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Sample records for resonant third-integer extraction

  1. Tracking Simulation of Third-Integer Resonant Extraction for Fermilab's Mu2e Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chong Shik; Amundson, James; Michelotti, Leo

    2015-02-13

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab requires acceleration and transport of intense proton beams in order to deliver stable, uniform particle spills to the production target. To meet the experimental requirement, particles will be extracted slowly from the Delivery Ring to the external beamline. Using Synergia2, we have performed multi-particle tracking simulations of third-integer resonant extraction in the Delivery Ring, including space charge effects, physical beamline elements, and apertures. A piecewise linear ramp profile of tune quadrupoles was used to maintain a constant averaged spill rate throughout extraction. To study and minimize beam losses, we implemented and introduced a number of features, beamline element apertures, and septum plane alignments. Additionally, the RF Knockout (RFKO) technique, which excites particles transversely, is employed for spill regulation. Combined with a feedback system, it assists in fine-tuning spill uniformity. Simulation studies were carried out to optimize the RFKO feedback scheme, which will be helpful in designing the final spill regulation system.

  2. Preliminaries toward studying resonant extraction from the Debuncher

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, Leo; Johnstone, John; /Fermilab

    2009-06-01

    A recent proposal to detect {mu} {yields} e direct conversion at Fermilab asks for slow extraction of protons from the antiproton source, specifically from the Debuncher. [1] A third-integer resonance originally was considered for this, partly because of the Debuncher's three-fold symmetry and partly because its operational horizontal tune, {nu}{sub x} {approx} 9.765, is already within 0.1 of {nu}{sub x} = 29/3. Using a half integer resonance, {nu}{sub x} = 19/2, though not part of the original proposal, has been suggested more recently because (a) Fermilab has had a good deal of experience with half-integer extraction from the Tevatron, the Main Injector and the erstwhile Main Ring, and (b) for reasons we shall examine later, it depopulates the entire bunch without an abort at the end. This memo presents considerations preliminary to studying both possibilities. It is meant only as a starting point for investigations to be carried out in the future. The working constraints and assumptions have oscillated between two extremes: (1) making minimal changes in the antiproton source to minimize cost and (2) building another machine in the same tunnel. In this memo we adopt an attitude aligned more toward the first. The assumed parameters are listed in Table 1. A few are not (easily) subject to change, such as those related to the beam's momentum and revolution frequency and the acceptance of the debuncher. Two resonance exemplars are presented in the next section, with an explanation of the analytic and semi-analytic calculations that can be done for each. Section 3 contains preliminary numerical work that was done to validate the exemplars within the context of extraction from the Debuncher. A final section contains a summary. Following the bibliography, appendices contain (a) a qualitative, conceptual discussion of extraction for the novice, (b) a telegraphic review of the perturbative incantations used to filter the exemplars as principal resonances of quadrupole

  3. Wave energy extraction by coupled resonant absorbers.

    PubMed

    Evans, D V; Porter, R

    2012-01-28

    In this article, a range of problems and theories will be introduced that will build towards a new wave energy converter (WEC) concept, with the acronym 'ROTA' standing for resonant over-topping absorber. First, classical results for wave power absorption for WECs constrained to operate in a single degree of freedom will be reviewed and the role of resonance in their operation highlighted. Emphasis will then be placed on how the introduction of further resonances can improve power take-off characteristics by extending the range of frequencies over which the efficiency is close to a theoretical maximum. Methods for doing this in different types of WECs will be demonstrated. Coupled resonant absorbers achieve this by connecting a WEC device equipped with its own resonance (determined from a hydrodynamic analysis) to a new system having separate mass/spring/damper characteristics. It is shown that a coupled resonant effect can be realized by inserting a water tank into a WEC, and this idea forms the basis of the ROTA device. In essence, the idea is to exploit the coupling between the natural sloshing frequencies of the water in the internal tank and the natural resonance of a submerged buoyant circular cylinder device that is tethered to the sea floor, allowing a rotary motion about its axis of attachment.

  4. Resonance Extraction from the Finite Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Doring, Michael; Molina Peralta, Raquel

    2016-06-01

    The spectrum of excited hadrons becomes accessible in simulations of Quantum Chromodynamics on the lattice. Extensions of Lüscher's method allow to address multi-channel scattering problems using moving frames or modified boundary conditions to obtain more eigenvalues in finite volume. As these are at different energies, interpolations are needed to relate different eigenvalues and to help determine the amplitude. Expanding the T- or the K-matrix locally provides a controlled scheme by removing the known non-analyticities of thresholds. This can be stabilized by using Chiral Perturbation Theory. Different examples to determine resonance pole parameters and to disentangle resonances from thresholds are dis- cussed, like the scalar meson f0(980) and the excited baryons N(1535)1/2^- and Lambda(1405)1/2^-.

  5. Extracting Neutron Structure Functions in the Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Yonatan Kahn

    2009-07-01

    A new iterative method is presented for extracting neutron structure functions from inclusive structure functions of nuclei, focusing specifically on the resonance region. Unlike earlier approaches, this method is applicable to both spin-averaged and spin-dependent structure functions. We show that in numerical tests, this method is able to reproduce known input functions of nearly arbitrary shape after only 5–10 iterations. We illustrate the method on extractions of F2n and g1,2n from data, and discuss the treatment of systematic errors from this extraction procedure.

  6. Power-recycled Michelson interferometer with resonant sideband extraction.

    PubMed

    Shaddock, Daniel A; Gray, Malcolm B; Mow-Lowry, Conor; McClelland, David E

    2003-03-01

    We present a system for the control and signal extraction of a power-recycled Michelson interferometer with resonant sideband extraction. This control system is capable of locking four degrees of freedom to a fixed point while locking the signal cavity to an arbitrary detuned point. One of the strengths of this system is that it can quickly change the instrument's frequency response without disrupting continuous operation. We report on an experimental implementation of this control system on a benchtop prototype and present broadband measurements of the prototype's frequency response for a range of signal cavity detunings.

  7. Development of a signal-extraction scheme for resonant sideband extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokeyama, K.; Somiya, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Sato, S.; Kawamura, S.; Sugamoto, A.

    2008-12-01

    As a future plan, an advanced gravitational-wave detector will employ an optical configuration of resonant sideband extraction (RSE), achieved with an additional mirror at the signal-detection port of the power-recycled Fabry Perot Michelson interferometer. To control the complex coupled cavity system, one of the most important design issues is how to extract the longitudinal control signals of the cavities. We have developed a new signal-extraction scheme which provides an appropriate sensing matrix. The new method uses two sets of sidebands: one of the sideband components satisfies the critical coupling condition for the RSE interferometer and reaches the signal-extraction port, and the other sideband is completely reflected by the Michelson interferometer. They provide a diagonalized sensing matrix and enable the RSE control to be robust.

  8. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  9. Extraction of Electromagnetic Transition Form Factors for Nucleon Resonances within a Dynamical Coupled-Channels Model

    SciTech Connect

    N. Suzuki, T. Sato, T.-S. H. Lee

    2010-10-01

    We explain the application of a recently developed analytic continuation method to extract the electromagnetic transition form factors for the nucleon resonances ($N^*$) within a dynamical coupled-channel model of meson-baryon reactions.Illustrative results of the obtained $N^*\\rightarrow \\gamma N$ transition form factors, defined at the resonance pole positions on the complex energy plane, for the well isolated $P_{33}$ and $D_{13}$, and the complicated $P_{11}$ resonances are presented. A formula has been developed to give an unified representation of the effects due to the first two $P_{11}$ poles, which are near the $\\pi\\Delta$ threshold, but are on different Riemann sheets. We also find that a simple formula, with its parameters determined in the Laurent expansions of $\\pi N \\rightarrow \\pi N$ and $\\gamma N \\rightarrow\\pi N$ amplitudes, can reproduce to a very large extent the exact solutions of the considered model at energies near the real parts of the extracted resonance positions. We indicate the differences between our results and those extracted from the approaches using the Breit-Wigner parametrization of resonant amplitudes to fit the data.

  10. The Need for Polarization for Extracting Baryon Resonances and the NSTAR Program at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Philip L.

    2007-10-26

    We report on the NSTAR program in Hall B of JLab on using polarization observables to extract parameters of baryon resonances. The scientific purpose of the program is to improve the understanding of the underlying quark degrees of freedom, especially in the higher resonance regions, where we expect to uncover many of missing baryon resonances that mainly decay through multi-meson channels. With the high-quality beam of circularly- and linearly-polarized photons onto unpolarized and polarized proton and deteurium targets, and coupled with the nearly complete solid angle coverage of CLAS, we will extract the differential cross sections and associated polarization observables obtained by the photoproduction of vector mesons and kaons at center of mass energies of 1.7 to 2.2 GeV. The paper will primarily present the photon beam aspects of the excited baryon program.

  11. The Need for Polarization for Extracting Baryon Resonances and the NSTAR Program at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    P.L. Cole

    2007-10-01

    We report on the NSTAR program in Hall B of JLab on using polarization observables to extract parameters of baryon resonances. The scientific purpose of the program is to improve the understanding of the underlying quark degrees of freedom, especially in the higher resonance regions, where we expect to uncover many of missing baryon resonances that mainly decay through multi-meson channels. With the high-quality beam of circularly- and linearly-polarized photons onto unpolarized and polarized proton and deteurium targets, and coupled with the nearly complete solid angle coverage of CLAS, we will extract the differential cross sections and associated polarization observables obtained by the photoproduction of vector mesons and kaons at center of mass energies of 1.7 to 2.2 GeV. The paper will primarily present the photon beam aspects of the excited baryon program.

  12. On the extraction of P11 resonances from πN data

    DOE PAGES

    Hiroyuki Kamano; Nakamura, Satoshi X.; Lee, Tsung -Shung; ...

    2010-06-22

    With the accuracy of the available P11 amplitudes of πΔ scattering, we show that two resonance poles near the pi Delta threshold, obtained in several analyses, are stable against large variations of parameters within a dynamical coupled-channels analysis. The number of poles in the 1.5 GeV < W < 2 GeV region could be more than one, depending on how the structure of the single-energy solution of SAID is fitted. Lastly, our results indicate the need of more accurate πN scattering data in the W > 1.6 GeV region for high precision resonance extractions.

  13. Cryogenic resonant microwave compressors with energy extraction through "warm" interference switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, S. N.; Samoilenko, G. M.; Shlapakovski, A. S.; Yushkov, Yu. G.

    2016-01-01

    A method of switching cryogenic resonant microwave compressors from the energy accumulation mode to the energy release mode is proposed and analyzed. The switching process is based on the resonant transfer of the microwave energy from a cryogenic storage cavity to a room temperature commutation cavity. The transfer can be realized using a cascade interference microwave switch weakly coupled to the storage cavity and consisting of two H-plane waveguide tees connected in series. The tees are made of a normally conducting material, located outside the cryostat, and contain commuting units in shorted side arms. The length of the cascade input arm (from the storage cavity to the first tee) is non-resonant, while the space between the storage cavity and the second tee is resonant. The weak coupling of the storage cavity to the cascade and the non-resonant length of its input arm allow one to minimize losses during the energy accumulation phase. When the commuting unit in the first tee is ignited, the tee opens, and the non-resonant volume of the cascade input arm is transformed into the volume of the resonant commutation cavity. The microwave energy is then transferred in a resonant way from the storage cavity to the commutation cavity, and when the transfer is complete, the commuting unit in the second tee is ignited to extract the energy into a load. It is shown analytically that, at a certain value of the coupling (the cryogenic storage cavity to the normally conducting cascade of tees) and length of the cascade input arm, the power gain in the storage cavity can be kept high. It is also shown that the energy accumulated in the storage cavity can be effectively transferred to the commutation cavity and from the commutation cavity to the load.

  14. Measurement of optical response of a detuned resonant sideband extraction gravitational wave detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Osamu; Ward, Robert; Adhikari, Rana; Evans, Matthew; Abbott, Benjamin; Bork, Rolf; Busby, Daniel; Heefner, Jay; Ivanov, Alexander; Smith, Michael; Taylor, Robert; Vass, Stephen; Weinstein, Alan; Varvella, Monica; Kawamura, Seiji; Kawazoe, Fumiko; Sakata, Shihori; Mow-Lowry, Conor

    2006-07-01

    We report on the optical response of a suspended-mass detuned resonant sideband extraction (RSE) interferometer with power recycling. The purpose of the detuned RSE configuration is to manipulate and optimize the optical response of the interferometer to differential displacements (induced by gravitational waves) as a function of frequency, independently of other parameters of the interferometer. The design of our interferometer results in an optical gain with two peaks: an RSE optical resonance at around 4 kHz and a radiation pressure induced optical spring at around 41 Hz. We have developed a reliable procedure for acquiring lock and establishing the desired optical configuration. In this configuration, we have measured the optical response to differential displacement and found good agreement with predictions at both resonances and all other relevant frequencies. These results build confidence in both the theory and practical implementation of the more complex optical configuration being planned for Advanced LIGO.

