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Sample records for resonant thermal noise

  1. A second generation of low thermal noise cryogenic silicon resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, D. G.; Legero, T.; Grebing, Ch; Häfner, S.; Lisdat, Ch; Weyrich, R.; Zhang, W.; Sonderhouse, L.; Robinson, J. M.; Riehle, F.; Ye, J.; Sterr, U.

    2016-06-01

    We have set up an improved vertically mounted silicon cavity operating at the zero-crossing temperature of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) near 123 K with estimated thermal noise limited instability of 4 x 10-17 in the modified Allan deviation. Owing to the anisotropic elasticity of single-crystal silicon, the vertical acceleration sensitivity was minimized in situ by axially rotating the resonator with respect to the mounting frame. The control of the resonator temperature is greatly improved by using a combination of two thermal shields, monitoring with several temperature sensors, and employing low-thermal conductivity materials. The instability of the resonator stabilized laser was characterized by comparing with another low-noise system based on a 48 cm long room temperature cavity of PTB's strontium lattice clock, resulting in a modified Allan deviation of 7 x 10-17 at 100 s.

  2. Resonant activation in a colored multiplicative thermal noise driven closed system

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Somrita; Bag, Bidhan Chandra; Mondal, Debasish

    2014-05-28

    In this paper, we have demonstrated that resonant activation (RA) is possible even in a thermodynamically closed system where the particle experiences a random force and a spatio-temporal frictional coefficient from the thermal bath. For this stochastic process, we have observed a hallmark of RA phenomena in terms of a turnover behavior of the barrier-crossing rate as a function of noise correlation time at a fixed noise variance. Variance can be fixed either by changing temperature or damping strength as a function of noise correlation time. Our another observation is that the barrier crossing rate passes through a maximum with increase in coupling strength of the multiplicative noise. If the damping strength is appreciably large, then the maximum may disappear. Finally, we compare simulation results with the analytical calculation. It shows that there is a good agreement between analytical and numerical results.

  3. Uncertainty in least-squares fits to the thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators with applications to the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Yousefi, Morteza; Friend, James R

    2014-02-01

    Thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators are used widely to characterize their physical properties. These spectra typically exhibit a Lorentzian response, with additional white noise due to extraneous processes. Least-squares fits of these measurements enable extraction of key parameters of the resonator, including its resonant frequency, quality factor, and stiffness. Here, we present general formulas for the uncertainties in these fit parameters due to sampling noise inherent in all thermal noise spectra. Good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation of synthetic data and measurements of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever is demonstrated. These formulas enable robust interpretation of thermal noise spectra measurements commonly performed in the AFM and adaptive control of fitting procedures with specified tolerances.

  4. Uncertainty in least-squares fits to the thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators with applications to the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Yousefi, Morteza; Friend, James R.

    2014-02-15

    Thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators are used widely to characterize their physical properties. These spectra typically exhibit a Lorentzian response, with additional white noise due to extraneous processes. Least-squares fits of these measurements enable extraction of key parameters of the resonator, including its resonant frequency, quality factor, and stiffness. Here, we present general formulas for the uncertainties in these fit parameters due to sampling noise inherent in all thermal noise spectra. Good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation of synthetic data and measurements of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever is demonstrated. These formulas enable robust interpretation of thermal noise spectra measurements commonly performed in the AFM and adaptive control of fitting procedures with specified tolerances.

  5. Telegraph frequency noise in electromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, F.; Zou, J.; Maizelis, Z. A.; Chan, H. B.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the possibility of revealing fluctuations in the eigenfrequency of a resonator when the frequency noise is of the telegraph type. Using a resonantly driven micromechanical resonator, we show that the time-averaged vibration amplitude spectrum exhibits two peaks. They merge with an increasing rate of frequency switching and the spectrum displays an analog of motional narrowing. We also show that the moments of the complex amplitude depend strongly on the frequency noise characteristics. This dependence remains valid even when strong thermal noise or detector noise is present.

  6. Eliminating thermal violin spikes from LIGO noise

    SciTech Connect

    Santamore, D. H.; Levin, Yuri

    2001-08-15

    We have developed a scheme for reducing LIGO suspension thermal noise close to violin-mode resonances. The idea is to monitor directly the thermally induced motion of a small portion of (a 'point' on) each suspension fiber, thereby recording the random forces driving the test-mass motion close to each violin-mode frequency. One can then suppress the thermal noise by optimally subtracting the recorded fiber motions from the measured motion of the test mass, i.e., from the LIGO output. The proposed method is a modification of an analogous but more technically difficult scheme by Braginsky, Levin and Vyatchanin for reducing broad-band suspension thermal noise. The efficiency of our method is limited by the sensitivity of the sensor used to monitor the fiber motion. If the sensor has no intrinsic noise (i.e. has unlimited sensitivity), then our method allows, in principle, a complete removal of violin spikes from the thermal-noise spectrum. We find that in LIGO-II interferometers, in order to suppress violin spikes below the shot-noise level, the intrinsic noise of the sensor must be less than {approx}2 x 10{sup -13} cm/Hz. This sensitivity is two orders of magnitude greater than that of currently available sensors.

  7. Thermal noise in confined fluids.

    PubMed

    Sanghi, T; Aluru, N R

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we discuss a combined memory function equation (MFE) and generalized Langevin equation (GLE) approach (referred to as MFE/GLE formulation) to characterize thermal noise in confined fluids. Our study reveals that for fluids confined inside nanoscale geometries, the correlation time and the time decay of the autocorrelation function of the thermal noise are not significantly different across the confinement. We show that it is the strong cross-correlation of the mean force with the molecular velocity that gives rise to the spatial anisotropy in the velocity-autocorrelation function of the confined fluids. Further, we use the MFE/GLE formulation to extract the thermal force a fluid molecule experiences in a MD simulation. Noise extraction from MD simulation suggests that the frequency distribution of the thermal force is non-Gaussian. Also, the frequency distribution of the thermal force near the confining surface is found to be different in the direction parallel and perpendicular to the confinement. We also use the formulation to compute the noise correlation time of water confined inside a (6,6) carbon-nanotube (CNT). It is observed that inside the (6,6) CNT, in which water arranges itself in a highly concerted single-file arrangement, the correlation time of thermal noise is about an order of magnitude higher than that of bulk water.

  8. Thermal noise in confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghi, T.; Aluru, N. R.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we discuss a combined memory function equation (MFE) and generalized Langevin equation (GLE) approach (referred to as MFE/GLE formulation) to characterize thermal noise in confined fluids. Our study reveals that for fluids confined inside nanoscale geometries, the correlation time and the time decay of the autocorrelation function of the thermal noise are not significantly different across the confinement. We show that it is the strong cross-correlation of the mean force with the molecular velocity that gives rise to the spatial anisotropy in the velocity-autocorrelation function of the confined fluids. Further, we use the MFE/GLE formulation to extract the thermal force a fluid molecule experiences in a MD simulation. Noise extraction from MD simulation suggests that the frequency distribution of the thermal force is non-Gaussian. Also, the frequency distribution of the thermal force near the confining surface is found to be different in the direction parallel and perpendicular to the confinement. We also use the formulation to compute the noise correlation time of water confined inside a (6,6) carbon-nanotube (CNT). It is observed that inside the (6,6) CNT, in which water arranges itself in a highly concerted single-file arrangement, the correlation time of thermal noise is about an order of magnitude higher than that of bulk water.

  9. Thermal background noise limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.

    1982-01-01

    Modern detection systems are increasingly limited in sensitivity by the background thermal photons which enter the receiving system. Expressions for the fluctuations of detected thermal radiation are derived. Incoherent and heterodyne detection processes are considered. References to the subject of photon detection statistics are given.

  10. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Melcher, Jennifer R.; Kiang, Nelson Y.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 μPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager’s permanent magnet and the room air handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  11. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, M E; Melcher, J R; Kiang, N Y

    2000-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 microPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager's permanent magnet and the room air-handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  12. Flow noise source-resonator coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, M.L.

    1997-11-01

    This paper investigates the coupling mechanism between flow noise sources and acoustic resonators. Analytical solutions are developed for the classical cases of monopole and dipole types of flow noise sources. The effectiveness of the coupling between the acoustic resonator and the noise source is shown to be dependent on the type of noise source as well as its location on the acoustic pressure mode shape. For a monopole source, the maximum coupling occurs when the noise source is most intense near an acoustic pressure antinode (i.e., location of maximum acoustic pressure). A numerical study with the impedance method demonstrates this effect. A dipole source couples most effectively when located near an acoustic pressure node.

  13. Noise and stochastic resonance in voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Robert K.

    2003-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo techniques, I calculate the effects of internally generated noise on information transfer through the passage of action potential spikes along unmyelinated axons in a simple nervous system. I take the Hodgkin–Huxley (HH) description of Na and K channels in squid giant axons as the basis of the calculations and find that most signal transmission noise is generated by fluctuations in the channel open and closed populations. To bring the model closer to conventional descriptions in terms of thermal noise energy, kT, and to determine gating currents, I express the HH equations in the form of simple relations from statistical mechanics where the states are separated by a Gibbs energy that is modified by the action of the transmembrane potential on dipole moments held by the domains. Using the HH equations, I find that the output response (in the probability of action potential spikes) from small input potential pulses across the cell membrane is increased by added noise but falls off when the input noise becomes large, as in stochastic resonance models. That output noise response is sharply reduced by a small increase in the membrane polarization potential or a moderate increase in the channel densities. Because any reduction of noise incurs metabolic and developmental costs to an animal, the natural noise level is probably optimal and any increase in noise is likely to be harmful. Although these results are specific to signal transmission in unmyelinated axons, I suggest that the conclusions are likely to be general. PMID:14506291

  14. Airfoil Tonal Noise Generation in Resonant Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atobe, Takashi; Tuinstra, Marthijn; Takagi, Shohei

    To clarify tonal noise generation, an experimental study on airfoil tonal noise was undertaken using a conventional wind tunnel, which allows acoustic reflection on test section walls. A two-dimensional wing model with the NACA0015 cross-section was used at 5 degrees angle of attack. Most previous experiments conducted in anechoic environments commonly show that the tonal noise frequency is selected in an overall trend of U1.5 (U is uniform velocity) locally consisting of a step-like structure, and Tollmien-Schlichting disturbances are rapidly amplified in the backflow region near the trailing edge of the pressure surface. The present experiments in an acoustically resonant environment show that the tonal noise emanates in accordance with the aforementioned features. However, the ladder-like structure has a different local slope from that observed in anechoic flow. These characteristics suggest that acoustic resonance does not play a fundamental role in tonal noise generation. Observation by hot-wire and smoke visualization techniques shows that unsteady disturbances rather than Tollmien-Schlichting waves are rapidly magnified by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the backflow region. The frequency selection mechanism at tonal noise generation still remains unsolved.

  15. Thermal-noise-limited underground interferometer CLIO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Arai, Koji; Fujimoto, Masa-Katsu; Kawamura, Seiji; Kuroda, Kazuaki; Miyakawa, Osamu; Miyoki, Shinji; Ohashi, Masatake; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Telada, Souichi; Uchiyama, Takashi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; collaborators, CLIO

    2010-04-01

    We report on the current status of CLIO (Cryogenic Laser Interferometer Observatory), which is a prototype interferometer for LCGT (large scale cryogenic gravitational-wave telescope). LCGT is a Japanese next-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detector featuring the use of cryogenic mirrors and a quiet underground site. The main purpose of CLIO is to demonstrate a reduction of the mirror thermal noise by cooling the sapphire mirrors. CLIO is located in an underground site of the Kamioka mine, 1000 m deep from the mountain top, to verify its advantages. After a few years of commissioning work, we have achieved a thermal-noise-limited sensitivity at room temperature. One of the main results of noise hunting was the elimination of thermal noise caused by a conductive coil holder coupled with a pendulum through magnets.

  16. Interior noise reduction by alternate resonance tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.; Gottwald, James A.; Bryce, Jeffrey W.

    1987-01-01

    Existing interior noise reduction techniques for aircraft fuselages perform reasonably well at higher frequencies, but are inadequate at low frequencies, particularly with respect to the low blade passage harmonics with high forcing levels found in propeller aircraft. A method is studied which considers aircraft fuselages lined with panels alternately tuned to frequencies above and below the frequency that must be attenuated. Adjacent panel would oscillate at equal amplitude, to give equal acoustic source strength, but with opposite phase. Provided these adjacent panels are acoustically compact, the resulting cancellation causes the interior acoustic modes to be cut off, and therefore be nonpropagating and evanescent. This interior noise reduction method, called Alternate Resonance Tuning (ART), is being investigated theoretically and experimentally. Progress to date is discussed.

  17. Dependence of SAW resonator 1/f noise on device size.

    PubMed

    Parker, T E

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with eight 450-MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators which demonstrate that a resonator's 1/f noise depends approximately inversely on the active acoustic area of the device. This observation is consistent with a proposed theory that 1/f noise in acoustic resonators is caused by localized velocity or dimensional fluctuations. PMID:18263254

  18. Thermal-mechanical-noise-based CMUT characterization and sensing.

    PubMed

    Gurun, Gokce; Hochman, Michael; Hasler, Paul; Degertekin, F Levent

    2012-06-01

    When capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) are monolithically integrated with custom-designed low-noise electronics, the output noise of the system can be dominated by the CMUT thermal-mechanical noise both in air and in immersion even for devices with low capacitance. Because the thermal-mechanical noise can be related to the electrical admittance of the CMUTs, this provides an effective means of device characterization. This approach yields a novel method to test the functionality and uniformity of CMUT arrays and the integrated electronics when a direct connection to CMUT array element terminals is not available. Because these measurements can be performed in air at the wafer level, the approach is suitable for batch manufacturing and testing. We demonstrate this method on the elements of an 800-μm-diameter CMUT-on-CMOS array designed for intravascular imaging in the 10 to 20 MHz range. Noise measurements in air show the expected resonance behavior and spring softening effects. Noise measurements in immersion for the same array provide useful information on both the acoustic cross talk and radiation properties of the CMUT array elements. The good agreement between a CMUT model based on finite difference and boundary element methods and the noise measurements validates the model and indicates that the output noise is indeed dominated by thermal-mechanical noise. The measurement method can be exploited to implement CMUT-based passive sensors to measure immersion medium properties, or other parameters affecting the electro-mechanics of the CMUT structure. PMID:22718877

  19. Endogenous neural noise and stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emberson, Lauren; Kitajo, Keiichi; Ward, Lawrence M.

    2007-06-01

    We discuss the relationship of endogenous neural noise (ENN) to performance of behavioral tasks and to information processing in the brain. Spontaneous neural activity is closely linked to development and perception, and is correlated with behavior. Some of this activity is probably related to internal processing of task- and goal-relevant information, but some is simply noise. Two previous studies have reported correlations between performance on behavioral tasks and measures of neural noise and have characterized these relationships as intrinsic stochastic resonance (SR). We argue that neither of these studies demonstrated intrinsic SR, and discuss several alternative ways of measuring ENN in humans from EEG or MEG records. Using one of these, random-phase power in the 30-50 Hz range 1 sec before the onset of the signal, we demonstrate a kind of intrinsic SR that optimizes detection of weak visual signals. Minimum response time was obtained when this EEG measure of ENN was in a middle decile. No other measure of ENN was related either to response time or to an unbiased measure of detection accuracy (e.g., d'). A discussion of the implications of these findings for the study of intrinsic SR concludes the paper.

  20. Noise properties of superconducting coplanar waveguide microwave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jiansong; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Mazin, Benjamin A.; LeDuc, Henry G.; Day, Peter K.

    2007-03-01

    The authors have measured noise in thin-film superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators. This noise appears entirely as phase noise, equivalent to a jitter of the resonance frequency. In contrast, amplitude fluctuations are not observed at the sensitivity of their measurement. The ratio between the noise power in the phase and amplitude directions is large, in excess of 30dB. These results have important implications for resonant readouts of various devices such as detectors, amplifiers, and qubits. They suggest that the phase noise is due to two-level systems in dielectric materials.

  1. Stochastic resonance with colored noise for neural signal detection.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2014-01-01

    We analyze signal detection with nonlinear test statistics in the presence of colored noise. In the limits of small signal and weak noise correlation, the optimal test statistic and its performance are derived under general conditions, especially concerning the type of noise. We also analyze, for a threshold nonlinearity-a key component of a neural model, the conditions for noise-enhanced performance, establishing that colored noise is superior to white noise for detection. For a parallel array of nonlinear elements, approximating neurons, we demonstrate even broader conditions allowing noise-enhanced detection, via a form of suprathreshold stochastic resonance.

  2. Noise control using a plate radiator and an acoustic resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control subassembly for reducing noise caused by a source (such as an aircraft engine) independent of the subassembly. A noise radiating panel is bendably vibratable to generate a panel noise canceling at least a portion of the source noise. A piezoceramic actuator plate is connected to the panel. A front plate is spaced apart from the panel and the first plate, is positioned generally between the source noise and the panel, and has a sound exit port. A first pair of spaced-apart side walls each generally abut the panel and the front plate so as to generally enclose a front cavity to define a resonator.

  3. Mechanically and thermally stable maser cavity resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.; Hoffman, T. E.; Levine, M. W.

    1972-01-01

    New type cavity resonator is designed for hydrogen maser. Resonator consists of three pieces of glass-ceramic material having extremely low thermal coefficient of expansion and provides very stable mechanical tuning.

  4. Nonlinear Thermal Compensators for WGM Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry; Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    In an alternative version of a proposed bimaterial thermal compensator for a whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonator, a mechanical element having nonlinear stiffness would be added to enable stabilization of a desired resonance frequency at a suitable fixed working temperature. The previous version was described in "Bimaterial Thermal Compensators for WGM Resonators." Both versions are intended to serve as inexpensive means of preventing (to first order) or reducing temperature-related changes in resonance frequencies.

  5. Thermal nonlinearity in silicon microcylindrical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, Natasha; Healy, Noel; Mehta, Priyanth; Day, Todd D.; Sazio, Pier J. A.; Badding, John V.; Peacock, Anna C.

    2012-04-01

    We explore the thermally induced nonlinearity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon microcylindrical resonators that are fabricated from the silicon optical fiber platform. In particular, we use a pump-probe technique to experimentally demonstrate thermally induced optical modulation and determine the response time. Through characterization of the thermal properties and the associated resonance wavelength shifts, we will show that it is possible to infer the material absorption coefficient for a range of whispering gallery mode resonators.

  6. Frequency Noise in Superconducting Thin-Film Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Shwetank; Day, Peter; Leduc, Henry; Mazin, Benjamin; Eckart, Megan; Gao, Jiansong; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2006-03-01

    We present the results of low temperature (120 -- 1200 mK) noise measurements performed on thin-film superconducting niobium resonators fabricated on a silicon substrate. The devices studied use coplanar waveguide (CPW) transmission lines and have resonance frequencies of around 4 GHz and quality factors in the range of Q ˜ 10^4 to 10^6. These resonators are similar to those used to make novel photon detectors and read out charge qubits. These resonators show excess frequency noise which varies as approximately f-1/2. This excess noise limits the sensitivity of our photon detectors and likely effects the qubit performance as well. Two level systems (TLS) in amorphous thin-film dielectrics and oxide tunnel barriers have been shown to cause dissipation and decoherence in phase qubits. We suggest that noise in our resonators is also caused by TLS most likely near the surfaces of the substrate and metal films. To test this idea, we have measured the frequency shift, the quality factor and the frequency noise as a function of the device temperature and the microwave readout power. The frequency shift data agrees well with existing weak field TLS theory. We also find that the frequency noise decreases with increasing readout power and temperature and that decreased noise at higher powers is not due to simply device heating.

  7. Qubit dephasing due to photon shot noise from coherent and thermal sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, S.; Yan, F.; Kamal, A.; Orlando, T. P.; Oliver, W. D.; Birenbaum, J.; Sears, A.; Hover, D.; Gudmundsen, T.; Yoder, J.

    We investigate qubit dephasing due to photon shot noise in a superconducting flux qubit transversally coupled to a coplanar microwave resonator. Due to the AC Stark effect, photon fluctuations in the resonator cause frequency shifts of the qubit, which in turn lead to dephasing. While this is universally understood, we have made the first quantitative spectroscopy of this noise for both thermal (i.e., residual photons from higher temperature stages) and coherent photons (residual photons from the readout and control pulses). We find that the bandwidth of the shot noise from thermal and coherent photons differ by approximately a factor of two, which we attribute to differences in the correlation time for the two noise sources. By comparing the results with noise spectra measured without any externally applied photons, we conclude that the qubit coherence times in our setup were limited by photon shot noise from thermal radiation, with an average resonator photon population of 0.006. Equipped with this knowledge, we improved the filtering for thermal noise and thereby improved the qubit coherence times by more than a factor of two, with T2 echo times approaching 100 us. From the measured T2 decay, we determine an upper bound on the residual photon population of 0.0004. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) via MIT LL under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002.

  8. Spectroscopy of spontaneous spin noise as a probe of spin dynamics and magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Crooker, S A; Rickel, D G; Balatsky, A V; Smith, D L

    2004-09-01

    Not all noise in experimental measurements is unwelcome. Certain fundamental noise sources contain valuable information about the system itself-a notable example being the inherent voltage fluctuations (Johnson noise) that exist across any resistor, which allow the temperature to be determined. In magnetic systems, fundamental noise can exist in the form of random spin fluctuations. For example, statistical fluctuations of N paramagnetic spins should generate measurable noise of order N spins, even in zero magnetic field. Here we exploit this effect to perform perturbation-free magnetic resonance. We use off-resonant Faraday rotation to passively detect the magnetization noise in an equilibrium ensemble of paramagnetic alkali atoms; the random fluctuations generate spontaneous spin coherences that precess and decay with the same characteristic energy and timescales as the macroscopic magnetization of an intentionally polarized or driven ensemble. Correlation spectra of the measured spin noise reveal g-factors, nuclear spin, isotope abundance ratios, hyperfine splittings, nuclear moments and spin coherence lifetimes-without having to excite, optically pump or otherwise drive the system away from thermal equilibrium. These noise signatures scale inversely with interaction volume, suggesting a possible route towards non-perturbative, sourceless magnetic resonance of small systems. PMID:15343328

  9. Noise-free stochastic resonance at an interior crisis.

    PubMed

    Jüngling, Thomas; Benner, Hartmut; Stemler, Thomas; Just, Wolfram

    2008-03-01

    We report on the observation of noise-free stochastic resonance in an externally driven diode resonator close to an interior crisis. At sufficiently high excitation amplitudes the diode resonator shows a strange attractor which after the collision with an unstable period-three orbit exhibits crisis-induced intermittency. In the intermittency regime the system jumps between the previously stable chaotic attractor and the phase space region which has been made accessible by the crisis. This random process can be used to amplify a weak periodic signal through the mechanism of stochastic resonance. In contrast to conventional stochastic resonance no external noise is needed. The chaotic intrinsic dynamics plays the role of the stochastic forcing. Our data obtained from the diode resonator are compared with numerical simulations of the logistic map where a similar crisis-induced intermittency is observed. PMID:18517494

  10. Current noise of the interacting resonant level model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T. J.; Kennes, D. M.; Meden, V.

    2016-02-01

    We study the zero-frequency current noise of the interacting resonant level model for arbitrary bias voltages using a functional renormalization group approach. For this we extend the existing nonequilibrium scheme by deriving and solving flow equations for the current-vertex functions. On-resonance artificial divergences of the latter found in lowest-order perturbation theory in the two-particle interaction are consistently removed. Away from resonance they are shifted to higher orders. This allows us to gain a comprehensive picture of the current noise in the scaling limit. At high bias voltages, the current noise exhibits a universal power-law decay, whose exponent is, to leading order in the interaction, identical to that of the current. The effective charge on resonance is analyzed in detail, employing properties of the vertex correction. We find that it is only modified to second or higher order in the two-particle interaction.

  11. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stiffness variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by a plurality of force transmitting mechanisms which contact the noise radiating element. Each one of the force transmitting mechanisms includes an expandable element and a spring in contact with the noise radiating element so that excitation of the element varies the spring force applied to the noise radiating element. The elements are actuated by a controller which receives input of a signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the elements and causes the spring force applied to the noise radiating element to be varied. The force transmitting mechanisms can be arranged to either produce bending or linear stiffness variations in the noise radiating element.

  12. Coherence resonance induced by colored noise near Hopf bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Juan; Xiao, Tiejun; Hou, Zhonghuai; Xin, Houwen

    2008-12-01

    Effects of colored noise near supercritical Hopf bifurcation, especially noise induced oscillation (NIO) and coherence resonance (CR), have been studied analytically in the Brusselator model, using the stochastic normal form method. Two types of colored noise are considered: one is the standard Gaussian colored noise generated by the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) process and the other is the so-called power-limited (PL) process. Depending on the noise intensity and noise type, it is found that the autocorrelation time, most probable radius and signal to noise ratio of the NIO may show nontrivial dependencies on the noise correlation time tau(c). Interestingly, for OU-type noise with intensity above a threshold, SNR is a bell-shaped function of tau(c), indicating enhancement of CR by noise correlation; and for PL-type noise, SNR may show double maxima when tau(c) is changed, demonstrating a new kind of multiresonance phenomenon. These theoretical predictions are well reproduced by numerical simulations. PMID:19123626

  13. Coherence resonance induced by colored noise near Hopf bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Juan; Xiao, Tiejun; Hou, Zhonghuai; Xin, Houwen

    2008-12-01

    Effects of colored noise near supercritical Hopf bifurcation, especially noise induced oscillation (NIO) and coherence resonance (CR), have been studied analytically in the Brusselator model, using the stochastic normal form method. Two types of colored noise are considered: one is the standard Gaussian colored noise generated by the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) process and the other is the so-called power-limited (PL) process. Depending on the noise intensity and noise type, it is found that the autocorrelation time, most probable radius and signal to noise ratio of the NIO may show nontrivial dependencies on the noise correlation time τc. Interestingly, for OU-type noise with intensity above a threshold, SNR is a bell-shaped function of τc, indicating enhancement of CR by noise correlation; and for PL-type noise, SNR may show double maxima when τc is changed, demonstrating a new kind of multiresonance phenomenon. These theoretical predictions are well reproduced by numerical simulations.

  14. Coherence resonance induced by colored noise near Hopf bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Juan; Xiao, Tiejun; Hou, Zhonghuai; Xin, Houwen

    2008-12-01

    Effects of colored noise near supercritical Hopf bifurcation, especially noise induced oscillation (NIO) and coherence resonance (CR), have been studied analytically in the Brusselator model, using the stochastic normal form method. Two types of colored noise are considered: one is the standard Gaussian colored noise generated by the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) process and the other is the so-called power-limited (PL) process. Depending on the noise intensity and noise type, it is found that the autocorrelation time, most probable radius and signal to noise ratio of the NIO may show nontrivial dependencies on the noise correlation time tau(c). Interestingly, for OU-type noise with intensity above a threshold, SNR is a bell-shaped function of tau(c), indicating enhancement of CR by noise correlation; and for PL-type noise, SNR may show double maxima when tau(c) is changed, demonstrating a new kind of multiresonance phenomenon. These theoretical predictions are well reproduced by numerical simulations.

  15. Stochastic resonance in the fractional Langevin equation driven by multiplicative noise and periodically modulated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tao; Zhang, Lu; Luo, Mao-Kang

    2013-10-01

    First we study the time and frequency characteristics of fractional calculus, which reflect the memory and gain properties of fractional-order systems. Then, the fractional Langevin equation driven by multiplicative colored noise and periodically modulated noise is investigated in the over-damped case. Using the moment equation method, the exact analytical expression of the output amplitude is derived. Numerical results indicate that the output amplitude presents stochastic resonance driven by periodically modulated noise. For low frequency signal, the higher the system order is, the bigger the resonance intensity will be; while the result of high frequency signal is quite the contrary. This is consistent with the frequency characteristics of fractional calculus.

  16. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stress variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by an expandable ring embedded in the noise radiating element. Excitation of the ring causes expansion or contraction of the ring, thereby varying the stress in the noise radiating element. The ring is actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the ring, causing the ring to expand or contract. Instead of a single ring embedded in the noise radiating panel, a first expandable ring can be bonded to one side of the noise radiating element, and a second expandable ring can be bonded to the other side.

  17. Thermally affected characterization region by Barkhausen noise.

    PubMed

    Zergoug, M; Boucherrou, N; Haddad, A; Benchaala, A; Moulti, B; Tahraoui, H; Sellidj, F; Hammouda, A

    2000-07-01

    The controlling of some industrial components require the development of new and particular nondestructive testing techniques. The testing method using Barkhausen noise (BN) is a particular one which can be applied to ferromagnetic materials. It is a magnetic nondestructive evaluation method and can provide very important information about the material structure. The aim of our work is to study the material structure using this technique to characterize the region submitted to thermal processing. Samples of steel have been heated at temperatures between 650 degrees C and 1,200 degrees C with variable parameters (time processing, maintenance time, etc.). Acoustic BN processing allows an easy interpretation of results. Micrographs of samples have been obtained to confirm the results obtained by BN.

  18. Robust stochastic resonance: Signal detection and adaptation in impulsive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosko, Bart; Mitaim, Sanya

    2001-11-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) occurs when noise improves a system performance measure such as a spectral signal-to-noise ratio or a cross-correlation measure. All SR studies have assumed that the forcing noise has finite variance. Most have further assumed that the noise is Gaussian. We show that SR still occurs for the more general case of impulsive or infinite-variance noise. The SR effect fades as the noise grows more impulsive. We study this fading effect on the family of symmetric α-stable bell curves that includes the Gaussian bell curve as a special case. These bell curves have thicker tails as the parameter α falls from 2 (the Gaussian case) to 1 (the Cauchy case) to even lower values. Thicker tails create more frequent and more violent noise impulses. The main feedback and feedforward models in the SR literature show this fading SR effect for periodic forcing signals when we plot either the signal-to-noise ratio or a signal correlation measure against the dispersion of the α-stable noise. Linear regression shows that an exponential law γopt(α)=cAα describes this relation between the impulsive index α and the SR-optimal noise dispersion γopt. The results show that SR is robust against noise ``outliers.'' So SR may be more widespread in nature than previously believed. Such robustness also favors the use of SR in engineering systems. We further show that an adaptive system can learn the optimal noise dispersion for two standard SR models (the quartic bistable model and the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model) for the signal-to-noise ratio performance measure. This also favors practical applications of SR and suggests that evolution may have tuned the noise-sensitive parameters of biological systems.

  19. Theory of excess noise in unstable resonator lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lamprecht, C.; Ritsch, H.

    2002-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the quantum dynamics of an unstable resonator laser. Compared to a stable cavity laser of equal gain and loss it exhibits a K-fold enhanced linewidth. This excess noise factor K is a measure of the nonorthogonality of the resonator eigenmodes and amounts to an enlargement of the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Using a quantum treatment starting from first principles based on the nonorthogonal eigenmodes, we put previous theoretical predictions onto a more firm ground. While we find a position-dependent enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into an empty mode of only {radical}(K), the constructive quantum interference of the spontaneous emission with a single oscillating mode lets the Petermann excess noise factor K reappear in the phase diffusion (laser linewidth). Hence locally enhanced spontaneous emission as well as noise enhanced by interference (amplified spontaneous emission) play an equal role in the origin of excess noise.

  20. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through variable ring loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of noise radiating structure is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating structure is tuned by a plurality of drivers arranged to contact the noise radiating structure. Excitation of the drivers causes expansion or contraction of the drivers, thereby varying the edge loading applied to the noise radiating structure. The drivers are actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the drivers, causing them to expand or contract. The noise radiating structure may be either the outer shroud of the engine or a ring mounted flush with an inner wall of the shroud or disposed in the interior of the shroud.

  1. Thermal instability of a compound resonator.

    PubMed

    Grudinin, Ivan S; Vahala, Kerry J

    2009-08-01

    We investigate the thermal and Kerr nonlinearity in a system of two optically-coupled silica microtoroid resonators experimentally and theoretically. A model for two coupled oscillators describing nonlinear resonance curves is developed. Stability of the static solutions is analyzed. It is shown that thermal nonlinearity is responsible for driving the eigenfrequencies of the two resonators apart, making the normal modes of the system unstable as the pump power grows. The red-detuned normal mode becomes unstable for certain pumping powers. PMID:19654817

  2. Thermal noise removal in hybrid polarimetry SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suneela Mishra, J. V. D.; Misra, Tapan

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of the estimation of noise, techniques for noise removal in Single Look Complex (SLC) as well as hybrid polarimetry decomposed images and the effects of noise removal in SAR images, using RISAT-1 data. Thermal noise affects the signal to noise ratio as well as radiometry of the SAR images. Different approaches adopted for estimating the thermal noise using onboard noise measurements and from the noise equivalent area of the images like calm reservoirs, lakes, etc., for RISAT-1 SAR are discussed. Subsequent to noise removal, its effect on minimum detectable noise and SNR of the images is addressed. Traditional noise removal methods affect the phase of the data, which in turn affect advanced SAR applications. A brief overview of the hybrid polarimetry configuration of RISAT-1 SAR, one of the emerging trends in polarimetry domain, is given and the effect of using noise removed single look complex (SLC) images for polarimetry decomposition is brought out. Thereby, a new technique for thermal noise removal in polarimetry decomposed data is presented.

  3. Estimation of Frequency Noise in Semiconductor Lasers Due to Mechanical Thermal Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Camp, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate mechanical thermal noise in semiconductor lasers, applying a methodology developed for fixed-spacer cavities for laser frequency stabilization. Our simple model determines an underlying fundamental limit for the frequency noise of free-running semiconductor laser, and provides a framework: where the noise may be potentially reduced with improved design.

  4. Frequency dependence of thermal noise in gram-scale cantilever flexures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thanh T.-H.; Mow-Lowry, Conor M.; Slagmolen, Bram J. J.; Miller, John; Mullavey, Adam J.; Goßler, Stefan; Altin, Paul A.; Shaddock, Daniel A.; McClelland, David E.

    2015-12-01

    We present measurements of the frequency dependence of thermal noise in aluminum and niobium flexures. Our measurements cover the audio-frequency band from 10 Hz to 10 kHz, which is of particular relevance to ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors, and span up to an order of magnitude above and below the fundamental flexure resonances. Results from two flexures are well explained by a simple model in which both structural and thermoelastic loss play a role. The ability of such a model to explain this interplay is important for investigations of quantum-radiation-pressure noise and the standard quantum limit. Furthermore, measurements on a third flexure provide evidence that surface damage can affect the frequency dependence of thermal noise in addition to reducing the quality factor, a result which will aid the understanding of how aging effects impact on thermal noise behavior.

  5. Fundamental Limit of 1/f Frequency Noise in Semiconductor Lasers Due to Mechanical Thermal Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, K.; Camp, J.

    2011-01-01

    So-called 1/f noise has power spectral density inversely proportional to frequency, and is observed in many physical processes. Single longitudinal-mode semiconductor lasers, used in variety of interferometric sensing applications, as well as coherent communications, exhibit 1/f frequency noise at low frequency (typically below 100kHz). Here we evaluate mechanical thermal noise due to mechanical dissipation in semiconductor laser components and give a plausible explanation for the widely-observed 1/f frequency noise, applying a methodology developed for fixed-spacer cavities for laser frequency stabilization. Semiconductor-laser's short cavity, small beam radius, and lossy components are expected to emphasize thermal-noise-limited frequency noise. Our simple model largely explains the different 1/f noise levels observed in various semiconductor lasers, and provides a framework where the noise may be reduced with proper design.

  6. Bimaterial Thermal Compensators for WGM Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    Bimaterial thermal compensators have been proposed as inexpensive means of preventing (to first order) or reducing temperature-related changes in the resonance frequencies of whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonators. A bimaterial compensator would apply, to a WGM resonator, a pressure that would slightly change the shape of the resonator and thereby change its resonance frequencies. Through suitable choice of the compensator dimensions and materials, it should be possible to make the temperature dependence of the pressure-induced frequency shift equal in magnitude and opposite in sign to the temperature dependence of the frequency shift of the uncompensated resonator so that, to first order, a change in temperature would cause zero net change in frequency.

  7. Thermal Noise in Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaminio, Raffaele

    Thermal noise is one of the major limitations to the sensitivity of present and future laser interferometers devoted to gravitational wave detection. According to the fluctuation-dissipation theorem any mechanical oscillator is affected by a motion of thermal origin directly related to its thermodynamic temperature. The mirrors and their suspensions that are used in gravitational wave detectors such as Virgo or LIGO are examples of such mechanical oscillators. As a consequence their position is affected by this thermal vibration and the sensitivity of the gravitational wave detector is thermal noise limited over a wide range of frequencies. After recalling briefly the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and its origins, this chapter describes the main types of thermal noise affecting gravitational wave detectors. In the last part of the chapter a special emphasis is given to the thermal noise due to dissipation in the mirrors optical coatings.

  8. Volume dependence in Handel's model of quartz crystal resonator noise.

    PubMed

    Sthal, Fabrice; Devel, Michel; Ghosh, Santunu; Imbaud, Joël; Cibiel, Gilles; Bourquin, Roger

    2013-09-01

    Although criticized by many, Handel's quantum model for 1/f noise remains the only model giving a quantitative estimation of the level of intrinsic 1/f noise in quartz crystal resonators that is compatible with the best experimental results. In this paper, we reconsider the volume dependence in this model. We first argue that an acoustic volume, representing the volume in which the vibration energy is trapped, should be used instead of the geometrical volume between the electrodes. Then, we show that because there is an implicit dependence of the quality factor of the resonator with its thickness, the net effect of Handel's formula is not an increase of noise proportionally to the thickness of the resonator, as could be naïvely expected, but a net decrease when thickness increases. Finally, we show that a plot of Q(4)Sy versus the acoustic volume, instead of the usual Sy plot, could be useful to compare the quality of acoustic resonators having very different resonance frequencies.

  9. Volume dependence in Handel's model of quartz crystal resonator noise.

    PubMed

    Sthal, Fabrice; Devel, Michel; Ghosh, Santunu; Imbaud, Joël; Cibiel, Gilles; Bourquin, Roger

    2013-09-01

    Although criticized by many, Handel's quantum model for 1/f noise remains the only model giving a quantitative estimation of the level of intrinsic 1/f noise in quartz crystal resonators that is compatible with the best experimental results. In this paper, we reconsider the volume dependence in this model. We first argue that an acoustic volume, representing the volume in which the vibration energy is trapped, should be used instead of the geometrical volume between the electrodes. Then, we show that because there is an implicit dependence of the quality factor of the resonator with its thickness, the net effect of Handel's formula is not an increase of noise proportionally to the thickness of the resonator, as could be naïvely expected, but a net decrease when thickness increases. Finally, we show that a plot of Q(4)Sy versus the acoustic volume, instead of the usual Sy plot, could be useful to compare the quality of acoustic resonators having very different resonance frequencies. PMID:24658728

  10. Cross-spectrum measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators.

    PubMed

    Hati, A; Nelson, C W; Howe, D A

    2016-03-01

    Cross-spectrum analysis is a commonly used technique for the detection of phase and amplitude noise of a signal in the presence of interfering uncorrelated noise. Recently, we demonstrated that the phase-inversion (anti-correlation) effect due to amplitude noise leakage can cause complete or partial collapse of the cross-spectral function. In this paper, we discuss the newly discovered effect of anti-correlated thermal noise that originates from the common-mode power divider (splitter), an essential component in a cross-spectrum noise measurement system. We studied this effect for different power splitters and discuss its influence on the measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators. We provide theory, simulation and experimental results. In addition, we expand this study to reveal how the presence of ferrite-isolators and amplifiers at the output ports of the power splitters can affect the oscillator noise measurements. Finally, we discuss a possible solution to overcome this problem. PMID:27036804

  11. Resonant and Time-Resolved Spin Noise Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xinlin; Pursley, Brennan; Sih, Vanessa

    Spin noise spectroscopy is a technique which can probe the system while it remains in equilibrium. It was first demonstrated in atomic gases and then in solid state systems. Most existing spin noise measurement setups digitize the spin fluctuation signal and then analyze the power spectrum. Recently, pulsed lasers have been used to expand the bandwidth of accessible dynamics and allow direct time-domain correlation measurements. Here we develop and test a model for ultrafast pulsed laser spin noise measurements as well as a scheme to measure spin lifetimes longer than the laser repetition period. For the resonant spin noise technique, analog electronics are used to capture correlations from the extended pulse train, and the signal at a fixed time delay is measured as a function of applied magnetic field.

  12. Optical Coatings and Thermal Noise in Precision Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harry, Gregory; Bodiya, Timothy P.; DeSalvo, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    1. Theory of thermal noise in optical mirrors Y. Levin; 2. Coating technology S. Chao; 3. Compendium of thermal noises in optical mirrors V. B. Braginsky, M. L. Gorodetsky and S. P. Vyatchanin; 4. Coating thermal noise I. Martin and S. Reid; 5. Direct measurements of coating thermal noise K. Numata; 6. Methods of improving thermal noise S. Ballmer and K. Somiya; 7. Substrate thermal noise S. Rowan and I. Martin; 8. Cryogenics K. Numata and K. Yamamoto; 9. Thermo-optic noise M. Evans and G. Ogin; 10. Absorption and thermal issues P. Willems, D. Ottaway and P. Beyersdorf; 11. Optical scatter J. R. Smith and M. E. Zucker; 12. Reflectivity and thickness optimisation I. M. Pinto, M. Principe and R. DeSalvo; 13. Beam shaping A. Freise; 14. Gravitational wave detection D. Ottaway and S. D. Penn; 15. High-precision laser stabilisation via optical cavities M. J. Martin and J. Ye; 16. Quantum optomechanics G. D. Cole and M. Aspelmeyer; 17. Cavity quantum electrodynamics T. E. Northup.

  13. Gaussian approximation and single-spin measurement in magnetic resonance force microscopy with spin noise

    SciTech Connect

    Raghunathan, Shesha; Brun, Todd A.; Goan, Hsi-Sheng

    2010-11-15

    A promising technique for measuring single electron spins is magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), in which a microcantilever with a permanent magnetic tip is resonantly driven by a single oscillating spin. The most effective experimental technique is the oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals (OSCAR) protocol, in which the signal takes the form of a frequency shift. If the quality factor of the cantilever is high enough, this signal will be amplified over time to the point where it can be detected by optical or other techniques. An important requirement, however, is that this measurement process occurs on a time scale that is short compared to any noise which disturbs the orientation of the measured spin. We describe a model of spin noise for the MRFM system and show how this noise is transformed to become time dependent in going to the usual rotating frame. We simplify the description of the cantilever-spin system by approximating the cantilever wave function as a Gaussian wave packet and show that the resulting approximation closely matches the full quantum behavior. We then examine the problem of detecting the signal for a cantilever with thermal noise and spin with spin noise, deriving a condition for this to be a useful measurement.

  14. Noise-enhanced Parametric Resonance in Perturbed Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sideris, Ioannis V.; Kandrup, Henry E.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes how parametric resonances associated with a galactic potential subjected to relatively low-amplitude, strictly periodic time-dependent perturbations can be impacted by pseudo-random variations in the pulsation frequency, modeled as colored noise. One aim thereby is to allow for the effects of a changing oscillation frequency as the density distribution associated with a galaxy evolves during violent relaxation. Another is to mimic the possible effects of internal substructures, satellite galaxies, and/or a high-density environment. The principal conclusions are that allowing for a variable frequency does not vitiate the effects of parametric resonance, and that, in at least some cases, such variations can increase the overall importance of parametric resonance associated with systematic pulsations. In memory of Professor H. E. Kandrup, a brilliant scientist, excellent teacher, and good friend. His genius and sense of humor will be greatly missed.

  15. Noise reduction from magnetic resonance images using nonseperable transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhadarya, Ehsan; Shamsollahi, Mohammad Bagher

    2006-03-01

    Multi-scale transforms have got a lot of applications in image processing, in recent years. Wavelet transform is a powerful multiscale transform for denoising noisy signals and images, but the usual two-dimensional separable wavelets are sub-optimal. These separable wavelet transforms can successfully identify zero dimensional singularities in images, but can weakly identify one dimensional singularities such as edges, curves and lines. In this sense, non-separable transforms such as Ridgelet and Curvelet transforms are proposed by Candes and Donoho. The coefficients produced by these non-separable transforms have shown to be sparser than wavelet coefficients. This fact results in better denoising capabilities than wavelet transform. These new non-separable transforms can identify direction in lines and curves, because of special structure of their basis elements. Basically, Magnetic Resonance images are probable to have Rician noise. In some special cases, this kind of noise can be supposed to be white Gaussian noise. In this paper, a new method for denoising MR images is proposed. This method is based on Monoscale Ridgelet transform. It is shown that this two transform can successfully denoise MR images embedded in white Gaussian noise. The results are better in comparison with usual wavelet denoising methods, based on both visual perception and signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. Physiological Noise Reduction Using Volumetric Functional Magnetic Resonance Inverse Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Witzel, Thomas; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Wang, Fu-Nien; Belliveau, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological noise arising from a variety of sources can significantly degrade the detection of task-related activity in BOLD-contrast fMRI experiments. If whole head spatial coverage is desired, effective suppression of oscillatory physiological noise from cardiac and respiratory fluctuations is quite difficult without external monitoring, since traditional EPI acquisition methods cannot sample the signal rapidly enough to satisfy the Nyquist sampling theorem, leading to temporal aliasing of noise. Using a combination of high speed magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) and digital filtering, we demonstrate that it is possible to suppress cardiac and respiratory noise without auxiliary monitoring, while achieving whole head spatial coverage and reasonable spatial resolution. Our systematic study of the effects of different moving average (MA) digital filters demonstrates that a MA filter with a 2 s window can effectively reduce the variance in the hemodynamic baseline signal, thereby achieving 57-58% improvements in peak z-statistic values compared to unfiltered InI or spatially smoothed EPI data (FWHM =8.6 mm). In conclusion, the high temporal sampling rates achievable with InI permit significant reductions in physiological noise using standard temporal filtering techniques that result in significant improvements in hemodynamic response estimation. PMID:21954026

  17. Intrinsic noise induced resonance in presence of sub-threshold signal in Brusselator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Supravat; Das, Dibyendu; Parmananda, P.

    2011-09-01

    In a system of non-linear chemical reactions called the Brusselator, we show that intrinsic noise can be regulated to drive it to exhibit resonance in the presence of a sub-threshold signal. The phenomena of periodic stochastic resonance and aperiodic stochastic resonance, hitherto studied mostly with extrinsic noise, is demonstrated here to occur with inherent systemic noise using exact stochastic simulation algorithm due to Gillespie. The role of intrinsic noise in a couple of other phenomena is also discussed.

  18. Testing resonating vector strength: Auditory system, electric fish, and noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo van Hemmen, J.; Longtin, André; Vollmayr, Andreas N.

    2011-12-01

    Quite often a response to some input with a specific frequency ν○ can be described through a sequence of discrete events. Here, we study the synchrony vector, whose length stands for the vector strength, and in doing so focus on neuronal response in terms of spike times. The latter are supposed to be given by experiment. Instead of singling out the stimulus frequency ν○ we study the synchrony vector as a function of the real frequency variable ν. Its length turns out to be a resonating vector strength in that it shows clear maxima in the neighborhood of ν○ and multiples thereof, hence, allowing an easy way of determining response frequencies. We study this "resonating" vector strength for two concrete but rather different cases, viz., a specific midbrain neuron in the auditory system of cat and a primary detector neuron belonging to the electric sense of the wave-type electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. We show that the resonating vector strength always performs a clear resonance correlated with the phase locking that it quantifies. We analyze the influence of noise and demonstrate how well the resonance associated with maximal vector strength indicates the dominant stimulus frequency. Furthermore, we exhibit how one can obtain a specific phase associated with, for instance, a delay in auditory analysis.

  19. Noise-induced Hypersensitivity and Stochastic Resonance: Can Living Systems Use Them at a Molecular Level?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerashchenko, O. V.; Ginzburg, S. L.; Pustovoit, M. A.

    2003-05-01

    Living organisms are known to receive and transduce useful signals in a very noisy environment. A natural question whether they can use this noise constructively is still lacking solid answer. Some recent works demonstrated that one of the phenomena where noise plays a constructive role, the stochastic resonance (SR), occurs in biology at system and cellular levels of organization. Its existence at molecular level, in ionic channels of cell membranes, is now a subject for intensive, though mainly theoretical, studies. In the present work we study a simple two-state model of ionic channel together with its continuous equivalent, the asymmetrical Kramers oscillator, with external periodic signal and dichotomous external noise. We found that the new kind of SR appears for adiabatically slow external noise, when its amplitude becomes equal to static bias, thus dynamically recovering the system symmetry. These findings are confirmed with analog circuit simulations. The next promising effect is the noise-induced hypersensitivity to small signals. The phenomenon arises in stochastic systems with on-off intermittency. Such a system at optimal external noise intensity and correlation time becomes sensitive to an ultrasmall signal, amplifying it by many orders of magnitude. Such a hypersensitivity is often robust to additive thermal noise. We speculate that a similar effect might occur in various sensory systems that are known to be very noisy and to display unique sensitivity to environmental signals. A simple model system of two neurons with common strong noise source is hypersensitive to small differential signal only in the ideal case of absence of internal noise.

  20. Dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in coupled ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chenguang; Fan, Jiahua; Zhu, Lin

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in a photonic system of two coupled ring resonators. A bus waveguide is used to couple light in and out of one of the coupled resonators. Based on the coupling from the bus to the resonator, the coupling between the resonators and the intrinsic loss of each individual resonator, the system transmission spectrum can be classified by three different categories: coupled-resonator-induced absorption, coupled-resonator-induced transparency and over coupled resonance splitting. Dynamic thermal optical effects due to linear absorption have been analyzed for each category as a function of the input power. The heat power in each resonator determines the thermal dynamics in this coupled resonator system. Multiple "shark fins" and power competition between resonators can be foreseen. Also, the nonlinear absorption induced thermal effects have been discussed.

  1. Contribution of thermal noise to frequency stability of rigid optical cavity via Hertz-linewidth lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Notcutt, Mark; Ma, L.-S.; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Foreman, Seth M.; Ye Jun; Hall, John L.

    2006-03-15

    We perform detailed studies of state-of-the-art laser stabilization to high finesse optical cavities, revealing fundamental mechanical thermal noise-related length fluctuations. We compare the frequency noise of lasers tightly locked to the resonances of a variety of rigid Fabry-Perot cavities of differing lengths and mirror substrate materials. The results are in agreement with the theoretical model proposed in K. Numata, A. Kemery, and J. Camp [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 250602 (2004)]. The results presented here on the fundamental limits of FP references will impact planning and construction of next generation ultrastable optical cavities.

  2. Scanning ferromagnetic resonance microscopy and resonant heating of magnetite nanoparticles: Demonstration of thermally detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakran, F.; Copty, A.; Golosovsky, M.; Davidov, D.; Monod, P.

    2004-05-01

    We report a 9 GHz microwave scanning probe based on a slit aperture for spatially resolved magnetic resonance detection. We use patterned layers of dispersed magnetite Fe3O4 nanoparticles and demonstrate low-field ferromagnetic resonance images with a spatial resolution of 15 μm. We also demonstrate localized heating of magnetite nanoparticles via ferromagnetic resonance absorption which can be controlled by an external dc magnetic field. Using our microwave probe as a transmitter and a temperature sensor (thermocouple or infrared detector), we show thermally detected magnetic resonance at room temperature.

  3. Suppression of extraneous thermal noise in cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi; Wilson, Dalziel; Ni, K.-K.; Kimble, H. J.

    2012-06-01

    Extraneous thermal motion can limit displacement sensitivity and radiation pressure effects, such as optical cooling, in a cavity-optomechanical system. Here we present an active noise suppression scheme and its experimental implementation. Our technique involves mapping a measurement of the extraneous noise onto the frequency of the incident laser field to stabilize the associated laser-cavity detuning. The main challenge is to selectively sense and suppress extraneous thermal noise without affecting motion of the oscillator. Our solution is to monitor two modes of the optical cavity, each with different sensitivity to the oscillator's motion but similar sensitivity to the extraneous thermal motion. This information is used to imprint ``anti-noise'' onto the frequency of the incident laser field. In our system, based on a nano-mechanical membrane coupled to a Fabry-P'erot cavity, simulation and experiment demonstrate that extraneous thermal noise can be selectively suppressed without substantially affecting motion of the oscillator and that the associated limit on optical cooling can be reduced. Details of this work are presented in [1].[4pt] [1] Y. Zhao, D. J. Wilson, K.-K. Ni, and H. J. Kimble, Optics Express (in press); arXiv:1112.3362.

  4. Determination of the Thermal Noise Limit of Graphene Biotransistors.

    PubMed

    Crosser, Michael S; Brown, Morgan A; McEuen, Paul L; Minot, Ethan D

    2015-08-12

    To determine the thermal noise limit of graphene biotransistors, we have measured the complex impedance between the basal plane of single-layer graphene and an aqueous electrolyte. The impedance is dominated by an imaginary component but has a finite real component. Invoking the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we determine the power spectral density of thermally driven voltage fluctuations at the graphene/electrolyte interface. The fluctuations have 1/f(p) dependence, with p = 0.75-0.85, and the magnitude of fluctuations scales inversely with area. Our results explain noise spectra previously measured in liquid-gated suspended graphene devices and provide realistic targets for future device performance. PMID:26176844

  5. Mirror thermal noise in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Shanti Raja

    2003-12-01

    The LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) project has begun its search for gravitational waves, and efforts are being made to improve its ability to detect these. The LIGO observatories are long, Fabry-Perot-Michelson interferometers, where the interferometer mirrors are also the gravitational wave test masses. LIGO is designed to detect the ripples in spacetime caused by cataclysmic astrophysical events, with a target gravitational wave minimum strain sensitivity of 4 × 10-22 [7] around 100 Hz. The Advanced LIGO concept [57] calls for an order of magnitude improvement in strain sensitivity, with a better signal to noise ratio to increase the rate of detection of events. Some of Advanced LIGO's major requirements are improvements over the LIGO design for thermal noise in the test mass substrates and reflective coatings [57]. Thermal noise in the interferometer mirrors is a significant challenge in LIGO's development. This thesis reviews the theory of test mass thermal noise and reports on several experiments conducted to understand this theory. Experiments to measure the thermal expansion of mirror substrates and coatings use the photothermal effect in a cross-polarized Fabry-Perot interferometer, with displacement sensitivity of 10-15m/rHz. Data are presented from 10 Hz to 4 kHz on solid aluminum, and on sapphire, BK7, and fused silica, with and without commercial TiO2/SiO2 dielectric mirror coatings. The substrate contribution to thermal expansion is compared to theories by Cerdonio et al. [32] and Braginsky, Vyatchanin, and Gorodetsky [22]. New theoretical models are presented for estimating the coating contribution to the thermal expansion. These results can also provide insight into how heat flows between coatings and substrates relevant to predicting coating thermoelastic noise [26, 108]. The Thermal Noise Interferometer (TNI) project is a interferometer built specifically to study thermal noise, and this thesis describes its

  6. Aircraft interior noise reduction by alternate resonance tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottwald, James A.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1990-01-01

    The focus is on a noise control method which considers aircraft fuselages lined with panels alternately tuned to frequencies above and below the frequency that must be attenuated. An interior noise reduction called alternate resonance tuning (ART) is described both theoretically and experimentally. Problems dealing with tuning single paneled wall structures for optimum noise reduction using the ART methodology are presented, and three theoretical problems are analyzed. The first analysis is a three dimensional, full acoustic solution for tuning a panel wall composed of repeating sections with four different panel tunings within that section, where the panels are modeled as idealized spring-mass-damper systems. The second analysis is a two dimensional, full acoustic solution for a panel geometry influenced by the effect of a propagating external pressure field such as that which might be associated with propeller passage by a fuselage. To reduce the analysis complexity, idealized spring-mass-damper panels are again employed. The final theoretical analysis presents the general four panel problem with real panel sections, where the effect of higher structural modes is discussed. Results from an experimental program highlight real applications of the ART concept and show the effectiveness of the tuning on real structures.

  7. Cantilever noise in off-cantilever-resonance force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, Lee E.; Thurber, Kent R.; Smith, Doran D.

    2004-03-01

    Early work in force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (FD-NMR) and magnetic resonance force microscopy was restricted to nuclei with a relatively large gyromagnetic ratio γ. Increasingly, as researchers look to apply FD-NMR to practical problems, observing isotopes with a small γ is becoming necessary. The small γ of these isotopes places severe restrictions on the radio frequency field strength necessary to flip the sample spins at practical cantilever frequencies by adiabatic rapid passage. These restrictions led us to investigate the feasibility of observing FD-NMR by flipping sample spins at a rate well below the cantilever frequency. In this article we show that there is no increase in thermomechanical force noise in off-cantilever-resonance FD-NMR relative to on-cantilever-resonance work. Further, we show that working off-cantilever resonance can reduce artifacts and decrease data acquisition time. The major disadvantage to working off-cantilever resonance—reduced cantilever response—increases the importance of low noise detection of cantilever oscillation.

  8. Quantum 1/f Noise in Resonant Tunneling Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handel, Peter H.

    2001-03-01

    Resonant tunneling diodes consist of two potential barriers enclosing a quantum well. If the electron energy is close to the energy level in the well, resonance occurs and a peak IP of the current occurs, for the voltage VP. If the voltage increases further, only a negligibly small non-resonant current trickle remains at the voltage V=VV. Scattering processes that reduce the energy of the carriers to a value close to eVP will always be present, generating a finite current minimum IV at VV. Between VP and VV there is a negative differential conductance G=-(IP-IV)/(VV-VP) on the I/V curve, that is used to generate oscillations. The 1/f noise in IV is given by the conventional quantum 1/f effect with (Dv/c)2=2eVV/m. This yields IV-2SIv(f) =2aA/f N. Here N is given by N =tIV/e, where t is the life time of the carriers. The quantum 1/f frequency fluctuations can be obtained from the formula Sdw/w =(1/4Q4)SdG/G ,which was derived in 1978. This yields Sdw/w =(1/4Q4)(4a/3p)(2eVV/mc2) for the fractional frequency fluctuation spectrum exhibited by the RTD if included in an RF circuit of quality factor Q.

  9. Phase-field model of dendritic sidebranching with thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Karma, A; Rappel, W J

    1999-10-01

    We investigate dendritic sidebranching during crystal growth in an undercooled melt by simulation of a phase-field model which incorporates thermal noise of microscopic origin. As a nontrivial quantitative test of this model, we first show that the simulated fluctuation spectrum of a one-dimensional interface in thermal equilibrium agrees with the exact sharp-interface spectrum up to an irrelevant short-wavelength cutoff comparable to the interface thickness. Simulations of dendritic growth are then carried out in two dimensions to compute sidebranching characteristics (root-mean-square amplitude and sidebranch spacing) as a function of distance behind the tip. These quantities are compared quantitatively to the predictions of the existing linear WKB theory of noise amplification. The extension of this study to three dimensions remains needed to determine the origin of noise in experiments.

  10. Receptivity to thermal noise in real airfoil configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchini, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Thermal noise, the macroscopic manifestation of microscopic particle agitation, is present in fluid flow just as in electron flow in conductors or in other physical transport phenomena. When the flow acts as an amplifier, typically during transition to turbulence, the transition position can be influenced by the amplitude of external disturbances through the so called receptivity of the flow instabilities; internally generated thermal noise represents a thermodynamically enforced lower bound to how much disturbances can be reduced. In a previous paper (Seventh IUTAM Symposium on Laminar-Turbulent Transition, IUTAM Bookseries Volume 18, Springer, 2010, pp. 11-18), the present author showed that the maximum transition distance in a Blasius boundary layer corresponds to a Reynolds number little above 6 .106 and to an N-factor of the order of 13. Results to be exhibited at this conference show that in a real airfoil configuration the maximum transition Reynolds number imposed by thermal noise is even lower than on a flat wall, and not far from the actually observed transition position. It follows that thermal noise might actually have a role in natural transition; and that even a perfectly silenced laboratory environment cannot push the transition position much farther. Work supported by the European Community through the RECEPT grant.

