establish the existence of an optimal finite temperature in one- and two-dimensional systems. Our numerical results are supported by mean-field calculations, which give an explicit expression of the optimal temperature to infer the spin-glass ground state as a function of variances of the distributions of the original interactions and the noise. The mean-field prediction is in qualitative agreement with numerical data. Implications on postprocessing of quantum annealing on a noisy device are discussed.

  18. Retrieving the ground state of spin glasses using thermal noise: Performance of quantum annealing at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Kohji; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Ochoa, Andrew J.; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2016-09-01

    We study the problem to infer the ground state of a spin-glass Hamiltonian using data from another Hamiltonian with interactions disturbed by noise from the original Hamiltonian, motivated by the ground-state inference in quantum annealing on a noisy device. It is shown that the average Hamming distance between the inferred spin configuration and the true ground state is minimized when the temperature of the noisy system is kept at a finite value, and not at zero temperature. We present a spin-glass generalization of a well-established result that the ground state of a purely ferromagnetic Hamiltonian is best inferred at a finite temperature in the sense of smallest Hamming distance when the original ferromagnetic interactions are disturbed by noise. We use the numerical transfer-matrix method to establish the existence of an optimal finite temperature in one- and two-dimensional systems. Our numerical results are supported by mean-field calculations, which give an explicit expression of the optimal temperature to infer the spin-glass ground state as a function of variances of the distributions of the original interactions and the noise. The mean-field prediction is in qualitative agreement with numerical data. Implications on postprocessing of quantum annealing on a noisy device are discussed.

  19. Evolution of elastic and thermal properties during TMOS-gel formation determined by ringing bottle acoustic resonance spectroscopy, impulsive stimulated scattering, photopyroelectric spectroscopy and the hot ball method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Agustin Flores Cuautle, Jose Jesus; Kouyate, Mansour; Bernardus Roozen, Nicolaas; Goossens, Jozefien; Menon, Preethy; Kuriakose Malayil, Maju; Salenbien, Robbe; Nair Rajesh, Ravindran; Glorieux, Christ; Griesmar, Pascal; Martinez, Loïc; Serfaty, Stéphane

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of the elastic and thermal properties of a tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS)-based gel that exhibits an extraordinary ringing effect when enclosed in a bottle is investigated during the sol-gel transition. The results demonstrate the feasibility of three proposed experimental methods for monitoring of gels during their formation. The shear stiffening evolution during gelation is monitored by ringing bottle, resonant acoustic spectroscopy and by an ultrasonic technique using piezo electric excitation and detection. The evolution of the longitudinal modulus and the thermal diffusivity of the gel during stiffening are simultaneously determined by a combined photoacoustic and photothermal method based on heterodyne diffraction detection of impulsive stimulated scattering by, respectively, a propagating acoustic wave grating and a decaying thermal expansion grating that were both thermo elastically generated using a pulsed laser. Also, the feasibility of an inverse photopyroelectric method and a hot ball technique to monitor the thermal transport efficiency and thermal impedance of a forming gel by tracking the thermal conductivity, the thermal diffusivity, and the thermal effusivity is demonstrated. The network polymerization and stiffening during the sol-gel transition in TMOS-gel corresponds with substantial changes in the shear acoustic velocity and in all thermal properties, while the longitudinal acoustic velocity is only weakly affected.

  20. Dispersive Thermometry with a Josephson Junction Coupled to a Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saira, O.-P.; Zgirski, M.; Viisanen, K. L.; Golubev, D. S.; Pekola, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We embed a small Josephson junction in a microwave resonator that allows simultaneous dc biasing and dispersive readout. Thermal fluctuations drive the junction into phase diffusion and induce a temperature-dependent shift in the resonance frequency. By sensing the thermal noise of a remote resistor in this manner, we demonstrate primary thermometry in the range of 300 mK to below 100 mK, and high-bandwidth (7.5 MHz) operation with a noise-equivalent temperature of better than 10 μ K /√{Hz } . At a finite bias voltage close to a Fiske resonance, amplification of the microwave probe signal is observed. We develop an accurate theoretical model of our device based on the theory of dynamical Coulomb blockade.

  1. Experimental methods for improved spatial control of thermal lesions in magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound ablation.

    PubMed

    Viallon, Magalie; Petrusca, Lorena; Auboiroux, Vincent; Goget, Thomas; Baboi, Loredana; Becker, Christoph D; Salomir, Rares

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU, or MRgFUS) is a hybrid technology that was developed to provide efficient and tolerable thermal ablation of targeted tumors or other pathologic tissues, while preserving the normal surrounding structures. Fast 3-D ablation strategies are feasible with the newly available phased-array HIFU transducers. However, unlike fixed heating sources for interstitial ablation (radiofrequency electrode, microwave applicator, infra-red laser applicator), HIFU uses propagating waves. Therefore, the main challenge is to avoid thermo-acoustical adverse effects, such as energy deposition at reflecting interfaces and thermal drift of the focal lesion toward the near field. We report here our investigations on some novel experimental solutions to solve, or at least to alleviate, these generally known tolerability problems in HIFU-based therapy. Online multiplanar MR thermometry was the main investigational tool extensively used in this study to identify the problems and to assess the efficacy of the tested solutions. We present an improved method to cancel the beam reflection at the exit window (i.e., tissue-to-air interface) by creating a multilayer protection, to dissipate the residual HIFU beam by bulk scattering. This study evaluates selective de-activation of transducer elements to reduce the collateral heating at bone surfaces in the far field, mainly during automatically controlled volumetric ablation. We also explore, using hybrid US/MR simultaneous imaging, the feasibility of using disruptive boiling at the focus, both as a far-field self-shielding technique and as an enhanced ablation strategy (i.e., boiling core controlled HIFU ablation).

  2. A signal input coil made of superconducting thin film for improved signal-to-noise ratio in a high-Tc SQUID-based ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuen-Lin; Hsu, Chin-Wei; Ku, Yue-Bai; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Wang, Li-Min; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, Hong-Chang

    2013-11-01

    Resonant coupling schemes are commonly used in SQUID-based ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) systems to couple the spin relaxation signals from samples to the SQUID. Generally, in NMR systems, a resonant coupling scheme is composed of two solenoid coils which are made of enamel insulated wires and a capacitor connected in series. In this work, we tried to replace the metal solenoid input coil with a planar high-Tc superconducting spiral coil to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the ULF NMR signal. A measurement of the free induction decay signal of water protons was performed to demonstrate the improved performance of the system. This improvement is due to the fact that the planar superconducting spiral coil possesses a higher mutual inductance with the SQUID. Therefore, it is a promising way to enhance the SNR of high-Tc SQUID-based ULF NMR/MRI systems.

  3. (239)Pu neutron resonance parameters revisited and covariance matrix in the neutron energy range from thermal to 2.5 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M

    2008-01-01

    To obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range up to 2.5 keV neutron energy and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the analysis code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The experimental data were renormalized, aligned on a common energy scale, and corrected for residual background. Average neutron transmission and cross sections calculated with the new resonance parameters were compared to the corresponding experimental data and to ENDF/B-VI.

  4. Dramatic enhancement of fullerene anion formation in polymer solar cells by thermal annealing: Direct observation by electron spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dong; Nagamori, Tatsuya; Yabusaki, Masaki; Yasuda, Takeshi; Han, Liyuan; Marumoto, Kazuhiro

    2014-06-16

    Using electron spin resonance (ESR), we clarified the origin of the efficiency degradation of polymer solar cells containing a lithium-fluoride (LiF) buffer layer created by a thermal annealing process after the deposition of an Al electrode (post-annealing). The device structure was indium-tin-oxide/ poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate)/poly (3-hexylthiophene):phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM)/LiF/Al. Three samples consisting of quartz/P3HT:PCBM/LiF/Al, quartz/P3HT:PCBM/Al, and quartz/PCBM/LiF/Al were investigated and compared. A clear ESR signal from radical anions on the PCBM was observed after LiF/Al was deposited onto a P3HT:PCBM layer because of charge transfer at the interface between the PCBM and the LiF/Al, which indicated the formation of PCBM{sup −}Li{sup +} complexes. The number of radical anions on the PCBM was enhanced remarkably by the post-annealing process; this enhancement was caused by the surface segregation of PCBM and by the dissociation of LiF at the Al interface by the post-annealing process. The formation of a greater number of anions enhanced the electron scattering, decreased the electron-transport properties of the PCBM molecules, and caused an energy-level shift at the interface. These effects led to degradation in the device performance.

  5. Realization of the thermal equilibrium in inhomogeneous magnetic systems by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with stochastic noise, and its dynamical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Masamichi; Miyashita, Seiji

    2015-04-01

    It is crucially important to investigate the effects of temperature on magnetic properties such as critical phenomena, nucleation, pinning, domain wall motion, and coercivity. The Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation has been applied extensively to study dynamics of magnetic properties. Approaches of Langevin noises have been developed to introduce the temperature effect into the LLG equation. To have the thermal equilibrium state (canonical distribution) as the steady state, the system parameters must satisfy some condition known as the fluctuation-dissipation relation. In inhomogeneous magnetic systems in which spin magnitudes are different at sites, the condition requires that the ratio between the amplitude of the random noise and the damping parameter depend on the magnitude of the magnetic moment at each site. Focused on inhomogeneous magnetic systems, we systematically showed agreement between the stationary state of the stochastic LLG equation and the corresponding equilibrium state obtained by Monte Carlo simulations in various magnetic systems including dipole-dipole interactions. We demonstrated how violations of the condition result in deviations from the true equilibrium state. We also studied the characteristic features of the dynamics depending on the choice of the parameter set. All the parameter sets satisfying the condition realize the same stationary state (equilibrium state). In contrast, different choices of parameter set cause seriously different relaxation processes. We show two relaxation types, i.e., magnetization reversals with uniform rotation and with nucleation.

  6. Implementation of Gas Sampling Chamber and Measuring Hardware for Capnograph System Considering Thermal Noise Effect and Time Response Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    chamber, thermal background effect I. INTRODUCTION As a measuring method for a capnograph system that determines indirectly the level of pCO2 in a...The chopping frequency of an IR lamp corresponds to the sampling frequency for the continuous measurement of the CO2 gas concentration without aliasing...order MFB(multiple feedback) lowpass filter. Finally, the use of 240×64 graphic LCD makes it easy to continuously observe and measure the CO2 gas

  7. Heterogeneous Superconducting Low-Noise Sensing Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Penanen, Konstantin I.; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2008-01-01

    A heterogeneous material construction has been devised for sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers that are subject to a combination of requirements peculiar to some advanced applications, notably including low-field magnetic resonance imaging for medical diagnosis. The requirements in question are the following: The sensing coils must be large enough (in some cases having dimensions of as much as tens of centimeters) to afford adequate sensitivity; The sensing coils must be made electrically superconductive to eliminate Johnson noise (thermally induced noise proportional to electrical resistance); and Although the sensing coils must be cooled to below their superconducting- transition temperatures with sufficient cooling power to overcome moderate ambient radiative heat leakage, they must not be immersed in cryogenic liquid baths. For a given superconducting sensing coil, this combination of requirements can be satisfied by providing a sufficiently thermally conductive link between the coil and a cold source. However, the superconducting coil material is not suitable as such a link because electrically superconductive materials are typically poor thermal conductors. The heterogeneous material construction makes it possible to solve both the electrical- and thermal-conductivity problems. The basic idea is to construct the coil as a skeleton made of a highly thermally conductive material (typically, annealed copper), then coat the skeleton with an electrically superconductive alloy (typically, a lead-tin solder) [see figure]. In operation, the copper skeleton provides the required thermally conductive connection to the cold source, while the electrically superconductive coating material shields against Johnson noise that originates in the copper skeleton.

  8. Photoluminescence, thermally stimulated luminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance investigations of Tb{sup 3+} doped SrBPO{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Mithlesh; Seshagiri, T.K.; Kadam, R.M.; Godbole, S.V.

    2011-09-15

    Graphical abstract: EPR spectra of BOHC's in 2 kGy {gamma}-irradiated SrBPO{sub 5}:Tb sample using Receiver Gain RG = 4 x 10{sup 4}, Modulation Amplitude MA = 0.25 G, Microwave power setting 6.3 mW: (A) un-annealed sample recorded at 300 K, (B) un-annealed sample recorded at 100 K and (C) sample annealed at 550 K for 10 min and recorded at 100 K. Highlights: {yields} PL studies on Tb doped SrBPO{sub 5} phosphor have shown emission due to Tb{sup 3+} associated with {sup 5}D{sub 3} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub J} and {sup 5}D{sub 4} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub J} (J = 3, 4, 5 and 6) transitions. {yields} The EPR studies on {gamma}-irradiated samples revealed formation of three types of boron oxygen hole trapped centres viz., BOHC{sub 1}, BOHC{sub 2} and BOHC{sub 3} and an electron trapped centre. {yields} The TSL peak at 475 K was associated with the thermal destruction of BOHC{sub 2}. -- Abstract: Trap level spectroscopic studies were carried out on {gamma}-irradiated Tb (1 mole%) doped SrBPO{sub 5} were carried out using photoluminescence (PL), thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. The incorporation of Tb in the 3+ oxidation state was ascertained from PL studies. Life time for Tb{sup 3+} emission corresponding to the intense transition {sup 5}D{sub 4} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub 5} at 543 nm was determined. The spectral characteristics of the TSL glows have shown that Tb{sup 3+} ions act as the emission center for the glow peak at 475 K. The trap parameters of the glow peak were determined. EPR investigations at room temperature/77 K revealed the stabilization of three boron oxygen hole trapped centers (BOHC's) and oxygen centered radicals such as O{sup -} and O{sub 2}{sup -} and trapped electrons in room temperature {gamma}-irradiated samples. TSL glow peak at 475 K was found to be associated with recombination of electron released from trapped electron center and the BOHC{sub 2} center.