  15. Energy Extraction from the Electron Beam in a Free Electron Laser Resonator Gaussian Mode.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Elias, Juan Gallardo and Peter Goldstein N00014-80-C-0308 S. PF OR -ING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS I . PROGRAM ELEMt.T PROJECT, TASK * ,’ niwxrsity...Elias, Juan Gallardo , Peter Goldstein Quantum Institue, University of California Santa Barbara, California 93106 ABSTRACT We present preliminary...QUANTUM INSTITUTE FREE ELECTRON LASER PROJECT Energy Extraction fran the Electron Beam in a Free Electron Laser Resonator Gaussian Mode Luis Elias, Juan

  16. The Experimental plan of the 4m Resonant Sideband Extraction Prototype for The LCGT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazoe, F.; Kokeyama, K.; Sato, S.; Miyakawa, O.; Somiya, K.; Fukushima, M.; Arai, N.; Kawamura, S.; Sugamoto, A.

    2006-03-01

    The 4m Resonant Sideband Extraction (RSE) interferometer is a planned prototype of the LCGT interferometer. The aim of the experiment is to operate a powerrecycled Broadband RSE interferometer with suspended optics and to achieve diagonalization of length signals of the central part of the interferometer directly through the optical setup. Details of the 4m RSE interferometer control method as well as the design of the experimental setup will be presented.

  17. Seasonal variations of global lightning activity extracted from Schumann resonances using a genetic algorithm method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Heng; Pasko, Victor P.; SáTori, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) model of the Earth-ionosphere cavity with a realistic conductivity profile is employed to study the global lightning activity using the observed intensity variations of Schumann resonances (SR). Comparison of the results derived from our FDTD model and the previous studies by other authors on related subjects shows that Schumann resonance is a good probe to indicate the seasonal variations of lightning activity in three main thunderstorm regions (Africa, southeast Asia, and South America). An inverse method based on genetic algorithms is developed to extract information on lightning intensity in these three regions from observed SR intensity data. Seasonal variations of the lightning activity in three thunderstorm centers are clearly observed in our results. Different SR frequency variations associated with seasonal variations of global lighting activity are also discussed.

  18. Extracting Information about the Rotator Cuff from Magnetic Resonance Images Using Deterministic and Random Techniques

    PubMed Central

    De Los Ríos, F. A.; Paluszny, M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider some methods to extract information about the rotator cuff based on magnetic resonance images; the study aims to define an alternative method of display that might facilitate the detection of partial tears in the supraspinatus tendon. Specifically, we are going to use families of ellipsoidal triangular patches to cover the humerus head near the affected area. These patches are going to be textured and displayed with the information of the magnetic resonance images using the trilinear interpolation technique. For the generation of points to texture each patch, we propose a new method that guarantees the uniform distribution of its points using a random statistical method. Its computational cost, defined as the average computing time to generate a fixed number of points, is significantly lower as compared with deterministic and other standard statistical techniques. PMID:25650281

  19. An Analysis Method for Superconducting Resonator Parameter Extraction with Complex Baseline Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    A new semi-empirical model is proposed for extracting the quality (Q) factors of arrays of superconducting microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The determination of the total internal and coupling Q factors enables the computation of the loss in the superconducting transmission lines. The method used allows the simultaneous analysis of multiple interacting discrete resonators with the presence of a complex spectral baseline arising from reflections in the system. The baseline removal allows an unbiased estimate of the device response as measured in a cryogenic instrumentation setting.

  20. Progress towards the development of a realistic electron cyclotron resonance ion source extraction model

    SciTech Connect

    Winklehner, D.; Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Strohmeier, M. M.

    2012-02-15

    In this paper, an ongoing effort to provide a simulation and design tool for electron cyclotron resonance ion source extraction and low energy beam transport is described and benchmarked against experimental results. Utilizing the particle-in-cell code WARP, a set of scripts has been developed: A semiempirical method of generating initial conditions, a 2D-3D hybrid method of plasma extraction and a simple beam transport deck. Measured emittances and beam profiles of uranium and helium beams are shown and the influence of the sextupole part of the plasma confinement field is investigated. The results are compared to simulations carried out using the methods described above. The results show that the simulation model (with some additional refinements) represents highly charged, well-confined ions well, but that the model is less applicable for less confined, singly charged ions.

  1. Model for the description of ion beam extraction from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Spädtke, P

    2010-02-01

    The finite difference method trajectory code KOBRA3-INP has been developed now for 25 years to perform the simulation of ion beam extraction in three dimensions. Meanwhile, the code has been validated for different applications: high current ion beam extraction from plasma sources for ion implantation technology, neutral gas heating in fusion devices, or ion thrusters for space propulsion. One major issue of the development of this code was to improve the flexibility of the applied model for the simulation of different types of particle sources. Fixed emitter sources might be simulated with that code as well as laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs), or H(-) sources, which require the simulation of negative ions, negative electrons, and positive charges simultaneously. The model which has been developed for ECRIS has now been used to explore the conditions for the ion beam extraction from a still nonexisting ion source, a so called ARC-ECRIS [P. Suominen and F. Wenander, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A305 (2008)]. It has to be shown whether the plasma generator has similar properties like regular ECRIS. However, the emittance of the extracted beam seems to be much better compared to an ECRIS equipped with a hexapole.

  2. Ion Extraction from a Toroidal Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source: a Numerical Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliri, Claudia; Volpe, Francesco; Gammino, Santo; Mascali, David

    2013-10-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) are magnetic mirror plasmas of microwave-heated electrons and cold multi-charged ions. The ions are extracted from one end of the mirror and injected in accelerators for nuclear and particle physics studies, hadrontherapy, or neutral beam injection in fusion plasmas. ECRIS devices progressed to higher and higher ion currents and charge states by adopting stronger magnetic fields (beneficial for confinement) and proportionally higher ECR frequencies. Further improvements would require the attainment of ``triple products'' comparable with major fusion experiments. For this, we propose a new, toroidal rather than linear, ECRIS geometry, which would at the same time improve confinement and make better use of the magnetic field. Ion extraction is more complicated than from a linear device, but feasible, as our modeling indicates. Possible techniques involve charge-dependent drifts, divertors, specially designed magnetic fields and associated loss-cones, electrostatic and/or magnetic deflectors, or techniques used in accelerators to transfer particles from one storage ring or accelerator to the next. Here we present single-particle tracings assessing and comparing these extraction techniques.

  3. Investigations on the structure of the extracted ion beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.; Lang, R.; Maeder, J.; Rossbach, J.; Tinschert, K.; Maimone, F.

    2012-02-15

    Using improved beam diagnostic tools, the structure of an ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) becomes visible. Especially viewing targets to display the beam profile and pepper pot devices for emittance measurements turned out to be very useful. On the contrary, diagnostic tools integrating over one space coordinate like wire harps for profile measurements or slit-slit devices, respectively slit-grid devices to measure the emittance might be applicable for beam transport investigations in a quadrupole channel, but are not very meaningful for investigations regarding the given ECRIS symmetry. Here we try to reproduce the experimentally found structure on the ion beam by simulation. For the simulation, a certain model has to be used to reproduce the experimental results. The model is also described in this paper.

  4. Third Interger Resonance Slow Extraction Using RFKO at High Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaslaev, V.; Amundson, J.; Johnstone, J.; Park, C.S.; Werkema, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-15

    A proposal to search for direct {mu} {yields} e conversion at Fermilab requires slow, resonant extraction of an intense proton beam. Large space charge forces will present challenges, partly due to the substantial betatron tune spread. The main challenges will be maintaining a uniform spill profile and moderate losses at the septum. We propose to use 'radio frequency knockout' (RFKO) for fine tuning the extraction. Strategies for the use of the RFKO method will be discussed here in the context of the Mu2e experiment. The feasibility of this method has been demonstrated in simulations. Tracking simulations show that optimal RFKO frequency modulation in case of the SC beam tune spread is substantially different from that of chromatic tune spread. FM should be centred at the bare betatron frequency rather than in the middle of the tune spread, and additional chromaticity must be added in order to facilitate rapid dilution of the dipole oscillations. Heating efficiency slowly decreases with the SC growing. Colored noise modulation (random signal within a given bandwidth) appears to be the most effective way of modulation, however its advantage over linear modulation is not very large, so practical reasons may prevail in the final choice between the two.

  5. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P. Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2014-03-15

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup −3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  6. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Mishra, L; Kewlani, H; Patil, D S; Mittal, K C

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10(-3) mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  7. Exploiting jump-resonance hysteresis in silicon auditory front-ends for extracting speaker discriminative formant trajectories.

    PubMed

    Aono, Kenji; Shaga, Ravi K; Chakrabartty, Shantanu

    2013-08-01

    Jump-resonance is a phenomenon observed in non-linear circuits where the amplitude of the output signal exhibits an abrupt jump when the frequency of the input signal is varied. For [Formula: see text] filters used in the design of analog auditory front-ends (AFEs), jump-resonance is generally considered to be undesirable and several techniques have been proposed in literature to avoid or alleviate this artifact. In this paper we explore the use of jump-resonance based hysteresis in [Formula: see text] band-pass filters for encoding speech formant trajectories. Using prototypes of silicon AFEs fabricated in a 0.5 μm CMOS process, we demonstrate the benefits of the proposed approach for extracting speaker discriminative features. These benefits are validated using speaker recognition experiments where consistent improvements in equal-error-rates (EERs) are achieved using the jump-resonance based features as compared to conventional features.

  8. Automatic brain extraction methods for T1 magnetic resonance images using region labeling and morphological operations.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, K; Kalaiselvi, T

    2011-08-01

    In this work we propose two brain extraction methods (BEM) that solely depend on the brain anatomy and its intensity characteristics. Our methods are simple, unsupervised and knowledge based. Using an adaptive intensity thresholding method on the magnetic resonance images of head scans, a binary image is obtained. The binary image is labeled using the anatomical facts that the scalp is the boundary between head and background, and the skull is the boundary separating brain and scalp. A run length scheme is applied on the labeled image to get a rough brain mask. Morphological operations are then performed to obtain the fine brain on the assumption that brain is the largest connected component (LCC). But the LCC concept failed to work on some slices where brain is composed of more than one connected component. To solve this problem a 3-D approach is introduced in the BEM. Experimental results on 61 sets of T1 scans taken from MRI scan center and neuroimage web services showed that our methods give better results than the popular methods, FSL's Brain Extraction Tool (BET), BrainSuite's Brain Surface Extractor (BSE) gives results comparable to that of Model-based Level Sets (MLS) and works well even where MLS failed. The average Dice similarity index computed using the "Gold standard" and the specificity values are 0.938 and 0.992, respectively, which are higher than that for BET, BSE and MLS. The average processing time by one of our methods is ≈1s/slice, which is smaller than for MLS, which is ≈4s/slice. One of our methods produces the lowest false positive rate of 0.075, which is smaller than that for BSE, BET and MLS. It is independent of imaging orientation and works well for slices with abnormal features like tumor and lesion in which the existing methods fail in certain cases.

  9. Studies of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Toivanen, V. Küchler, D.

    2016-02-15

    The 14.5 GHz GTS-LHC Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) provides multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The GTS-LHC beam formation has been studied extensively with lead, argon, and xenon beams with varied beam extraction conditions using the ion optical code IBSimu. The simulation model predicts self-consistently the formation of triangular and hollow beam structures which are often associated with ECRIS ion beams, as well as beam loss patterns which match the observed beam induced markings in the extraction region. These studies provide a better understanding of the properties of the extracted beams and a way to diagnose the extraction system performance and limitations, which is otherwise challenging due to the lack of direct diagnostics in this region and the limited availability of the ion source for development work.

  10. Studies of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN.

    PubMed

    Toivanen, V; Küchler, D

    2016-02-01

    The 14.5 GHz GTS-LHC Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) provides multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The GTS-LHC beam formation has been studied extensively with lead, argon, and xenon beams with varied beam extraction conditions using the ion optical code IBSimu. The simulation model predicts self-consistently the formation of triangular and hollow beam structures which are often associated with ECRIS ion beams, as well as beam loss patterns which match the observed beam induced markings in the extraction region. These studies provide a better understanding of the properties of the extracted beams and a way to diagnose the extraction system performance and limitations, which is otherwise challenging due to the lack of direct diagnostics in this region and the limited availability of the ion source for development work.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of nonaqueous phase liquid during soil vapor extraction in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Yanjie; Werth, Charles J.; Valocchi, Albert J.; Yoon, Hongkyu; Webb, Andrew G.