  11. Stochastic resonance in a piecewise nonlinear model driven by multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and additive white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yongfeng; Shen, Yajun; Tan, Jianguo

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a piecewise nonlinear model driven by a periodic signal and correlated noises for the cases of a multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and an additive Gaussian white noise is investigated. Applying the path integral approach, the unified colored noise approximation and the two-state model theory, the analytical expression of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is derived. It is found that conventional stochastic resonance exists in this system. From numerical computations we obtain that: (i) As a function of the non-Gaussian noise intensity, the SNR is increased when the non-Gaussian noise deviation parameter q is increased. (ii) As a function of the Gaussian noise intensity, the SNR is decreased when q is increased. This demonstrates that the effect of the non-Gaussian noise on SNR is different from that of the Gaussian noise in this system. Moreover, we further discuss the effect of the correlation time of the non-Gaussian noise, cross-correlation strength, the amplitude and frequency of the periodic signal on SR.

  12. Modeling noise-induced resonance in an excitable system: an alternative approach.

    PubMed

    Nurujjaman, Md

    2010-03-01

    Recently, it has been observed [Md. Nurujjaman, Phy. Rev. E 80, 015201(R) (2009)] that in an excitable system, one can maintain noise-induced coherency in the coherence resonance by blocking the destructive effect of the noise on the system at higher noise level. This phenomenon of constant coherence resonance (CCR) cannot be explained by the existing way of simulation of the model equations of an excitable system with added noise. In this paper, we have proposed a general model which explains the noise-induced resonance phenomenon CCR as well as coherence resonance (CR) and stochastic resonance (SR). The simulation has been carried out considering the basic mechanism of noise-induced resonance phenomena: noise only perturbs the system control parameter to excite coherent oscillations, taking proper precautions so that the destructive effect of noise does not affect the system. In this approach, the CR has been obtained from the interference between the system output and noise and the SR has been obtained by adding noise and a subthreshold signal. This also explains the observation of the frequency shift of coherent oscillations in the CCR with noise level.

  13. Noise measurement on thermal systems with narrow band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, Stephen D.; Haefner, David P.; Doe, Joshua M.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal systems with a narrow spectral bandpass and mid-wave thermal imagers are useful for a variety of imaging applications. Additionally, the sensitivity for these classes of systems is increasing along with an increase in performance requirements when evaluated in a lab. Unfortunately, the uncertainty in the blackbody temperature along with the temporal instability of the blackbody could lead to uncontrolled laboratory environmental effects which could increase the measured noise. If the temporal uncertainty and accuracy of a particular blackbody is known, then confidence intervals could be adjusted for source accuracy and instability. Additionally, because thermal currents may be a large source of temporal noise in narrow band systems, a means to mitigate them is presented and results are discussed.

  14. Role of thermal noise in tripartite quantum steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Gong, Qihuang; Ficek, Zbigniew; He, Qiongyi

    2014-08-01

    The influence of thermal noise on bipartite and tripartite quantum steering induced by a short laser pulse in a hybrid three-mode optomechanical system is investigated. The calculation is carried out under the bad cavity limit, the adiabatic approximation of a slowly varying amplitude of the cavity mode, and with the assumption of driving the cavity mode with a blue detuned strong laser pulse. Under such conditions, explicit expressions of the bipartite and tripartite steering parameters are obtained, and the concept of collective tripartite quantum steering, recently introduced by He and Reid [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 250403 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.250403], is clearly explored. It is found that both bipartite and tripartite steering parameters are sensitive functions of the initial state of the modes and distinctly different steering behavior could be observed depending on whether the modes were initially in a thermal state or not. For the modes initially in a vacuum state, the bipartite and tripartite steering occur simultaneously over the entire interaction time. This indicates that collective tripartite steering cannot be achieved. The collective steering can be achieved for the modes initially prepared in a thermal state. We find that the initial thermal noise is more effective in destroying the bipartite rather than the tripartite steering which, on the other hand, can persist even for a large thermal noise. For the initial vacuum state of a steered mode, the tripartite steering exists over the entire interaction time even if the steering modes are in very noisy thermal states. When the steered mode is initially in a thermal state, it can be collectively steered by the other modes. There are thresholds for the average number of the thermal photons above which the existing tripartite steering appears as the collective steering. Finally, we point out that the collective steering may provide a resource in a hybrid quantum network for quantum secret sharing

  15. Waterborne noise due to ocean thermal energy conversion plants

    SciTech Connect

    Janota, C.P.; Thompson, D.E.

    1983-07-01

    Public law reflects a United States national commitment to the rapid development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) as an alternate energy source. OTEC plants extract the stored solar energy from the world's tropical seas and in so doing pose a potential for altering the character of the ambient noise there. The sources of noise from an OTEC plant are analyzed in the context of four configurations, two of which were built and tested, and two which are concepts for future full-scale moored facilities. The analysis indicates that the noise resulting from the interaction of turbulence with the seawater pumps is expected to dominate in the frequency range 10 Hz to 1 kHz. Measured radiated noise data from the OTEC-I research plant, located near the island of Hawaii, are compared with the analysis. The measured data diverge from the predicted levels at frequencies above about 60 Hz because of dominant non-OTEC noise sources on this platform. However, at low frequency, the measured broadband noise is comparable to that predicted.

  16. Internal additive noise effects in stochastic resonance using organic field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshiharu; Matsubara, Kiyohiko; Asakawa, Naoki

    2016-08-01

    Stochastic resonance phenomenon was observed in organic field effect transistor using poly(3-hexylthiophene), which enhances performance of signal transmission with application of noise. The enhancement of correlation coefficient between the input and output signals was low, and the variation of correlation coefficient was not remarkable with respect to the intensity of external noise, which was due to the existence of internal additive noise following the nonlinear threshold response. In other words, internal additive noise plays a positive role on the capability of approximately constant signal transmission regardless of noise intensity, which can be said "homeostatic" behavior or "noise robustness" against external noise. Furthermore, internal additive noise causes emergence of the stochastic resonance effect even on the threshold unit without internal additive noise on which the correlation coefficient usually decreases monotonically.

  17. Measurement of thermal noise in multilayer coatings with optimized layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, Akira E.; Black, Eric D.; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Libbrecht, Kenneth G.; Michel, Christophe; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent; Pinto, Innocenzo M.; Pierro, Vincenzo; Galdi, Vincenzo; Principe, Maria; Taurasi, Ilaria

    2010-06-15

    A standard quarter-wavelength multilayer optical coating will produce the highest reflectivity for a given number of coating layers, but in general it will not yield the lowest thermal noise for a prescribed reflectivity. Coatings with the layer thicknesses optimized to minimize thermal noise could be useful in future generation interferometric gravitational wave detectors where coating thermal noise is expected to limit the sensitivity of the instrument. We present the results of direct measurements of the thermal noise of a standard quarter-wavelength coating and a low noise optimized coating. The measurements indicate a reduction in thermal noise in line with modeling predictions.

  18. Intrinsic noise induced resonance in presence of sub-threshold signal in Brusselator.

    PubMed

    Dey, Supravat; Das, Dibyendu; Parmananda, P

    2011-09-01

    In a system of non-linear chemical reactions called the Brusselator, we show that intrinsic noise can be regulated to drive it to exhibit resonance in the presence of a sub-threshold signal. The phenomena of periodic stochastic resonance and aperiodic stochastic resonance, hitherto studied mostly with extrinsic noise, is demonstrated here to occur with inherent systemic noise using exact stochastic simulation algorithm due to Gillespie. The role of intrinsic noise in a couple of other phenomena is also discussed. PMID:21974659

  19. Reduction of diesel engine exhaust noise in the petroleum mining industry. [by resonator type diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinov, T.

    1974-01-01

    An important noise source in a drilling plant is Diesel engine exhaust. In order to reduce this noise, a reactive silencer of the derivative resonator type was proposed, calculated from the acoustic and design point of view and applied. As a result of applying such a silencer on the exhaust conduit of a Diesel engine the noise level dropped down to 18 db.

  20. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP.

  1. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP. PMID:26156387

  2. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP. PMID:26156387

  3. Noise control for a ChamberCore cylindrical structure using long T-shaped acoustic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deyu; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    2003-10-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate has developed a new advanced composite launch vehicle fairing (referred to as ``ChamberCore''). The ChamberCore is sandwich-type structure fabricated from multi-layered composite face sheets separated by channels that form passive acoustic chambers. These acoustic chambers have a potential to create an acoustic resonator network that can be used to attenuate noise inside the closed ChamberCore cylindrical structure. In this study, first, the feasibility of using cylindrical Helmholtz resonators to control noise in a mock-scale ChamberCore composite cylinder is investigated. The targeted frequencies for noise control are the first four acoustic cavity resonances of the ChamberCore cylinder. The optimal position of the Helmholtz resonators for controlling each targeted cavity mode is discussed, and the effects of resonator spacing on noise attenuation are also experimentally evaluated. Next, six long T-shaped acoustic resonators are designed and constructed within the acoustic chambers of the structure and investigated. Several tests are conducted to evaluate the noise control ability of the resonators in the ChamberCore cylinder. Reductions ranging from 3.2 to 6.0 dB were observed in the overall mean-square noise reduction spectrum at the targeted inner cavity resonance frequencies. [Work supported by AFRL/DV.

  4. Quantum reading capacity under thermal and correlated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Pirandola, Stefano; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Mancini, Stefano

    2013-06-01

    Quantum communication theory sets the maximum rates at which information can be encoded and decoded reliably given the physical properties of the information carriers. Here we consider the problem of readout of a digital optical memory, where information is stored by means of the optical properties of the memory cells that are in turn probed by shining a laser beam on them. Interesting features arise in the regime in which the probing light has to be treated quantum mechanically. The maximum rate of reliable readout defines the quantum reading capacity, which is proven to overcome the classical reading capacity—obtained by probing with classical light—in several relevant settings. We consider a model of optical memory in which information is encoded in the (complex-valued) attenuation factor and study the effects on the reading rates of thermal and correlated noise. The latter type of noise arises when the effects of wave diffraction on the probing light beam are taken into account. We discuss the advantages of quantum reading over the classical one and show that the former is substantially more robust than the latter under thermal noise in the regime of low power per pulse.

  5. Direct Observations of Surface Thermal Fluctuations Below Shot Noise Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kenichiro; Mitsui, Takahisa

    Surface thermal fluctuation spectra are measured to previously unachieved precision, down to three orders of magnitude below the shot noise level. Such precision is achieved through statistical reduction of extraneous noise, including shot noise, using the averaged correlation of measurements. Both height and inclination fluctuations of surface fluctuations are measured for various materials and in the case of liquids, their hydrodynamical understanding is compared to the experimental results at unprecedented levels. They agree well for water, but for oil, deviations are seen at high frequencies, perhaps indicating its more complex underlying physics. Surface thermal fluctuation spectra of complex fluids (such as epoxy), rubber and biological materials have also been measured and have qualitatively diverse behavior. We discuss the physics underlying the various spectra and explain the experimental methods used to obtain them. The measurement is simple, requiring relatively a weak power light source, a short time and a small surface area, so that it should be useful for fluctuation measurements in various fields requiring precision, both within and outside physics.

  6. Noise-assisted information transfer in crayfish mechanoreceptors: stochastic resonance in a neuronal receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, John K.; Wilkens, Lon A.; Moss, Frank

    1993-11-01

    Adding random noise to a weak periodic signal can enhance the flow of information through certain nonlinear physical systems, via a process known as stochastic resonance (SR). We have used crayfish mechanoreceptor cells to investigate the possibility that SR can be induced in neurophysiological systems. Various signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements were derived from the action potentials (spikes) of single receptor cells stimulated with weak periodic signals. Spike noise was controlled by one of two methods: (1) adding external noise to the stimulus, or (2) altering internal noise sources by changing the temperature of the cell. In external noise experiments, an optimal noise level can be identified at which the SNR is maximized. In internal noise experiments, although the SNR increases with increasing noise, no SNR maximum has been observed. These results demonstrate that SR can be induced in single neurons, and suggest that neuronal systems may also be capable of exploiting SR.

  7. Correlated noise-based switches and stochastic resonance in a bistable genetic regulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can-Jun; Yang, Ke-Li

    2016-07-01

    The correlated noise-based switches and stochastic resonance are investigated in a bistable single gene switching system driven by an additive noise (environmental fluctuations), a multiplicative noise (fluctuations of the degradation rate). The correlation between the two noise sources originates from on the lysis-lysogeny pathway system of the λ phage. The steady state probability distribution is obtained by solving the time-independent Fokker-Planck equation, and the effects of noises are analyzed. The effects of noises on the switching time between the two stable states (mean first passage time) is investigated by the numerical simulation. The stochastic resonance phenomenon is analyzed by the power amplification factor. The results show that the multiplicative noise can induce the switching from "on" → "off" of the protein production, while the additive noise and the correlation between the noise sources can induce the inverse switching "off" → "on". A nonmonotonic behaviour of the average switching time versus the multiplicative noise intensity, for different cross-correlation and additive noise intensities, is observed in the genetic system. There exist optimal values of the additive noise, multiplicative noise and cross-correlation intensities for which the weak signal can be optimal amplified.

  8. Thermal noise informatics: totally secure communication via a wire, zero-power communication, and thermal noise driven computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Mingesz, Robert; Gingl, Zoltan

    2007-06-01

    Very recently, it has been shown that Gaussian thermal noise and its artificial versions (Johnson-like noises) can be utilized as an information carrier with peculiar properties therefore it may be proper to call this topic Thermal Noise Informatics. Zero Power (Stealth) Communication, Thermal Noise Driven Computing, and Totally Secure Classical Communication are relevant examples. In this paper, while we will briefly describe the first and the second subjects, we shall focus on the third subject, the secure classical communication via wire. This way of secure telecommunication utilizes the properties of Johnson(-like) noise and those of a simple Kirchhoff's loop. The communicator is unconditionally secure at the conceptual (circuit theoretical) level and this property is (so far) unique in communication systems based on classical physics. The communicator is superior to quantum alternatives in all known aspects, except the need of using a wire. In the idealized system, the eavesdropper can extract zero bit of information without getting uncovered. The scheme is naturally protected against the man-in-the-middle attack. The communication can take place also via currently used power lines or phone (wire) lines and it is not only a point-to-point communication like quantum channels but network-ready. We report that a pair of Kirchhoff-Loop-Johnson(-like)-Noise communicators, which is able to work over variable ranges, was designed and built. Tests have been carried out on a model-line with ranges beyond the ranges of any known direct quantum communication channel and they indicate unrivalled signal fidelity and security performance. This simple device has single-wire secure key generation/sharing rates of 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 bit/second for copper wires with diameters/ranges of 21 mm / 2000 km, 7 mm / 200 km, 2.3 mm / 20 km, and 0.7 mm / 2 km, respectively and it performs with 0.02% raw-bit error rate (99.98 % fidelity). The raw-bit security of this practical system

  9. Multiple Spatial Coherence Resonances and Spatial Patterns in a Noise-Driven Heterogeneous Neuronal Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Ye; Ding, Xue-Li

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneity of the neurons and noise are inevitable in the real neuronal network. In this paper, Gaussian white noise induced spatial patterns including spiral waves and multiple spatial coherence resonances are studied in a network composed of Morris—Lecar neurons with heterogeneity characterized by parameter diversity. The relationship between the resonances and the transitions between ordered spiral waves and disordered spatial patterns are achieved. When parameter diversity is introduced, the maxima of multiple resonances increases first, and then decreases as diversity strength increases, which implies that the coherence degrees induced by noise are enhanced at an intermediate diversity strength. The synchronization degree of spatial patterns including ordered spiral waves and disordered patterns is identified to be a very low level. The results suggest that the nervous system can profit from both heterogeneity and noise, and the multiple spatial coherence resonances are achieved via the emergency of spiral waves instead of synchronization patterns.

  10. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe; Sepúlveda, Manuel; Bellon, Ludovic; Melo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD) of thermal fluctuations together with Sader’s model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0.03 mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 μL. PMID:26540061

  11. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Felipe Aguilar; Sepúlveda, Manuel; Bellon, Ludovic; Melo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD) of thermal fluctuations together with Sader's model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0:03mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL. PMID:26540061

  12. On-Chip Switched Parasitic Capacitors of Sleep Blocks for Resonant Supply Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinmyoung; Nakura, Toru; Takata, Hidehiro; Ishibashi, Koichiro; Ikeda, Makoto; Asada, Kunihiro

    Switched parasitic capacitors of sleep blocks with a tri-mode power gating structure are implemented to reduce on-chip resonant supply noise in 1.2V, 65nm standard CMOS process. The tri-mode power gating structure makes it possible to store charge into the parasitic capacitance of the power gated blocks. The proposed method achieves 53.1% and 57.9% noise reduction for wake-up noise and 130MHz periodic supply noise, respectively. It also realizes noise cancelling without discharging time before using parasitic capacitors of sleep blocks, and shows 8.4x boost of the effective capacitance value with 2.1% chip area overhead. The proposed method can save the chip area for reducing resonant supply noise more effectively.

  13. Functional Stochastic Resonance in the Human Brain: Noise Induced Sensitization of Baroreflex System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidaka, Ichiro; Nozaki, Daichi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2000-10-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that noise can enhance the homeostatic function in the human blood pressure regulatory system. The results show that the compensatory heart rate response to the weak periodic signal introduced at the venous blood pressure receptor is optimized by adding noise to the arterial blood pressure receptor. We conclude that this functional stochastic resonance most likely results from the interaction of noise with signal in the brain stem, where the neuronal inputs from these two different receptors first join together.

  14. Noise-enhanced stability and double stochastic resonance of active Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chunhua; Zhang, Chun; Zeng, Jiakui; Liu, Ruifen; Wang, Hua

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we study the transient and resonant properties of active Brownian particles (ABPs) in the Rayleigh-Helmholtz (RH) and Schweitzer-Ebeling-Tilch (SET) models, which is driven by the simultaneous action of multiplicative and additive noise and periodic forcing. It is shown that the cross-correlation between two noises (λ) can break the symmetry of the potential to generate motion of the ABPs. In case of no correlation between two noises, the mean first passage time (MFPT) is a monotonic decrease depending on the multiplicative noise, however in case of correlation between two noises, the MFPT exhibits a maximum, depending on the multiplicative noise for both models, this maximum for MFPT identifies the noise-enhanced stability (NES) effect of the ABPs. By comparing with case of no correlation (λ =0.0 ), we find two maxima in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depending on the cross-correlation intensity, i.e. the double stochastic resonance is shown in both models. For the RH model, the SNR exhibits two maxima depending on the multiplicative noise for small cross-correlation intensity, while in the SET model, it exhibits only a maximum depending on the multiplicative noise. Whether λ =0.0 or not, the MFPT is a monotonic decrease, and the SNR exhibits a maximum, depending on the additive noise in both models.

  15. Metallic-thin-film instability with spatially correlated thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Diez, Javier A; González, Alejandro G; Fernández, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We study the effects of stochastic thermal fluctuations on the instability of the free surface of a flat liquid metallic film on a solid substrate. These fluctuations are represented by a stochastic noise term added to the deterministic equation for the film thickness within the long-wave approximation. Unlike the case of polymeric films, we find that this noise, while remaining white in time, must be colored in space, at least in some regimes. The corresponding noise term is characterized by a nonzero correlation length, ℓ_{c}, which, combined with the size of the system, leads to a dimensionless parameter β that accounts for the relative importance of the spatial correlation (β∼ℓ_{c}^{-1}). We perform the linear stability analysis (LSA) of the film both with and without the noise term and find that for ℓ_{c} larger than some critical value (depending on the system size), the wavelength of the peak of the spectrum is larger than that corresponding to the deterministic case, while for smaller ℓ_{c} this peak corresponds to smaller wavelength than the latter. Interestingly, whatever the value of ℓ_{c}, the peak always approaches the deterministic one for larger times. We compare LSA results with the numerical simulations of the complete nonlinear problem and find a good agreement in the power spectra for early times at different values of β. For late times, we find that the stochastic LSA predicts well the position of the dominant wavelength, showing that nonlinear interactions do not modify the trends of the early linear stages. Finally, we fit the theoretical spectra to experimental data from a nanometric laser-melted copper film and find that at later times, the adjustment requires smaller values of β (larger space correlations). PMID:26871167

  16. Resonant-pattern formation induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongli; Zhang, Ke; Ouyang, Qi

    2006-09-01

    We report frequency-locked resonant patterns induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion Brusselator model. In the regime of 2:1 frequency-locking and homogeneous oscillation, the introduction of additive noise, which is colored in time and white in space, generates and sustains resonant patterns of hexagons, stripes, and labyrinths which oscillate at half of the forcing frequency. Both the noise strength and the correlation time control the pattern formation. The system transits from homogeneous to hexagons, stripes, and to labyrinths successively as the noise strength is adjusted. Good frequency-locked patterns are only sustained by the colored noise and a finite time correlation is necessary. At the limit of white noise with zero temporal correlation, irregular patterns which are only nearly resonant come out as the noise strength is adjusted. The phenomenon induced by colored noise in the forced reaction-diffusion system is demonstrated to correspond to noise-induced Turing instability in the corresponding forced complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  17. Resonant-pattern formation induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Zhang, Ke; Ouyang, Qi

    2006-09-01

    We report frequency-locked resonant patterns induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion Brusselator model. In the regime of 2:1 frequency-locking and homogeneous oscillation, the introduction of additive noise, which is colored in time and white in space, generates and sustains resonant patterns of hexagons, stripes, and labyrinths which oscillate at half of the forcing frequency. Both the noise strength and the correlation time control the pattern formation. The system transits from homogeneous to hexagons, stripes, and to labyrinths successively as the noise strength is adjusted. Good frequency-locked patterns are only sustained by the colored noise and a finite time correlation is necessary. At the limit of white noise with zero temporal correlation, irregular patterns which are only nearly resonant come out as the noise strength is adjusted. The phenomenon induced by colored noise in the forced reaction-diffusion system is demonstrated to correspond to noise-induced Turing instability in the corresponding forced complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. PMID:17025732

  18. Efficient and robust analysis of complex scattering data under noise in microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Probst, S.; Song, F. B.; Bushev, P. A.; Ustinov, A. V.; Weides, M.

    2015-02-15

    Superconducting microwave resonators are reliable circuits widely used for detection and as test devices for material research. A reliable determination of their external and internal quality factors is crucial for many modern applications, which either require fast measurements or operate in the single photon regime with small signal to noise ratios. Here, we use the circle fit technique with diameter correction and provide a step by step guide for implementing an algorithm for robust fitting and calibration of complex resonator scattering data in the presence of noise. The speedup and robustness of the analysis are achieved by employing an algebraic rather than an iterative fit technique for the resonance circle.

  19. Functionalized AFM probes for force spectroscopy: eigenmode shapes and stiffness calibration through thermal noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Justine; Steinberger, Audrey; Bellon, Ludovic

    2013-06-01

    The functionalization of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever with a colloidal bead is a widely used technique when the geometry between the probe and the sample must be controlled, particularly in force spectroscopy. But some questions remain: how does a bead glued at the end of a cantilever influence its mechanical response? And more importantly for quantitative measurements, can we still determine the stiffness of the AFM probe with traditional techniques?In this paper, the influence of the colloidal mass loading on the eigenmode shape and resonant frequency is investigated by measuring the thermal noise on rectangular AFM microcantilevers with and without beads attached at their extremities. The experiments are performed with a home-made ultra-sensitive AFM, based on differential interferometry. The focused beam from the interferometer probes the cantilever at different positions and the spatial shapes of the modes are determined up to the fifth resonance, without external excitation. The results clearly demonstrate that the first eigenmode is almost unchanged by mass loading. However the oscillation behavior of higher resonances presents a marked difference: with a particle glued at its extremity, the nodes of the modes are displaced towards the free end of the cantilever. These results are compared to an analytical model taking into account the mass and inertial moment of the load in an Euler-Bernoulli framework, where the normalization of the eigenmodes is explicitly worked out in order to allow a quantitative prediction of the thermal noise amplitude of each mode. A good agreement between the experimental results and the analytical model is demonstrated, allowing a clean calibration of the probe stiffness.

  20. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  1. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  2. Temporal evolution of resonant transmission under telegraph noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvitz, Shmuel; Aharony, Amnon; Entin-Wohlman, Ora

    2016-08-01

    The environment of a quantum dot that is connected to two leads is modeled by telegraph noise, i.e., random Markovian jumps of the (spinless) electron energy on the dot between two levels. The temporal evolutions of the charge on the dot and of the currents in the leads are studied using a recently developed single-particle basis approach, which is particularly convenient for the averaging over the histories of the noise. In the steady-state limit, we recover the Landauer formula. At a very fast jump rate between the two levels, the noise does not affect the transport. As the jump rate decreases, the effective average transmission crosses over from the transmission through a single (average) level to an incoherent sum of the transmissions through the two levels. The transient temporal evolution towards the steady state is dominated by the displacement current at short times, and by the Landauer current at long times. It contains oscillating terms that decay to zero faster than for the case without noise. When the average chemical potential on the leads equals the dot's "original" energy, without the noise, the oscillations disappear completely and the transient evolution becomes independent of the noise.

  3. Thermal and Quantum Mechanical Noise of a Superfluid Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin

    2004-01-01

    A potential application of a superfluid gyroscope is for real-time measurements of the small variations in the rotational speed of the Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Such rotational jitter, if not measured and corrected for, will be a limiting factor on the resolution potential of a GPS system. This limitation will prevent many automation concepts in navigation, construction, and biomedical examination from being realized. We present the calculation of thermal and quantum-mechanical phase noise across the Josephson junction of a superfluid gyroscope. This allows us to derive the fundamental limits on the performance of a superfluid gyroscope. We show that the fundamental limit on real-time GPS due to rotational jitter can be reduced to well below 1 millimeter/day. Other limitations and their potential mitigation will also be discussed.

  4. Logical stochastic resonance in bistable system under α-stable noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Song, Aiguo

    2014-05-01

    In the presence of α-stable noise, the logical stochastic resonance (LSR) phenomenon in a class of double well nonlinear system is investigated in this paper. LSR effect is obtained under α-stable noise. The probability of getting correct logic outputs is used to evaluate LSR behavior. Four main results are presented. Firstly, in the optimal band of noise intensity, Gaussian white noise is considered a better choice than heavy tailed noise to obtain clean logic operation. But at weak noise background, the success probability of getting the right logic outputs is higher when the system is subjected to heavy tailed noise. Secondly, it is shown that over the entire range of noise variance, the asymmetric noise induced LSR performs better than that induced by the symmetric noise. Furthermore, we find which side the tail skews also affects the correct probability of LSR. At last, the fractional Fokker-Planck equation is presented to show when the characteristic exponent of α-stable noise is less than 1, LSR behavior will not be obtained irrespective of the setting for other parameters.

  5. Double-maximum enhancement of signal-to-noise ratio gain via stochastic resonance and vibrational resonance.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2014-08-01

    This paper studies the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain of a parallel array of nonlinear elements that transmits a common input composed of a periodic signal and external noise. Aiming to further enhance the SNR gain, each element is injected with internal noise components or high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations. We report that the SNR gain exhibits two maxima at different values of the internal noise level or of the sinusoidal vibration amplitude. For the addition of internal noise to an array of threshold-based elements, the condition for occurrence of stochastic resonance is analytically investigated in the limit of weak signals. Interestingly, when the internal noise components are replaced by high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations, the SNR gain displays the vibrational multiresonance phenomenon. In both considered cases, there are certain regions of the internal noise intensity or the sinusoidal vibration amplitude wherein the achieved maximal SNR gain can be considerably beyond unity for a weak signal buried in non-Gaussian external noise. Due to the easy implementation of sinusoidal vibration modulation, this approach is potentially useful for improving the output SNR in an array of nonlinear devices. PMID:25215715

  6. Reduction of Return Current Noise Using Double-Series Resonant Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Satoshi; Itoh, Daisuke; Sugahara, Kengo

    A novel double-series resonant filter is implemented in order to reduce the high-frequency return current noise generated by AC-powered electric cars with AC/DC PWM converters and inverters. The double-series resonant filter is placed between a main transformer and a converter. The resonant filter is tuned so that the noise signal due to the return current is attenuated at the exact noise frequency; for example, the 105-kHz component of an ATS (Automatic Train Stop) signal is attenuated by this filter. The filter has two LCR resonant circuits, one of which is in parallel with a resistance. This filter design helps achieve good attenuation at the noise frequency and helps limit unnecessary amplification at other frequencies. First, a test filter is realized, and the inductance and capacitance of this filter are in good agreement with the corresponding values in the filter design. Then, the filter is included in a full-scale test system with a main transformer and a converter. Then it is confirmed that a 5-dB reduction in the return current noise is achieved by using the proposed filter. Finally, the return current noise in the test system is confirmed to be well below the desired regulation level. This is expected to help realize simple methods for dealing with the effects of impedance at high frequencies in the main transformer.

  7. Consistent thermodynamic framework for interacting particles by neglecting thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Fernando D; Curado, Evaldo M F; Souza, Andre M C; Andrade, Roberto F S

    2015-02-01

    An effective temperature θ, conjugated to a generalized entropy s(q), was introduced recently for a system of interacting particles. Since θ presents values much higher than those of typical room temperatures T≪θ, the thermal noise can be neglected (T/θ≃0) in these systems. Moreover, the consistency of this definition, as well as of a form analogous to the first law of thermodynamics, du=θds(q)+δW, were verified lately by means of a Carnot cycle, whose efficiency was shown to present the usual form, η=1-(θ(2)/θ(1)). Herein we explore further the heat contribution δQ=θds(q) by proposing a way for a heat exchange between two such systems, as well as its associated thermal equilibrium. As a consequence, the zeroth principle is also established. Moreover, we consolidate the first-law proposal by following the usual procedure for obtaining different potentials, i.e., applying Legendre transformations for distinct pairs of independent variables. From these potentials we derive the equation of state, Maxwell relations, and define response functions. All results presented are shown to be consistent with those of standard thermodynamics for T>0. PMID:25768486

  8. Mechanical-Thermal Noise in Drive-Mode of a Silicon Micro-Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Shourong; Li, Hongsheng; Zhou, Bailing

    2009-01-01

    A new closed-loop drive scheme which decouples the phase and the gain of the closed-loop driving system was designed in a Silicon Micro-Gyroscope (SMG). We deduce the system model of closed-loop driving and use stochastic averaging to obtain an approximate “slow” system that clarifies the effect of thermal noise. The effects of mechanical-thermal noise on the driving performance of the SMG, including the noise spectral density of the driving amplitude and frequency, are derived. By calculating and comparing the noise amplitude due to thermal noise both in the opened-loop driving and in the closed-loop driving, we find that the closed-loop driving does not reduce the RMS noise amplitude. We observe that the RMS noise frequency can be reduced by increasing the quality factor and the drive amplitude in the closed-loop driving system. The experiment and simulation validate the feasibility of closed-loop driving and confirm the validity of the averaged equation and its stablility criterion. The experiment and simulation results indicate the electrical noise of closed-loop driving circuitry is bigger than the mechanical-thermal noise and as the driving mass decreases, the mechanical-thermal noise may get bigger than the electrical noise of the closed-loop driving circuitry. PMID:22412316

  9. Chaos and thermal noise in the rf-biased Josephson junction

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, R.L.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of thermal noise on chaotic behavior in the rf-biased Josephson junction is studied through digital simulations. In instances for which chaotic behavior occurs in the noise-free system, it is found that the dynamics of the system are almost unchanged by the addition of thermal noise unless the level of thermal noise exceeds that of the chaotic state. In instances for which the only stable states of the noise-free system are periodic solutions, small amounts of thermal noise can induce the junction to hop between two different dynamical states, producing a low-frequency noise level much higher than that of the thermal noise. Such noise-induced hopping can occur either between two periodic solutions or between a periodic solution and a metastable chaotic solution. When a metastable chaotic state is involved, temperatures somewhat higher than those which produce hopping can destablize the periodic solution to the point where the system spends virtually all of its time in the metastable chaotic state, creating noise-induced chaos. The similarities between chaotic behavior at zero temperature and noise-induced chaos are sufficiently strong that it may be difficult to distinguish the two cases experimentally.

  10. Noise induced oscillations and coherence resonance in a generic model of the nonisothermal chemical oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Simakov, David S. A.; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are common in biological systems and they also occur in artificial non-biological systems. Generally, these reactions are subject to random fluctuations in environmental conditions which translate into fluctuations in the values of physical variables, for example, temperature. We formulate a mathematical model for a nonisothermal minimal chemical oscillator containing a single negative feedback loop and study numerically the effects of stochastic fluctuations in temperature in the absence of any deterministic limit cycle or periodic forcing. We show that noise in temperature can induce sustained limit cycle oscillations with a relatively narrow frequency distribution and some characteristic frequency. These properties differ significantly depending on the noise correlation. Here, we have explored white and colored (correlated) noise. A plot of the characteristic frequency of the noise induced oscillations as a function of the correlation exponent shows a maximum, therefore indicating the existence of autonomous stochastic resonance, i.e. coherence resonance. PMID:23929212

  11. Laser phase noise effects on the dynamics of optomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, Gregory; Meystre, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the effects of laser phase noise on the sideband cooling of opto-mechanical oscillators, demonstrating how it limits the minimum occupation number of the phonon mode being cooled and how it modifies optical cooling rate and mechanical frequency shift of the mechanical element. We also comment on the effects of laser phase noise on coherent oscillations of the mechanical element in the blue detuned regime and on the back-action evasion detection method where an additional drive is used to prevent heating of one quadrature of motion of the oscillator. This work was supported by the US Office of Naval Research, the US National Science Foundation, the US Army Research Office and the DARPA ORCHID program through a grant from AFOSR.

  12. Fan Noise Control Using Herschel-Quincke Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Ng, Wing F.

    2003-01-01

    The research effort proposed for this NASA NRA is mainly experimental. In addition, Virginia Tech is working in partnership with Goodrich Aerospace, Aerostructures Group for the analytical development needed to support the experimental endeavor, i.e. model development, design, and system studies. In this project, Herschel-Quincke (HQ)liner technology experiments will be performed at the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) facility. A schematic of both inlet and aft HQ-liner systems installed in the ANCF rig as well as a picture of the Glenn facility is shown. The main goal is to simultaneously test in both the inlet and bypass duct sections. The by-pass duct will have HQ-systems in both the inner and outer duct walls. The main advantages of performing tests at the ANCF facility are that the effect of the inlet HQ-system on the by-pass HQ-system and vice versa, can be accurately determined from the in-duct modal data. Another significant advantage is that it offers the opportunity to assess (on a common basis) the proposed noise reduction concept on the ANCF rig which in the past has been used for assessing other active and passive noise reduction strategies.

  13. Fan Noise Control Using Herschel-quincke Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Ng, Wing F.; Provenza, Andrew (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The research effort proposed for this NASA NRA is mainly experimental. In addition, Virginia Tech is working in partnership with Goodrich Aerospace, Aerostructures Group for the analytical development needed to support the experimental endeavor, i.e. model development, design, and system studies. In this project, Herschel-Quincke (HQ)liner technology experiments will be performed at the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) facility. A schematic of both inlet and aft HQ-liner systems installed in the ANCF rig as well as a picture of the Glenn facility is shown. The main goal is to simultaneously test in both the inlet and bypass duct sections. The by-pass duct will have HQ-systems in both the inner and outer duct walls. The main advantages of performing tests at the ANCF facility are that the effect of the inlet HQ-system on the by-pass HQ-system and vice versa, can be accurately determined from the in-duct modal data. Another significant advantage is that it offers the opportunity to assess (on a common basis) the proposed noise reduction concept on the ANCF rig which in the past has been used for assessing other active and passive noise reduction strategies.

  14. Parameter Diversity Induced Multiple Spatial Coherence Resonances and Spiral Waves in Neuronal Network with and Without Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Ye; Jia, Bing; Gu, Hua-Guang; An, Shu-Cheng

    2012-05-01

    Diversity in the neurons and noise are inevitable in the real neuronal network. In this paper, parameter diversity induced spiral waves and multiple spatial coherence resonances in a two-dimensional neuronal network without or with noise are simulated. The relationship between the multiple resonances and the multiple transitions between patterns of spiral waves are identified. The coherence degrees induced by the diversity are suppressed when noise is introduced and noise density is increased. The results suggest that natural nervous system might profit from both parameter diversity and noise, provided a possible approach to control formation and transition of spiral wave by the cooperation between the diversity and noise.

  15. Passive ultrasonics using sub-Nyquist sampling of high-frequency thermal-mechanical noise.

    PubMed

    Sabra, Karim G; Romberg, Justin; Lani, Shane; Degertekin, F Levent

    2014-06-01

    Monolithic integration of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays with low noise complementary metal oxide semiconductor electronics minimizes interconnect parasitics thus allowing the measurement of thermal-mechanical (TM) noise. This enables passive ultrasonics based on cross-correlations of diffuse TM noise to extract coherent ultrasonic waves propagating between receivers. However, synchronous recording of high-frequency TM noise puts stringent requirements on the analog to digital converter's sampling rate. To alleviate this restriction, high-frequency TM noise cross-correlations (12-25 MHz) were estimated instead using compressed measurements of TM noise which could be digitized at a sampling frequency lower than the Nyquist frequency.

  16. The use of plasmon resonances in thermally assisted magnetic recording

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Mayergoyz, I. D.

    2008-04-01

    The numerical study of plasmon resonances as optical means for light delivery in thermally assisted magnetic recording is reported. The analysis of two distinct designs is performed. In these designs, the plasmon resonances in metallic nanoparticles and perforated metallic nanofilms are used, respectively. The specific plasmon modes that create the strongest and well-localized (on nanoscale) optical fields have been identified. The issues of coupling of incident laser radiation to these plasmon modes as well as the sharpness of plasmon resonances are discussed.

  17. 239Pu Resonance Evaluation for Thermal Benchmark System Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, L. C.; Noguere, G.; de Saint Jean, C.; Kahler, A. C.

    2014-04-01

    Analyses of thermal plutonium solution critical benchmark systems have indicated a deficiency in the 239Pu resonance evaluation. To investigate possible solutions to this issue, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party for Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) established Subgroup 34 to focus on the reevaluation of the 239Pu resolved resonance parameters. In addition, the impacts of the prompt neutron multiplicity (νbar) and the prompt neutron fission spectrum (PFNS) have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the 239Pu resolved resonance evaluation effort.

  18. Extremely low-phase-noise SAW resonators and oscillators: design and performance.

    PubMed

    Montress, G K; Parker, T E; Loboda, M J; Greer, J A

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe prototype low-noise SAW (surface acoustic wave) resonator oscillators which have demonstrated state-of-the-art phase-noise performance not only at their fundamental operating frequencies in the 400- to 600-MHz range but also after 16x frequency multiplication to X-band as well. SAW resonator designs with overmoded cavities, very wide apertures, and dual apertures, as well as modified fabrication techniques, have been used to realize an overall reduction in an oscillator's phase-noise spectrum, i.e. white phiM, flicker FM, and random-walk FM. The S resonators can typically handle incident RF power in excess of +20 dBm, a key requirement to achieving an extremely low oscillator-phase-noise floor. A novel burn-in procedure at relatively high incident-RF-power levels (>27 dBm) was used to reduce both the flicker FM and random-walk FM phase-noise levels. Using these various techniques, a 5- to 15-dB improvement in the overall phase-noise spectrum for several prototype oscillators was demonstrated. PMID:18290201

  19. Spin-Torque Driven Macrospin Dynamics subject to Thermal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, Daniele

    This thesis considers the general Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert theory underlying the magnetization dynamics of a macrospin subject to spin-torque effects and thermal fluctuations, as a function of the spin-polarization angle. The macrospin has biaxial magnetic anisotropy, typical of thin film magnetic elements, with an easy axis in the film plane and a hard axis out of the plane. When magnetic diffusion due to spin-torque and thermal noise effects occurs on a timescale that is much larger than the conservative precessional timescale due to magnetic anisotropies, it is possible to explore steady-state dynamics perturbatively by averaging the magnetization dynamics over constant energy orbits. This simplifies the magnetization dynamics to a 1D stochastic differential equation governing the evolution of the macropsin's energy. Current induced steady-state motions are then found to appear whenever the magnetization settles onto a stable constant energy trajectory where a balance of spin-torque and damping effects is achieved: with the remaining gyromagnetic motion due to anisotropy fields driving precessions. After averaging, all the relevant dynamical scenarios are found to depend on the ratio between hard and easy axis anisotropies. We derive the range of currents for which in-plane and out-of-plane limit cycles exist and discuss the regimes in which the constant energy orbit averaging technique is applicable. We find that there is a critical angle of the spin-polarization necessary for the occurrence of such states and predict a hysteretic response to applied current. This model can be tested in experiments on orthogonal spin-transfer devices, which consist of both an in-plane and out-of-plane magnetized spin-polarizers, effectively leading to an angle between the easy and spin-polarization axes. The technique developed allows for a detailed study of thermally driven macrospin escape phenomena within a stochastic Langevin framework. By employing Friedlin- Wentzell theory

  20. Stochastic resonance in a fractional harmonic oscillator subject to random mass and signal-modulated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Zhu, Cheng-Yin; Cheng, Xiao-Feng; Li, Heng

    2016-10-01

    Stochastic resonance in a fractional harmonic oscillator with random mass and signal-modulated noise is investigated. Applying linear system theory and the characteristics of the noises, the analysis expression of the mean output-amplitude-gain (OAG) is obtained. It is shown that the OAG varies non-monotonically with the increase of the intensity of the multiplicative dichotomous noise, with the increase of the frequency of the driving force, as well as with the increase of the system frequency. In addition, the OAG is a non-monotonic function of the system friction coefficient, as a function of the viscous damping coefficient, as a function of the fractional exponent.

  1. Coherence resonance in the two-dimensional neural map driven by non-Gaussian colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongxi; Hu, Bing; Wang, Jia; Jing, Yingchuan; Hou, Fangmei

    2016-01-01

    Based on the two-dimensional (2D) neural map, we investigate the impacts of non-Gaussian colored noise on the firing activity of discrete system. Taking the coherence parameter R to measure the regularity of firing behavior, it is demonstrated that coherence parameter R has a pronounced minimum value with the noise intensity and the correlation time of non-Gaussian colored noise, which is the so-called phenomenon of coherence resonance (CR). Besides, the firing activity is not sensitive to the non-Gaussian parameter which determines the departure from the Gaussian distribution when the correlation time is large enough.

  2. Ultra-Narrow Bandwidth Optical Resonators for Integrated Low Frequency Noise Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Daryl T.

    The development of narrowband resonators has far reaching applications in integrated optics. As a precise reference of wavelength, filters can be used in sensors, metrology, nonlinear optics, microwave photonics, and laser stabilization. In this work, we develop record high quality factor (Q) Si 3N4 waveguide resonators, and utilize them to stabilize a heterogeneously integrated Si/III V laser. To increase the Q factor of waveguide resonators, particular attention is given to loss mechanisms. Propagation loss of <0.1 dB/m is demonstrated on the ultra low loss waveguide platform, a low index contrast, high aspect ratio Si3N4 waveguide geometry fabricated with high quality materials and high temperature anneals. Ideality in the directional couplers used for coupling to the resonators is studied and losses are reduced such that 81 million intrinsic Q factor is achieved. Additional results include 1x16 resonant splitters, low ? narrowband gratings, and a dual layer waveguide technology for low loss and low bend radius in separate regions of the same device layer. We then combine an ultra high Q resonator and a heterogeneous Si/III V laser in a Pound Drever Hall (PDH) frequency stabilization system to yield narrow linewidth characteristics for a stable on chip laser reference. The high frequency noise filtering is performed with Si resonant mirrors in the laser cavity. A 30 million Q factor Si3N4 resonator is used with electrical feedback to reduce close in noise and frequency walk off. The laser shows high frequency noise levels of 60x103 Hz2/Hz corresponding to 160 kHz linewidth, and the low frequency noise is suppressed 33 dB to 103 Hz2/Hz with the PDH system.

  3. Noise-Induced Sensitization of Human Brain: Toward the Neurological Application of Stochastic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Soma, Rika; Hidaka, Ichiro; Nozaki, Daichi; Iso-o, Noriko; Kwak, Shin

    2003-05-01

    In the past decade, it has been recognized that noise can enhance the response of nonlinear systems to weak signals, via a mechanism known as stochastic resonance (SR). Particularly, the concept of SR has generated considerable interest in sensory biology, because it has been shown in several experimental studies that noise can assist neural systems in detecting weak signals which could not be detected in its absence. Recently, we have shown a similar type of noise-induced sensitization of human brain; externally added noise to the brain stem baroreflex centers sensitized their responses in maintaining adequate blood perfusion to the brain itself. Furthermore, the addition of noise has also shown to be useful in compensating for dysfunctions of the baroreflex centers in certain neurological diseases. It is concluded that the statistical physics concept of SR could be useful in sensitizing human brain in health and disease.

  4. Electrical noise modulates perception of electrical pulses in humans: sensation enhancement via stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulos, Fivos; Nierhaus, Till; Villringer, Arno

    2014-03-01

    Although noise is usually considered to be harmful for signal detection and information transmission, stochastic resonance (SR) describes the counterintuitive phenomenon of noise enhancing the detection and transmission of weak input signals. In mammalian sensory systems, SR-related phenomena may arise both in the peripheral and the central nervous system. Here, we investigate behavioral SR effects of subliminal electrical noise stimulation on the perception of somatosensory stimuli in humans. We compare the likelihood to detect near-threshold pulses of different intensities applied on the left index finger during presence vs. absence of subliminal noise on the same or an adjacent finger. We show that (low-pass) noise can enhance signal detection when applied on the same finger. This enhancement is strong for near-threshold pulses below the 50% detection threshold and becomes stronger when near-threshold pulses are applied as brief trains. The effect reverses at pulse intensities above threshold, especially when noise is replaced by subliminal sinusoidal stimulation, arguing for a peripheral direct current addition. Unfiltered noise applied on longer pulses enhances detection of all pulse intensities. Noise applied to an adjacent finger has two opposing effects: an inhibiting effect (presumably due to lateral inhibition) and an enhancing effect (most likely due to SR in the central nervous system). In summary, we demonstrate that subliminal noise can significantly modulate detection performance of near-threshold stimuli. Our results indicate SR effects in the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:24353303

  5. Noise-induced transitions and resonant effects in nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikin, Alexei

    2003-02-01

    Our every-day experience is connected with different acoustical noise or music. Usually noise plays the role of nuisance in any communication and destroys any order in a system. Similar optical effects are known: strong snowing or raining decreases quality of a vision. In contrast to these situations noisy stimuli can also play a positive constructive role, e.g. a driver can be more concentrated in a presence of quiet music. Transmission processes in neural systems are of especial interest from this point of view: excitation or information will be transmitted only in the case if a signal overcomes a threshold. Dr. Alexei Zaikin from the Potsdam University studies noise-induced phenomena in nonlinear systems from a theoretical point of view. Especially he is interested in the processes, in which noise influences the behaviour of a system twice: if the intensity of noise is over a threshold, it induces some regular structure that will be synchronized with the behaviour of neighbour elements. To obtain such a system with a threshold one needs one more noise source. Dr. Zaikin has analyzed further examples of such doubly stochastic effects and developed a concept of these new phenomena. These theoretical findings are important, because such processes can play a crucial role in neurophysics, technical communication devices and living sciences. Unsere alltägliche Erfahrung ist mit verschiedenen akustischen Einfluessen wie Lärm, aber auch Musik verbunden. Jeder weiss, wie Lärm stören kann und Kommunikation behindert oder gar unterbindet. Ähnliche optische Effekte sind bekannt: starkes Schneetreiben oder Regengüsse verschlechtern die Sicht und lassen uns Umrisse nur noch schemenhaft erkennen. Jedoch koennen ähnliche Stimuli auch sehr positive Auswirkungen haben: Autofahrer fahren bei leiser Musik konzentrierter -- die Behauptung von Schulkindern, nur bei dröhnenden Bässen die Mathehausaufgaben richtig rechnen zu können, ist allerdings nicht wissenschaftlich

  6. Enhanced visibility of two-mode thermal squeezed states via degenerate parametric amplification and resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahboob, I.; Okamoto, H.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2016-08-01

    Two-mode squeezed states, generated via non-degenerate parametric down-conversion, are invariably revealed via their entangled vacuum or correlated thermal fluctuations. Here, two-mode thermal squeezed states, generated in an electromechanical system, are made bright by means of degenerate parametric amplification of their constituent modes to the point where they are almost perfect, even when seeded from low intensity non-degenerate parametric down-conversion. More dramatically, activating the degenerate parametric resonances of the underlying modes yields perfect correlations which can be resolved via the coordinated switching of their phase bi-stable vibrations, without recourse to monitoring their thermal fluctuations. This ability to enhance the two-mode squeezed states and to decipher them without needing to observe their intrinsic noise is supported by both analytical and numerical modelling and it suggests that the technical constraints to making this phenomenon more widely available can be dramatically relaxed.

  7. Squeezing of Quantum Noise of Motion in a Micromechanical Resonator.

    PubMed

    Pirkkalainen, J-M; Damskägg, E; Brandt, M; Massel, F; Sillanpää, M A

    2015-12-11

    A pair of conjugate observables, such as the quadrature amplitudes of harmonic motion, have fundamental fluctuations that are bound by the Heisenberg uncertainty relation. However, in a squeezed quantum state, fluctuations of a quantity can be reduced below the standard quantum limit, at the cost of increased fluctuations of the conjugate variable. Here we prepare a nearly macroscopic moving body, realized as a micromechanical resonator, in a squeezed quantum state. We obtain squeezing of one quadrature amplitude 1.1±0.4  dB below the standard quantum limit, thus achieving a long-standing goal of obtaining motional squeezing in a macroscopic object. PMID:26705631

  8. 1/f noise in etched groove surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators.

    PubMed

    Parker, T E; Andres, D; Greer, J A; Montress, G K

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of 1/f (or flicker) frequency fluctuations in SAW resonators fabricated with etched groove reflectors on single crystal quartz have shown that the observed noise levels vary inversely with device size. These measurements were made on sixteen 450 MHz resonators of four different sizes. The 1/f noise levels were also evaluated on twenty-eight other SAW resonators ranging in frequency from 401 to 915 MHz. This additional data provides valuable information on the dependence of the flicker noise levels on resonator frequency. A model based an localized, independent velocity fluctuations in the quartz is proposed which correctly fits the observed size and frequency dependence of the measured 1/f noise levels. This model suggests that the velocity fluctuations originate in small regions (much less than ~5 mum in diameter) randomly distributed throughout the quartz with an average separation of about 5 mum between independent (incoherent) sources. The magnitude of the localized fractional velocity fluctuations, Deltav/v, averaged over a 5 micron cube is on the order of 1x10 (-9). PMID:18263275

  9. Role of the nature of noise in the thermal conductance of mechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Welles A M; Duarte Queirós, Sílvio M

    2012-10-01

    Focusing on a paradigmatic small system consisting of two coupled damped oscillators, we survey the role of the Lévy-Itô nature of the noise in the thermal conductance. For white noises, we prove that the Lévy-Itô composition (Lebesgue measure) of the noise is irrelevant for the thermal conductance of a nonequilibrium linearly coupled chain, which signals the independence of mechanical and thermodynamical properties. In contrast, for the nonlinearly coupled case, the two types of properties mix and the explicit definition of the noise plays a central role. PMID:23214530

  10. Finite-difference time-domain simulation of thermal noise in open cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Andreasen, Jonathan; Cao Hui; Taflove, Allen; Kumar, Prem |; Cao Changqi

    2008-02-15

    A numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is developed to simulate thermal noise in open cavities owing to output coupling. The absorbing boundary of the FDTD grid is treated as a blackbody, whose thermal radiation penetrates the cavity in the grid. The calculated amount of thermal noise in a one-dimensional dielectric cavity recovers the standard result of the quantum Langevin equation in the Markovian regime. Our FDTD simulation also demonstrates that in the non-Markovian regime the buildup of the intracavity noise field depends on the ratio of the cavity photon lifetime to the coherence time of thermal radiation. The advantage of our numerical method is that the thermal noise is introduced in the time domain without prior knowledge of cavity modes.

  11. Lévy stable noise-induced transitions: stochastic resonance, resonant activation and dynamic hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2009-05-01

    A standard approach to analysis of noise-induced effects in stochastic dynamics assumes a Gaussian character of the noise term describing interaction of the analyzed system with its complex surroundings. An additional assumption about the existence of timescale separation between the dynamics of the measured observable and the typical timescale of the noise allows external fluctuations to be modeled as temporally uncorrelated and therefore white. However, in many natural phenomena the assumptions concerning the above mentioned properties of 'Gaussianity' and 'whiteness' of the noise can be violated. In this context, in contrast to the spatiotemporal coupling characterizing general forms of non-Markovian or semi-Markovian Lévy walks, so called Lévy flights correspond to the class of Markov processes which can still be interpreted as white, but distributed according to a more general, infinitely divisible, stable and non-Gaussian law. Lévy noise-driven non-equilibrium systems are known to manifest interesting physical properties and have been addressed in various scenarios of physical transport exhibiting a superdiffusive behavior. Here we present a brief overview of our recent investigations aimed at understanding features of stochastic dynamics under the influence of Lévy white noise perturbations. We find that the archetypal phenomena of noise-induced ordering are robust and can be detected also in systems driven by memoryless, non-Gaussian, heavy-tailed fluctuations with infinite variance.

  12. Measuring and interpreting the mechanical thermal noise spectrum in a MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, L. A.; Cretu, E.; Wolffenbuttel, R. F.

    2005-07-01

    The meta-stability of the pull-in displacement of an electrostatically operated parallel plate micromechanical structure is used for the capacitive measurement of the mechanical-thermal noise spectrum in a MEMS. Pull-in time depends on force and is not affected by the input-referred noise of the readout circuit. Repeatedly bringing the microstructure to pull-in while measuring the pull-in time followed by FFT enables the measurement of the mechanical noise spectrum with a non-mechanical noise level set primarily by the resolution of the time measurement. The white noise level is found to be in agreement with the theory on damping. The 1/f noise spectrum is found to be independent of ambient gas pressure with a 1/f noise-white noise cross-over frequency at 0.007 Hz for a 1 bar gas pressure and is reproducible for devices fabricated in the same process and the same run.

  13. Modulating resonance behaviors by noise recycling in bistable systems with time delay

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhongkui Xu, Wei; Yang, Xiaoli; Xiao, Yuzhu

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the impact of noise recycling on resonance behaviors is studied theoretically and numerically in a prototypical bistable system with delayed feedback. According to the interior cooperating and interacting activity of noise recycling, a theory has been proposed by reducing the non-Markovian problem into a two-state model, wherein both the master equation and the transition rates depend on not only the current state but also the earlier two states due to the recycling lag and the feedback delay. By virtue of this theory, the formulae of the power spectrum density and the linear response function have been found analytically. And the theoretical results are well verified by numerical simulations. It has been demonstrated that both the recycling lag and the feedback delay play a crucial role in the resonance behaviors. In addition, the results also suggest an alternative scheme to modulate or control the coherence or stochastic resonance in bistable systems with time delay.

  14. Aircraft interior noise reduction by alternate resonance tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.; Gottwald, James A.; Gustaveson, Mark B.; Burton, James R., III

    1988-01-01

    Model problem development and analysis continues with the Alternate Resonance Tuning (ART) concept. The various topics described are presently at different stages of completion: investigation of the effectiveness of the ART concept under an external propagating pressure field associated with propeller passage by the fuselage; analysis of ART performance with a double panel wall mounted in a flexible frame model; development of a data fitting scheme using a branch analysis with a Newton-Raphson scheme in multiple dimensions to determine values of critical parameters in the actual experimental apparatus; and investigation of the ART effect with real panels as opposed to the spring-mass-damper systems currently used in much of the theory.

  15. Living Organisms Coupling to Electromagnetic Radiation Below Thermal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Freund, Friedemann

    2013-04-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) and extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic (EM) radiation is part of the natural environment. Prior to major earthquakes the local ULF and global ELF radiation field is often markedly perturbed. This has detrimental effects on living organisms. We are studying the mechanism of these effects on the biochemical, cellular and organismal levels. The transfer of electrons along the Electron Transfer Chain (ETC) controls the universal reduction-oxidation reactions that are essential for fundamental biochemical processes in living cells. In order for these processes to work properly, the ETC has to maintain some form of synchronization, or coherence with all biochemical reactions in the living cells, including energy production, RNA transcription, and DNA replication. As a consequence of this synchronization, harmful chemical conflict between the reductive and the oxidative partial reactions can be minimized or avoided. At the same time we note that the synchronization allows for a transfer of energy, coherent or interfering, via coupling to the natural ambient EM field. Extremely weak high frequency EM fields, well below the thermal noise level, tuned in frequency to the electron spins of certain steps in the ETC, have already been shown to cause aberrant cell growth and disorientation among plants and animals with respect to the magnetic and gravity vectors. We investigate EM fields over a much wider frequency range, including ULF known to be generated deep in the Earth prior to major earthquakes locally, and ELF known to be fed by lightning discharges, traveling around the globe in the cavity formed between the Earth's surface and the ionosphere. This ULF/ELF radiation can control the timing of the biochemical redox cycle and thereby have a universal effect on physiology of organisms. The timing can even have a detrimental influence, via increased oxidative damage, on the DNA replication, which controls heredity.

  16. Narrow band noise response of a Belleville spring resonator.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard H

    2013-09-01

    This study of nonlinear dynamics includes (i) an identification of quasi-steady states of response using equivalent linearization, (ii) the temporal simulation of the system using Heun's time step procedure on time domain analytic signals, and (iii) a laboratory experiment. An attempt has been made to select material and measurement parameters so that nearly the same systems are used and analyzed for all three parts of the study. This study illustrates important features of nonlinear response to narrow band excitation: (a) states of response that the system can acquire with transitions of the system between those states, (b) the interaction between the noise source and the vibrating load in which the source transmits energy to or draws energy from the load as transitions occur; (c) the lag or lead of the system response relative to the source as transitions occur that causes the average frequencies of source and response to differ; and (d) the determination of the state of response (mass or stiffness controlled) by observation of the instantaneous phase of the influence function. These analyses take advantage of the use of time domain analytic signals that have a complementary role to functions that are analytic in the frequency domain.

  17. Modeling Thermal Noise from Crystaline Coatings for Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demos, Nicholas; Lovelace, Geoffrey; LSC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The sensitivity of current and future ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are, in part, limited in sensitivity by Brownian and thermoelastic noise in each detector's mirror substrate and coating. Crystalline mirror coatings could potentially reduce thermal noise, but thermal noise is challenging to model analytically in the case of crystalline materials. Thermal noise can be modeled using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, which relates thermal noise to an auxiliary elastic problem. In this poster, I will present results from a new code that numerically models thermal noise by numerically solving the auxiliary elastic problem for various types of crystalline mirror coatings. The code uses a finite element method with adaptive mesh refinement to model the auxiliary elastic problem which is then related to thermal noise. I will present preliminary results for a crystal coating on a fused silica substrate of varying sizes and elastic properties. This and future work will help develop the next generation of ground-based gravitational-wave detectors.