  9. Correcting Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) High Altitude (40 - 65 km) Temperature Retrievals for Instrumental Correlated Noise and Biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnochie, T. H.; Smith, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) nadir-soundings have been used to derive atmospheric temperatures up to roughly 40 km [Conrath et al., JGR 105 2000, Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001], and MGS-TES limb soundings have been used to extend the atmospheric temperature data set to > 60 km in altitude [Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001]. The ~40 - ~65 km altitude range probed by the MGS-TES limb sounding is particularly important for capturing key dynamical features such as the warm winter polar mesosphere [e.g., Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001; McCleese et al., Nature Geoscience 1, 2008], and the response of thermal tides to dust opacity [e.g. Wilson and Hamilton, J. Atmos. Sci. 53, 1996]. Thus accurate and precise temperature profiles at these altitudes are particularly important for constraining global circulation models. They are also critical for interpreting observations of mesospheric condensate aerosols [e.g., Määttänen et al., Icarus 209, 2010; McConnochie et al., Icarus 210, 2010)]. We have indentified correlated noise components in the MGS-TES limb sounding radiances that propagate into very large uncertainties in the retrieved temperatures. We have also identified a slowly varying radiance bias in the limb sounding radiances. Note that the nadir-sounding-based MGS-TES atmospheric temperatures currently available from the Planetary Data System are not affected by either of these issues. These two issues affect the existing MGS-TES limb sounding temperature data set are as follows: Considering, for example, the 1.5 Pascal pressure level (which typically falls between 50 and 60 km altitude), correlated-noise induced standard errors for individual limb-sounding temperature retrievals were 3 - 5 K in Mars Year 24, rising to 5 - 15 K in Mars Year 25 and 10 - 15 K in Mars Year 26 and 27. The radiance bias, although consistent on ~10-sol time scales, is highly variable over the course of the MGS-TES mission. It results in temperatures (at the 1

  10. Engineered Theranostic Magnetic Nanostructures: Role of Composition and Surface Coating on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast and Thermal Activation.

    PubMed

    Nandwana, Vikas; Ryoo, Soo-Ryoon; Kanthala, Shanthi; De, Mrinmoy; Chou, Stanley S; Prasad, Pottumarthi V; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2016-03-23

    Magnetic nanostructures (MNS) have emerged as promising functional probes for simultaneous diagnostics and therapeutics (theranostic) applications due to their ability to enhance localized contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and heat under external radio frequency (RF) field, respectively. We show that the "theranostic" potential of the MNS can be significantly enhanced by tuning their core composition and architecture of surface coating. Metal ferrite (e.g., MFe2O4) nanoparticles of ∼8 nm size and nitrodopamine conjugated polyethylene glycol (NDOPA-PEG) were used as the core and surface coating of the MNS, respectively. The composition was controlled by tuning the stoichiometry of MFe2O4 nanoparticles (M = Fe, Mn, Zn, ZnxMn1-x) while the architecture of surface coating was tuned by changing the molecular weight of PEG, such that larger weight is expected to result in longer length extended away from the MNS surface. Our results suggest that both core as well as surface coating are important factors to take into consideration during the design of MNS as theranostic agents which is illustrated by relaxivity and thermal activation plots of MNS with different core composition and surface coating thickness. After optimization of these parameters, the r2 relaxivity and specific absorption rate (SAR) up to 552 mM(-1) s(-1) and 385 W/g were obtained, respectively, which are among the highest values reported for MNS with core magnetic nanoparticles of size below 10 nm. In addition, NDOPA-PEG coated MFe2O4 nanostructures showed enhanced biocompatibility (up to [Fe] = 200 μg/mL) and reduced nonspecific uptake in macrophage cells in comparison to other well established FDA approved Fe based MR contrast agents.

  11. Thermal noise and optomechanical features in the emission of a membrane-coupled compound cavity laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldacci, Lorenzo; Pitanti, Alessandro; Masini, Luca; Arcangeli, Andrea; Colangelo, Francesco; Navarro-Urrios, Daniel; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of a compound optical cavity as linear displacement detector, by measuring the thermal motion of a silicon nitride suspended membrane acting as the external mirror of a near-infrared Littrow laser diode. Fluctuations in the laser optical power induced by the membrane vibrations are collected by a photodiode integrated within the laser, and then measured with a spectrum analyzer. The dynamics of the membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator is investigated as a function of air pressure and actuator displacement in a homodyne configuration. The high Q-factor (~3.4 · 104 at 8.3 · 10‑3 mbar) of the fundamental mechanical mode at ~73 kHz guarantees a detection sensitivity high enough for direct measurement of thermal motion at room temperature (~87 pm RMS). The compound cavity system here introduced can be employed as a table-top, cost-effective linear displacement detector for cavity optomechanics. Furthermore, thanks to the strong optical nonlinearities of the laser compound cavity, these systems open new perspectives in the study of non-Markovian quantum properties at the mesoscale.

  12. Thermal noise and optomechanical features in the emission of a membrane-coupled compound cavity laser diode.

    PubMed

    Baldacci, Lorenzo; Pitanti, Alessandro; Masini, Luca; Arcangeli, Andrea; Colangelo, Francesco; Navarro-Urrios, Daniel; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2016-08-19

    We demonstrate the use of a compound optical cavity as linear displacement detector, by measuring the thermal motion of a silicon nitride suspended membrane acting as the external mirror of a near-infrared Littrow laser diode. Fluctuations in the laser optical power induced by the membrane vibrations are collected by a photodiode integrated within the laser, and then measured with a spectrum analyzer. The dynamics of the membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator is investigated as a function of air pressure and actuator displacement in a homodyne configuration. The high Q-factor (~3.4 · 10(4) at 8.3 · 10(-3) mbar) of the fundamental mechanical mode at ~73 kHz guarantees a detection sensitivity high enough for direct measurement of thermal motion at room temperature (~87 pm RMS). The compound cavity system here introduced can be employed as a table-top, cost-effective linear displacement detector for cavity optomechanics. Furthermore, thanks to the strong optical nonlinearities of the laser compound cavity, these systems open new perspectives in the study of non-Markovian quantum properties at the mesoscale.

  13. Thermal noise and optomechanical features in the emission of a membrane-coupled compound cavity laser diode

    PubMed Central

    Baldacci, Lorenzo; Pitanti, Alessandro; Masini, Luca; Arcangeli, Andrea; Colangelo, Francesco; Navarro-Urrios, Daniel; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a compound optical cavity as linear displacement detector, by measuring the thermal motion of a silicon nitride suspended membrane acting as the external mirror of a near-infrared Littrow laser diode. Fluctuations in the laser optical power induced by the membrane vibrations are collected by a photodiode integrated within the laser, and then measured with a spectrum analyzer. The dynamics of the membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator is investigated as a function of air pressure and actuator displacement in a homodyne configuration. The high Q-factor (~3.4 · 104 at 8.3 · 10−3 mbar) of the fundamental mechanical mode at ~73 kHz guarantees a detection sensitivity high enough for direct measurement of thermal motion at room temperature (~87 pm RMS). The compound cavity system here introduced can be employed as a table-top, cost-effective linear displacement detector for cavity optomechanics. Furthermore, thanks to the strong optical nonlinearities of the laser compound cavity, these systems open new perspectives in the study of non-Markovian quantum properties at the mesoscale. PMID:27538586

  14. Analysis of a Precambrian resonance-stabilized day length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Benjamin C.; Stevenson, David J.

    2016-06-01

    During the Precambrian era, Earth's decelerating rotation would have passed a 21 h period that would have been resonant with the semidiurnal atmospheric thermal tide. Near this point, the atmospheric torque would have been maximized, being comparable in magnitude but opposite in direction to the lunar torque, halting Earth's rotational deceleration, maintaining a constant day length, as detailed by Zahnle and Walker (1987). We develop a computational model to determine necessary conditions for formation and breakage of this resonant effect. Our simulations show the resonance to be resilient to atmospheric thermal noise but suggest a sudden atmospheric temperature increase like the deglaciation period following a possible "snowball Earth" near the end of the Precambrian would break this resonance; the Marinoan and Sturtian glaciations seem the most likely candidates for this event. Our model provides a simulated day length over time that resembles existing paleorotational data, though further data are needed to verify this hypothesis.

  15. Observation of the fundamental Nyquist noise limit in an ultra-high Q-factor cryogenic bulk acoustic wave cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Goryachev, Maxim Ivanov, Eugene N.; Tobar, Michael E.; Kann, Frank van; Galliou, Serge

    2014-10-13

    Thermal Nyquist noise fluctuations of high-Q bulk acoustic wave cavities have been observed at cryogenic temperatures with a DC superconducting quantum interference device amplifier. High Q modes with bandwidths of few tens of milliHz produce thermal fluctuations with a signal-to-noise ratio of up to 23 dB. The estimated effective temperature from the Nyquist noise is in good agreement with the physical temperature of the device, confirming the validity of the equivalent circuit model and the non-existence of any excess resonator self-noise. The measurements also confirm that the quality factor remains extremely high (Q > 10{sup 8} at low order overtones) for very weak (thermal) system motion at low temperatures, when compared to values measured with relatively strong external excitation. This result represents an enabling step towards operating such a high-Q acoustic device at the standard quantum limit.

  16. Rotorcraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of a realistic plan for NASA and the U.S. helicopter industry to develop a design-for-noise methodology, including plans for the identification and development of promising noise reduction technology was discussed. Topics included: noise reduction techniques, scaling laws, empirical noise prediction, psychoacoustics, and methods of developing and validing noise prediction methods.

  17. Optical motion sensor for resonant-bar gravitational wave antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, J.-P.; Pang, Y.; Hamilton, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    An experiment is described in which an optical method was used to measure fluctuations in the separation between two mirrors of a Fabry-Perot sensor cavity. Noise measurements were made to determine the sensitivity of this device to vibration amplitudes in the frequency range 1.1-2.1 kHz, which is of interest for resonant-bar gravitational wave antennas. The rms spectral noise density for length fluctuations in this range was sq rt 3.7 x 10 exp -15 m/Hz and can be related to electronic noise of the circuitry plus vibrational noise from the environment. The cavity finesse was relatively low at 117, and the power dissipated in the mirrors was estimated to be 1.9 micro-W. On a multimode gravitational wave detector, the sensor cavity would be formed by one reference mirror and by one mirror mounted on the last resonator. For a 1200-kg bar, 1.2-g last resonator system operating at 1600 Hz the sensor described here would exhibit a noise temperature of 18 micro-K; the resolution in h in the case of negligible thermal noise from the mechanical system would be sq rt 3.7 x 10 exp -18/Hz. Improvements in the sensitivity in a quiet antenna-like environment should be possible with higher finesse mirrors.