    2004-09-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is commonly used to remediate nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the vadose zone. This paper aims to determine the effect of grain size heterogeneity on the removal of NAPL in porous media during SVE. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to observe and quantify the amount and location of NAPL in flow-through columns filled with silica gel grains. MRI is unique because it is nondestructive, allowing three-dimensional images to be taken of the phases as a function of space and time. Columns were packed with silica gel in three ways: coarse grains (250-550 μm) only, fine grains (32-63 μm) only, and a core of fine grains surrounded by a shell of coarse grains. Columns saturated with water were drained under a constant suction head, contaminated with decane, and then drained to different decane saturations. Each column was then continuously purged with water-saturated nitrogen gas and images were taken intermittently. Results showed that at residual saturation, a sharp volatilization front moved through the columns filled with either coarse-grain or fine-grain silica gel. In the heterogeneous columns, the volatilization front in the core lagged just behind the shell because gas flow was greater through the shell and decane in the core diffused outward to the shell. When decane saturation in the core was above residual saturation, decane volatilization occurred near the inlet, the relative decane saturation throughout the core dropped uniformly, and decane in the core flowed in the liquid phase to the shell to replenish volatilized decane. These results indicate that NAPL trapped in low-permeability zones can flow to replenish areas where NAPL is lost due to SVE. However, when residual NAPL saturation is reached, NAPL flow no longer occurs and diffusion limits removal from low-permeability zones.

  12. Advanced light ion source extraction system for a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source geometry at Saclay.

    PubMed

    Delferrière, O; Gobin, R; Harrault, F; Nyckees, S; Sauce, Y; Tuske, O

    2012-02-01

    One of the main goal of intense light ion injector projects such as IPHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2, is to produce high current beams while keeping transverse emittance as low as possible. To prevent emittance growth induced in a dual solenoid low energy transfer line, its length has to be minimized. This can be performed with the advanced light ion source extraction system concept that we are developing: a new ECR 2.45 GHz type ion source based on the use of an additional low energy beam transport (LEBT) short length solenoid close to the extraction aperture to create the resonance in the plasma chamber. The geometry of the source has been considerably modified to allow easy maintenance of each component and to save space in front of the extraction. The source aims to be very flexible and to be able to extract high current ion beams at energy up to 100 kV. A specific experimental setup for this source is under installation on the BETSI test bench, to compare its performances with sources developed up to now in the laboratory, such as SILHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2 ECR sources. This original extraction source concept is presented, as well as electromagnetic simulations with OPERA-2D code. Ion beam extraction in space charge compensation regime with AXCEL, and beam dynamics simulation with SOLMAXP codes show the beam quality improvement at the end of the LEBT.

  13. Advanced light ion source extraction system for a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source geometry at Saclaya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Nyckees, S.; Sauce, Y.; Tuske, O.

    2012-02-01

    One of the main goal of intense light ion injector projects such as IPHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2, is to produce high current beams while keeping transverse emittance as low as possible. To prevent emittance growth induced in a dual solenoid low energy transfer line, its length has to be minimized. This can be performed with the advanced light ion source extraction system concept that we are developing: a new ECR 2.45 GHz type ion source based on the use of an additional low energy beam transport (LEBT) short length solenoid close to the extraction aperture to create the resonance in the plasma chamber. The geometry of the source has been considerably modified to allow easy maintenance of each component and to save space in front of the extraction. The source aims to be very flexible and to be able to extract high current ion beams at energy up to 100 kV. A specific experimental setup for this source is under installation on the BETSI test bench, to compare its performances with sources developed up to now in the laboratory, such as SILHI, IFMIF, or SPIRAL2 ECR sources. This original extraction source concept is presented, as well as electromagnetic simulations with OPERA-2D code. Ion beam extraction in space charge compensation regime with AXCEL, and beam dynamics simulation with SOLMAXP codes show the beam quality improvement at the end of the LEBT.

  14. Power penalty measurement and frequency chirp extraction in silicon microdisk resonator modulators.

    SciTech Connect

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Zortman, William A.; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; Watts, Michael R.

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate 5 Gbs and 10 Gbs error free operation of silicon photonic microdisk resonant modulators to a distance of 70 km, measure dispersion power penalties and compare the experimental results with theoretically derived values.

  15. P_11 Resonance Extracted from pi-N Data and Its Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi Nakamura

    2012-04-01

    We study the stability of resonance poles in {pi}N P{sub 11} partial wave, particularly the Roper resonance, by varying parameters significantly within the EBAC dynamical coupled-channels model, keeping a good fit to the empirical amplitude. We find that two Roper poles are stable against the variation. However, for higher energies, the number of poles can change depending on how the parameters are fitted within error bars. We also developed a model with a bare nucleon which forms the physical nucleon by being dressed by the meson-cloud. We still find a good stability of the Roper poles.

  16. Spatially resolved charge-state and current-density distributions at the extraction of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Peleikis, Thies; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    In this paper we present our measurements of charge-state and current-density distributions performed in very close vicinity (15 mm) of the extraction of our hexapole geometry electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We achieved a relatively high spatial resolution reducing the aperture of our 3D-movable extraction (puller) electrode to a diameter of only 0.5 mm. Thus, we are able to limit the source of the extracted ion beam to a very small region of the plasma electrode's hole (O = 4 mm) and therefore to a very small region of the neutral plasma sheath. The information about the charge-state distribution and the current density in the plane of the plasma electrode at each particular position is conserved in the ion beam. We determined the total current density distribution at a fixed coaxial distance of only 15 mm to the plasma electrode by remotely moving the small-aperture puller electrode which contained a dedicated Faraday cup (FC) across the aperture of the plasma electrode. In a second measurement we removed the FC and recorded m/q-spectra for the different positions using a sector magnet. From our results we can deduce that different ion charge-states can be grouped into bloated triangles of different sizes and same orientation at the extraction with the current density peaking at centre. This confirms observations from other groups based on simulations and emittance measurements. We present our measurements in detail and discuss possible systematic errors.

  17. Key metabolites in tissue extracts of Elliptio complanata identified using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hurley-Sanders, Jennifer L; Levine, Jay F; Nelson, Stacy A C; Law, J M; Showers, William J; Stoskopf, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    We used (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to describe key metabolites of the polar metabolome of the freshwater mussel, Elliptio complanata. Principal components analysis documented variability across tissue types and river of origin in mussels collected from two rivers in North Carolina (USA). Muscle, digestive gland, mantle and gill tissues yielded identifiable but overlapping metabolic profiles. Variation in digestive gland metabolic profiles between the two mussel collection sites was characterized by differences in mono- and disaccharides. Variation in mantle tissue metabolomes appeared to be associated with sex. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a sensitive means to detect metabolites in the tissues of E. complanata and holds promise as a tool for the investigation of freshwater mussel health and physiology.

  18. Key metabolites in tissue extracts of Elliptio complanata identified using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hurley-Sanders, Jennifer L.; Levine, Jay F.; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Law, J. M.; Showers, William J.; Stoskopf, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    We used 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to describe key metabolites of the polar metabolome of the freshwater mussel, Elliptio complanata. Principal components analysis documented variability across tissue types and river of origin in mussels collected from two rivers in North Carolina (USA). Muscle, digestive gland, mantle and gill tissues yielded identifiable but overlapping metabolic profiles. Variation in digestive gland metabolic profiles between the two mussel collection sites was characterized by differences in mono- and disaccharides. Variation in mantle tissue metabolomes appeared to be associated with sex. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a sensitive means to detect metabolites in the tissues of E. complanata and holds promise as a tool for the investigation of freshwater mussel health and physiology. PMID:27293708

  19. Upgrade of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN.

    PubMed

    Toivanen, V; Bellodi, G; Dimov, V; Küchler, D; Lombardi, A M; Maintrot, M

    2016-02-01

    Linac3 is the first accelerator in the heavy ion injector chain of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), providing multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The ion beams are produced with GTS-LHC, a 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, operated in afterglow mode. Improvement of the GTS-LHC beam formation and beam transport along Linac3 is part of the upgrade program of the injector chain in preparation for the future high luminosity LHC. A mismatch between the ion beam properties in the ion source extraction region and the acceptance of the following Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section has been identified as one of the factors limiting the Linac3 performance. The installation of a new focusing element, an einzel lens, into the GTS-LHC extraction region is foreseen as a part of the Linac3 upgrade, as well as a redesign of the first section of the LEBT. Details of the upgrade and results of a beam dynamics study of the extraction region and LEBT modifications will be presented.

  20. Upgrade of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Toivanen, V. Bellodi, G.; Dimov, V.; Küchler, D.; Lombardi, A. M.; Maintrot, M.

    2016-02-15

    Linac3 is the first accelerator in the heavy ion injector chain of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), providing multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The ion beams are produced with GTS-LHC, a 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, operated in afterglow mode. Improvement of the GTS-LHC beam formation and beam transport along Linac3 is part of the upgrade program of the injector chain in preparation for the future high luminosity LHC. A mismatch between the ion beam properties in the ion source extraction region and the acceptance of the following Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section has been identified as one of the factors limiting the Linac3 performance. The installation of a new focusing element, an einzel lens, into the GTS-LHC extraction region is foreseen as a part of the Linac3 upgrade, as well as a redesign of the first section of the LEBT. Details of the upgrade and results of a beam dynamics study of the extraction region and LEBT modifications will be presented.

  1. Automatic segmentation of the bone and extraction of the bone cartilage interface from magnetic resonance images of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fripp, Jurgen; Crozier, Stuart; Warfield, Simon K.; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2007-03-01

    The accurate segmentation of the articular cartilages from magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee is important for clinical studies and drug trials into conditions like osteoarthritis. Currently, segmentations are obtained using time-consuming manual or semi-automatic algorithms which have high inter- and intra-observer variabilities. This paper presents an important step towards obtaining automatic and accurate segmentations of the cartilages, namely an approach to automatically segment the bones and extract the bone-cartilage interfaces (BCI) in the knee. The segmentation is performed using three-dimensional active shape models, which are initialized using an affine registration to an atlas. The BCI are then extracted using image information and prior knowledge about the likelihood of each point belonging to the interface. The accuracy and robustness of the approach was experimentally validated using an MR database of fat suppressed spoiled gradient recall images. The (femur, tibia, patella) bone segmentation had a median Dice similarity coefficient of (0.96, 0.96, 0.89) and an average point-to-surface error of 0.16 mm on the BCI. The extracted BCI had a median surface overlap of 0.94 with the real interface, demonstrating its usefulness for subsequent cartilage segmentation or quantitative analysis.

  2. Automatic bone segmentation and bone-cartilage interface extraction for the shoulder joint from magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhengyi; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Neubert, Aleš; Xia, Ying; Strudwick, Mark; Paproki, Anthony; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-02-01

    We present a statistical shape model approach for automated segmentation of the proximal humerus and scapula with subsequent bone-cartilage interface (BCI) extraction from 3D magnetic resonance (MR) images of the shoulder region. Manual and automated bone segmentations from shoulder MR examinations from 25 healthy subjects acquired using steady-state free precession sequences were compared with the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The mean DSC scores between the manual and automated segmentations of the humerus and scapula bone volumes surrounding the BCI region were 0.926  ±  0.050 and 0.837  ±  0.059, respectively. The mean DSC values obtained for BCI extraction were 0.806  ±  0.133 for the humerus and 0.795  ±  0.117 for the scapula. The current model-based approach successfully provided automated bone segmentation and BCI extraction from MR images of the shoulder. In future work, this framework appears to provide a promising avenue for automated segmentation and quantitative analysis of cartilage in the glenohumeral joint.

  3. Upgrade of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toivanen, V.; Bellodi, G.; Dimov, V.; Küchler, D.; Lombardi, A. M.; Maintrot, M.

    2016-02-01

    Linac3 is the first accelerator in the heavy ion injector chain of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), providing multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The ion beams are produced with GTS-LHC, a 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, operated in afterglow mode. Improvement of the GTS-LHC beam formation and beam transport along Linac3 is part of the upgrade program of the injector chain in preparation for the future high luminosity LHC. A mismatch between the ion beam properties in the ion source extraction region and the acceptance of the following Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section has been identified as one of the factors limiting the Linac3 performance. The installation of a new focusing element, an einzel lens, into the GTS-LHC extraction region is foreseen as a part of the Linac3 upgrade, as well as a redesign of the first section of the LEBT. Details of the upgrade and results of a beam dynamics study of the extraction region and LEBT modifications will be presented.

  4. High intensity beams from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources: A study of efficient extraction and transport system (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Andò, L.; Passarello, S.; Zhang, X. Zh.; Spädtke, P.; Winkler, M.

    2004-05-01

    A study of the design of extraction and transport system for high intensity beams that will be produced by the next generation electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) was carried out in the frame of a European collaboration devoted to the definition of the main parameters of third generation ECRIS. High intensity production tests carried out in the previous years at INFN-LNS have shown evidence for the need to review the main concepts of the beam analysis and transport when high currents of low energy highly charged ions are extracted from the source. The transport of such low energy beams becomes critical as soon as the total current exceeds a few mA. The study reported here is based on the calculated parameters for the GyroSERSE source and the computer simulations have been carried out to obtain low emittance beams. The design of the extraction system was carried out by means of the KOBRA (three dimensional) code. The study of the beam line has been carried out with the codes GIOS, GICO, and TRANSPORT by taking into account both the phase space growth due to space charge and to the aberrations inside the magnets. The description of some different beam line options will be also given.

  5. Influence of magnification on extraction efficiency in laser resonators with non-overlapping beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M. G.; Peuriot, A. L.; Garea, M. T.; Santiago, G. D.