  18. Phase stability in fMRI time series: effect of noise regression, off-resonance correction and spatial filtering techniques.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Gisela E; Bianciardi, Marta; Brainovich, Valentina; Cassara, Antonino Mario; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2012-02-15

    Although the majority of fMRI studies exploit magnitude changes only, there is an increasing interest regarding the potential additive information conveyed by the phase signal. This integrated part of the complex number furnished by the MR scanners can also be used for exploring direct detection of neuronal activity and for thermography. Few studies have explicitly addressed the issue of the available signal stability in the context of phase time-series, and therefore we explored the spatial pattern of frequency specific phase fluctuations, and evaluated the effect of physiological noise components (heart beat and respiration) on the phase signal. Three categories of retrospective noise reduction techniques were explored and the temporal signal stability was evaluated in terms of a physiologic noise model, for seven fMRI measurement protocols in eight healthy subjects at 3T, for segmented CSF, gray and white matter voxels. We confirmed that for most processing methods, an efficient use of the phase information is hampered by the fact that noise from physiological and instrumental sources contributes significantly more to the phase than to the magnitude instability. Noise regression based on the phase evolution of the central k-space point, RETROICOR, or an orthonormalized combination of these were able to reduce their impact, but without bringing phase stability down to levels expected from the magnitude signal. Similar results were obtained after targeted removal of scan-to-scan variations in the bulk magnetic field by the dynamic off-resonance in k-space (DORK) method and by the temporal off-resonance alignment of single-echo time series technique (TOAST). We found that spatial high-pass filtering was necessary, and in vivo a Gaussian filter width of 20mm was sufficient to suppress physiological noise and bring the phase fluctuations to magnitude levels. Stronger filters brought the fluctuations down to levels dictated by thermal noise contributions, and for 62

  19. Internal noise induced pattern formation and spatial coherence resonance for calcium signals of diffusively coupled cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Maosheng; Sun, Runzhi; Huang, Wanxia; Tu, Yubing

    2014-01-01

    The effects of internal noise in a square-lattice Höfer calcium oscillation system have been studied numerically in the context of chemical Langevin equations. It was found that spatial pattern can be induced by internal noise and, interestingly, an optimal internal noise strength (or optimal cell size) exists which maximizes the spatial coherence of pattern, indicating the occurrence of spatial coherence resonance. The effects of control parameter and coupling strength on system’s spatial coherence have also been investigated. We found that larger internal noise strength is needed to induce spatial pattern for a small control parameter or a stronger coupling strength, and spatial coherence can be enhanced by coupling.

  20. Noise enhancement of information transfer in crayfish mechanoreceptors by stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, John K.; Wilkens, Lon; Pantazelou, Eleni; Moss, Frank

    1993-09-01

    IN linear information theory, electrical engineering and neurobiology, random noise has traditionally been viewed as a detriment to information transmission. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a nonlinear, statistical dynamics whereby information flow in a multistate system is enhanced by the presence of optimized, random noise1 4. A major consequence of SR for signal reception is that it makes possible substantial improvements in the detection of weak periodic signals. Although SR has recently been demonstrated in several artificial physical systems5,6, it may also occur naturally, and an intriguing possibility is that biological systems have evolved the capability to exploit SR by optimizing endogenous sources of noise. Sensory systems are an obvious place to look for SR, as they excel at detecting weak signals in a noisy environment. Here we demonstrate SR using external noise applied to crayfish mechanoreceptor cells. Our results show that individual neurons can provide a physiological substrate for SR in sensory systems.

  1. Stochastic resonance and noise delayed extinction in a model of two competing species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, D.; Fiasconaro, A.; Spagnolo, B.

    2004-01-01

    We study the role of the noise in the dynamics of two competing species. We consider generalized Lotka-Volterra equations in the presence of a multiplicative noise, which models the interaction between the species and the environment. The interaction parameter between the species is a random process which obeys a stochastic differential equation with a generalized bistable potential in the presence of a periodic driving term, which accounts for the environment temperature variation. We find noise-induced periodic oscillations of the species concentrations and stochastic resonance phenomenon. We find also a nonmonotonic behavior of the mean extinction time of one of the two competing species as a function of the additive noise intensity.

  2. Ultra-stable, low phase noise dielectric resonator stabilized oscillators for military and commercial systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizan, Muhammad; Higgins, Thomas; Sturzebecher, Dana

    1993-01-01

    EPSD has designed, fabricated and tested, ultra-stable, low phase noise microwave dielectric resonator oscillators (DRO's) at S, X, Ku, and K-bands, for potential application to high dynamic range and low radar cross section target detection radar systems. The phase noise and the temperature stability surpass commercially available DROs. Low phase noise signals are critical for CW Doppler radars, at both very close-in and large offset frequencies from the carrier. The oscillators were built without any temperature compensation techniques and exhibited a temperature stability of 25 parts per million (ppm) over an extended temperature range. The oscillators are lightweight, small and low cost compared to BAW & SAW oscillators, and can impact commercial systems such as telecommunications, built-in-test equipment, cellular phone and satellite communications systems. The key to obtaining this performance was a high Q factor resonant structure (RS) and careful circuit design techniques. The high Q RS consists of a dielectric resonator (DR) supported by a low loss spacer inside a metal cavity. The S and the X-band resonant structures demonstrated loaded Q values of 20,300 and 12,700, respectively.

  3. Suppression of thermal frequency noise in erbium-doped fiber random lasers.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Bhavaye; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Liang

    2014-02-15

    Frequency and intensity noise are characterized for erbium-doped fiber (EDF) random lasers based on Rayleigh distributed feedback mechanism. We propose a theoretical model for the frequency noise of such random lasers using the property of random phase modulations from multiple scattering points in ultralong fibers. We find that the Rayleigh feedback suppresses the noise at higher frequencies by introducing a Lorentzian envelope over the thermal frequency noise of a long fiber cavity. The theoretical model and measured frequency noise agree quantitatively with two fitting parameters. The random laser exhibits a noise level of 6  Hz²/Hz at 2 kHz, which is lower than what is found in conventional narrow-linewidth EDF fiber lasers and nonplanar ring laser oscillators (NPROs) by a factor of 166 and 2, respectively. The frequency noise has a minimum value for an optimum length of the Rayleigh scattering fiber.

  4. The cooperation effect of noise and an external signal on implicit and explicit coherence resonances in the brusselator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.-C.

    2010-04-01

    The brusselator system subject to noise and an external signal is investigated in this work. The results show that both implicit coherence resonance and explicit coherence biresonance are exhibited in the absence of external signal. When an external signal is introduced into the system, explicit coherence biresonance is eliminated, whereas implicit coherence resonance is enhanced, and the enhanced implicit coherence resonance is attributed to the internal signal generated from noise-induced oscillations, not to the external signal. When an external signal and noise are added to the same control parameter, implicit coherence resonance is enhanced; when they are added to two control parameters separately, implicit coherence resonance is suppressed. Furthermore, above the critical noise intensity, the effect of the external signal on coherent behaviors is destroyed.

  5. Transonic Resonance Demonstrated To Be a Source of Internal Noise From Mixer-Ejector Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Khairul B.

    2002-01-01

    During noise field studies with mixer-ejector nozzles in NASA's High-Speed Research program, tones were often encountered. The tones would persist in the simulated "cutback" condition (shortly after takeoff). Unfortunately, we did not understand their origin and, thus, could not develop a logical approach for suppressing them. We naturally questioned whether or not some of those tones were due to the transonic resonance. This was studied with a 1/13th scale model of the High-Speed Civil Transport nozzle. The first objective was to determine if indeed tones could be detected in the radiated noise. The next objective was to diagnose if those tones were due to the transonic resonance. Agreement of the frequencies with the correlation equation and the effect of boundary layer tripping were to be used in the diagnosis.

  6. Synchronization of electrically coupled stochastic magnetic oscillators induced by thermal and electrical noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrahi, A.; Locatelli, N.; Grollier, J.; Querlioz, D.

    2016-08-01

    Superparamagnetic tunnel junctions are nanostructures that auto-oscillate stochastically under the effect of thermal noise. Recent works showed that despite their stochasticity, such junctions possess a capability to synchronize to subthreshold voltage drives, in a way that can be enhanced or controlled by adding noise. In this work, we investigate a system composed of two electrically coupled junctions, connected in series to a periodic voltage source. We make use of numerical simulations and of an analytical model to demonstrate that both junctions can be phase locked to the drive, in phase or in antiphase. This synchronization phenomenon can be controlled by both thermal and electrical noises, although the two types of noises induce qualitatively different behaviors. Namely, thermal noise can stabilize a regime where one junction is phase locked to the drive voltage while the other is blocked in one state; on the contrary, electrical noise causes the junctions to have highly correlated behaviors and thus cannot induce the latter. These results open the way for the design of superparamagnetic tunnel junctions that can perform computation through synchronization, and which harvest the largest part of their energy consumption from thermal noise.

  7. Noise-Induced Entrainment and Stochastic Resonance in Human Brain Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Toshio; Kai, Shoichi

    2002-05-01

    We present the first observation of stochastic resonance (SR) in the human brain's visual processing area. The novel experimental protocol is to stimulate the right eye with a subthreshold periodic optical signal and the left eye with a noisy one. The stimuli bypass sensory organs and are mixed in the visual cortex. With many noise sources present in the brain, higher brain functions, e.g., perception and cognition, may exploit SR.

  8. Electron concentrations calculated from the lower hybrid resonance noise band observed by Ogo 3.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burtis, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    A noise band at the lower hybrid resonance (LHR) is often detected by the VLF and ELF receivers on Ogo 3, using the electric antenna. In some cases the noise band is at the geometric mean gyrofrequency as measured by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) magnetometer, and local LHR in a dense H(+) plasma is indicated; in such cases, electron concentration can be calculated, if it is assumed that heavy ions are negligible. Observations at midlatitudes and altitudes of a few earth radii show local concentrations as low as 1.4 electrons/cu cm. In one case the concentrations obtained from the LHR noise band agree with those measured simultaneously by the GSFC ion mass spectrometer within a factor of 2. In another case the concentration is observed to fall by a factor of 2 in 150 km and then to decrease roughly as R to the minus fourth power, in agreement with whistler measurements outside the plasmapause.

  9. Study on the origin of 1/f noise in quartz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sthal, F.; Devel, M.; Imbaud, J.; Bourquin, R.; Ghosh, S.; Cibiel, G.

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic frequency fluctuations with a 1/f power spectral density limit the short-term stability in quartz crystal ultra-stable oscillators. The physical origin of this 1/f noise remains not clearly explained. In this paper, a review of an experimental study on numerous ultra-stable quartz crystal resonators is presented. A comparison with past measurements is given. A theoretical approach, based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, is used in order to put numerical constraints on a model of 1/f noise caused by an internal (or structural) dissipation proportional to the amplitude and not to the speed, in the limit of low frequencies. The order of the magnitude of the noise is then discussed using a candidate physical process. Comparisons between theoretical and experimental results show that internal damping of thickness fluctuations by any internal friction force proportional to strain and independent of frequency may not be the dominant noise mechanism for the best SC-cut quartz resonators. Finally, we conclude on the work that could be done to solve the remaining open problems.

  10. Comparison of the signal-to-noise characteristics of quantum versus thermal ghost imaging

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, Malcolm N.; Chan, Kam Wai Clifford; Boyd, Robert W.

    2010-11-15

    We present a theoretical comparison of the signal-to-noise characteristics of quantum versus thermal ghost imaging. We first calculate the signal-to-noise ratio of each process in terms of its controllable experimental conditions. We show that a key distinction is that a thermal ghost image always resides on top of a large background; the fluctuations in this background constitutes an intrinsic noise source for thermal ghost imaging. In contrast, there is a negligible intrinsic background to a quantum ghost image. However, for practical reasons involving achievable illumination levels, acquisition times for thermal ghost images are often much shorter than those for quantum ghost images. We provide quantitative predictions for the conditions under which each process provides superior performance. Our conclusion is that each process can provide useful functionality, although under complementary conditions.

  11. A review of the combined effects of thermal and noise conditions on human performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscoso, Richard A.; Wang, Lily M.; Musser, Amy

    2001-05-01

    Human perception and annoyance due to background noise has been the subject of much research. A great deal of work has also been done to identify conditions that produce an acceptable thermal environment for building occupants. The experience of occupants in indoor environments, however, is much more complex than can be represented by thermal comfort or the acoustic environment in isolation. Occupants normally experience a mix of thermal, auditory, visual, and olfactory stimuli that combines to form an impression of the environment. This paper is specifically interested in how building occupants trade off between acoustic and thermal comfort. Heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems in buildings are often adjusted by building users to arrive at a more comfortable temperature, but this change may also produce more noise. Previous studies on the interaction effects between temperature and noise on human performance are reviewed in this presentation, followed by a discussion of the authors' current work in this area.

  12. Low-noise Brillouin random fiber laser with a random grating-based resonator.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Gao, Song; Lu, Ping; Mihailov, Stephen; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2016-07-15

    A novel Brillouin random fiber laser (BRFL) with the random grating-based Fabry-Perot (FP) resonator is proposed and demonstrated. Significantly enhanced random feedback from the femtosecond laser-fabricated random grating overwhelms the Rayleigh backscattering, which leads to efficient Brillouin gain for the lasing modes and reduced lasing threshold. Compared to the intensity and frequency noises of the Rayleigh feedback resonator, those of the proposed random laser are effectively suppressed due to the reduced resonating modes and mode competition resulting from the random grating-formed filters. Using the heterodyne technique, the linewidth of the coherent random lasing spike is measured to be ∼45.8  Hz. PMID:27420494

  13. Noise-resilient multi-frequency surface sensor for nuclear quadrupole resonance.

    PubMed

    Peshkovsky, A S; Cattena, C J; Cerioni, L M; Osán, T M; Forguez, J G; Peresson, W J; Pusiol, D J

    2008-10-01

    A planar nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) sensor has been developed. The sensor is resilient to environmental noise and is capable of simultaneous independent multi-frequency operation. The device was constructed as an open multimodal birdcage structure, in which the higher modes, generally not used in magnetic resonance, are utilized for NQR detection. These modes have smooth distributions of the amplitudes of the corresponding radiofrequency magnetic fields everywhere along the sensor's surface. The phases of the fields, on the other hand, are cyclically shifted across the sensor's surface. Noise signals coming from distant sources, therefore, induce equal-magnitude cyclically phase-shifted currents in different parts of the sensor. When such cyclically phase-shifted currents arrive at the mode connection point, they destructively interfere with each other and are cancelled out. NQR signals of polycrystalline or disordered substances, however, are efficiently detected by these modes because they are insensitive to the phases of the excitation/detection. No blind spots exist along the sensor's surface. The sensor can be used for simultaneous detection of one or more substances in locations with environmental noise.

  14. Stochastic resonance in an ensemble of bistable systems under stable distribution noises and nonhomogeneous coupling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yang; Zou, Wei; Lu, Jianquan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, stochastic resonance of an ensemble of coupled bistable systems driven by noise having an α-stable distribution and nonhomogeneous coupling is investigated. The α-stable distribution considered here is characterized by four intrinsic parameters: α∈(0,2] is called the stability parameter for describing the asymptotic behavior of stable densities; β∈[-1,1] is a skewness parameter for measuring asymmetry; γ∈(0,∞) is a scale parameter for measuring the width of the distribution; and δ∈(-∞,∞) is a location parameter for representing the mean value. It is demonstrated that the resonant behavior is optimized by an intermediate value of the diversity in coupling strengths. We show that the stability parameter α and the scale parameter γ can be well selected to generate resonant effects in response to external signals. In addition, the interplay between the skewness parameter β and the location parameter δ on the resonance effects is also studied. We further show that the asymmetry of a Lévy α-stable distribution resulting from the skewness parameter β and the location parameter δ can enhance the resonance effects. Both theoretical analysis and simulation are presented to verify the results of this paper. PMID:22680556

  15. Adaptive Helmholtz resonators and passive vibration absorbers for cylinder interior noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estève, Simon J.; Johnson, Marty E.

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents an adaptive-passive solution to control the broadband sound transmission into rocket payload fairings. The treatment is composed of passive distributed vibration absorbers (DVAs) and adaptive Helmholtz resonators (HR). Both the frequency domain and time-domain model of a simply supported cylinder excited by an external plane wave are developed. To tune vibration absorbers to tonal excitation, a tuning strategy, based on the phase information between the velocity of the absorber mass and the velocity of the host structure is used here in a new fashion to tune resonators to peaks in the broadband acoustic spectrum of a cavity. This tuning law, called the dot-product method, only uses two microphone signals local to each HR, which allows the adaptive Helmholtz resonator (AHR) to be manufactured as an autonomous device with power supply, sensor, actuator and controller integrated. Numerical simulations corresponding to a 2.8 m long 2.5 m diameter composite cylinder prototype demonstrate that, as long as the structure modes, which strongly couple to the acoustic cavity, are damped with a DVA treatment, the dot-product method tune multiple HRs to a near-optimal solution over a broad frequency range (40-160 Hz). An adaptive HR prototype with variable opening is built and characterized. Experiments conducted on the cylinder prototype with eight AHRs demonstrate the ability of resonators adapted with the dot-product method to converge to near-optimal noise attenuation in a frequency band including multiple resonances.

  16. Modified Skvor/Starr approach in the mechanical-thermal noise analysis of condenser microphone.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chee Wee; Miao, Jianmin

    2009-11-01

    Simple analytical expressions of mechanical resistance, such as those formulated by Skvor/Starr, are widely used to describe the mechanical-thermal noise performance of a condenser microphone. However, the Skvor/Starr approach does not consider the location effect of acoustic holes in the backplate and overestimates the total equivalent mechanical resistance and mechanical-thermal noise. In this paper, a modified form of the Skvor/Starr approach is proposed to address this hole location dependent effect. A mode shape factor, which consists of the zero order Bessel and modified Bessel functions, is included in Skvor's mechanical resistance formulation to consider the effect of the hole location in the backplate. With reference to two B&K microphones, the theoretical results of the A-weighted mechanical-thermal noise obtained by the modified Skvor/Starr approach are in good agreements with those reported experimental ones.

  17. Modified Skvor/Starr approach in the mechanical-thermal noise analysis of condenser microphone.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chee Wee; Miao, Jianmin

    2009-11-01

    Simple analytical expressions of mechanical resistance, such as those formulated by Skvor/Starr, are widely used to describe the mechanical-thermal noise performance of a condenser microphone. However, the Skvor/Starr approach does not consider the location effect of acoustic holes in the backplate and overestimates the total equivalent mechanical resistance and mechanical-thermal noise. In this paper, a modified form of the Skvor/Starr approach is proposed to address this hole location dependent effect. A mode shape factor, which consists of the zero order Bessel and modified Bessel functions, is included in Skvor's mechanical resistance formulation to consider the effect of the hole location in the backplate. With reference to two B&K microphones, the theoretical results of the A-weighted mechanical-thermal noise obtained by the modified Skvor/Starr approach are in good agreements with those reported experimental ones. PMID:19894812

  18. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to 'internal photons' inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350-700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation.

  19. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to ‘internal photons’ inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350–700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation. PMID:26950936

  20. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to 'internal photons' inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350-700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation. PMID:26950936

  1. The effect of magnetic resonance imaging noise on cochlear function in dogs.

    PubMed

    Venn, R E; McBrearty, A R; McKeegan, D; Penderis, J

    2014-10-01

    Noise produced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners (which can peak at a sound pressure level of 131 dB) has been shown to cause noise-induced cochlear dysfunction in people. The aim of this study was to investigate whether noise produced during MRI had a deleterious effect on cochlear function in dogs, using distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) testing, which allows frequency specific, non-invasive assessment of cochlear function. DPOAE testing was performed before and after MRI in one or both ears under general anaesthesia at 14 frequency pairs (f2 frequency ranging from 0.84 kHz to 8.0 kHz). A control group comprised dogs undergoing anaesthesia of a similar duration for quiet procedures. Thirty-six dogs (66 ears) and 17 dogs (28 ears) were included in the MRI and control groups respectively. There was a reduction in DPOAE at all frequencies tested in the MRI group; a similar effect was not evident in the control group. This reduction in the MRI group was statistically significant in five of the 14 frequencies assessed (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that exposure to MRI noise results in a significant reduction in frequency-specific cochlear function in dogs, although it is not known whether this is reversible or permanent. This suggests that all dogs undergoing MRI studies should be provided with ear protection as a routine precautionary measure.

  2. A new multiscale noise tuning stochastic resonance for enhanced fault diagnosis in wind turbine drivetrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bingbing; Li, Bing

    2016-02-01

    It is very difficult to detect weak fault signatures due to the large amount of noise in a wind turbine system. Multiscale noise tuning stochastic resonance (MSTSR) has proved to be an effective way to extract weak signals buried in strong noise. However, the MSTSR method originally based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has disadvantages such as shift variance and the aliasing effects in engineering application. In this paper, the dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT) is introduced into the MSTSR method, which makes it possible to further improve the system output signal-to-noise ratio and the accuracy of fault diagnosis by the merits of DTCWT (nearly shift invariant and reduced aliasing effects). Moreover, this method utilizes the relationship between the two dual-tree wavelet basis functions, instead of matching the single wavelet basis function to the signal being analyzed, which may speed up the signal processing and be employed in on-line engineering monitoring. The proposed method is applied to the analysis of bearing outer ring and shaft coupling vibration signals carrying fault information. The results confirm that the method performs better in extracting the fault features than the original DWT-based MSTSR, the wavelet transform with post spectral analysis, and EMD-based spectral analysis methods.

  3. Stochastic resonance in a tumor-immune system subject to bounded noises and time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most recent approaches in cancer therapy. A mathematical model of tumor-immune interaction, subject to a periodic immunotherapy treatment (imitated by a periodic signal), correlative and bounded stochastic fluctuations and time delays, is investigated by numerical simulations for its signal power amplification (SPA). Within the tailored parameter regime, the synchronous response of tumor growth to the immunotherapy, stochastic resonance (SR), versus both the noises and delays is obtained. The details are as follows (i) the peak values of SPA versus the noise intensity (A) in the proliferation term of tumor cells decrease as the frequency of periodic signal increases, i.e. an increase of the frequency restrains the SR; (ii) an increase of the amplitude of periodic signal restrains the SR versus A, but boosts up the SR versus the noise intensity B in the immune term; (iii) there is an optimum cross-correlated degree between the two bounded noises, at which the system exhibits the strongest SR versus the delay time τα(the reaction time of tumor cell population to their surrounding environment constraints); (iv) upon increasing the delay time τα, double SR versus the delay time τβ (the time taken by both the tumor antigen identification and tumor-stimulated proliferation of effectors) emerges. These results may be helpful for an immunotherapy treatment for the sufferer.

  4. Temperature-depended mechanical properties of microfabricated vanadium oxide mechanical resonators for thermal sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Naoki; Pan, Libao; Toda, Masaya; Ono, Takahito

    2016-03-01

    This study describes our newly fabricated resonant thermal sensors based on vanadium oxide and investigates the temperature dependences of their resonant frequencies and Q factor. The suspended vanadium oxide resonators are microfabricated using Au or SiO2 as the sacrificial layer. The resonant frequency of the fabricated vanadium oxide resonators linearly varies with temperature, and the value of temperature coefficient of the resonant frequency is -1308 ppm/K in the range of 20-100 °C. The averaged Q factor in this range was 540. The temperature and thermal resolution of the vanadium oxide resonator are estimated as 1.7 mK/\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}} and 4.3 nW/\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}} , respectively, which are higher than those of a Si resonator having similar dimensions and under similar conditions. Therefore, the feasibility that vanadium oxide is a promising material for resonant thermal sensors is indicated.

  5. Stochastic resonance and stability for a stochastic metapopulation system subjected to non-Gaussian noise and multiplicative periodic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang-Kang, Wang; Xian-Bin, Liu; Yu, Zhou

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the stability and stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon induced by the multiplicative periodic signal for a metapopulation system driven by the additive Gaussian noise, multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and noise correlation time is investigated. By using the fast descent method, unified colored noise approximation and McNamara and Wiesenfeld’s SR theory, the analytical expressions of the stationary probability distribution function and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are derived in the adiabatic limit. Via numerical calculations, each effect of the addictive noise intensity, the multiplicative noise intensity and the correlation time upon the steady state probability distribution function and the SNR is discussed, respectively. It is shown that multiplicative, additive noises and the departure parameter from the Gaussian noise can all destroy the stability of the population system. However, the noise correlation time can consolidate the stability of the system. On the other hand, the correlation time always plays an important role in motivating the SR and enhancing the SNR. Under different parameter conditions of the system, the multiplicative, additive noises and the departure parameter can not only excite SR phenomenon, but also restrain the SR phenomenon, which demonstrates the complexity of different noises upon the nonlinear system.

  6. Magnetic-resonance-guided directional transurethral ultrasound thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Anthony; Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Tyreus, Per Daniel; Gill, Harchi; Bouley, Donna; Butts, R. K.; Rieke, Viola; Daniel, Bruce; Sommer, Graham

    2003-06-01

    Two catheter-based transurethral ultrasound applicators designed for selective thermal coagulation of prostate tissue were evaluated. The first applicator utilized two 3.5 mm piezoelectric sectored tubes with the active transducer surface forming 90°. The second applicator's transducer assembly consisted of a linear array of 3.5 x 10 mm planar transducer elements. Both applicators operated at 8 MHz and were positioned on a 4 mm diameter catheter within an integrated expandable balloon (10 mm). Manual rotation of the transducer assembly within the balloon allowed for angular control and/or sweeping of the treatment volume. Ambient temperature degassed cooling water (~120 ml/min) was circulated inside the balloon to preserve the urethral mucosa. Acoustic efficiencies of 20-54% and acoustic beam distributions were measured. The thermal treatment characteristics of the applicator were investigated in vivo (canine prostate) under MRI guidance in an interventional open magnet (0.5 T). Magnetic resonance thermal imaging (MRTI) monitored the treatments (GRE phase mapping, multiple planes, 15 sec update intervals). Post-treatment imaging (T1 w/contrast) and TTC staining of the prostate were used to verify zones of thermal damage. Single sonications lasting 8-15 min produced coagulated zones of tissue extending to the outer boundary of the prostate while preserving 2-3 mm of urethral mucosa. Multiple sonications in sequence produced larger contiguous sectors of coagulated tissue (~ 3/4 of the gland). In summary, highly directional transurethral applicators under MRI guidance were able to produce selective and controllable thermal coagulation.

  7. Reducing the Effects of Background Noise during Auditory Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Speech Processing: Qualitative and Quantitative Comparisons between Two Image Acquisition Schemes and Noise Cancellation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Graham A.; Hall, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The intense sound generated during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) complicates studies of speech and hearing. This experiment evaluated the benefits of using active noise cancellation (ANC), which attenuates the level of the scanner sound at the participant's ear by up to 35 dB around the peak at 600 Hz. Method: Speech and…

  8. Coherent population trapping resonances in the presence of the frequency-phase noises of an exciting field

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A V; Matveev, A N; Samokotin, A Yu; Akimov, A V; Sorokin, Vadim N; Kolachevsky, Nikolai N

    2009-05-31

    The influence of noises of the frequency and phase difference of an exciting bichromatic field on the parameters of coherent population trapping resonances is studied experimentally. When the phase difference fluctuates within a limited interval near its average value with a short correlation time, the resonance contrast decreases proportionally to exp({phi}{sup 2}{sub rms}), where {phi}{sup 2}{sub rms} is the phase dispersion (in rad{sup 2}). In this case, the spectral width of the resonance remains constant. In another limiting case, when the phase noise has a long correlation time, the resonance contour broadens, the area under the contour being invariable. Experiments were performed with the Zeeman sublevels of the ground state of {sup 87}Rb by exciting rubidium vapour in a glass cell at the resonance wavelength of 795 nm. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  9. Thermal and athermal crackling noise in ferroelastic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z; Ding, X; Sun, J; Salje, E K H

    2014-04-01

    The evolution of ferroelastic microstructures under external shear is determined by large-scale molecular dynamics simulations in two and three dimensions. Ferroelastic pattern formation was found to be almost identical in two and three dimensions, with only the ferroelastic transition temperature changing. The twin patterns generated by shear deformation depend strongly on temperature, with high wall densities nucleating under optimized temperature conditions. The dynamical tweed and mobile kink movement inside the twin walls is continuous and thermally activated at high temperatures, and becomes jerky and athermal at low temperatures. With decreasing temperature, the statistical distributions of dynamical tweed and kinks vary from a Vogel-Fulcher law P(E)~exp-(E/(T-TVF)) to an athermal power-law distribution P(E)~E-E. During the yield event, the nucleation of needles and kinks is always jerky, and the energy of the jerks is power-law distributed. Low-temperature yield proceeds via one large avalanche. With increasing temperature, the large avalanche is thermally broken up into a multitude of small segments. The power-law exponents reflect the changes in temperature, even in the athermal regime. PMID:24651403

  10. A transformed analytical model for thermal noise of FinFET based on fringing field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhulika Sharma, Savitesh; Dasgupta, S.; Kartikeyant, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    This paper delineates the effect of nonplanar structure of FinFETs on noise performance. We demonstrate the thermal noise analytical model that has been inferred by taking into account the presence of an additional inverted region in the extended (underlap) S/D region due to finite gate electrode thickness. Noise investigation includes the effects of source drain resistances which become significant as channel length becomes shorter. In this paper, we evaluate the additional noise caused by three dimensional (3-D) structure of the single fin device and then extended analysis of the multi-fin and multi-fingers structure. The addition of fringe field increases its minimum noise figure and noise resistance of approximately 1 dB and 100 Ω respectively and optimum admittance increases to 5.45 mƱ at 20 GHz for a device operating under saturation region. Hence, our transformed model plays a significant function in evaluation of accurate noise performance at circuit level. Project supported in part by the All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE).

  11. Effect of thermal noise on vesicles and capsules in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Abreu, David; Seifert, Udo

    2012-07-01

    We add thermal noise consistently to reduced models of undeformable vesicles and capsules in shear flow and derive analytically the corresponding stochastic equations of motion. We calculate the steady-state probability distribution function and construct the corresponding phase diagrams for the different dynamical regimes. For fluid vesicles, we predict that at small shear rates thermal fluctuations induce a tumbling motion for any viscosity contrast. For elastic capsules, due to thermal mixing, an intermittent regime appears in regions where deterministic models predict only pure tank treading or tumbling. PMID:23005361

  12. Thermal Noise Reduction of Mechanical Oscillators by Actively Controlled External Dissipative Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan; Medich, David; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Sheng, Sitong; Yuan, Jian-Yang; Shao, Zhifeng

    1999-01-01

    We show that the thermal fluctuations of very soft mechanical oscillators, such as the cantilever in an atomic force microscope (AFM), can be reduced without changing the stiffness of the spring or having to lower the environment temperature. We derive a theoretical relationship between the thermal fluctuations of an oscillator and an actively external-dissipative force. This relationship is verified by experiments with an AFM cantilever where the external active force is coupled through a magnetic field. With simple instrumentation, we have reduced the thermal noise amplitude of the cantilever by a factor of 3.4, achieving an apparent temperature of 25 K with the environment at 295K. This active noise reduction approach can significantly improve the accuracy of static position or static force measurements in a number of practical applications.

  13. Thermal Noise Limit in Frequency Stabilization of Lasers with Rigid Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity Used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with the direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency-reference cavity of order 1 Hz/rtHz at 10mHz at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results.

  14. Thermal Noise Limit in Frequency Stabilization of Lasers with Rigid Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with t.he direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency- reference cavity of order 1 Hz/square root Hz(0.01 Hz/square root Hz) at 10 mHz (100 Hz) at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results.

  15. Thermal-noise limit in the frequency stabilization of lasers with rigid cavities.

    PubMed

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2004-12-17

    We evaluate thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with the direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency-reference cavity of order 1 Hz/ square root Hz (0.01 Hz/ square root Hz) at 10 mHz (100 Hz) at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results. PMID:15697887

  16. Waterborne noise due to ocean thermal energy conversion plants. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Janota, C.P.; Thompson, D.E.

    1982-06-17

    Public law reflects a United States national commitment to the rapid development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) as an alternate energy source. OTEC plants extract the stored solar energy from the world's tropical seas and in so doing pose a potential for altering the character of the ambient noise there. The sources of noise from an OTEC plant are analyzed in the context of four configurations, two of which were built and tested, and two which are concepts for future full-scale moored facilities. The analysis indicates that the noise resulting from the interaction of turbulence with the sea-water pumps is expected to dominate in the frequency range 10 Hz to 1 kHZ. Measured radiated noise data from the OTEC-I research plant, located near the island of Hawaii, are compared with the analysis. The measured data diverge from the predicted levels at frequencies above about 60 Hz because of dominant non-OTEC noise sources on this platform. However, at low frequency, the measured broadband noise is comparable to that predicted.

  17. Stacked phased array coils for increasing the signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dandan Liang; Hon Tat Hui; Tat Soon Yeo; Bing Keong Li

    2013-02-01

    A new concept of using a stacked phased coil array to increase the signal-to-circuit noise ratio (SCNR) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is introduced. Unlike conventional phased coil arrays, the proposed stacked phased coil array is constructed by stacking the coil elements closely together in the vertical direction. Through a proper combination of the coil terminal voltages, the SCNR is shown to increase with the square root of the number of coil elements. A prototype two-element array is constructed and an experimental method is designed to determine the combiner coefficients in a simulated MRI electromagnetic field environment. The experimental results show that the mutual coupling effect among the array coils can be totally removed and the combiner output voltage increases with the number of coil elements. This demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed method.

  18. Noise-improved signal detection in cat primary visual cortex via a well-balanced stochastic resonance-like procedure.

    PubMed

    Funke, Klaus; Kerscher, Nicolas J; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2007-09-01

    Adding noise to a weak signal can paradoxically improve signal detection, a process called 'stochastic resonance' (SR). In the visual system, noise might be introduced by the image jitter resulting from high-frequency eye movements, like eye microtremor and microsaccades. To test whether this kind of noise might be beneficial or detrimental for cortical signal detection, we performed single-unit recordings from area 17 of anaesthetized cats while jittering the visual stimulus in a frequency and amplitude range resembling the possible range of eye movements. We used weak, sub- and peri-threshold visual stimuli, on top of which we superimposed noise with variable jitter amplitude. In accordance with the typical SR effect, we found that small noise levels actually increased the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of previously weak cortical visual responses, while originally strong responses were little affected or even reduced. Above a certain noise level, the SNR dropped a little, but not as a result of increased background activity - as would be proposed by SR theory - but because of a lowered response to signal and noise. Therefore, it seems that the ascending visual pathway optimally utilizes signal detection improvement by a SR-like process, while at the same time preventing spurious noise-induced activity and keeping the SNR sufficiently high.

  19. Thermo-optically tuned photonic resonators with concurrent electrical connection and thermal isolation

    DOEpatents

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Kekatpure, Rohan Deodatta; Zortman, William A.; Savignon, Daniel J.

    2016-06-14

    A photonic resonator system is designed to use thermal tuning to adjust the resonant wavelength of each resonator in the system, with a separate tuning circuit associated with each resonator so that individual adjustments may be made. The common electrical ground connection between the tuning circuits is particularly formed to provide thermal isolation between adjacent resonators by including a capacitor along each return path to ground, where the presence of the capacitor's dielectric material provides the thermal isolation. The use of capacitively coupling necessarily requires the use of an AC current as an input to the heater element (conductor/resistor) of each resonator, where the RMS value of the AC signal is indicative of the amount of heat that is generated along the element and the degree of wavelength tuning that is obtained.

  20. A digital accelerometer array utilizing suprathreshold stochastic resonance for detection of sub-Brownian noise floor accelerations.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Dustin Wade; Olsson, Roy H.

    2004-12-01

    The goal of this LDRD project was to evaluate the possibilities of utilizing Stochastic resonance in micromechanical sensor systems as a means for increasing signal to noise for physical sensors. A careful study of this field reveals that in the case of a single sensing element, stochastic resonance offers no real advantage. We have, however, identified a system that can utilize very similar concepts to stochastic resonance in order to achieve an arrayed sensor system that could be superior to existing technologies in the field of inertial sensors, and could offer a very low power technique for achieving navigation grade inertial measurement units.

  1. A signal filtering method for improved quantification and noise discrimination in fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Payne, Tristan G; Southam, Andrew D; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Viant, Mark R

    2009-06-01

    Direct-infusion electrospray-ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (DI ESI FT-ICR MS) is increasingly being utilized in metabolomics, including the high sensitivity selected ion monitoring (SIM)-stitching approach. Accurate signal quantification and the discrimination of real signals from noise remain major challenges for this approach, with both adversely affected by factors including ion suppression during electrospray, ion-ion interactions in the detector cell, and thermally-induced white noise. This is particularly problematic for complex mixture analysis where hundreds of metabolites are present near the noise level. Here we address relative signal quantification and noise discrimination issues in SIM-stitched DI ESI FT-ICR MS-based metabolomics. Using liver tissue, we first optimized the number of scans (n) acquired per SIM window to address the balance between quantification accuracy versus acquisition time (and thus sample throughput); a minimum of n = 5 is recommended. Secondly, we characterized and computationally-corrected an effect whereby an ion's intensity is dependent upon its location within a SIM window, exhibiting a 3-fold higher intensity at the high m/z end. This resulted in significantly improved quantification accuracy. Finally, we thoroughly characterized a three-stage filter to discriminate noise from real signals, which comprised a signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) hard threshold, then a "replicate" filter (retaining only peaks in r-out-of-3 replicate analyses), and then a "sample" filter (retaining only peaks in >s% of biological samples). We document the benefits of three-stage filtering versus one- and two-stage filters, and show the importance of selecting filter parameters that balance the confidence that a signal is real versus the total number of peaks detected.

  2. Joint application of a statistical optimization process and Empirical Mode Decomposition to Magnetic Resonance Sounding Noise Cancelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanati, Reza; Fallahsafari, Mahdi; Hafizi, Mohammad Kazem

    2014-12-01

    The signal quality of Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS) measurements is a crucial criterion. The accuracy of the estimation of the signal parameters (i.e. E0 and T2*) strongly depends on amplitude and conditions of ambient electromagnetic interferences at the site of investigation. In this paper, in order to enhance the performance in the noisy environments, a two-step noise cancelation approach based on the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and a statistical method is proposed. In the first stage, the noisy signal is adaptively decomposed into intrinsic oscillatory components called intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by means of the EMD algorithm. Afterwards based on an automatic procedure the noisy IMFs are detected, and then the partly de-noised signal is reconstructed through the no-noise IMFs. In the second stage, the signal obtained from the initial section enters an optimization process to cancel the remnant noise, and consequently, estimate the signal parameters. The strategy is tested on a synthetic MRS signal contaminated with Gaussian noise, spiky events and harmonic noise, and on real data. By applying successively the proposed steps, we can remove the noise from the signal to a high extent and the performance indexes, particularly signal to noise ratio, will increase significantly.

  3. Study of thermal and acoustic noise interferences in low stiffness atomic force microscope cantilevers and characterization of their dynamic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Boudaoud, Mokrane; Haddab, Yassine; Le Gorrec, Yann; Lutz, Philippe

    2012-01-15

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool for the measurement of forces at the micro/nano scale when calibrated cantilevers are used. Besides many existing calibration techniques, the thermal calibration is one of the simplest and fastest methods for the dynamic characterization of an AFM cantilever. This method is efficient provided that the Brownian motion (thermal noise) is the most important source of excitation during the calibration process. Otherwise, the value of spring constant is underestimated. This paper investigates noise interference ranges in low stiffness AFM cantilevers taking into account thermal fluctuations and acoustic pressures as two main sources of noise. As a result, a preliminary knowledge about the conditions in which thermal fluctuations and acoustic pressures have closely the same effect on the AFM cantilever (noise interference) is provided with both theoretical and experimental arguments. Consequently, beyond the noise interference range, commercial low stiffness AFM cantilevers are calibrated in two ways: using the thermal noise (in a wide temperature range) and acoustic pressures generated by a loudspeaker. We then demonstrate that acoustic noises can also be used for an efficient characterization and calibration of low stiffness AFM cantilevers. The accuracy of the acoustic characterization is evaluated by comparison with results from the thermal calibration.

  4. Study of thermal and acoustic noise interferences in low stiffness atomic force microscope cantilevers and characterization of their dynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Boudaoud, Mokrane; Haddab, Yassine; Le Gorrec, Yann; Lutz, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool for the measurement of forces at the micro/nano scale when calibrated cantilevers are used. Besides many existing calibration techniques, the thermal calibration is one of the simplest and fastest methods for the dynamic characterization of an AFM cantilever. This method is efficient provided that the Brownian motion (thermal noise) is the most important source of excitation during the calibration process. Otherwise, the value of spring constant is underestimated. This paper investigates noise interference ranges in low stiffness AFM cantilevers taking into account thermal fluctuations and acoustic pressures as two main sources of noise. As a result, a preliminary knowledge about the conditions in which thermal fluctuations and acoustic pressures have closely the same effect on the AFM cantilever (noise interference) is provided with both theoretical and experimental arguments. Consequently, beyond the noise interference range, commercial low stiffness AFM cantilevers are calibrated in two ways: using the thermal noise (in a wide temperature range) and acoustic pressures generated by a loudspeaker. We then demonstrate that acoustic noises can also be used for an efficient characterization and calibration of low stiffness AFM cantilevers. The accuracy of the acoustic characterization is evaluated by comparison with results from the thermal calibration.

  5. Thermal-wave resonator cavity design and measurements of the thermal diffusivity of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Mandelis, A.; Garcia, J. A.

    2000-07-01

    A liquid-ambient-compatible thermal wave resonant cavity (TWRC) has been constructed for the measurement of the thermal diffusivity of liquids. The thermal diffusivities of distilled water, glycerol, ethylene glycol, and olive oil were determined at room temperature (25 °C), with four-significant-figure precision as follows: (0.1445±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (distilled water); (0.0922±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (glycerol); (0.0918±0.0002)×10-2 cm2/s (ethylene glycol); and (0.0881±0.0004)×10-2 cm2/s (olive oil). The liquid-state TWRC sensor was found to be highly sensitive to various mixtures of methanol and salt in distilled water with sensitivity limits 0.5% (v/v) and 0.03% (w/v), respectively. The use of the TWRC to measure gas evolution from liquids and its potential for environmental applications has also been demonstrated.

  6. Electrically Isolating Thermally Coupled Device for Noise Suppression of Circuits in Deep Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantooth, A.; McNutt, T.; Mojarradi, M.; Li, H.; Blalock, B.

    2001-01-01

    Mixed mode rad hard avionics Systems on a Chip (SoC) designed for deep space applications such as Europa orbiters and Europa Landers will require data isolation circuits to block noise. This paper presents the simulation performance for a novel rad hard SOI CMOS compatible thermal transducer used for on-chip data isolation in SoC. The research presented involves the use of commercially available computer aided design tools to model the transient electrothermal behavior of the transducer. Both one- and two-dimensional analyses of a prototype thermal transducer were performed. Results indicate that thermal-based data isolator technology can pass a data bit in under a microsecond and, as a measurement of feasibility, I2C bus specifications can be met.

  7. Diurnal variations of ELF transients and background noise in the Schumann resonance band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Eran; Price, Colin

    2007-02-01

    Schumann resonances (SR) are resonant electromagnetic waves in the Earth-ionosphere cavity, induced primarily by lightning discharges, with a fundamental frequency of about 8 Hz and higher-order modes separated by approximately 6 Hz. The SR are made up of the background signal resulting from global lightning activity and extremely low frequency (ELF) transients resulting from particularly intense lightning discharges somewhere on the planet. Since transients within the Earth-ionosphere cavity due to lightning propagate globally in the ELF range, we can monitor and study global ELF transients from a single station. Data from our Negev Desert (Israel) ELF site are collected using two horizontal magnetic induction coils and a vertical electric field ball antenna, monitored in the 5-40 Hz range with a sampling frequency of 250 Hz. In this paper we present statistics related to the probability distribution of ELF transients and background noise in the time domain and its temporal variations during the day. Our results show that the ELF signal in the time domain follows the normal distribution very well. The σ parameter exhibits three peaks at 0800, 1400, and 2000 UT, which are related to the three main global lightning activity centers in Asia, Africa, and America, respectively. Furthermore, the occurrence of intense ELF events obeys the Poisson distribution, with such intense events occurring every ~10 s, depending on the time of the day. We found that the diurnal changes of the σ parameter are several percent of the mean, while for the number of intense events per minute, the diurnal changes are tens of percent about the mean. We also present the diurnal changes of the SR intensities in the frequency domain as observed at our station. To better understand the diurnal variability of the observations, we simulated the measured ELF background noise using space observations as input, as detected by the Optical Transient Detector (OTD). The most active center which is

  8. A joint resonance frequency estimation and in-band noise reduction method for enhancing the detectability of bearing fault signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozchalooi, I. Soltani; Liang, Ming

    2008-05-01

    The vibration signal measured from a bearing contains vital information for the prognostic and health assessment purposes. However, when bearings are installed as part of a complex mechanical system, the measured signal is often heavily clouded by various noises due to the compounded effect of interferences of other machine elements and background noises present in the measuring device. As such, reliable condition monitoring would not be possible without proper de-noising. This is particularly true for incipient bearing faults with very weak signature signals. A new de-noising scheme is proposed in this paper to enhance the vibration signals acquired from faulty bearings. This de-noising scheme features a spectral subtraction to trim down the in-band noise prior to wavelet filtering. The Gabor wavelet is used in the wavelet transform and its parameters, i.e., scale and shape factor are selected in separate steps. The proper scale is found based on a novel resonance estimation algorithm. This algorithm makes use of the information derived from the variable shaft rotational speed though such variation is highly undesirable in fault detection since it complicates the process substantially. The shape factor value is then selected by minimizing a smoothness index. This index is defined as the ratio of the geometric mean to the arithmetic mean of the wavelet coefficient moduli. De-noising results are presented for simulated signals and experimental data acquired from both normal and faulty bearings with defective outer race, inner race, and rolling element.

  9. Feasibility study of noise analysis methods on virtual thermal reactor subcriticality monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, C.; Lee, D.; Lee, E.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the analysis results of Rossi-alpha, cross-correlation, Feynman-alpha, and Feynman difference methods applied to the subcriticality monitoring of nuclear reactors. A thermal spectrum Godiva model has been designed for the analysis of the four methods. This Godiva geometry consists of a spherical core containing the isotopes of H-l, U-235 and U-238, and the H{sub 2}O reflector outside the core. A Monte Carlo code, McCARD, is used in real time mode to generate virtual detector signals to analyze the feasibility of the four methods. The analysis results indicate that the four methods can be used with high accuracy for the continuous monitoring of subcriticality. In addition to that, in order to analyze the impact of the random noise contamination on the accuracy of the noise analysis, the McCARD-generated signals are contaminated with arbitrary noise. It is noticed that, even when the detector signals are contaminated, the four methods can predict the subcriticality with reasonable accuracy. Nonetheless, in order to reduce the adverse impact of the random noise, eight detector signals, rather than a single signal, are generated from the core, one signal from each equally divided eighth part of the core. The preliminary analysis with multiple virtual detector signals indicates that the approach of using many detectors is promising to improve the accuracy of criticality prediction and further study will be performed in this regard. (authors)

  10. Analytical estimation of ultrasound properties, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, C. R.; Borasi, G.; Payne, A.

    2016-01-01

    For thermal modeling to play a significant role in treatment planning, monitoring, and control of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal therapies, accurate knowledge of ultrasound and thermal properties is essential. This study develops a new analytical solution for the temperature change observed in MRgFUS which can be used with experimental MR temperature data to provide estimates of the ultrasound initial heating rate, Gaussian beam variance, tissue thermal diffusivity, and Pennes perfusion parameter. Simulations demonstrate that this technique provides accurate and robust property estimates that are independent of the beam size, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion levels in the presence of realistic MR noise. The technique is also demonstrated in vivo using MRgFUS heating data in rabbit back muscle. Errors in property estimates are kept less than 5% by applying a third order Taylor series approximation of the perfusion term and ensuring the ratio of the fitting time (the duration of experimental data utilized for optimization) to the perfusion time constant remains less than one.

  11. Analytical estimation of ultrasound properties, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound temperature data.

    PubMed

    Dillon, C R; Borasi, G; Payne, A

    2016-01-21

    For thermal modeling to play a significant role in treatment planning, monitoring, and control of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal therapies, accurate knowledge of ultrasound and thermal properties is essential. This study develops a new analytical solution for the temperature change observed in MRgFUS which can be used with experimental MR temperature data to provide estimates of the ultrasound initial heating rate, Gaussian beam variance, tissue thermal diffusivity, and Pennes perfusion parameter. Simulations demonstrate that this technique provides accurate and robust property estimates that are independent of the beam size, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion levels in the presence of realistic MR noise. The technique is also demonstrated in vivo using MRgFUS heating data in rabbit back muscle. Errors in property estimates are kept less than 5% by applying a third order Taylor series approximation of the perfusion term and ensuring the ratio of the fitting time (the duration of experimental data utilized for optimization) to the perfusion time constant remains less than one. PMID:26741344

  12. Optical Resonance Shifts in the Fluorescence of Thermal and Cold Atomic Gases.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, S D; Ruostekoski, J; Javanainen, J; Bourgain, R; Jennewein, S; Sortais, Y R P; Browaeys, A

    2016-05-01

    We show that the resonance shifts in the fluorescence of a cold gas of rubidium atoms substantially differ from those of thermal atomic ensembles that obey the standard continuous medium electrodynamics. The analysis is based on large-scale microscopic numerical simulations and experimental measurements of the resonance shifts in a steady-state response in light propagation. PMID:27203321

  13. Noise-induced suppression of nonlinear distortions in a bistable system with biharmonic excitation in vibrational resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhevsky, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    This paper is a report of the experimental evidence of suppression of vibrational higher-order harmonics in a bistable vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser driven by two harmonic signals with very different frequencies in the phenomenon of vibrational resonance when an optimal amount of white, Gaussian noise is applied. A quantitative characterization of the suppression is given on the basis of the coefficient of nonlinear distortions. The behavior of the coefficient of nonlinear distortions is studied in wide ranges of the added noise intensity, the dc current, and the amplitude of the harmonic signals. The experimental results are compared with a numerical simulation of a Langevin model showing good agreement.

  14. Brownian Thermal Noise in Interferometric Gravitational Wave Detectors and Single Photon Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ting

    The Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is designed to detect the Gravitational Waves (GW) predicted by Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The advanced LIGO project is ongoing an upgrade to increase the detection sensitivity by more than a factor of 10, which will make the events detection a routine occurrence. In addition to using higher power lasers, heavier test mass, and better isolation systems, several new designs and techniques are proposed in the long-term upgrade, such as modifying the optics configuration to reduce the quantum noise, active noise cancellation of the Newtonian noise, optimizing the coating structure, and employing non-Guassian laser beams etc. In the first part of my thesis (Chapters 2 and 3), I apply statistical mechanics and elastostatics to the LIGO coated mirrors, and study the thermal fluctuations that dominate advanced LIGO's most sensitive frequency band from 40 Hz to 200 Hz. In particular, in Chapter 2, I study the so-called coating Brownian noise, fluctuations of mirrors coated with multiple layers of dielectrics due to internal friction. Assuming coating materials to be isotropic and homogeneous, I calculate the cross spectra of Brownian fluctuations in the bulk and shear strains of the coating layers, as well as fluctuations in the height of the coating-substrate interface. The additional phase shifting and back-scattering caused by photo elastic effects are also considered for the first time. In Chapter 3, I study whether it is realistic to adopt higher-order Laguerre-Gauss modes in LIGO, in order to mitigate the effect of mirror thermal noise. We investigate the effect on the detector's contrast defect caused by the mode degeneracy. With both analytical calculation and numerical simulation, we show that with this approach, the detector's susceptibility to mirror figure errors is reduced greatly compared to using the nondegenerate modes, therefore making it unacceptable for LIGO requirements

  15. Solar wind electron temperature and density measurements on the Solar Orbiter with thermal noise spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, M.; Issautier, K.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Perche, C.; Moncuquet, M.; Zouganelis, I.; Bale, S. D.; Vilmer, N.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    The measurement of the solar wind electron temperature in the unexplored region between 1 and 45 Rs is of prime importance for understanding the solar wind acceleration. Solar Orbiter's location, combined with the fact that the spacecraft will nearly co-rotate with the sun on some portions of its orbit, will furnish observations placing constraints on solar wind models. We discuss the implementation of the plasma thermal noise analysis for the Solar Orbiter, in order to get accurate measurements of the total electron density and electron temperature and to correct the spacecraft charging effects which affect the electron analyzers.

  16. Solar wind electron temperature and density measurements for the Solar Orbiter using the thermal noise spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, M.; Issautier, K.; Moncuquet, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Zouganelis, I.; Bale, S. D.; Vilmer, N.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    The measurement of the solar wind electron temperature radial profile in the unexplored region between 1 and 45 R_s is of prime importance for understanding the solar wind acceleration. Solar Orbiter's location, combined with its ability to observe the corona in co-rotation, will furnish strong observational constraints on solar wind models. We discuss the implementation of the plasma thermal noise analysis for the Solar Orbiter, in order (i) to get accurate measurements of the total electron density and core electron temperature and (ii) to allow direct determination of the spacecraft charging effects which affect the electron analyzers.

  17. Thermal effects on mass detection sensitivity of carbon nanotube resonators in nonlinear oscillation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong-Keun; Yang, Hyun-Ik; Kim, Chang-Wan

    2015-11-01

    A mass sensor using a nano-resonator has high detection sensitivity, and mass sensitivity is higher with smaller resonators. Therefore, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the ultimate materials for these applications and have been actively studied. In particular, CNT-based nanomechanical devices may experience high temperatures that lead to thermal expansion and residual stress in devices, which affects the device reliability. In this letter, to demonstrate the influence of the temperature change (i.e., thermal effect) on the mass detection sensitivity of CNT-based mass sensor, dynamic analysis is carried out for a CNT resonator with thermal effects in both linear and nonlinear oscillation regimes. Based on the continuum mechanics model, the analytical solution method with an assumed deflection eigenmode is applied to solve the nonlinear differential equation which involves the von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relation and the additional axial force associated with thermal effects. A thermal effect on the fundamental resonance behavior and resonance frequency shift due to adsorbed mas, i.e., mass detection sensitivity, is examined in high-temperature environment. Results indicate a valid improvement of fundamental resonance frequency by using nonlinear oscillation in a thermal environment. In both linear and nonlinear oscillation regimes, the mass detection sensitivity becomes worse due to the increasing of temperature in a high-temperature environment. The thermal effect on the detection sensitivity is less effective in the nonlinear oscillation regime. It is concluded that a temperature change of a mass sensor with a CNT-based resonator can be utilized to enhance the detection sensitivity depending on the CNT length, linear/nonlinear oscillation behaviors, and the thermal environment.

  18. Noise-induced resonance-like phenomena in InP crystals embedded in fluctuating electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persano Adorno, D.; Pizzolato, N.; Spagnolo, B.

    2016-05-01

    We explore and discuss the complex electron dynamics inside a low-doped n-type InP bulk embedded in a sub-THz electric field, fluctuating for the superimposition of an external source of Gaussian correlated noise. The results presented in this study derive from numerical simulations obtained by means of a multi-valley Monte Carlo approach to simulate the nonlinear transport of electrons inside the semiconductor crystal. The electronic noise characteristics are statistically investigated by calculating the correlation function of the velocity fluctuations, its spectral density and the integrated spectral density, i.e. the total noise power, for different values of both amplitude and frequency of the driving oscillating electric field and for different correlation times of the field fluctuations. Our results show that the nonlinear response of electrons is strongly affected by the field fluctuations. In particular, crucially depending on the relationship between the correlation times of the external Gaussian noise and the timescales of complex phenomena involved in the electron dynamical behavior: (i) electrons self-organize among different valleys, giving rise to intrinsic noise suppression; (ii) this cooperative behavior causes the appearance of a resonance-like phenomenon in the noise spectra.

  19. An improved multiscale noise tuning of stochastic resonance for identifying multiple transient faults in rolling element bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2014-12-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR), a noise-assisted tool, has been proved to be very powerful in weak signal detection. The multiscale noise tuning SR (MSTSR), which breaks the restriction of the requirement of small parameters and white noise in classical SR, has been applied to identify the characteristic frequency of a bearing. However, the multiscale noise tuning (MST), which is originally based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT), limits the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement of SR and the performance in identifying multiple bearing faults. In this paper, the wavelet packet transform (WPT) is developed and incorporated into the MSTSR method to overcome its shortcomings and to further enhance its capability in multiple faults detection of bearings. The WPT-based MST can achieve a finer tuning of multiscale noise and aims at detecting multiple target frequencies separately. By introducing WPT into the MST of SR, this paper proposes an improved SR method particularly suited for the identification of multiple transient faults in rolling element bearings. Simulated and practical bearing signals carrying multiple characteristic frequencies are employed to validate the performance improvement of the proposed method as compared to the original DWT-based MSTSR method. The results confirm the good capability of the proposed method in multi-fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings.

  20. Self-sustained oscillation limit of tube bundle resonant noise. (Phase 1: Evaluation equation of oscillation limit)

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, M.; Fujita, K.; Hasegawa, N.

    1995-12-01

    Self-sustained oscillation limit of tube bundle resonant noise is studied in this paper. Excited acoustic energy and dissipating one in tube bundle are derived theoretically. In the exciting stage, the acoustic field is considered to be fed back to the flow field as the inlet flow fluctuation. And the acoustic damping is considered to induce the dissipating energy. Based on the energy balance of both and dimensional analysis, a new simple evaluation equation of self-sustained oscillation limit is proposed concerning on tube bundle resonant noise. A typical experimental results are evaluated based on this equation. The results are roughly good, but this suggests that model analysis of both exciting energy and dissipating one is necessary for more precise evaluation.

  1. Passive Phase Noise Cancellation Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Kenig, Eyal; Cross, M. C.; Lifshitz, Ron; Karabalin, R. B.; Villanueva, L. G.; Matheny, M. H.; Roukes, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new method for reducing phase noise in oscillators, thereby improving their frequency precision. The noise reduction is realized by a passive device consisting of a pair of coupled nonlinear resonating elements that are driven parametrically by the output of a conventional oscillator at a frequency close to the sum of the linear mode frequencies. Above the threshold for parametric instability, the coupled resonators exhibit self-oscillations which arise as a response to the parametric driving, rather than by application of active feedback. We find operating points of the device for which this periodic signal is immune to frequency noise in the driving oscillator, providing a way to clean its phase noise. We present results for the effect of thermal noise to advance a broader understanding of the overall noise sensitivity and the fundamental operating limits. PMID:23004985

  2. Isolating the auditory system from acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaging: Examination of noise conduction through the ear canal, head, and bodya)

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Melcher, Jennifer R.