  18. Thermal and resonance neutrons generated by various electron and X-ray therapeutic beams from medical linacs installed in polish oncological centers

    PubMed Central

    Konefał, Adam; Orlef, Andrzej; Łaciak, Marcin; Ciba, Aleksander; Szewczuk, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Background High-energy photon and electron therapeutic beams generated in medical linear accelerators can cause the electronuclear and photonuclear reactions in which neutrons with a broad energy spectrum are produced. A low-energy component of this neutron radiation induces simple capture reactions from which various radioisotopes originate and in which the radioactivity of a linac head and various objects in the treatment room appear. Aim The aim of this paper is to present the results of the thermal/resonance neutron fluence measurements during therapeutic beam emission and exemplary spectra of gamma radiation emitted by medical linac components activated in neutron reactions for four X-ray beams and for four electron beams generated by various manufacturers’ accelerators installed in typical concrete bunkers in Polish oncological centers. Materials and methods The measurements of neutron fluence were performed with the use of the induced activity method, whereas the spectra of gamma radiation from decays of the resulting radioisotopes were measured by means of a portable high-purity germanium detector set for field spectroscopy. Results The fluence of thermal neutrons as well as resonance neutrons connected with the emission of a 20 MV X-ray beam is ∼106 neutrons/cm2 per 1 Gy of a dose in water at a reference depth. It is about one order of magnitude greater than that for the 15 MV X-ray beams and about two orders of magnitude greater than for the 18–22 MeV electron beams regardless of the type of an accelerator. Conclusion The thermal as well as resonance neutron fluence depends strongly on the type and the nominal potential of a therapeutic beam. It is greater for X-ray beams than for electrons. The accelerator accessories and other large objects should not be stored in a treatment room during high-energy therapeutic beam emission to avoid their activation caused by thermal and resonance neutrons. Half-lives of the radioisotopes originating from

  19. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  20. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  1. Compromised extinction and signal-to-noise ratios of weak-resonant-cavity laser diode transmitter injected by channelized and amplitude squeezed spontaneous-emission.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hung; Lin, Gong-Cheng; Wang, Hai-Lin; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2010-03-01

    By using a 200GHz AWG channelized ASE source in connection with a saturable semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) based noise blocker as the injecting source at the remote node in front of the local optical network units (ONUs), we demonstrate the spectrum-sliced ASE transmitter with greatly suppressed intensity noise performance in WDM-PON network. Such channelized SOA filtering technique effectively reduces the relative intensity noise of the ASE source by at least 4.5 dB. The low-noise WRC-FPLD transmitter improves its extinction-ratio (ER) from 8.9 to 9.6 dB and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) from 5.9 to 6.3 dB. In comparison with broad-band ASE injection-locked WRC-FPLD transmitter at same power, there is an improvement on receiving power penalty (DeltaP(Receiver)) by 2 dB at BER 10(-9) in back-to-back case, and the receiving power of BER 10(-9) can achieve -24 dBm even after 25km fiber transmission. With additional AWG filtering, the intraband crosstalk effect between the upstream transmitted data and the reflected ASE signal is significantly reduced by 6.3dB. The compromised effects of ER and SNR on BER performance are also elucidated via the modified SNR model for the WRC-FPLD under ASE injection induced gain-saturation condition. The DeltaP(Receiver)/DeltaSNR of 8.89 at same ER condition is more pronounced than the DeltaP(Receiver)/DeltaER of 3.17 obtained under same SNR condition, indicating that the SNR plays a more important role than the ER on enhancing the BER performance.

  2. Nonlinear resonance converse magnetoelectric effect modulated by voltage for the symmetrical magnetoelectric laminates under magnetic and thermal loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao-Miao; Liu, Hui; Zhou, Yun; Hu, Wen-Wen

    2016-12-01

    Based on the tri-layer symmetrical magnetoelectric laminates, a equivalent circuit for the nonlinear resonance converse magnetoelectric coupling effect is established. Because the nonlinear thermo-magneto-mechanical constitutive equations of magnetostrictive material were introduced, a converse magnetoelectric coefficient model was derived from the equivalent circuit, which can describe the influence of bias electric field, bias magnetic field and ambient temperature on the resonance converse magnetoelectric coupling effect. Especially, the model can well predict the modulation effect of bias electric field/voltage on the magnetism of magnetoelectric composite or the converse magnetoelectric coefficient, which is absolutely vital in applications. Both of the converse magnetoelectric coefficient and the resonance frequency predicted by the model have good agreements with the existing experimental results in qualitatively and quantitatively, and the validity of the model is confirmed. On this basis, according to the model, the nonlinear trends of the resonance converse magnetoelectric effect under different bias voltages, bias magnetic fields and ambient temperatures are predicted. From the results, it can be found that the bias voltage can effectively modulate the curve of the resonance converse magnetoelectric coefficient versus bias magnetic field, and then change the corresponding optimal bias magnetic field of the maximum converse magnetoelectric coefficient; with the increasing volume ratio of piezoelectric layers, the modulation effect of bias voltage becomes more obvious; under different bias magnetic fields, the modulation effect of bias voltage on the converse magnetoelectric effect has nonvolatility in a wide temperature region.

  3. Optical motion sensor for resonant-bar gravitational wave antennas.

    PubMed

    Richard, J P; Pang, Y; Hamilton, J J

    1992-04-01

    An experiment is described in which an optical method was used to measure fluctuations in the separation between two mirrors of a Fabry-Perot sensor cavity. Noise measurements were made to determine the sensitivity of this device to vibration amplitudes in the frequency range 1.1-2.1 kHz, which is of interestfor resonant-bar gravitational wave antennas. The rms spectral noise density for length fluctuations inthis range was 3.7 x 10(15-) m/Hz((1/2)) and can be related to electronic noise of the circuitry plus vibrationalnoise from the environment. The cavity finesse was relatively low at 117, and the power dissipated in the mirrors was estimated to be 1.9 muW. On a multimode gravitational wave detector, the sensor cavity would be formed by one reference mirror and by one mirror mounted on the last resonator. For a 1200-kg bar, 1.2-g last resonator system operating at 1600 Hz, the sensor described here would exhibit a noise temperature of 18 muK; the resolution in h in the case of negligible thermal noise from the mechanical system would be 3.7 x 10(-18)/Hz((1/2)). Improvements in the sensitivity in a quiet antenna-like environment should be possible with higher finesse mirrors.

  4. A microrod-resonator Brillouin laser with 240 Hz absolute linewidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, William; Becker, Joe; Cole, Daniel C.; Coillet, Aurelien; Baynes, Fred N.; Papp, Scott B.; Diddams, Scott A.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate an ultralow-noise microrod-resonator based laser that oscillates on the gain supplied by the stimulated Brillouin scattering optical nonlinearity. Microresonator Brillouin lasers are known to offer an outstanding frequency noise floor, which is limited by fundamental thermal fluctuations. Here, we show experimental evidence that thermal effects also dominate the close-to-carrier frequency fluctuations. The 6 mm diameter microrod resonator used in our experiments has a large optical mode area of ˜100 μm2, and hence its 10 ms thermal time constant filters the close-to-carrier optical frequency noise. The result is an absolute laser linewidth of 240 Hz with a corresponding white-frequency noise floor of 0.1 Hz2 Hz-1. We explain the steady-state performance of this laser by measurements of its operation state and of its mode detuning and lineshape. Our results highlight a mechanism for noise that is common to many microresonator devices due to the inherent coupling between intracavity power and mode frequency. We demonstrate the ability to reduce this noise through a feedback loop that stabilizes the intracavity power.

  5. A very low noise monolithic Horizontal accelerometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Alessandro; Takamori, Akiteru; Cella, Giancarlo; Fidecaro, Francesco; Francesconi, Mario; Desalvo, Riccardo; Sannibale, Virginio

    2000-04-01

    We present a new low noise, low frequency, horizontal accelerometer. The mechanical design and the machining process aim to improve the sensitivity in the frequency region between 0.01 and 1 Hz, where metal internal friction and thermal elastic effects become critical. The accelerometer mechanics is shaped as a small folded pendulum in order to obtain a very low resonant frequency and low mechanical losses. A folded pendulum is essentially a mass suspended on one side by a simple pendulum and on the other by an inverted pendulum working antagonistically. The straight pendulum positive gravitational spring constant is balanced by the inverted pendulum’s negative one; by changing the center of mass position one can lower arbitrarily the resonant frequency. The only dissipation is in the anelasticity of the mechanical flex joint and in the readout/actuation system. If the spring constant is minimised, the mechanical losses are minimal. The monolithic design of the accelerometer eliminates the stick-and-slip friction localised in the flexure clamps. Low stiffness, 10 micron thick flex joints are achieved by EDM and electropolishing. The instrument is equipped with a low capacitance position sensor; the signal from the sensor is filtered by a PID controller and fed back to the mass through capacitive force actuator for feedback closed-loop operation. The sensor noise matches the expected thermal noise performances, 10-12 m/√Hz , with measuring range of a few microns. The expected sensitivity, less than 10-11 m/ s^2 / √Hz around 150 mHz, is a factor 30 below the state of the art limit. This accelerometer was designed to be integrated in the active control of the LIGO II mirror seismic isolators.

  6. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  7. Fully vectorial laser resonator modeling of continuous-wave solid-state lasers including rate equations, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence.

    PubMed

    Asoubar, Daniel; Wyrowski, Frank

    2015-07-27

    The computer-aided design of high quality mono-mode, continuous-wave solid-state lasers requires fast, flexible and accurate simulation algorithms. Therefore in this work a model for the calculation of the transversal dominant mode structure is introduced. It is based on the generalization of the scalar Fox and Li algorithm to a fully-vectorial light representation. To provide a flexible modeling concept of different resonator geometries containing various optical elements, rigorous and approximative solutions of Maxwell's equations are combined in different subdomains of the resonator. This approach allows the simulation of plenty of different passive intracavity components as well as active media. For the numerically efficient simulation of nonlinear gain, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence effects in solid-state active crystals a semi-analytical vectorial beam propagation method is discussed in detail. As a numerical example the beam quality and output power of a flash-lamp-pumped Nd:YAG laser are improved. To that end we compensate the influence of stress-induced birefringence and thermal lensing by an aspherical mirror and a 90° quartz polarization rotator.

  8. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m-1(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  9. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations-this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m(-1)(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  10. Application of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to comparative examination of different groups of free radicals in thermal injuries treated with propolis and silver sulphadiazine.

    PubMed

    Olczyk, Pawel; Ramos, Pawel; Bernas, Marcin; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Pilawa, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Different groups of free radicals expressed in burn wounds treated with propolis and silver sulphadiazine were examined. The thermal effect forms major types of free radicals in a wound because of the breaking of chemical bonds. Free radicals, located in the heated skin, were tested after 21 days of treating by these two substances. The aim of this work was to find the method for determination of types and concentrations of different groups of free radicals in wound after high temperature impact during burning. The effects of the therapy by propolis and silver sulphadiazine on free radicals were studied. Since the chemical methods of free radicals studies are destructive, the usefulness of the electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was tested in this work. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra measured with the microwave power of 2.2 mW were numerically fitted by theoretical curves of Gaussian and Lorentzian shapes. The experimental electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of tissue samples are best fitted by the sum of one Gauss and two Lorentz lines. An innovatory numerical procedure of spectroscopic skin analysis was presented. It is very useful in the alternative medicine studies.

  11. THz Pyro-Optical Detector Based on LiNbO₃ Whispering Gallery Mode Microdisc Resonator.

    PubMed

    Cosci, Alessandro; Cerminara, Matteo; Conti, Gualtiero Nunzi; Soria, Silvia; Righini, Giancarlo C; Pelli, Stefano

    2017-01-28

    This study analyzes the capabilities of a LiNbO₃ whispering gallery mode microdisc resonator as a potential bolometer detector in the THz range. The resonator is theoretically characterized in the stationary regime by its thermo-optic and thermal coefficients. Considering a Q-factor of 10⁷, a minimum detectable power of 20 μW was evaluated, three orders of magnitude above its noise equivalent power. This value opens up the feasibility of exploiting LiNbO₃ disc resonators as sensitive room-temperature detectors in the THz range.

  12. Brain activation related to affective dimension during thermal stimulation in humans: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Sung, Eun-Jung; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Yoon, Hyo Woon; Oh, Sung-Suk; Han, Yeji; Park, Hyun Wook

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the activated brain region that is involved with the affective dimension of thermal stimulation (not pain, but innocuous warming) using functional MR imaging. Twelve healthy, right-handed male subjects participated in the study. Thermal stimulation with two different temperatures of 41 degrees C and 34 degrees C was applied to the subjects using a fomentation pack, wrapped around the right lower leg of each subject. On the basis of the subjects' responses after the scanning sessions, the authors were able to observe that the subjects felt "warm" and "slightly pleasant and comfortable" under the 41 degrees C condition. The experimental results indicated that warm stimulation produced a significant increase of activation compared to thermal neutral stimulation in various regions such as contralateral insular, ipsilateral cerebellum, ipsilateral putamen, contralateral middle frontal gyrus, ipsilateral inferior frontal gyrus, contralateral postcentral gyrus, and contralateral paracentral lobule. The activated regions are known to be related to thermal sensory, affective/emotional awareness, cognitive functions, sensory-discrimination, and emotion/affective processing, and so on. These results suggest that an appropriate thermal stimulation can produce a positive emotion and activate emotion/affect related regions of the brain.

  13. Community noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragdon, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Airport and community land use planning as they relate to airport noise reduction are discussed. Legislation, community relations, and the physiological effect of airport noise are considered. Noise at the Logan, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis/St. Paul airports is discussed.

  14. Thermal Microphotonic Focal Plane Array (TM-FPA).

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Frederick Bossert; Lentine, Anthony L.; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Watts, Michael R.; Shaw, Michael J.; Rakich, Peter T.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Peters, David William; Zortman, William A.

    2009-10-01

    The advent of high quality factor (Q) microphotonic-resonators has led to the demonstration of high-fidelity optical sensors of many physical phenomena (e.g. mechanical, chemical, and biological sensing) often with far better sensitivity than traditional techniques. Microphotonic-resonators also offer potential advantages as uncooled thermal detectors including significantly better noise performance, smaller pixel size, and faster response times than current thermal detectors. In particular, microphotonic thermal detectors do not suffer from Johnson noise in the sensor, offer far greater responsivity, and greater thermal isolation as they do not require metallic leads to the sensing element. Such advantages make the prospect of a microphotonic thermal imager highly attractive. Here, we introduce the microphotonic thermal detection technique, present the theoretical basis for the approach, discuss our progress on the development of this technology and consider future directions for thermal microphotonic imaging. Already we have demonstrated viability of device fabrication with the successful demonstration of a 20{micro}m pixel, and a scalable readout technique. Further, to date, we have achieved internal noise performance (NEP{sub Internal} < 1pW/{radical}Hz) in a 20{micro}m pixel thereby exceeding the noise performance of the best microbolometers while simultaneously demonstrating a thermal time constant ({tau} = 2ms) that is five times faster. In all, this results in an internal detectivity of D*{sub internal} = 2 x 10{sup 9}cm {center_dot} {radical}Hz/W, while roughly a factor of four better than the best uncooled commercial microbolometers, future demonstrations should enable another order of magnitude in sensitivity. While much work remains to achieve the level of maturity required for a deployable technology, already, microphotonic thermal detection has demonstrated considerable potential.