    2015-04-01

    The magnification and the Fresnel number determine the mode profile and losses in a bare unstable resonator. Upon inclusion of gain, both the beam pattern and the reflectivity are changed, more than in a stable cavity, because the counter-propagation intensities differ spatially and saturate the amplifier in a way that alters the mode profile, the reflectivity and the conditions of optimal operation. In this paper we present a numerical study of two types of cavities and compute the mode profile and losses in presence of an amplifier that saturates homogeneously. We compare these results with experimental data obtained on a TEA CO2 laser.

  6. Antioxidant activity of Calendula officinalis extract: inhibitory effects on chemiluminescence of human neutrophil bursts and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Braga, Pier Carlo; Dal Sasso, Monica; Culici, Maria; Spallino, Alessandra; Falchi, Mario; Bertelli, Aldo; Morelli, Roberto; Lo Scalzo, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    There is growing interest in natural chemical compounds from aromatic, spicy, medicinal and other plants with antioxidant properties in order to find new sources of compounds inactivating free radicals generated by metabolic pathways within body tissue and cells, mainly polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) whose overregulated recruitment and activation generate a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), leading to an imbalance of redox homeostasis and oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to examine whether a propylene glycol extract of Calendula officinalis interferes with ROS and RNS during the PMN respiratory bursts, and to establish the lowest concentration at which it still exerts antioxidant activity by means of luminol-amplified chemiluminescence. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was also used in order to confirm the activity of the C. officinalis extract. The C. officinalis extract exerted its anti-ROS and anti-RNS activity in a concentration-dependent manner, with significant effects being observed at even very low concentrations: 0.20 microg/ml without L-arginine, 0.10 microg/ml when L-arginine was added to the test with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and 0.05 microg/ml when it was added to the test with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. The EPR study confirmed these findings, 0.20 microg/ml being the lowest concentration of C. officinalis extract that significantly reduced 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl. These findings are interesting for improving the antioxidant network and restoring the redox balance in human cells with plant-derived molecules as well as extending the possibility of antagonizing the oxidative stress generated in living organisms when the balance is in favor of free radicals as a result of the depletion of cell antioxidants.

  7. Studies of emittance of multiply charged ions extracted from high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source, PKDELIS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G.; Lakshmy, P. S.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Baskaran, R.

    2010-02-15

    For the high current injector project at Inter University Accelerator Centre, a high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, PKDELIS, would provide the high charge state ions. The emittance of the ECR ion source is an important parameter to design further beam transport system and to match the acceptances of the downstream radio frequency quadrupole and drift tube linac accelerators of the high current injector. The emittance of the analyzed beam of PKDELIS ECR source has been measured utilizing the three beam size technique. A slit and two beam profile monitors positioned at fixed distances from each other were used to measure the beam size. The digitized beam profiles have been analyzed to determine the emittance of various multiply charged ions. The variation of emittance with gas mixing, ultrahigh frequency power, and extraction energy are discussed in this presentation.

  8. Extracting meson-baryon contributions to the electroexcitation of the N (1675)-5/2 nucleon resonance

    DOE PAGES

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker D.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the determination of the electrocouplings for the transition from the proton to the N (1675)-5/2 resonance state using recent differential cross section data on ep → eπ+n by the CLAS collaboration at 1.8 ≤ Q² < 4.5GeV². The data have been analyzed using two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and fixed-t dispersion relations. The extracted γ*p → N (1675)-5/2 helicity amplitudes show considerable coupling through the AP1/2 amplitude, that is significantly larger than predicted three-quark contribution to this amplitude. The amplitude AP3/2 is much smaller. Both results are consistent with the predicted sizes of the meson-baryonmore » contributions at Q² ≥ 1.8 GeV² from the dynamical coupled-channel model.« less

  9. Extraction of Resonance Parameters and Role of the Final State Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strakovsky, Igor I.; Briscoe, William J.; Kudryavtsev, Alexander E.; Tarasov, Vladimir E.

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the SAID group effort to analyze new γn → π-p cross sections vs. the world database to get new multipoles and determine neutron electromagnetic couplings. The differential cross section for the processes γn → π-p was extracted from new measurements at CLAS and MAMI-B accounting for Fermi motion effects in the impulse approximation (IA) as well as NN- and πN-FSI effects beyond the IA. We evaluated results of several pion photoproduction analyses and compared πN PWA results as a constraint for analyses of pion photoproduction data (Watson's theorem).

  10. Nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering: Methodology and extraction of vibrational properties of minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, M. Y.; Alp, E. E.; Bi, W.; Sturhahn, W.; Toellner, T. S.; Zhao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) is a synchrotron radiation based experimental method [1]. Since its introduction almost 20 years ago [2], NRIXS has found an expanding range of applications of studying lattice dynamics in condensed matter physics, materials science, high-pressure research, geosciences, and biophysics. After the first high pressure application in geophysics of measuring sound velocity of iron up to 153 GPa [3], it has become a widely used method to investigate deep earth compositions through sound velocity measurements [4,5]. Thermodynamic properties are also explored, in particular Grueneisen parameters [6]. Later, it was realized that isotope fractionaton factors can be derived from NRIXS measurements [7,8]. Sum rules and moments of NRIXS is a critical part of this methodology [9,10]. We will discuss this and in general the data analysis of NRIXS which enables the above mentioned applications. [1] Alp et al. Hyperfine Interactions 144/145, 3 (2002) [2] Sturhahn et al., PRL 74, 3832 (1995) [3] Mao et al., Science 292, 914 (2001) [4] Hu et al., PRB 67, 094304 (2003) [5] Sturhahn & Jackson, GSA special paper 421 (2007) [6] Murphy et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 38, L24306 (2011) [7] Polyakov, Science 323, 912 (2009) [8] Dauphas et al., Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 94, 254 (2012) [9] Lipkin, PRB 52, 10073 (1995) [10] Hu et al., PRB 87, 064301 (2013)

  11. Hyphenating Centrifugal Partition Chromatography with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance through Automated Solid Phase Extraction.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Jonathan; Brunel, Marion; Badoc, Alain; Da Costa, Grégory; Richard, Tristan; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Waffo-Téguo, Pierre

    2016-10-18

    Centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) and all countercurrent separation apparatus provide chemists with efficient ways to work with complex matrixes, especially in the domain of natural products. However, despite the great advances provided by these techniques, more efficient ways of analyzing the output flow would bring further enhancement. This study describe a hyphenated approach made by coupling NMR with CPC through a hybrid-indirect coupling made possible by using a solid phase extraction (SPE) apparatus intended for high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-NMR hyphenation. Some hardware changes were needed to adapt the incompatible flow-rates and a reverse-engineering approach that led to the specific software required to control the apparatus. 1D (1)HNMR and (1)H-(1)H correlation spectroscopy (COSY) spectra were acquired in reasonable time without the need for any solvent-suppression method thanks to the SPE nitrogen drying step. The reduced usage of expensive deuterated solvents from several hundreds of milliliters to the milliliter order is the major improvement of this approach compared to the previously published ones.

  12. Metabolomic Analysis of Rat Brain by High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Tissue Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Norbert W.; Béraud, Evelyne; Cozzone, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of gene expression on the RNA and protein levels have long been used to explore biological processes underlying disease. More recently, genomics and proteomics have been complemented by comprehensive quantitative analysis of the metabolite pool present in biological systems. This strategy, termed metabolomics, strives to provide a global characterization of the small-molecule complement involved in metabolism. While the genome and the proteome define the tasks cells can perform, the metabolome is part of the actual phenotype. Among the methods currently used in metabolomics, spectroscopic techniques are of special interest because they allow one to simultaneously analyze a large number of metabolites without prior selection for specific biochemical pathways, thus enabling a broad unbiased approach. Here, an optimized experimental protocol for metabolomic analysis by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is presented, which is the method of choice for efficient quantification of tissue metabolites. Important strengths of this method are (i) the use of crude extracts, without the need to purify the sample and/or separate metabolites; (ii) the intrinsically quantitative nature of NMR, permitting quantitation of all metabolites represented by an NMR spectrum with one reference compound only; and (iii) the nondestructive nature of NMR enabling repeated use of the same sample for multiple measurements. The dynamic range of metabolite concentrations that can be covered is considerable due to the linear response of NMR signals, although metabolites occurring at extremely low concentrations may be difficult to detect. For the least abundant compounds, the highly sensitive mass spectrometry method may be advantageous although this technique requires more intricate sample preparation and quantification procedures than NMR spectroscopy. We present here an NMR protocol adjusted to rat brain analysis; however, the same protocol can be applied to other tissues with minor

  13. Determination of trace uranium by resonance fluorescence method coupled with photo-catalytic technology and dual cloud point extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiekang; Li, Guirong; Han, Qian

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, two kinds of salophens (Sal) with different solubilities, Sal1 and Sal2, have been respectively synthesized, and they all can combine with uranyl to form stable complexes: [UO22 +-Sal1] and [UO22 +-Sal2]. Among them, [UO22 +-Sal1] was used as ligand to extract uranium in complex samples by dual cloud point extraction (dCPE), and [UO22 +-Sal2] was used as catalyst for the determination of uranium by photocatalytic resonance fluorescence (RF) method. The photocatalytic characteristic of [UO22 +-Sal2] on the oxidized pyronine Y (PRY) by potassium bromate which leads to the decrease of RF intensity of PRY were studied. The reduced value of RF intensity of reaction system (ΔF) is in proportional to the concentration of uranium (c), and a novel photo-catalytic RF method was developed for the determination of trace uranium (VI) after dCPE. The combination of photo-catalytic RF techniques and dCPE procedure endows the presented methods with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. Under optimal conditions, the linear calibration curves range for 0.067 to 6.57 ng mL- 1, the linear regression equation was ΔF = 438.0 c (ng mL- 1) + 175.6 with the correlation coefficient r = 0.9981. The limit of detection was 0.066 ng mL- 1. The proposed method was successfully applied for the separation and determination of uranium in real samples with the recoveries of 95.0-103.5%. The mechanisms of the indicator reaction and dCPE are discussed.

  14. Determination of trace uranium by resonance fluorescence method coupled with photo-catalytic technology and dual cloud point extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiekang; Li, Guirong; Han, Qian

    2016-12-05

    In this paper, two kinds of salophens (Sal) with different solubilities, Sal1 and Sal2, have been respectively synthesized, and they all can combine with uranyl to form stable complexes: [UO2(2+)-Sal1] and [UO2(2+)-Sal2]. Among them, [UO2(2+)-Sal1] was used as ligand to extract uranium in complex samples by dual cloud point extraction (dCPE), and [UO2(2+)-Sal2] was used as catalyst for the determination of uranium by photocatalytic resonance fluorescence (RF) method. The photocatalytic characteristic of [UO2(2+)-Sal2] on the oxidized pyronine Y (PRY) by potassium bromate which leads to the decrease of RF intensity of PRY were studied. The reduced value of RF intensity of reaction system (ΔF) is in proportional to the concentration of uranium (c), and a novel photo-catalytic RF method was developed for the determination of trace uranium (VI) after dCPE. The combination of photo-catalytic RF techniques and dCPE procedure endows the presented methods with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. Under optimal conditions, the linear calibration curves range for 0.067 to 6.57ngmL(-1), the linear regression equation was ΔF=438.0 c (ngmL(-1))+175.6 with the correlation coefficient r=0.9981. The limit of detection was 0.066ngmL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied for the separation and determination of uranium in real samples with the recoveries of 95.0-103.5%. The mechanisms of the indicator reaction and dCPE are discussed.

  15. Extraction of chili, black pepper, and ginger with near-critical CO2, propane, and dimethyl ether: analysis of the extracts by quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Owen J; Grey, John B; Perry, Nigel B; Burgess, Elaine J; Redmond, Wayne A; Porter, Noel G

    2003-08-13

    Ginger, black pepper, and chili powder were extracted using near-critical carbon dioxide, propane, and dimethyl ether on a laboratory scale to determine the overall yield and extraction efficiency for selected pungent components. The temperature dependency of extraction yield and efficiency was also determined for black pepper and chili using propane and dimethyl ether. The pungency of the extracts was determined by using an NMR technique developed for this work. The volatiles contents of ginger and black pepper extracts were also determined. Extraction of all spice types was carried out with acetone to compare overall yields. Subcritical dimethyl ether was as effective at extracting the pungent principles from the spices as supercritical carbon dioxide, although a substantial amount of water was also extracted. Subcritical propane was the least effective solvent. All solvents quantitatively extracted the gingerols from ginger. The yields of capsaicins obtained by supercritical CO(2) and dimethyl ether were similar and approximately double that extracted by propane. The yield of piperines obtained by propane extraction of black pepper was low at approximately 10% of that achieved with dimethyl ether and CO(2), but improved with increasing extraction temperature.

  16. Extracted magnetic resonance texture features discriminate between phenotypes and are associated with overall survival in glioblastoma multiforme patients.