    2007-01-01

    Approaches were examined for reducing acoustic noise levels heard by subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a technique for localizing brain activation in humans. Specifically, it was examined whether a device for isolating the head and ear canal from sound (a “helmet”) could add to the isolation provided by conventional hearing protection devices (i.e., earmuffs and earplugs). Both subjective attenuation (the difference in hearing threshold with versus without isolation devices in place) and objective attenuation (difference in ear-canal sound pressure) were measured. In the frequency range of the most intense fMRI noise (1–1.4 kHz), a helmet, earmuffs, and earplugs used together attenuated perceived sound by 55–63 dB, whereas the attenuation provided by the conventional devices alone was substantially less: 30–37 dB for earmuffs, 25–28 dB for earplugs, and 39–41 dB for earmuffs and earplugs used together. The data enabled the clarification of the relative importance of ear canal, head, and body conduction routes to the cochlea under different conditions: At low frequencies (≤500 Hz), the ear canal was the dominant route of sound conduction to the cochlea for all of the device combinations considered. At higher frequencies (>500 Hz), the ear canal was the dominant route when either earmuffs or earplugs were worn. However, the dominant route of sound conduction was through the head when both earmuffs and earplugs were worn, through both ear canal and body when a helmet and earmuffs were worn, and through the body when a helmet, earmuffs, and earplugs were worn. It is estimated that a helmet, earmuffs, and earplugs together will reduce the most intense fMRI noise levels experienced by a subject to 60–65 dB SPL. Even greater reductions in noise should be achievable by isolating the body from the surrounding noise field. PMID:11206150

  3. In-flight thermal experiments for LISA Pathfinder: Simulating temperature noise at the Inertial Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, Ll; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Maghami, P.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-04-01

    Thermal Diagnostics experiments to be carried out on board LISA Pathfinder (LPF) will yield a detailed characterisation of how temperature fluctuations affect the LTP (LISA Technology Package) instrument performance, a crucial information for future space based gravitational wave detectors as the proposed eLISA. Amongst them, the study of temperature gradient fluctuations around the test masses of the Inertial Sensors will provide as well information regarding the contribution of the Brownian noise, which is expected to limit the LTP sensitivity at frequencies close to 1 mHz during some LTP experiments. In this paper we report on how these kind of Thermal Diagnostics experiments were simulated in the last LPF Simulation Campaign (November, 2013) involving all the LPF Data Analysis team and using an end-to-end simulator of the whole spacecraft. Such simulation campaign was conducted under the framework of the preparation for LPF operations.

  4. In-flight thermal experiments for LISA Pathfinder: Simulating temperature noise at the Inertial Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, F.; Nofrarias, M.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, Ll; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Maghami, P.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal Diagnostics experiments to be carried out on board LISA Pathfinder (LPF) will yield a detailed characterisation of how temperature fluctuations affect the LTP (LISA Technology Package) instrument performance, a crucial information for future space based gravitational wave detectors as the proposed eLISA. Amongst them, the study of temperature gradient fluctuations around the test masses of the Inertial Sensors will provide as well information regarding the contribution of the Brownian noise, which is expected to limit the LTP sensitivity at frequencies close to 1 mHz during some LTP experiments. In this paper we report on how these kind of Thermal Diagnostics experiments were simulated in the last LPF Simulation Campaign (November, 2013) involving all the LPF Data Analysis team and using an end-to-end simulator of the whole spacecraft. Such simulation campaign was conducted under the framework of the preparation for LPF operations.

  5. Effects of Thermal Noise on the Transitional Dynamics of an Inextensible Elastic Filament in Stagnation Flow

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Mingge; Grinberg, Leopold; Caswell, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a single inextensible elastic filament subject to anisotropic friction in a viscous stagnation-point flow, by employing both a continuum model represented by Langevin type stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) and a Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method. Unlike previous works1, the filament is free to rotate and the tension along the filament is determined by the local inextensible constraint. The kinematics of the filament is recorded and studied with normal modes analysis. The results show that the filament displays an instability induced by negative tension, which is analogous to Euler buckling of a beam. Symmetry breaking of normal modes dynamics and stretch-coil transitions are observed above the threshold of the buckling instability point. Furthermore, both temporal and spatial noise are amplified resulting from the interaction of thermal fluctuations and nonlinear filament dynamics. Specifically, the spatial noise is amplified with even normal modes being excited due to symmetry breaking, while the temporal noise is amplified with increasing time correlation length and variance. PMID:26023834

  6. CFD simulation of pulsation noise in a small centrifugal compressor with volute and resonance tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakaki, Daich; Sakuka, Yuta; Inokuchi, Yuzo; Ueda, Kosuke; Yamasaki, Nobuhiko; Yamagata, Akihiro

    2015-02-01

    The rotational frequency tone noise emitted from the automobile turbocharger is called the pulsation noise. The cause of the pulsation noise is not fully understood, but is considered to be due to some manufacturing errors, which is called the mistuning. The effects of the mistuning of the impeller blade on the noise field inside the flow passage of the compressor are numerically investigated. Here, the flow passage includes the volute and duct located downstream of the compressor impeller. Our numerical approach is found to successfully capture the wavelength of the pulsation noise at given rotational speeds by the comparison with the experiments. One of the significant findings is that the noise field of the pulsation noise in the duct is highly one-dimensional although the flow fields are highly three-dimensional.

  7. Effect of temperature variations and thermal noise on the static and dynamic behavior of straintronics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barangi, Mahmood; Mazumder, Pinaki

    2015-11-01

    A theoretical model quantifying the effect of temperature variations on the magnetic properties and static and dynamic behavior of the straintronics magnetic tunneling junction is presented. Four common magnetostrictive materials (Nickel, Cobalt, Terfenol-D, and Galfenol) are analyzed to determine their temperature sensitivity and to provide a comprehensive database for different applications. The variations of magnetic anisotropies are studied in detail for temperature levels up to the Curie temperature. The energy barrier of the free layer and the critical voltage required for flipping the magnetization vector are inspected as important metrics that dominate the energy requirements and noise immunity when the device is incorporated into large systems. To study the dynamic thermal noise, the effect of the Langevin thermal field on the free layer's magnetization vector is incorporated into the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The switching energy, flipping delay, write, and hold error probabilities are studied, which are important metrics for nonvolatile memories, an important application of the straintronics magnetic tunneling junctions.

  8. Noise reduction of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transversal data using improved wavelet transform and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xinmin; Fan, Yiren; Li, Jiangtao; Wang, Yang; Deng, Shaogui

    2015-02-01

    NMR logging and core NMR signals acts as an effective way of pore structure evaluation and fluid discrimination, but it is greatly contaminated by noise for samples with low magnetic resonance intensity. Transversal relaxation time (T2) spectrum obtained by inversion of decay signals intrigued by Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence may deviate from the truth if the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is imperfect. A method of combing the improved wavelet thresholding with the EWMA is proposed for noise reduction of decay data. The wavelet basis function and decomposition level are optimized in consideration of information entropy and white noise estimation firstly. Then a hybrid threshold function is developed to avoid drawbacks of hard and soft threshold functions. To achieve the best thresholding values of different levels, a nonlinear objective function based on SNR and mean square error (MSE) is constructed, transforming the problem to a task of finding optimal solutions. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is used to ensure the stability and global convergence. EWMA is carried out to eliminate unwanted peaks and sawtooths of the wavelet denoised signal. With validations of numerical simulations and experiments, it is demonstrated that the proposed approach can reduce the noise of T2 decay data perfectly.

  9. Ferromagnetic resonance studies of thermal effects on lunar metallic Fe phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, F.-D.; Live, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance results of annealing experiments are discussed which illustrate the thermal effects on lunar metallic iron phases already present in a lunar fines sample. Spectral features of ferromagnetic resonance produced in the sample by heat treatments at temperatures between 600 and 1025 C are described which resemble those detected in lunar breccias and crystalline rocks. A correlation is shown to exist between these features and the degree of thermal metamorphism. It is noted that this correlation can be used as a built-in geothermometer or probe to investigate the thermal history and degree of metamorphism of a lunar sample containing metallic iron phases. The thermal history of a metaclastic rock is analyzed in this way, and it is shown that thermal metamorphism is an effective process for increasing relaxation times or the stability of the natural remanent magnetization carried by single-domain metallic iron particles.

  10. Model building and measurement of the temporal noise for thermal infrared imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xun; Nie, Liang; Hu, Tieli; Jiang, Xu; Wang, Fang

    2008-09-01

    In the measurement of the infrared imager, noise is the primary parameter in evaluating the quality of the infrared imager. In the engineering application of the infrared imager, three-dimensional noise pattern is not applied widely in the hard technology of the infrared imager due to its pattern is complex, physical significance is not definite and visualized. Noise parameters include the temporal noise and the spatial noise. The temporal noise can be divided into high frequency temporal noise and low frequency temporal noise (namely 1/f noise), and the spatial noise can be divided into high frequency spatial noise (namely fixed pattern noise, FPN) and low frequency spatial noise (un-uniform noise). The strict definition about high frequency temporal noise and low frequency temporal noise is given in this paper. The algorithm and measuring methods for low frequency temporal noise equivalent temperature difference are proposed. The algorithms and measuring methods of high frequency noise equivalent temperature difference are given, ignoring low frequency temporal noise in short-time during measuring high frequency noise equivalent temperature difference or not. Moreover, the uncertainty of measurement results for high frequency temporal noise equivalent temperature difference is analyzed in the paper.

  11. Frequency-dependent hydrodynamic inductance and the determination of the thermal and quantum noise of a superfluid gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin

    2005-04-01

    We reexamine mass flow in a superfluid gyroscope containing a superfluid Josephson weak link. We introduce a frequency-dependent hydrodynamic inductance to account for an oscillatory flow of the normal fluid component in the sensing loop. With this hydrodynamic inductance, we derive the thermal phase noise, and hence the thermal rotational noise of the gyroscope. We examine the thermodynamic stability of the system based on an analysis of the free energy. We derive a quantum phase noise, which is analogous to the zero-point motion of a simple harmonic oscillator. The configuration of the studied gyroscope is analogous to a conventional superconducting RF SQUID. We show that the gyroscope has very low intrinsic noise (1.9x10{sup -13} rad s{sup -1}/{radical}(Hz)), and it can potentially be applied to study general relativity, Earth science, and to improve global positioning systems (GPS)

  12. Effect of negative emotions evoked by light, noise and taste on trigeminal thermal sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with migraine often have impaired somatosensory function and experience headache attacks triggered by exogenous stimulus, such as light, sound or taste. This study aimed to assess the influence of three controlled conditioning stimuli (visual, auditory and gustatory stimuli and combined stimuli) on affective state and thermal sensitivity in healthy human participants. Methods All participants attended four experimental sessions with visual, auditory and gustatory conditioning stimuli and combination of all stimuli, in a randomized sequence. In each session, the somatosensory sensitivity was tested in the perioral region with use of thermal stimuli with and without the conditioning stimuli. Positive and Negative Affect States (PANAS) were assessed before and after the tests. Subject based ratings of the conditioning and test stimuli in addition to skin temperature and heart rate as indicators of arousal responses were collected in real time during the tests. Results The three conditioning stimuli all induced significant increases in negative PANAS scores (paired t-test, P ≤0.016). Compared with baseline, the increases were in a near dose-dependent manner during visual and auditory conditioning stimulation. No significant effects of any single conditioning stimuli were observed on trigeminal thermal sensitivity (P ≥0.051) or arousal parameters (P ≥0.057). The effects of combined conditioning stimuli on subjective ratings (P ≤0.038) and negative affect (P = 0.011) were stronger than those of single stimuli. Conclusions All three conditioning stimuli provided a simple way to evoke a negative affective state without physical arousal or influence on trigeminal thermal sensitivity. Multisensory conditioning had stronger effects but also failed to modulate thermal sensitivity, suggesting that so-called exogenous trigger stimuli e.g. bright light, noise, unpleasant taste in patients with migraine may require a predisposed or sensitized nervous

  13. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Study of Thermally Treated Bismuth Subgallate

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Paweł; Pilawa, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Complex of bismuth, an anti-inflammatory drug, was studied by EPR spectroscopy. The aim of this study was to determine concentrations and properties of free radicals formed during thermal sterilization of bismuth subgallate according to pharmacopoeia norms to optimize its sterilization process. Different temperatures (160°C, 170°C, and 180°C) and times (120 minutes, 60 minutes, and 30 minutes) of sterilization were used. Interactions of bismuth subgallate with DPPH, the model free radical reference, were checked. g-Factors, amplitudes (A), integral intensities (I), and linewidths (ΔBpp) were obtained. Integral intensities were obtained by double integration of the first-derivative EPR lines. The influence of microwave power in the range of 2.2–70 mW on shape and parameters of the EPR spectra was examined. Thermal sterilization produced free radicals in bismuth subgallate in all tested cases. Strong interactions with free radicals were pointed out for all the analysed samples containing bismuth independent of sterilization conditions. Optimal conditions of thermal sterilization for bismuth subgallate with the lowest free radical formation are temperature 170°C and time of heating 60 minutes. Strong dipolar interactions exist in thermally sterilized bismuth subgallate. EPR spectroscopy is a useful method of examination of thermal sterilization conditions. PMID:25525421

  14. Increasing the resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio of magnetic resonance sounding data using a central loop configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozmand, Ahmad A.; Auken, Esben; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Rejkjaer, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance technique, also called magnetic resonance sounding (MRS), is an emerging geophysical method that can detect the presence and spatial variations of the subsurface water content directly. In this paper, we introduce the MRS central loop geometry, in which the receiver loop is smaller than the transmitter loop and placed in its centre. In addition, using a shielded receiver coil we show how this configuration greatly increases signal-to-noise ratio and improves the resolution of the subsurface layers compared to the typically used coincident loop configuration. We compare sensitivity kernels for different loop configurations and describe advantages of the MRS central loop geometry in terms of superior behaviour of the sensitivity function, increased sensitivity values, reduced noise level of the shielded receiver coil, improved resolution matrix and reduced instrument dead time. With no extra time and effort in the field, central-loop MRS makes it possible to reduce measurement time and to measure data in areas with high anthropogenic noise. The results of our field example agree well with the complementary data, namely airborne electromagnetics, borehole data, and the hydrologic model of the area.

  15. Measurement and analysis of a microwave oscillator stabilized by a sapphire dielectric ring resonator for ultra-low noise.

    PubMed

    Dick, G J; Saunders, J

    1990-01-01

    Phase-noise measurements are presented for a microwave oscillator whose frequency is stabilized by a whispering gallery mode sapphire ring resonator with Q of 2x10(5). The nature of the mode, which involves little metallic conduction, allows nearly full use of the very low dielectric loss in sapphire. Several mode families have been identified with good agreement with calculated frequency predictions. Waveguide coupling parameters have been characterized for the principal (lowest frequency) mode family, for n=5 to n =10 full waves around the perimeter. For a 5-cm wheel resonator in a 7.6-cm container, Q-values of above 10(5) were found at room temperature for all of the modes in this sequence. Coupling Q-values for the same modes ranged from 10(4) (n =5) to 10(5) (n=10) for a WR112 waveguide port at the center of the cylinder wall of the containing can. Phase noise measurements for a transistor oscillator locked to the n=10 (7.84-GHz) mode showed a 1/f(3) dependence for low offset frequencies, and a value of L(f)=-55 dB/Hz at an offset of 10 Hz from the carrier. The oscillator shows phase noise below the previously reported for any X-band source. PMID:18285050

  16. Detection of bacteria based on the thermomechanical noise of a nanomechanical resonator: origin of the response and detection limits.

    PubMed

    Ramos, D; Tamayo, J; Mertens, J; Calleja, M; Villanueva, L G; Zaballos, A

    2008-01-23

    We have measured the effect of bacteria adsorption on the resonant frequency of microcantilevers as a function of the adsorption position and vibration mode. The resonant frequencies were measured from the Brownian fluctuations of the cantilever tip. We found that the sign and amount of the resonant frequency change is determined by the position and extent of the adsorption on the cantilever with regard to the shape of the vibration mode. To explain these results, a theoretical one-dimensional model is proposed. We obtain analytical expressions for the resonant frequency that accurately fit the data obtained by the finite element method. More importantly, the theory data shows a good agreement with the experiments. Our results indicate that there exist two opposite mechanisms that can produce a significant resonant frequency shift: the stiffness and the mass of the bacterial cells. Based on the thermomechanical noise, we analyse the regions of the cantilever of lowest and highest sensitivity to the attachment of bacteria. The combination of high vibration modes and the confinement of the adsorption to defined regions of the cantilever allows the detection of single bacterial cells by only measuring the Brownian fluctuations. This study can be extended to smaller cantilevers and other biological systems such as proteins and nucleic acids.

  17. A low noise and high precision linear power supply with thermal foldback protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Pessina, G.

    2016-05-01

    A low noise and high precision linear power supply was designed for use in rare event search experiments with macrobolometers. The circuit accepts at the input a "noisy" dual supply voltage up to ±15 V and gives at the output precise, low noise, and stable voltages that can be set between ±3.75 V and ±12.5 V in eight 1.25 V steps. Particular care in circuit design, component selection, and proper filtering results in a noise spectral density of 50 nV / √{ Hz } at 1 Hz and 20 nV / √{ Hz } white when the output is set to ±5 V. This corresponds to 125 nV RMS (0.8 μV peak to peak) between 0.1 Hz and 10 Hz, and 240 nV RMS (1.6 μV peak to peak) between 0.1 Hz and 100 Hz. The power supply rejection ratio (PSRR) of the circuit is 100 dB at low frequency, and larger than 40 dB up to high frequency, thanks to a proper compensation design. Calibration allows to reach a precision in the absolute value of the output voltage of ±70 ppm, or ±350 μV at ±5 V, and to reduce thermal drifts below ±1 ppm/∘C in the expected operating range. The maximum peak output current is about 6 A from each output. An original foldback protection scheme was developed that dynamically limits the maximum output current to keep the temperature of the output transistors within their safe operating range. An add-on card based on an ARM Cortex-M3 microcontroller is devoted to the monitoring and control of all circuit functionalities and provides remote communication via CAN bus.

  18. Case study. Health hazards of automotive repair mechanics: thermal and lighting comfort, particulate matter and noise.

    PubMed

    Loupa, G

    2013-01-01

    An indoor environmental quality survey was conducted in a small private automotive repair shop during May 2009 (hot season) and February 2010 (cold season). It was established that the detached building, which is naturally ventilated and lit, had all the advantages of the temperate local climate. It provided a satisfactory microclimatic working environment, concerning the thermal and the lighting comfort, without excessive energy consumption for air-conditioning or lighting. Indoor number concentrations of particulate matter (PM) were monitored during both seasons. Their size distributions were strongly affected by the indoor activities and the air exchange rate of the building. During working hours, the average indoor/outdoor (I/O) number concentration ratio was 31 for PM0.3-1 in the hot season and 69 for the cold season. However I/O PM1-10 number concentration ratios were similar, 33 and 32 respectively, between the two seasons. The estimated indoor mass concentration of PM10 for the two seasons was on average 0.68 mg m(-3) and 1.19 mg m(-3), i.e., 22 and 36 times higher than outdoors, during the hot and the cold seasons, respectively. This is indicative that indoor air pollution may adversely affect mechanics' health. Noise levels were highly variable and the average LEX, 8 h of 69.3 dB(A) was below the European Union exposure limit value 87db (A). Noise originated from the use of manual hammers, the revving up of engines, and the closing of car doors or hoods. Octave band analysis indicated that the prevailing noise frequencies were in the area of the maximum ear sensitivity.

  19. Thermal rectification in anharmonic chains under an energy-conserving noise.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Pedro H; Landi, Gabriel T; de Oliveira, Mário J

    2015-12-01

    Systems in which the heat flux depends on the direction of the flow are said to present thermal rectification. This effect has attracted much theoretical and experimental interest in recent years. However, in most theoretical models the effect is found to vanish in the thermodynamic limit, in disagreement with experiment. The purpose of this paper is to show that the rectification may be restored by including an energy-conserving noise which randomly flips the velocity of the particles with a certain rate λ. It is shown that as long as λ is nonzero, the rectification remains finite in the thermodynamic limit. This is illustrated in a classical harmonic chain subject to a quartic pinning potential (the Φ(4) model) and coupled to heat baths by Langevin equations.

  20. Reply to "Comment on 'Ratchet universality in the presence of thermal noise' ".

    PubMed

    Martínez, Pedro J; Chacón, Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    The Comment by Quintero et al. [preceding Comment, Phys. Rev. E 88, 066101 (2013)] does not dispute the central result of our paper [Martínez and Chacón, Phys. Rev. E 87, 062114 (2013)], which is a theory explaining the interplay between thermal noise and symmetry breaking in the ratchet transport of a Brownian particle moving on a periodic substrate subjected to a temporal biharmonic excitation γ[ηsin(ωt)+α(1-η)sin(2ωt+φ)]. In the Comment, the authors claim, on the sole basis of their numerical simulations for the particular case α=2, that "there is no such universal force waveform and that the evidence obtained by the authors otherwise is due to their particular choice of parameters." Here we demonstrate by means of theoretical arguments and additional numerical simulations that all the conclusions of our original article are preserved.

  1. Correspondence behavior of classical and quantum dissipative directed transport via thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Gabriel G; Ermann, Leonardo; Rivas, Alejandro M F; Spina, María E

    2016-04-01

    We systematically study several classical-quantum correspondence properties of the dissipative modified kicked rotator, a paradigmatic ratchet model. We explore the behavior of the asymptotic currents for finite ℏ_{eff} values in a wide range of the parameter space. We find that the correspondence between the classical currents with thermal noise providing fluctuations of size ℏ_{eff} and the quantum ones without it is very good in general with the exception of specific regions. We systematically consider the spectra of the corresponding classical Perron-Frobenius operators and quantum superoperators. By means of an average distance between the classical and quantum sets of eigenvalues we find that the correspondence is unexpectedly quite uniform. This apparent contradiction is solved with the help of the Weyl-Wigner distributions of the equilibrium eigenvectors, which reveal the key role of quantum effects by showing surviving coherences in the asymptotic states. PMID:27176280

  2. Correspondence behavior of classical and quantum dissipative directed transport via thermal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo, Gabriel G.; Ermann, Leonardo; Rivas, Alejandro M. F.; Spina, María E.

    2016-04-01

    We systematically study several classical-quantum correspondence properties of the dissipative modified kicked rotator, a paradigmatic ratchet model. We explore the behavior of the asymptotic currents for finite ℏeff values in a wide range of the parameter space. We find that the correspondence between the classical currents with thermal noise providing fluctuations of size ℏeff and the quantum ones without it is very good in general with the exception of specific regions. We systematically consider the spectra of the corresponding classical Perron-Frobenius operators and quantum superoperators. By means of an average distance between the classical and quantum sets of eigenvalues we find that the correspondence is unexpectedly quite uniform. This apparent contradiction is solved with the help of the Weyl-Wigner distributions of the equilibrium eigenvectors, which reveal the key role of quantum effects by showing surviving coherences in the asymptotic states.

  3. Thermal rectification in anharmonic chains under an energy-conserving noise.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Pedro H; Landi, Gabriel T; de Oliveira, Mário J

    2015-12-01

    Systems in which the heat flux depends on the direction of the flow are said to present thermal rectification. This effect has attracted much theoretical and experimental interest in recent years. However, in most theoretical models the effect is found to vanish in the thermodynamic limit, in disagreement with experiment. The purpose of this paper is to show that the rectification may be restored by including an energy-conserving noise which randomly flips the velocity of the particles with a certain rate λ. It is shown that as long as λ is nonzero, the rectification remains finite in the thermodynamic limit. This is illustrated in a classical harmonic chain subject to a quartic pinning potential (the Φ(4) model) and coupled to heat baths by Langevin equations. PMID:26764645

  4. Thermal noise limitations to force measurements with torsion pendulums: Applications to the measurement of the Casimir force and its thermal correction

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoreaux, S.K.; Buttler, W.T.

    2005-03-01

    A general analysis of thermal noise in torsion pendulums is presented. The specific case where the torsion angle is kept fixed by electronic feedback is analyzed. This analysis is applied to a recent experiment that employed a torsion pendulum to measure the Casimir force. The ultimate limit to the distance at which the Casimir force can be measured to high accuracy is discussed, and in particular we elaborate on the prospects for measuring the thermal correction.

  5. Signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and pharmacokinetic modeling considerations in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Huang, Wei; Rooney, William D

    2012-11-01

    With advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI is approaching the capability to simultaneously deliver both high spatial and high temporal resolutions for clinical applications. However, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) considerations and their impacts regarding pharmacokinetic modeling of the time-course data continue to represent challenges in the design of DCE-MRI acquisitions. Given that many acquisition parameters can affect the nature of DCE-MRI data, minimizing tissue-specific data acquisition discrepancy (among sites and scanner models) is as important as synchronizing pharmacokinetic modeling approaches. For cancer-related DCE-MRI studies where rapid contrast reagent (CR) extravasation is expected, current DCE-MRI protocols often adopt a three-dimensional fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence to achieve spatial-temporal resolution requirements. Based on breast and prostate DCE-MRI data acquired with different FLASH sequence parameters, this paper elucidates a number of SNR and CNR considerations for acquisition optimization and pharmacokinetic modeling implications therein. Simulations based on region of interest data further indicate that the effects of intercompartmental water exchange often play an important role in DCE time-course data modeling, especially for protocols optimized for post-CR SNR.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of thermal oxidation of polyisoprene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, M. A.; Hsu, M. S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted concerning the microstructural changes occurring in cis- and trans-1,4-polyisoprenes during uncatalized thermal oxidation in the solid phase. The investigation made use of approaches based on proton and carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy. The oxidation of squalene and dihydromyrcene in the liquid phase was also studied. The studies provide the first NMR spectroscopic evidence for the presence of epoxy and peroxide, hydroperoxide, and alcohol groups within the oxidized polyisoprene chain.

  7. Array-enhanced coherence resonance and forced dynamics in coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons with noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Yuji; Kanamaru, Takashi; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Horita, Takehiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2002-05-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons subject to independent noise is analyzed. A kind of self-sustained global oscillation with almost synchronous firing is generated by array-enhanced coherence resonance. Further, forced dynamics of the self-sustained global oscillation stimulated by sinusoidal input is analyzed and classified as synchronized, quasiperiodic, and chaotic responses just like the forced oscillations in nerve membranes observed by in vitro experiments with squid giant axons. Possible physiological importance of such forced oscillations is also discussed.

  8. Resistance noise spectroscopy across the thermally and electrically driven metal-insulator transitions in VO2 nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaqqa, Ali; Kilcoyne, Colin; Singh, Sujay; Horrocks, Gregory; Marley, Peter; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Sambandamurthy, G.

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is a strongly correlated material that exhibits a sharp thermally driven metal-insulator transition at Tc ~ 340 K. The transition can also be triggered by a DC voltage in the insulating phase with a threshold (Vth) behavior. The mechanisms behind these transitions are hotly discussed and resistance noise spectroscopy is a suitable tool to delineate different transport mechanisms in correlated systems. We present results from a systematic study of the low frequency (1 mHz < f < 10 Hz) noise behavior in VO2 nanobeams across the thermally and electrically driven transitions. In the thermal transition, the power spectral density (PSD) of the resistance noise is unchanged as we approach Tc from 300 K and an abrupt drop in the magnitude is seen above Tc and it remains unchanged till 400 K. However, the noise behavior in the electrically driven case is distinctly different: as the voltage is ramped from zero, the PSD gradually increases by an order of magnitude before reaching Vth and an abrupt increase is seen at Vth. The noise magnitude decreases above Vth, approaching the V = 0 value. The individual roles of percolation, Joule heating and signatures of correlated behavior will be discussed. This work is supported by NSF DMR 0847324.

  9. Carnot cycle for interacting particles in the absence of thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Curado, Evaldo M F; Souza, Andre M C; Nobre, Fernando D; Andrade, Roberto F S

    2014-02-01

    A thermodynamic formalism is developed for a system of interacting particles under overdamped motion, which has been recently analyzed within the framework of nonextensive statistical mechanics. It amounts to expressing the interaction energy of the system in terms of a temperature θ, conjugated to a generalized entropy s(q), with q = 2. Since θ assumes much higher values than those of typical room temperatures T ≪ θ, the thermal noise can be neglected for this system (T/θ ≃ 0). This framework is now extended by the introduction of a work term δW which, together with the formerly defined heat contribution (δ Q = θ ds(q)), allows for the statement of a proper energy conservation law that is analogous to the first law of thermodynamics. These definitions lead to the derivation of an equation of state and to the characterization of s(q) adiabatic and θ isothermic transformations. On this basis, a Carnot cycle is constructed, whose efficiency is shown to be η = 1-(θ(2)/θ(1)), where θ(1) and θ(2) are the effective temperatures of the two isothermic transformations, with θ(1)>θ(2). The results for a generalized thermodynamic description of this system open the possibility for further physical consequences, like the realization of a thermal engine based on energy exchanges gauged by the temperature θ.

  10. Carnot cycle for interacting particles in the absence of thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Curado, Evaldo M F; Souza, Andre M C; Nobre, Fernando D; Andrade, Roberto F S

    2014-02-01

    A thermodynamic formalism is developed for a system of interacting particles under overdamped motion, which has been recently analyzed within the framework of nonextensive statistical mechanics. It amounts to expressing the interaction energy of the system in terms of a temperature θ, conjugated to a generalized entropy s(q), with q = 2. Since θ assumes much higher values than those of typical room temperatures T ≪ θ, the thermal noise can be neglected for this system (T/θ ≃ 0). This framework is now extended by the introduction of a work term δW which, together with the formerly defined heat contribution (δ Q = θ ds(q)), allows for the statement of a proper energy conservation law that is analogous to the first law of thermodynamics. These definitions lead to the derivation of an equation of state and to the characterization of s(q) adiabatic and θ isothermic transformations. On this basis, a Carnot cycle is constructed, whose efficiency is shown to be η = 1-(θ(2)/θ(1)), where θ(1) and θ(2) are the effective temperatures of the two isothermic transformations, with θ(1)>θ(2). The results for a generalized thermodynamic description of this system open the possibility for further physical consequences, like the realization of a thermal engine based on energy exchanges gauged by the temperature θ. PMID:25353432

  11. Assessment of the Fundamental Resonance Frequency of the Sedimentary Cover in the Eskisehir Basin (Turkey) Using Noise Measuremeets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tün, Muammer; Karabulut, Savaş; Avdan, Uǧur; Özel, Oǧuz; Güney, Yücel

    2014-05-01

    Geological observations indicate that the Eskisehir graben is related with Eskisehir Fault Zone (EFZ), one of the major active structures within the Anatolian plate. The fault zone has a considerable seismic risk for the urban area of Eskişehir. Local site conditions substantially affect the characteristics of seismic waves and generally have a direct effect on the potential of the earthquake damage. Site effects are very complex factors. The importance of site response is well known, and few would question the assertion that the motion on soil is usually greater than on rock, when all other things were being held equal. In general, site response estimation can be obtained from instrumental recordings. The purpose of this study was to estimate if there would be a relationship between the structural geology in the Eskisehir Basin and the fundamental resonance frequency. Extensive ambient noise measurements were performed in the basin of Eskisehir from June 2010 to spring 2012. In this work, we conduct microtremor surveys to investigate the 3-D basin structure of Eskisehir Basin and determine the fundamental resonance frequency of the sedimentary cover in the Eskisehir Valley area. The measurements of single-station microtremor were carried out at 318 sites in the Eskişehir Basin. We use data recorded by a broadband seismometer and digitizer CMG-6TD, Guralp seismometer. Some of the measurement locations, the CMG-6TD sensor was located into 30 cm-deep holes in the ground to avoid strongly wind-generated, long-period noise. Finally, a map showing the fundamental resonance frequency distribution in the studied area was drawn using the results obtained from applying the HVSR technique. A fundamental resonance frequency map of the Eskisehir Basin was produced from main peak in the horizontal-to-vertical component (H/V) spectral ratio.

  12. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio of thermal ghost imaging based on positive-negative intensity correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shu-Chun; Sun, Ming-Jie; Wu, Ling-An

    2016-05-01

    Ghost imaging with thermal light is a topic in optical imaging that has aroused great interest in recent years. However, the imaging quality must be greatly improved before the technology can be transferred from the lab to engineering applications. By means of correspondence ghost imaging (CGI) with a pseudo-thermal light source and appropriate sorting of the intensity fluctuations of the signal and reference beams, we obtain the positive and negative Hanbury Brown and Twiss intensity correlation characteristics of the optical field. Then, for ghost imaging of a transmissive binary object, we find that by subtracting the negative from the positive fluctuation frames of the presorted reference detector signals, the signal-to-noise ratio can be effectively increased, with almost all the background noise eliminated. Our results show that, compared with the generic CGI technique, the signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by nearly 60%.

  13. Thermal neutron cross sections and resonance integrals for the 1994 handbook of chemistry and physics

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1994-12-31

    A re-evaluation of all thermal neutron cross sections and neutron resonance integrals has been performed, utilizing the previous database of the ``Barn Book`` and all of the more recently published experiments. Only significant changes or previously undetermined values are recorded in this report. The source for each value is also recorded in the accompanying table.

  14. Partially coherent scattering in stellar chromospheres. I - Effects on resonance line thermalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayley, Kenneth G.

    1992-01-01

    The conditions necessary for partially coherent scattering to influence the thermalization depth are investigated, and the effects of partial redistribution in homogeneous slab atmospheres are approximated using several common resonance lines as examples. For electron densities above 10 exp 10/cu cm, it is concluded that even when coherent scattering dominates the escape process, the thermalization depths of the strongest resonance lines of H, Ca II, and Mg II agree roughly with the Doppler diffusion in frequency. No elastic scattering effects on the thermalization of Mg II h and k and Ca II H and K are found. At lower densities, such as for giant star chromospheres and QSO models, the results deviate strongly from the Doppler complete redistribution case.

  15. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-12-12

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  16. Thermal analysis of multifacet-mirror ring resonator for XUV free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, B.D.; Goldstein, J.C.; McFarland, R.D.; Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    XUV (10 nm {le} {lambda} {le} 100 nm) free-electron lasers (FELs) are potentially important light sources for advanced lithography and materials applications. The average power of an XUV FEL oscillator may be limited by thermal loading of the resonator mirrors. We analyze the requirements for the thermal performance of the mirrors of a metal, multifacet-mirror ring resonator for use at 12 nm. We use analytical methods and numerical approaches which include simulations with the 3-D FEL code FELEX. Thermal distortion of mirror surfaces leads to optical wavefront aberrations which reduce the focusability of the light beam in the gain medium (wiggler/electron beam) and limit the laser performance. 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Measurement and analysis of a microwave oscillator stabilized by a sapphire dielectric ring resonator for ultra-low noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Saunders, Jon

    1990-01-01

    Phase-noise measurements are presented for a microwave oscillator whose frequency is stabilized by a whispering-gallery sapphire ring resonator with Q of 200,000. This mode involves little metallic conduction and allows nearly full use of the very low dielectric loss in sapphire. Several mode families have been identified, in good agreement with frequency calculations. For a 5-cm wheel resonator in a 7.6-cm container, Q values above 100,000 were found at room temperature for all of the modes in this sequence. Coupling Q-values for these same modes ranged from 10,000 (n = 5) to 100,000 (n = 10) for a WR112 waveguide port at the center of the cylinder wall of the containing can. Phase noise measurements for a transistor oscillator locked to the n = 10 (7.84-GHz) mode showed a 1/f cubed dependence for low offset frequencies, and a value of L(f) = -55 dB/Hz at an offset of 10 Hz from the carrier.

  18. Measurement and analysis of a microwave oscillator stabilized by a sapphire dielectric ring resonator for ultra-low noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, G. John; Saunders, Jon

    1990-09-01

    Phase-noise measurements are presented for a microwave oscillator whose frequency is stabilized by a whispering-gallery sapphire ring resonator with Q of 200,000. This mode involves little metallic conduction and allows nearly full use of the very low dielectric loss in sapphire. Several mode families have been identified, in good agreement with frequency calculations. For a 5-cm wheel resonator in a 7.6-cm container, Q values above 100,000 were found at room temperature for all of the modes in this sequence. Coupling Q-values for these same modes ranged from 10,000 (n = 5) to 100,000 (n = 10) for a WR112 waveguide port at the center of the cylinder wall of the containing can. Phase noise measurements for a transistor oscillator locked to the n = 10 (7.84-GHz) mode showed a 1/f cubed dependence for low offset frequencies, and a value of L(f) = -55 dB/Hz at an offset of 10 Hz from the carrier.

  19. A Low-Noise, Wideband Preamplifier for a Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Raman; Knepper, Ronald W.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    FTMS performance parameters such as limits of detection, dynamic range, sensitivity, and even mass accuracy and resolution can be greatly improved by enhancing its detection circuit. An extended investigation of significant design considerations for optimal signal-to-noise ratio in an FTMS detection circuit are presented. A low noise amplifier for an FTMS is developed based on the discussed design rules. The amplifier has a gain of ≈ 3500 and a bandwidth of 10 kHz - 1 MHz corresponding to m/z range of 100 Da to 10 kDa (at 7 Tesla). The performance of the amplifier was tested on a MALDI-FTMS, and has demonstrated a 25-fold reduction in noise in a mass spectrum of C60 compared to that of a commercial amplifier. PMID:18029195

  20. Effect of neck geometry of resonance cells on noise reduction efficiency in sound-absorbing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarev, P. V.; Anoshkin, A. N.; Pan'kov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The present work formulates the physical and mathematical models capable to forecast acoustic properties of resonance cells in sound absorbing structures. Distribution of acoustic pressure inside the duct and on sidewall cell was found, loss factor of output acoustic pressure wave was calculated for variety of geometric forms of cell's chamber and neck for monochromatic wave in 100-600Hz frequency range. Analysis of the acoustic pressure fields revealed that cell neck geometry strongly influences on cell resonant frequency and on outlet acoustic pressure loss factor. The effectiveness of the proposed by the authors biconical design of the resonant cell was proved, which increased acoustic radiation at the resonance frequency resulting significant increase of loss ratio of wave acoustic pressure at duct outlet.

  1. A non-contact, thermal noise based method for the calibration of lateral deflection sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, Nic Hobbs, Jamie K.

    2014-11-15

    Calibration of lateral forces and displacements has been a long standing problem in lateral force microscopies. Recently, it was shown by Wagner et al. that the thermal noise spectrum of the first torsional mode may be used to calibrate the deflection sensitivity of the detector. This method is quick, non-destructive and may be performed in situ in air or liquid. Here we make a full quantitative comparison of the lateral inverse optical lever sensitivity obtained by the lateral thermal noise method and the shape independent method developed by Anderson et al. We find that the thermal method provides accurate results for a wide variety of rectangular cantilevers, provided that the geometry of the cantilever is suitable for torsional stiffness calibration by the torsional Sader method, in-plane bending of the cantilever may be eliminated or accounted for and that any scaling of the lateral deflection signal between the measurement of the lateral thermal noise and the measurement of the lateral deflection is eliminated or corrected for. We also demonstrate that the thermal method may be used to characterize the linearity of the detector signal as a function of position, and find a deviation of less than 8% for the instrument used.

  2. Thermal conductivity of silver loaded conductive epoxy from cryogenic to ambient temperature and its application for precision cryogenic noise measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amils, Ricardo I.; Gallego, Juan Daniel; Sebastián, José Luis; Muñoz, Sagrario; Martín, Agustín; Leuther, Arnulf

    2016-06-01

    The pressure to increase the sensitivity of instrumentation has pushed the use of cryogenic Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) technology into a growing number of fields. These areas range from radio astronomy and deep space communications to fundamental physics. In this context manufacturing for cryogenic environments requires a proper thermal knowledge of the materials to be able to achieve adequate design behavior. In this work, we present experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of a silver filled conductive epoxy (EPO-TEK H20E) which is widely used in cryogenic electronics applications. The characterization has been made using a sample preparation which mimics the practical use of this adhesive in the fabrication of cryogenic devices. We apply the data obtained to a detailed analysis of the effects of the conductive epoxy in a monolithic thermal noise source used for high accuracy cryogenic microwave noise measurements. In this application the epoxy plays a fundamental role since its limited thermal conductivity allows heating the chip with relatively low power. To our knowledge, the cryogenic thermal conductivity data of this epoxy has not been reported before in the literature in the 4-300 K temperature range. A second non-conductive epoxy (Gray Scotch-Weld 2216 B/A), also widely used in cryogenic applications, has been measured in order to validate the method by comparing with previous published data.

  3. Evaluation of Silicon Neutron Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 1800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2002-09-30

    The evaluation of the neutron cross sections of the three stable isotopes of silicon in the energy range thermal to 20 MeV was performed by Hetrick et al. for ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File). Resonance parameters were obtained in the energy range thermal to 1500 keV from a SAMMY analysis of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory experimental neutron transmission data. A new measurement of the capture cross section of natural silicon in the energy range 1 to 700 keV has recently been performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Results of this measurement were used in a SAMMY reevaluation of the resonance parameters, allowing determination of the capture width of a large number of resonances. The experimental data base is described; properties of the resonance parameters are given. For the first time the direct neutron capture component has been taken into account from the calculation by Rauscher et al. in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. Results of benchmark calculations are also given. The new evaluation is available in the ENDF/B-VI format.

  4. Thermal conductance measurements for the development of ultra low-noise transition-edge sensors with a new method for measuring the noise equivalent power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostem, Karwan; Glowacka, Dorota M.; Goldie, David J.; Withington, Stafford

    2008-07-01

    Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) are sensitive devices used in astronomical detectors. Recent projects in ground-based and space astronomy demand the Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) of the TES to be reduced to the limits needed for accurate measurements, for example, of the B-mode polarisation of the CMB. Thus, we have measured thermal conductance of SixNy bridges of various geometries, and present the results that give insight into the phonon transport mechanism inside these low-dimensional structures. We also present a new method for measuring the NEP of TESs using an on-chip black body radiator.

  5. Thermal tuning of infrared resonant absorbers based on hybrid gold-VO{sub 2} nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kocer, Hasan; Butun, Serkan; Aydin, Koray; Banar, Berker; Wang, Kevin; Wu, Junqiao; Tongay, Sefaatttin

    2015-04-20

    Resonant absorbers based on plasmonic materials, metamaterials, and thin films enable spectrally selective absorption filters, where absorption is maximized at the resonance wavelength. By controlling the geometrical parameters of nano/microstructures and materials' refractive indices, resonant absorbers are designed to operate at wide range of wavelengths for applications including absorption filters, thermal emitters, thermophotovoltaic devices, and sensors. However, once resonant absorbers are fabricated, it is rather challenging to control and tune the spectral absorption response. Here, we propose and demonstrate thermally tunable infrared resonant absorbers using hybrid gold-vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) nanostructure arrays. Absorption intensity is tuned from 90% to 20% and 96% to 32% using hybrid gold-VO{sub 2} nanowire and nanodisc arrays, respectively, by heating up the absorbers above the phase transition temperature of VO{sub 2} (68 °C). Phase change materials such as VO{sub 2} deliver useful means of altering optical properties as a function of temperature. Absorbers with tunable spectral response can find applications in sensor and detector applications, in which external stimulus such as heat, electrical signal, or light results in a change in the absorption spectrum and intensity.

  6. Influence of thermal deformations of resonators on propagation properties of laser annular beams through turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yufeng; Peng, Fang; Han, Junpeng

    2013-02-01

    Based on the laser field from a positive confocal unstable resonator, considering the influence of thermal distortion of the internal resonator mirror on the annular beam, the propagation characteristics of the annular beam through turbulent atmosphere are investigated by means of the fast Fourier transform algorithm (FFT). The intensity distributions of the output laser far-field are obtained to analyze the propagation characteristics of laser annular beam through the turbulent atmosphere, which is a function about different propagation distances. The results show that the peak intensity of the laser pattern becomes depressed and the spread of the far field diagram patterns is broadened under the increasing of the transmission distance and the thermal distortion of the laser resonator. β-parameter and strehl ratio are introduced to estimate the annular beam quality characteristics. It is found that the annular beam through strong turbulence influences much less obviously than the annular beam through weak turbulence on the quality characteristics with thermal distortion. In the same atmospheric conditions with a certain distance, the greater the mirror thermal distortion is, the worse the annular beam quality characteristics is.

  7. Micromechanical IR thermal detector using torsional oscillation: Improvement of resonator profile for high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jonghyeon; Kumagai, Shinya; Yamashita, Ichiro; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Sasaki, Minoru

    2015-04-01

    An infrared (IR) thermal detector, which used the torsional oscillation of a micromechanical resonator, was developed to achieve a high sensitivity. The detector has a bimaterial structure consisting of a tense Si film (oscillating body) and a metal film (IR absorber). Owing to the difference in thermal expansion between the two materials, the resonator is bent by light incidence. Because the axis of torsion is bent from the initial flat state, the spring for torsional oscillation hardens and resonant frequency shifts. To enhance bending, an Al film with a large coefficient of thermal expansion was used. In addition, the tension in the polycrystalline Si film was enhanced by metal-induced lateral crystallization using biomineralized Ni nanoparticles. The fabricated detector was flat under initial conditions and showed a bending response to the light incidence and heating. The present IR detector achieved a thermal coefficient of frequency of 1000 ppm/K, which was one order larger than that of the conventional micromechanical IR sensors.

  8. Oscillations emerging from noise-driven steady state in networks with electrical synapses and subthreshold resonance

    PubMed Central

    Tchumatchenko, Tatjana; Clopath, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Oscillations play a critical role in cognitive phenomena and have been observed in many brain regions. Experimental evidence indicates that classes of neurons exhibit properties that could promote oscillations, such as subthreshold resonance and electrical gap junctions. Typically, these two properties are studied separately but it is not clear which is the dominant determinant of global network rhythms. Our aim is to provide an analytical understanding of how these two effects destabilize the fluctuation-driven state, in which neurons fire irregularly, and lead to an emergence of global synchronous oscillations. Here we show how the oscillation frequency is shaped by single neuron resonance, electrical and chemical synapses.The presence of both gap junctions and subthreshold resonance are necessary for the emergence of oscillations. Our results are in agreement with several experimental observations such as network responses to oscillatory inputs and offer a much-needed conceptual link connecting a collection of disparate effects observed in networks. PMID:25405458

  9. Collective behavior of globally coupled Langevin equations with colored noise in the presence of stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Lu; Luo, Mao-Kang

    2016-08-01

    The long-time collective behavior of globally coupled Langevin equations in a dichotomous fluctuating potential driven by a periodic source is investigated. By describing the collective behavior using the moments of the mean field and single-particle displacements, we study stochastic resonance and synchronization using the exact steady-state solutions and related stability criteria. Based on the simulation results and the criterion of the stationary regime, the notable differences between the stationary and nonstationary regimes are demonstrated. For the stationary regime, stochastic resonance with synchronization is discussed, and for the nonstationary regime, the volatility clustering phenomenon is observed.

  10. Large-scale variation of electron parameters from Quasi‑Thermal Noise during WIND perigees in the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issautier, Karine; Ongala-Edoumou, Samuel; Moncuquet, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The quasi-thermal noise (QTN) method consists in measuring the electrostatic fluctuations produced by the thermal motion of the ambient particles. This noise is detected with a sensitive wave receiver and measured at the terminal of a passive electric antenna, which is immersed in a stable plasma. The analysis of the so-called QTN provides in situ measurements, mainly the total electron density, with a good accuracy, and thermal temperature in a large number of space media. We create a preliminary electron database to analyse the anti-correlation between electron density and temperature deduced from WIND perigees in the Earth's plasmasphere. We analyse the radio power spectra measured by the Thermal Noise Receiver (TNR), using the 100-m long dipole antenna, onboard WIND spacecraft. We develop a systematic routine to determine the electron density, core and halo temperature and the magnitude of the magnetic field based on QTN in Bernstein modes. Indeed, the spectra are weakly banded between gyroharmonics below the upper hybrid frequency, from which we derive the local electron density. From the gyrofrequency determination, we obtain an independent measure of the magnetic field magnitude, which is in close agreement with the onboard magnetometer.

  11. Excess-noise-enhanced photon-pair generation in unstable resonators.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Claus; Ritsch, Helmut

    2002-05-01

    We investigate a degenerate optical parametric device with a transversely finite unstable cavity configuration operated below threshold. Using an approximate quantum description in terms of a biorthogonal set of effective cavity-matched modes and their adjoint modes, we predict an intracavity field intensity enhancement by the Petermann excess-noise factor, K . This enhancement is accompanied by a reduction of photon bunching and quadrature squeezing. PMID:18007923

  12. Two-level noise and stochastic resonance in individual permalloy nanoscale magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngblood, Bern Willem

    We present the results of a study on stochastic resonance in individual magnetic random telegraph oscillators. We have fabricated sub-micron magnetic samples, which have multiple stable magnetic states. We are able to observe random telegraph switching between magnetic states and tune the energetics by varying the temperature and applied external field. If a small AC field is applied to the system, it will modulate the energy well depth for the two states and the system shows stochastic resonance near the matching condition 2fA = oD, where o D is the drive frequency and fA is the characteristic frequency of magnetic transitions. We fit our measured data for the resonance amplitude and phase of the particle as a function of temperature to a linear-response model and obtain good agreement. At low temperatures we observe a peak in the phase lag of the returned signal, which is consistent with linear-response theories. At higher temperatures, our fitted model parameters suggest that the particle has an energy surface that is not sinusoidal. This contradicts our initial approximation for the energy surface, but it is consistent with a model for magnetic energy that takes into account the magnetization dynamics near the conditions for random telegraph switching. Our work is the first clear observation of stochastic resonance in a single superparamagnetic particle where the energetics are modulated by an applied field. In addition, our work is the first physical system where stochastic resonance has been characterized with sufficient detail to allow for comparison to linear-response models.

  13. Noise amplification in parallel whole-head ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging using 306 detectors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Vesanen, Panu T.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Koos, C.J.; Ilmoniemi, åJ.

    2012-01-01

    In ultra-low-field (ULF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), arrays of up to hundreds of highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can be used to detect the weak magnetic fields emitted by the precessing magnetization. Here we investigate the noise amplification in sensitivity encoded (SENSE) ULF MRI at various acceleration rates using a SQUID array consisting of 102 magnetometers, 102 gradiometers, or 306 magnetometers and gradiometers, to cover the whole head. Our results suggest that SQUID arrays consisting of 102 magnetometers and 102 gradiometers are similar in g-factor distribution. A SQUID array of 306 sensors (102 magnetometers and 204 gradiometers) only marginally improves the g-factor. Corroborating with previous studies, the g-factor in 2D SENSE ULF MRI with 9 to 16-fold 2D accelerations using the SQUID array studied here may be acceptable. PMID:23023497

  14. Noise amplification in parallel whole-head ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging using 306 detectors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Vesanen, Panu T; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Zevenhoven, Koos C J; Dabek, Juhani; Parkkonen, Lauri T; Zhdanov, Andrey; Ilmoniemi, Risto J

    2013-08-01

    In ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging, arrays of up to hundreds of highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can be used to detect the weak magnetic fields emitted by the precessing magnetization. Here, we investigate the noise amplification in sensitivity-encoded ultra-low-field MRI at various acceleration rates using a SQUID array consisting of 102 magnetometers, 102 gradiometers, or 306 magnetometers and gradiometers, to cover the whole head. Our results suggest that SQUID arrays consisting of 102 magnetometers and 102 gradiometers are similar in g-factor distribution. A SQUID array of 306 sensors (102 magnetometers and 204 gradiometers) only marginally improves the g-factor. Corroborating with previous studies, the g-factor in 2D sensitivity-encoded ultra-low-field MRI with 9 to 16-fold 2D accelerations using the SQUID array studied here may be acceptable.

  15. Effect of rapid thermal annealing on the noise properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dot structures

    SciTech Connect

    Arpatzanis, N.; Tsormpatzoglou, A.; Dimitriadis, C. A.; Song, J. D.; Choi, W. J.; Lee, J. I.; Charitidis, C.

    2007-09-01

    Self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on n{sup +}-GaAs substrates, capped between 0.4 {mu}m thick n-type GaAs layers with electron concentration of 1x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. The effect of rapid thermal annealing at 700 deg. C for 60 s on the noise properties of the structure has been investigated using Au/n-GaAs Schottky diodes as test devices. In the reference sample without containing QDs, the noise spectra show a generation-recombination (g-r) noise behavior due to a discrete energy level located about 0.51 eV below the conduction band edge. This trap is ascribed to the M4 (or EL3) trap in GaAs MBE layers, related to a chemical impurity-native defect complex. In the structure with embedded QDs, the observed g-r noise spectra are due to a midgap trap level ascribed to the EL2 trap in GaAs, which is related to the InAs QDs dissolution due to the thermal treatment.

  16. Combined action of time-delay and colored cross-associated multiplicative and additive noises on stability and stochastic resonance for a stochastic metapopulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang-Kang; Zong, De-Cai; Wang, Ya-Jun; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the transition between the stable state of a big density and the extinction state and stochastic resonance (SR) for a time-delayed metapopulation system disturbed by colored cross-correlated noises are investigated. By applying the fast descent method, the small time-delay approximation and McNamara and Wiesenfeld's SR theory, we investigate the impacts of time-delay, the multiplicative, additive noises and colored cross-correlated noise on the SNR and the shift between the two states of the system. Numerical results show that the multiplicative, additive noises and time-delay can all speed up the transition from the stable state to the extinction state, while the correlation noise and its correlation time can slow down the extinction process of the population system. With respect to SNR, the multiplicative noise always weakens the SR effect, while noise correlation time plays a dual role in motivating the SR phenomenon. Meanwhile, time-delay mainly plays a negative role in stimulating the SR phenomenon. Conversely, it could motivate the SR effect to increase the strength of the cross-correlation noise in the SNR-β plot, while the increase of additive noise intensity will firstly excite SR, and then suppress the SR effect.

  17. Cooling a nanomechanical resonator using spin-dependent transport and noise interference in Andreev reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Pascal; Belzig, Wolfgang; Rastelli, Gianluca

    Nanoelectromechanical systems promise to manipulate mechanical motion in the quantum regime using electron transport. For such a goal, a necessary condition is the ability of cooling the resonator into or near to its quantum ground state. A still open challenge in this field is the achievement of active cooling using purely electron transport in, for instance, suspended carbon nanotube quantum dots. We consider the quantum transport in a carbon nanotube quantum dot suspended between two electric nanocontacts. Due to the interaction between electrons and flexural mechanical modes, the electron transport results in inelastic vibration-assisted tunneling processes. These give rise to a mechanical damping and to a steady nonequilibrium phonon occupation of the resonator. We discuss these effects for two different coherent transport regimes: (i) spin-polarized current between two ferromagnets and (ii) subgap Andreev current between a superconductor and normal metal.

  18. Influence of thermal and resonance neutron on fast neutron flux measurement by 239Pu fission chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Li-Na; Wang, Qiang; Song, Ling-Li; Zheng, Chun

    2015-01-01

    The 239Pu fission chambers are widely used to measure fission spectrum neutron flux due to a flat response to fast neutrons. However, in the meantime the resonance and thermal neutrons can cause a significant influence on the measurement if they are moderated, which could be eliminated by using 10B and Cd covers. At a column enriched uranium fast neutron critical assembly, the fission reaction rates of 239Pu are measured as 1.791×10-16, 2.350×10-16 and 1.385×10-15 per second for 15 mm thick 10B cover, 0.5 mm thick Cd cover, and no cover respectively, while the fission reaction rate of 239Pu is rapidly increased to 2.569×10-14 for a 20 mm thick polythene covering fission chamber. The average 239Pu fission cross-section of thermal and resonance neutrons is calculated to be 500 b and 24.95 b with the assumption of 1/v and 1/E spectra respectively, then thermal, resonance and fast neutron flux are achieved to be 2.30×106, 2.24×106 and 1.04×108 cm-2·s-1.

  19. Repulsive particles under a general external potential: Thermodynamics by neglecting thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mauricio S; Nobre, Fernando D

    2016-08-01

    A recent proposal of an effective temperature θ, conjugated to a generalized entropy s_{q}, typical of nonextensive statistical mechanics, has led to a consistent thermodynamic framework in the case q=2. The proposal was explored for repulsively interacting vortices, currently used for modeling type-II superconductors. In these systems, the variable θ presents values much higher than those of typical room temperatures T, so that the thermal noise can be neglected (T/θ≃0). The whole procedure was developed for an equilibrium state obtained after a sufficiently long-time evolution, associated with a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation and approached due to a confining external harmonic potential, ϕ(x)=αx^{2}/2 (α>0). Herein, the thermodynamic framework is extended to a quite general confining potential, namely ϕ(x)=α|x|^{z}/z (z>1). It is shown that the main results of the previous analyses hold for any z>1: (i) The definition of the effective temperature θ conjugated to the entropy s_{2}. (ii) The construction of a Carnot cycle, whose efficiency is shown to be η=1-(θ_{2}/θ_{1}), where θ_{1} and θ_{2} are the effective temperatures associated with two isothermal transformations, with θ_{1}>θ_{2}. The special character of the Carnot cycle is indicated by analyzing another cycle that presents an efficiency depending on z. (iii) Applying Legendre transformations for a distinct pair of variables, different thermodynamic potentials are obtained, and furthermore, Maxwell relations and response functions are derived. The present approach shows a consistent thermodynamic framework, suggesting that these results should hold for a general confining potential ϕ(x), increasing the possibility of experimental verifications. PMID:27627259

  20. Repulsive particles under a general external potential: Thermodynamics by neglecting thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mauricio S; Nobre, Fernando D

    2016-08-01

    A recent proposal of an effective temperature θ, conjugated to a generalized entropy s_{q}, typical of nonextensive statistical mechanics, has led to a consistent thermodynamic framework in the case q=2. The proposal was explored for repulsively interacting vortices, currently used for modeling type-II superconductors. In these systems, the variable θ presents values much higher than those of typical room temperatures T, so that the thermal noise can be neglected (T/θ≃0). The whole procedure was developed for an equilibrium state obtained after a sufficiently long-time evolution, associated with a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation and approached due to a confining external harmonic potential, ϕ(x)=αx^{2}/2 (α>0). Herein, the thermodynamic framework is extended to a quite general confining potential, namely ϕ(x)=α|x|^{z}/z (z>1). It is shown that the main results of the previous analyses hold for any z>1: (i) The definition of the effective temperature θ conjugated to the entropy s_{2}. (ii) The construction of a Carnot cycle, whose efficiency is shown to be η=1-(θ_{2}/θ_{1}), where θ_{1} and θ_{2} are the effective temperatures associated with two isothermal transformations, with θ_{1}>θ_{2}. The special character of the Carnot cycle is indicated by analyzing another cycle that presents an efficiency depending on z. (iii) Applying Legendre transformations for a distinct pair of variables, different thermodynamic potentials are obtained, and furthermore, Maxwell relations and response functions are derived. The present approach shows a consistent thermodynamic framework, suggesting that these results should hold for a general confining potential ϕ(x), increasing the possibility of experimental verifications.

  1. Repulsive particles under a general external potential: Thermodynamics by neglecting thermal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Mauricio S.; Nobre, Fernando D.

    2016-08-01

    A recent proposal of an effective temperature θ , conjugated to a generalized entropy sq, typical of nonextensive statistical mechanics, has led to a consistent thermodynamic framework in the case q =2 . The proposal was explored for repulsively interacting vortices, currently used for modeling type-II superconductors. In these systems, the variable θ presents values much higher than those of typical room temperatures T , so that the thermal noise can be neglected (T /θ ≃0 ). The whole procedure was developed for an equilibrium state obtained after a sufficiently long-time evolution, associated with a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation and approached due to a confining external harmonic potential, ϕ (x ) =α x2/2 (α >0 ). Herein, the thermodynamic framework is extended to a quite general confining potential, namely ϕ (x ) =α|x | z/z (z >1 ). It is shown that the main results of the previous analyses hold for any z >1 : (i) The definition of the effective temperature θ conjugated to the entropy s2. (ii) The construction of a Carnot cycle, whose efficiency is shown to be η =1 -(θ2/θ1) , where θ1 and θ2 are the effective temperatures associated with two isothermal transformations, with θ1>θ2 . The special character of the Carnot cycle is indicated by analyzing another cycle that presents an efficiency depending on z . (iii) Applying Legendre transformations for a distinct pair of variables, different thermodynamic potentials are obtained, and furthermore, Maxwell relations and response functions are derived. The present approach shows a consistent thermodynamic framework, suggesting that these results should hold for a general confining potential ϕ (x ) , increasing the possibility of experimental verifications.