  15. Photoinduced (WO4)3--La3+ center in PbWO4: Electron spin resonance and thermally stimulated luminescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguta, V. V.; Martini, M.; Meinardi, F.; Vedda, A.; Hofstaetter, A.; Meyer, B. K.; Nikl, M.; Mihóková, E.; Rosa, J.; Usuki, Y.

    2000-10-01

    The localization of electrons at W6+ sites perturbed by lanthanum in PbWO4 is studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) and thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) measurements. The (WO4)3--La3+ centers are created at the W6+ sites close to La3+ in two different ways: (i) direct trapping of electrons from the conduction band under ultraviolet or x-ray irradiation at T=60 K (ii) retrapping of electrons freed from unperturbed (WO4)3- centers after irradiation at T<40 K followed by heating up to T around 60 K. Electron transfer from La3+-perturbed to unperturbed W6+ sites stimulated by red light illumination is also observed. The proposed mechanism of electron localization at one of four equivalent tungstate ions close to La3+ is based on the pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect, which gives rise to a rhombic distortion of (WO4)3- complex. At T~95-98 K the (WO4)3--La3+ centers are thermally ionized giving rise to a TSL glow peak due to the recombination of detrapped electrons with localized holes. The emission spectrum of the TSL features one band peaking at 2.8 eV. The temperature dependence of both TSL and ESR intensity is analyzed in the frame of a general order recombination model. The thermal ionization energy of (WO4)3--La3+ centers has been calculated to be approximately 0.27 eV.

  16. Phase dynamics in graphene-based Josephson junctions in the presence of thermal and correlated fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarcello, Claudio; Valenti, Davide; Spagnolo, Bernardo

    2015-11-01

    We study by numerical methods the phase dynamics in ballistic graphene-based short Josephson junctions. A superconductor-graphene-superconductor system exhibits superconductive quantum metastable states similar to those present in normal current-biased Josephson junctions. We investigate the effects of thermal and correlated fluctuations on the escape time from these metastable states, when the system is driven by an oscillating bias current in the presence of Gaussian white and colored noise sources. Varying the intensity and the correlation time of the noise source, it is possible to analyze the behavior of the escape time, or switching time, from a superconductive metastable state in different temperature regimes. Moreover, we are able to clearly distinguish dynamical regimes characterized by the dynamic resonant activation effect, in the absence of noise source, and the stochastic resonant activation phenomenon induced by the noise. For low initial values of the bias current, the dynamic resonant activation shows double-minimum structures, strongly dependent on the value of the damping parameter. Noise-enhanced stability is also observed in the system investigated. We analyze the probability density function (PDF) of the switching times. The PDFs for frequencies within the dynamic resonant activation minima are characterized by single peaks with exponential tails. The PDFs for noise intensities around the maxima of the switching time, peculiarity of the noise-enhanced stability phenomenon, are composed of regular sequences of two peaks for each period of the driving current, with exponentially decaying envelopes.

  17. Noise filtering via electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Taek; Bae, In-Ho; Moon, Han Seb

    2017-01-01

    We report on the intensity-noise reduction of pseudo-thermal light via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the Λ-type system of the 5S1/2-5P1/2 transition in 87Rb. Noise filtering of the pseudo-thermal probe light was achieved via an EIT filter and measured according to the degree of intensity noise of the pseudo-thermal probe light. Reductions in the intensity and spectral noise of the pseudo-thermal probe light with the EIT filter were observed using the direct intensity fluctuation and heterodyne detection technique, respectively. Comparison of the intensity noise of the pseudo-thermal probe light before and after passing through the EIT filter revealed a significant reduction in the intensity noise.

  18. Transurethral ultrasound applicators with directional heating patterns for prostate thermal therapy: in vivo evaluation using magnetic resonance thermometry.

    PubMed

    Diederich, C J; Stafford, R J; Nau, W H; Burdette, E C; Price, R E; Hazle, J D

    2004-02-01

    A catheter-based transurethral ultrasound applicator with angularly directional heating patterns has been designed for prostate thermal therapy and evaluated in canine prostate in vivo using MRI to monitor and assess performance. The ultrasound transducer array (3.5 mm diameter tubular transducers, 180 degrees active sectors, approximately 7.5 MHz) was integrated to a flexible delivery catheter (4 mm OD), and encapsulated within an expandable balloon (35 mm x 10 mm OD, 80 ml min(-1) ambient water) for coupling and cooling of the prostatic urethra. These devices were used to thermally coagulate targeted portions of the canine prostate (n = 2) while using MR thermal imaging (MRTI) to monitor the therapy. MRI was also used for target definition, positioning of the applicator, and evaluation of target viability post-therapy. MRTI was based upon the complex phase-difference mapping technique using an interleaved gradient echo-planar imaging sequence with lipid suppression. MRTI derived temperature distributions, thermal dose exposures, T1-contrast enhanced MR images, and histology of sectioned prostates were used to define destroyed tissue zones and characterize the three-dimensional heating patterns. The ultrasound applicators produced approximately 180 degrees directed zones of thermal coagulation within targeted tissue which extended 15-20 mm radially to the outer boundary of the prostate within 15 min. Transducer activation lengths of 17 mm and 24 mm produced contiguous zones of coagulation extending axially approximately 18 mm and approximately 25 mm from base to apex, respectively. Peak temperatures around 90 degrees C were measured, with approximately 50 degrees C-52 degrees C corresponding to outer boundary t43 = 240 min at approximately 15 min treatment time. These devices are MRI compatible, and when coupled with multiplanar MRTI provide a means for selectively controlling the length and sector angle of therapeutic thermal treatment in the prostate.

  19. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  20. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-10-31

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics.

  1. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-10-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics.

  2. Ideal current patterns yielding optimal signal-to-noise ratio and specific absorption rate in magnetic resonance imaging: computational methods and physical insights.

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Riccardo; Sodickson, Daniel K

    2012-07-01

    At high and ultra-high magnetic field strengths, understanding interactions between tissues and the electromagnetic fields generated by radiofrequency coils becomes crucial for safe and effective coil design as well as for insight into limits of performance. In this work, we present a rigorous electrodynamic modeling framework, using dyadic Green's functions, to derive the electromagnetic field in homogeneous spherical and cylindrical samples resulting from arbitrary surface currents in the presence or absence of a surrounding radiofrequency shield. We show how to calculate ideal current patterns that result in the highest possible signal-to-noise ratio (ultimate intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio) or the lowest possible radiofrequency power deposition (ultimate intrinsic specific absorption rate) compatible with electrodynamic principles. We identify familiar coil designs within optimal current patterns at low to moderate field strength, thereby establishing and explaining graphically the near-optimality of traditional surface and volume quadrature designs. We also document the emergence of less familiar patterns, e.g., involving substantial electric--as well as magnetic-dipole contributions, at high field strength. Performance comparisons with particular coil array configurations demonstrate that optimal performance may be approached with finite arrays if ideal current patterns are used as a guide for coil design.

  3. Extension of the characteristic potential method for noise calculation and its application to shot noise in semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Min; Min, Hong S.; Park, Chan H.; Park, Young J.

    2004-05-01

    Characteristic potential method (CPM) for noise calculation has been developed for multi-terminal semiconductor devices under the drift-diffusion scheme. Merit of the CPM is that clear cut definitions of the terminal thermal noise currents and the terminal excess noise currents can be made for unipolar devices and homogeneous resistors. We prove that the terminal thermal noise currents and the terminal excess noise currents are uncorrelated for unipolar devices even when they come from the same local noise sources. We also suggest a way to define thermal noise and excess noise in bipolar devices using the derived formulas from the CPM. As applications of the CPM, we show that the high frequency excess noise observed in homogenous semiconductor resistors is really shot noise whose noise generating mechanism is just the same as that of vacuum diodes. We also show that the dominant high frequency noise in long-channel MOSFETs is thermal noise in the linear region, but the excess noise is getting more significant as the drain bias increases, and is important in the saturation region. The excess noise in the saturation region of the long-channel MOSFETs is shown to be shot noise. Finally, we try to explain the shot noise-like behaviors observed in forward-biased pn junction diodes by the conventional corpuscular theory of shot noise even though the impedance field method confirms that the shot noise behaviors are caused by the local noise sources in the neutral regions, not in the depletion regions.

  4. Improving Thermal Dose Accuracy in Magnetic Resonance-Guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery: Long-Term Thermometry Using a Prior Baseline as a Reference

    PubMed Central

    Bitton, Rachel R.; Webb, Taylor D.; Pauly, Kim Butts; Ghanouni, Pejman

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate thermal dose volume (TDV) and non-perfused volume (NPV) of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatments in patients with soft tissue tumors, and describe a method for MR thermal dosimetry using a baseline reference. Materials and Methods Agreement between TDV and immediate post treatment NPV was evaluated from MRgFUS treatments of five patients with biopsy-proven desmoid tumors. Thermometry data (gradient echo, 3T) were analyzed over the entire course of the treatments to discern temperature errors in the standard approach. The technique searches previously acquired baseline images for a match using 2D normalized cross-correlation and a weighted mean of phase difference images. Thermal dose maps and TDVs were recalculated using the matched baseline and compared to NPV. Results TDV and NPV showed between 47%–91% disagreement, using the standard immediate baseline method for calculating TDV. Long-term thermometry showed a nonlinear local temperature accrual, where peak additional temperature varied between 4–13°C (mean = 7.8°C) across patients. The prior baseline method could be implemented by finding a previously acquired matching baseline 61% ± 8% (mean ± SD) of the time. We found 7%–42% of the disagreement between TDV and NPV was due to errors in thermometry caused by heat accrual. For all patients, the prior baseline method increased the estimated treatment volume and reduced the discrepancies between TDV and NPV (P = 0.023). Conclusion This study presents a mismatch between in-treatment and post treatment efficacy measures. The prior baseline approach accounts for local heating and improves the accuracy of thermal dose-predicted volume. PMID:26119129

  5. Near-interfacial thermal donor generation during processing of (100)Si/low-κ Si-oxycarbide insulator structures revealed by electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stesmans, A.; Iacovo, S.; Nguyen, S.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Baklanov, M. R.; Urbanowicz, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    A low-temperature multifrequency electron spin resonance (ESR) study has been carried out on Cz-(110)Si/insulator structures with organosilicate films of low dielectric constant κ grown at 300 °C using the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method (PECVD). After subjection to a short-term UV-irradiation-assisted thermal curing treatment at 430 °C to remove the organic component from the low-κ film and obtain optimal porosity, the NL8 ESR spectrum of C2v symmetry is observed, characterized by g1 (//[100] = 1.999 83(8), g2(//[011] = 1.992 74(8), g3 = (//[1\\bar{1}0]) = 2.001 15(8). Based on previous insight, this reveals the generation in the c-Si substrate of singly ionized thermal double donor (TDD) defects with a core containing oxygen atoms. Remarkably, the generation is found to be highly nonuniform, and the defect density depth profile shows an exponential-like decay (decay length ˜3.8 μm) from the oxide/Si interface inward the Si substrate, thus exposing the defect formation as an interface-administered effect. Upon analysis, the strain induced by interfacial stress in the c-Si beneath the interface is suggested as the major driving component in the enhancement of TDD formation during thermal treatment, suggesting that substantial stress is involved with PECVD organosilicate low-κ glasses. The result represents a different and affirmative illustration of the influence of strain on TDD formation. Based on the principal g values, the observed TDD is closest to the NL81 type, the one formed first in bulk c-Si through oxygen agglomeration during short-term thermal treatment.

  6. The radio waves & thermal electrostatic noise spectroscopy (SORBET) experiment on BepiColombo/MMO/PWI and the importance of radio HF measurements at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncuquet, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Issautier, K.; Kojima, H.; Maksimovic, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Zarka, P.