    PubMed

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Tanougast, Camel

    2016-11-01

    GBM is a markedly heterogeneous brain tumor consisting of three main volumetric phenotypes identifiable on magnetic resonance imaging: necrosis (vN), active tumor (vAT), and edema/invasion (vE). The goal of this study is to identify the three glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) phenotypes using a texture-based gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) approach and determine whether the texture features of phenotypes are related to patient survival. MR imaging data in 40 GBM patients were analyzed. Phenotypes vN, vAT, and vE were segmented in a preprocessing step using 3D Slicer for rigid registration by T1-weighted imaging and corresponding fluid attenuation inversion recovery images. The GBM phenotypes were segmented using 3D Slicer tools. Texture features were extracted from GLCM of GBM phenotypes. Thereafter, Kruskal-Wallis test was employed to select the significant features. Robust predictive GBM features were identified and underwent numerous classifier analyses to distinguish phenotypes. Kaplan-Meier analysis was also performed to determine the relationship, if any, between phenotype texture features and survival rate. The simulation results showed that the 22 texture features were significant with p value <0.05. GBM phenotype discrimination based on texture features showed the best accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 79.31, 91.67, and 98.75 %, respectively. Three texture features derived from active tumor parts: difference entropy, information measure of correlation, and inverse difference were statistically significant in the prediction of survival, with log-rank p values of 0.001, 0.001, and 0.008, respectively. Among 22 features examined, three texture features have the ability to predict overall survival for GBM patients demonstrating the utility of GLCM analyses in both the diagnosis and prognosis of this patient population.

  17. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yorita, T. Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K.

    2014-02-15

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  18. New opportunities of the application of natural herb and spice extracts in plant oils: application of electron paramagnetic resonance in examining the oxidative stability.

    PubMed

    Kozłowska, Mariola; Szterk, Arkadiusz; Zawada, Katarzyna; Ząbkowski, Tomasz

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the applicability of natural water-ethanol extracts of herbs and spices in increasing the oxidative stability of plant oils and in the production of novel food. Different concentrations (0, 100, 300, 500, and 700 ppm) of spice extracts and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) (100 ppm) were added to the studied oils. The antioxidant activity of spice extracts was determined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical assay. The study showed that the extracts significantly increased the oxidative stability of the examined oils when compared to one of the strongest synthetic antioxidants--BHA. The applied simple production technology and addition of herb and spice extracts to plant oils enabled enhancement of their oxidative stability. The extracts are an alternative to the oils aromatized with an addition of fresh herbs, spices, and vegetables because it did not generate additional flavors thus enabling the maintenance of the characteristic ones. Moreover, it will increase the intake of natural substances in human diet, which are known to possess anticarcinogenic properties.

  19. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K.

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  20. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Ueda, H; Yasuda, Y; Morinobu, S; Tamii, A; Kamakura, K

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  1. A study of coal extraction with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.; Mehlenbacher, R.C.; Ito, O.

    1993-09-01

    An electron spin and proton magnetic relaxation study is presented on the effects of the solvent extraction of coal on the macromoleculer network of the coal and on the mobile molecular species that are initially within the coal. The eight Argonne Premium coals were extracted at room temperature with a 1:1 (v/v) N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP)-CS2 solvent mixture under an inert atmosphere. As much solvent as possible was removed from extract and residue by treatment in a vacuum. The mobilization of molecular free radicals by the solvent and the exposure of free radicals in the macromoleculer matrix to solvent or to species dissolved in the solvent, results in a preferential survival of residue radicals of types that depend on the particular coal and results in the apparently fairly uniform loss of all types of radicals in bituminous coal extracts. The surviving extract and residue free radicals are more predominantly of the odd- alternate hydrocarbon free radical type. The spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) of these coal free radicals has previously been inferred (Doetschman and Dwyer, Energy Fuels, 1992, 6, 783) to be from the modulation of the intramolecular electron-nuclear dipole-interactions of the CH groups in a magnetic field by rocldng motions of the radical in the coal matrix. Such a modulation would depend not only on the rocking amplitude and frequency but also upon the electron spin density at the CH groups in the radical. The observed SLR rates decrease with coal rank in agreement with the smaller spin densities and the lower rocidng amplitudes that are expected for the larger polycondensed ring systems in coals of higher rank. The SLR rates are found to be generally faster in the extracts (than residues) where the molecular species would be expected to have a smaller polycondensed ring system than in the macromoleculer matrix of the residue.

  2. On-Demand Single Photons with High Extraction Efficiency and Near-Unity Indistinguishability from a Resonantly Driven Quantum Dot in a Micropillar.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xing; He, Yu; Duan, Z-C; Gregersen, Niels; Chen, M-C; Unsleber, S; Maier, S; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-01-15

    Scalable photonic quantum technologies require on-demand single-photon sources with simultaneously high levels of purity, indistinguishability, and efficiency. These key features, however, have only been demonstrated separately in previous experiments. Here, by s-shell pulsed resonant excitation of a Purcell-enhanced quantum dot-micropillar system, we deterministically generate resonance fluorescence single photons which, at π pulse excitation, have an extraction efficiency of 66%, single-photon purity of 99.1%, and photon indistinguishability of 98.5%. Such a single-photon source for the first time combines the features of high efficiency and near-perfect levels of purity and indistinguishabilty, and thus opens the way to multiphoton experiments with semiconductor quantum dots.

  3. pH recycling aqueous two-phase systems applied in extraction of Maitake β-Glucan and mechanism analysis using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hou, Huiyun; Cao, Xuejun

    2015-07-31

    In this paper, a recycling aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) based on two pH-response copolymers PADB and PMDM were used in purification of β-Glucan from Grifola frondosa. The main parameters, such as polymer concentration, type and concentration of salt, extraction temperature and pH, were investigated to optimize partition conditions. The results demonstrated that β-Glucan was extracted into PADB-rich phase, while impurities were extracted into PMDM-rich phase. In this 2.5% PADB/2.5% PMDM ATPS, 7.489 partition coefficient and 96.92% extraction recovery for β-Glucan were obtained in the presence of 30mmol/L KBr, at pH 8.20, 30°C. The phase-forming copolymers could be recycled by adjusting pH, with recoveries of over 96.0%. Furthermore, the partition mechanism of Maitake β-Glucan in PADB/PMDM aqueous two-phase systems was studied. Fourier transform infrared spectra, ForteBio Octet system and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) were introduced for elucidating the partition mechanism of β-Glucan. Especially, LF-NMR was firstly used in the mechanism analysis in partition of aqueous two-phase systems. The change of transverse relaxation time (T2) in ATPS could reflect the interaction between polymers and β-Glucan.

  4. Rapid characterization of the chemical constituents of Cortex Fraxini by homogenate extraction followed by UHPLC coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinan; Han, Fei; Song, Aihua; Wang, Miao; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Chunjie

    2016-11-01

    Cortex Fraxini is an important traditional Chinese medicine. In this work, a rapid and reliable homogenate extraction method was applied for the fast extraction for Cortex Fraxini, and the method was optimized by response surface methodology. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry were established for the separation and characterization of the constituents of Cortex Fraxini. Liquid chromatography separation was conducted on a C18 column (150 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.8 μm), and gas chromatography separation was performed on a capillary with a 5% phenyl-methylpolysiloxane stationary phase (30 m × 0.25 mm × 0.25 mm) by injection of silylated samples. According to the results, 33 chemical compounds were characterized by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, and 11 chemical compounds were characterized by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry, and coumarins were the major components characterized by both gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. The proposed homogenate extraction was an efficient and rapid method, and coumarins, phenylethanoid glycosides, iridoid glycosides, phenylpropanoids, and lignans were the main constituents of Cortex Fraxini. This work laid the foundation for further study of Cortex Fraxini and will be helpful for the rapid extraction and characterization of ingredients in other traditional Chinese medicines.

  5. Combined use of high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling and high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for investigation of antidiabetic principles in crude plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Kongstad, Kenneth T; Özdemir, Ceylan; Barzak, Asmah; Wubshet, Sileshi G; Staerk, Dan

    2015-03-04

    Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder affecting millions of people worldwide, and new drug leads or functional foods containing selective α-glucosidase inhibitors are needed. Crude extract of 24 plants were assessed for α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Methanol extracts of Cinnamomum zeylanicum bark, Rheum rhabarbarum peel, and Rheum palmatum root and ethyl acetate extracts of C. zeylanicum bark, Allium ascalonicum peel, and R. palmatum root showed IC50 values below 20 μg/mL. Subsequently, high-resolution α-glucosidase profiling was used in combination with high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for identification of metabolites responsible for the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Quercetin (1) and its dimer (2), trimer (3), and tetramer (4) were identified as main α-glucosidase inhibitors in A. ascalonicum peel, whereas (E)-piceatannol 3'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5), (E)-rhapontigenin 3'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6), (E)-piceatannol (8), and emodin (12) were identified as main α-glucosidase inhibitors in R. palmatum root.

  6. Determination of rhodium by resonance light-scattering technique coupled with solid phase extraction using Rh(III) ion-imprinted polymers as sorbent.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Zhang, Ting; Tan, Wenxiang; Liu, Peng; Ding, Zhongtao; Cao, Qiue

    2013-02-15

    A resonance light-scattering method (RLS) for the determination of Rh(III) was initially developed, based on the reaction among Rh(III), WO4(2-) and ethylrhodamine B. The method possesses high sensitivity, but lacks selectivity. Therefore, a Rh(III) ion-imprinted polymer (IIP), prepared by precipitation polymerization using 2-(allylthio)nicotinic acid (ANA) as functional monomer, was used as sorbent to construct a ion-imprint based solid-phase extraction (IIP-SPE) method for separation of rhodium from complicated matrices prior to its determination by RLS. The experimental parameters affecting the extraction efficiency and selectivity of IIP-SPE were studied carefully. Under the optimal conditions, the IIP-SPE column with the enrichment factor (EF) of 10 could be used at least 20 times without decreasing its extraction recovery (above 90%) significantly. The calibration graph for the determination of rhodium by RLS coupled with IIP-SPE procedure was linear in the range of 0.06-1.5 ng mL(-1) with the detection limit of 0.024 ng mL(-1). There is no metal ions tested at the concentration below 10 ng mL(-1) interfered in the determination of 0.8 ng mL(-1) Rh(III). The proposed IIP-SPE-RLS method was successfully applied to the extraction and measurement of trace rhodium in catalyst, water and geochemical samples with the relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 4.0% (n=4).

  7. Experimental investigation of a control scheme for a zero-detuning resonant sideband extraction interferometer for next-generation gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazoe, Fumiko; Sugamoto, Akio; Leonhardt, Volker; Sato, Shuichi; Yamazaki, Toshitaka; Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Kawamura, Seiji; Miyakawa, Osamu; Somiya, Kentaro; Morioka, Tomoko; Nishizawa, Atsushi

    2008-10-01

    Some next-generation gravitational-wave detectors, such as the American Advanced LIGO project and the Japanese LCGT project, plan to use power recycled resonant sideband extraction (RSE) interferometers for their interferometer's optical configuration. A power recycled zero-detuning (PRZD) RSE interferometer, which is the default design for LCGT, has five main length degrees of freedom that need to be controlled in order to operate a gravitational-wave detector. This task is expected to be very challenging because of the complexity of optical configuration. A new control scheme for a PRZD RSE interferometer has been developed and tested with a prototype interferometer. The PRZD RSE interferometer was successfully locked with the control scheme. It is the first experimental demonstration of a PRZD RSE interferometer with suspended test masses. The result serves as an important step for the operation of LCGT.

  8. Metabonomic analysis of water extracts from different angelica roots by ¹H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pui Hei; Zhang, Wendy L; Lau, Chung-Ho; Cheung, Chi Yuen; Keun, Hector C; Tsim, Karl W K; Lam, Henry

    2014-03-20

    Angelica Radix, the roots of the genus Angelica, has been used for more than 2,000 years as a traditional medicine in Eastern Asia. The Chinese Pharmacopoeia records more than 100 herbal formulae containing Angelica roots. There are two common sources of Angelica roots, Angelica sinensis from China and A. gigas from Korea. The two species of Angelica roots differ in their chemical compositions, pharmacological properties and clinical efficacy. ¹H-NMR metabolic profiling has recently emerged as a promising quality control method for food and herbal chemistry. We explored the use of ¹H-NMR metabolic profiling for the quality control of Angelica Radix. Unlike previous work, we performed the metabolic profiling on hot water extracts, so as to mimic the clinically relevant preparation method. Unsupervised principle component analyses of both the full spectral profile and a selection of targeted molecules revealed a clear differentiation of three types of Angelica roots. In addition, the levels of 13 common metabolites were measured. Statistically significant differences in the levels of glucose, fructose and threonine were found between different sources of Angelica. Ferulic acid, a marker commonly used to evaluate Angelica root, was detected in our samples, but the difference in ferulic acid levels between the samples was not statistically significant. Overall, we successfully applied ¹H-NMR metabolic profiling with water extraction to discriminate all three sources of Angelica roots, and obtained quantitative information of many common metabolites.