  2. Investigation of the MTC noise estimation with a coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulic dedicated model - 'Closing the loop'

    SciTech Connect

    Demaziere, C.; Larsson, V.

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the reliability of different noise estimators aimed at determining the Moderator Temperature Coefficient (MTC) of reactivity in Pressurized Water Reactors. By monitoring the inherent fluctuations in the neutron flux and moderator temperature, an on-line monitoring of the MTC without perturbing reactor operation is possible. In order to get an accurate estimation of the MTC by noise analysis, the point-kinetic component of the neutron noise and the core-averaged moderator temperature noise have to be used. Because of the scarcity of the in-core instrumentation, the determination of these quantities is difficult, and several possibilities thus exist for estimating the MTC by noise analysis. Furthermore, the effect of feedback has to be negligible at the frequency chosen for estimating the MTC in order to get a proper determination of the MTC. By using an integrated neutronic/thermal- hydraulic model specifically developed for estimating the three-dimensional distributions of the fluctuations in neutron flux, moderator properties, and fuel temperature, different approaches for estimating the MTC by noise analysis can be tested individually. It is demonstrated that a reliable MTC estimation can only be provided if the core is equipped with a sufficient number of both neutron detectors and temperature sensors, i.e. if the core contain in-core detectors monitoring both the axial and radial distributions of the fluctuations in neutron flux and moderator temperature. It is further proven that the effect of feedback is negligible for frequencies higher than 0.1 Hz, and thus the MTC noise estimations have to be performed at higher frequencies. (authors)

  3. The early history of thermal noise: The long way to paradigm change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörfel, Gunter

    2012-08-01

    Electronic noise is a consequence of the quantization of electric charge. So it is an omnipresent phenomenon and was observable early on -- latest at the birth of electronic amplifier technology. The acoustic noise in the headphones have become synonymous with very general fluctuation processes.

  4. Measurement of macroscopic plasma parameters with a radio experiment: Interpretation of the quasi-thermal noise spectrum observed in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couturier, P.; Hoang, S.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Steinberg, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The ISEE-3 SBH radio receiver has provided the first systematic observations of the quasi-thermal (plasma waves) noise in the solar wind plasma. The theoretical interpretation of that noise involves the particle distribution function so that electric noise measurements with long antennas provide a fast and independent method of measuring plasma parameters: densities and temperatures of a two component (core and halo) electron distribution function have been obtained in that way. The polarization of that noise is frequency dependent and sensitive to the drift velocity of the electron population. Below the plasma frequency, there is evidence of a weak noise spectrum with spectral index -1 which is not yet accounted for by the theory. The theoretical treatment of the noise associated with the low energy (thermal) proton population shows that the moving electrical antenna radiates in the surrounding plasma by Carenkov emission which becomes predominant at the low frequencies, below about 0.1 F sub P.

  5. White noise of Nb-based microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers with NbN coplanar resonators for readout of transition edge sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori; Yamamori, Hirotake; Nagasawa, Shuichi; Fukuda, Daiji; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2014-06-14

    White noise of dissipationless microwave radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (RF-SQUID) multiplexers has been experimentally studied to evaluate their readout performance for transition edge sensor (TES) photon counters ranging from near infrared to gamma ray. The characterization has been carried out at 4 K, first to avoid the low-frequency fluctuations present at around 0.1 K, and second, for a feasibility study of readout operation at 4 K for extended applications. To increase the resonant Q at 4 K and maintain low noise SQUID operation, multiplexer chips consisting of niobium nitride (NbN)-based coplanar-waveguide resonators and niobium (Nb)-based RF-SQUIDs have been developed. This hybrid multiplexer exhibited 1 × 10{sup 4} ≤ Q ≤ 2 × 10{sup 4} and the square root of spectral density of current noise referred to the SQUID input √S{sub I} = 31 pA/√Hz. The former and the latter are factor-of-five and seven improvements from our previous results on Nb-based resonators, respectively. Two-directional readout on the complex plane of the transmission component of scattering matrix S{sub 21} enables us to distinguish the flux noise from noise originating from other sources, such as the cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier. Systematic noise measurements with various microwave readout powers P{sub MR} make it possible to distinguish the contribution of noise sources within the system as follows: (1) The achieved √S{sub I} is dominated by the Nyquist noise from a resistor at 4 K in parallel to the SQUID input coil which is present to prevent microwave leakage to the TES. (2) The next dominant source is either the HEMT-amplifier noise (for small values of P{sub MR}) or the quantization noise due to the resolution of 300-K electronics (for large values of P{sub MR}). By a decrease of these noise levels to a degree that is achievable by current technology, we predict that the

  6. White noise of Nb-based microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers with NbN coplanar resonators for readout of transition edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori; Yamamori, Hirotake; Nagasawa, Shuichi; Fukuda, Daiji; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2014-06-01

    White noise of dissipationless microwave radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (RF-SQUID) multiplexers has been experimentally studied to evaluate their readout performance for transition edge sensor (TES) photon counters ranging from near infrared to gamma ray. The characterization has been carried out at 4 K, first to avoid the low-frequency fluctuations present at around 0.1 K, and second, for a feasibility study of readout operation at 4 K for extended applications. To increase the resonant Q at 4 K and maintain low noise SQUID operation, multiplexer chips consisting of niobium nitride (NbN)-based coplanar-waveguide resonators and niobium (Nb)-based RF-SQUIDs have been developed. This hybrid multiplexer exhibited 1 × 104 ≤ Q ≤ 2 × 104 and the square root of spectral density of current noise referred to the SQUID input √SI = 31 pA/√Hz. The former and the latter are factor-of-five and seven improvements from our previous results on Nb-based resonators, respectively. Two-directional readout on the complex plane of the transmission component of scattering matrix S21 enables us to distinguish the flux noise from noise originating from other sources, such as the cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier. Systematic noise measurements with various microwave readout powers PMR make it possible to distinguish the contribution of noise sources within the system as follows: (1) The achieved √SI is dominated by the Nyquist noise from a resistor at 4 K in parallel to the SQUID input coil which is present to prevent microwave leakage to the TES. (2) The next dominant source is either the HEMT-amplifier noise (for small values of PMR) or the quantization noise due to the resolution of 300-K electronics (for large values of PMR). By a decrease of these noise levels to a degree that is achievable by current technology, we predict that the microwave RF-SQUID multiplexer can exhibit √SI ≤ 5 pA/√Hz, i.e., close to √SI of

  7. Reproducibility of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in correlation with signal-to-noise ratio.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomohisa; Sakamoto, Setsu; Nakamoto, Yuji; Kohara, Nobuo; Senda, Michio

    2007-11-15

    An increased amount of myoinositol (mI) relative to creatine (Cr) by proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) measurement gives a useful aid for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous results of test-retest measurement of mI, however, have shown variability more than twice as large as for other metabolites. The aims of this study were to analyze test-retest variability of (1)H-MRS measurements in correlation with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Ten subjects clinically suspected of mild AD were examined twice (2-14 days apart) with (1)H-MRS measurements of voxels placed at anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. The percent differences between two measurements (%differences) of mI/Cr showed a significant linear trend to decrease as average SNR increased, but %differences of N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/Cr and choline (Cho)/Cr did not. The average of %differences was 10.5, 15.0 and 20.8 for NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and mI/Cr, respectively, indicating a prominent deterioration of mI/Cr measurement reproducibility, which decreased to 6.96, 15.4 and 9.87, respectively, when the analysis was limited to measurements with SNR over 25. The results indicate that MRS measurements with high SNR should be used to obtain reliable assessments of mI/Cr as accurate diagnostic indicator of AD in clinical MR examinations. PMID:17900878

  8. Review of pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting and new MEMs based resonant energy conversion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Scott Robert; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Mostafa, Salwa; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G

    2012-01-01

    Harvesting electrical energy from thermal energy sources using pyroelectric conversion techniques has been under investigation for over 50 years, but it has not received the attention that thermoelectric energy harvesting techniques have during this time period. This lack of interest stems from early studies which found that the energy conversion efficiencies achievable using pyroelectric materials were several times less than those potentially achievable with thermoelectrics. More recent modeling and experimental studies have shown that pyroelectric techniques can be cost competitive with thermoelectrics and, using new temperature cycling techniques, has the potential to be several times as efficient as thermoelectrics under comparable operating conditions. This paper will review the recent history in this field and describe the techniques that are being developed to increase the opportunities for pyroelectric energy harvesting. The development of a new thermal energy harvester concept, based on temperature cycled pyroelectric thermal-to-electrical energy conversion, are also outlined. The approach uses a resonantly driven, pyroelectric capacitive bimorph cantilever structure that can be used to rapidly cycle the temperature in the energy harvester. The device has been modeled using a finite element multi-physics based method, where the effect of the structure material properties and system parameters on the frequency and magnitude of temperature cycling, and the efficiency of energy recycling using the proposed structure, have been modeled. Results show that thermal contact conductance and heat source temperature differences play key roles in dominating the cantilever resonant frequency and efficiency of the energy conversion technique. This paper outlines the modeling, fabrication and testing of cantilever and pyroelectric structures and single element devices that demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of high efficiency thermal

  9. Thermal imager fixed pattern noise prediction using a characterization of the infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Paolo; Zatti, Stefano; Giunti, Claudio; Sozzi, Barbara; Guadagnoli, Emanuele; Porta, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    Cooled infrared detectors are typically characterized by well-known electro-optical parameters: responsivity, noise equivalent temperature difference, shot noise, 1/f noise, and so on. Particularly important for staring arrays is also the residual fixed pattern noise (FPN) that can be obtained after the application of the nonuniformity correction (NUC) algorithm. A direct measure of this parameter is usually hard to define because the residual FPN strongly depends, other than on the detector, on the choice of the NUC algorithm and the operative scenario. We introduce three measurable parameters: instability, nonlinearity, and a residual after a polynomial fitting of the detector response curve, and we demonstrate how they are related to the residual FPN after the application of an NUC (the relationship with three common correction algorithms is discussed). A comparison with experimental data is also presented and discussed.

  10. Nanoshell-mediated near-infrared thermal therapy of tumors under magnetic resonance guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, L. R.; Stafford, R. J.; Bankson, J. A.; Sershen, S. R.; Rivera, B.; Price, R. E.; Hazle, J. D.; Halas, N. J.; West, J. L.

    2003-11-01

    Metal nanoshells are a class of nanoparticles with tunable optical resonances. In this article, an application of this technology to thermal ablative therapy for cancer is described. By tuning the nanoshells to strongly absorb light in the near infrared, where optical transmission through tissue is optimal, a distribution of nanoshells at depth in tissue can be used to deliver a therapeutic dose of heat by using moderately low exposures of extracorporeally applied near-infrared (NIR) light. Human breast carcinoma cells incubated with nanoshells in vitro were found to have undergone photothermally induced morbidity on exposure to NIR light (820 nm, 35 W/cm2), as determined by using a fluorescent viability stain. Cells without nanoshells displayed no loss in viability after the same periods and conditions of NIR illumination. Likewise, in vivo studies under magnetic resonance guidance revealed that exposure to low doses of NIR light (820 nm, 4 W/cm2) in solid tumors treated with metal nanoshells reached average maximum temperatures capable of inducing irreversible tissue damage (T = 37.4 ± 6.6°C) within 4-6 min. Controls treated without nanoshells demonstrated significantly lower average temperatures on exposure to NIR light (T < 10°C). These findings demonstrated good correlation with histological findings. Tissues heated above the thermal damage threshold displayed coagulation, cell shrinkage, and loss of nuclear staining, which are indicators of irreversible thermal damage. Control tissues appeared undamaged.

  11. Thermal Excitation of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Using Spin Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Fridjhon, Peter; Rubin, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations into the thermal excitation of liquid paramagnetic contrast agents using the spin resonance relaxation mechanism are presented. The electronic spin-lattice relaxation time τ1e of gadolinium-based contrast agents, which is estimated at 0.1 ns, is ten orders of magnitude faster than the relaxation time of protons in water. The shorter relaxation time is found to significantly increase the rate of thermal energy deposition. To the authors’ knowledge this is the first study of gadolinium based contrast agents in a liquid state used as thermal agents. Analysis shows that when τ1e and other experimental parameters are optimally selected, a maximum theoretical heating rate of 29.4 °C.s−1 could be achieved which would suffice for clinical thermal ablation of neoplasms. The experimental results show a statistically significant thermal response for two out of the four contrast agents tested. The results are compared to the simulated estimates via analysis of a detailed model of the system. While these experimentally determined temperature rises are small and thus of no clinical utility, their presence supports the theoretical analysis and strongly suggests that the chemical structure of the selected compounds plays an important role in this mechanism of heat deposition. There exists an opportunity for the development of alternative gadolinium-based compounds with an order of magnitude longer τ1e in a diluted form to be used as an efficient hyperthermia agent for clinical use. PMID:27341338

  12. Thermal Excitation of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Using Spin Resonance.

    PubMed

    Dinger, Steven C; Fridjhon, Peter; Rubin, David M

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations into the thermal excitation of liquid paramagnetic contrast agents using the spin resonance relaxation mechanism are presented. The electronic spin-lattice relaxation time τ1e of gadolinium-based contrast agents, which is estimated at 0.1 ns, is ten orders of magnitude faster than the relaxation time of protons in water. The shorter relaxation time is found to significantly increase the rate of thermal energy deposition. To the authors' knowledge this is the first study of gadolinium based contrast agents in a liquid state used as thermal agents. Analysis shows that when τ1e and other experimental parameters are optimally selected, a maximum theoretical heating rate of 29.4 °C.s-1 could be achieved which would suffice for clinical thermal ablation of neoplasms. The experimental results show a statistically significant thermal response for two out of the four contrast agents tested. The results are compared to the simulated estimates via analysis of a detailed model of the system. While these experimentally determined temperature rises are small and thus of no clinical utility, their presence supports the theoretical analysis and strongly suggests that the chemical structure of the selected compounds plays an important role in this mechanism of heat deposition. There exists an opportunity for the development of alternative gadolinium-based compounds with an order of magnitude longer τ1e in a diluted form to be used as an efficient hyperthermia agent for clinical use. PMID:27341338

  13. Resonant dipolar relaxation in poly ( ɛ -caprolactone)—A thermally stimulated depolarization current study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patidar, M. M.; Jain, D.; Nath, R.; Ganesan, V.

    2016-07-01

    Resonant dipolar relaxation in poly( ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) is reported using thermally stimulated discharge current spectroscopy. PCL is a bio-medically known shape memory polymer having a well defined γ, β, α, and α ' relaxations, respectively, centered around 125 K, 170 K, 220 K, and 270 K as seen by the measurements. By employing a new protocol variable poling temperature at constant freezing temperature, resonant dipolar relaxation in PCL could be induced, especially in the vicinity of α relaxation. Such a protocol is useful in de-convoluting the features in a more meaningful fashion. By an analysis of activation process, we could show a clear contrast enhancement of the dynamics of the participating dipoles by means of a minimum in the activation energies situated around the glass transition region. The relevant parameters of interest such as activation energies and relaxation times are estimated and discussed.

  14. Heat equation inversion framework for average SAR calculation from magnetic resonance thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Alon, Leeor; Sodickson, Daniel K; Deniz, Cem M

    2016-10-01

    Deposition of radiofrequency (RF) energy can be quantified via electric field or temperature change measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging has been used as a tool to measure three dimensional small temperature changes associated with RF radiation exposure. When duration of RF exposure is long, conversion from temperature change to specific absorption rate (SAR) is nontrivial due to prominent heat-diffusion and conduction effects. In this work, we demonstrated a method for calculation of SAR via an inversion of the heat equation including heat-diffusion and conduction effects. This method utilizes high-resolution three dimensional magnetic resonance temperature images and measured thermal properties of the phantom to achieve accurate calculation of SAR. Accuracy of the proposed method was analyzed with respect to operating frequency of a dipole antenna and parameters used in heat equation inversion. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:493-503, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27490064

  15. Fano resonance in the nonadiabatically pumped shot noise of a time-dependent quantum well in a two-dimensional electron gas and graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Rui Dai, Jiao-Hua; Guo, Yong

    2015-04-28

    Interference between different quantum paths can generate Fano resonance. One of the examples is transport through a quasibound state driven by a time-dependent scattering potential. Previously it is found that Fano resonance occurs as a result of energy matching in one-dimensional systems. In this work, we demonstrate that when transverse motion is present, Fano resonance occurs precisely at the wavevector matching situation. Using the Floquet scattering theory, we considered the transport properties of a nonadiabatic time-dependent well both in a two-dimensional electron gas and monolayer graphene structure. Dispersion of the quasibound state of a static quantum well is obtained with transverse motion present. We found that Fano resonance occurs when the wavevector in the transport direction of one of the Floquet sidebands is exactly identical to that of the quasibound state in the well at equilibrium and follows the dispersion pattern of the latter. To observe the Fano resonance phenomenon in the transmission spectrum, we also considered the pumped shot noise properties when time and spatial symmetry secures vanishing current in the considered configuration. Prominent Fano resonance is found in the differential pumped shot noise with respect to the reservoir Fermi energy.

  16. Method and Apparatus for Thermal Spraying of Metal Coatings Using Pulsejet Resonant Pulsed Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thermal spraying a metal coating on a substrate is accomplished with a modified pulsejet and optionally an ejector to assist in preventing oxidation. Metal such as Aluminum or Magnesium may be used. A pulsejet is first initiated by applying fuel, air, and a spark. Metal is inserted continuously in a high volume of metal into a combustion chamber of the pulsejet. The combustion is thereafter controlled resonantly at high frequency and the metal is heated to a molten state. The metal is then transported from the combustion chamber into a tailpipe of said pulsejet and is expelled therefrom at high velocity and deposited on a target substrate.

  17. Measurement of the thermal neutron capture cross section and the resonance integral of radioactive Hf182

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vockenhuber, C.; Bichler, M.; Wallner, A.; Kutschera, W.; Dillmann, I.; Käppeler, F.

    2008-04-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the radioactive isotope Hf182 (t1/2=8.9×106 yr) in the thermal and epithermal energy regions have been measured by activation at the TRIGA Mark-II reactor of the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities in Vienna, Austria, and subsequent γ-ray spectroscopy of Hf183. High values for the thermal (kT=25 meV) cross section σ0=133±10 b and for the resonance integral I0=5850±660 b were found. Additionally, the absolute intensities of the main γ-ray transitions in the decay of Hf182 have been considerably improved.

  18. Calculation of Shear Stiffness in Noise Dominated Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) Data Based on Principal Frequency Estimation

    PubMed Central

    McGee, K. P.; Lake, D.; Mariappan, Y; Hubmayr, R. D.; Manduca, A.; Ansell, K.; Ehman, R. L.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a non invasive phase-contrast based method for quantifying the shear stiffness of biological tissues. Synchronous application of a shear wave source and motion encoding gradient waveforms within the MRE pulse sequence enable visualization of the propagating shear wave throughout the medium under investigation. Encoded shear wave induced displacements are then processed to calculate the local shear stiffness of each voxel. An important consideration in local shear stiffness estimates is that the algorithms employed typically calculate shear stiffness using relatively high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) MRE images and have difficulties at extremely low SNR. A new method of estimating shear stiffness based on the principal spatial frequency of the shear wave displacement map is presented. Finite element simulations were performed to assess the relative insensitivity of this approach to decreases in SNR. Additionally, ex vivo experiments were conducted on normal rat lungs to assess the robustness of this approach in low SNR biological tissue. Simulation and experimental results indicate that calculation of shear stiffness by the principal frequency method is less sensitive to extremely low SNR than previously reported MRE inversion methods but at the expense of loss of spatial information within the region of interest from which the principal frequency estimate is derived. PMID:21701049

  19. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Focal Laser-Induced Interstitial Thermal Therapy in a Canine Prostate Model

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, R. Jason; Shetty, Anil; Elliott, Andrew M.; Klumpp, Sherry A.; McNichols, Roger J.; Gowda, Ashok; Hazle, John D.; Ward, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate a newly FDA-cleared closed-loop, magnetic resonance (MR)-guided laser-induced interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) system for targeted ablation of prostate tissue in order to assess targeting ability, lesion generation and feasibility. Materials and Methods Mongrel dogs with (n = 2) and without (n = 5) canine transmissible venereal tumors in the prostate were imaged with a 1.5-T MR imaging scanner. Real-time 3D MR imaging was used to accurately position water-cooled 980-nm laser applicators to pre-determined targets within the canine prostates. Destruction of targeted tissue was guided with MR temperature imaging in real time for precise control of thermal ablation. MR predictions of thermal damage were correlated with findings from post-treatment images and compared to histopathology. Results Template-based targeting using MR guidance allowed the laser applicator to be placed within a mean of 1.1 mm (SD = 0.7 mm) of the target location. The mean width and length of the ablation zone by MR were 13.7 mm (SD = 1.3 mm) and 19.0 mm (SD = 4.2 mm) using single and compound exposures. The thermal damage predicted by MR correlated with the thermal damage determined by post-treatment imaging with a slope near unity and excellent correlation (R2 = 0.94). Conclusions This LITT system provided rapid and localized heating of tissue with minimal collateral thermal spread or injury. Combined with real-time monitoring and template-based planning, MR-guided LITT is an attractive modality for prostate cancer focal therapy. PMID:20727549

  20. Random telegraphic voltage noise due to thermal bi-stability in a superconducting weak link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Sourav; Kumar, Nikhil; Winkelmann, C. B.; Courtois, Herve; Gupta, Anjan K.

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the random telegraphic voltage noise signal in the hysteretic bi-stable state of a superconducting weak link device. Fluctuation induced random switching between zero voltage state and non-zero-voltage state gives rise to a random telegraphic voltage signal in time domain. This telegraphic noise is used to find the mean lifetime of each of the two states. The mean life time in the zero voltage state is found to decrease with increasing bias current while that of resistive state increases and thus the two cross at certain bias current. We qualitatively discuss this observed switching behavior as arising from the bi-stable nature.

  1. Conjunction of standing wave and resonance in asymmetric nanowires: a mechanism for thermal rectification and remote energy accumulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-Yang; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2015-12-02

    As an important way to control and manage heat transport, thermal rectification has become an elementary issue in the field of phononics and plays a key role in the designing of thermal devices. Here we investigate systematically the standing wave and the accompanying resonance process in asymmetric nanowires to understand the standing wave itself and its great effect on thermal rectification. Results show that the standing wave is sensitive to both the structural and thermal properties of the material, and its great effect on enhancing the thermal rectification is realized not only by the energy-localization nature of the standing wave, but also by the resonance-caused large amplitude and high energy of the standing wave.

  2. Conjunction of standing wave and resonance in asymmetric nanowires: a mechanism for thermal rectification and remote energy accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yue-Yang; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    As an important way to control and manage heat transport, thermal rectification has become an elementary issue in the field of phononics and plays a key role in the designing of thermal devices. Here we investigate systematically the standing wave and the accompanying resonance process in asymmetric nanowires to understand the standing wave itself and its great effect on thermal rectification. Results show that the standing wave is sensitive to both the structural and thermal properties of the material, and its great effect on enhancing the thermal rectification is realized not only by the energy-localization nature of the standing wave, but also by the resonance-caused large amplitude and high energy of the standing wave. PMID:26628291

  3. Method for Thermal Spraying of Coatings Using Resonant-Pulsed Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    A method has been devised for high-volume, high-velocity surface deposition of protective metallic coatings on otherwise vulnerable surfaces. Thermal spraying is used whereby the material to be deposited is heated to the melting point by passing through a flame. Rather than the usual method of deposition from the jet formed from the combustion products, this innovation uses non-steady combustion (i.e. high-frequency, periodic, confined bursts), which generates not only higher temperatures and heat transfer rates, but exceedingly high impingement velocities an order of magnitude higher than conventional thermal systems. Higher impingement rates make for better adhesion. The high heat transfer rates developed here allow the deposition material to be introduced, not as an expensive powder with high surface-area-to-volume, but in convenient rod form, which is also easier and simpler to feed into the system. The nonsteady, resonant combustion process is self-aspirating and requires no external actuation or control and no high-pressure supply of fuel or air. The innovation has been demonstrated using a commercially available resonant combustor shown in the figure. Fuel is naturally aspirated from the tank through the lower Tygon tube and into the pulsejet. Air for starting is ported through the upper Tygon tube line. Once operation commences, this air is no longer needed as additional air is naturally aspirated through the inlet. A spark plug on the device is needed for starting, but the process carries on automatically as the operational device is resonant and reignites itself with each 220-Hz pulse.

  4. Assessment of thermal effects of interstitial laser phototherapy on mammary tumors using proton resonance frequency method.

    PubMed

    Le, Kelvin; Li, Xiaosong; Figueroa, Daniel; Towner, Rheal A; Garteiser, Philippe; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Liu, Hong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E; Chen, Wei R

    2011-12-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses a synergistic approach to treat cancer systemically through local laser irradiation and immunological stimulation. Currently, LIT utilizes dye-assisted noninvasive laser irradiation to achieve selective photothermal interaction. However, LIT faces difficulties treating deeper tumors or tumors with heavily pigmented overlying skin. To circumvent these barriers, we use interstitial laser irradiation to induce the desired photothermal effects. The purpose of this study is to analyze the thermal effects of interstitial irradiation using proton resonance frequency (PRF). An 805-nm near-infrared laser with an interstitial cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors. Different power settings (1.0, 1.25, and 1.5 W) were applied with an irradiation duration of 10 min. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7 T magnetic resonance imager using PRF. We found that temperature distributions in tissue depended on both laser power and time settings, and that variance in tissue composition has a major influence in temperature elevation. The temperature elevations measured during interstitial laser irradiation by PRF and thermocouple were consistent, with some variations due to tissue composition and the positioning of the thermocouple's needle probes. Our results indicated that, for a tissue irradiation of 10 min, the elevation of rat tumor temperature ranged from 8 to 11°C for 1 W and 8 to 15°C for 1.5 W. This is the first time a 7 T magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. Our work provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside a tumor using interstitial laser treatment. Our work may lead to an optimal protocol for future cancer treatment using interstitial phototherapy in conjunction with immunotherapy. PMID:22191937

  5. Assessment of thermal effects of interstitial laser phototherapy on mammary tumors using proton resonance frequency method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Kelvin; Li, Xiaosong; Figueroa, Daniel; Towner, Rheal A.; Garteiser, Philippe; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Liu, Hong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-12-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses a synergistic approach to treat cancer systemically through local laser irradiation and immunological stimulation. Currently, LIT utilizes dye-assisted noninvasive laser irradiation to achieve selective photothermal interaction. However, LIT faces difficulties treating deeper tumors or tumors with heavily pigmented overlying skin. To circumvent these barriers, we use interstitial laser irradiation to induce the desired photothermal effects. The purpose of this study is to analyze the thermal effects of interstitial irradiation using proton resonance frequency (PRF). An 805-nm near-infrared laser with an interstitial cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors. Different power settings (1.0, 1.25, and 1.5 W) were applied with an irradiation duration of 10 min. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7 T magnetic resonance imager using PRF. We found that temperature distributions in tissue depended on both laser power and time settings, and that variance in tissue composition has a major influence in temperature elevation. The temperature elevations measured during interstitial laser irradiation by PRF and thermocouple were consistent, with some variations due to tissue composition and the positioning of the thermocouple's needle probes. Our results indicated that, for a tissue irradiation of 10 min, the elevation of rat tumor temperature ranged from 8 to 11°C for 1 W and 8 to 15°C for 1.5 W. This is the first time a 7 T magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. Our work provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside a tumor using interstitial laser treatment. Our work may lead to an optimal protocol for future cancer treatment using interstitial phototherapy in conjunction with immunotherapy.

  6. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied - in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry - neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  7. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-15

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied – in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry – neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  8. Magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy: report of a series of pediatric brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Spinoza, Zulma; Choi, Hoon

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a novel, minimally invasive treatment that has multiple advantages in pediatric use and broad applicability for different types of lesions. Here, the authors report the preliminary results of the first series of pediatric brain tumors treated with MRgLITT at Golisano Children's Hospital in Syracuse, New York. METHODS Pediatric brain tumors treated with MRgLITT between February 2012 and August 2014 at Golisano Children's Hospital were evaluated retrospectively. Medical records, radiological findings, surgical data, complications, and results of tumor volumetric analyses were reviewed. The Visualase thermal laser system (Medtronic) was used in all MRgLITT procedures. RESULTS This series included 11 patients with 12 tumors (pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymoma, medulloblastoma, choroid plexus xanthogranuloma, subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, and ganglioglioma). A single laser and multiple overlapping ablations were used for all procedures. The mean laser dose was 10.23 W, and the mean total ablation time was 68.95 seconds. The mean initial target volume was 6.79 cm(3), and the mean immediate post-ablation volume was 7.86 cm(3). The mean hospital stay was 3.25 days, and the mean follow-up time was 24.5 months. Tumor volume decreased in the first 3 months after surgery (n = 11; p = 0.007) and continued to decrease by the 4- to 6-month followup (n = 11; mean volume 2.61 cm(3); p = 0.009). Two patients experienced post-ablation complications: transient right leg weakness in one patient, and transient hemiparesis, akinetic mutism, and eye movement disorder in the other. CONCLUSIONS Magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy is an effective first- or second-line treatment for select pediatric brain tumors. Larger multiinstitutional clinical trials are necessary to evaluate its use for different types of lesions to further standardize practices.

  9. Magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy: report of a series of pediatric brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Spinoza, Zulma; Choi, Hoon

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a novel, minimally invasive treatment that has multiple advantages in pediatric use and broad applicability for different types of lesions. Here, the authors report the preliminary results of the first series of pediatric brain tumors treated with MRgLITT at Golisano Children's Hospital in Syracuse, New York. METHODS Pediatric brain tumors treated with MRgLITT between February 2012 and August 2014 at Golisano Children's Hospital were evaluated retrospectively. Medical records, radiological findings, surgical data, complications, and results of tumor volumetric analyses were reviewed. The Visualase thermal laser system (Medtronic) was used in all MRgLITT procedures. RESULTS This series included 11 patients with 12 tumors (pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymoma, medulloblastoma, choroid plexus xanthogranuloma, subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, and ganglioglioma). A single laser and multiple overlapping ablations were used for all procedures. The mean laser dose was 10.23 W, and the mean total ablation time was 68.95 seconds. The mean initial target volume was 6.79 cm(3), and the mean immediate post-ablation volume was 7.86 cm(3). The mean hospital stay was 3.25 days, and the mean follow-up time was 24.5 months. Tumor volume decreased in the first 3 months after surgery (n = 11; p = 0.007) and continued to decrease by the 4- to 6-month followup (n = 11; mean volume 2.61 cm(3); p = 0.009). Two patients experienced post-ablation complications: transient right leg weakness in one patient, and transient hemiparesis, akinetic mutism, and eye movement disorder in the other. CONCLUSIONS Magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy is an effective first- or second-line treatment for select pediatric brain tumors. Larger multiinstitutional clinical trials are necessary to evaluate its use for different types of lesions to further standardize practices. PMID:26849811

  10. Simulation of generation of dissipative soliton, dissipative soliton resonance and noise-like pulse in Yb-doped mode-locked fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhaochen; Li, Huihui; Wang, Pu

    2015-03-01

    we report three types of pulse generation in Yb-doped nonlinear polarization rotation mode-locked fiber lasers in all-normal-dispersion regime through simulation, including dissipative soliton, dissipative soliton resonance and noise-like pulse. We distinguish the different conditions of generating such different pulses by analyzing the transmission curve of saturable absorber, which plays a key role in pulse shaping. PMID:25836822

  11. Preliminary investigation into the design of thermally responsive Forster resonance energy transfer colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, Monte Scott

    While nuclear imaging techniques (Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Computed Tomography, and Positron Emission Tomography) have proven effective for diagnosis and treatment of disease in the human body, fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging offers additional benefits. Fluorescent imaging provides high resolution with real-time response, persistent lifetime (hours to days), cell targeting, and transdermal penetration with minimal physical encumbrance. Malignant cells can be targeted by absorbance of exogenous fluorescent nanoprobe contrast agents. Imaging is improved by fluorescent enhancement, especially by energy transfer between attached dyes. Also for use against cancer are heat-active treatments, such as hyperthermal, photothermal, and chemothermal therapies. Helpful to these treatments is the thermal response from nanoprobes, within human cells, which provide real-time feedback. The present study investigates the design and feasibility of a nanoprobe molecular device, absorbable into malignant human cells, which provides real-time tracking and thermal response, as indicated by enhanced fluorescence by energy transfer. A poly(propargyl acrylate) colloidal suspension was synthesized. The particles were modified with a triblock copolymer, previously shown to be thermally responsive, and an end-attached fluorescent dye. A second dye was modeled for attachment in subsequent work. When two fluorescent dyes are brought within sufficiently close proximity, and excitation light is supplied, energy can be transferred between dyes to give enhanced fluorescence with a large Stokes shift (increase in wavelength between excitation and emission). The dye pair was modeled for overlap of emission and absorbance wavelengths, and energy transfer was demonstrated with 23% efficiency and a 209 nm Stokes shift. The quantum yield of the donor dye was determined at 70%, and the distance for 50% energy transfer was calculated at 2.9 nm, consistent with reports for similar compounds. When

  12. Blocking Phonon Transport by Structural Resonances in Alloy-Based Nanophononic Metamaterials Leads to Ultralow Thermal Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Kosevich, Yuriy A; Han, Haoxue; Donadio, Davide; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the design rules to obtain materials that enable a tight control of phonon transport over a broad range of frequencies would aid major developments in thermoelectric energy harvesting, heat management in microelectronics, and information and communication technology. Using atomistic simulations we show that the metamaterials approach relying on localized resonances is very promising to engineer heat transport at the nanoscale. Combining designed resonant structures to alloying can lead to extremely low thermal conductivity in silicon nanowires. The hybridization between resonant phonons and propagating modes greatly reduces the group velocities and the phonon mean free paths in the low frequency acoustic range below 4 THz. Concurrently, alloy scattering hinders the propagation of high frequency thermal phonons. Our calculations establish a rationale between the size, shape, and period of the resonant structures, and the thermal conductivity of the nanowire, and demonstrate that this approach is even effective to block phonon transport in wavelengths much longer than the size and period of the surface resonant structures. A further consequence of using resonant structures is that they are not expected to scatter electrons, which is beneficial for thermoelectric applications. PMID:27447516

  13. Blocking Phonon Transport by Structural Resonances in Alloy-Based Nanophononic Metamaterials Leads to Ultralow Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Han, Haoxue; Donadio, Davide; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the design rules to obtain materials that enable a tight control of phonon transport over a broad range of frequencies would aid major developments in thermoelectric energy harvesting, heat management in microelectronics, and information and communication technology. Using atomistic simulations we show that the metamaterials approach relying on localized resonances is very promising to engineer heat transport at the nanoscale. Combining designed resonant structures to alloying can lead to extremely low thermal conductivity in silicon nanowires. The hybridization between resonant phonons and propagating modes greatly reduces the group velocities and the phonon mean free paths in the low frequency acoustic range below 4 THz. Concurrently, alloy scattering hinders the propagation of high frequency thermal phonons. Our calculations establish a rationale between the size, shape, and period of the resonant structures, and the thermal conductivity of the nanowire, and demonstrate that this approach is even effective to block phonon transport in wavelengths much longer than the size and period of the surface resonant structures. A further consequence of using resonant structures is that they are not expected to scatter electrons, which is beneficial for thermoelectric applications.

  14. Blocking Phonon Transport by Structural Resonances in Alloy-Based Nanophononic Metamaterials Leads to Ultralow Thermal Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Kosevich, Yuriy A; Han, Haoxue; Donadio, Davide; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the design rules to obtain materials that enable a tight control of phonon transport over a broad range of frequencies would aid major developments in thermoelectric energy harvesting, heat management in microelectronics, and information and communication technology. Using atomistic simulations we show that the metamaterials approach relying on localized resonances is very promising to engineer heat transport at the nanoscale. Combining designed resonant structures to alloying can lead to extremely low thermal conductivity in silicon nanowires. The hybridization between resonant phonons and propagating modes greatly reduces the group velocities and the phonon mean free paths in the low frequency acoustic range below 4 THz. Concurrently, alloy scattering hinders the propagation of high frequency thermal phonons. Our calculations establish a rationale between the size, shape, and period of the resonant structures, and the thermal conductivity of the nanowire, and demonstrate that this approach is even effective to block phonon transport in wavelengths much longer than the size and period of the surface resonant structures. A further consequence of using resonant structures is that they are not expected to scatter electrons, which is beneficial for thermoelectric applications.

  15. Application oriented batch fabrication and system level integration of thermal-piezoresistive and piezoelectric M/NEMS resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, Emad

    Today micro- and nano-electromechanical (MEMS and NEMS) resonant sensors are integral to numerous industrial, environmental, and biomedical applications. Traditionally capacitive and piezoelectric have been the primary options for transduction of high frequency resonant structures. When direct contact with the surrounding environment is needed, however, capacitive resonators are not suitable candidates due to their low Qs and vulnerability to contaminants. Recent developments in the field of high frequency thermally actuated MEMS resonators with piezoresistive detection have enabled a great deal of opportunities for realization of more robust, reliable and sensitive sensing platforms. Such monolithic structures can be conveniently implemented at micro and nanoscale without any fabrication challenges or the need for material integration. Self-sustained oscillation capability and design flexibility for sensory applications are among other unique properties that thermal-piezoresistive transduction offers. The objective of the present research is to explore the untapped potentials of thermal-piezoresistive transduction for expanding the horizons of the field of N/MEMS resonant sensors. Moreover, a new class of piezoelectric MEMS resonant structures capable of operating in liquid media is developed and its potential as a direct real-time chemical and biological sensor is investigated. Low-cost batch fabrication of nanoelectromechanical devices and controllable feature size reduction of such will be among other topics being addressed in the current study. In particular, the crystalline structure of silicon will be exploited to realize nanowires with smooth surface and any length and cross-sectional dimensions using only conventional microfabrication processes.

  16. Resonant Pedestal Pressure Reduction Induced by a Thermal Transport Enhancement due to Stochastic Magnetic Boundary Layers in High Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, O.; Evans, T.E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Unterberg, E. A.; Austin, M. E.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Frerichs, H.; Groth, M.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lehnen, M.; Leonard, A. W.; Mordijck, S.; Moyer, R.A.; Osborne, T. H.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Schaffer, M. J.; Unterberg, B.; West, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    Good alignment of the magnetic field line pitch angle with the mode structure of an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field is shown to induce modulation of the pedestal electron pressure p(e) in high confinement high rotation plasmas at the DIII-D tokamak with a shape similar to ITER, the next step tokamak experiment. This is caused by an edge safety factor q(95) resonant enhancement of the thermal transport, while in contrast, the RMP induced particle pump out does not show a significant resonance. The measured p(e) reduction correlates to an increase in the modeled stochastic layer width during pitch angle variations matching results from resistive low rotation plasmas at the TEXTOR tokamak. These findings suggest a field line pitch angle resonant formation of a stochastic magnetic edge layer as an explanation for the q(95) resonant character of type-I edge localized mode suppression by RMPs.

  17. Resonant Pedestal Pressure Reduction Induced by a Thermal Transport Enhancement due to Stochastic Magnetic Boundary Layers in High Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Lehnen, M.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.; Evans, T. E.; Austin, M. E.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Schaffer, M. J.; West, W. P.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Groth, M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, E. A.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Mordijck, S.

    2009-10-16

    Good alignment of the magnetic field line pitch angle with the mode structure of an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field is shown to induce modulation of the pedestal electron pressure p{sub e} in high confinement high rotation plasmas at the DIII-D tokamak with a shape similar to ITER, the next step tokamak experiment. This is caused by an edge safety factor q{sub 95} resonant enhancement of the thermal transport, while in contrast, the RMP induced particle pump out does not show a significant resonance. The measured p{sub e} reduction correlates to an increase in the modeled stochastic layer width during pitch angle variations matching results from resistive low rotation plasmas at the TEXTOR tokamak. These findings suggest a field line pitch angle resonant formation of a stochastic magnetic edge layer as an explanation for the q{sub 95} resonant character of type-I edge localized mode suppression by RMPs.

  18. Tailored noise waveform/collision-induced dissociation of ions stored in a linear ion trap combined with liquid chromatography/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vilkov, Andrey N; Bogdanov, Bogdan; Pasa-Tolić, Ljiljana; Prior, Dave C; Anderson, Gordon A; Masselon, Christophe D; Moore, Ronald J; Smith, Richard D

    2004-01-01

    A new collision-induced dissociation (CID) technique based on broadband tailored noise waveform (TNW) excitation of ions stored in a linear ion trap has been developed. In comparison with the conventional sustained off-resonance irradiation (SORI) CID method commonly used in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS), this MS/MS technique increases throughput by eliminating the long pump-down delay associated with gas introduction into the high vacuum ICR cell region. In addition, the TNW-CID method speeds spectrum acquisition since it does not require Fourier transformation, calculation of resonant frequencies and generation of the excitation waveforms. We demonstrate TNW-CID coupled with on-line capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography separations for the identification of peptides. The experimental results are compared with data obtained using conventional quadrupole ion trap MS/MS and SORI-CID MS/MS in an ICR cell.

  19. Effects of resonant phonon scattering from internal molecular modes on the thermal conductivity of molecular glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivchikov, A. I.; Yushchenko, A. N.; Korolyuk, O. A.; Bermejo, F. J.; Fernandez-Perea, R.; Bustinduy, I.; González, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal conductivity κ(T) of the crystalline and glassy phases of the two isomers of propyl alcohol has been measured. The two isomers differ by a minor chemical detail involving the position of the hydroxyl group with respect to the carbon backbone. Such a difference in molecular structure leads, however, to disparate behaviors for the temperature dependence of κ(T) , for both glass and crystal states. The κ(T) for the glass shows for 1-propanol an anomalously large plateau region comprising temperatures within 6-90K , while data for isomeric 2-propanol show only a small plateau up to 10K which is comparable to data on lower alcohols. The results emphasize the role played by internal molecular degrees of freedom as sources of strong resonant phonon scattering.

  20. Observation of thermal spin-transfer torque via ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Bai, Lihui; Chen, Xiaobin; Guo, Hong; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.; Hu, C.-M.

    2016-08-01

    The thermal spin-transfer torque (TSTT) in magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) was systematically studied using electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Evidence for the existence of TSTT in MTJs is observed. A temperature difference was applied across an MTJ acting as a TSTT on the free layer of the MTJ. The FMR of the free layer was then excited by a microwave current and electrically detected as a dc voltage. We found that the FMR line shape was changed by the TSTT, indicated by the ratio of dispersive and Lorentz components of the FMR spectra (D /L ). D /L increases by increasing the temperature difference. In addition, we analyze the magnetization orientation dependence of TSTT and provide solid evidence that this dependence differs from the magnetization orientation dependence of spin-transfer torque driven by a dc bias.

  1. Quantification of total pigments in citrus essential oils by thermal wave resonant cavity photopyroelectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    López-Muñoz, Gerardo A; Antonio-Pérez, Aurora; Díaz-Reyes, J

    2015-05-01

    A general theory of thermal wave resonant cavity photopyroelectric spectroscopy (TWRC-PPE) was recently proposed by Balderas-López (2012) for the thermo-optical characterisation of substances in a condensed phase. This theory is used to quantify the total carotenoids and chlorophylls in several folded and un-folded citrus essential oils to demonstrate the viability of using this technique as an alternative analytical method for the quantification of total pigments in citrus oils. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) reveals significant differences (p < 0.05) among the means of optical absorption coefficient data for the folding degree and fruit type in citrus oils. The experimental results show that TWRC-PPE spectroscopy can be used to quantify concentrations up to five times higher of total carotenoids and chlorophylls in citrus oils than UV-Vis spectroscopy without sample preparation or dilution. The optical limits of this technique and possible interference are also described.

  2. Method and Apparatus for Thermal Spraying of Metal Coatings Using Pulsejet Resonant Pulsed Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus and method [or thermal spraying a metal coating on a substrate is accomplished with a modified pulsejet and optionally an ejector to assist in preventing oxidation. Metal such a Aluminum or Magnesium may be used. A pulsejet is first initiated by applying fuel, air. and a spark. Metal is inserted continuously in a high volume of meta1 into a combustion chamber of the pulsejet. The combustion is thereafter. controlled resonantly at high frequency and the metal is heated to a molten state. The metal is then transported from the combustion chamber into a tail pipe of said pulsejet and is expelled therefrom at high velocity and deposited on a target substrate.

  3. Andrade, Omori, and time-to-failure laws from thermal noise in material rupture.

    PubMed

    Saichev, A; Sornette, D

    2005-01-01

    Using a simple mean-field rupture model with quenched disorder in the presence of thermal fluctuations introduced by S. Ciliberto et al., we provide an analytical theory of three ubiquitous empirical observations obtained in creep (constant applied stress) experiments: the initial Andrade-like and Omori-like 1/t decay of the rate of deformation and of fiber ruptures and the 1/( tc-t) critical time-to-failure behavior of acoustic emissions just prior to the macroscopic rupture. The lifetime of the material is controlled by a thermally activated Arrhenius nucleation process, describing the crossover between these two regimes, as shown by S. Ciliberto et al. Thus tiny thermal fluctuations may actually play an essential role in macroscopic deformation and rupture processes at room temperature. We also discover a reentrant dependence of the lifetime as a function of the amount of quenched disorder. PMID:15697748

  4. Resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical gallium arsenide nanowires studied using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Walia, Jaspreet; Boulanger, Jonathan; Dhindsa, Navneet; LaPierre, Ray; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Saini, Simarjeet S

    2016-06-17

    Gallium arsenide nanowires have shown considerable promise for use in applications in which the absorption of light is required. When the nanowires are oriented vertically, a considerable amount of light can be absorbed, leading to significant heating effects. Thus, it is important to understand the threshold power densities that vertical GaAs nanowires can support, and how the nanowire morphology is altered under these conditions. Here, resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical GaAs nanowires was studied using both Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques. Resonant waveguiding, and subsequent absorption of the excited optical mode reduces the irradiance vertical GaAs nanowires can support relative to horizontal ones, by three orders of magnitude before the onset of structural changes occur. A power density of only 20 W mm(-2) was sufficient to induce local heating in the nanowires, resulting in the formation of arsenic species. Upon further increasing the power, a hollow nanowire morphology was realized. These findings are pertinent to all optical applications and spectroscopic measurements involving vertically oriented GaAs nanowires. Understanding the optical absorption limitations, and the effects of exceeding these limitations will help improve the development of all III-V nanowire devices. PMID:27172276

  5. Resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical gallium arsenide nanowires studied using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walia, Jaspreet; Boulanger, Jonathan; Dhindsa, Navneet; LaPierre, Ray; (Shirley Tang, Xiaowu; Saini, Simarjeet S.

    2016-06-01

    Gallium arsenide nanowires have shown considerable promise for use in applications in which the absorption of light is required. When the nanowires are oriented vertically, a considerable amount of light can be absorbed, leading to significant heating effects. Thus, it is important to understand the threshold power densities that vertical GaAs nanowires can support, and how the nanowire morphology is altered under these conditions. Here, resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical GaAs nanowires was studied using both Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques. Resonant waveguiding, and subsequent absorption of the excited optical mode reduces the irradiance vertical GaAs nanowires can support relative to horizontal ones, by three orders of magnitude before the onset of structural changes occur. A power density of only 20 W mm-2 was sufficient to induce local heating in the nanowires, resulting in the formation of arsenic species. Upon further increasing the power, a hollow nanowire morphology was realized. These findings are pertinent to all optical applications and spectroscopic measurements involving vertically oriented GaAs nanowires. Understanding the optical absorption limitations, and the effects of exceeding these limitations will help improve the development of all III-V nanowire devices.

  6. Resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical gallium arsenide nanowires studied using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Walia, Jaspreet; Boulanger, Jonathan; Dhindsa, Navneet; LaPierre, Ray; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Saini, Simarjeet S

    2016-06-17

    Gallium arsenide nanowires have shown considerable promise for use in applications in which the absorption of light is required. When the nanowires are oriented vertically, a considerable amount of light can be absorbed, leading to significant heating effects. Thus, it is important to understand the threshold power densities that vertical GaAs nanowires can support, and how the nanowire morphology is altered under these conditions. Here, resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical GaAs nanowires was studied using both Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques. Resonant waveguiding, and subsequent absorption of the excited optical mode reduces the irradiance vertical GaAs nanowires can support relative to horizontal ones, by three orders of magnitude before the onset of structural changes occur. A power density of only 20 W mm(-2) was sufficient to induce local heating in the nanowires, resulting in the formation of arsenic species. Upon further increasing the power, a hollow nanowire morphology was realized. These findings are pertinent to all optical applications and spectroscopic measurements involving vertically oriented GaAs nanowires. Understanding the optical absorption limitations, and the effects of exceeding these limitations will help improve the development of all III-V nanowire devices.

  7. Observations of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaru, S. Kubota, H.; Yakushiji, K.; Konoto, M.; Nozaki, T.; Fukushima, A.; Imamura, H.; Taniguchi, T.; Arai, H.; Tsunegi, S.; Yuasa, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-05-07

    Measurements of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance were performed on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer and in-plane magnetized reference layer (abbreviated as PMF-STO in the following) for the purpose of obtaining magnetic properties in the PMF-STO structure. The measured spectra clearly showed a large main peak and multiple smaller peaks on the high frequency side. A Lorentzian fit on the main peak yielded Gilbert damping factor of 0.0041. The observed peaks moved in proportion to the out-of-plane bias field. From the slope of the main peak frequency as a function of the bias field, Lande g factor was estimated to be about 2.13. The mode intervals showed a clear dependence on the diameter of the PMF-STOs, i.e., intervals are larger for a smaller diameter. These results suggest that the observed peaks should correspond to eigenmodes of lateral spin wave resonance in the perpendicularly magnetized free layer.

  8. R-MATRIX RESONANCE ANALYSIS AND STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE RESONANCE PARAMETERS OF 233U IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY RANGE FROM THERMAL TO 600 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    2001-02-27

    The R-matrix resonance analysis of experimental neutron transmission and cross sections of {sup 233}U, with the Reich-Moore Bayesian code SAMMY, was extended up to the neutron energy of 600 eV by taking advantage of new high resolution neutron transmission and fission cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). The experimental data base is described. In addition to the microscopic data (time-of-flight measurements of transmission and cross sections), some experimental and evaluated integral quantities were included in the data base. Tabulated and graphical comparisons between the experimental data and the SAMMY calculated cross sections are given. The ability of the calculated cross sections to reproduce the effective multiplication factors k{sub eff} for various thermal, intermediate, and fast systems was tested. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters were examined and recommended values of the average s-wave resonance parameters are given.

  9. Phase-dependent deterministic switching of magnetoelectric spin wave detector in the presence of thermal noise via compensation of demagnetization

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Sourav Naeemi, Azad; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2015-11-09

    The possibility of achieving phase-dependent deterministic switching of the magnetoelectric spin wave detector in the presence of thermal noise has been discussed. The proposed idea relies on the modification of the energy landscape by partially canceling the out-of-plane demagnetizing field and the resultant change in the intrinsic magnetization dynamics to drive the nanomagnet towards a preferential final magnetization state. The remarkable increase in the probability of successful switching can be accounted for by the shift in the location of the saddle point in the energy landscape and a resultant change in the nature of the relaxation dynamics of the magnetization from a highly precessional to a fairly damped one and an increased dependence on the initial magnetization values, a crucial requirement for phase-dependent spin wave detection.

  10. From thermal equilibrium to nonequilibrium quench dynamics: A conserving approximation for the interacting resonant level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinkler-Aviv, Yuval; Schiller, Avraham; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2014-10-01

    We develop a low-order conserving approximation for the interacting resonant-level model (IRLM), and apply it to (i) thermal equilibrium, (ii) nonequilibrium steady state, and (iii) nonequilibrium quench dynamics. Thermal equilibrium is first used to carefully gauge the quality of the approximation by comparing the results with other well-studied methods, and finding good agreement for small values of the interaction. We analytically show that the power-law exponent of the renormalized level width usually derived using renormalization group approaches can also be correctly obtained in our approach in the weak interaction limit. A closed expression for the nonequilibrium steady-state current is derived and analytically and numerically evaluated. We find a negative differential conductance at large voltages, and the exponent of the power-law suppression of the steady-state current is calculated analytically at zero temperature. The response of the system to quenches is investigated for a single lead as well as for two-lead setup at finite voltage bias at particle-hole symmetry using a self-consistent two-times Keldysh Green function approach, and results are presented for the time-dependent current for different bias and contact interaction strength.

  11. Electron spin resonance study of thermal instability reactions in jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeldes, H.; Livingston, R.

    1984-01-01

    Free radicals were studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) using model compounds that are representative of constituents of jet fuels. Radical formation was initiated with peroxides and hydroperoxides by using UV photolysis at and near room temperature and thermal initiation at higher temperatures. Both oxygen free and air saturated systems were studied. N-Dodecane was frequently used as a solvent, and a mixture of n-dodecyl radicals was made with a peroxide initiator in n-dodecane (free of oxygen) thermally at 212 C and photolytically at room temperature. Hydrogen abstraction from the 3,4,5 and 6-positions gives radicals that are sufficiently alike that their spectra are essentially superimposed. The radical formed by abstract of hydrogen from the 2-position gives a different spectrum. ESR parameters for these radicals were measured. The radical formed by abstraction of a primary hydrogen was not observed. Similar radicals are formed from n-decane. A variety of exploratory experiments were carried out with systems that give free radical spectra to which was added small amounts of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole.

  12. Thermal tuning of surface plasmon resonance: Ag gratings on barium strontium titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, J. Z.; Hui, K. C.; Wang, K.; Chan, H. L. W.; Ong, D. H. C.; Leung, C. W.

    2012-04-01

    Surface plasmon tuning via thermally induced refractive index changes in ferroelectrics is investigated. Epitaxial (Ba0.7Sr0.3)TiO3 (BST) thin films were deposited on MgO (001) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The refractive index of BST thin films measured by the prism-coupling technique was found to increase from 2.3932 (TE)/1.9945 (TM) at room temperature to 2.3949 (TE)/1.9965 (TM) at 66°C. Then 30-nm-Ag gratings with periodicity 750 nm and width 300 nm were fabricated on BST by soft ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography and subsequent lift-off process. The reflection spectra from 500 to 1000 nm with incident angle from 5° to 60° were measured at room temperature and 66°C, with a collimated and p-polarized light incident perpendicularly to the grating direction. Several modes were observed from the spectra. At 66°C, a red shift of a dip at about 850 nm by 2 nm was obtained at an incident angle of 15°. Calculations confirmed that the observed modes belong to the (-1), (2), (-2) and (3) surface plasmon modes from the Ag and BST interfaces and localized mode; the red shift by thermal tuning is also confirmed. The results indicate the feasibility of active modulation in surface plasmon resonance in solid-state structures.

  13. Properties of the solar wind electrons between 1 and 3.3 AU from Ulysses thermal noise measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maksimovic, M.; Hoang, S.; Bougeret, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    In order to describe the distribution function f(v) of the solar wind electrons, the simplest model which is commonly used consists of the sum of two Maxwellians representing two distinct populations: a core (density n(sub c), temperature T(sub c)) and a halo (density n(sub h), temperature T(sub h)). It is possible, with the latter assumptions on the electron f(v), to determine the quasi-thermal noise (QTN) induced on an antenna by the motion of the ambient electrons in the solar wind. Using this distribution and the spectroscopy of thermal noise measurements from the radio receiver on Ulysses in the ecliptic plane, we deduce the total electron density N(sub e), the core temperature T(sub c), and the core and halo kinetic pressures N(sub c)T(sub c) and N(sub h)T(sub h). From these electron parameters, we can define a 'global' electron temperature as T(sub e) = (N(sub c)T(sub c) + N(sub h)T(sub h))/N(sub e). Here we present different radial gradients of T(sub e), between 1 and 3.3 AU, as a function of three classes of N(sub e) at 1 AU: low, intermediate, and high densities. In general all these gradients are found to be positive with different polytrope power law indexes between N(sub e) and T(sub e), which are in general lower than unity. We also show different behaviors of the ratio N(sub h)T(sub h)/N(sub c)T(sub c) for each density class considered. Some possible interpretations for these observations are discussed.

  14. Thermal Actuation Based 3-DoF Non-Resonant Microgyroscope Using MetalMUMPs

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Rana Iqtidar; Bazaz, Shafaat Ahmed; Kraft, Michael; Lai, Yongjun; Masood ul Hassan, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    High force, large displacement and low voltage consumption are a primary concern for microgyroscopes. The chevron-shaped thermal actuators are unique in terms of high force generation combined with the large displacements at a low operating voltage in comparison with traditional electrostatic actuators. A Nickel based 3-DoF micromachined gyroscope comprising 2-DoF drive mode and 1-DoF sense mode oscillator utilizing the chevron-shaped thermal actuators is presented here. Analytical derivations and finite element simulations are carried out to predict the performance of the proposed device using the thermo-physical properties of electroplated nickel. The device sensitivity is improved by utilizing the dynamical amplification of the oscillation in 2-DoF drive mode using an active-passive mass configuration. A comprehensive theoretical description, dynamics and mechanical design considerations of the proposed gyroscopes model are discussed in detail. Parametric optimization of gyroscope, its prototype modeling and fabrication using MetalMUMPs has also been investigated. Dynamic transient simulation results predicted that the sense mass of the proposed device achieved a drive displacement of 4.1μm when a sinusoidal voltage of 0.5V is applied at 1.77 kHz exhibiting a mechanical sensitivity of 1.7μm /°/s in vacuum. The wide bandwidth frequency response of the 2-DoF drive mode oscillator consists of two resonant peaks and a flat region of 2.11 kHz between the peaks defining the operational frequency region. The sense mode resonant frequency can lie anywhere within this region and therefore the amplitude of the response is insensitive to structural parameter variations, enhancing device robustness against such variations. The proposed device has a size of 2.2 × 2.6 mm2, almost one third in comparison with existing M-DoF vibratory gyroscope with an estimated power consumption of 0.26 Watts. These predicted results illustrate that the chevron-shaped thermal actuator has

  15. Compact thermally-denatured state of a staphylococcal nuclease mutant from resonance energy transfer measurements.

    PubMed

    Wu, P G; James, E; Brand, L

    1993-12-01

    Thermal denaturation of a staphylococcal nuclease mutant K78C, where lysine 78 is replaced by cysteine, was studied by circular dichroism (CD) and resonance energy transfer. CD spectra suggest that residual structures remain in the denatured state. Steady-state energy transfer from intrinsic tyrosines to a single and intrinsic tryptophan was measured at different temperatures. In the thermally-denatured state of K78C, there is still a substantial degree of energy transfer from tyrosine(s) to tryptophan, indicating residual structures in the denatured state. The cysteine residue in mutant K78C was labeled with a cysteine specific probe IAEDANS. Fluorescence decays of the tryptophan were measured to estimate distance distributions between Trp 140 and IAEDANS at position 78. Measurements were done as a function of temperature from 4 degrees C (native) to 65 degrees C (denatured) both with and without Ca2+ and inhibitor pdTp. Below 30 degrees C, the apparent distance distribution of both the ligand-free nuclease and the enzyme with bound pdTp can be adequately described by a Gaussian model. Above 40 degrees C, where the ligand-free nuclease but not the ternary complex begins to denature, two different populations are required to fit the data both with and without pdTp. One population has a compact structure and the other has an expanded structure. As temperature rises, the population of the expanded structure increases. At the highest temperature, the non-native compact structure is still the major form (60 to 70%). The overall thermally-denatured states of staphylococcal nuclease mutant K78C in the absence and presence of ligands are thus compact and heterogeneous.