    SORBET (Spectroscopie des Ondes Radio & du Bruit Electrostatique Thermique) is a radio HF spectrometer designed for the radio and Plasma Waves Instrument (PWI) onboard BepiColombo/Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), which performs remote and in-situ measurements of waves (electromagnetic and electrostatic). Technically, SORBET includes a plasma wave spectrometer, with two E-field inputs from the two perpendicular electric antennas and one B-field input from a search coil, in the range 2.5 kHz - 640 kHz. This frequency band includes the local gyrofrequency and plasma frequency expected on most part of the MMO orbits. SORBET also includes a higher frequency radio receiver for remote sensing in the range 500kHz-10.2MHz. Owing to its capabilities, SORBET will be able to address the following scientific objectives: High resolution mapping (˜ 30 km) of electron density and temperature in the solar wind and Hermean magnetosphere and exo-ionosphere, via the technique of Quasi-Thermal Noise (QTN) spectroscopy. It is noteworthy that the QTN technique is weakly sensitive to spacecraft potential and photoelectron perturbations, a point highly in favour of this technique at Mercury. These QTN measurements will be determinant for the dynamic modeling of the magnetosphere and will provide a fundamental input for the chemistry of cold ionized species (Na, K, O ...) in Mercury's environment. Detection and study of Hermean radio emissions, including possible cyclotron emissions (up to ˜ 10-20 kHz) from mildly energetic electrons in highly magnetized (polar?) regions, and possible synchrotron radiation (up to a few MHz?) from more energetic electrons. Monitoring of solar radio emissions up to ~10 MHz, in order to create a solar activity index from the view point of Mercury, allowing to correlate it with the Hermean magnetospheric response. We propose to further discuss these scientific objectives and to underline that such radio HF measurements are a clue for understanding the

  7. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Laser-Induced Thermal Therapy for Recurrent Brain Metastases in the Motor Strip After Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Casey H; Grant, Gerald A; Deb, Sayantan; Li, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    The authors report a challenging case of a brain metastasis located in the motor cortex, which was not responsive to radiosurgery. Use of a novel technique, magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (MRgLITT), resulted in the complete obliteration of the lesion without adverse effects or evidence of tumor recurrence at follow-up. This case illustrates that MRgLITT may provide a viable alternative for patients with brain metastases refractory to radiosurgery or in deep locations, where both stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and surgical resection may be ineffective.   PMID:28083463

  8. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 Nanoparticles: Synthesis by Thermal Decomposition of Iron(III) Glucuronate and Application in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Patsula, Vitalii; Kosinová, Lucie; Lovrić, Marija; Ferhatovic Hamzić, Lejla; Rabyk, Mariia; Konefal, Rafal; Paruzel, Aleksandra; Šlouf, Miroslav; Herynek, Vít; Gajović, Srećko; Horák, Daniel

    2016-03-23

    Monodisperse superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with oleic acid were prepared by thermal decomposition of Fe(III) glucuronate. The shape, size, and particle size distribution were controlled by varying the reaction parameters, such as the reaction temperature, concentration of the stabilizer, and type of high-boiling-point solvents. Magnetite particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), as well as electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and magnetometer measurements. The particle coating was analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. To make the Fe3O4 nanoparticles dispersible in water, the particle surface was modified with α-carboxyl-ω-bis(ethane-2,1-diyl)phosphonic acid-terminated poly(3-O-methacryloyl-α-D-glucopyranose) (PMG-P). For future practical biomedical applications, nontoxicity plays a key role, and the PMG-P&Fe3O4 nanoparticles were tested on rat mesenchymal stem cells to determine the particle toxicity and their ability to label the cells. MR relaxometry confirmed that the PMG-P&Fe3O4 nanoparticles had high relaxivity but rather low cellular uptake. Nevertheless, the labeled cells still provided visible contrast enhancement in the magnetic resonance image. In addition, the cell viability was not compromised by the nanoparticles. Therefore, the PMG-P&Fe3O4 nanoparticles have the potential to be used in biomedical applications, especially as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Reevaluation of 58Ni and 60Ni Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Wiarda, Dorothea; Arbanas, Goran

    2009-01-01

    The previous 58Ni and 60Ni set of resonance parameters (ENDF/B-VII-0, JEFF-3, etc.) was based on the SAMMY analysis of Oak Ridge National Laboratory neutron transmission, scattering cross section and capture cross section measurements by C. M. Perey et al. The present results were obtained by adding to the SAMMY experimental data base the capture cross sections measured recently at the Oak Ridge Linear Electron Accelerator by Guber et al. and the Geel Electron Linear Accelerator very high-resolution neutron transmission measurements performed by Brusegan et al. A complete resonance parameter covariance matrix (RPCM) was obtained from the SAMMY analysis of the experimental database. The data sets were made consistent, when needed, by adjusting the neutron energy scales, the normalization coefficients, and the background corrections. The RPCM allows the calculation of the cross section uncertainties due mainly to statistical errors in the experimental data. The systematic uncertainties of the experimental data, estimated from the preliminary analyses of the experimental database, were taken into account in the cross section covariance matrix (CSCM) for total, scattering, and capture cross sections. The diagonal elements of the CSCM were obtained by quadratic combination of the different components of the uncertainties. Because of a lack of experimental information, the energy correlations were not obtained, and a value of 0.5 was arbitrarily taken for all the CSCM nondiagonal elements.

  10. Correlations between 1/f noise and thermal treatment of Al-doped ZnO thin films deposited by direct current sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Barhoumi, A. Guermazi, S.; Leroy, G.; Gest, J.; Carru, J. C.; Yang, L.; Boughzala, H.; Duponchel, B.

    2014-05-28

    Al-doped ZnO thin films (AZO) have been deposited on amorphous glass substrates by DC sputtering at different substrate temperatures T{sub s}. X-Ray diffraction results reveal that AZO thin films have a hexagonal wurtzite structure with (002) preferred orientation. (002) peaks indicate that the crystalline structure of the films is oriented with c-axis perpendicular to the substrate. Three-dimensional (3D) atomic force microscopy images of AZO thin films deposited on glass substrate at 200 °C, 300 °C, and 400 °C, respectively, shows the improvement of the crystallinity and the homogeneity of AZO thin films with T{sub s} which is in agreement with the noise measurements. The noise was characterized between 1 Hz and 100 kHz and we have obtained 1/f spectra. The noise is very sensitive to the crystal structure especially to the orientation of the crystallites which is perpendicular to the substrate and to the grain boundaries which generate a high current flow and a sharp increase in noise. Through time, R{sub sh} and [αμ]{sub eff} increase with the modification of the crystallinity of AZO thin films. Study of noise aging shows that the noise is more sensitive than resistivity for all AZO thin films.

  11. Human hearing enhanced by noise.

    PubMed

    Zeng, F G; Fu, Q J; Morse, R

    2000-06-30

    Noise was traditionally regarded as a nuisance, which should be minimized if possible. However, recent research has shown that addition of an appropriate amount of noise can actually improve signal detection in a nonlinear system, an effect called stochastic resonance. While stochastic resonance has been described in a variety of physical and biological systems, its functional significance in human sensory systems remains mostly unexplored. Here we report psychophysical data showing that signal detection and discrimination can be enhanced by noise in human subjects whose hearing is evoked by either normal acoustic stimulation or electric stimulation of the auditory nerve or the brainstem. Our results suggest that noise is an integral part of the normal sensory process and should be added to auditory prostheses.

  12. An analytical formulation for phase noise in MEMS oscillators.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Deepak; Seshia, Ashwin

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the design of low-noise MEMS oscillators. This paper presents a new analytical formulation for noise in a MEMS oscillator encompassing essential resonator and amplifier nonlinearities. The analytical expression for oscillator noise is derived by solving a second-order nonlinear stochastic differential equation. This approach is applied to noise modeling of an electrostatically addressed MEMS resonator-based square-wave oscillator in which the resonator and oscillator circuit nonlinearities are integrated into a single modeling framework. By considering the resulting amplitude and phase relations, we derive additional noise terms resulting from resonator nonlinearities. The phase diffusion of an oscillator is studied and the phase diffusion coefficient is proposed as a metric for noise optimization. The proposed nonlinear phase noise model provides analytical insight into the underlying physics and a pathway toward the design optimization for low-noise MEMS oscillators.

  13. Periodic and stochastic thermal modulation of protein folding kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Platkov, Max; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-07-21

    Chemical reactions are usually observed either by relaxation of a bulk sample after applying a sudden external perturbation, or by intrinsic fluctuations of a few molecules. Here we show that the two ideas can be combined to measure protein folding kinetics, either by periodic thermal modulation, or by creating artificial thermal noise that greatly exceeds natural thermal fluctuations. We study the folding reaction of the enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase driven by periodic temperature waveforms. As the temperature waveform unfolds and refolds the protein, its fluorescence color changes due to FRET (Förster resonant Energy Transfer) of two donor/acceptor fluorophores labeling the protein. We adapt a simple model of periodically driven kinetics that nicely fits the data at all temperatures and driving frequencies: The phase shifts of the periodic donor and acceptor fluorescence signals as a function of driving frequency reveal reaction rates. We also drive the reaction with stochastic temperature waveforms that produce thermal fluctuations much greater than natural fluctuations in the bulk. Such artificial thermal noise allows the recovery of weak underlying signals due to protein folding kinetics. This opens up the possibility for future detection of a stochastic resonance for protein folding subject to noise with controllable amplitude.

  14. Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Wilby, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The generation and control of flight vehicle interior noise is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of transmission through airborne and structure-borne paths and the control of cabin noise by path modification. Techniques for identifying the relative contributions of the various source-path combinations are also discussed along with methods for the prediction of aircraft interior noise such as those based on the general modal theory and statistical energy analysis.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth > For Parents > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain ... child may be given headphones to listen to music or earplugs to block the noise, and will ...

  16. Noise Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  17. Natural radio noise - A mini-review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flock, W. L.; Smith, E. K.

    1984-01-01

    Natural radio noise in telecommunication systems can be accounted for by the contribution which it makes to antenna noise temperature. Attenuation due to water vapor and oxygen, clouds, and precipitation is accompanied by thermal noise which further degrades the applicable signal-to-noise ratio. Extraterrestrial noise may be of thermal or nonthermal origin and may cover a continuum of frequencies or occur at discrete frequencies. The spectral index n (the exponent giving the variation of noise power density with wavelength) is -2 for a black body and between 0 and -2 for thermal emission in general. The mechanism responsible for much of the extensive nonthermal extraterrestrial noise is synchrotron radiation, characterized by a positive spectral index.

  18. Accuracy of real time noninvasive temperature measurements using magnetic resonance thermal imaging in patients treated for high grade extremity soft tissue sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Craciunescu, Oana I.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Soher, Brian J.; Wyatt, Cory R.; Arabe, Omar; Maccarini, Paolo; Das, Shiva K.; Cheng, Kung-Shan; Wong, Terence Z.; Jones, Ellen L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; MacFall, James R.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To establish accuracy of real time noninvasive temperature measurements using magnetic resonance thermal imaging in patients treated for high grade extremity soft tissue sarcomas. Methods: Protocol patients with advanced extremity sarcomas were treated with external beam radiation therapy and hyperthermia. Invasive temperature measures were compared to noninvasive magnetic resonance thermal imaging (MRTI) at 1.5 T performed during hyperthermia. Volumetric temperature rise images were obtained using the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) technique during heating in a 140 MHz miniannular phased array applicator. MRTI temperature changes were compared to invasive measurements of temperature with a multisensor fiber optic probe inside a no. 15 g catheter in the tumor. Since the PRFS technique is sensitive to drifts in the primary imaging magnetic field, temperature change distributions were corrected automatically during treatment using temperature-stable reference materials to characterize field changes in 3D. The authors analyzed MRT images and compared, in evaluable treatments, MR-derived temperatures to invasive temperatures measured in extremity sarcomas. Small regions of interest (ROIs) were specified near each invasive sensor identified on MR images. Temperature changes in the interstitial sensors were compared to the corresponding ROI PRFS-based temperature changes over the entire treatment and over the steady-state period. Nonevaluable treatments (motion/imaging artifacts, noncorrectable drifts) were not included in the analysis. Results: The mean difference between MRTI and interstitial probe measurements was 0.91 deg. C for the entire heating time and 0.85 deg. C for the time at steady state. These values were obtained from both tumor and normal tissue ROIs. When the analysis is done on just the tumor ROIs, the mean difference for the whole power on time was 0.74 deg. C and during the period of steady state was 0.62 deg. C. Conclusions: The

  19. High level white noise generator

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  20. Exploration of Adiabatic Resonance Crossing Through Neutron Activator Design for Thermal and Epithermal Neutron Formation in (99)Mo Production and BNCT Applications.

    PubMed

    Khorshidi, Abdollah

    2015-10-01

    A feasibility study was performed to design thermal and epithermal neutron sources for radioisotope production and boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) by moderating fast neutrons. The neutrons were emitted from the reaction between (9)Be, (181)Ta, and (184)W targets and 30 MeV protons accelerated by a small cyclotron at 300 μA. In this study, the adiabatic resonance crossing (ARC) method was investigated by means of (207)Pb and (208)Pb moderators, graphite reflector, and boron absorber around the moderator region. Thermal/epithermal flux, energy, and cross section of accumulated neutrons in the activator were examined through diverse thicknesses of the specified regions. Simulation results revealed that the (181)Ta target had the highest neutron yield, and also tungsten was found to have the highest values in both surface and volumetric flux ratio. Transmutation in the (98)Mo sample through radiative capture was investigated for the natural lead moderator. When the sample radial distance from the target was increased inside the graphite region, the production yield had the greatest value of activity. The potential of the ARC method is a replacement or complements the current reactor-based supply sources of BNCT purposes.