  9. Neuroimaging measures of error-processing: Extracting reliable signals from event-related potentials and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Steele, Vaughn R; Anderson, Nathaniel E; Claus, Eric D; Bernat, Edward M; Rao, Vikram; Assaf, Michal; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Calhoun, Vince D; Kiehl, Kent A

    2016-05-15

    Error-related brain activity has become an increasingly important focus of cognitive neuroscience research utilizing both event-related potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Given the significant time and resources required to collect these data, it is important for researchers to plan their experiments such that stable estimates of error-related processes can be achieved efficiently. Reliability of error-related brain measures will vary as a function of the number of error trials and the number of participants included in the averages. Unfortunately, systematic investigations of the number of events and participants required to achieve stability in error-related processing are sparse, and none have addressed variability in sample size. Our goal here is to provide data compiled from a large sample of healthy participants (n=180) performing a Go/NoGo task, resampled iteratively to demonstrate the relative stability of measures of error-related brain activity given a range of sample sizes and event numbers included in the averages. We examine ERP measures of error-related negativity (ERN/Ne) and error positivity (Pe), as well as event-related fMRI measures locked to False Alarms. We find that achieving stable estimates of ERP measures required four to six error trials and approximately 30 participants; fMRI measures required six to eight trials and approximately 40 participants. Fewer trials and participants were required for measures where additional data reduction techniques (i.e., principal component analysis and independent component analysis) were implemented. Ranges of reliability statistics for various sample sizes and numbers of trials are provided. We intend this to be a useful resource for those planning or evaluating ERP or fMRI investigations with tasks designed to measure error-processing.

  10. Extracting meson-baryon contributions to the electroexcitation of the N (1675)-5/2 nucleon resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker D.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the determination of the electrocouplings for the transition from the proton to the N (1675)-5/2 resonance state using recent differential cross section data on ep → eπ+n by the CLAS collaboration at 1.8 ≤ Q² < 4.5GeV². The data have been analyzed using two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and fixed-t dispersion relations. The extracted γ*p → N (1675)-5/2 helicity amplitudes show considerable coupling through the AP1/2 amplitude, that is significantly larger than predicted three-quark contribution to this amplitude. The amplitude AP3/2 is much smaller. Both results are consistent with the predicted sizes of the meson-baryon contributions at Q² ≥ 1.8 GeV² from the dynamical coupled-channel model.

  11. Direct proof by 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance of semi-purified extract and isolation of ent-Catechin from leaves of Eucalyptus cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Sayonara Mendes; Abe, Simone Yae; Bueno, Fernanda Giacomini; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Nakashima, Tomoe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Eucalyptus cinerea F. Muell. ex Benth. is native to Australia and acclimatized to Southern Brazil. Its aromatic leaves are used for ornamental purposes and have great potential for essential oil production, although reports of its use in folk medicine are few. Objective: This study evaluated the composition of E. cinerea leaves using the solid state 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and isolation of the compound from the semipurified extract (SE). Materials and Methods: The SE of E. cinerea leaves was evaluated in the solid state by 13C-NMR spectrum, and the SE was chromatographed on a Sephadex LH-20 column, followed by high-speed counter-current chromatography to isolate the compound. The SE was analyzed by 13C-NMR and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight spectra. Results: Flavan-3-ol units were present, suggesting the presence of proanthocyanidins as well as a gallic acid unit. The uncommon ent-catechin was isolated. Conclusion: The presence of ent-catechin is reported for the first time in this genus and species. PMID:25210302

  12. Resonances and resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-05-01

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances.

  13. Non-targeted analysis of wastewater treatment plant effluents by high performance liquid chromatography-time slice-solid phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance/time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Godejohann, Markus; Berset, Jean-Daniel; Muff, Daniel

    2011-12-23

    Extracts of effluents from two different wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Switzerland taken during the application period of pesticides were examined by coupling an HPLC-MS system to a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer using a post column peak trapping device. By trapping 1 min portions of the chromatogram onto post column solid phase extraction cartridges (time slice-SPE-NMR) a comprehensive overview of proton carrying constituents could be achieved. Non-supervised statistical analysis of the NMR spectra obtained by this approach revealed NMR resonances pointing to contaminants present in decreasing proton concentration in the extracts. Comparison of exact mass data acquired during the trapping process to these NMR resonances enabled the identification of the pesticides Linuron, Metazachlor, Ethofumesate, Isoproturon, Metamitron, Propazine and Chloridazon. Desaminometamitron, a known transformation product of Metamitron could also be identified together with unexpected highly concentrated C8, C10 and C12 fatty acids and their glycerol mono- and di esters. Other compounds identified were a drug metabolite (3-Carboxymefenamic acid), a sun screen agent (Ensulizole: 2-Phenyl-1H-1,3-benzodiazole-6-sulfonic acid) and industrial chemicals (Benzotriazole, N-Benzyl-indole). In addition, a number of well-resolved proton spectra cannot be attributed to a mass response showing the need of further investigations using 2D-NMR and different ionization techniques.

  14. Triple aldose reductase/α-glucosidase/radical scavenging high-resolution profiling combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for identification of antidiabetic constituents in crude extract of Radix Scutellariae.

    PubMed

    Tahtah, Yousof; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Wubshet, Sileshi G; Nyberg, Nils T; Jønsson, Louise H; Jäger, Anna K; Qinglei, Sun; Staerk, Dan

    2015-08-21

    In this work, development of a new microplate-based high-resolution profiling assay using recombinant human aldose reductase is presented. Used together with high-resolution radical scavenging and high-resolution α-glucosidase assays, it provided the first report of a triple aldose reductase/α-glucosidase/radical scavenging high-resolution inhibition profile - allowing proof of concept with Radix Scutellariae crude extract as a polypharmacological herbal drug. The triple bioactivity high-resolution profiles were used to pinpoint bioactive compounds, and subsequent structure elucidation was performed with hyphenated high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The only α-glucosidase inhibitor was baicalein, whereas main aldose reductase inhibitors in the crude extract were baicalein and skullcapflavone II, and main radical scavengers were ganhuangemin, viscidulin III, baicalin, oroxylin A 7-O-glucuronide, wogonoside, baicalein, wogonin, and skullcapflavone II.

  15. Targeting high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis with high-resolution radical scavenging profiles-Bioactive secondary metabolites from the endophytic fungus Penicillium namyslowskii.

    PubMed

    Wubshet, Sileshi G; Nyberg, Nils T; Tejesvi, Mysore V; Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Kajula, Marena; Mattila, Sampo; Staerk, Dan

    2013-08-09

    The high-resolution radical scavenging profile of an extract of the endophytic fungus Penicillium namyslowskii was used to target analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, i.e., HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR, for identification of anti-oxidative secondary metabolites. This revealed the two chromatographic peaks with the highest relative response in the radical scavenging profile to be griseophenone C and peniprequinolone. The HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR analysis was performed in the tube-transfer mode using a cryogenically cooled NMR probe designed for 1.7mm NMR tubes. To further explore the potential of the above HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR platform for analysis of endophytic extracts, six peaks displaying no radical scavenging activity were also analyzed. This allowed unambiguous identification of six metabolites, i.e., dechlorogriseofulvin, dechlorodehydrogriseofulvin, griseofulvin, dehydrogriseofulvin, mevastatin acid, and mevastatin. The high mass sensitivity of the 1.7mm cryogenically cooled NMR probe allowed for the first time acquisition of direct detected (13)C NMR spectra of fungal metabolites, i.e., dechlorogriseofulvin and griseofulvin, directly from crude extract via HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR. Dechlorodehydrogriseofulvin was reported for the first time from nature.

  16. Screening of key antioxidant compounds of longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) seed extract by combining online fishing/knockout, activity evaluation, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyu; Ge, Zhen-Zhen; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Ze; Li, Chun-Mei

    2014-10-08

    To figure out the key phenolic compounds accounting for the antioxidant effects of longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) seed extract, online fishing/knockout method, activity evaluation assays, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS), and high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) analysis were used jointly for the first time. p-Coumaric acid-glycoside, (S)-flavogallonic acid, ellagic acid derivative, and methyl-ellagic acid glucopyranoside were first identified in longan seeds. In addition, our study revealed that ellagic acid as well as its derivative and p-coumaric acid-glycoside had important contribution to the potent antioxidant activity of longan seed extract, while gallic acid, corilagin, (S)-flavogallonic acid, methyl-ellagic acid glucopyranoside, and ethyl gallate showed very little contribution to the total antioxidant activity of longan seed extract. The combining use of the online fishing/knockout method, activity evaluation assays, FT-ICR-MS, and HPLC-ESI-MS analysis is a useful and simple strategy for screening of key bioactive compounds from complex extracts.

  17. A study on prevention of an electric discharge at an extraction electrode of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kishii, Y; Kawasaki, S; Kitagawa, A; Muramatsu, M; Uchida, T

    2014-02-01

    A compact ECR ion source has utilized for carbon radiotherapy. In order to increase beam intensity with higher electric field at the extraction electrode and be better ion supply stability for long periods, electric geometry and surface conditions of an extraction electrode have been studied. Focusing attention on black deposited substances on the extraction electrode, which were observed around the extraction electrode after long-term use, the relation between black deposited substances and the electrical insulation property is investigated. The black deposited substances were inspected for the thickness of deposit, surface roughness, structural arrangement examined using Raman spectroscopy, and characteristics of electric discharge in a test bench, which was set up to simulate the ECR ion source.

  18. Measurements of $ep \\to e^\\prime π^+n$ at W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV and extraction of nucleon resonance electrocouplings at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kijun; Aznauryan, I. G.; Burkert, V. D.; Adhikari, K. P.; Amaryan, M. J.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Badui, R.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; Alaoui, A. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fassi, L. El; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Joo, H. S.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J.; Markov, N.; Martinez, D.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati??, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sparveris, N.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Trivedi, A.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-04-01

    Differential cross sections of the exclusive process $e p \\to e^\\prime \\pi^+ n$ were measured with good precision in the range of the photon virtuality $Q^2 = 1.8 - 4.5$ GeV$^2$, and the invariant mass range of the $\\pi^+ n$ final state W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Data were collected with nearly complete coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the $n\\pi^+$ center-of-mass system. More than 37,000 cross section points were measured. The contributions of the isospin $I = {1\\over 2}$ resonances $N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$, $N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$ and $N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$ were extracted at different values of $Q^2$ using a single-channel, energy-dependent resonance amplitude analysis. Two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and the fixed-$t$ dispersion relations, were employed in the analysis. We observe significant strength of the $N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$ in the $A_{1/2}$ amplitude, which is in strong disagreement with quark models that predict both transverse amplitudes to be strongly suppressed. For the $N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$ we observe a slow changeover from the dominance of the $A_{3/2}$ amplitude at the real photon point ($Q^2=0$) to a $Q^2$ where $A_{1/2}$ begins to dominate. The scalar amplitude $S_{1/2}$ drops rapidly with $Q^2$ consistent with quark model prediction. For the $N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$ resonance our analysis shows significant strength for the $A_{1/2}$ amplitude at $Q^2 < 2.5$ GeV$^2$.

  19. Measurements of $$ep \\to e^\\prime π^+n$$ at W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV and extraction of nucleon resonance electrocouplings at CLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Kijun; Aznauryan, I. G.; Burkert, V. D.; ...

    2015-04-01

    Differential cross sections of the exclusive processmore » $$e p \\to e^\\prime \\pi^+ n$$ were measured with good precision in the range of the photon virtuality $Q^2 = 1.8 - 4.5$ GeV$^2$, and the invariant mass range of the $$\\pi^+ n$$ final state W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Data were collected with nearly complete coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the $$n\\pi^+$$ center-of-mass system. More than 37,000 cross section points were measured. The contributions of the isospin $$I = {1\\over 2}$$ resonances $$N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$$, $$N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$$ and $$N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$$ were extracted at different values of $Q^2$ using a single-channel, energy-dependent resonance amplitude analysis. Two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and the fixed-$t$ dispersion relations, were employed in the analysis. We observe significant strength of the $$N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$$ in the $$A_{1/2}$$ amplitude, which is in strong disagreement with quark models that predict both transverse amplitudes to be strongly suppressed. For the $$N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$$ we observe a slow changeover from the dominance of the $$A_{3/2}$$ amplitude at the real photon point ($Q^2=0$) to a $Q^2$ where $$A_{1/2}$$ begins to dominate. The scalar amplitude $$S_{1/2}$$ drops rapidly with $Q^2$ consistent with quark model prediction. For the $$N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$$ resonance our analysis shows significant strength for the $$A_{1/2}$$ amplitude at $Q^2 < 2.5$ GeV$^2$.« less

  20. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  1. Application of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to on-line solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the analysis of degradation products of V-class nerve agents and nitrogen mustard.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Avik; Kumar, Ajeet; Purohit, Ajay K; Dubey, Devendra K

    2010-04-23

    The detection and identification of the degradation products of nitrogen mustard and nerve agent VX by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to on-line solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR) were demonstrated. The analytes selected for the study were N,N-dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE), N,N-diethylaminoethanol (DEAE), N,N-diisopropylaminoethanol (DIAE) and triethanolamine (TEA). Offline solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by derivatization was applied to eliminate the interferents and make the analytes amenable for UV detection. Thereafter, chromatographically separated derivatives were trapped on on-line SPE cartridges. They were subsequently eluted and 1H NMR and COSY spectra were obtained. The overall detection limits of the LC-UV-SPE-NMR method for the mentioned analytes were found to be 18, 23, 25, and 32 mg/L respectively. Applicability of the method to real samples was demonstrated by the analysis of samples provided during the 22nd OPCW official proficiency test. The method gave reproducible NMR spectra devoid of intense background signals.