  16. Method to Produce Flexible Ceramic Thermal Protection System Resistant to High Aeroacoustic Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor); Calamito, Dominic P. (Inventor); Jong, Anthony (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method of producing a three dimensional angle interlock ceramic fiber which is stable to high aeroacoustic noise of about 170 decibels and to high temperatures of about 2500 F is disclosed. The method uses multiple separate strands of a ceramic fiber or ceramic tow suitable for weaving having multiple warp fibers and multiple fill fibers woven with a modified fly-shuttle loom or rapier shuttleless loom which has nip rolls, a modified fabric advancement mechanism and at least eight harnesses in connection with a Dobby pattern chain utilizing sufficient heddles for each warp fiber and a reed which accommodates at least 168 ends per inch. The method produces a multilayered top fabric, rib fabric and single-layered bottom fabric.

  17. Quantitative linear and nonlinear resonance inspection techniques and analysis for material characterization: application to concrete thermal damage.

    PubMed

    Payan, C; Ulrich, T J; Le Bas, P Y; Saleh, T; Guimaraes, M

    2014-08-01

    Developed in the late 1980s, Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS) has been widely employed in the field of material characterization. Most of the studies assume the measured amplitude to be proportional to the strain amplitude which drives nonlinear phenomena. In 1D resonant bar experiments, the configuration for which NRUS was initially developed, this assumption holds. However, it is not true for samples of general shape which exhibit several resonance mode shapes. This paper proposes a methodology based on linear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy, numerical simulations and nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy to provide quantitative values of nonlinear elastic moduli taking into account the 3D nature of the samples. In the context of license renewal in the field of nuclear energy, this study aims at providing some quantitative information related to the degree of micro-cracking of concrete and cement based materials in the presence of thermal damage. The resonance based method is validated as regard with concrete microstructure evolution during thermal exposure.

  18. A real-time de-noising method applied for transient and weak biomolecular interaction analysis in surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Shuyue; Shi, Chunfei; Ou, Huichao; Song, Hong; Wang, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing technology will likely become a type of label-free technology for transient and weak biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA); however, it needs some improvement with regard to high-speed and high-resolution measurement. We studied a type of real-time de-noising (RD) data processing method for SPR sensorgrams based on moving average; it can immediately distinguish ultra-weak signals during the process of experiment, and can display a low-noise sensorgram in real time. A flow injection analysis experiment and a CM5 sensorchip affinity experiment are designed to evaluate the characteristics of the RD method. High noise suppression ability and low signal distortion risks of the RD method have been proved. The RD method does not significantly distort signals of the sensorgram in the molecular affinity experiment, and K D values of the RD method essentially coincide with those of the raw sensorgram with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Meanwhile, by the RD method denoising the sensorgram with an ultralow SNR that is closer to the condition of the transient and weak molecular interactions, the kinetic constant can be more accurately analyzed, whereas it cannot be realized for the raw sensorgram. The crucial function and significance of the RD method are primarily embodied in the measurement limit of SPR sensing.

  19. Electron spin resonance study of point defects in thermal GaAs/GaAs-oxide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, S.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Stesmans, A.

    2012-12-01

    In an attempt to atomically assess interface and oxide-related point defects, a first basic multifrequency low-temperature electron spin resonance study has been carried out on semi-insulating (Fe compensated) GaAs/oxide structures, implying both powders and (100)GaAs/oxide slices, thermally grown in the range Tox=350-615 °C. Various spectra are observed: As for powders, this includes the 4-line EL2 defect spectrum centered at g~2.043 and characterized by the isotropic hyperfine constant Aiso~ 910 G, ascribed to the 75AsGa+ antisite defect. Observed in freshly crushed powder, it substantially increases in density with oxidation, in line with theoretical expectation; A maximum appears reached for at Tox~440 °C. It is not observed in the parent c-GaAs wafer. A second isotropic signal is observed at g~1.937 in powders for Tox in the range 510-615 °C, but only after additional VUV irradiation; it may correspond to As clusters. In bulk (100)GaAs, we observe the 5-branch spectrum of substitutional Fe impurities (spin S=5/2) in GaAs, with inferred crystal field constant a ≈ 360 G, well in line with previous observations. The results are discussed within the framework of advanced theoretical interface and defect models and previous experimental assessment.

  20. Thermal shape fluctuation model study of the giant dipole resonance in 152Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhine Kumar, A. K.; Arumugam, P.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the hot and rotating nucleus 152Gd within the framework of the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) built on the microscopic-macroscopic calculations of the free energies with a macroscopic approach for the GDR. Our results for GDR cross sections are in good agreement with the experimental values except for a component peaking around 17 MeV, where the data has large uncertainties. Such a component is beyond our description which properly takes care of the splitting of GDR components due to the deformation and Coriolis effects. Around 17 MeV lies the half maximum in experimental cross sections, and hence the extracted GDR widths and deformations (estimated from these widths) turn out to be overestimated and less reliable. Reproducing these widths with empirical formulas could conceal the information contained in the cross sections. Fully microscopic GDR calculations and a more careful look at the data could be useful to understand the GDR component around 17 MeV. We also discuss the occurrence of γ softness in the free energy surfaces of 152Gd and its role on GDR.

  1. An analytical study on excitation of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability due to seismically induced resonance in BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Masashi

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a scoping study on seismically induced resonance of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability in BWRs, which was conducted by using TRAC-BF1 within a framework of a point kinetics model. As a result of the analysis, it is shown that a reactivity insertion could occur accompanied by in-surge of coolant into the core resulted from the excitation of the nuclear-coupled instability by the external acceleration. In order to analyze this phenomenon more in detail, it is necessary to couple a thermal-hydraulic code with a three-dimensional nuclear kinetics code.

  2. 57Co (n,γ) 58Co reaction cross section: Thermal and resonance integral measurements and energy dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidana, Nora L.; Mesa, Joel; Vanin, Vito R.; Castro, Ruy M.; Dias, Mauro S.; Koskinas, Marina F.

    2004-07-01

    The 57Co (n,γ) 58Co thermal and resonance integral cross section were measured as 51 (5) b and 20.0 (19) b , respectively, by irradiating aliquots of 57Co solution sealed inside quartz bottles near the core of the IEA-R1 IPEN research reactor and counting the gamma-ray residual activity. The irradiations were monitored using Au-Al alloy foils, with and without Cd cover. The gamma-ray measurements were performed with a shielded HPGe detector. Westcott formalism was applied for the average neutron flux determination. The cross section energy dependence was evaluated using the multilevel Breit-Wigner expression considering the first two resonances and the statistical model for energies above the second resonance. Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross section with neutron temperatures between 5 and 100 keV were also evaluated.

  3. {sup 57}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 58}Co reaction cross section: Thermal and resonance integral measurements and energy dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Maidana, Nora L.; Mesa, Joel; Vanin, Vito R.; Castro, Ruy M.; Dias, Mauro S.; Koskinas, Marina F.

    2004-07-01

    The {sup 57}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 58}Co thermal and resonance integral cross section were measured as 51(5) b and 20.0(19) b, respectively, by irradiating aliquots of {sup 57}Co solution sealed inside quartz bottles near the core of the IEA-R1 IPEN research reactor and counting the gamma-ray residual activity. The irradiations were monitored using Au-Al alloy foils, with and without Cd cover. The gamma-ray measurements were performed with a shielded HPGe detector. Westcott formalism was applied for the average neutron flux determination. The cross section energy dependence was evaluated using the multilevel Breit-Wigner expression considering the first two resonances and the statistical model for energies above the second resonance. Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross section with neutron temperatures between 5 and 100 keV were also evaluated.

  4. Nano-domains of high viscosity and stiffness mapped in the cell membrane by thermal noise imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yunhsiang; Pralle, Arnd

    2012-02-01

    The cell membrane is thought to contain spatial domains, created by cholesterol-lipid clusters and by interactions with the membrane cytoskeleton. The influence of these domains on membrane protein mobility and cell signaling has clearly been demonstrate. Yet, due to their small size and transient nature, the cholesterol stabilized domains cannot be visualized directly. We show here that thermal noise imaging (TNI) which tracks the diffusion of a colloid labeled membrane protein with microsecond and nanometer precision, can visualize cholesterol stabilized domains, also know as lipid raft, in intact cells. Using TNI to confine a single membrane protein to diffuse for seconds in an area of 300nm x 300nm provides sufficient data for high resolutions maps of the local diffusion, local attraction potentials and membrane stiffness. Using a GPI-anchored GFP molecule to probe the membrane of PtK2 cells we detect domains of increased membrane stiffness, which also show increase viscosity and are the preferred location for the GPI-anchored protein. These domains are further stabilized by addition of ganglioside cross linking toxins and disappear after removal of the cholesterol.

  5. Properties of the solar wind electrons between 1.1 and 3.3 AU from Ulysses thermal noise measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimovic, M.; Hoang, S.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    1996-07-20

    Using the distribution function f(v) of the solar wind electrons made of two Maxwellians: a core (density n{sub c}, temperature T{sub c}) and a halo (density n{sub h}, temperature T{sub h}), we determine the quasi-thermal noise (QTN) induced by the ambient electrons on the long wire dipole antenna connected to the radio receiver on the Ulysses Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) Experiment. The QTN spectroscopy yields the total electron density n{sub e}, the core temperature T{sub c}, and the core and halo kinetic pressures n{sub c}T{sub c} and n{sub h}T{sub h}. We present the results of n{sub e} and T{sub c} measured between 1.1 and 3.3 AU in the ecliptic plane, from November 1990 to June 1991. We investigate the variation of T{sub c} with the heliocentric distance. We also study this radial gradient as a function of three classes of n{sub e} normalized to 1 AU: Low, intermediate and high densities. The T{sub c} gradient is found to increase with increasing plasma density.

  6. Liquid-phase exfoliated graphene self-assembled films: Low-frequency noise and thermal-electric characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubon Usca, G.; Hernandez-Ambato, J.; Pace, C.; Caputi, L. S.; Tavolaro, A.

    2016-09-01

    In few years, graphene has become a revolutionary material, leading not only to applications in various fields such as electronics, medicine and environment, but also to the production of new types of 2D materials. In this work, Liquid Phase Exfoliation (LPE) was applied to natural graphite by brief sonication or mixer treatment in suitable solvents, in order to produce Few Layers Graphene (FLG) suspensions. Additionally, zeolite 4A (Z4A) was added during the production of FLG flakes-based inks, with the aim of aiding the exfoliation process. Conductive films were obtained by drop casting three types of suspensions over Al2O3 substrates with interdigitated electrodes, with total channel surface of 1.39 mm2. The morphology characterization resulted in the verification of the presence of thin self-assembled flakes. Raman studies gave evidence of 4 to 10 layers graphene flakes. Electrical measurements were performed to state the Low-Frequency Noise and Thermal-Electric characteristics of the samples. We observe interesting relations between sample preparation procedures and electrical properties.

  7. Measurement of acoustic noise effect due to the gradient pulsing in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, SungTaek; Song, Inchang; Park, Hyun Wook

    1999-05-01

    In MRI, gradient magnetic fields are used to obtain the spatial information by frequency modulation of the received signal. The gradient fields are generated by switching currents on the gradient coils, which generates acoustic noise due to Lorentzian force. In particular, fast imaging methods, which are usually used for fMRI, require fast switching of the gradient pulse, thereby generating large acoustic noise. The intensity of the acoustic noise depends on the imaging method and the pulse sequences. The acoustic noise induced by gradient pulsing may interfere for signal enhancement of brain areas with the presentation of auditory stimuli during fMRI. In this paper, the gradient pulsing effects on fMRI are analyzed for different combinations of gradients. The experimental results show that total activations by visual stimulation are slightly larger for a combination of Z readout and Y phase-encoding gradients than those for a combination of Y readout and Z phase-encoding gradients when sagittal-view fMRI is performed.

  8. A pressure gauge based on gas density measurement from analysis of the thermal noise of an atomic force microscope cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Dongjin; Ducker, William A.; Paul, Mark R.

    2012-05-15

    We describe a gas-density gauge based on the analysis of the thermally-driven fluctuations of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever. The fluctuations are modeled as a ring-down of a simple harmonic oscillator, which allows fitting of the resonance frequency and damping of the cantilever, which in turn yields the gas density. The pressure is obtained from the density using the known equation of state. In the range 10-220 kPa, the pressure readings from the cantilever gauge deviate by an average of only about 5% from pressure readings on a commercial gauge. The theoretical description we use to determine the pressure from the cantilever motion is based upon the continuum hypothesis, which sets a minimum pressure for our analysis. It is anticipated that the cantilever gauge could be extended to measure lower pressures given a molecular theoretical description. Alternatively, the gauge could be calibrated for use in the non-continuum range. Our measurement technique is similar to previous AFM cantilever measurements, but the analysis produces improved accuracy.

  9. 13C Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of kerogen from Cretaceous black shales thermally altered by basaltic intrusions and laboratory simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dennis, L.W.; Maciel, G.E.; Hatcher, P.G.; Simoneit, B.R.T.

    1982-01-01

    Cretaceous black shales from DSDP Leg 41, Site 368 in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean were thermally altered during the Miocene by an intrusive basalt. The sediments overlying and underlying the intrusive body were subjected to high temperatures (up to ~ 500??C) and, as a result, their kerogen was significantly altered. The extent of this alteration has been determined by examination by means of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, using cross polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS). Results indicate that the kerogen becomes progressively more aromatic in the vicinity of the intrusive body. Laboratory heating experiments, simulating the thermal effects of the basaltic intrusion, produced similar results on unaltered shale from the drill core. The 13C CP/MAS results appear to provide a good measure of thermal alteration. ?? 1982.

  10. Noise and poise: Enhancement of postural complexity in the elderly with a stochastic-resonance based therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, M.; Priplata, A. A.; Lipsitz, L. A.; Wu, Z.; Huang, N. E.; Goldberger, A. L.; Peng, C.-K.

    2007-03-01

    Pathologic states are associated with a loss of dynamical complexity. Therefore, therapeutic interventions that increase physiologic complexity may enhance health status. Using multiscale entropy analysis, we show that the postural sway dynamics of healthy young and healthy elderly subjects are more complex than that of elderly subjects with a history of falls. Application of subsensory noise to the feet has been demonstrated to improve postural stability in the elderly. We next show that this therapy significantly increases the multiscale complexity of sway fluctuations in healthy elderly subjects. Quantification of changes in dynamical complexity of biologic variability may be the basis of a new approach to assessing risk and to predicting the efficacy of clinical interventions, including noise-based therapies.

  11. Highly sensitive thermometer using a vacuum-packed Si resonator in a microfluidic chip for the thermal measurement of single cells.

    PubMed

    Inomata, Naoki; Toda, Masaya; Ono, Takahito

    2016-09-21

    A highly sensitive thermometer system for a living cell is proposed, fabricated, and evaluated. The system possesses a resonant thermal sensor surrounded by vacuum in a microfluidic chip. The measurement principle relies on resonant frequency tracking of the resonator in temperature variations due to the heat from a sample cell; the heat is conducted from the sample cell in the microfluidic channel via a heat guide connecting the resonator to a sample stage. This configuration can reduce heat loss from the resonator to the surroundings and damping in water. Two types of resonators are prepared, i.e., a cantilevered resonator and a double-supported resonator. The resonator sizes as a sensor are 30 × 50 × 1.5 μm in the cantilevered resonator, 30 × 75 × 0.40 μm in the double-supported one, respectively. The temperature and thermal resolutions of 79 μK and 1.90 nW, respectively, are achieved using the double-supported resonator. Two types of heat emissions from single brown fat cells are detected; one is continuous heat generation in the presence of chemical stimulation by a norepinephrine solution, and the other is pulsed without any stimulation. PMID:27526966

  12. The radio waves and thermal electrostatic noise spectroscopy (SORBET) experiment on BEPICOLOMBO/MMO/PWI: Scientific objectives and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncuquet, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Blomberg, L. G.; Issautier, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Kojima, H.; Maksimovic, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Zarka, P.

    2006-01-01

    SORBET ( Spectroscopie des Ondes Radio and du Bruit Electrostatique Thermique) is a radio HF spectrometer designed for the radio and Plasma Waves Instrument onboard BepiColombo/Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), which performs remote and in situ measurements of waves (electromagnetic and electrostatic). Technically, SORBET includes a plasma wave spectrometer, with two E-field inputs from the two perpendicular electric antennas and one B-field input from a search coil, in the range 2.5-640 kHz. This frequency band includes the local gyrofrequency and plasma frequency expected on most part of the MMO orbits. SORBET also includes a higher frequency radio receiver for remote sensing in the range 500 kHz-10.2 MHz. Owing to its capabilities, SORBET will be able to address the following scientific objectives: High resolution mapping (˜30 km) of electron density and temperature in the solar wind and in the Hermean magnetosphere and exo-ionosphere, via the technique of Quasi-Thermal Noise (QTN) spectroscopy. These QTN measurements will be determinant for the dynamic modeling of the magnetosphere and will provide a fundamental input for the chemistry of cold ionized species (Na, K, O, …) in Mercury's environment. Detection and study of Hermean radio emissions, including possible cyclotron emissions (up to ˜10-20 kHz) from mildly energetic electrons in most highly magnetized (polar?) regions, and possible synchrotron radiation (up to a few MHz?) from more energetic electrons. Monitoring of solar radio emissions up to ˜10 MHz in order to create a solar activity index from the view point of Mercury, allowing to correlate it with the Hermean magnetospheric response. We especially discuss the capabilities of SORBET for performing the QTN spectroscopy in Mercury's magnetosphere, using the two electric dipole antennas equipping MMO, called MEFISTO and WPT.

  13. Diverse output states from an all-normal dispersion ytterbium-doped fiber laser: Q-switch, dissipative soliton resonance, and noise-like pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. W.; Zhang, Z. X.

    2013-06-01

    An all-normal-dispersion ytterbium-doped fiber ring laser has been demonstrated, with different operation regimes: Q-switch, CW mode-locking and noise-like pulses, depending on the pump power and suitable orientation of the polarization controllers. As a transition between Q-switch and CW mode-locking, Q-switched mode-locking has also been observed. Moreover, our experiment shows that the CW mode-locking operation is the result of dissipative soliton resonance in the all-normal-dispersion fiber laser without external filter, which is a new way to generate high-energy pulses. This fiber laser with diverse outputs has many potential applications, and is helpful to investigate laser dynamics.

  14. 1-D and 2-D resonances in an Alpine valley identified from ambient noise measurements and 3-D modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Olivier; Cornou, Cécile; Jongmans, Denis; Schwartz, Stéphane

    2012-09-01

    H/V spectral ratios are regularly used for estimating the bedrock depth in 1-D like basins exhibiting smooth lateral variations. In the case of 2-D or 3-D pronounced geometries, observational and numerical studies have shown that H/V curves exhibit peculiar shapes and that the H/V frequency generally overestimates 1-D theoretical resonance frequency. To investigate the capabilities of the H/V method in complex structures, a detailed comparison between measured and 3-D-simulated ambient vibrations was performed in the small-size lower Romanche valley (French Alps), which shows significant variations in geometry, downstream and upstream the Séchilienne basin. Analysing the H/V curve characteristics, two different wave propagation modes were identified along the valley. Relying on previous geophysical investigation, a power-law relationship was derived between the bedrock depth and the H/V peak frequency, which was used for building a 3-D model of the valley geometry. Simulated and experimental H/V curves were found to exhibit quite similar features in terms of curve shape and peak frequency values, validating the 3-D structure. This good agreement also evidenced two different propagation modes in the valley: 2-D resonance in the Séchilienne basin and 1-D resonance in the external parts. This study underlines the interest of H/V curves for investigating complex basin structures.

  15. Thermal-neutron cross sections and resonance integrals of 138Ba and 141Pr using Am-Be neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Mohanakrishnan, P.

    2016-09-01

    The thermal-neutron capture cross sections and resonance integrals of 138Ba(n, γ)139Ba and 141Pr(n, γ)142Pr were measured by activation method using an isotopic Am-Be neutron source. The estimations were with respect to that of 55Mn(n, γ)56Mn and 197Au(n, γ)198Au reference monitors. The measured thermal-capture cross section of 138 Ba with respect to 55 Mn is 0.410±0.023 b and with respect to 197 Au is 0.386±0.019 b. The measured thermal-capture cross section of 141 Pr with respect to 55 Mn is 11.36±1.29 b and with respect to 197 Au is 10.43±1.14 b. The resonance integrals for 138 Ba are 0.380±0.033 b (55 Mn) and 0.364±0.027 b (197 Au) and for 141 Pr are 21.05±2.88 b (55 Mn) and 15.27±1.87 b (197 Au). The comparison between the present measurements and various reported values are discussed. The cross sections corresponding to the selected isotopes are measured using an Am-Be source facility for the first time.

  16. Characterization of thermal shock damage in a 2D-woven fiber CVI SiC composite using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, J.E.; Singh, R.N.; Cari, H.; Ferber, M.K.

    1996-12-31

    Thermal shock damage was generated by a water quench technique in 2-D woven-Nicalon{trademark} fiber chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC composite bars. In this study, resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) was used as a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique to quantify such damage. RUS spectra were measured for each specimen before and after quenching. The results show a clear correlation between the quench temperature difference ({Delta}T) and changes in the RUS spectra. Both the resonant frequencies and the resonance quality factor decreased with increasing magnitude of {Delta}T, thus, providing quantitative measures for the degree of thermal shock damage.

  17. Giant Dipole Resonance in the Hot and Thermalized Ce132 Nucleus: Damping of Collective Modes at Finite Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, O.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Crespi, F.; Giussani, A.; Leoni, S.; Mason, P.; Million, B.; Moroni, A.; Barlini, S.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Gramegna, F.; Lanchais, A.; Mastinu, P.; Maj, A.; Brekiesz, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Bruno, M.; Geraci, E.; Vannini, G.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.; Nannini, A.; Ordine, A.; Ormand, E.

    2006-07-01

    The γ decay of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the Ce132 compound nucleus with temperature up to ≈4MeV has been measured, using the reaction Ni64+Zn68 at Ebeam=300, 400, and 500 MeV. The γ and charged particles measured in coincidence with recoils are consistent with a fully equilibrated compound nucleus emission. The GDR width, obtained with the statistical model analysis, is found to increase almost linearly with temperature. This increase is rather well reproduced within a model including thermal shape fluctuations and the lifetime of the compound nucleus.

  18. Resonant excited state absorption and relaxation mechanisms in Tb3+-doped calcium aluminosilicate glasses: an investigation by thermal mirror spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, G S; Zanuto, V S; Astrath, F B G; Malacarne, L C; Terra, I A A; Catunda, T; Nunes, L A O; Jacinto, C; Andrade, L H C; Lima, S M; Baesso, M L; Astrath, N G C

    2013-11-15

    Resonant excited state absorption (ESA) and relaxation processes in Tb(3+)-doped aluminosilicate glasses are quantitatively evaluated. A model describing the excitation steps and upconversion emission is developed and applied to interpret the results from laser-induced surface deformation using thermal mirror spectroscopy. The fluorescence quantum efficiency of level (5)D(4) was found to be close to unity and concentration independent while, for the level (5)D(3), it decreases with Tb(3+) concentration. Emission spectroscopy measurements supported these results. ESA cross sections are found to be more than three orders of magnitude higher than the ground state absorption cross section. PMID:24322101

  19. Local thermal resonance control of GaInP photonic crystal membrane cavities using ambient gas cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Sergei Lian, Jin; Yüce, Emre; Mosk, Allard P.; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaelle; De Rossi, Alfredo

    2015-04-27

    We perform spatially dependent tuning of a GaInP photonic crystal cavity using a continuous wave violet laser. Local tuning is obtained by laser heating of the photonic crystal membrane. The cavity resonance shift is measured for different pump positions and for two ambient gases: He and N{sub 2}. We find that the width of the temperature profile induced in the membrane depends strongly on the thermal conductivity of the ambient gas. For He gas, a narrow spatial width of the temperature profile of 2.8 μm is predicted and verified in experiment.

  20. Intrinsic Noise Properties of Atomic Point Contact Displacement Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers-Jacobs, N. E.; Lehnert, K. W.

    2007-03-01

    By coupling an atomic point contact (APC) to a nanomechanical beam, we measure the noise properties of an APC, an object which is the basis of scanning tunneling microscopy and is used to create electrical contact to single molecules. Using a microwave technique, we detect the resonant motion of the nanomechanical beam at frequencies up to 200 MHz. This measurement is sensitive enough to observe the random thermal motion of the nanomechanical beam at 250 mK. We use this thermal motion to evaluate the noise properties of the APC, demonstrating a displacement imprecision limited by the shot-noise in the number of electrons that tunnel across the APC and observing the force due to measurement backaction. Together, the imprecision and backaction yield a total uncertainty in the beam's displacement that is 42 times the standard quantum limit. In addition, we detect the beam's response to piezoelectric, electric, and magnetic forces, and use feedback to ``squash'' the shot-noise.

  1. Influence of temporal noise on the skin blood flow measurements performed by cooled thermal imaging camera: limit possibilities within each physiological frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagaidachnyi, A. A.; Volkov, I. U.; Fomin, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes limit possibilities of modern cooled thermal imaging cameras as a tool for estimation of blood flow oscillations at the surface of living body. Skin temperature oscillations, as we assumed, are a consequence of the blood flow oscillations. We considered the temperature sensitivity 0.01-0.02 °C as a typical for the most of modern cooled long wave thermal imaging cameras. Fourier filter used to investigate the temperature signal separately within endothelial, neurogenic, myogenic, respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges. The level of temporal noise has been estimated during measurements of no living body with stabilized temperature ~ 24°C. The level of temperature oscillations has been calculated for the group of healthy subjects within each frequency range. Thus, we were able to determine signal-to-noise ratio within frequency band [0.001, 1] Hz. As a result, we determine that skin temperature oscillations measured by thermal imaging camera with sensitivity 0.02°C have the upper frequency limit ~ 0.2 Hz. In other words, within the respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges of blood flow oscillations the noise level exceeds signal one, and temperature measurements at the skin surface are practically useless. The endothelial, neurogenic and myogenic components of the temperature oscillations contain ~98% of the total spectral power of the signal. We have plot the empirical extrapolated curve of sensitivity of thermal imaging camera vs. frequency of the temperature oscillations. The data analysis shows that measurements of skin temperature oscillations within respiratory and cardiac ranges require the temperature sensitivity at least ~ 0.01°C and 0.001°C, respectively.

  2. Probing the inner heliosphere and corona with electric antennas: quasi-thermal noise spectroscopy on Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zouganelis, Y.; Moncuquet, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Issautier, K.; Zaslavsky, A.; Maksimovic, M.; LE CHAT, G.; Martinovic, M.

    2014-12-01

    Solar wind electrons are expected to play an important role for energy transport in the solar corona and wind. Solar wind electron velocity distributions exhibit three components: a thermal core, a suprathermal halo, and a magnetic field aligned strahl, which is usually moving away from the Sun. The origin of these non-thermal distributions is unknown. Are such distributions already present in the solar corona or are they only a consequence of the solar wind transport in the interplanetary medium? The answer to these questions is of paramount importance to understand the origin of the solar wind. It requires accurate in situ measurements of the electron properties. Traditional electron analysers generally suffer from spacecraft charging and photoelectron perturbations, but the alternative method of Quasi-Thermal Noise Spectroscopy (QTN), which has been successfully used in various space plasma environments, is immune to these limitations. This method is based on the electrostatic fluctuations induced by the thermal motion of the ambient plasma particles, which can be measured with a sensitive radio wave receiver connected to a wire dipole antenna. As this quasi-thermal noise is completely determined by the particle velocity distributions in the frame of the antenna, QTN is a high-accuracy robust method for determining electron moments together with some non-thermal features. After a short review of the QTN method, we describe its recent developments and how it will be implemented on the upcoming missions Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus. New simulations of QTN measurements in the inner heliosphere are presented for typical expected corona, solar wind and ICMEs conditions down to 9.5 solar radii.

  3. Stability and anomalous compressibility of Bose gases near resonance: The scale-dependent interactions and thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shao-Jian; Zhou, Fei

    2015-07-01

    The stability of Bose gases near resonance has been a puzzling problem in recent years. In this article, we demonstrate that in addition to generating thermal pressure, thermal atoms enhance the repulsiveness of the scale-dependent interactions between condensed atoms due to a renormalization effect and further stabilize the Bose gases. Consequently, we find that, as a precursor of instability, the compressibility develops an anomalous structure as a function of scattering length and is drastically reduced compared with the mean-field value. Furthermore, the density profile of a Bose gas in a harmonic trap is found to develop a flat top near the center. This is due to the anomalous behavior of compressibility and can be a potential smoking gun for probing such an effect.

  4. Comparison of force sensors for atomic force microscopy based on quartz tuning forks and length-extensional resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Pielmeier, Florian; Eguchi, Toyoaki; An, Toshu; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2011-09-01

    The force sensor is key to the performance of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nowadays, most atomic force microscopes use micromachined force sensors made from silicon, but piezoelectric quartz sensors are being applied at an increasing rate, mainly in vacuum. These self-sensing force sensors allow a relatively easy upgrade of a scanning tunneling microscope to a combined scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope. Two fundamentally different types of quartz sensors have achieved atomic resolution: the “needle sensor,” which is based on a length-extensional resonator, and the “qPlus sensor,” which is based on a tuning fork. Here, we calculate and measure the noise characteristics of these sensors. We find four noise sources: deflection detector noise, thermal noise, oscillator noise, and thermal drift noise. We calculate the effect of these noise sources as a factor of sensor stiffness, bandwidth, and oscillation amplitude. We find that for self-sensing quartz sensors, the deflection detector noise is independent of sensor stiffness, while the remaining three noise sources increase strongly with sensor stiffness. Deflection detector noise increases with bandwidth to the power of 1.5, while thermal noise and oscillator noise are proportional to the square root of the bandwidth. Thermal drift noise, however, is inversely proportional to bandwidth. The first three noise sources are inversely proportional to amplitude while thermal drift noise is independent of the amplitude. Thus, we show that the earlier finding that quoted an optimal signal-to-noise ratio for oscillation amplitudes similar to the range of the forces is still correct when considering all four frequency noise contributions. Finally, we suggest how the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensors can be improved further, we briefly discuss the challenges of mounting tips, and we compare the noise performance of self-sensing quartz sensors and optically detected Si cantilevers.

  5. Wiedemann-Franz-type relation between shot noise and thermal conduction of Majorana surface states in a three-dimensional topological superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnezdilov, N. V.; Diez, M.; Pacholski, M. J.; Beenakker, C. W. J.

    2016-09-01

    We compare the thermal conductance Gthermal (at temperature T ) and the electrical shot-noise power Pshot (at bias voltage V ≫kBT /e ) of Majorana fermions on the two-dimensional surface of a three-dimensional topological superconductor. We present analytical and numerical calculations to demonstrate that, for a local coupling between the superconductor and metal contacts, Gthermal/Pshot=L T /e V (with L the Lorenz number). This relation is ensured by the combination of electron-hole and time-reversal symmetries, irrespective of the microscopics of the surface Hamiltonian, and provides for a purely electrical way to detect the charge-neutral Majorana surface states. A surface of aspect ratio W /L ≫1 has the universal shot-noise power Pshot=(W /L ) ×(e2/h ) ×(e V /2 π ) .

  6. Electron spin resonance of ultraviolet radiation induced defects in ZnO thermal control coating pigment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T.

    1972-01-01

    Electron spin resonance measurements on variously treated zinc oxide powders reveal that the resonance signal at g = 1.956 is due to one electron trapped oxygen ion vacancy level, at a depth of (0.31 plus or minus 0.02) eV below the conduction band. The electrons at this level are delocalized. Schottky barrier influences nearly the entire bulk of the powder sample, and the bending of the bands caused by chemisorbed oxygen puts the vacancy level above the Fermi level almost through the entire bulk.

  7. Making noise comfortable for people

    SciTech Connect

    Leventhall, H.G.; Wise, S.S.

    1998-10-01

    Typical HVAC noise may produce an uncomfortable environment, leading to the associated problems of general dissatisfaction and reduced productivity. It is not sufficient to have good thermal, lighting, and air cleanliness conditions if the noise is disturbing. In this paper, noise comfort is considered, with special emphasis on the developing criteria for low-frequency noise.

  8. Thermal compensation in GaPO4 beam resonators: experimental evidence for length extensional mode.

    PubMed

    Sthal, Fabrice; Bigler, Emmanuel; Bourquin, Roger

    2007-01-01

    Temperature effects in gallium orthophosphate (GaPO4) vibrating beams are reported. In addition to the well-known, thickness-shear AT-cut, temperature-compensated cuts exist in GaPO4 for length extensional modes. Experimental evidence of a temperature-compensated cut in GaPO4 rectangular beam resonator vibrating in length extension is given. PMID:17225814

  9. Efficient copper vapor laser using metal (Cu, Ag) chlorides in thermal insulation and performance with new prism resonator configurations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijendra

    2012-12-01

    A copper vapor laser based on the use of copper chloride and silver chloride mixture embedded inside the laser head thermal insulation is successfully demonstrated. The use of external HCl generator cell containing zirconium chloride normally used for its kinetically enhanced mode of operation is completely eliminated. With this new configuration laser power of ~70 W was achieved from a wide aperture ~47-50 mm bore discharge tube with input power of ~5 kW and overall high efficiency of ~1.4% without external supply of HCl vapors to the laser head. In a typical operational cycle the laser initially operates as low temperature CuCl laser with startup time of few minutes and output power of ~10 W during low tube temperature range of ~300-500 °C. Thereafter, the laser transforms itself into efficient kinetically enhanced copper vapor laser (CVL) at high temperature range of ~1200-1600 °C with maximum laser output power of ~70 W. This dual mode of operation observed in a single CVL system is unique and has not been reported so far in any high temperature copper vapor laser. New resonator configurations, namely, the prism resonator in stable and unstable form are successfully demonstrated for the first time in a copper vapor laser to achieve low divergence beam with dramatic increase in misalignment tolerance to ~25 mrad, which is an improvement of about ~50 times compared to standard CVLs with conventional spherical or plane-plane resonators. With these new resonator configurations the CVL functions almost as an "alignment free laser" system with significantly reduced beam divergence of ~0.2 mrad and high optical extraction efficiency of ~70%-80%. PMID:23277966

  10. Efficient copper vapor laser using metal (Cu, Ag) chlorides in thermal insulation and performance with new prism resonator configurations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijendra

    2012-12-01

    A copper vapor laser based on the use of copper chloride and silver chloride mixture embedded inside the laser head thermal insulation is successfully demonstrated. The use of external HCl generator cell containing zirconium chloride normally used for its kinetically enhanced mode of operation is completely eliminated. With this new configuration laser power of ~70 W was achieved from a wide aperture ~47-50 mm bore discharge tube with input power of ~5 kW and overall high efficiency of ~1.4% without external supply of HCl vapors to the laser head. In a typical operational cycle the laser initially operates as low temperature CuCl laser with startup time of few minutes and output power of ~10 W during low tube temperature range of ~300-500 °C. Thereafter, the laser transforms itself into efficient kinetically enhanced copper vapor laser (CVL) at high temperature range of ~1200-1600 °C with maximum laser output power of ~70 W. This dual mode of operation observed in a single CVL system is unique and has not been reported so far in any high temperature copper vapor laser. New resonator configurations, namely, the prism resonator in stable and unstable form are successfully demonstrated for the first time in a copper vapor laser to achieve low divergence beam with dramatic increase in misalignment tolerance to ~25 mrad, which is an improvement of about ~50 times compared to standard CVLs with conventional spherical or plane-plane resonators. With these new resonator configurations the CVL functions almost as an "alignment free laser" system with significantly reduced beam divergence of ~0.2 mrad and high optical extraction efficiency of ~70%-80%.

  11. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Laser Induced Thermal Therapy for Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Norred, Sarah E.; Johnson, Jacqueline Anne

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided laser induced thermotherapy (MRgLITT) has become an increasingly relevant therapy for tumor ablation due to its minimally invasive approach and broad applicability across many tissue types. The current state of the art applies laser irradiation via cooled optical fiber applicators in order to generate ablative heat and necrosis in tumor tissue. Magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) is used concurrently with this therapy to plan treatments and visualize tumor necrosis. Though application in neurosurgery remains in its infancy, MRgLITT has been found to be a promising therapy for many types of brain tumors. This review examines the current use of MRgLITT with regard to the special clinical challenge of glioblastoma multiforme and examines the potential applications of next-generation nanotherapy specific to the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:24527455

  12. Optical Johnson noise thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, R. L.; Blalock, T. V.; Maxey, L. C.; Roberts, M. J.; Simpson, M. L.

    1989-01-01

    A concept is being explored that an optical analog of the electrical Johnson noise may be used to measure temperature independently of emissivity. The concept is that a laser beam may be modulated on reflection from a hot surface by interaction of the laser photons with the thermally agitated conduction electrons or the lattice phonons, thereby adding noise to the reflected laser beam. If the reflectance noise can be detected and quantified in a background of other noise in the optical and signal processing systems, the reflectance noise may provide a noncontact measurement of the absolute surface temperature and may be independent of the surface's emissivity.

  13. A micromachined thermally compensated thin film Lamb wave resonator for frequency control and sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingqvist, G.; Arapan, L.; Yantchev, V.; Katardjiev, I.

    2009-03-01

    Micromachined thin film plate acoustic wave resonators (FPARs) utilizing the lowest order symmetric Lamb wave (S0) propagating in highly textured 2 µm thick aluminium nitride (AlN) membranes have been successfully demonstrated (Yantchev and Katardjiev 2007 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 54 87-95). The proposed devices have a SAW-based design and exhibit Q factors of up to 3000 at a frequency around 900 MHz as well as design flexibility with respect to the required motional resistance. However, a notable drawback of the proposed devices is the non-zero temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) which lies in the range -20 ppm K-1 to -25 ppm K-1. Thus, despite the promising features demonstrated, further device optimization is required. In this work temperature compensation of thin AlN film Lamb wave resonators is studied and experimentally demonstrated. Temperature compensation while retaining at the same time the device electromechanical coupling is experimentally demonstrated. The zero TCF Lamb wave resonators are fabricated onto composite AlN/SiO2 membranes. Q factors of around 1400 have been measured at a frequency of around 755 MHz. Finally, the impact of technological issues on the device performance is discussed in view of improving the device performance.

  14. Signal-to-noise ratio and parallel imaging performance of commercially available phased array coils in 3.0 T brain magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tsukasa; Shirata, Kensei; Urikura, Atsushi; Ito, Michitoshi; Nakaya, Yoshihiro

    2015-07-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and parallel imaging (PI) performance of two commercial phased-array coils (PACs) were examined in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. All measurements were performed on a 3.0 T MRI instrument. The SNR and PI performance were evaluated with 32-channel and 15-channel PACs. A gradient echo sequence was used for obtaining images of a phantom. SNR and geometry factor (g-factor) maps were calculated from two images with identical parameters. Horizontal and vertical profiles were taken through the SNR maps in the axial plane. The average g-factor was measured in a circular region of interest in the g-factor maps for the axial plane. The SNR map of the 32-channel coil showed a higher SNR than that of the 15-channel coil at the phantom's posterior and lateral surfaces. The SNR profiles for the 32-channel coil also showed a 1.3-fold increase at the phantom's center. The average g-factor of the 32-channel coil was lower than that of the 15-channel coil at the same acceleration factor. These results indicate that the 32-channel coil can provide a higher spatial resolution and/or a faster imaging speed. Horizontal and vertical profiles are useful for evaluation of the performance of commercially available PACs.

  15. Assessment of heavy metals exposure, noise and thermal safety in the ambiance of a vacuum metallurgy separation system for recycling heavy metals from crushed e-wastes.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Lu; Xu, Zhenming

    2014-12-01

    Vacuum metallurgy separation (VMS) is a technically feasible method to recover Pb, Cd and other heavy metals from crushed e-wastes. To further determine the environmental impacts and safety of this method, heavy metals exposure, noise and thermal safety in the ambiance of a vacuum metallurgy separation system are evaluated in this article. The mass concentrations of total suspended particulate (TSP) and PM10 are 0.1503 and 0.0973 mg m(-3) near the facilities. The concentrations of Pb, Cd and Sn in TSP samples are 0.0104, 0.1283 and 0.0961 μg m(-3), respectively. Health risk assessments show that the hazard index of Pb is 3.25 × 10(-1) and that of Cd is 1.09 × 10(-1). Carcinogenic risk of Cd through inhalation is 1.08 × 10(-5). The values of the hazard index and risk indicate that Pb and Cd will not cause non-cancerous effects or carcinogenic risk on workers. The noise sources are mainly the mechanical vacuum pump and the water cooling pump. Both of them have the noise levels below 80 dB (A). The thermal safety assessment shows that the temperatures of the vacuum metallurgy separation system surface are all below 303 K after adopting the circulated water cooling and heat insulation measures. This study provides the environmental information of the vacuum metallurgy separation system, which is of assistance to promote the industrialisation of vacuum metallurgy separation for recovering heavy metals from e-wastes.

  16. Assessment of heavy metals exposure, noise and thermal safety in the ambiance of a vacuum metallurgy separation system for recycling heavy metals from crushed e-wastes.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Lu; Xu, Zhenming

    2014-12-01

    Vacuum metallurgy separation (VMS) is a technically feasible method to recover Pb, Cd and other heavy metals from crushed e-wastes. To further determine the environmental impacts and safety of this method, heavy metals exposure, noise and thermal safety in the ambiance of a vacuum metallurgy separation system are evaluated in this article. The mass concentrations of total suspended particulate (TSP) and PM10 are 0.1503 and 0.0973 mg m(-3) near the facilities. The concentrations of Pb, Cd and Sn in TSP samples are 0.0104, 0.1283 and 0.0961 μg m(-3), respectively. Health risk assessments show that the hazard index of Pb is 3.25 × 10(-1) and that of Cd is 1.09 × 10(-1). Carcinogenic risk of Cd through inhalation is 1.08 × 10(-5). The values of the hazard index and risk indicate that Pb and Cd will not cause non-cancerous effects or carcinogenic risk on workers. The noise sources are mainly the mechanical vacuum pump and the water cooling pump. Both of them have the noise levels below 80 dB (A). The thermal safety assessment shows that the temperatures of the vacuum metallurgy separation system surface are all below 303 K after adopting the circulated water cooling and heat insulation measures. This study provides the environmental information of the vacuum metallurgy separation system, which is of assistance to promote the industrialisation of vacuum metallurgy separation for recovering heavy metals from e-wastes. PMID:25391553

  17. High-power and high-quality, green-beam generation by employing a thermally near-unstable resonator design.

    PubMed

    Bo, Yong; Geng, Aicong; Bi, Yong; Sun, Zhipei; Yang, Xiaodong; Peng, Qinjun; Li, Huiqing; Li, Ruining; Cui, Dafu; Xu, Zuyan

    2006-04-10

    We have obtained green-beam quality of M2 = 6.2 at an average output power of 120 W by intracavity frequency doubling of a diode-side-pumped, Q-switched Nd:YAG rod laser with a repetition rate of 10 kHz and an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 15.2%. To achieve high-beam quality at high average power, the laser employs a thermally near-unstable resonator design with two-rod birefringence compensation in an L-shaped flat-flat cavity. The output power fluctuation of the green laser remains less than 0.9% in 4 h. PMID:16623247

  18. Dynamic Correction of Thermal Focusing in Nd:YAG Confocal Unstable Resonators by Use of a Variable Radius Mirror.

    PubMed

    Moshe, I; Jackel, S; Lallouz, R

    1998-10-20

    Excellent beam quality and divergence stability over a wide pump power range was demonstrated in a Q-switched, Nd:YAG, positive branch confocal unstable resonator by using a one degree-of-freedom, adaptive optic. Unlike single-element flexible-membrane mirrors, the variable radius mirror (VRM) consisted of a lens and mirror, whose separation determined the VRM's effective radius of curvature. This simple method enabled low cost and efficient thermal focusing compensation. The VRM was demonstrated by producing a 300-mJ Q-switch or 1-J free-running at a beam quality factor M(2) that varied between 1.2 and 1.8 as the average output power varied between 0 and 33 W. PMID:18301522

  19. Nonlinear mechanical resonators for ultra-sensitive mass detection

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, Panos G; Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental sensitivity limit of an appropriately scaled down mechanical resonator can approach one atomic mass unit when only thermal noise is present in the system. However, operation of such nanoscale mechanical resonators is very challenging due to minuteness of their oscillation amplitudes and presence of multiple noise sources in real experimental environments. In order to surmount these challenges, we use microscale cantilever resonators driven to large amplitudes, far beyond their nonlinear instability onset. Our experiments show that such a nonlinear cantilever resonator, described analytically as a Duffing oscillator, has mass sensing performance comparable to that of much smaller resonators operating in a linear regime. We demonstrate femtogram level mass sensing that relies on a bifurcation point tracking that does not require any complex readout means. Our approaches enable straightforward detection of mass changes that are near the fundamental limit imposed by thermo-mechanical fluctuations.

  20. Reconfigurable optical add-drop multiplexer based on thermally tunable micro-ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Danning; Wu, Yuanda; Wang, Yue; An, Junming; Hu, Xiongwei

    2016-05-01

    We report on an eight-channel reconfigurable optical add-drop multiplexer (ROADM) based on micro-ring resonators (MRRs). The effective footprint of the device is about 1000×760 μm2. The free spectral range (FSR) is about 18 nm. The adjacent channel crosstalk ranges from -19.02 dB to -8.29 dB. With the help of the multi-wire structure heaters, compact footprint and high tuning efficiency are achieved simultaneously. Therefore, the minimum average tuning efficiency is 2.723 mW/nm.

  1. Solid-state effects on thermal-neutron cross sections and on low-energy resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, J.A.; Mook, H.A.; Hill, N.W.; Shahal, O.

    1982-01-01

    The neutron total cross sections of several single crystals (Si, Cu, sapphire), several polycrystalline samples (Cu, Fe, Be, C, Bi, Ta), and a fine-powder copper sample have been measured from 0.002 to 5 eV. The Cu powder and polycrystalline Fe, Be and C data exhibit the expected abrupt changes in cross section. The cross section of the single crystal of Si is smooth with only small broad fluctuations. The data on two single Cu crystals, the sapphire crystal, cast Bi, and rolled samples of Ta and Cu have many narrow peaks approx. 10/sup -3/ eV wide. High resolution (0.3%) transmission measurements were made on the 1.057-eV resonance in /sup 240/Pu and the 0.433-eV resonance in /sup 180/Ta, both at room and low temperatures to study the effects of crystal binding. Although the changes in Doppler broadening with temperature were apparent, no asymmetries due to a recoilless contribution were observed.

  2. Retrieving the ground state of spin glasses using thermal noise: Performance of quantum annealing at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Kohji; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Ochoa, Andrew J.; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2016-09-01

    We study the problem to infer the ground state of a spin-glass Hamiltonian using data from another Hamiltonian with interactions disturbed by noise from the original Hamiltonian, motivated by the ground-state inference in quantum annealing on a noisy device. It is shown that the average Hamming distance between the inferred spin configuration and the true ground state is minimized when the temperature of the noisy system is kept at a finite value, and not at zero temperature. We present a spin-glass generalization of a well-established result that the ground state of a purely ferromagnetic Hamiltonian is best inferred at a finite temperature in the sense of smallest Hamming distance when the original ferromagnetic interactions are disturbed by noise. We use the numerical transfer-matrix method to establish the existence of an optimal finite temperature in one- and two-dimensional systems. Our numerical results are supported by mean-field calculations, which give an explicit expression of the optimal temperature to infer the spin-glass ground state as a function of variances of the distributions of the original interactions and the noise. The mean-field prediction is in qualitative agreement with numerical data. Implications on postprocessing of quantum annealing on a noisy device are discussed.

  3. Optimal operating points of oscillators using nonlinear resonators

    PubMed Central

    Kenig, Eyal; Cross, M. C.; Villanueva, L. G.; Karabalin, R. B.; Matheny, M. H.; Lifshitz, Ron; Roukes, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate an analytical method for calculating the phase sensitivity of a class of oscillators whose phase does not affect the time evolution of the other dynamic variables. We show that such oscillators possess the possibility for complete phase noise elimination. We apply the method to a feedback oscillator which employs a high Q weakly nonlinear resonator and provide explicit parameter values for which the feedback phase noise is completely eliminated and others for which there is no amplitude-phase noise conversion. We then establish an operational mode of the oscillator which optimizes its performance by diminishing the feedback noise in both quadratures, thermal noise, and quality factor fluctuations. We also study the spectrum of the oscillator and provide specific results for the case of 1/f noise sources. PMID:23214857

  4. Stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammaitoni, Luca; Hänggi, Peter; Jung, Peter; Marchesoni, Fabio

    1998-01-01

    Over the last two decades, stochastic resonance has continuously attracted considerable attention. The term is given to a phenomenon that is manifest in nonlinear systems whereby generally feeble input information (such as a weak signal) can be be amplified and optimized by the assistance of noise. The effect requires three basic ingredients: (i) an energetic activation barrier or, more generally, a form of threshold; (ii) a weak coherent input (such as a periodic signal); (iii) a source of noise that is inherent in the system, or that adds to the coherent input. Given these features, the response of the system undergoes resonance-like behavior as a function of the noise level; hence the name stochastic resonance. The underlying mechanism is fairly simple and robust. As a consequence, stochastic resonance has been observed in a large variety of systems, including bistable ring lasers, semiconductor devices, chemical reactions, and mechanoreceptor cells in the tail fan of a crayfish. In this paper, the authors report, interpret, and extend much of the current understanding of the theory and physics of stochastic resonance. They introduce the readers to the basic features of stochastic resonance and its recent history. Definitions of the characteristic quantities that are important to quantify stochastic resonance, together with the most important tools necessary to actually compute those quantities, are presented. The essence of classical stochastic resonance theory is presented, and important applications of stochastic resonance in nonlinear optics, solid state devices, and neurophysiology are described and put into context with stochastic resonance theory. More elaborate and recent developments of stochastic resonance theory are discussed, ranging from fundamental quantum properties-being important at low temperatures-over spatiotemporal aspects in spatially distributed systems, to realizations in chaotic maps. In conclusion the authors summarize the achievements

  5. Photoinduced oxygen-vacancy related centers in PbWO4: Electron spin resonance and thermally stimulated luminescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguta, V. V.; Martini, M.; Vedda, A.; Rosetta, E.; Nikl, M.; Mihokovo, E.; Bohacek, P.; Rosa, J.; Hofstatter, A.; Meyer, B. K.; Usuki, Y.

    Using electron spin resonance (ESR) and thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) three different electron traps based on regular W sites perturbed by oxygen vacancies have been identified in PbWO4 . Analysis of ESR spectra parameters ( g -factor values and principal axes orientations) has shown that revealed centers are (WO3 )(-) vacancy containing complex anions associated with a defect in Pb sublattice: (WO3)(-) -A(Pb) complexes. One of the centers (W-1) is thermally stable up to 350-370 K, while the other two (W-2 and W-3 ) only to 270-290 K. Above these temperatures trapped electrons become free and recombine with localized holes, giving rise to TSL glow peaks at T approximate to 323 K and 365 K. Using the initial rise method the 323 K TSL peak-shape was fitted allowing the first order recombination kinetic that gives trap parameters E = 0.88 eV and s similar or equal to 5* 10(12) 1/s.

  6. Single-crystal sapphire resonator at millikelvin temperatures: Observation of thermal bistability in high-Q factor whispering gallery modes

    SciTech Connect

    Creedon, Daniel L.; Tobar, Michael E.; Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Reshitnyk, Yarema; Duty, Timothy

    2010-09-01

    Resonance modes in single crystal sapphire ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) exhibit extremely high electrical and mechanical Q factors ({approx_equal}10{sup 9} at 4 K), which are important characteristics for electromechanical experiments at the quantum limit. We report the cool down of a bulk sapphire sample below superfluid liquid-helium temperature (1.6 K) to as low as 25 mK. The electromagnetic properties were characterized at microwave frequencies, and we report the observation of electromagnetically induced thermal bistability in whispering gallery modes due to the material T{sup 3} dependence on thermal conductivity and the ultralow dielectric loss tangent. We identify ''magic temperatures'' between 80 and 2100 mK, the lowest ever measured, at which the onset of bistability is suppressed and the frequency-temperature dependence is annulled. These phenomena at low temperatures make sapphire suitable for quantum metrology and ultrastable clock applications, including the possible realization of the quantum-limited sapphire clock.

  7. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  8. Correction of birefringence and thermal lensing in nonreciprocal resonators by use of a dynamic imaging mirror.

    PubMed

    Moshe, I; Jackel, S

    2000-08-20

    Enhanced correction of thermally induced birefringence in the presence of strong single-pass, azimuthally dependent bipolar focusing was achieved in single-rod laser oscillators by use of an adaptive optic rear mirror with image relay and aberration correction capabilities. Together with a Faraday rotator, the imaging variable radius mirror was successfully tested in stable and unstable Nd:Cr:GSGG power oscillators under variable pump power conditions from 0 to 800 W. Birefringence correction in the absence of ray retracing was achieved. PMID:18350015

  9. Thermal stability of the three domains of streptokinase studied by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Conejero-Lara, F.; Parrado, J.; Azuaga, A. I.; Smith, R. A.; Ponting, C. P.; Dobson, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    Streptococcus equisimilis streptokinase (SK) is a single-chain protein of 414 residues that is used extensively in the clinical treatment of acute myocardial infarction due to its ability to activate human plasminogen (Plg). The mechanism by which this occurs is poorly understood due to the lack of structural details concerning both molecules and their complex. We reported recently (Parrado J et al., 1996, Protein Sci 5:693-704) that SK is composed of three structural domains (A, B, and C) with a C-terminal tail that is relatively unstructured. Here, we report thermal unfolding experiments, monitored by CD and NMR, using samples of intact SK, five isolated SK fragments, and two two-chain noncovalent complexes between complementary fragments of the protein. These experiments have allowed the unfolding processes of specific domains of the protein to be monitored and their relative stabilities and interdomain interactions to be characterized. Results demonstrate that SK can exist in a number of partially unfolded states, in which individual domains of the protein behave as single cooperative units. Domain B unfolds cooperatively in the first thermal transition at approximately 46 degrees C and its stability is largely independent of the presence of the other domains. The high-temperature transition in intact SK (at approximately 63 degrees C) corresponds to the unfolding of both domains A and C. Thermal stability of domain C is significantly increased by its isolation from the rest of the chain. By contrast, cleavage of the Phe 63-Ala 64 peptide bond within domain A causes thermal destabilization of this domain. The two resulting domain portions (A1 and A2) adopt unstructured conformations when separated. A1 binds with high affinity to all fragments that contain the A2 portion, with a concomitant restoration of the native-like fold of domain A. This result demonstrates that the mechanism whereby A1 stimulates the plasminogen activator activities of complementary SK

  10. Irreversible change in the T1 temperature dependence with thermal dose using the proton resonance frequency-T1 technique.

    PubMed

    Diakite, Mahamadou; Payne, Allison; Todd, Nick; Parker, Dennis L

    2013-04-01

    Denaturation of macromolecules within the tissues is believed to be the major factor contributing to the damage of tissues upon hyperthermia. As a result, the value of the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of the tissue water, which is related to the translational and rotational rates of water, represents an intrinsic probe for investigating structural changes in tissues at high temperature. Therefore, the goal of this work is to investigate whether the simultaneous measurement of temperature and T1 using a hybrid proton resonance frequency (PRF)-T1 measurement technique can be used to detect irreversible changes in T1 that might be indicative of tissue damage. A new hybrid PRF-T1 sequence was implemented based on the variable flip angle driven-equilibrium single-pulse observation (DESPOT)1 method from a standard three dimensional segmented echo-planar imaging sequence by alternating two flip angles from measurement to measurement. The structural changes of the heated tissue volumes were analyzed based on the derived T1 values and the corresponding PRF temperatures. Using the hybrid PRF-T1 technique, we demonstrate that the change of spin lattice relaxation time T1 is reversible with temperature for low thermal dose (thermal dose ≤ 240 cumulative equivalent minutes [CEM] 43°C) and irreversible with temperature after significant accumulation of thermal dose in ex vivo chicken breast tissue. These results suggest that the hybrid PRF-T1 method may be a potentially powerful tool to investigate the extent and mechanism of heat damage of biological tissues.

  11. The influence of thermal and free carrier dispersion effects on all-optical wavelength conversion in a silicon racetrack-shaped microring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaolu; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan; Li, Shaopeng; Han, Jing

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate ultra-low pump power wavelength conversion based on four-wave mixing in a silicon racetrack-shaped microring resonator. When the pump and signal are located at the resonance wavelengths, wavelength conversion with a pump power of only 1 mW can be realized in this microring resonator because of the resonant enhancement of the device. However, saturation of the conversion efficiency occurs because of the shift of the resonance peak, which is caused by the change of the effective refractive index induced by a combination of thermal and free carrier dispersion effects, and it is demonstrated that the thermal effect is the leading-order factor for the change of the refractive index. The maximum conversion efficiency of  ‑21 dB is obtained when the pump power is less than 12 mW. This ultra-low-power on-chip wavelength convertor based on a silicon microring resonator can find important potential applications in highly integrated optical circuits for all-optical signal processing.

  12. Effect of interference between two colored noises on the stationary states of a Brownian particle.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Shrabani; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present properties of an external colored cross-correlated noise-driven Brownian system which is coupled to a thermal bath. Multiplicative cross-correlated noises can stabilize the transition state. Thus by monitoring the interference between the noises one can understand the mechanism of a chemical reaction. At the same time, we have investigated how the interference affects the barrier-crossing dynamics. In its presence breakdown of the Arrhenius result occurs. The breakdown becomes prominent if the multiplicative noises become additive in nature. We have also investigated how the power law behavior of the rate constant as a function of damping strength is affected by the properties of external colored noises. Furthermore, we have observed that multiplicative colored cross-correlated noises can induce the resonant activation phenomenon. PMID:25974476

  13. Effect of interference between two colored noises on the stationary states of a Brownian particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Shrabani; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present properties of an external colored cross-correlated noise-driven Brownian system which is coupled to a thermal bath. Multiplicative cross-correlated noises can stabilize the transition state. Thus by monitoring the interference between the noises one can understand the mechanism of a chemical reaction. At the same time, we have investigated how the interference affects the barrier-crossing dynamics. In its presence breakdown of the Arrhenius result occurs. The breakdown becomes prominent if the multiplicative noises become additive in nature. We have also investigated how the power law behavior of the rate constant as a function of damping strength is affected by the properties of external colored noises. Furthermore, we have observed that multiplicative colored cross-correlated noises can induce the resonant activation phenomenon.

  14. Measurement of the Fundamental Thermal Noise Limit in a Cryogenic Sapphire Frequency Standard Using Bimodal Maser Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Benmessai, Karim; Kersale, Yann; Giordano, Vincent; Creedon, Daniel Lloyd; Tobar, Michael Edmund; Bourgeois, Pierre-Yves

    2008-06-13

    We report observations of the Schawlow-Townes noise limit in a cryogenic sapphire secondary frequency standard. The effect causes a fundamental limit to the frequency stability, and was measured through the novel excitation of a bimodal maser oscillation of a Whispering Gallery doublet at 12.04 GHz. The beat frequency of 10 kHz between the oscillations enabled a sensitive probe for this measurement of fractional frequency instability of 10{sup -14}{tau}{sup -1/2} with only 0.5 pW of output power.