  1. Low-noise fan exit guide vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G. (Inventor); Parrott, Tony L. (Inventor); Heidelberg, Laurence J. (Inventor); Envia, Edmane (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Low-noise fan exit guide vanes are disclosed. According to the present invention a fan exit guide vane has an outer shell substantially shaped as an airfoil and defining an interior cavity. A porous portion of the outer shell allows communication between the fluctuations in the air passing over the guide vane and the interior cavity. At least one acoustically resonant chamber is located within the interior cavity. The resonant chamber is in communication with the porous portion of the outer perimeter. The resonant chamber is configured to reduce the noise generated at a predetermined frequency. In various preferred embodiments, there is a plurality of acoustically resonant chambers located within the interior cavity. The resonant chambers can be separated by one or more partitions within the interior cavity. In these embodiments, the resonant chambers can be configured to reduce the noise generated over a range of predetermined frequencies.

  2. Stress and Thermal Analysis of the In-Vessel Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Coils on the J-TEXT Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Changduan; Zhang, Ming; Ding, Yonghua; Rao, Bo; Cen, Yishun; Zhuang, Ge

    2012-01-01

    A set of four in-vessel saddle coils was designed to generate a helical field on the J-TEXT tokamak to study the influences of the external perturbation field on plasma. The coils are fed with alternating current up to 10 kA at frequency up to 10 kHz. Due to the special structure, complex thermal environment and limited space in the vacuum chamber, it is very important to make sure that the coils will not be damaged when undergoing the huge electromagnetic forces in the strong toroidal field, and that their temperatures don't rise too much and destroy the insulation. A 3D finite element model is developed in this paper using the ANSYS code, stresses are analyzed to find the worst condition, and a mounting method is then established. The results of the stress and modal analyses show that the mounting method meets the strength requirements. Finally, a thermal analysis is performed to study the cooling process and the temperature distribution of the coils.

  3. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-01-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density. PMID:28186135

  4. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  5. THz Pyro-Optical Detector Based on LiNbO3 Whispering Gallery Mode Microdisc Resonator

    PubMed Central

    Cosci, Alessandro; Cerminara, Matteo; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Soria, Silvia; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Pelli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzes the capabilities of a LiNbO3 whispering gallery mode microdisc resonator as a potential bolometer detector in the THz range. The resonator is theoretically characterized in the stationary regime by its thermo-optic and thermal coefficients. Considering a Q-factor of 107, a minimum detectable power of 20 μW was evaluated, three orders of magnitude above its noise equivalent power. This value opens up the feasibility of exploiting LiNbO3 disc resonators as sensitive room-temperature detectors in the THz range. PMID:28134857

  6. Characterizing Random Telegraph Frequency Noise in a Micromechanical Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fengpei; Zou, Jie; Maizelis, Zakhar; Chan, Ho Bun

    2014-03-01

    We perform a comprehensive study of the effect of random telegraph frequency noise(RTFN) on a micromechanical torsional oscillator. A sinusoidal driving voltage is applied to one electrode of the oscillator to excite its torsional vibration. Telegraph noise is applied to the other electrode so that the eigenfrequency of the oscillator randomly jumps back and forth between two states. This arrangement resembles a mechanical oscillator dispersively coupled to a classical or quantum two-level system. As the jumping rate of the eigenfrequency is increased, the two peaks in the spectrum of the time-averaged vibration amplitude merge into a single peak, displaying spectral broadening followed by motional narrowing. Furthermore, we analyze the ratios of the moments of the complex vibration amplitude to the powers of the averaged complex amplitude as a function of the driving frequency. If RTFN is absent, the ratios are equal to one; otherwise they deviate from one near resonance and approach to one far off resonance. The shape of the spectra depends strongly on the characteristics of RTFN and this dependence remains valid even in the presence of strong thermal or detector noise. Our results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  7. New insights into the thermal behaviour of organic ionic plastic crystals: magnetic resonance imaging of polycrystalline morphology alterations induced by solid-solid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Pringle, Jennifer M; O'Dell, Luke A; Forsyth, Maria

    2015-07-15

    Organic ionic plastic crystals (OIPCs) show strong potential as solid-state electrolytes for lithium battery applications, demonstrating promising electrochemical performance and eliminating the need for a volatile and flammable liquid electrolyte. The ionic conductivity (σ) in these systems has recently been shown to depend strongly on polycrystalline morphology, which is largely determined by the sample's thermal history. [K. Romanenko et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2014, 136, 15638]. Tailoring this morphology could lead to conductivities sufficiently high for battery applications, so a more complete understanding of how phenomena such as solid-solid phase transitions can affect the sample morphology is of significant interest. Anisotropic relaxation of nuclear spin magnetisation provides a new MRI based approach for studies of polycrystalline materials at both a macroscopic and molecular level. In this contribution, morphology alterations induced by solid-solid phase transitions in triisobutyl(methyl)phosphonium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (P1444FSI) and diethyl(methyl)(isobutyl)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate (P1224PF6) are examined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), alongside nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, diffusion measurements and conductivity data. These observations are linked to molecular dynamics and structural behaviour crucial for the conductive properties of OIPCs. A distinct correlation is established between the conductivity at a given temperature, σ(T), and the intensity of the narrow NMR signal that is attributed to a mobile fraction, fm(T), of ions in the OIPC. To explain these findings we propose an analogy with the well-studied relationship between permeability (k) and void fraction (θ) in porous media, with k(θ) commonly quantified by a power-law dependence that can also be employed to describe σ(fm).

  8. Spin-noise correlations and spin-noise exchange driven by low-field spin-exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellis, A. T.; Loulakis, M.; Kominis, I. K.

    2014-09-01

    The physics of spin-exchange collisions have fueled several discoveries in fundamental physics and numerous applications in medical imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance. We report on the experimental observation and theoretical justification of spin-noise exchange, the transfer of spin noise from one atomic species to another. The signature of spin-noise exchange is an increase of the total spin-noise power at low magnetic fields, on the order of 1 mG, where the two-species spin-noise resonances overlap. The underlying physical mechanism is the two-species spin-noise correlation induced by spin-exchange collisions.

  9. Use of Nuclear Spin Noise Spectroscopy to Monitor Slow Magnetization Buildup at Millikelvin Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Peat, David; Owers‐Bradley, John

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At ultralow temperatures, longitudinal nuclear magnetic relaxation times become exceedingly long and spectral lines are very broad. These facts pose particular challenges for the measurement of NMR spectra and spin relaxation phenomena. Nuclear spin noise spectroscopy is used to monitor proton spin polarization buildup to thermal equilibrium of a mixture of glycerol, water, and copper oxide nanoparticles at 17.5 mK in a static magnetic field of 2.5 T. Relaxation times determined in such a way are essentially free from perturbations caused by excitation radiofrequency pulses, radiation damping, and insufficient excitation bandwidth. The experimental spin‐lattice relaxation times determined on resonance by saturation recovery with spin noise detection are consistently longer than those determined by using pulse excitation. These longer values are in better accordance with the expected field dependence trend than those obtained by on‐resonance experiments with pulsed excitation. PMID:27305629

  10. Monolithic Cylindrical Fused Silica Resonators with High Q Factors

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yao; Wang, Dongya; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Jianping; Wu, Suyong; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The cylindrical resonator gyroscope (CRG) is a typical Coriolis vibratory gyroscope whose performance is determined by the Q factor and frequency mismatch of the cylindrical resonator. Enhancing the Q factor is crucial for improving the rate sensitivity and noise performance of the CRG. In this paper, for the first time, a monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator with a Q factor approaching 8 × 105 (ring-down time over 1 min) is reported. The resonator is made of fused silica with low internal friction and high isotropy, with a diameter of 25 mm and a center frequency of 3974.35 Hz. The structure of the resonator is first briefly introduced, and then the experimental non-contact characterization method is presented. In addition, the post-fabrication experimental procedure of Q factor improvement, including chemical and thermal treatment, is demonstrated. The Q factor improvement by both treatments is compared and the primary loss mechanism is analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, the work presented in this paper represents the highest reported Q factor for a cylindrical resonator. The proposed monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator may enable high performance inertial sensing with standard manufacturing process and simple post-fabrication treatment. PMID:27483263

  11. Noise Simulation of Continuous-Time {sigma}{delta} Modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, J.; Quintanilla, L.; Bisbal, D.; San Pablo, J.; Enriquez, L.; Vicente, J.; Barbolla, J.

    2005-08-25

    In this work, an approach for the simulation of the effect of noise sources in the performance of continuous-time {delta}{sigma} modulators is presented. Electrical noise including thermal noise, 1/f noise and clock jitter are included in a simulation program and their impact on the system performance is analyzed.

  12. SU-F-BRE-12: Optical Resonator Water Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, J; DeMarco, J; Low, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Water calorimetry based on resistance thermometry has matured as a primary standard. Developing an optical technique hold the promise to push the boundaries of what is currently achievable with dosimetry. We will present a feasibility study and the current progress of construction of a Fabry-Perot resonator for dose to water measurement. Additionally, estimations of the theoretical limits resonator sensitivity and potential sources of noise for the system are described. Methods: A temperature change from the dose to water would be measured by the change in the index of refraction from the water in the cavity. Calculations are presented of the expected signal from the resonator for dose to water. The Fabry-Perot resonator constructed from optical quality narrowband mirrors is described. A water cell will be inserted into the cavity gap to provide the medium swept cavity length technique is explored as a specific implementation of this technique. Results: Calculations indicate that a dose to water on the order of a Gray is measureable with a reasonably implementable system. A resonator is currently under construction and progress towards a proof of principle measurement will be presented. The primary sources of noise, in order of importance, are expected to be; optical absorption by the medium, mechanical perturbations of the cavity length and thermal expansion of the optical mounts. Estimations of these noise sources and mitigation techniques will be discussed. Conclusion: A Fabry-Perot resonator is a promising technique for measuring the absorbed dose to water from a radiotherapy beam. This technique has the potential to serve as a check on the current primary standard for dose to water measurements. As well, i0074 may be the foundation for a new class of optical property based dosimetry measurement.

  13. Oscillator With Low Phase Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1987-01-01

    Phase errors cancelled for high frequency stability. Radio-frequency oscillator achieves high stability of frequency through parallel, two-amplifier configuration in which effects cause phase noise tend to cancel each other. Circuit includes two amplifiers with resonating elements, each constitutes part of feedback loop of other. Generate same frequency because each circuit provides other with conditions necessary for oscillation.

  14. Stochastic and Coherence Resonance in Hippocampal Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    decreases the signal to noise ratio of subthreshold synaptic inputs. Keywords - Hippocampus , neurons, stochastic resonance I. INTRODUCTION... subthreshold signals in the hippocampus ,” J. Neurophysiology , in press. [3] J. Collins C.C. Chow and T.T. Imboff, “Stochastic resonance without...nonlinear systems whereby the introduction of noise enhances the detection of subthreshold signals. Both computer simulations and experimental

  15. Non-Markovian stochastic processes: colored noise.

    PubMed

    Łuczka, J

    2005-06-01

    We survey classical non-Markovian processes driven by thermal equilibrium or nonequilibrium (nonthermal) colored noise. Examples of colored noise are presented. For processes driven by thermal equilibrium noise, the fluctuation-dissipation relation holds. In consequence, the system has to be described by a generalized (integro-differential) Langevin equation with a restriction on the damping integral kernel: Its form depends on the correlation function of noise. For processes driven by nonequilibrium noise, there is no such a restriction: They are considered to be described by stochastic differential (Ito- or Langevin-type) equations with an independent noise term. For the latter, we review methods of analysis of one-dimensional systems driven by Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise.

  16. Analysis of the Thermal Degradation of the Individual Anthocyanin Compounds of Black Carrot (Daucus carota L.): A New Approach Using High-Resolution Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulou, Ioanna; Thaeron, Delphine; Baker, Ashley; Jones, Anita; Robertson, Neil

    2015-08-12

    The black carrot dye is a mixture of cyanidin molecules, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of which shows a highly overlapped aromatic region. In this study, the (1)H NMR (800 MHz) aromatic chemical shifts of the mixture were fully assigned by overlaying them with the characterized (1)H NMR chemical shifts of the separated compounds. The latter were isolated using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and their chemical shifts were identified using (1)H and two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy (COSY) NMR spectroscopy. The stability of the black carrot mixture to heat exposure was investigated at pH 3.6, 6.8, and 8.0 by heat-treating aqueous solutions at 100 °C and the powdered material at 180 °C. From integration of high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra, it was possible to follow the relative degradation of each compound, offering advantages over the commonly used ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) and HPLC approaches. UV/vis spectroscopy and CIE color measurements were used to determine thermally induced color changes, under normal cooking conditions.