  2. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Characterization of coal-derived materials by field desorption mass spectrometry, two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, supercritical fluid extraction, and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Robins, W.H.

    1992-07-01

    Under contract from the DOE , and in association with CONSOL Inc., Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated four principal and several complementary techniques for the analysis of non-distillable direct coal liquefaction materials in support of process development. Field desorption mass spectrometry (FDMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods were examined for potential usefulness as techniques to elucidate the chemical structure of residual (nondistillable) direct coal liquefaction derived materials. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry (SFC/MS) were evaluated for effectiveness in compound-class separation and identification of residual materials. Liquid chromatography (including microcolumn) separation techniques, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and GC/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods were applied to supercritical fluid extracts. The full report authored by the PNL researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal liquefaction materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of CONSOL`s contract.

  3. Room-temperature extraction of spin lifetimes in metallic thin films via determination of the spin-pumping contribution to damping in ferromagnetic resonance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Carl; Schoen, Martin; Shaw, Justin; Nembach, Hans; Silva, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Recent room-temperature measurements yield spin diffusion lengths for Pt and Pd that are smaller than the bulk electron mean free path at room temperature. One proposed explanation is the thickness-dependence of conductivity that results in shorter momentum lifetimes at small Pt/Pd thicknesses. We measured spin transport properties in Pd and Pt thin films at room temperature via fitting of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) damping vs. NM thickness with the spin pumping model for ferromagnet (FM)/normal metal (NM) multilayers. We use a broadband, perpendicular FMR system to obtain high-precision values for the damping. The fits are based upon spin diffusion equations that include both momentum and spin scattering processes. By measuring thickness-dependent conductivity of the same films, we correlate the charge and spin transport parameters, permitting us to test multiple models for spin scattering. We explicitly show that the spin scattering time τsf must be shorter than the momentum scattering time tau over some range of NM thicknesses to adequately fit the data. Invocation of a simple monotonic proportionality between τsf and τ fails to fit the data. However, an inverse proportionality τ ~ 1 /τsf can fit the data, and τ <τsf for sufficiently thin NM layer.

  4. Nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.

    This report discusses research in the area of slowly varying nonlinear oscillatory systems. Some of the topics discussed are as follows: adiabatic invariants and transient resonance in very slowly varying Hamiltonian systems; sustained resonance in very slowly varying Hamiltonian systems; free-electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillators.

  5. Nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, J.; Pernarowski, Mark; Bosley, David L.

    1990-04-01

    The subjects discussed are: transient and sustained resonance for systems with very slowly varying parameters; free electron lasers with very slow wiggler taper; and bursting oscillations in biological systems. Plans are discussed for: FEL applications; transient and sustained resonance; and bursting oscillations.

  6. Micro-morphometrical assessment of the effect of Harpagophytum procumbens extract on articular cartilage in rabbits with experimental osteoarthritis using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wachsmuth, L; Lindhorst, E; Wrubel, S; Hadzhiyski, H; Hudelmaier, M; Eckstein, F; Chrubasik, S

    2011-08-01

    In vitro effects indicate a putative beneficial effect of Harpagophytum procumbens on cartilage turnover, however, in vivo protective effects on cartilage have yet to be demonstrated. A 7.1T MRI scanner was used to derive measurements of thickness, surface area and volume of the tibial condylar cartilage and to assess their precision (in the case of volume also accuracy) against the volumes of dissected cartilage measured by water displacement. Quantitative measurements were made in 16 rabbits, 6 months after unilateral medial meniscectomy and transection of the anterior cruciate ligament, after which eight of these were given a proprietary extract of Harpagophytum procumbens (HP). A semiquantitative MRI-based grading of the tibial cartilage was also compared with a 'macroscopic' grading based on direct visual inspection of dissected joints. The test-retest precision for MRI-based measurement was ≤6.4%. MRI-based measurements correlated well with volumes of surgically resected cartilage (r =  0.97, pair-wise random difference 4.2%). The medial tibial cartilage thickness and volume were about 35% smaller in the operated knees than in the non-operated contralateral knees (p < 0.05). The findings suggest that MRI is a precise and accurate tool for evaluating cartilage in a rabbit model of OA. The difference between the intact and operated knee in thickness and volume of the medial tibial cartilage was slightly but not significantly smaller in the HP-treated group than in the non-treated group.

  7. Acoustic Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2012-11-01

    Recently my collection of historical physics teaching apparatus was given a group of 19th-century tuning forks on resonant boxes. Figure 1 shows the smallest fork sitting on the largest one. The large tuning fork oscillates at 128 Hz and has a resonator that is 57.9 cm long. The small fork has a frequency 10 times higher, but its resonator has a length of 11.0 cm instead of the 5.8 cm that simple scaling would suggest. How is this possible?

  8. Slow extraction at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    Resonant slow extraction at the SSC will permit fixed-target operation. Stochastic extraction appears to be a promising technique for achieving spill times of the order of 1000 s. However, systematic sextupole error fields in the SSC dipoles must be reduced a factor of twenty from the design values; otherwise the extraction process will be perturbed or suppressed. In addition, good regulation of the SSC power supplies is essential for smooth extraction over the spill period. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Multiquark resonances

    DOE PAGES

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, Antonio D.

    2016-12-02

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building.more » Lastly, data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.« less

  10. Multiquark resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, Antonio D.

    2016-12-02

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Lastly, data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  11. Multiquark resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  12. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  13. Autostereogram resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  14. Hadron Resonances from QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, Jozef J.

    2016-03-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study ππ elastic scattering, including the ρ resonance, as well as coupled-channel πK, ηK scattering. The very recent extension to the case where an external current acts is also presented, considering the reaction πγ* → ππ, from which the unstable ρ → πγ transition form factor is extracted. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  15. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  16. If It's Resonance, What is Resonating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon under the name "resonance," which, is based on the mathematical analogy between mechanical resonance and the behavior of wave functions in quantum mechanical exchange phenomena was described. The resonating system does not have a structure intermediate between those involved in the resonance, but instead a structure which is further…

  17. Noise in nonlinear nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Noise limits the sensitivity of linear sensors, in a manner that is well understood, but also limits nonlinear systems in a less trivial way. Nonlinear nanomechanical resonators present interesting possibilities for the sensitive detection of forces and masses, but the noise limitations have not been explored much to date. Here we report on noise effects on nonlinear resonators operated in regimes where they have either one or two stable attractors. We have made quantitative measurements of the nonlinear response of a radiofrequency mechanical resonator with very high quality factor, measuring the noise-free transitions between the two attractors, and find good agreement with theory. We measure the transition rate response to controlled levels of white noise, and extract the basin activation energy. This allows us to obtain precise values for the relevant frequencies and the cubic nonlinearity in the Duffing oscillator, with applications to parametric sensing, in particular mass sensing. References: ``Noise-enabled precision measurements of a Duffing nanomechanical resonator,'' J.S. Aldridge and A.N. Cleland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 156403 (2005). ``Thermomechanical noise limits on parametric sensing with nanomechanical resonators,'' A.N. Cleland, New J. Phys. 7, 235 (2005).

  18. Resonances in pi-K scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, David J.

    2014-06-23

    We have obtained clear signals of resonances in coupled-channel pi K - eta K scattering. Using distillation and a large basis of operators we are able to extract a precise spectrum of energy levels using the variational method. These energies are analysed using inelastic extensions of the Luescher method to obtain scattering amplitudes that clearly describe S, P and D wave resonances, corresponding to the physical K_0^*(1430), the K^*(892) and the K_2^*(1430).

  19. Experiments with Helmholtz Resonators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Presents experiments that use Helmholtz resonators and have been designed for a sophomore-level course in oscillations and waves. Discusses the theory of the Helmholtz resonator and resonance curves. (JRH)

  20. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  1. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  2. Resonance beyond frequency-matching: multidimensional resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Mingzhe; Wang, Ruifang

    2017-03-01

    Resonance, conventionally defined as the oscillation of a system when the temporal frequency of an external stimulus matches a natural frequency of the system, is important in both fundamental physics and applied disciplines. However, the spatial character of oscillation is not considered in this definition. We reveal the creation of spatial resonance when the stimulus matches the space pattern of a normal mode in an oscillating system. The complete resonance, which we call multidimensional resonance, should be a combination of both the temporal and the spatial resonance. We further elucidate that the spin wave produced by multidimensional resonance drives considerably faster reversal of the vortex core in a magnetic nanodisc. Multidimensional resonance provides insight into the nature of wave dynamics and opens the door to novel applications.

  3. Measuring frequency response of surface-micromachined resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Bright, Victor M.; Dalton, George C.

    1997-09-01

    Resonator structures offer a unique mechanism for characterizing MEMS materials, but measuring the resonant frequency of microstructures is challenging. In this effort a network analyzer system was used to electrically characterize surface-micromachined resonator structures in a carefully controlled pressure and temperature environment.A microscope laser interferometer was used to confirm actual device deflections.Cantilever, comb, and piston resonators fabricated in the DARPA-sponsored MUMPs process were extensively tested. Measured resonator frequency results show reasonable agreement with analytic predictions computed using manufacturer measured film thickness and residual material stress. Alternatively the measured resonant frequency data can be used to extract materials data. Tuning of resonant frequency with DC bias was also investigated. Because the tested devices vary widely in complexity, form a simple cantilever beam to a comb resonator, the data collected is especially well suited for validation testing of MEMS modeling codes.

  4. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed.

  5. Integral resonator gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses an inertial sensor having an integral resonator. A typical sensor comprises a planar mechanical resonator for sensing motion of the inertial sensor and a case for housing the resonator. The resonator and a wall of the case are defined through an etching process. A typical method of producing the resonator includes etching a baseplate, bonding a wafer to the etched baseplate, through etching the wafer to form a planar mechanical resonator and the wall of the case and bonding an end cap wafer to the wall to complete the case.

  6. Unstable resonators with excited converging wave

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, N. ); Weber, H. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper reports the properties of unstable resonators with an additional mirror inside or outside the resonator investigated, both experimentally and theoretically. The additional mirror excites the converging wave, and by this, output coupling is decreased without affecting beam quality. Experiments were performed with a pulsed Nd:YAG system. The theoretical model was based on the coupled Kirchhoff integrals and solved numerically. Agreement between theory and experiments indicates that this kind of resonator provides high focusability and maximum extraction efficiency simultaneously, even with low-gain media. This enables one to apply unstable resonators to solid-state lasers with low small-signal gain, like alexandrite or CW-pumped Nd:YAG.

  7. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-01-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density. PMID:28186135

  8. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  9. a Survey of Giant Resonance Excitations with 200 Mev Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, James Royce

    The giant resonance region in ('60)Ni, ('90)Zr, ('120)Sn, and ('208)Pb has been studied using inelastic scattering of 200 MeV protons. Angular distributions were obtained for the giant quadrupole resonance, giant octupole resonance, and for the combined giant dipole and giant monopole resonance between 4 and 20 degrees. The 2(H/2PI)(omega) component of the giant hexadecapole resonance has been directly observed for the first time in ('208)Pb. In the other nuclei, upper limits on the amount of hexadecapole strength contained within the giant quadrupole resonance have been obtained. Peaks are observed in ('60)Ni and ('90)Zr that are consistent with recently reported M1 states. Discrepancies between sum rules extracted from this data and from previous work are discussed. Possible explanations include DWBA breakdown or difficulties in estimating the magnitude of the continuum. Systematics obtained for the giant resonances are compared to earlier work.

  10. Detection of kestoses and kestose-related oligosaccharides in extracts of Festuca arundinacea, Dactylis glomerate L. , and Asparagus officinalis L. root cultures and invertase by sup 13 C and sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, K.L.; Feather, M.S.; Gracz, H.; Wong, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Previous studies show that {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to detect and identify mixtures of 1-kestose and neokestose after conversion to the acetate derivatives. In this study, unequivocal assignments are made for the anomeric carbon and proton signals for the above two trisaccharide acetates as well as for 6-kestose hendecaacetate and for nystose tetradecaacetate (a 1-kestose-derived tetrasaccharide). A number of oligosaccharide fractions were isolated from several plant species, converted to the acetates, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra obtained. Using the above reference data, the following information was obtained. The trisaccharide fraction from Dactylis gomerata L. stem tissue and Asparagus officinalis L. roots contain both 1-kestose and neokestose, and the tetrasaccharide fractions contain three components, one of which is nystose. Penta- and hexasaccharide acetates were also isolated from A. officinalis L. roots and were found to contain, respectively, four and at least five components. All components of both of the above species appear to contain a kestose residue and to be produced by the sequential addition of fructofuranosyl units to these. The trisaccharide fraction from Festuca arundinacea is complex, and contains at least five different components, two of which appear to be 1-kestose and neokestose.