  15. A signal input coil made of superconducting thin film for improved signal-to-noise ratio in a high-Tc SQUID-based ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuen-Lin; Hsu, Chin-Wei; Ku, Yue-Bai; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Wang, Li-Min; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, Hong-Chang

    2013-11-01

    Resonant coupling schemes are commonly used in SQUID-based ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) systems to couple the spin relaxation signals from samples to the SQUID. Generally, in NMR systems, a resonant coupling scheme is composed of two solenoid coils which are made of enamel insulated wires and a capacitor connected in series. In this work, we tried to replace the metal solenoid input coil with a planar high-Tc superconducting spiral coil to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the ULF NMR signal. A measurement of the free induction decay signal of water protons was performed to demonstrate the improved performance of the system. This improvement is due to the fact that the planar superconducting spiral coil possesses a higher mutual inductance with the SQUID. Therefore, it is a promising way to enhance the SNR of high-Tc SQUID-based ULF NMR/MRI systems.

  16. Realization of the thermal equilibrium in inhomogeneous magnetic systems by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with stochastic noise, and its dynamical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Masamichi; Miyashita, Seiji

    2015-04-01

    It is crucially important to investigate the effects of temperature on magnetic properties such as critical phenomena, nucleation, pinning, domain wall motion, and coercivity. The Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation has been applied extensively to study dynamics of magnetic properties. Approaches of Langevin noises have been developed to introduce the temperature effect into the LLG equation. To have the thermal equilibrium state (canonical distribution) as the steady state, the system parameters must satisfy some condition known as the fluctuation-dissipation relation. In inhomogeneous magnetic systems in which spin magnitudes are different at sites, the condition requires that the ratio between the amplitude of the random noise and the damping parameter depend on the magnitude of the magnetic moment at each site. Focused on inhomogeneous magnetic systems, we systematically showed agreement between the stationary state of the stochastic LLG equation and the corresponding equilibrium state obtained by Monte Carlo simulations in various magnetic systems including dipole-dipole interactions. We demonstrated how violations of the condition result in deviations from the true equilibrium state. We also studied the characteristic features of the dynamics depending on the choice of the parameter set. All the parameter sets satisfying the condition realize the same stationary state (equilibrium state). In contrast, different choices of parameter set cause seriously different relaxation processes. We show two relaxation types, i.e., magnetization reversals with uniform rotation and with nucleation.

  17. Pseudomorphic InGaAs/AlGaAs modulation-doped FET's with reduced low-frequency noise and thermally stable performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Shih-Ming; Das, M. B.; Peng, C. K.; Klem, J.; Henderson, T.

    1987-01-01

    A high-performance MODFET structure grown by MBE with the incorporation of a single quantum well In(0.15)Ga(0.85)As layer for the transport of two-dimensional electron gas has been critically examined for its thermal stability at 80 K and low-frequency noise form 0.01 to 10 to the 8th Hz. Experimental results indicate that the behavior of this device in both these respects is much superior when compared with the same behavior of conventional MODFETs. A maximum low-field carrier mobility of 29,000 sq cm/s at 80 K and an average carrier saturation velocity of 2 x 10 to the 7th cm/s at 300 K in a 1-micron gate device clearly indicate that the quality of the pseudomorphic quantum well (InGaAs) layer is either comparable or better than that of the usual GaAs buffer layer. The deep level spectra, obtained through photo-FET measurements, and the low-frequency noise spectra at different temperatures obtained for the new pseudomorphic and conventional MODFET's have clearly indicated that contributions from various deep levels present in the new structure are significantly reduced.

  18. Large-Scale Structure of the Solar Wind: Electron Density, Temperature and Kappa Deduced From ULYSSES Radio Measurements by Quasi-Thermal Noise Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zouganelis, I.; Maksimovic, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Issautier, K.; Moncuquet, M.

    2006-12-01

    We will revisit and discuss the electron density and temperature derived from the electrostatic noise measurement made with the URAP-RAR dipole electric antenna on Ulysses, as this probe flew by pole-to-pole during the minimum solar activity (1994-95). The electron parameters are obtained by fitting a model of the voltage power spectrum to the voltage measured at the terminals of an electric antenna. This method is generically known as quasi thermal noise spectroscopy. In the present work, the model of spectrum is depending on only 3 parameters and computed by assuming that the electron velocity distribution is a generalized Lorentzian or kappa distribution. The 3 fitted parameters are thus the electron density, temperature and kappa value of the distribution, and we will discuss their variations with heliocentric distance, latitude and temporal solar activity. We will also compare these new results to those obtained by our team from the same data set but assuming instead a classical core + halo distribution for the electron velocity, that is a sum of two Maxwellian distributions. With this latter method, the only temperature that could be determined with enough precision was the core temperature, while our new processing provides the total temperature of the solar wind electrons. We will finally focus on the total temperature gradient with distance we find when using such a kappa distribution.

  19. Large-Scale Structure of the Solar Wind: Electron Density, Temperature and Kappa Deduced from ULYSSES Radio Measurements by Quasi-Thermal Noise Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncuquet, M.; Issautier, K.; Zouganelis, I.

    2004-05-01

    We will revisit and discuss the electron density and temperature derived from the electrostatic noise measurement made with the URAP-RAR dipole electric antenna on Ulysses, as this probe flew by pole-to-pole during the minimum solar activity (1994-95). The electron parameters are obtained by fitting a model of the voltage power spectrum to the voltage measured at the terminals of an electric antenna. This method is generically known as ``quasi thermal noise spectroscopy''. In the present work, the model of spectrum is depending on only 3 parameters and computed by assuming that the electron velocity distribution is a generalized Lorentzian or ``kappa'' distribution. The 3 fitted parameters are thus the electron density, temperature and kappa value of the distribution, and we will discuss their variations with heliocentric distance, latitude and temporal solar activity. We will also compare these new results to those obtained by our team from the same data set but assuming instead a classical ''core + halo'' distribution for the electron velocity, that is a sum of two Maxwellian distributions. With this later method, the only temperature that could be determined with enough precision was the core temperature, while our new processing provides the total temperature of the solar wind electrons. We will finally focus on the total temperature gradient with distance we find when using such a kappa distribution.

  20. Dispersive Thermometry with a Josephson Junction Coupled to a Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saira, O.-P.; Zgirski, M.; Viisanen, K. L.; Golubev, D. S.; Pekola, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We embed a small Josephson junction in a microwave resonator that allows simultaneous dc biasing and dispersive readout. Thermal fluctuations drive the junction into phase diffusion and induce a temperature-dependent shift in the resonance frequency. By sensing the thermal noise of a remote resistor in this manner, we demonstrate primary thermometry in the range of 300 mK to below 100 mK, and high-bandwidth (7.5 MHz) operation with a noise-equivalent temperature of better than 10 μ K /√{Hz } . At a finite bias voltage close to a Fiske resonance, amplification of the microwave probe signal is observed. We develop an accurate theoretical model of our device based on the theory of dynamical Coulomb blockade.

  1. Evolution of elastic and thermal properties during TMOS-gel formation determined by ringing bottle acoustic resonance spectroscopy, impulsive stimulated scattering, photopyroelectric spectroscopy and the hot ball method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Agustin Flores Cuautle, Jose Jesus; Kouyate, Mansour; Bernardus Roozen, Nicolaas; Goossens, Jozefien; Menon, Preethy; Kuriakose Malayil, Maju; Salenbien, Robbe; Nair Rajesh, Ravindran; Glorieux, Christ; Griesmar, Pascal; Martinez, Loïc; Serfaty, Stéphane

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of the elastic and thermal properties of a tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS)-based gel that exhibits an extraordinary ringing effect when enclosed in a bottle is investigated during the sol-gel transition. The results demonstrate the feasibility of three proposed experimental methods for monitoring of gels during their formation. The shear stiffening evolution during gelation is monitored by ringing bottle, resonant acoustic spectroscopy and by an ultrasonic technique using piezo electric excitation and detection. The evolution of the longitudinal modulus and the thermal diffusivity of the gel during stiffening are simultaneously determined by a combined photoacoustic and photothermal method based on heterodyne diffraction detection of impulsive stimulated scattering by, respectively, a propagating acoustic wave grating and a decaying thermal expansion grating that were both thermo elastically generated using a pulsed laser. Also, the feasibility of an inverse photopyroelectric method and a hot ball technique to monitor the thermal transport efficiency and thermal impedance of a forming gel by tracking the thermal conductivity, the thermal diffusivity, and the thermal effusivity is demonstrated. The network polymerization and stiffening during the sol-gel transition in TMOS-gel corresponds with substantial changes in the shear acoustic velocity and in all thermal properties, while the longitudinal acoustic velocity is only weakly affected.

  2. A computer tool for the fusion and visualization of thermal and magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Bichinho, Gerson Linck; Gariba, Munir Antonio; Sanches, Ionildo José; Gamba, Humberto Remigio; Cruz, Felipe Pardal Franco; Nohama, Percy

    2009-10-01

    The measurement of temperature variation along the surface of the body, provided by digital infrared thermal imaging (DITI), is becoming a valuable auxiliary tool for the early detection of many diseases in medicine. However, DITI is essentially a 2-D technique and its image does not provide useful anatomical information associated with it. However, multimodal image registration and fusion may overcome this difficulty and provide additional information for diagnosis purposes. In this paper, a new method of registering and merging 2-D DITI and 3-D MRI is presented. Registration of the images acquired from the two modalities is necessary as they are acquired with different image systems. Firstly, the body volume of interest is scanned by a MRI system and a set of 2-D DITI of it, at orthogonal angles, is acquired. Next, it is necessary to register these two different sets of images. This is done by creating 2-D MRI projections from the reconstructed 3-D MRI volume and registering it with the DITI. Once registered, the DITI is then projected over the 3-D MRI. The program developed to assess the proposed method to combine MRI and DITI resulted in a new tool for fusing two different image modalities, and it can help medical doctors.

  3. Heterogeneous Superconducting Low-Noise Sensing Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Penanen, Konstantin I.; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2008-01-01

    A heterogeneous material construction has been devised for sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers that are subject to a combination of requirements peculiar to some advanced applications, notably including low-field magnetic resonance imaging for medical diagnosis. The requirements in question are the following: The sensing coils must be large enough (in some cases having dimensions of as much as tens of centimeters) to afford adequate sensitivity; The sensing coils must be made electrically superconductive to eliminate Johnson noise (thermally induced noise proportional to electrical resistance); and Although the sensing coils must be cooled to below their superconducting- transition temperatures with sufficient cooling power to overcome moderate ambient radiative heat leakage, they must not be immersed in cryogenic liquid baths. For a given superconducting sensing coil, this combination of requirements can be satisfied by providing a sufficiently thermally conductive link between the coil and a cold source. However, the superconducting coil material is not suitable as such a link because electrically superconductive materials are typically poor thermal conductors. The heterogeneous material construction makes it possible to solve both the electrical- and thermal-conductivity problems. The basic idea is to construct the coil as a skeleton made of a highly thermally conductive material (typically, annealed copper), then coat the skeleton with an electrically superconductive alloy (typically, a lead-tin solder) [see figure]. In operation, the copper skeleton provides the required thermally conductive connection to the cold source, while the electrically superconductive coating material shields against Johnson noise that originates in the copper skeleton.

  4. Correcting Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) High Altitude (40 - 65 km) Temperature Retrievals for Instrumental Correlated Noise and Biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnochie, T. H.; Smith, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) nadir-soundings have been used to derive atmospheric temperatures up to roughly 40 km [Conrath et al., JGR 105 2000, Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001], and MGS-TES limb soundings have been used to extend the atmospheric temperature data set to > 60 km in altitude [Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001]. The ~40 - ~65 km altitude range probed by the MGS-TES limb sounding is particularly important for capturing key dynamical features such as the warm winter polar mesosphere [e.g., Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001; McCleese et al., Nature Geoscience 1, 2008], and the response of thermal tides to dust opacity [e.g. Wilson and Hamilton, J. Atmos. Sci. 53, 1996]. Thus accurate and precise temperature profiles at these altitudes are particularly important for constraining global circulation models. They are also critical for interpreting observations of mesospheric condensate aerosols [e.g., Määttänen et al., Icarus 209, 2010; McConnochie et al., Icarus 210, 2010)]. We have indentified correlated noise components in the MGS-TES limb sounding radiances that propagate into very large uncertainties in the retrieved temperatures. We have also identified a slowly varying radiance bias in the limb sounding radiances. Note that the nadir-sounding-based MGS-TES atmospheric temperatures currently available from the Planetary Data System are not affected by either of these issues. These two issues affect the existing MGS-TES limb sounding temperature data set are as follows: Considering, for example, the 1.5 Pascal pressure level (which typically falls between 50 and 60 km altitude), correlated-noise induced standard errors for individual limb-sounding temperature retrievals were 3 - 5 K in Mars Year 24, rising to 5 - 15 K in Mars Year 25 and 10 - 15 K in Mars Year 26 and 27. The radiance bias, although consistent on ~10-sol time scales, is highly variable over the course of the MGS-TES mission. It results in temperatures (at the 1

  5. Rotorcraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of a realistic plan for NASA and the U.S. helicopter industry to develop a design-for-noise methodology, including plans for the identification and development of promising noise reduction technology was discussed. Topics included: noise reduction techniques, scaling laws, empirical noise prediction, psychoacoustics, and methods of developing and validing noise prediction methods.

  6. Dramatic enhancement of fullerene anion formation in polymer solar cells by thermal annealing: Direct observation by electron spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dong; Nagamori, Tatsuya; Yabusaki, Masaki; Yasuda, Takeshi; Han, Liyuan; Marumoto, Kazuhiro

    2014-06-16

    Using electron spin resonance (ESR), we clarified the origin of the efficiency degradation of polymer solar cells containing a lithium-fluoride (LiF) buffer layer created by a thermal annealing process after the deposition of an Al electrode (post-annealing). The device structure was indium-tin-oxide/ poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate)/poly (3-hexylthiophene):phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM)/LiF/Al. Three samples consisting of quartz/P3HT:PCBM/LiF/Al, quartz/P3HT:PCBM/Al, and quartz/PCBM/LiF/Al were investigated and compared. A clear ESR signal from radical anions on the PCBM was observed after LiF/Al was deposited onto a P3HT:PCBM layer because of charge transfer at the interface between the PCBM and the LiF/Al, which indicated the formation of PCBM{sup −}Li{sup +} complexes. The number of radical anions on the PCBM was enhanced remarkably by the post-annealing process; this enhancement was caused by the surface segregation of PCBM and by the dissociation of LiF at the Al interface by the post-annealing process. The formation of a greater number of anions enhanced the electron scattering, decreased the electron-transport properties of the PCBM molecules, and caused an energy-level shift at the interface. These effects led to degradation in the device performance.

  7. Temperature and velocity determination of shock-heated flows with non-resonant heterodyne laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, F. J.; Baab, S.; Lamanna, G.; Weigand, B.

    2015-12-01

    Non-resonant laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), a four-wave mixing technique, was applied to post-shock flows within a shock tube. Simultaneous single-shot determination of temperature, speed of sound and flow velocity behind incident and reflected shock waves at different pressure and temperature levels are presented. Measurements were performed non-intrusively and without any seeding. The paper describes the technique and outlines its advantages compared to more established laser-based methods with respect to the challenges of shock tube experiments. The experiments include argon and nitrogen as test gas at temperatures of up to 1000 K and pressures of up to 43 bar. The experimental data are compared to calculated values based on inviscid one-dimensional shock wave theory. The single-shot uncertainty of the technique is investigated for worst-case test conditions resulting in relative standard deviations of 1, 1.7 and 3.4 % for Mach number, speed of sound and temperature, respectively. For all further experimental conditions, calculated values stay well within the 95 % confidence intervals of the LITA measurement.

  8. Giant Dipole Resonance in the hot and thermalized 132Ce nucleus: damping of collective modes at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wieland, O; Bracco, A; Camera, F; Benzoni, G; Blasi, N; Brambilla, S; Crespi, F; Giussani, A; Leoni, S; Million, B; Moroni, A; Barlini, S; Kravchuk, V L; Gramegna, F; Lanchais, A; Mastinu, P; Maj, A; Brekiesz, M; Kmiecik, M; Bruno, M; Geraci, E; Vannini, G; Casini, G; Chiari, M; Nannini, A; Ordine, A; Ormand, W E

    2006-06-16

    The {gamma} decay of the Giant Dipole Resonance in the {sup 132}Ce compound nucleus with temperature up to {approx} 4 MeV has been measured. The symmetric {sup 64}Ni + {sup 68}Zn at E{sub beam} = 300, 400, 500 MeV and the asymmetric reaction {sup 16}O + {sup 116}Sn at E{sub beam} = 130, 250 MeV have been investigated. Light charged particles and {gamma} rays have been detected in coincidence with the recoiling compound system. In the case of the mass symmetric {sup 64}Ni induced reaction the {gamma} and charged particle spectral shapes are found to be consistent with the emission from a fully equilibrated compound nuclei and the GDR parameters are extracted from the data using a statistical model analysis. The GDR width is found to increase almost linear with temperature. This increase is rather well reproduced within a model which includes both the thermal fluctuation of the nuclear shape and the lifetime of the compound nucleus.

  9. Interference and nonlinear properties of four-wave-mixing resonances in thermal vapor: Analytical results and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parniak, Michał; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2015-02-01

    We develop a model to calculate nonlinear polarization in a nondegenerate four-wave mixing in diamond configuration which includes the effects of hyperfine structure and Doppler broadening. We verify the model against the experiment with 5 2S1 /2,5 2P3 /2,5 2D3 /2 , and 5 2P1 /2 levels of rubidium 85. Treating the multilevel atomic system as a combination of many four-level systems we are able to express the nonlinear susceptibility of a thermal ensemble in a low-intensity regime in terms of Voigt-type profiles and obtain an excellent conformity of theory and experiment within this complex system. The agreement is also satisfactory at high intensity and the analytical model correctly predicts the positions and shapes of resonances. Our results elucidate the physics of coherent interaction of light with atoms involving higher excited levels in vapors at room temperature, which is used in an increasing range of applications.

  10. Thermal noise and optomechanical features in the emission of a membrane-coupled compound cavity laser diode

    PubMed Central

    Baldacci, Lorenzo; Pitanti, Alessandro; Masini, Luca; Arcangeli, Andrea; Colangelo, Francesco; Navarro-Urrios, Daniel; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a compound optical cavity as linear displacement detector, by measuring the thermal motion of a silicon nitride suspended membrane acting as the external mirror of a near-infrared Littrow laser diode. Fluctuations in the laser optical power induced by the membrane vibrations are collected by a photodiode integrated within the laser, and then measured with a spectrum analyzer. The dynamics of the membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator is investigated as a function of air pressure and actuator displacement in a homodyne configuration. The high Q-factor (~3.4 · 104 at 8.3 · 10−3 mbar) of the fundamental mechanical mode at ~73 kHz guarantees a detection sensitivity high enough for direct measurement of thermal motion at room temperature (~87 pm RMS). The compound cavity system here introduced can be employed as a table-top, cost-effective linear displacement detector for cavity optomechanics. Furthermore, thanks to the strong optical nonlinearities of the laser compound cavity, these systems open new perspectives in the study of non-Markovian quantum properties at the mesoscale. PMID:27538586

  11. Thermal noise and optomechanical features in the emission of a membrane-coupled compound cavity laser diode.

    PubMed

    Baldacci, Lorenzo; Pitanti, Alessandro; Masini, Luca; Arcangeli, Andrea; Colangelo, Francesco; Navarro-Urrios, Daniel; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a compound optical cavity as linear displacement detector, by measuring the thermal motion of a silicon nitride suspended membrane acting as the external mirror of a near-infrared Littrow laser diode. Fluctuations in the laser optical power induced by the membrane vibrations are collected by a photodiode integrated within the laser, and then measured with a spectrum analyzer. The dynamics of the membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator is investigated as a function of air pressure and actuator displacement in a homodyne configuration. The high Q-factor (~3.4 · 10(4) at 8.3 · 10(-3) mbar) of the fundamental mechanical mode at ~73 kHz guarantees a detection sensitivity high enough for direct measurement of thermal motion at room temperature (~87 pm RMS). The compound cavity system here introduced can be employed as a table-top, cost-effective linear displacement detector for cavity optomechanics. Furthermore, thanks to the strong optical nonlinearities of the laser compound cavity, these systems open new perspectives in the study of non-Markovian quantum properties at the mesoscale. PMID:27538586

  12. Thermal noise and optomechanical features in the emission of a membrane-coupled compound cavity laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldacci, Lorenzo; Pitanti, Alessandro; Masini, Luca; Arcangeli, Andrea; Colangelo, Francesco; Navarro-Urrios, Daniel; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of a compound optical cavity as linear displacement detector, by measuring the thermal motion of a silicon nitride suspended membrane acting as the external mirror of a near-infrared Littrow laser diode. Fluctuations in the laser optical power induced by the membrane vibrations are collected by a photodiode integrated within the laser, and then measured with a spectrum analyzer. The dynamics of the membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator is investigated as a function of air pressure and actuator displacement in a homodyne configuration. The high Q-factor (~3.4 · 104 at 8.3 · 10‑3 mbar) of the fundamental mechanical mode at ~73 kHz guarantees a detection sensitivity high enough for direct measurement of thermal motion at room temperature (~87 pm RMS). The compound cavity system here introduced can be employed as a table-top, cost-effective linear displacement detector for cavity optomechanics. Furthermore, thanks to the strong optical nonlinearities of the laser compound cavity, these systems open new perspectives in the study of non-Markovian quantum properties at the mesoscale.

  13. Thermal noise and optomechanical features in the emission of a membrane-coupled compound cavity laser diode.

    PubMed

    Baldacci, Lorenzo; Pitanti, Alessandro; Masini, Luca; Arcangeli, Andrea; Colangelo, Francesco; Navarro-Urrios, Daniel; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2016-08-19

    We demonstrate the use of a compound optical cavity as linear displacement detector, by measuring the thermal motion of a silicon nitride suspended membrane acting as the external mirror of a near-infrared Littrow laser diode. Fluctuations in the laser optical power induced by the membrane vibrations are collected by a photodiode integrated within the laser, and then measured with a spectrum analyzer. The dynamics of the membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator is investigated as a function of air pressure and actuator displacement in a homodyne configuration. The high Q-factor (~3.4 · 10(4) at 8.3 · 10(-3) mbar) of the fundamental mechanical mode at ~73 kHz guarantees a detection sensitivity high enough for direct measurement of thermal motion at room temperature (~87 pm RMS). The compound cavity system here introduced can be employed as a table-top, cost-effective linear displacement detector for cavity optomechanics. Furthermore, thanks to the strong optical nonlinearities of the laser compound cavity, these systems open new perspectives in the study of non-Markovian quantum properties at the mesoscale.

  14. Observation of the fundamental Nyquist noise limit in an ultra-high Q-factor cryogenic bulk acoustic wave cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Goryachev, Maxim Ivanov, Eugene N.; Tobar, Michael E.; Kann, Frank van; Galliou, Serge

    2014-10-13

    Thermal Nyquist noise fluctuations of high-Q bulk acoustic wave cavities have been observed at cryogenic temperatures with a DC superconducting quantum interference device amplifier. High Q modes with bandwidths of few tens of milliHz produce thermal fluctuations with a signal-to-noise ratio of up to 23 dB. The estimated effective temperature from the Nyquist noise is in good agreement with the physical temperature of the device, confirming the validity of the equivalent circuit model and the non-existence of any excess resonator self-noise. The measurements also confirm that the quality factor remains extremely high (Q > 10{sup 8} at low order overtones) for very weak (thermal) system motion at low temperatures, when compared to values measured with relatively strong external excitation. This result represents an enabling step towards operating such a high-Q acoustic device at the standard quantum limit.

  15. An Inexpensive Resonance Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of resonance is applicable to almost every branch of physics. Without resonance, there wouldn't be televisions or stereos, or even swings on the playground. However, resonance also has undesirable side effects such as irritating noises in the car and the catastrophic events such as helicopters flying apart. In this article, the…

  16. Photoluminescence, thermally stimulated luminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance investigations of Tb{sup 3+} doped SrBPO{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Mithlesh; Seshagiri, T.K.; Kadam, R.M.; Godbole, S.V.

    2011-09-15

    Graphical abstract: EPR spectra of BOHC's in 2 kGy {gamma}-irradiated SrBPO{sub 5}:Tb sample using Receiver Gain RG = 4 x 10{sup 4}, Modulation Amplitude MA = 0.25 G, Microwave power setting 6.3 mW: (A) un-annealed sample recorded at 300 K, (B) un-annealed sample recorded at 100 K and (C) sample annealed at 550 K for 10 min and recorded at 100 K. Highlights: {yields} PL studies on Tb doped SrBPO{sub 5} phosphor have shown emission due to Tb{sup 3+} associated with {sup 5}D{sub 3} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub J} and {sup 5}D{sub 4} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub J} (J = 3, 4, 5 and 6) transitions. {yields} The EPR studies on {gamma}-irradiated samples revealed formation of three types of boron oxygen hole trapped centres viz., BOHC{sub 1}, BOHC{sub 2} and BOHC{sub 3} and an electron trapped centre. {yields} The TSL peak at 475 K was associated with the thermal destruction of BOHC{sub 2}. -- Abstract: Trap level spectroscopic studies were carried out on {gamma}-irradiated Tb (1 mole%) doped SrBPO{sub 5} were carried out using photoluminescence (PL), thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. The incorporation of Tb in the 3+ oxidation state was ascertained from PL studies. Life time for Tb{sup 3+} emission corresponding to the intense transition {sup 5}D{sub 4} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub 5} at 543 nm was determined. The spectral characteristics of the TSL glows have shown that Tb{sup 3+} ions act as the emission center for the glow peak at 475 K. The trap parameters of the glow peak were determined. EPR investigations at room temperature/77 K revealed the stabilization of three boron oxygen hole trapped centers (BOHC's) and oxygen centered radicals such as O{sup -} and O{sub 2}{sup -} and trapped electrons in room temperature {gamma}-irradiated samples. TSL glow peak at 475 K was found to be associated with recombination of electron released from trapped electron center and the BOHC{sub 2} center.

  17. Engineered Theranostic Magnetic Nanostructures: Role of Composition and Surface Coating on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast and Thermal Activation.

    PubMed

    Nandwana, Vikas; Ryoo, Soo-Ryoon; Kanthala, Shanthi; De, Mrinmoy; Chou, Stanley S; Prasad, Pottumarthi V; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2016-03-23

    Magnetic nanostructures (MNS) have emerged as promising functional probes for simultaneous diagnostics and therapeutics (theranostic) applications due to their ability to enhance localized contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and heat under external radio frequency (RF) field, respectively. We show that the "theranostic" potential of the MNS can be significantly enhanced by tuning their core composition and architecture of surface coating. Metal ferrite (e.g., MFe2O4) nanoparticles of ∼8 nm size and nitrodopamine conjugated polyethylene glycol (NDOPA-PEG) were used as the core and surface coating of the MNS, respectively. The composition was controlled by tuning the stoichiometry of MFe2O4 nanoparticles (M = Fe, Mn, Zn, ZnxMn1-x) while the architecture of surface coating was tuned by changing the molecular weight of PEG, such that larger weight is expected to result in longer length extended away from the MNS surface. Our results suggest that both core as well as surface coating are important factors to take into consideration during the design of MNS as theranostic agents which is illustrated by relaxivity and thermal activation plots of MNS with different core composition and surface coating thickness. After optimization of these parameters, the r2 relaxivity and specific absorption rate (SAR) up to 552 mM(-1) s(-1) and 385 W/g were obtained, respectively, which are among the highest values reported for MNS with core magnetic nanoparticles of size below 10 nm. In addition, NDOPA-PEG coated MFe2O4 nanostructures showed enhanced biocompatibility (up to [Fe] = 200 μg/mL) and reduced nonspecific uptake in macrophage cells in comparison to other well established FDA approved Fe based MR contrast agents. PMID:26936392

  18. Analysis of a Precambrian resonance-stabilized day length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Benjamin C.; Stevenson, David J.

    2016-06-01

    During the Precambrian era, Earth's decelerating rotation would have passed a 21 h period that would have been resonant with the semidiurnal atmospheric thermal tide. Near this point, the atmospheric torque would have been maximized, being comparable in magnitude but opposite in direction to the lunar torque, halting Earth's rotational deceleration, maintaining a constant day length, as detailed by Zahnle and Walker (1987). We develop a computational model to determine necessary conditions for formation and breakage of this resonant effect. Our simulations show the resonance to be resilient to atmospheric thermal noise but suggest a sudden atmospheric temperature increase like the deglaciation period following a possible "snowball Earth" near the end of the Precambrian would break this resonance; the Marinoan and Sturtian glaciations seem the most likely candidates for this event. Our model provides a simulated day length over time that resembles existing paleorotational data, though further data are needed to verify this hypothesis.

  19. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  20. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  1. Shot noise effect on noise source and noise parameter of 10-nm-scale quasi-ballistic n-/p-type MOS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jongwook; Kang, Myounggon

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we investigated the noise source and noise parameters of a quasi-ballistic MOSFET at the high-frequency regime. We presented the shot noise properties in the measured drain current noise and its impact on the induced gate noise and the noise parameters of 10-nm-scale n-/p-type MOS (N/PMOS) devices for the first time. The measured noise sources and noise parameters were carefully analyzed with the shot and thermal noise models in all operation regions. On the basis of the results, new noise parameter models are proposed and the noise performance improvement in the quasi-ballistic regime is shown.

  2. Noise in miniature microphones.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stephen C; LoPresti, Janice L; Ring, Eugene M; Nepomuceno, Henry G; Beard, John J; Ballad, William J; Carlson, Elmer V

    2002-02-01

    The internal noise spectrum in miniature electret microphones of the type used in the manufacture of hearing aids is measured. An analogous circuit model of the microphone is empirically fit to the measured data and used to determine the important sources of noise within the microphone. The dominant noise source is found to depend on the frequency. Below 40 Hz and above 9 kHz, the dominant source is electrical noise from the amplifier circuit needed to buffer the electrical signal from the microphone diaphragm. Between approximately 40 Hz and 1 kHz, the dominant source is thermal noise originating in the acoustic flow resistance of the small hole pierced in the diaphragm to equalize barometric pressure. Between approximately 1 kHz and 9 kHz, the noise originates in the acoustic flow resistances of sound entering the microphone and propagating to the diaphragm. To further reduce the microphone internal noise in the audio band requires attacking these sources. A prototype microphone having reduced acoustical noise is measured and discussed. PMID:11863188

  3. Noise in miniature microphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Stephen C.; Lopresti, Janice L.; Ring, Eugene M.; Nepomuceno, Henry G.; Beard, John J.; Ballad, William J.; Carlson, Elmer V.

    2002-02-01

    The internal noise spectrum in miniature electret microphones of the type used in the manufacture of hearing aids is measured. An analogous circuit model of the microphone is empirically fit to the measured data and used to determine the important sources of noise within the microphone. The dominant noise source is found to depend on the frequency. Below 40 Hz and above 9 kHz, the dominant source is electrical noise from the amplifier circuit needed to buffer the electrical signal from the microphone diaphragm. Between approximately 40 Hz and 1 kHz, the dominant source is thermal noise originating in the acoustic flow resistance of the small hole pierced in the diaphragm to equalize barometric pressure. Between approximately 1 kHz and 9 kHz, the noise originates in the acoustic flow resistances of sound entering the microphone and propagating to the diaphragm. To further reduce the microphone internal noise in the audio band requires attacking these sources. A prototype microphone having reduced acoustical noise is measured and discussed.

  4. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  5. Community noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragdon, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Airport and community land use planning as they relate to airport noise reduction are discussed. Legislation, community relations, and the physiological effect of airport noise are considered. Noise at the Logan, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis/St. Paul airports is discussed.

  6. Thermal and resonance neutrons generated by various electron and X-ray therapeutic beams from medical linacs installed in polish oncological centers

    PubMed Central

    Konefał, Adam; Orlef, Andrzej; Łaciak, Marcin; Ciba, Aleksander; Szewczuk, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Background High-energy photon and electron therapeutic beams generated in medical linear accelerators can cause the electronuclear and photonuclear reactions in which neutrons with a broad energy spectrum are produced. A low-energy component of this neutron radiation induces simple capture reactions from which various radioisotopes originate and in which the radioactivity of a linac head and various objects in the treatment room appear. Aim The aim of this paper is to present the results of the thermal/resonance neutron fluence measurements during therapeutic beam emission and exemplary spectra of gamma radiation emitted by medical linac components activated in neutron reactions for four X-ray beams and for four electron beams generated by various manufacturers’ accelerators installed in typical concrete bunkers in Polish oncological centers. Materials and methods The measurements of neutron fluence were performed with the use of the induced activity method, whereas the spectra of gamma radiation from decays of the resulting radioisotopes were measured by means of a portable high-purity germanium detector set for field spectroscopy. Results The fluence of thermal neutrons as well as resonance neutrons connected with the emission of a 20 MV X-ray beam is ∼106 neutrons/cm2 per 1 Gy of a dose in water at a reference depth. It is about one order of magnitude greater than that for the 15 MV X-ray beams and about two orders of magnitude greater than for the 18–22 MeV electron beams regardless of the type of an accelerator. Conclusion The thermal as well as resonance neutron fluence depends strongly on the type and the nominal potential of a therapeutic beam. It is greater for X-ray beams than for electrons. The accelerator accessories and other large objects should not be stored in a treatment room during high-energy therapeutic beam emission to avoid their activation caused by thermal and resonance neutrons. Half-lives of the radioisotopes originating from

  7. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of “Violin-Mode” resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level “Violin-Mode” (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent “noise-gain peaking” arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes’ two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m{sup −1}(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  8. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m-1(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  9. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations-this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m(-1)(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm. PMID:25430131

  10. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations-this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m(-1)(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  11. AsGa+ antisites identified by electron spin resonance as a main interface defect system in thermal GaAs/native oxide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stesmans, A.; Nguyen, S.; Afanas'ev, V. V.

    2013-10-01

    Aiming to assess the atomic-structural identity of inherently generated interfacial point defects during thermal oxidation, a conventional low-temperature electron spin resonance study has been carried out on (100)GaAs/native oxide structures thermally grown in the range of 350-615 °C on both powders and slices of semi-insulating (100)GaAs. This compellingly reveals substantial generation (density ˜ 1 × 1013 cm-2) of interfacial 75AsGa+ antisites in registry with the GaAs substrate layer, thus providing solid independent evidence of substantial interfacial As enrichment, appearing as endemic to oxidation of GaAs, and at the same time, providing an answer of how a major part of excess As gets interfacially incorporated. Given the known electrical deep double donor attribute of AsGa, direct identification is thus established of a major system of detrimental interface traps.

  12. Dependence of electrically detected magnetic resonance signal shape from iron-contaminated silicon wafers on the thermal treatment of the samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mchedlidze, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Lin, T.-C.; Suezawa, M.

    1999-12-01

    The shape of the electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) signal from iron-contaminated Czochralski-grown silicon (CZ-Si) samples strongly depends on the thermal treatments applied to the samples before and after the contamination procedure, although the average g-value of the spectra apparently does not vary. A signal from an iron-contaminated float-zone grown silicon (FZ-Si) sample was detected employing an EDMR signal detection unit with enhanced sensitivity. For similar contamination levels, the signal from the FZ-Si sample has amplitude about {1}/{45} that of the CZ-Si signal and has specific shape. Further study of the EDMR signals from iron-contaminated Si samples will be useful for the investigation of gettering and recombination processes in Si wafers. Besides that, dependence of the EDMR spectrum shape on the thermal processes employed can help to pinpoint the process responsible for wafer contamination during semiconductor device fabrication.

  13. Rotor noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, F. H.

    1991-08-01

    The physical characteristics and sources of rotorcraft noise as they exist today are presented. Emphasis is on helicopter-like vehicles, that is, on rotorcraft in nonaxial flight. The mechanisms of rotor noise are reviewed in a simple physical manner for the most dominant sources of rotorcraft noise. With simple models, the characteristic time- and frequency-domain features of these noise sources are presented for idealized cases. Full-scale data on several rotorcraft are then reviewed to allow for the easy identification of the type and extent of the radiating noise. Methods and limitations of using scaled models to test for several noise sources are subsequently presented. Theoretical prediction methods are then discussed and compared with experimental data taken under very controlled conditions. Finally, some promising noise reduction technology is reviewed.

  14. Rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    The physical characteristics and sources of rotorcraft noise as they exist today are presented. Emphasis is on helicopter-like vehicles, that is, on rotorcraft in nonaxial flight. The mechanisms of rotor noise are reviewed in a simple physical manner for the most dominant sources of rotorcraft noise. With simple models, the characteristic time- and frequency-domain features of these noise sources are presented for idealized cases. Full-scale data on several rotorcraft are then reviewed to allow for the easy identification of the type and extent of the radiating noise. Methods and limitations of using scaled models to test for several noise sources are subsequently presented. Theoretical prediction methods are then discussed and compared with experimental data taken under very controlled conditions. Finally, some promising noise reduction technology is reviewed.

  15. A microrod-resonator Brillouin laser with 240 Hz absolute linewidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, William; Becker, Joe; Cole, Daniel C.; Coillet, Aurelien; Baynes, Fred N.; Papp, Scott B.; Diddams, Scott A.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate an ultralow-noise microrod-resonator based laser that oscillates on the gain supplied by the stimulated Brillouin scattering optical nonlinearity. Microresonator Brillouin lasers are known to offer an outstanding frequency noise floor, which is limited by fundamental thermal fluctuations. Here, we show experimental evidence that thermal effects also dominate the close-to-carrier frequency fluctuations. The 6 mm diameter microrod resonator used in our experiments has a large optical mode area of ∼100 μm2, and hence its 10 ms thermal time constant filters the close-to-carrier optical frequency noise. The result is an absolute laser linewidth of 240 Hz with a corresponding white-frequency noise floor of 0.1 Hz2 Hz‑1. We explain the steady-state performance of this laser by measurements of its operation state and of its mode detuning and lineshape. Our results highlight a mechanism for noise that is common to many microresonator devices due to the inherent coupling between intracavity power and mode frequency. We demonstrate the ability to reduce this noise through a feedback loop that stabilizes the intracavity power.

  16. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  17. Generation of micro-domains in AT-cut quartz by thermal processing and the effect on resonator modes

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenback, L.; Martin, S.J.; Frye, G.C.; Bohuszewicz, T.V.; Doughty, D.H.

    1994-08-01

    The fabrication of acoustic sensors with sol-gel selective coatings requires the deposition of thin films on quartz resonators using solution chemistry techniques. Oxide films are spin-cast, then heat treated. A variety of film compositions are deposited, requiring a variety of firing schedules. Network analysis of the untreated AT-cut quartz devices revealed a resonant frequency of 5.0 MHz, corresponding to a pure thickness-shear mode resonance. For devices that were rapidly fired to 400C and rapidly air cooled, network analysis showed the shear-mode response at 5.0 MHz disappeared, while a predominantly compressional mode response at 7.3 MHz emerged. Structural analysis explored the crystal structure changes induced by processing which resulted in this new mode.

  18. The cavity resonance mode of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 mesa terahertz sources as probed by scanning laser thermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benseman, Timothy; Koshelev, Alexei; Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii; Welp, Ulrich; Kwok, Wai-Kwong; Hao, Yang; Gross, Boris; Lange, Matthias; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    Stacked Intrinsic Josephson Junctions (IJJs) in the extremely anisotropic high-Tc superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 are a promising solid-state source of coherent terahertz radiation in the so-called ``THz gap'' range. In these devices, a geometric resonant mode of a stack of IJJs of typical dimensions 300 x 60 x 1 microns3 acts to synchronize the individual junctions, resulting in coherent far-field THz emission. This resonance can be probed by scanning thermal laser microscopy, in which a modulated optical laser beam is rastered across the top surface of a stack. The resulting thermal perturbation to the stack's cavity mode can thus be mapped via the resulting xy-dependent modulation of the stack's electrical resistance. Here we discuss the experimentally measured scanning laser pattern of such a THz cavity mode, and the implications of its symmetry for the mechanism of IJJ synchronization in these devices. This research was supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. De-AC02-06CH11357.

  19. Fully vectorial laser resonator modeling of continuous-wave solid-state lasers including rate equations, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence.

    PubMed

    Asoubar, Daniel; Wyrowski, Frank

    2015-07-27

    The computer-aided design of high quality mono-mode, continuous-wave solid-state lasers requires fast, flexible and accurate simulation algorithms. Therefore in this work a model for the calculation of the transversal dominant mode structure is introduced. It is based on the generalization of the scalar Fox and Li algorithm to a fully-vectorial light representation. To provide a flexible modeling concept of different resonator geometries containing various optical elements, rigorous and approximative solutions of Maxwell's equations are combined in different subdomains of the resonator. This approach allows the simulation of plenty of different passive intracavity components as well as active media. For the numerically efficient simulation of nonlinear gain, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence effects in solid-state active crystals a semi-analytical vectorial beam propagation method is discussed in detail. As a numerical example the beam quality and output power of a flash-lamp-pumped Nd:YAG laser are improved. To that end we compensate the influence of stress-induced birefringence and thermal lensing by an aspherical mirror and a 90° quartz polarization rotator.

  20. Fully vectorial laser resonator modeling of continuous-wave solid-state lasers including rate equations, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence.

    PubMed

    Asoubar, Daniel; Wyrowski, Frank

    2015-07-27

    The computer-aided design of high quality mono-mode, continuous-wave solid-state lasers requires fast, flexible and accurate simulation algorithms. Therefore in this work a model for the calculation of the transversal dominant mode structure is introduced. It is based on the generalization of the scalar Fox and Li algorithm to a fully-vectorial light representation. To provide a flexible modeling concept of different resonator geometries containing various optical elements, rigorous and approximative solutions of Maxwell's equations are combined in different subdomains of the resonator. This approach allows the simulation of plenty of different passive intracavity components as well as active media. For the numerically efficient simulation of nonlinear gain, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence effects in solid-state active crystals a semi-analytical vectorial beam propagation method is discussed in detail. As a numerical example the beam quality and output power of a flash-lamp-pumped Nd:YAG laser are improved. To that end we compensate the influence of stress-induced birefringence and thermal lensing by an aspherical mirror and a 90° quartz polarization rotator. PMID:26367545

  1. Overall mechanical transfer function calculated for a spherical resonant gravitational waves antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, José L.; Velloso, Walter F.; Aguiar, Odylio D.

    2004-06-01

    In this article, we describe the vibrational isolation system, the thermal link and the transducer mechanical structure, for the Schenberg resonant gravitational wave detector, which has been conceived modeled and analyzed using the finite element method. The dynamical equations corresponding to the structure have been solved using the MSC/NASTRAN software. In order to study the overall system behavior and the noise influence on it, we have carried out the analysis considering simultaneously all mechanical systems: vibrational isolation, thermal linking (between the dilution refrigerator and the suspension), and transducer-resonant mass mechanical coupling. Our calculation shows that a 300 dB attenuation level could be obtained.

  2. Application of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to comparative examination of different groups of free radicals in thermal injuries treated with propolis and silver sulphadiazine.

    PubMed

    Olczyk, Pawel; Ramos, Pawel; Bernas, Marcin; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Pilawa, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Different groups of free radicals expressed in burn wounds treated with propolis and silver sulphadiazine were examined. The thermal effect forms major types of free radicals in a wound because of the breaking of chemical bonds. Free radicals, located in the heated skin, were tested after 21 days of treating by these two substances. The aim of this work was to find the method for determination of types and concentrations of different groups of free radicals in wound after high temperature impact during burning. The effects of the therapy by propolis and silver sulphadiazine on free radicals were studied. Since the chemical methods of free radicals studies are destructive, the usefulness of the electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was tested in this work. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra measured with the microwave power of 2.2 mW were numerically fitted by theoretical curves of Gaussian and Lorentzian shapes. The experimental electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of tissue samples are best fitted by the sum of one Gauss and two Lorentz lines. An innovatory numerical procedure of spectroscopic skin analysis was presented. It is very useful in the alternative medicine studies.

  3. Application of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Comparative Examination of Different Groups of Free Radicals in Thermal Injuries Treated with Propolis and Silver Sulphadiazine

    PubMed Central

    Olczyk, Pawel; Ramos, Pawel; Bernas, Marcin; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Pilawa, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Different groups of free radicals expressed in burn wounds treated with propolis and silver sulphadiazine were examined. The thermal effect forms major types of free radicals in a wound because of the breaking of chemical bonds. Free radicals, located in the heated skin, were tested after 21 days of treating by these two substances. The aim of this work was to find the method for determination of types and concentrations of different groups of free radicals in wound after high temperature impact during burning. The effects of the therapy by propolis and silver sulphadiazine on free radicals were studied. Since the chemical methods of free radicals studies are destructive, the usefulness of the electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was tested in this work. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra measured with the microwave power of 2.2 mW were numerically fitted by theoretical curves of Gaussian and Lorentzian shapes. The experimental electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of tissue samples are best fitted by the sum of one Gauss and two Lorentz lines. An innovatory numerical procedure of spectroscopic skin analysis was presented. It is very useful in the alternative medicine studies. PMID:23762162

  4. Airframe noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, David G.

    1991-08-01

    Current understanding of airframe noise was reviewed as represented by experiment at model and full scale, by theoretical modeling, and by empirical correlation models. The principal component sources are associated with the trailing edges of wing and tail, deflected trailing edge flaps, flap side edges, leading edge flaps or slats, undercarriage gear elements, gear wheel wells, fuselage and wing boundary layers, and panel vibration, together with many minor protrusions like radio antennas and air conditioning intakes which may contribute significantly to perceived noise. There are also possibilities for interactions between the various mechanisms. With current engine technology, the principal airframe noise mechanisms dominate only at low frequencies, typically less than 1 kHz and often much lower, but further reduction of turbomachinery noise in particular may make airframe noise the principal element of approach noise at frequencies in the sensitive range.

  5. Thermal Microphotonic Focal Plane Array (TM-FPA).

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Frederick Bossert; Lentine, Anthony L.; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Watts, Michael R.; Shaw, Michael J.; Rakich, Peter T.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Peters, David William; Zortman, William A.

    2009-10-01

    The advent of high quality factor (Q) microphotonic-resonators has led to the demonstration of high-fidelity optical sensors of many physical phenomena (e.g. mechanical, chemical, and biological sensing) often with far better sensitivity than traditional techniques. Microphotonic-resonators also offer potential advantages as uncooled thermal detectors including significantly better noise performance, smaller pixel size, and faster response times than current thermal detectors. In particular, microphotonic thermal detectors do not suffer from Johnson noise in the sensor, offer far greater responsivity, and greater thermal isolation as they do not require metallic leads to the sensing element. Such advantages make the prospect of a microphotonic thermal imager highly attractive. Here, we introduce the microphotonic thermal detection technique, present the theoretical basis for the approach, discuss our progress on the development of this technology and consider future directions for thermal microphotonic imaging. Already we have demonstrated viability of device fabrication with the successful demonstration of a 20{micro}m pixel, and a scalable readout technique. Further, to date, we have achieved internal noise performance (NEP{sub Internal} < 1pW/{radical}Hz) in a 20{micro}m pixel thereby exceeding the noise performance of the best microbolometers while simultaneously demonstrating a thermal time constant ({tau} = 2ms) that is five times faster. In all, this results in an internal detectivity of D*{sub internal} = 2 x 10{sup 9}cm {center_dot} {radical}Hz/W, while roughly a factor of four better than the best uncooled commercial microbolometers, future demonstrations should enable another order of magnitude in sensitivity. While much work remains to achieve the level of maturity required for a deployable technology, already, microphotonic thermal detection has demonstrated considerable potential.

  6. Measurement of thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance integrals for 164Dy(n,γ) 165Dy and 180Hf(n,γ) 181Hf reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun-Je; Kobayashi, Katsuhei; Yamamoto, Shuji; Seo, Kyung-Won; Hwang, Han Yull; Nha, Sang Kyun; Ko, Seung Kook

    2001-04-01

    The thermal neutron cross-sections for the 164Dy(n,γ) 165Dy and the 180Hf(n,γ) 181Hf reactions have been measured by the activation method at the heavy water thermal neutron facility of the Kyoto University Reactor, KUR. The results measured at 0.0253 eV are 2656±98 b for the 164Dy(n,γ) 165Dy reaction and 13.04±0.47 b for the 180Hf(n,γ) 181Hf reaction, respectively. The results have been obtained relative to the reference value of 98.65±0.09 b for the 197Au(n,γ) 198Au reaction. For dysprosium, most of the experimental data and the evaluated ones in ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 are in good agreement with the present value. For hafnium, the previous measurements and the evaluated ones in ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3.2 are in good agreement with the present result. The resonance integrals for the 164Dy(n,γ) 165Dy and the 180Hf(n,γ) 181Hf reactions have also been measured relative to the reference value of 1550±28 b for the 197Au(n,γ) 198Au reaction using a 1/ E standard neutron spectrum field of the Kinki University Reactor, UTR-KINKI. The present resonance integral for the 164Dy(n,γ) 165Dy reaction is 649±24 b, and the existing experimental and the evaluated data are distributed from 335 to 820 b. The present result for the 180Hf(n,γ) 181Hf reaction is 32.4±1.2 b, and most of the previous measurements and the evaluated values are close to the present measurement. Gryntakis et al. reported the resonance integrals for both reactions, whose results were also in good agreement with the measurements.

  7. Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Wilby, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The generation and control of flight vehicle interior noise is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of transmission through airborne and structure-borne paths and the control of cabin noise by path modification. Techniques for identifying the relative contributions of the various source-path combinations are also discussed along with methods for the prediction of aircraft interior noise such as those based on the general modal theory and statistical energy analysis.

  8. Noise Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  9. An analytical formulation for phase noise in MEMS oscillators.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Deepak; Seshia, Ashwin

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the design of low-noise MEMS oscillators. This paper presents a new analytical formulation for noise in a MEMS oscillator encompassing essential resonator and amplifier nonlinearities. The analytical expression for oscillator noise is derived by solving a second-order nonlinear stochastic differential equation. This approach is applied to noise modeling of an electrostatically addressed MEMS resonator-based square-wave oscillator in which the resonator and oscillator circuit nonlinearities are integrated into a single modeling framework. By considering the resulting amplitude and phase relations, we derive additional noise terms resulting from resonator nonlinearities. The phase diffusion of an oscillator is studied and the phase diffusion coefficient is proposed as a metric for noise optimization. The proposed nonlinear phase noise model provides analytical insight into the underlying physics and a pathway toward the design optimization for low-noise MEMS oscillators.

  10. High level white noise generator

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  11. Parametric Amplification Protocol for Frequency-Modulated Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, Lee; Moore, Eric; Lee, Sanggap; Hickman, Steven; Marohn, John

    2011-03-01

    We present data and theoretical signal and noise calculations for a protocol using parametric amplification to evade the inherent tradeoff between signal and detector frequency noise in force-gradient magnetic resonance force microscopy signals, which are manifested as a modulated frequency shift of a high- Q microcantilever. Substrate-induced frequency noise has a 1 / f frequency dependence, while detector noise exhibits an f2 dependence on modulation frequency f . Modulation of sample spins at a frequency that minimizes these two contributions typically results in a surface frequency noise power an order of magnitude or more above the thermal limit and may prove incompatible with sample spin relaxation times as well. We show that the frequency modulated force-gradient signal can be used to excite the fundamental resonant mode of the cantilever, resulting in an audio frequency amplitude signal that is readily detected with a low-noise fiber optic interferometer. This technique allows us to modulate the force-gradient signal at a sufficiently high frequency so that substrate-induced frequency noise is evaded without subjecting the signal to the normal f2 detector noise of conventional demodulation.

  12. Low-noise fan exit guide vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G. (Inventor); Parrott, Tony L. (Inventor); Heidelberg, Laurence J. (Inventor); Envia, Edmane (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Low-noise fan exit guide vanes are disclosed. According to the present invention a fan exit guide vane has an outer shell substantially shaped as an airfoil and defining an interior cavity. A porous portion of the outer shell allows communication between the fluctuations in the air passing over the guide vane and the interior cavity. At least one acoustically resonant chamber is located within the interior cavity. The resonant chamber is in communication with the porous portion of the outer perimeter. The resonant chamber is configured to reduce the noise generated at a predetermined frequency. In various preferred embodiments, there is a plurality of acoustically resonant chambers located within the interior cavity. The resonant chambers can be separated by one or more partitions within the interior cavity. In these embodiments, the resonant chambers can be configured to reduce the noise generated over a range of predetermined frequencies.

  13. Squeezed light from a silicon micromechanical resonator.

    PubMed

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Gröblacher, Simon; Hill, Jeff T; Chan, Jasper; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Painter, Oskar

    2013-08-01

    Monitoring a mechanical object's motion, even with the gentle touch of light, fundamentally alters its dynamics. The experimental manifestation of this basic principle of quantum mechanics, its link to the quantum nature of light and the extension of quantum measurement to the macroscopic realm have all received extensive attention over the past half-century. The use of squeezed light, with quantum fluctuations below that of the vacuum field, was proposed nearly three decades ago as a means of reducing the optical read-out noise in precision force measurements. Conversely, it has also been proposed that a continuous measurement of a mirror's position with light may itself give rise to squeezed light. Such squeezed-light generation has recently been demonstrated in a system of ultracold gas-phase atoms whose centre-of-mass motion is analogous to the motion of a mirror. Here we describe the continuous position measurement of a solid-state, optomechanical system fabricated from a silicon microchip and comprising a micromechanical resonator coupled to a nanophotonic cavity. Laser light sent into the cavity is used to measure the fluctuations in the position of the mechanical resonator at a measurement rate comparable to its resonance frequency and greater than its thermal decoherence rate. Despite the mechanical resonator's highly excited thermal state (10(4) phonons), we observe, through homodyne detection, squeezing of the reflected light's fluctuation spectrum at a level 4.5 ± 0.2 per cent below that of vacuum noise over a bandwidth of a few megahertz around the mechanical resonance frequency of 28 megahertz. With further device improvements, on-chip squeezing at significant levels should be possible, making such integrated microscale devices well suited for precision metrology applications. PMID:23925241

  14. Ambient resonance of rock arches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Alison Margaret

    Resonant frequencies of structural elements are related to fundamental material properties of mass and stiffness, and monitoring over time can thus serve as an indirect indictor of internal mechanical change. Until now, however, this methodology has not been applied to natural rock structures such as arches and towers. We evaluated the resonance characteristics of four rock arches in southeastern Utah, combining in-situ ambient vibration measurements with numerical modal analysis. At each location, we measured the spectral and polarization attributes of ambient vibrations using up to two broadband seismometers. Ambient vibration spectra measured on the arches showed clear peaks at distinct frequencies (typically between 1-10 Hz), which we interpret as resonant frequencies, as opposed to the relatively flat spectra recorded on nearby bedrock. Polarization analysis helped us identify the orientations of vibration and explore resonant mode shapes. We then verified the measured resonant frequencies through 3D finite-element numerical modal analysis, and in most cases we were able to match the fundamental along with several higher-order modes. Repeat occupation and short-term continuous ambient vibration monitoring were aimed at assessing daily and seasonal changes in resonant frequencies, which in turn may provide evidence of internal mechanical change; Mesa Arch in Canyonlands National Park served as the main focus for our repeat measurements. Results revealed that minor, reversible changes in resonant frequencies can be created by thermal effects, i.e., changes in bulk material stiffness as the arch expands and contracts on daily and seasonal time scales. No irreversible change in the resonant frequency of Mesa Arch was detected over the period of this study. Our research provides the first step towards monitoring the long-term structural health of natural rock arches as they change through time or in the wake of a damaging event. We have shown that the resonance

  15. Squeezed light spin noise spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Kong, Jia; Mitchell, Morgan

    2016-05-01

    Spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for determining physical properties of an unperturbed spin system from its power noise spectrum both in atomic and solid state physics. In the presence of a transverse magnetic field, we detect spontaneous spin fluctuations of a dense Rb vapor via Faraday rotation of an off-resonance probe beam, resulting in the excess of spectral noise at the Larmor frequency over a white photon shot-noise background. We report quantum enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio via polarization squeezing of the probe beam up to 3dB over the full density range up to n = 1013 atoms cm-3, covering practical conditions used in optimized SNS experiments. Furthermore, we show that squeezing improves the trade-off between statistical sensitivity and systematic errors due to line broadening, a previously unobserved quantum advantage.

  16. Oxygen limitation of thermal tolerance in cod, Gadus morhua L., studied by magnetic resonance imaging and on-line venous oxygen monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lannig, Gisela; Bock, Christian; Sartoris, Franz J; Pörtner, Hans O

    2004-10-01

    The hypothesis of an oxygen-limited thermal tolerance due to restrictions in cardiovascular performance at extreme temperatures was tested in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua (North Sea). Heart rate, changes in arterial and venous blood flow, and venous oxygen tensions were determined during an acute temperature change to define pejus ("getting worse") temperatures that border the thermal optimum range. An exponential increase in heart rate occurred between 2 and 16 degrees C (Q(10) = 2.38 +/- 0.35). Thermal sensitivity was reduced beyond 16 degrees C when cardiac arrhythmia became visible. Flow-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of temperature-dependent blood flow revealed no exponential but a hyperbolic increase of blood flow with a moderate linear increase at temperatures >4 degrees C. Therefore, temperature-dependent heart rate increments are not mirrored by similar increments in blood flow. Venous Po(2) (Pv(O(2))), which reflects the quality of oxygen supply to the heart of cod (no coronary circulation present), followed an inverse U-shaped curve with highest Pv(O(2)) levels at 5.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C. Thermal limitation of circulatory performance in cod set in below 2 degrees C and beyond 7 degrees C, respectively, characterized by decreased Pv(O(2)). Further warming led to a sharp drop in Pv(O(2)) beyond 16.1 +/- 1.2 degrees C in accordance with the onset of cardiac arrhythmia and, likely, the critical temperature. In conclusion, progressive cooling or warming brings cod from a temperature range of optimum cardiac performance into a pejus range, when aerobic scope falls before critical temperatures are reached. These patterns might cause a shift in the geographical distribution of cod with global warming.