  17. A simple method for determining the coagulation threshold temperature of transparent tissue-mimicking thermal therapy gel phantoms: Validated by magnetic resonance imaging thermometry

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, N. Patrik; Partanen, Ari; Asp, Patrik; Branch, Craig A.; Guha, Chandan; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Tissue-mimicking thermal therapy phantoms that coagulate at specific temperatures are valuable tools for developing and evaluating treatment strategies related to thermal therapy. Here, the authors propose a simple and efficient method for determining the coagulation threshold temperature of transparent thermal therapy gel phantoms. Methods: The authors used a previously published gel phantom recipe with 2% (w/v) of bovine serum albumin as the temperature-sensitive protein. Using the programmable heating settings of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) machine, the authors heated 50 μl gel samples to various temperatures for 3 min and then imaged them using the BioRad Gel Doc system to determine the coagulation temperature using an opacity quantification method. The estimated coagulation temperatures were then validated for gel phantoms prepared with different pH levels using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) heating and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) thermometry methods on a clinical MR-HIFU system. Results: The PCR heating method produced consistent and reproducible coagulation of gel samples in precise correlation with the set incubation temperatures. The resulting coagulation threshold temperatures for gel phantoms of varying pH levels were found to be 44.1 ± 0.1, 53.4 ± 0.9, and 60.3 ± 0.9 °C for pH levels of 4.25, 4.50, and 4.75, respectively. This corresponded well with the coagulation threshold temperatures determined by MR-thermometry, with coagulation defined as a 95% decrease in T2 relaxation time, which were estimated at 53.6 ± 1.9 and 62.9 ± 2.4 °C for a pH of 4.50 and 4.75, respectively. Conclusions: The opacity quantification method provides a fast and reproducible estimate of the coagulation threshold temperature of transparent temperature-sensitive gel phantoms. The temperatures determined using this method were well within the range of temperatures estimated using MR-thermometry. Due to the specific heating capabilities

  18. Optical Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Paul; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad; Pardo, Fabrice

    2014-08-01

    Helmholtz resonators are widely used acoustic components able to select a single frequency. Here, based on an analogy between acoustics and electromagnetism wave equations, we present an electromagnetic 2D Helmholtz resonator made of a metallic slit-box structure. At the resonance, the light is funneled in the λ/800 apertures, and is subsequently absorbed in the cavity. As in acoustics, there is no higher order of resonance, which is an appealing feature for applications such as photodetection or thermal emission. Eventually, we demonstrate that the slit is of capacitive nature while the box behaves inductively. We derive an analytical formula for the resonance wavelength, which does not rely on wave propagation and therefore does not depend on the permittivity of the material filling the box. Besides, in contrast with half-wavelength resonators, the resonance wavelength can be engineered by both the slit aspect ratio and the box area.

  19. Quantum noise of a Michelson-Sagnac interferometer with a translucent mechanical oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Friedrich, Daniel; Westphal, Tobias; Gossler, Stefan; Danzmann, Karsten; Schnabel, Roman; Somiya, Kentaro; Danilishin, Stefan L.

    2010-03-15

    Quantum fluctuations in the radiation pressure of light can excite stochastic motions of mechanical oscillators thereby realizing a linear quantum opto-mechanical coupling. When performing a precise measurement of the position of an oscillator, this coupling results in quantum radiation pressure noise. Up to now this effect has not been observed yet. Generally speaking, the strength of radiation pressure noise increases when the effective mass of the oscillator is decreased or when the power of the reflected light is increased. Recently, extremely light SiN membranes ({approx_equal}100 ng) with high mechanical Q values at room temperature ({>=}10{sup 6}) have attracted attention as low thermal noise mechanical oscillators. However, the power reflectance of these membranes is much lower than unity (<0.4 at a wavelength of 1064 nm) which makes the use of advanced interferometer recycling techniques to amplify the radiation pressure noise in a standard Michelson interferometer inefficient. Here, we propose and theoretically analyze a Michelson-Sagnac interferometer that includes the membrane as a common end mirror for the Michelson interferometer part. In this topology, both power and signal recycling can be used even if the reflectance of the membrane is much lower than unity. In particular, signal recycling is a useful tool because it does not involve a power increase at the membrane. We derive the formulas for the quantum radiation pressure noise and the shot noise of an oscillator position measurement and compare them with theoretical models of the thermal noise of a SiN membrane with a fundamental resonant frequency of 75 kHz and an effective mass of125 ng. We find that quantum radiation pressure noise should be observable with a power of 1 W at the central beam splitter of the interferometer and a membrane temperature of 1 K.

  20. Silicon single-crystal cryogenic optical resonator.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Eugen; Chen, Qun-Feng; Ernsting, Ingo; Luckmann, Heiko; Rosowski, Ulrich; Nevsky, Alexander; Schiller, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    We report on the demonstration and characterization of a silicon optical resonator for laser frequency stabilization, operating in the deep cryogenic regime at temperatures as low as 1.5 K. Robust operation was achieved, with absolute frequency drift less than 20 Hz over 1 h. This stability allowed sensitive measurements of the resonator thermal expansion coefficient (α). We found that α=4.6×10(-13)  K(-1) at 1.6 K. At 16.8 K α vanishes, with a derivative equal to -6×10(-10)  K(-2). The temperature of the resonator was stabilized to a level below 10 μK for averaging times longer than 20 s. The sensitivity of the resonator frequency to a variation of the laser power was also studied. The corresponding sensitivities and the expected Brownian noise indicate that this system should enable frequency stabilization of lasers at the low-10(-17) level.

  1. Parametric Resonance Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broeck, C.; Bena, I.

    The phenomenon of parametric resonance is revisited. Several physical examples are reviewed and an exactly solvable model is discussed. A mean field theory is presented for globally coupled parametric oscillators with randomly distributed phases. A new type of collective instability appears, which is similar in nature to that of noise induced phase transitions.

  2. Photon Statistics of Propagating Thermal Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J.; Pogorzalek, S.; Deppe, F.; Fedorov, K. G.; Eder, P.; Fischer, M.; Wulschner, F.; Xie, E.; Marx, A.; Gross, R.

    2017-03-01

    In experiments with superconducting quantum circuits, characterizing the photon statistics of propagating microwave fields is a fundamental task. We quantify the n2+n photon number variance of thermal microwave photons emitted from a blackbody radiator for mean photon numbers, 0.05 ≲n ≲1.5 . We probe the fields using either correlation measurements or a transmon qubit coupled to a microwave resonator. Our experiments provide a precise quantitative characterization of weak microwave states and information on the noise emitted by a Josephson parametric amplifier.

  3. Resonances and resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-05-01

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances.

  4. Chain reconfiguration in active noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Nairhita; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi

    2016-05-01

    In a typical single molecule experiment, the dynamics of an unfolded protein is studied by determining the reconfiguration time using long-range Förster resonance energy transfer, where the reconfiguration time is the characteristic decay time of the position correlation between two residues of the protein. In this paper we theoretically calculate the reconfiguration time for a single flexible polymer in the presence of active noise. The study suggests that though the mean square displacement grows faster, the chain reconfiguration is always slower in the presence of long-lived active noise with exponential temporal correlation. Similar behavior is observed for a worm-like semi-flexible chain and a Zimm chain. However it is primarily the characteristic correlation time of the active noise and not the strength that controls the increase in the reconfiguration time. In brief, such active noise makes the polymer move faster but the correlation loss between the monomers becomes slow.

  5. Resonant-cantilever bio/chemical sensors with an integrated heater for both resonance exciting optimization and sensing repeatability enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Li, Xinxin; Gan, Xiaohua; Liu, Yongjing; Liu, Xiang; Xu, Pengcheng; Li, Jungang; Liu, Min

    2009-04-01

    With an integrated resonance exciting heater and a self-sensing piezoresistor, resonant micro-cantilever bio/chemical sensors are optimally designed and fabricated by micromachining techniques. This study is emphasized on the optimization of the integrated heating resistor. Previous research has put the heater at either the cantilever clamp end, the midpoint or the free end. Aiming at sufficiently high and stable resonant amplitude, our research indicates that the optimized location of the thermal-electric exciting resistor is the clamp end instead of other positions. By both theoretical analysis and resonance experiments where three heating resistors are placed at the three locations of the fabricated cantilever, it is clarified that the clamp end heating provides the most efficient resonance excitation in terms of resonant amplitude, Q-factor and resonance stability. Besides, the optimized combination of dc bias and ac voltage is determined by both analysis and experimental verification. With the optimized heating excitation, the resonant cantilever is used for biotin-avidin-specific detection, resulting in a ±0.1 Hz ultra-low noise floor of the frequency signal and a 130 fg mass resolution. In addition to resonance excitation, the heater is used to heat up the cantilever for speed-up desorption after detection that helps rapid and repeated sensing to chemical vapor. The clamp end is determined (by simulation) as the optimal heating location for uniform temperature distribution on the cantilever. Using the resonant cantilever, a rapid and repeated sensing experiment on dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) vapor shows that a short-period heating at the detection interval significantly quickens the signal recovery and enhances the sensing repeatability.

  6. Thermal neutron capture cross-section and resonance integral measurements of 139La(n, γ)140La and 140Ce(n, γ)141Ce using a Am-Be neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Mohanakrishnan, P.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal neutron capture cross-sections and resonance integrals of 139La(n, γ)140La and 140Ce (n, γ)141Ce are measured with respect to reference reactions 197Au(n, γ)198Au and 55Mn(n, γ)56Mn using the neutron activation technique. Measurements are carried out using neutrons from an Am-Be source located inside a concrete bunker. Two different methods are used for determining self-shielding factors of activation foils as well as for finding the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor. For 139 La with reference to 197 Au and 55 Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 9.24 ± 0.25 b and 9.28 ± 0.37 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 12.18 ± 0.67 b and 11.81 ± 0.94 b, respectively. For 140 Ce with reference to 197 Au and 55 Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 0.44 ± 0.01 b and 0.44 ± 0.02 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 0.55 ± 0.03 b and 0.54 ± 0.04 b, respectively. The present measurements are compared with earlier measurements and evaluations. Presently estimated values confirm the established 139La(n, γ)140La cross-sections. The presently measured thermal capture cross-section 140Ce(n, γ)141Ce , though lower than the evaluated data, is having higher accuracy compared to previous measurements with large uncertainties. The resonance integral measured is higher (like most previous measurements) than most evaluations requiring a revision of the evaluated data.

  7. Thermal-noise suppression in nano-scale Si field-effect transistors by feedback control based on single-electron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Kensaku; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Yamahata, Gento; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Fujiwara, Akira

    2015-08-01

    We perform feedback (FB) control for suppressing thermal fluctuation in the number of electrons in a silicon single-electron (SE) device composed of a small transistor and capacitor. SEs enter and leave the capacitor via the transistor randomly at thermal equilibrium, which is monitored in real time using a high-charge-sensitivity detector. In order to suppress such random motion or thermal fluctuation of the electrons, SEs are injected and removed using the transistor according to the monitored change in the number of electrons in the capacitor, which is exactly the FB control. As a result, thermal fluctuation in the number of electrons in a SE device is suppressed by 60%, which corresponds to the so-called FB cooling from 300 to 110 K. Moreover, a thermodynamics analysis of this FB cooling reveals that entropy in the capacitor is reduced and the device is at non-equilibrium; i.e., the free energy of the device increases. Since this entropy reduction originates from information about the electrons' motion monitored by the detector, our results by the FB control represent one type of information-to-energy conversion.

  8. Thermal-noise suppression in nano-scale Si field-effect transistors by feedback control based on single-electron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chida, Kensaku Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Yamahata, Gento; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Fujiwara, Akira

    2015-08-17

    We perform feedback (FB) control for suppressing thermal fluctuation in the number of electrons in a silicon single-electron (SE) device composed of a small transistor and capacitor. SEs enter and leave the capacitor via the transistor randomly at thermal equilibrium, which is monitored in real time using a high-charge-sensitivity detector. In order to suppress such random motion or thermal fluctuation of the electrons, SEs are injected and removed using the transistor according to the monitored change in the number of electrons in the capacitor, which is exactly the FB control. As a result, thermal fluctuation in the number of electrons in a SE device is suppressed by 60%, which corresponds to the so-called FB cooling from 300 to 110 K. Moreover, a thermodynamics analysis of this FB cooling reveals that entropy in the capacitor is reduced and the device is at non-equilibrium; i.e., the free energy of the device increases. Since this entropy reduction originates from information about the electrons' motion monitored by the detector, our results by the FB control represent one type of information-to-energy conversion.

  9. Reaching the quantum limit of sensitivity in electron spin resonance.

    PubMed

    Bienfait, A; Pla, J J; Kubo, Y; Stern, M; Zhou, X; Lo, C C; Weis, C D; Schenkel, T; Thewalt, M L W; Vion, D; Esteve, D; Julsgaard, B; Mølmer, K; Morton, J J L; Bertet, P

    2016-03-01

    The detection and characterization of paramagnetic species by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is widely used throughout chemistry, biology and materials science, from in vivo imaging to distance measurements in spin-labelled proteins. ESR relies on the inductive detection of microwave signals emitted by the spins into a coupled microwave resonator during their Larmor precession. However, such signals can be very small, prohibiting the application of ESR at the nanoscale (for example, at the single-cell level or on individual nanoparticles). Here, using a Josephson parametric microwave amplifier combined with high-quality-factor superconducting microresonators cooled at millikelvin temperatures, we improve the state-of-the-art sensitivity of inductive ESR detection by nearly four orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the detection of 1,700 bismuth donor spins in silicon within a single Hahn echo with unit signal-to-noise ratio, reduced to 150 spins by averaging a single Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. This unprecedented sensitivity reaches the limit set by quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field instead of thermal or technical noise, which constitutes a novel regime for magnetic resonance. The detection volume of our resonator is ∼ 0.02 nl, and our approach can be readily scaled down further to improve sensitivity, providing a new versatile toolbox for ESR at the nanoscale.

  10. The Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem of Colloidal Particle's energy on 2D Periodic Substrates: A Monte Carlo Study of thermal noise-like fluctuation and diffusion like Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, Amin

    2014-05-01

    Using the Monte Carlo simulations, we have calculated mean-square fluctuations in statistical mechanics, such as those for colloids energy configuration are set on square 2D periodic substrates interacting via a long range screened Coulomb potential on any specific and fixed substrate. Random fluctuations with small deviations from the state of thermodynamic equilibrium arise from the granular structure of them and appear as thermal diffusion with Gaussian distribution structure as well. The variations are showing linear form of the Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem on the energy of particles constitutive a canonical ensemble with continuous diffusion process of colloidal particle systems. The noise-like variation of the energy per particle and the order parameter versus the Brownian displacement of sum of large number of random steps of particles at low temperatures phase are presenting a markovian process on colloidal particles configuration, too.

  11. Techniques for noise removal and registration of TIMS data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hummer-Miller, S.

    1990-01-01

    Extracting subtle differences from highly correlated thermal infrared aircraft data is possible with appropriate noise filters, constructed and applied in the spatial frequency domain. This paper discusses a heuristic approach to designing noise filters for removing high- and low-spatial frequency striping and banding. Techniques for registering thermal infrared aircraft data to a topographic base using Thematic Mapper data are presented. The noise removal and registration techniques are applied to TIMS thermal infrared aircraft data. -Author

  12. Direct Observation of Thermal Equilibrium of Excited Triplet States of 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone. A Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Venkatraman Ravi; Rajkumar, Nagappan; Ariese, Freek; Umapathy, Siva

    2015-10-08

    The photochemistry of aromatic ketones plays a key role in various physicochemical and biological processes, and solvent polarity can be used to tune their triplet state properties. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of the conformational structure and the solvent polarity induced energy level reordering of the two lowest triplet states of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) was carried out using nanosecond-time-resolved absorption (ns-TRA), time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectroscopy, and time dependent-density functional theory (TD-DFT) studies. The ns-TRA of PQ in acetonitrile displays two bands in the visible range, and these two bands decay with similar lifetime at least at longer time scales (μs). Interestingly, TR(3) spectra of these two bands indicate that the kinetics are different at shorter time scales (ns), while at longer time scales they followed the kinetics of ns-TRA spectra. Therefore, we report a real-time observation of the thermal equilibrium between the two lowest triplet excited states of PQ, assigned to nπ* and ππ* of which the ππ* triplet state is formed first through intersystem crossing. Despite the fact that these two states are energetically close and have a similar conformational structure supported by TD-DFT studies, the slow internal conversion (∼2 ns) between the T(2)(1(3)nπ*) and T(1)(1(3)ππ*) triplet states indicates a barrier. Insights from the singlet excited states of PQ in protic solvents [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 142 , 24305 ] suggest that the lowest nπ* and ππ* triplet states should undergo hydrogen bond weakening and strengthening, respectively, relative to the ground state, and these mechanisms are substantiated by TD-DFT calculations. We also hypothesize that the different hydrogen bonding mechanisms exhibited by the two lowest singlet and triplet excited states of PQ could influence its ISC mechanism.

  13. Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy for Analytical Chemistry: Thermal Evolution of Low Volatility Impurities and Detection with a Fourier Transform Molecular Rotational Resonance Spectrometer (tev Ft-Mrr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Brent; Fields, Shelby S.; Neill, Justin L.; Pulliam, Robin; Muckle, Matt; Pate, Brooks

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in Fourier transform millimeter-wave spectroscopy techniques have renewed the application reach of molecular rotational spectroscopy for analytical chemistry. We present a sampling method for sub ppm analysis of low volatility impurities by thermal evolution from solid powders using a millimeter-wave Fourier transform molecular rotational resonance (FT-MRR) spectrometer for detection. This application of FT-MRR is relevant to the manufacturing of safe oral pharmaceuticals. Low volatility impurities can be challenging to detect at 1 ppm levels with chromatographic techniques. One such example of a potentially mutagenic impurity is acetamide (v.p. 1 Torr at 40 C, m.p. 80 C). We measured the pure reference spectrum of acetamide by flowing the sublimated vapor pressure of acetamide crystals through the FT-MRR spectrometer. The spectrometer lower detection level (LDL) for a broadband (> 20 GHz, 10 min.) spectrum is 300 nTorr, 30 pmol, or 2 ng. For a 50 mg powder, perfect sample transfer efficiency can yield a w/w % detection limit of 35 ppb. We extended the sampling method for the acetamide reference measurement to an acetaminophen sample spiked with 5000 ppm acetamide in order to test the sample transfer efficiency when liberated from an pharmaceutical powder. A spectral reference matching algorithm detected the presence of several impurities including acetaldehyde, acetic acid, and acetonitrile that evolved at the melting point of acetaminophen, demonstrating the capability of FT-MRR for identification without a routine chemical standard. The method detection limit (MDL) without further development is less than 10 ppm w/w %. Resolved FT-MRR mixture spectra will be presented with a description of sampling methods.

  14. Cyclotron resonant scattering feature simulations. I. Thermally averaged cyclotron scattering cross sections, mean free photon-path tables, and electron momentum sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarm, F.-W.; Schönherr, G.; Falkner, S.; Pottschmidt, K.; Wolff, M. T.; Becker, P. A.; Sokolova-Lapa, E.; Klochkov, D.; Ferrigno, C.; Fürst, F.; Hemphill, P. B.; Marcu-Cheatham, D. M.; Dauser, T.; Wilms, J.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Electron cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs) are observed as absorption-like lines in the spectra of X-ray pulsars. A significant fraction of the computing time for Monte Carlo simulations of these quantum mechanical features is spent on the calculation of the mean free path for each individual photon before scattering, since it involves a complex numerical integration over the scattering cross section and the (thermal) velocity distribution of the scattering electrons. Aims: We aim to numerically calculate interpolation tables which can be used in CRSF simulations to sample the mean free path of the scattering photon and the momentum of the scattering electron. The tables also contain all the information required for sampling the scattering electron's final spin. Methods: The tables were calculated using an adaptive Simpson integration scheme. The energy and angle grids were refined until a prescribed accuracy is reached. The tables are used by our simulation code to produce artificial CRSF spectra. The electron momenta sampled during these simulations were analyzed and justified using theoretically determined boundaries. Results: We present a complete set of tables suited for mean free path calculations of Monte Carlo simulations of the cyclotron scattering process for conditions expected in typical X-ray pulsar accretion columns (0.01 ≤ B/Bcrit ≤ 0.12, where Bcrit = 4.413 × 1013 G, and 3 keV ≤ kBT ≤ 15 keV). The sampling of the tables is chosen such that the results have an estimated relative error of at most 1/15 for all points in the grid. The tables are available online (see link in footnote, page 1). The electronic tables described here are available at http://www.sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de/research/cyclo

  15. Effects of thermal annealing on the radiation produced electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of bovine and equine tooth enamel: Fossil and modern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, Robert A.; Bogard, James S.; Elam, J. Michael; Weinand, Daniel C.; Kramer, Andrew

    2003-06-01

    The concentration of stable radiation-induced paramagnetic states in fossil teeth can be used as a measure of sample age. Temperature excursions >100 °C, however, can cause the paramagnetic state clock to differ from the actual postmortem time. We have heated irradiated enamel from both fossilized bovid and modern equine (MEQ) teeth for 30 min in 50 °C increments from 100 to 300 °C, measuring the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum after each anneal, to investigate such effects. Samples were irradiated again after the last anneal, with doses of 300-1200 Gy from 60Co photons, and measured. Two unirradiated MEQ samples were also annealed for 30 min at 300 °C, one in an evacuated EPR tube and the other in a tube open to the atmosphere, and subsequently irradiated. The data showed that hyperfine components attributed to the alanine radical were not detected in the irradiated MEQ sample until after the anneals. The spectrum of the MEQ sample heated in air and then irradiated was similar to that of the heat treated fossil sample. We conclude that the hyperfine components are due to sample heating to temperatures/times >100 °C/30 min and that similarities between fossil and MEQ spectra after the 300 °C/30 min MEQ anneal are also due to sample heating. We conclude that the presence of the hyperfine components in spectra of fossil tooth enamel indicate that such thermal events occurred either at the time of death, or during the postmortem history.

  16. Label-free characterization of carbonic anhydrase-novel inhibitor interactions using surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence-based thermal shift assays.

    PubMed

    Rogez-Florent, Tiphaine; Duhamel, Laetitia; Goossens, Laurence; Six, Perrine; Drucbert, Anne-Sophie; Depreux, Patrick; Danzé, Pierre-Marie; Landy, David; Goossens, Jean-François; Foulon, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the development of biophysical unbiased methods to study the interactions between new designed compounds and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) enzyme. These methods have to permit both a screening of a series of sulfonamide derivatives and the identification of a lead compound after a thorough study of the most promising molecules. Interactions data were collected using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and thermal shift assay (TSA). In the first step, experiments were performed with bovine CAII isoform and were extended to human CAII. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments were also conducted to obtain thermodynamics parameters necessary for the processing of the TSA data. Results obtained with this reference methodology demonstrate the effectiveness of SPR and TSA. KD values obtained from SPR data were in perfect accordance with ITC. For TSA, despite the fact that the absolute values of KD were quite different, the same affinity scale was obtained for all compounds. The binding affinities of the analytes studied vary by more than 50 orders of magnitude; for example, the KD value determined by SPR were 6 ± 4 and 299 ± 25 nM for compounds 1 and 3, respectively. This paper discusses some of the theoretical and experimental aspects of the affinity-based methods and evaluates the protein consumption to develop methods for the screening of further new compounds. The double interest of SPR, that is, for screening and for the quick thorough study of the interactions parameters (ka , kd , and KD ), leads us to choose this methodology for the study of new potential inhibitors.

  17. Enhancing detection sensitivity of metallic nanostructures by resonant coupling mode and spectral integration analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, En-Hung; Tsai, Wan-Shao; Lee, Kuang-Li; Lee, Ming-Chang M; Wei, Pei-Kuen

    2014-08-11

    We report a simple method to efficiently improve the detection limit of surface plasmon resonance in periodic metallic nanostructures by using small angle illumination and spectral integration analysis. The large-area gold nanoslit arrays were fabricated by thermal-annealing template-stripping method with a slit width of 60 nm and period of 500 nm. The small angle illumination induced a resonant coupling between surface plasmon mode and substrate mode. It increased ~2.24 times intensity sensitivity at 5.5° incident angle. The small-angle illumination also resulted in multiple resonant peaks. The spectral integration method integrated all changes near the resonant peaks and increased the signal to noise ratio about 5 times as compared to single-wavelength intensity analysis. Combining both small angle and spectral integration, the detection limit was increased to one order of magnitude. The improvement of the detection limit for antigen-antibody interactions was demonstrated.

  18. Listen to the Noise: Noise Is Beneficial for Cognitive Performance in ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderlund, Goran; Sikstrom, Sverker; Smart, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Background: Noise is typically conceived of as being detrimental to cognitive performance. However, given the mechanism of stochastic resonance, a certain amount of noise can benefit performance. We investigate cognitive performance in noisy environments in relation to a neurocomputational model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)…

  19. Improving Gabor noise.

    PubMed

    Lagae, Ares; Lefebvre, Sylvain; Dutré, Philip

    2011-08-01

    We have recently proposed a new procedural noise function, Gabor noise, which offers a combination of properties not found in the existing noise functions. In this paper, we present three significant improvements to Gabor noise: 1) an isotropic kernel for Gabor noise, which speeds up isotropic Gabor noise with a factor of roughly two, 2) an error analysis of Gabor noise, which relates the kernel truncation radius to the relative error of the noise, and 3) spatially varying Gabor noise, which enables spatial variation of all noise parameters. These improvements make Gabor noise an even more attractive alternative for the existing noise functions.

  20. Thermal Improvement and Stability of Si3N4/GeNx/p- and n-Ge Structures Prepared by Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Plasma Nitridation and Sputtering at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yukio; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Iwasaki, Takuro; Izumi, Kohei; Otani, Yohei; Ishizaki, Hiroki; Ono, Toshiro

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports on the thermal improvement of Si3N4/GeNx/Ge structures. After the Si3N4 (5 nm)/GeNx (2 nm) stacks were prepared on Ge substrates by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma nitridation and sputtering at room temperature, they were thermally annealed in atmospheric N2 + 10% H2 ambient at temperatures from 400 to 600 °C. It was demonstrated that the electronic properties of the GeNx/Ge interfaces were thermally improved at temperatures of up to 500 °C with a minimum interface trap density (Dit) of ˜1×1011 cm-2 eV-1 near the Ge midgap, whereas the interface properties were slightly degraded after annealing at 600 °C with a minimum Dit value of ˜4×1011 cm-2 eV-1.