  17. Improving Thermal Dose Accuracy in Magnetic Resonance-Guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery: Long-Term Thermometry Using a Prior Baseline as a Reference

    PubMed Central

    Bitton, Rachel R.; Webb, Taylor D.; Pauly, Kim Butts; Ghanouni, Pejman

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate thermal dose volume (TDV) and non-perfused volume (NPV) of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatments in patients with soft tissue tumors, and describe a method for MR thermal dosimetry using a baseline reference. Materials and Methods Agreement between TDV and immediate post treatment NPV was evaluated from MRgFUS treatments of five patients with biopsy-proven desmoid tumors. Thermometry data (gradient echo, 3T) were analyzed over the entire course of the treatments to discern temperature errors in the standard approach. The technique searches previously acquired baseline images for a match using 2D normalized cross-correlation and a weighted mean of phase difference images. Thermal dose maps and TDVs were recalculated using the matched baseline and compared to NPV. Results TDV and NPV showed between 47%–91% disagreement, using the standard immediate baseline method for calculating TDV. Long-term thermometry showed a nonlinear local temperature accrual, where peak additional temperature varied between 4–13°C (mean = 7.8°C) across patients. The prior baseline method could be implemented by finding a previously acquired matching baseline 61% ± 8% (mean ± SD) of the time. We found 7%–42% of the disagreement between TDV and NPV was due to errors in thermometry caused by heat accrual. For all patients, the prior baseline method increased the estimated treatment volume and reduced the discrepancies between TDV and NPV (P = 0.023). Conclusion This study presents a mismatch between in-treatment and post treatment efficacy measures. The prior baseline approach accounts for local heating and improves the accuracy of thermal dose-predicted volume. PMID:26119129

  18. Periodic and stochastic thermal modulation of protein folding kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Platkov, Max; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-07-21

    Chemical reactions are usually observed either by relaxation of a bulk sample after applying a sudden external perturbation, or by intrinsic fluctuations of a few molecules. Here we show that the two ideas can be combined to measure protein folding kinetics, either by periodic thermal modulation, or by creating artificial thermal noise that greatly exceeds natural thermal fluctuations. We study the folding reaction of the enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase driven by periodic temperature waveforms. As the temperature waveform unfolds and refolds the protein, its fluorescence color changes due to FRET (Förster resonant Energy Transfer) of two donor/acceptor fluorophores labeling the protein. We adapt a simple model of periodically driven kinetics that nicely fits the data at all temperatures and driving frequencies: The phase shifts of the periodic donor and acceptor fluorescence signals as a function of driving frequency reveal reaction rates. We also drive the reaction with stochastic temperature waveforms that produce thermal fluctuations much greater than natural fluctuations in the bulk. Such artificial thermal noise allows the recovery of weak underlying signals due to protein folding kinetics. This opens up the possibility for future detection of a stochastic resonance for protein folding subject to noise with controllable amplitude.

  19. Periodic and stochastic thermal modulation of protein folding kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platkov, Max; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Chemical reactions are usually observed either by relaxation of a bulk sample after applying a sudden external perturbation, or by intrinsic fluctuations of a few molecules. Here we show that the two ideas can be combined to measure protein folding kinetics, either by periodic thermal modulation, or by creating artificial thermal noise that greatly exceeds natural thermal fluctuations. We study the folding reaction of the enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase driven by periodic temperature waveforms. As the temperature waveform unfolds and refolds the protein, its fluorescence color changes due to FRET (Förster resonant Energy Transfer) of two donor/acceptor fluorophores labeling the protein. We adapt a simple model of periodically driven kinetics that nicely fits the data at all temperatures and driving frequencies: The phase shifts of the periodic donor and acceptor fluorescence signals as a function of driving frequency reveal reaction rates. We also drive the reaction with stochastic temperature waveforms that produce thermal fluctuations much greater than natural fluctuations in the bulk. Such artificial thermal noise allows the recovery of weak underlying signals due to protein folding kinetics. This opens up the possibility for future detection of a stochastic resonance for protein folding subject to noise with controllable amplitude.

  20. CEM43°C thermal dose thresholds: a potential guide for magnetic resonance radiofrequency exposure levels?

    PubMed Central

    Samaras, Theodoros; Yarmolenko, Pavel S.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Neufeld, Esra; Kuster, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Objective To define thresholds of safe local temperature increases for MR equipment that exposes patients to radiofrequency fields of high intensities for long duration. These MR systems induce heterogeneous energy absorption patterns inside the body and can create localised hotspots with a risk of overheating. Methods The MRI + EUREKA research consortium organised a “Thermal Workshop on RF Hotspots”. The available literature on thresholds for thermal damage and the validity of the thermal dose (TD) model were discussed. Results/Conclusions The following global TD threshold guidelines for safe use of MR are proposed: All persons: maximum local temperature of any tissue limited to 39 °CPersons with compromised thermoregulation AND Uncontrolled conditions: maximum local temperature limited to 39 °CControlled conditions: TD<2 CEM43°CPersons with uncompromised thermoregulation AND Uncontrolled conditions: TD<2 CEM43°CControlled conditions: TD<9 CEM43°C The following definitions are applied: Controlled conditions A medical doctor or a dedicated trained person can respond instantly to heat-induced physiological stress Compromised thermoregulation All persons with impaired systemic or reduced local thermoregulation PMID:23553588

  1. Landslide noise.

    PubMed

    Cadman, J D; Goodman, R E

    1967-12-01

    Acoustical monitoring of real landslides has revealed the existence of subaudible noise activity prior to failure and has enabled prediction of the depth of the seat of sliding when conducted in boreholes beneath the surface. Recordings of noise generated in small slopes of moist sand, tilted to failure in laboratory tests, have been analyzed to determine the foci of discrete subaudible noise events. The noises emitted shortly before failure were plotted close to the true sliding surface observed after failure. The foci of earlier events lay either within the central portion of the sliding mass or in a region behind the failure surface. The head and toe zones were devoid of strong seismic activity. PMID:17734306

  2. Spin-noise correlations and spin-noise exchange driven by low-field spin-exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellis, A. T.; Loulakis, M.; Kominis, I. K.

    2014-09-01

    The physics of spin-exchange collisions have fueled several discoveries in fundamental physics and numerous applications in medical imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance. We report on the experimental observation and theoretical justification of spin-noise exchange, the transfer of spin noise from one atomic species to another. The signature of spin-noise exchange is an increase of the total spin-noise power at low magnetic fields, on the order of 1 mG, where the two-species spin-noise resonances overlap. The underlying physical mechanism is the two-species spin-noise correlation induced by spin-exchange collisions.

  3. Noise in strong laser-atom interactions: Phase telegraph noise

    SciTech Connect

    Eberly, J.H.; Wodkiewicz, K.; Shore, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    We discuss strong laser-atom interactions that are subjected to jump-type (random telegraph) random-phase noise. Physically, the jumps may arise from laser fluctuations, from collisions of various kinds, or from other external forces. Our discussion is carried out in two stages. First, direct and partially heuristic calculations determine the laser spectrum and also give a third-order differential equation for the average inversion of a two-level atom on resonance. At this stage a number of general features of the interaction are able to be studied easily. The optical analog of motional narrowing, for example, is clearly predicted. Second, we show that the theory of generalized Poisson processes allows laser-atom interactions in the presence of random telegraph noise of all kinds (not only phase noise) to be treated systematically, by means of a master equation first used in the context of quantum optics by Burshtein. We use the Burshtein equation to obtain an exact expression for the two-level atom's steady-state resonance fluorescence spectrum, when the exciting laser exhibits phase telegraph noise. Some comparisons are made with results obtained from other noise models. Detailed treatments of the effects ofmly jumps, or as a model of finite laser bandwidth effects, in which the laser frequency exhibits random jumps. We show that these two types of frequency noise can be distinguished in light-scattering spectra. We also discuss examples which demonstrate both temporal and spectral motional narrowing, nonexponential correlations, and non-Lorentzian spectra. Its exact solubility in finite terms makes the frequency-telegraph noise model an attractive alternative to the white-noise Ornstein-Uhlenbeck frequency noise model which has been previously applied to laser-atom interactions.

  4. Mechanical monolithic sensor for low frequency seismic noise measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, Fausto; De Rosa, Rosario; Giordano, Gerardo; Romano, Rocco; Barone, Fabrizio

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes a mechanical monolithic sensor for geophysical applications developed at the University of Salerno. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum, shaped with precision machining and electric-discharge-machining, that can be used both as seismometer and, in a force-feedback configuration, as accelerometer. The monolithic mechanical design and the introduction of laser interferometric techniques for the readout implementation make it a very compact instrument, very sensitive in the low-frequency seismic noise band, with a very good immunity to environmental noises. Many changes have been produced since last version (2006), mainly aimed to the improvement of the mechanics and of the optical readout of the instrument. In fact, we have developed and tested a prototype with elliptical hinges and mechanical tuning of the resonance frequency together with a new laser optical lever and laser interferometer readout system. The theoretical sensitivity curve for both laser optical lever and laser interferometric readouts, calculated on the basis of suitable theoretical models, shows a very good agreement with the experimental measurements. Very interesting scientific result is that the measured natural resonance frequency of the instrument is ~ 70mHz with a Q ~ 140 in air without thermal stabilization, demonstrating the feasibility of a monolithic FP sensor with a natural resonance frequency of the order of 5 mHz with a more refined mechanical tuning.

  5. Mechanical monolithic horizontal sensor for low frequency seismic noise measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, Fausto; Giordano, Gerardo; Romano, Rocco; De Rosa, Rosario; Barone, Fabrizio

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes a mechanical monolithic horizontal sensor for geophysical applications developed at the University of Salerno. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum, shaped with precision machining and electric discharge machining, that can be used both as seismometer and, in a force-feedback configuration, as accelerometer. The monolithic mechanical design and the introduction of laser interferometric techniques for the readout implementation makes it a very compact instrument, very sensitive in the low frequency seismic noise band, with a very good immunity to environmental noises. Many changes have been produced since last version (2007), mainly aimed to the improvement of the mechanics and of the optical readout of the instrument. In fact, we have developed and tested a prototype with elliptical hinges and mechanical tuning of the resonance frequency together with a laser optical lever and a new laser interferometer readout system. The theoretical sensitivity curve for both laser optical lever and laser interferometric readouts, evaluated on the basis of suitable theoretical models, shows a very good agreement with the experimental measurements. Very interesting scientific result is the measured natural resonance frequency of the instrument of 70mHz with a Q =140 in air without thermal stabilization. This result demonstrates the feasibility of a monolithic folded pendulum sensor with a natural resonance frequency of the order of millihertz with a more refined mechanical tuning.

  6. Noise Simulation of Continuous-Time {sigma}{delta} Modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, J.; Quintanilla, L.; Bisbal, D.; San Pablo, J.; Enriquez, L.; Vicente, J.; Barbolla, J.

    2005-08-25

    In this work, an approach for the simulation of the effect of noise sources in the performance of continuous-time {delta}{sigma} modulators is presented. Electrical noise including thermal noise, 1/f noise and clock jitter are included in a simulation program and their impact on the system performance is analyzed.

  7. Use of Nuclear Spin Noise Spectroscopy to Monitor Slow Magnetization Buildup at Millikelvin Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Peat, David; Owers‐Bradley, John

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At ultralow temperatures, longitudinal nuclear magnetic relaxation times become exceedingly long and spectral lines are very broad. These facts pose particular challenges for the measurement of NMR spectra and spin relaxation phenomena. Nuclear spin noise spectroscopy is used to monitor proton spin polarization buildup to thermal equilibrium of a mixture of glycerol, water, and copper oxide nanoparticles at 17.5 mK in a static magnetic field of 2.5 T. Relaxation times determined in such a way are essentially free from perturbations caused by excitation radiofrequency pulses, radiation damping, and insufficient excitation bandwidth. The experimental spin‐lattice relaxation times determined on resonance by saturation recovery with spin noise detection are consistently longer than those determined by using pulse excitation. These longer values are in better accordance with the expected field dependence trend than those obtained by on‐resonance experiments with pulsed excitation. PMID:27305629

  8. Encapsulated subwavelength grating as a quasi-monolithic resonant reflector.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Frank; Friedrich, Daniel; Britzger, Michael; Clausnitzer, Tina; Burmeister, Oliver; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Danzmann, Karsten; Tünnermann, Andreas; Schnabel, Roman

    2009-12-21

    For a variety of laser interferometric experiments, the thermal noise of high-reflectivity multilayer dielectric coatings limits the measurement sensitivity. Recently, monolithic high-reflection waveguide mirrors with nanostructured surfaces have been proposed to reduce the thermal noise in interferometric measurements. Drawbacks of this approach are a highly complicated fabrication process and the high susceptibility of the nanostructured surfaces to damage and pollution. Here, we propose and demonstrate a novel quasi-monolithic resonant surface reflector that also avoids the thick dielectric stack of conventional mirrors but has a flat and robust surface. Our reflector is an encapsulated subwavelength grating that is based on silicon. We measured a high reflectivity of 93% for a wavelength of lambda = 1.55 microm under normal incidence. Perfect reflectivities are possible in theory.

  9. Demonstration of a cavity coupler based on a resonant waveguide grating.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Frank; Friedrich, Daniel; Clausnitzer, Tina; Burmeister, Oliver; Britzger, Michael; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Danzmann, Karsten; Tünnermann, Andreas; Schnabel, Roman

    2009-01-01

    Thermal noise in multilayer optical coatings may not only limit the sensitivity of future gravitational wave detectors in their most sensitive frequency band but is also a major impediment for experiments that aim to reach the standard quantum limit or to cool mechanical systems to their quantum ground state. Here, we present the experimental realization and characterization of a cavity coupler, which is based on a surface relief guided ode resonant grating. Since the required thickness of the dielectric coating is dramatically decreased compared to conventional mirrors, it is expected to provide low mechanical loss and, thus, low thermal noise. The cavity coupler was incorporated into a Fabry-Perot resonator together with a conventional high quality mirror. The finesse of this cavity was measured to be F = 657, which corresponds to a coupler reflectivity of R = 99.08 %. PMID:19129884

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of human erythrocytes in the presence of manganese ions. Evidence for a thermal transition.

    PubMed

    Morariu, V V; Ionescu, M S; Frangopol, M; Grosescu, R; Lupu, M; Frangopol, P T

    1985-05-14

    Water proton transverse relaxation was investigated in whole blood and washed erythrocytes samples, respectively, at various temperatures and manganese concentrations. Water diffusional exchange controls proton relaxation in whole blood samples at higher Mn2+ concentrations (20-30 mM) or in washed erythrocyte samples at low Mn2+ content (1-5 mM). Mn2+ uptake is significant in washed normal erythrocyte samples when its concentration is about 18 mM or higher in the medium, at temperatures below about 26 degrees C. The thermal transition as revealed by the NMR doping method represents a switch from a water exchange process, mainly seen in the higher temperature range, to a paramagnetic ion controlled water proton relaxation in the lower temperature range.

  11. Development of resonator analysis applied in hybrid slab laser with consideration of optical gain and thermal lens effect.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingkun; Huang, Lei; Gong, Mali; Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Haitao; Yan, Ping

    2013-07-10

    By introducing the rate equations and light intensity propagating equations into the fast Fourier transform-based calculation, the optical gain served as the connection between the light field and light intensity, its influence over mode pattern was studied. Thermal lens effect was also investigated by means of finite element analysis. The analysis was applied to a slab laser with a hybrid cavity. A similar experimental study was also carried out in the laboratory. TEM(00) mode with sidelobes along the unstable direction was observed both in the calculation and experiment. As predicted in the analysis, the homogeneity of the pump light improved the beam quality. Numerical and experimental results of pump threshold and slope efficiency were also presented. PMID:23852199

  12. Quantum noise of a Michelson-Sagnac interferometer with a translucent mechanical oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Friedrich, Daniel; Westphal, Tobias; Gossler, Stefan; Danzmann, Karsten; Schnabel, Roman; Somiya, Kentaro; Danilishin, Stefan L.

    2010-03-15

    Quantum fluctuations in the radiation pressure of light can excite stochastic motions of mechanical oscillators thereby realizing a linear quantum opto-mechanical coupling. When performing a precise measurement of the position of an oscillator, this coupling results in quantum radiation pressure noise. Up to now this effect has not been observed yet. Generally speaking, the strength of radiation pressure noise increases when the effective mass of the oscillator is decreased or when the power of the reflected light is increased. Recently, extremely light SiN membranes ({approx_equal}100 ng) with high mechanical Q values at room temperature ({>=}10{sup 6}) have attracted attention as low thermal noise mechanical oscillators. However, the power reflectance of these membranes is much lower than unity (<0.4 at a wavelength of 1064 nm) which makes the use of advanced interferometer recycling techniques to amplify the radiation pressure noise in a standard Michelson interferometer inefficient. Here, we propose and theoretically analyze a Michelson-Sagnac interferometer that includes the membrane as a common end mirror for the Michelson interferometer part. In this topology, both power and signal recycling can be used even if the reflectance of the membrane is much lower than unity. In particular, signal recycling is a useful tool because it does not involve a power increase at the membrane. We derive the formulas for the quantum radiation pressure noise and the shot noise of an oscillator position measurement and compare them with theoretical models of the thermal noise of a SiN membrane with a fundamental resonant frequency of 75 kHz and an effective mass of125 ng. We find that quantum radiation pressure noise should be observable with a power of 1 W at the central beam splitter of the interferometer and a membrane temperature of 1 K.

  13. Measurements of mechanical dissipation in high sound velocity materials: implications for resonant-mass gravitational radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, En-Ke; Zhou, C.; Mann, L.; Michelson, P. F.; Price, J. C.

    1991-07-01

    The sensitivity of resonant-mass gravitational radiation detectors depends on both the antenna cross-section and the detector noise. The cross-section is determined by the sound velocity vs and density ϱ of the antenna material, while the principal detector noise sources are thermal Nyquist noise and noise due to the readout electromechanical amplifier. The thermal noise is proportional to T/Q, where T is the temperature and Q is the antenna's mechanical quality factor. For a given frequency and antenna geometry, the cross-section is proportional to ϱ v5s. Thus the speed of sound and Q are important figures-of-merit in selecting the antenna material. Materials with high vs are available that in principle could provide about a hundred-fold increase in the cross-section of resonant-mass gravity wave detectors as compared to current generation detectors. In this Letter we report the results of measurements of the temperature-dependent mechanical losses associated with excitation of the fundamental longitudinal acoustic mode in several potentially suitable materials. We also discuss the impact that these materials could have on the sensitivity of resonant-mass detectors.

  14. Chain reconfiguration in active noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Nairhita; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi

    2016-05-01

    In a typical single molecule experiment, the dynamics of an unfolded protein is studied by determining the reconfiguration time using long-range Förster resonance energy transfer, where the reconfiguration time is the characteristic decay time of the position correlation between two residues of the protein. In this paper we theoretically calculate the reconfiguration time for a single flexible polymer in the presence of active noise. The study suggests that though the mean square displacement grows faster, the chain reconfiguration is always slower in the presence of long-lived active noise with exponential temporal correlation. Similar behavior is observed for a worm-like semi-flexible chain and a Zimm chain. However it is primarily the characteristic correlation time of the active noise and not the strength that controls the increase in the reconfiguration time. In brief, such active noise makes the polymer move faster but the correlation loss between the monomers becomes slow.

  15. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 Nanoparticles: Synthesis by Thermal Decomposition of Iron(III) Glucuronate and Application in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Patsula, Vitalii; Kosinová, Lucie; Lovrić, Marija; Ferhatovic Hamzić, Lejla; Rabyk, Mariia; Konefal, Rafal; Paruzel, Aleksandra; Šlouf, Miroslav; Herynek, Vít; Gajović, Srećko; Horák, Daniel

    2016-03-23

    Monodisperse superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with oleic acid were prepared by thermal decomposition of Fe(III) glucuronate. The shape, size, and particle size distribution were controlled by varying the reaction parameters, such as the reaction temperature, concentration of the stabilizer, and type of high-boiling-point solvents. Magnetite particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), as well as electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and magnetometer measurements. The particle coating was analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. To make the Fe3O4 nanoparticles dispersible in water, the particle surface was modified with α-carboxyl-ω-bis(ethane-2,1-diyl)phosphonic acid-terminated poly(3-O-methacryloyl-α-D-glucopyranose) (PMG-P). For future practical biomedical applications, nontoxicity plays a key role, and the PMG-P&Fe3O4 nanoparticles were tested on rat mesenchymal stem cells to determine the particle toxicity and their ability to label the cells. MR relaxometry confirmed that the PMG-P&Fe3O4 nanoparticles had high relaxivity but rather low cellular uptake. Nevertheless, the labeled cells still provided visible contrast enhancement in the magnetic resonance image. In addition, the cell viability was not compromised by the nanoparticles. Therefore, the PMG-P&Fe3O4 nanoparticles have the potential to be used in biomedical applications, especially as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26928653

  16. New insights into the thermal behaviour of organic ionic plastic crystals: magnetic resonance imaging of polycrystalline morphology alterations induced by solid-solid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Pringle, Jennifer M; O'Dell, Luke A; Forsyth, Maria

    2015-07-15

    Organic ionic plastic crystals (OIPCs) show strong potential as solid-state electrolytes for lithium battery applications, demonstrating promising electrochemical performance and eliminating the need for a volatile and flammable liquid electrolyte. The ionic conductivity (σ) in these systems has recently been shown to depend strongly on polycrystalline morphology, which is largely determined by the sample's thermal history. [K. Romanenko et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2014, 136, 15638]. Tailoring this morphology could lead to conductivities sufficiently high for battery applications, so a more complete understanding of how phenomena such as solid-solid phase transitions can affect the sample morphology is of significant interest. Anisotropic relaxation of nuclear spin magnetisation provides a new MRI based approach for studies of polycrystalline materials at both a macroscopic and molecular level. In this contribution, morphology alterations induced by solid-solid phase transitions in triisobutyl(methyl)phosphonium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (P1444FSI) and diethyl(methyl)(isobutyl)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate (P1224PF6) are examined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), alongside nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, diffusion measurements and conductivity data. These observations are linked to molecular dynamics and structural behaviour crucial for the conductive properties of OIPCs. A distinct correlation is established between the conductivity at a given temperature, σ(T), and the intensity of the narrow NMR signal that is attributed to a mobile fraction, fm(T), of ions in the OIPC. To explain these findings we propose an analogy with the well-studied relationship between permeability (k) and void fraction (θ) in porous media, with k(θ) commonly quantified by a power-law dependence that can also be employed to describe σ(fm).

  17. Monolithic Cylindrical Fused Silica Resonators with High Q Factors.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yao; Wang, Dongya; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Jianping; Wu, Suyong; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The cylindrical resonator gyroscope (CRG) is a typical Coriolis vibratory gyroscope whose performance is determined by the Q factor and frequency mismatch of the cylindrical resonator. Enhancing the Q factor is crucial for improving the rate sensitivity and noise performance of the CRG. In this paper, for the first time, a monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator with a Q factor approaching 8 × 10⁵ (ring-down time over 1 min) is reported. The resonator is made of fused silica with low internal friction and high isotropy, with a diameter of 25 mm and a center frequency of 3974.35 Hz. The structure of the resonator is first briefly introduced, and then the experimental non-contact characterization method is presented. In addition, the post-fabrication experimental procedure of Q factor improvement, including chemical and thermal treatment, is demonstrated. The Q factor improvement by both treatments is compared and the primary loss mechanism is analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, the work presented in this paper represents the highest reported Q factor for a cylindrical resonator. The proposed monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator may enable high performance inertial sensing with standard manufacturing process and simple post-fabrication treatment. PMID:27483263

  18. Monolithic Cylindrical Fused Silica Resonators with High Q Factors

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yao; Wang, Dongya; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Jianping; Wu, Suyong; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The cylindrical resonator gyroscope (CRG) is a typical Coriolis vibratory gyroscope whose performance is determined by the Q factor and frequency mismatch of the cylindrical resonator. Enhancing the Q factor is crucial for improving the rate sensitivity and noise performance of the CRG. In this paper, for the first time, a monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator with a Q factor approaching 8 × 105 (ring-down time over 1 min) is reported. The resonator is made of fused silica with low internal friction and high isotropy, with a diameter of 25 mm and a center frequency of 3974.35 Hz. The structure of the resonator is first briefly introduced, and then the experimental non-contact characterization method is presented. In addition, the post-fabrication experimental procedure of Q factor improvement, including chemical and thermal treatment, is demonstrated. The Q factor improvement by both treatments is compared and the primary loss mechanism is analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, the work presented in this paper represents the highest reported Q factor for a cylindrical resonator. The proposed monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator may enable high performance inertial sensing with standard manufacturing process and simple post-fabrication treatment. PMID:27483263

  19. SU-F-BRE-12: Optical Resonator Water Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, J; DeMarco, J; Low, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Water calorimetry based on resistance thermometry has matured as a primary standard. Developing an optical technique hold the promise to push the boundaries of what is currently achievable with dosimetry. We will present a feasibility study and the current progress of construction of a Fabry-Perot resonator for dose to water measurement. Additionally, estimations of the theoretical limits resonator sensitivity and potential sources of noise for the system are described. Methods: A temperature change from the dose to water would be measured by the change in the index of refraction from the water in the cavity. Calculations are presented of the expected signal from the resonator for dose to water. The Fabry-Perot resonator constructed from optical quality narrowband mirrors is described. A water cell will be inserted into the cavity gap to provide the medium swept cavity length technique is explored as a specific implementation of this technique. Results: Calculations indicate that a dose to water on the order of a Gray is measureable with a reasonably implementable system. A resonator is currently under construction and progress towards a proof of principle measurement will be presented. The primary sources of noise, in order of importance, are expected to be; optical absorption by the medium, mechanical perturbations of the cavity length and thermal expansion of the optical mounts. Estimations of these noise sources and mitigation techniques will be discussed. Conclusion: A Fabry-Perot resonator is a promising technique for measuring the absorbed dose to water from a radiotherapy beam. This technique has the potential to serve as a check on the current primary standard for dose to water measurements. As well, i0074 may be the foundation for a new class of optical property based dosimetry measurement.

  20. Propulsion system noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, C. E.; Heidelberg, L. J.; Karchmer, A. M.; Lansing, D. L.; Miller, B. A.; Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The progress in propulsion system noise reduction is reviewed. The noise technology areas discussed include: fan noise; advances in suppression including conventional acoustic treatment, high Mach number inlets, and wing shielding; engine core noise; flap noise from both under-the-wing and over-the-wing powered-lift systems; supersonic jet noise suppression; and the NASA program in noise prediction.

  1. Thermal-noise suppression in nano-scale Si field-effect transistors by feedback control based on single-electron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chida, Kensaku Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Yamahata, Gento; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Fujiwara, Akira

    2015-08-17

    We perform feedback (FB) control for suppressing thermal fluctuation in the number of electrons in a silicon single-electron (SE) device composed of a small transistor and capacitor. SEs enter and leave the capacitor via the transistor randomly at thermal equilibrium, which is monitored in real time using a high-charge-sensitivity detector. In order to suppress such random motion or thermal fluctuation of the electrons, SEs are injected and removed using the transistor according to the monitored change in the number of electrons in the capacitor, which is exactly the FB control. As a result, thermal fluctuation in the number of electrons in a SE device is suppressed by 60%, which corresponds to the so-called FB cooling from 300 to 110 K. Moreover, a thermodynamics analysis of this FB cooling reveals that entropy in the capacitor is reduced and the device is at non-equilibrium; i.e., the free energy of the device increases. Since this entropy reduction originates from information about the electrons' motion monitored by the detector, our results by the FB control represent one type of information-to-energy conversion.

  2. Techniques for noise removal and registration of TIMS data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hummer-Miller, S.

    1990-01-01

    Extracting subtle differences from highly correlated thermal infrared aircraft data is possible with appropriate noise filters, constructed and applied in the spatial frequency domain. This paper discusses a heuristic approach to designing noise filters for removing high- and low-spatial frequency striping and banding. Techniques for registering thermal infrared aircraft data to a topographic base using Thematic Mapper data are presented. The noise removal and registration techniques are applied to TIMS thermal infrared aircraft data. -Author

  3. Hyphenation of Thermal Analysis to Ultrahigh-Resolution Mass Spectrometry (Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry) Using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization For Studying Composition and Thermal Degradation of Complex Materials.

    PubMed

    Rüger, Christopher P; Miersch, Toni; Schwemer, Theo; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the hyphenation of a thermobalance to an ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (UHR FTICR MS) is presented. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) is used for efficient ionization. The evolved gas analysis (EGA), using high-resolution mass spectrometry allows the time-resolved molecular characterization of thermally induced processes in complex materials or mixtures, such as biomass or crude oil. The most crucial part of the setup is the hyphenation between the thermobalance and the APCI source. Evolved gases are forced to enter the atmospheric pressure ionization interface of the MS by applying a slight overpressure at the thermobalance side of the hyphenation. Using the FTICR exact mass data, detailed chemical information is gained by calculation of elemental compositions from the organic species, enabling a time and temperature resolved, highly selective detection of the evolved species. An additional selectivity is gained by the APCI ionization, which is particularly sensitive toward polar compounds. This selectivity on the one hand misses bulk components of petroleum samples such as alkanes and does not deliver a comprehensive view but on the other hand focuses particularly on typical evolved components from biomass samples. As proof of principle, the thermal behavior of different fossil fuels: heavy fuel oil, light fuel oil, and a crude oil, and different lignocellulosic biomass, namely, beech, birch, spruce, ash, oak, and pine as well as commercial available softwood and birch-bark pellets were investigated. The results clearly show the capability to distinguish between certain wood types through their molecular patterns and compound classes. Additionally, typical literature known pyrolysis biomass marker were confirmed by their elemental composition, such as coniferyl aldehyde (C10H10O3), sinapyl aldehyde (C11H12O4), retene (C18H18), and abietic acid (C20H30O2). PMID:26024433

  4. Hyphenation of Thermal Analysis to Ultrahigh-Resolution Mass Spectrometry (Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry) Using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization For Studying Composition and Thermal Degradation of Complex Materials.

    PubMed

    Rüger, Christopher P; Miersch, Toni; Schwemer, Theo; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the hyphenation of a thermobalance to an ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (UHR FTICR MS) is presented. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) is used for efficient ionization. The evolved gas analysis (EGA), using high-resolution mass spectrometry allows the time-resolved molecular characterization of thermally induced processes in complex materials or mixtures, such as biomass or crude oil. The most crucial part of the setup is the hyphenation between the thermobalance and the APCI source. Evolved gases are forced to enter the atmospheric pressure ionization interface of the MS by applying a slight overpressure at the thermobalance side of the hyphenation. Using the FTICR exact mass data, detailed chemical information is gained by calculation of elemental compositions from the organic species, enabling a time and temperature resolved, highly selective detection of the evolved species. An additional selectivity is gained by the APCI ionization, which is particularly sensitive toward polar compounds. This selectivity on the one hand misses bulk components of petroleum samples such as alkanes and does not deliver a comprehensive view but on the other hand focuses particularly on typical evolved components from biomass samples. As proof of principle, the thermal behavior of different fossil fuels: heavy fuel oil, light fuel oil, and a crude oil, and different lignocellulosic biomass, namely, beech, birch, spruce, ash, oak, and pine as well as commercial available softwood and birch-bark pellets were investigated. The results clearly show the capability to distinguish between certain wood types through their molecular patterns and compound classes. Additionally, typical literature known pyrolysis biomass marker were confirmed by their elemental composition, such as coniferyl aldehyde (C10H10O3), sinapyl aldehyde (C11H12O4), retene (C18H18), and abietic acid (C20H30O2).

  5. Analysis of the Thermal Degradation of the Individual Anthocyanin Compounds of Black Carrot (Daucus carota L.): A New Approach Using High-Resolution Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulou, Ioanna; Thaeron, Delphine; Baker, Ashley; Jones, Anita; Robertson, Neil

    2015-08-12

    The black carrot dye is a mixture of cyanidin molecules, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of which shows a highly overlapped aromatic region. In this study, the (1)H NMR (800 MHz) aromatic chemical shifts of the mixture were fully assigned by overlaying them with the characterized (1)H NMR chemical shifts of the separated compounds. The latter were isolated using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and their chemical shifts were identified using (1)H and two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy (COSY) NMR spectroscopy. The stability of the black carrot mixture to heat exposure was investigated at pH 3.6, 6.8, and 8.0 by heat-treating aqueous solutions at 100 °C and the powdered material at 180 °C. From integration of high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra, it was possible to follow the relative degradation of each compound, offering advantages over the commonly used ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) and HPLC approaches. UV/vis spectroscopy and CIE color measurements were used to determine thermally induced color changes, under normal cooking conditions.

  6. Analysis of the Thermal Degradation of the Individual Anthocyanin Compounds of Black Carrot (Daucus carota L.): A New Approach Using High-Resolution Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulou, Ioanna; Thaeron, Delphine; Baker, Ashley; Jones, Anita; Robertson, Neil

    2015-08-12

    The black carrot dye is a mixture of cyanidin molecules, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of which shows a highly overlapped aromatic region. In this study, the (1)H NMR (800 MHz) aromatic chemical shifts of the mixture were fully assigned by overlaying them with the characterized (1)H NMR chemical shifts of the separated compounds. The latter were isolated using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and their chemical shifts were identified using (1)H and two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy (COSY) NMR spectroscopy. The stability of the black carrot mixture to heat exposure was investigated at pH 3.6, 6.8, and 8.0 by heat-treating aqueous solutions at 100 °C and the powdered material at 180 °C. From integration of high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra, it was possible to follow the relative degradation of each compound, offering advantages over the commonly used ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) and HPLC approaches. UV/vis spectroscopy and CIE color measurements were used to determine thermally induced color changes, under normal cooking conditions. PMID:26160425

  7. The Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem of Colloidal Particle's energy on 2D Periodic Substrates: A Monte Carlo Study of thermal noise-like fluctuation and diffusion like Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, Amin

    2014-05-01

    Using the Monte Carlo simulations, we have calculated mean-square fluctuations in statistical mechanics, such as those for colloids energy configuration are set on square 2D periodic substrates interacting via a long range screened Coulomb potential on any specific and fixed substrate. Random fluctuations with small deviations from the state of thermodynamic equilibrium arise from the granular structure of them and appear as thermal diffusion with Gaussian distribution structure as well. The variations are showing linear form of the Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem on the energy of particles constitutive a canonical ensemble with continuous diffusion process of colloidal particle systems. The noise-like variation of the energy per particle and the order parameter versus the Brownian displacement of sum of large number of random steps of particles at low temperatures phase are presenting a markovian process on colloidal particles configuration, too.

  8. Listen to the Noise: Noise Is Beneficial for Cognitive Performance in ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderlund, Goran; Sikstrom, Sverker; Smart, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Background: Noise is typically conceived of as being detrimental to cognitive performance. However, given the mechanism of stochastic resonance, a certain amount of noise can benefit performance. We investigate cognitive performance in noisy environments in relation to a neurocomputational model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)…

  9. Kramers' rate for systems with multiplicative noise.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Alexandre; Pinto, Italo'Ivo Lima Dias; Lindenberg, Katja

    2016-07-01

    Kramers' rate for the passage of trajectories X(t) over an energy barrier due to thermal or other fluctuations is usually associated with additive noise. We present a generalization of Kramers' rate for systems with multiplicative noise. We show that the expression commonly used in the literature for multiplicative noise is not correct, and we present results of numerical integrations of the Langevin equation for dX(t)/dt evolving in a quartic bistable potential which corroborate our claim. PMID:27575071

  10. Kramers' rate for systems with multiplicative noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, Alexandre; Pinto, Italo'Ivo Lima Dias; Lindenberg, Katja

    2016-07-01

    Kramers' rate for the passage of trajectories X (t ) over an energy barrier due to thermal or other fluctuations is usually associated with additive noise. We present a generalization of Kramers' rate for systems with multiplicative noise. We show that the expression commonly used in the literature for multiplicative noise is not correct, and we present results of numerical integrations of the Langevin equation for d X (t )/d t evolving in a quartic bistable potential which corroborate our claim.

  11. Community noise sources and noise control issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nihart, Gene L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: community noise sources and noise control issues; noise components for turbine bypass turbojet engine (TBE) turbojet; engine cycle selection and noise; nozzle development schedule; NACA nozzle design; NACA nozzle test results; nearly fully mixed (NFM) nozzle design; noise versus aspiration rate; peak noise test results; nozzle test in the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF); and Schlieren pictures of NACA nozzle.

  12. Community noise sources and noise control issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihart, Gene L.

    1992-04-01

    The topics covered include the following: community noise sources and noise control issues; noise components for turbine bypass turbojet engine (TBE) turbojet; engine cycle selection and noise; nozzle development schedule; NACA nozzle design; NACA nozzle test results; nearly fully mixed (NFM) nozzle design; noise versus aspiration rate; peak noise test results; nozzle test in the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF); and Schlieren pictures of NACA nozzle.

  13. Silicon single-crystal cryogenic optical resonator.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Eugen; Chen, Qun-Feng; Ernsting, Ingo; Luckmann, Heiko; Rosowski, Ulrich; Nevsky, Alexander; Schiller, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    We report on the demonstration and characterization of a silicon optical resonator for laser frequency stabilization, operating in the deep cryogenic regime at temperatures as low as 1.5 K. Robust operation was achieved, with absolute frequency drift less than 20 Hz over 1 h. This stability allowed sensitive measurements of the resonator thermal expansion coefficient (α). We found that α=4.6×10(-13)  K(-1) at 1.6 K. At 16.8 K α vanishes, with a derivative equal to -6×10(-10)  K(-2). The temperature of the resonator was stabilized to a level below 10 μK for averaging times longer than 20 s. The sensitivity of the resonator frequency to a variation of the laser power was also studied. The corresponding sensitivities and the expected Brownian noise indicate that this system should enable frequency stabilization of lasers at the low-10(-17) level. PMID:24876023

  14. Optical Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Paul; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad; Pardo, Fabrice

    2014-08-01

    Helmholtz resonators are widely used acoustic components able to select a single frequency. Here, based on an analogy between acoustics and electromagnetism wave equations, we present an electromagnetic 2D Helmholtz resonator made of a metallic slit-box structure. At the resonance, the light is funneled in the λ/800 apertures, and is subsequently absorbed in the cavity. As in acoustics, there is no higher order of resonance, which is an appealing feature for applications such as photodetection or thermal emission. Eventually, we demonstrate that the slit is of capacitive nature while the box behaves inductively. We derive an analytical formula for the resonance wavelength, which does not rely on wave propagation and therefore does not depend on the permittivity of the material filling the box. Besides, in contrast with half-wavelength resonators, the resonance wavelength can be engineered by both the slit aspect ratio and the box area.

  15. Control of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Paul

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the physical properties, sources, physiological effects, and legislation pertaining to noise, especially noise characteristics in the community. Indicates that noise reduction steps can be taken more intelligently after determination of the true noise sources and paths. (CC)

  16. Low Frequency Noise Measurement and Analysis of Capacitive Micro-Accelerometers: Temperature Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd-Yasin, Faisal; Nagel, David J.; Ong, D. S.; Korman, Can E.; Chuah, H. T.

    2008-06-01

    A noise measurements of micro-accelerometers were performed using a special measurement system. A common spectral behavior of noise is found, with 1/ f noise dominating at low frequencies and white thermal noise being the limiting factor at higher frequencies. A temperature dependent and an acceleration dependant of the noise are found in the accelerometers, in agreement and contract of the theories, respectively.

  17. Reaching the quantum limit of sensitivity in electron spin resonance.

    PubMed

    Bienfait, A; Pla, J J; Kubo, Y; Stern, M; Zhou, X; Lo, C C; Weis, C D; Schenkel, T; Thewalt, M L W; Vion, D; Esteve, D; Julsgaard, B; Mølmer, K; Morton, J J L; Bertet, P

    2016-03-01

    The detection and characterization of paramagnetic species by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is widely used throughout chemistry, biology and materials science, from in vivo imaging to distance measurements in spin-labelled proteins. ESR relies on the inductive detection of microwave signals emitted by the spins into a coupled microwave resonator during their Larmor precession. However, such signals can be very small, prohibiting the application of ESR at the nanoscale (for example, at the single-cell level or on individual nanoparticles). Here, using a Josephson parametric microwave amplifier combined with high-quality-factor superconducting microresonators cooled at millikelvin temperatures, we improve the state-of-the-art sensitivity of inductive ESR detection by nearly four orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the detection of 1,700 bismuth donor spins in silicon within a single Hahn echo with unit signal-to-noise ratio, reduced to 150 spins by averaging a single Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. This unprecedented sensitivity reaches the limit set by quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field instead of thermal or technical noise, which constitutes a novel regime for magnetic resonance. The detection volume of our resonator is ∼ 0.02 nl, and our approach can be readily scaled down further to improve sensitivity, providing a new versatile toolbox for ESR at the nanoscale. PMID:26657787

  18. Reaching the quantum limit of sensitivity in electron spin resonance.

    PubMed

    Bienfait, A; Pla, J J; Kubo, Y; Stern, M; Zhou, X; Lo, C C; Weis, C D; Schenkel, T; Thewalt, M L W; Vion, D; Esteve, D; Julsgaard, B; Mølmer, K; Morton, J J L; Bertet, P

    2016-03-01

    The detection and characterization of paramagnetic species by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is widely used throughout chemistry, biology and materials science, from in vivo imaging to distance measurements in spin-labelled proteins. ESR relies on the inductive detection of microwave signals emitted by the spins into a coupled microwave resonator during their Larmor precession. However, such signals can be very small, prohibiting the application of ESR at the nanoscale (for example, at the single-cell level or on individual nanoparticles). Here, using a Josephson parametric microwave amplifier combined with high-quality-factor superconducting microresonators cooled at millikelvin temperatures, we improve the state-of-the-art sensitivity of inductive ESR detection by nearly four orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the detection of 1,700 bismuth donor spins in silicon within a single Hahn echo with unit signal-to-noise ratio, reduced to 150 spins by averaging a single Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. This unprecedented sensitivity reaches the limit set by quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field instead of thermal or technical noise, which constitutes a novel regime for magnetic resonance. The detection volume of our resonator is ∼ 0.02 nl, and our approach can be readily scaled down further to improve sensitivity, providing a new versatile toolbox for ESR at the nanoscale.

  19. Reaching the quantum limit of sensitivity in electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienfait, A.; Pla, J. J.; Kubo, Y.; Stern, M.; Zhou, X.; Lo, C. C.; Weis, C. D.; Schenkel, T.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Vion, D.; Esteve, D.; Julsgaard, B.; Mølmer, K.; Morton, J. J. L.; Bertet, P.

    2016-03-01

    The detection and characterization of paramagnetic species by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is widely used throughout chemistry, biology and materials science, from in vivo imaging to distance measurements in spin-labelled proteins. ESR relies on the inductive detection of microwave signals emitted by the spins into a coupled microwave resonator during their Larmor precession. However, such signals can be very small, prohibiting the application of ESR at the nanoscale (for example, at the single-cell level or on individual nanoparticles). Here, using a Josephson parametric microwave amplifier combined with high-quality-factor superconducting microresonators cooled at millikelvin temperatures, we improve the state-of-the-art sensitivity of inductive ESR detection by nearly four orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the detection of 1,700 bismuth donor spins in silicon within a single Hahn echo with unit signal-to-noise ratio, reduced to 150 spins by averaging a single Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. This unprecedented sensitivity reaches the limit set by quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field instead of thermal or technical noise, which constitutes a novel regime for magnetic resonance. The detection volume of our resonator is ˜0.02 nl, and our approach can be readily scaled down further to improve sensitivity, providing a new versatile toolbox for ESR at the nanoscale.

  20. Noise pollution resources compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Abstracts of reports concerning noise pollution are presented. The abstracts are grouped in the following areas of activity: (1) sources of noise, (2) noise detection and measurement, (3) noise abatement and control, (4) physical effects of noise and (5) social effects of noise.

  1. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Luong, Michel

    2015-09-07

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a “bump” or as a “dip” superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  2. Noise Abatement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-01-01

    SMART, Sound Modification and Regulated Temperature compound, is a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy and sound absorbing qualities. It is derived from a very elastic plastic which was an effective noise abatement material in the Apollo Guidance System. Discovered by a NASA employee, it is marketed by Environmental Health Systems, Inc. (EHS). The product has been successfully employed by a diaper company with noisy dryers and a sugar company with noisy blowers. The company also manufactures an audiometric test booth and acoustical office partitions.

  3. Resonances and resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-05-01

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances.

  4. Multiplicative noise effects on electroconvection in controlling additive noise by a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    We report multiplicative noise-induced threshold shift of electroconvection (EC) in the presence of a magnetic field H . Controlling the thermal fluctuation (i.e., additive noise) of the rodlike molecules of nematic liquid crystals by H , the EC threshold is examined at various noise levels [characterized by their intensity and cutoff frequency (fc) ]. For a sufficiently strong H (i.e., ignorable additive noise), a modified noise sensitivity characterizing the shift problem is in good agreement with experimental results for colored as well as white noise (fc→∞ ) ; until now, there was a large deviation for (sufficiently) colored noises. The present study shows that H provides us with ideal conditions for studying the corresponding Carr-Helfrich theory considering pure multiplicative noise.

  5. Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy for Analytical Chemistry: Thermal Evolution of Low Volatility Impurities and Detection with a Fourier Transform Molecular Rotational Resonance Spectrometer (tev Ft-Mrr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Brent; Fields, Shelby S.; Neill, Justin L.; Pulliam, Robin; Muckle, Matt; Pate, Brooks

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in Fourier transform millimeter-wave spectroscopy techniques have renewed the application reach of molecular rotational spectroscopy for analytical chemistry. We present a sampling method for sub ppm analysis of low volatility impurities by thermal evolution from solid powders using a millimeter-wave Fourier transform molecular rotational resonance (FT-MRR) spectrometer for detection. This application of FT-MRR is relevant to the manufacturing of safe oral pharmaceuticals. Low volatility impurities can be challenging to detect at 1 ppm levels with chromatographic techniques. One such example of a potentially mutagenic impurity is acetamide (v.p. 1 Torr at 40 C, m.p. 80 C). We measured the pure reference spectrum of acetamide by flowing the sublimated vapor pressure of acetamide crystals through the FT-MRR spectrometer. The spectrometer lower detection level (LDL) for a broadband (> 20 GHz, 10 min.) spectrum is 300 nTorr, 30 pmol, or 2 ng. For a 50 mg powder, perfect sample transfer efficiency can yield a w/w % detection limit of 35 ppb. We extended the sampling method for the acetamide reference measurement to an acetaminophen sample spiked with 5000 ppm acetamide in order to test the sample transfer efficiency when liberated from an pharmaceutical powder. A spectral reference matching algorithm detected the presence of several impurities including acetaldehyde, acetic acid, and acetonitrile that evolved at the melting point of acetaminophen, demonstrating the capability of FT-MRR for identification without a routine chemical standard. The method detection limit (MDL) without further development is less than 10 ppm w/w %. Resolved FT-MRR mixture spectra will be presented with a description of sampling methods.

  6. Effects of thermal annealing on the radiation produced electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of bovine and equine tooth enamel: Fossil and modern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, Robert A.; Bogard, James S.; Elam, J. Michael; Weinand, Daniel C.; Kramer, Andrew

    2003-06-01

    The concentration of stable radiation-induced paramagnetic states in fossil teeth can be used as a measure of sample age. Temperature excursions >100 °C, however, can cause the paramagnetic state clock to differ from the actual postmortem time. We have heated irradiated enamel from both fossilized bovid and modern equine (MEQ) teeth for 30 min in 50 °C increments from 100 to 300 °C, measuring the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum after each anneal, to investigate such effects. Samples were irradiated again after the last anneal, with doses of 300-1200 Gy from 60Co photons, and measured. Two unirradiated MEQ samples were also annealed for 30 min at 300 °C, one in an evacuated EPR tube and the other in a tube open to the atmosphere, and subsequently irradiated. The data showed that hyperfine components attributed to the alanine radical were not detected in the irradiated MEQ sample until after the anneals. The spectrum of the MEQ sample heated in air and then irradiated was similar to that of the heat treated fossil sample. We conclude that the hyperfine components are due to sample heating to temperatures/times >100 °C/30 min and that similarities between fossil and MEQ spectra after the 300 °C/30 min MEQ anneal are also due to sample heating. We conclude that the presence of the hyperfine components in spectra of fossil tooth enamel indicate that such thermal events occurred either at the time of death, or during the postmortem history.

  7. Label-free characterization of carbonic anhydrase-novel inhibitor interactions using surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence-based thermal shift assays.

    PubMed

    Rogez-Florent, Tiphaine; Duhamel, Laetitia; Goossens, Laurence; Six, Perrine; Drucbert, Anne-Sophie; Depreux, Patrick; Danzé, Pierre-Marie; Landy, David; Goossens, Jean-François; Foulon, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the development of biophysical unbiased methods to study the interactions between new designed compounds and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) enzyme. These methods have to permit both a screening of a series of sulfonamide derivatives and the identification of a lead compound after a thorough study of the most promising molecules. Interactions data were collected using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and thermal shift assay (TSA). In the first step, experiments were performed with bovine CAII isoform and were extended to human CAII. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments were also conducted to obtain thermodynamics parameters necessary for the processing of the TSA data. Results obtained with this reference methodology demonstrate the effectiveness of SPR and TSA. KD values obtained from SPR data were in perfect accordance with ITC. For TSA, despite the fact that the absolute values of KD were quite different, the same affinity scale was obtained for all compounds. The binding affinities of the analytes studied vary by more than 50 orders of magnitude; for example, the KD value determined by SPR were 6 ± 4 and 299 ± 25 nM for compounds 1 and 3, respectively. This paper discusses some of the theoretical and experimental aspects of the affinity-based methods and evaluates the protein consumption to develop methods for the screening of further new compounds. The double interest of SPR, that is, for screening and for the quick thorough study of the interactions parameters (ka , kd , and KD ), leads us to choose this methodology for the study of new potential inhibitors.

  8. Surface Adsorbate Fluctuations and Noise in Nanoelectromechanical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y. T.; Callegari, C.; Feng, X. L.; Roukes, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Physisorption on solid surfaces is important in both fundamental studies and technology. Adsorbates can also be critical for the performance of miniature electromechanical resonators and sensors. Advances in resonant nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), particularly mass sensitivity attaining the single-molecule level, make it possible to probe surface physics in a new regime, where a small number of adatoms cause a detectable frequency shift in a high quality factor (Q) NEMS resonator, and adsorbate fluctuations result in resonance frequency noise. Here we report measurements and analysis of the kinetics and fluctuations of physisorbed xenon (Xe) atoms on a high-Q NEMS resonator vibrating at 190.5 MHz. The measured adsorption spectrum and frequency noise, combined with analytic modeling of surface diffusion and adsorption–desorption processes, suggest that diffusion dominates the observed excess noise. This study also reveals new power laws of frequency noise induced by diffusion, which could be important in other low-dimensional nanoscale systems. PMID:21388120

  9. Friction-induced Resonance of a Stochastic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Laas, K.; Mankin, R.

    2009-10-29

    The influence of the friction coefficient on the long-time behavior of the output signal of a harmonic oscillator with fluctuating frequency subjected to an external periodic force and an additive thermal noise is considered. The colored fluctuations of the oscillator frequency are modeled as a three-level Markovian telegraph noise. The main purpose of this work is to demonstrate, based on exact expressions, that the resonance is manifested in the dependence of the response function and the complex susceptibility of the oscillator upon the friction coefficient. The advantage of the latter effect is that the control parameter is the damping coefficient, which can easily be varied in possible experiments as well as potential technological applications.

  10. Magnetic resonance force microscopy of paramagnetic electron spins at millikelvin temperatures.

    PubMed

    Vinante, A; Wijts, G; Usenko, O; Schinkelshoek, L; Oosterkamp, T H

    2011-12-06

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a powerful technique to detect a small number of spins that relies on force detection by an ultrasoft magnetically tipped cantilever and selective magnetic resonance manipulation of the spins. MRFM would greatly benefit from ultralow temperature operation, because of lower thermomechanical noise and increased thermal spin polarization. Here we demonstrate MRFM operation at temperatures as low as 30 mK, thanks to a recently developed superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based cantilever detection technique, which avoids cantilever overheating. In our experiment, we detect dangling bond paramagnetic centres on a silicon surface down to millikelvin temperatures. Fluctuations of such defects are supposedly linked to 1/f magnetic noise and decoherence in SQUIDs, as well as in several superconducting and single spin qubits. We find evidence that spin diffusion has a key role in the low-temperature spin dynamics.

  11. Continuous Stern-Gerlach effect: Noise and the measurement process

    PubMed Central

    Dehmelt, Hans

    1986-01-01

    This paper resumes the discussion of the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, a method to continuously and nondestructively determine the spin state of the same individual electron, quasipermanently confined in a Penning trap in ultrahigh vacuum at liquid helium temperatures. Here the focus is on limitations to spin-state detection due to thermal and zero-point noise and on the quantum-mechanical measurement process. Illustrations of the continuous spin measurement process in the presence of selected perturbations are provided. The alteration of the spin state brought about by the frequency measurement process is exhibited. To resolve Zeno's paradox in a specific example, a slow resonant spin flip is discussed, when interrupted by frequent spin-state measurements. The continuous Stern-Gerlach effect is shown to be a near-ideal example for the quantum mechanical measurement process, for which all steps may be followed in quantitative detail. PMID:16593696

  12. Continuous Stern--Gerlach Effect: Noise and the Measurement Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehmelt, Hans

    1986-05-01

    This paper resumes the discussion of the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, a method to continuously and nondestructively determine the spin state of the same individual electron, quasipermanently confined in a Penning trap in ultrahigh vacuum at liquid helium temperatures. Here the focus is on limitations to spin-state detection due to thermal and zero-point noise and on the quantum-mechanical measurement process. Illustrations of the continuous spin measurement process in the presence of selected perturbations are provided. The alteration of the spin state brought about by the frequency measurement process is exhibited. To resolve Zeno's paradox in a specific example, a slow resonant spin flip is discussed, when interrupted by frequent spin-state measurements. The continuous Stern-Gerlach effect is shown to be a near-ideal example for the quantum mechanical measurement process, for which all steps may be followed in quantitative detail.

  13. Continuous Stern-Gerlach effect: Noise and the measurement process.

    PubMed

    Dehmelt, H

    1986-05-01

    This paper resumes the discussion of the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, a method to continuously and nondestructively determine the spin state of the same individual electron, quasipermanently confined in a Penning trap in ultrahigh vacuum at liquid helium temperatures. Here the focus is on limitations to spin-state detection due to thermal and zero-point noise and on the quantum-mechanical measurement process. Illustrations of the continuous spin measurement process in the presence of selected perturbations are provided. The alteration of the spin state brought about by the frequency measurement process is exhibited. To resolve Zeno's paradox in a specific example, a slow resonant spin flip is discussed, when interrupted by frequent spin-state measurements. The continuous Stern-Gerlach effect is shown to be a near-ideal example for the quantum mechanical measurement process, for which all steps may be followed in quantitative detail. PMID:16593696

  14. Excess optical quantum noise in atomic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy; Xiao, Yanhong

    2015-05-01

    Enhanced nonlinear optical response of a coherent atomic medium is the basis for many atomic sensors, and their performance is ultimately limited by the quantum fluctuations of the optical read-out. Here we demonstrate that off-resonant interactions can significantly modify the quantum noise of the optical field, even when their effect on the mean signal is negligible. We illustrate this concept by using an atomic magnetometer based on the nonlinear Faraday effect: the rotation of the light polarization is mainly determined by the resonant light-induced spin alignment, which alone does not change the photon statistics of the optical probe. Yet, we found that the minimum noise of output polarization rotation measurements is above the expected shot noise limit. This excess quantum noise is due to off-resonant coupling and grows with atomic density. We also show that the detection scheme can be modified to reduce the measured quantum noise (even below the shot-noise limit) but only at the expense of the reduced rotational sensitivity. These results show the existence of previously unnoticed factors in fundamental limitations in atomic magnetometry and could have impacts in many other atom-light based precision measurements. We acknowledge the support from AFOSR (grant FA9550-13-1-0098), NSF (grant PHY-1308281), NBRPC(973 Program Grant 2012CB921604 and 2011CB921604), and NNSFC (Grants No. 11322436).

  15. Community Response to Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidell, Sandy

    The primary effects of community noise on residential populations are speech interference, sleep disturbance, and annoyance. This chapter focuses on transportation noise in general and on aircraft noise in particular because aircraft noise is one of the most prominent community noise sources, because airport/community controversies are often the most contentious and widespread, and because industrial and other specialized formsofcommunitynoise generally posemorelocalized problems.

  16. All-metal superconducting planar microwave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, Matt; Pereverzev, Sergey; Dubois, Jonathon; Friedrich, Stephan; Qu, Dongxia; Libby, Steve; Lordi, Vincenzo; Carosi, Gianpaolo; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Chapline, George; Drury, Owen; Quantum Noise in Superconducting Devices Team

    There is common agreement that noise and resonance frequency jitter in superconducting microwave planar resonators are caused by presence of two-level systems, or fluctuators, in resonator materials- in dielectric substrate, in superconducting and dielectric layers and on the boundaries and interfaces. Scaling of noise with device dimensions indicate that fluctuators are likely concentrated around boundaries; physical nature of those fluctuators remains unclear. The presence of dielectrics is not necessary for the superconducting device functionality, and one can ask question about properties of all-metal device, where dielectric substrate and oxide films on metal are absent. Resonator made from of thin conducting layer with cuts in it is usually called slot line resonator. We report on the design, fabrication and initial testing of multiple split rings slot line resonator made out of thin molybdenum plate. This work is being funded as part of a three year strategic initiative (LDRD 16-SI-004) to better understand noise in superconducting devices.

  17. Superconducting Resonators: Protecting Schrodinger's Cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Jose; Mauskopf, Philip

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, superconducting resonators have played a fundamental role in various novel astronomical detectors and quantum information processors. One example is the microwave kinetic inductance detector that is able to resolve photon energies by measuring shifts in its resonant frequency. Similar resonators have been integrated with superconducting qubits, specifically the transmon, to substantially improve quantum coherence times. The purpose of this investigation is to survey various resonant structures within the requirements of circuit quantum electrodynamics giving special attention to quality factors, TLS noise, and quasi-particle generation. Specifically, planar and three dimensional cavities with varying geometries and materials are characterized - primarily focusing on NbTiN and Nb.

  18. Noise-induced sensitization of human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Hidaka, Ichiro; Nozaki, Daichi; Iso-o, Noriko; Soma, Rika; Kwak, Shin

    2002-11-01

    In the past decade, it has been recognized that noise can enhance the response of nonlinear systems to weak signals, via a mechanism known as stochastic resonance (SR). Particularly, the concept of SR has generated considerable interest in sensory biology, because it has been shown in several experimental studies that noise can assist neural systems in detecting weak signals which could not be detected in its absence. Recently, we have shown a similar type of noise-induced sensitization of human brain; externally added noise to the brain stem baroreflex centers sensitized their responses in maintaining adequate blood perfusion to the brain itself. Furthermore, the addition of noise has also shown to be useful in compensating for dysfunctions of the baroreflex centers in certain neurological diseases. It is concluded that the statistical physics concept of SR could be useful in sensitizing human brain in health and disease.

  19. Noise-Enhanced Human Balance Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priplata, Attila; Niemi, James; Salen, Martin; Harry, Jason; Lipsitz, Lewis A.; Collins, J. J.

    2002-11-01

    Noise can enhance the detection and transmission of weak signals in certain nonlinear systems, via a mechanism known as stochastic resonance. Here we show that input noise can be used to improve motor control in humans. Specifically, we show that the postural sway of both young and elderly individuals during quiet standing can be significantly reduced by applying subsensory mechanical noise to the feet. We further demonstrate with input noise a trend towards the reduction of postural sway in elderly subjects to the level of young subjects. These results suggest that noise-based devices, such as randomly vibrating shoe inserts, may enable people to overcome functional difficulties due to age-related sensory loss.

  20. Negative excess noise in gated quantum wires

    SciTech Connect

    Dolcini, F.; Trauzettel, B.; Safi, I.; Grabert, H.

    2009-04-23

    The electrical current noise of a quantum wire is expected to increase with increasing applied voltage. We show that this intuition can be wrong. Specifically, we consider a single channel quantum wire with impurities and with a capacitive coupling to a metallic gate, and find that its excess noise, defined as the change in the noise caused by the finite voltage, can be negative at zero temperature. This feature is present both for large (c>>c{sub q}) and small (c<>c{sub q}, negativity of the excess noise can occur at finite frequency when the transmission coefficients are energy dependent, i.e. in the presence of Fabry-Perot resonances or band curvature. In the opposite regime c < or approx. c{sub q}, a non trivial voltage dependence of the noise arises even for energy independent transmission coefficients: at zero frequency the noise decreases with voltage as a power law when cnoise are present due to Andreev-type resonances.