  11. Neutron resonance averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  12. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  13. Resonant cortical dynamics of speech perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossberg, Stephen

    2003-04-01

    What is the neural representation of a speech code as it evolves in time? How do listeners integrate temporally distributed phonemic information into coherent representations of syllables and words? How does the brain extract invariant properties of variable-rate speech? This talk describes a neural model that suggests answers to these questions, while quantitatively simulating speech and word recognition data. The conscious speech and word recognition code is suggested to be a resonant wave, and a percept of silence a temporal discontinuity in the rate that resonance evolves. A resonant wave emerges when sequential activation and storage of phonemic items in working memory provides bottom-up input to list chunks that group together sequences of items of variable length. The list chunks compete and winning chunks activate top-down expectations that amplify and focus attention on consistent working memory items, while suppressing inconsistent ones. The ensuing resonance boosts activation levels of selected items and chunks. Because resonance occurs after working memory activation, it can incorporate information presented after intervening silence intervals, so future sounds can influence how we hear past sounds. The model suggests that resonant dynamics enable the brain to learn quickly without suffering catastrophic forgetting, as described within Adaptive Resonance Theory.

  14. MARS Tracking Simulations for the Mu2e Slow Extracted Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Rakhno, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Particle tracking taking into account interactions with fields and materials is necessary for proper evaluation of the resonant extraction losses and geometry optimization for the extraction beam line. This paper describes the tracking simulations for the Mu2e Resonant Extraction and discusses the geometry choices made based on these simulations.

  15. The Electric Giant Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Woude, A.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Experimental Methods to Study Giant Resonances * Introduction * The Tools * Introduction * Tools for Isoscalar Scattering * INELASTIC α-SCATTERING * INELASTIC PROTON SCATTERING * Tools for Isovector Excitations * γ-ABSORPTION AND PARTICLE CAPTURE REACTIONS * CHARGE EXCHANGE REACTIONS - THE (π+, π0) REACTION * Tools For Isoscalar And Isovector Excitations * INELASTIC ELECTRON SCATTERING * GIANT RESONANCE EXCITATION BY FAST HEAVY IONS * From Multipole Cross Section To Multipole Strength * The Electric Isoscalar Resonances * The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance * Systematics on the GMR * Compressibility and the Giant Monopole Resonance * Introduction * The Compressibility of nuclear matter from the GMR energies * Discussion * The Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance * General Trends In Medium-Heavy and Heavy Nuclei * The GQR In Light Nuclei * The Isoscalar 3- Strength, LEOR and HEOR * Isoscalar 4+ Strength * Miscellaneous; Isoscalar 1- and L > 4-Strength * The Electric Isovector Giant Resonances * The Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance: GDR * The Isovector Giant Monopole Resonances: IVGMR * The Isovector Quadrupole Resonance: IVGQR * The Effect of Ground State Deformation on the Shape of Giant Resonance: Microscopic Picture * Giant Resonances Built on Excited States * Introduction * Capture Reactions on Light Nuclei * Statistical decay of GDR γ Emission in Heavy Compound Systems * Introduction * Theoretical Predictions * Some Experimental Results * Summary and Outlook * Acknowledgements * General References * References

  16. A combination strategy for extraction and isolation of multi-component natural products by systematic two-phase solvent extraction-(13)C nuclear magnetic resonance pattern recognition and following conical counter-current chromatography separation: Podophyllotoxins and flavonoids from Dysosma versipellis (Hance) as examples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Wu, Youqian; Wu, Shihua

    2016-01-29

    Despite of substantial developments of extraction and separation techniques, isolation of natural products from natural resources is still a challenging task. In this work, an efficient strategy for extraction and isolation of multi-component natural products has been successfully developed by combination of systematic two-phase liquid-liquid extraction-(13)C NMR pattern recognition and following conical counter-current chromatography separation. A small-scale crude sample was first distributed into 9 systematic hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (HEMWat) two-phase solvent systems for determination of the optimum extraction solvents and partition coefficients of the prominent components. Then, the optimized solvent systems were used in succession to enrich the hydrophilic and lipophilic components from the large-scale crude sample. At last, the enriched components samples were further purified by a new conical counter-current chromatography (CCC). Due to the use of (13)C NMR pattern recognition, the kinds and structures of major components in the solvent extracts could be predicted. Therefore, the method could collect simultaneously the partition coefficients and the structural information of components in the selected two-phase solvents. As an example, a cytotoxic extract of podophyllotoxins and flavonoids from Dysosma versipellis (Hance) was selected. After the systematic HEMWat system solvent extraction and (13)C NMR pattern recognition analyses, the crude extract of D. versipellis was first degreased by the upper phase of HEMWat system (9:1:9:1, v/v), and then distributed in the two phases of the system of HEMWat (2:8:2:8, v/v) to obtain the hydrophilic lower phase extract and lipophilic upper phase extract, respectively. These extracts were further separated by conical CCC with the HEMWat systems (1:9:1:9 and 4:6:4:6, v/v). As results, total 17 cytotoxic compounds were isolated and identified. In general, whole results suggested that the strategy was very

  17. Analysis and calibration techniques for superconducting resonators.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Wollack, Edward J; Barrentine, Emily M; Brown, Ari D; Moseley, S Harvey; U-Yen, Kongpop

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed and experimentally explored for in-situ calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response is analyzed in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microstrip and coplanar-waveguide resonator devices were investigated and a recovery within 1% of the observed complex transmission amplitude was achieved with both analysis approaches. The experimental configuration used in microwave characterization of the devices and self-consistent constraints for the electromagnetic constitutive relations for parameter extraction are also presented.

  18. The spherical birdcage resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpen, Michael D.

    A description of the operation of a spherical resonator capable of producing a uniform magnetic induction throughout a spherical volume is presented. Simple closed-form expressions for the spectrum of resonant frequencies are derived for both the low-pass and the high-pass configuration of the resonator and are shown to compare favorably with observation in an experimental coil system. It is shown that the spherical resonator produces a uniform spherical field of view when used as a magnetic resonance imaging radiofrequency coil.

  19. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  20. Optical Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Paul; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad; Pardo, Fabrice

    2014-08-01

    Helmholtz resonators are widely used acoustic components able to select a single frequency. Here, based on an analogy between acoustics and electromagnetism wave equations, we present an electromagnetic 2D Helmholtz resonator made of a metallic slit-box structure. At the resonance, the light is funneled in the λ/800 apertures, and is subsequently absorbed in the cavity. As in acoustics, there is no higher order of resonance, which is an appealing feature for applications such as photodetection or thermal emission. Eventually, we demonstrate that the slit is of capacitive nature while the box behaves inductively. We derive an analytical formula for the resonance wavelength, which does not rely on wave propagation and therefore does not depend on the permittivity of the material filling the box. Besides, in contrast with half-wavelength resonators, the resonance wavelength can be engineered by both the slit aspect ratio and the box area.

  1. Resonance splitting in gyrotropic ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Jalas, Dirk; Petrov, Alexander; Krause, Michael; Hampe, Jan; Eich, Manfred

    2010-10-15

    We present the theoretical concept of an optical isolator based on resonance splitting in a silicon ring resonator covered with a magneto-optical polymer cladding. For this task, a perturbation method is derived for the modes in the cylindrical coordinate system. A polymer magneto-optical cladding causing a 0.01 amplitude of the off-diagonal element of the dielectric tensor is assumed. It is shown that the derived resonance splitting of the clockwise and counterclockwise modes increases for smaller ring radii. For the ring with a radius of approximately 1.5μm, a 29GHz splitting is demonstrated. An integrated optical isolator with a 10μm geometrical footprint is proposed based on a critically coupled ring resonator.

  2. Highlights of Resonance Measurements With HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epple, Eliane

    2015-06-01

    This contribution aims to give a basic overview of the latest results regarding the production of resonances in different collision systems. The results were extracted from experimental data collected with HADES that is a multipurpose detector located at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt. The main points discussed here are: the properties of the strange resonances Λ(1405) and Σ(1385), the role of Δ's as a source of pions in the final state, the production dynamics reflected in form of differential cross sections, and the role of the ϕ meson as a source for K- particles.

  3. Phase I ResonantSonic CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Richterich, L.R.; Amos, L.O.; Fancher, J.D.; McLellan, G.W.; Setzer, W.V.; Tuttle, B.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Ferris, R.H.; Riechers, D.M.; Pitman, S.G.

    1994-03-28

    This test report describes the Phase 1 testing and results of the ResonantSonic drilling method. This effort was conducted as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the US Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Westinghouse Hanford Company and Water Development Corporation. The purpose of this demonstration was to evaluate the Water Development Corporation`s ResonantSonic drilling system, modify components as necessary and determine compatible drilling applications for the ResonantSonic drilling method for use at facilities in the DOE complex and private industry. Initially, the ResonantSonic drill was used to drill several test holes at the Drilling Technology Test Site to assess the feasibility of drilling vertical and angle holes. After this initial phase, a 45 degree angle vapor extraction well was drilled to a depth of 168 feet at the 200 West Carbon Tetrachloride Site. This well was drilled and completed in nine days. Extensive geologic and vapor sampling were conducted while drilling this well. In addition, testing was also conducted at the test site to evaluated drilling with larger diameter casing (8 5/8 inch). Evaluation of the Resonant Sonic drilling method will be continued during the Phase 2 portion of testing to determine if improvements to the ResonantSonic system will make it a more viable method for drilling and sampling.

  4. Noise-hidden signal recovery via stochastic resonance in the SOI waveguide resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Heng; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan; Wang, Zhaolu; Han, Jing; Li, Shaopeng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a method to recover weak pulse signals buried in noise via stochastic resonance (SR) based on optical bistability induced by the free-carrier dispersion effect in the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide resonator. The bistable system threshold is determined by the resonator parameters including the waveguide length, mirror reflectivity, and the free-carrier lifetime. A signal with different power levels can be detected by changing the free-carrier lifetime using a reverse-biased p-i-n junction embedded in the SOI waveguide. The influence of the system parameters on the SR is quantitatively analyzed by calculating the cross-correlation coefficient between the input and output signals. A cross-correlation gain of 5.6 is obtained by optimizing the system parameters of the SOI waveguide resonator. The results show the potential of using this structure to reconstruct and extract weak signals in all-optical integrated systems.

  5. Large mode radius resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Resonator configurations permitting operation with large mode radius while maintaining good transverse mode discrimination are considered. Stable resonators incorporating an intracavity telescope and unstable resonator geometries utilizing an output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile are shown to enable large radius single mode laser operation. Results of heterodyne studies of pulsed CO2 lasers with large (11mm e sup-2 radius) fundamental mode sizes are presented demonstrating minimal frequency sweeping in accordance with the theory of laser-induced medium perturbations.

  6. Dynamical coupled-channels model of meson photo- and electroproduction in the nucleon resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.

    2007-12-01

    A dynamical approach of the meson production reaction for extracting nucleon resonance parameters has been developed. We report on the γ N Δ form factors extracted from the recent pion electroproduction data and the coupled-channels model of π N scattering up to W ≤ 2 GeV. An analysis of the resonance poles extracted using the speed-plot and time-delay methods is briefly discussed.

  7. On open electromagnetic resonators: relation between interferometers and resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Manenkov, Aleksandr A; Bykov, Vladimir P; Kuleshov, N V

    2010-05-26

    The physical difference between the concepts 'Fabry-Perot interferometer' and 'open resonator' is discussed. It is shown that the use of the term 'Fabry-Perot resonator' for open laser resonators is incorrect both from the historical viewpoint and from the viewpoint of the physical meaning of the processes occurring in these resonators. (laser beams and resonators)

  8. Fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth E.

    1999-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  9. Radiative decays of resonances on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Agadjanov, Andria; Bernard, Véronique; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2016-01-22

    We discuss a generalization of the Lüscher approach to the calculation of the matrix elements of the unstable states. A theoretical framework for the lattice extraction of the ΔNγ* transition form factors is formulated. The procedure to measure the form factors at the resonance pole is given. The current theoretical progress on the B → K*γ* decays is briefly summarized.

  10. Missing baryonic resonances in the Hagedorn spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man Lo, Pok; Marczenko, Michał; Redlich, Krzysztof; Sasaki, Chihiro

    2016-08-01

    The hadronic medium of QCD is modeled as a gas of point-like hadrons, with its composition determined by the Hagedorn mass spectrum. The spectrum consists of a discrete and a continuous part. The former is determined by the experimentally confirmed resonances tabulated by the Particle Data Group (PDG), while the latter can be extracted from the existing lattice data. This formulation of the hadron resonance gas (HRG) provides a transparent framework to relate the fluctuation of conserved charges as calculated in the lattice QCD approach to the particle content of the medium. A comparison of the two approaches shows that the equation of state is well described by the standard HRG model, which includes only a discrete spectrum of known hadrons. The corresponding description in the strange sector, however, shows clear discrepancies, thus a continuous spectrum is added to incorporate the effect of missing resonances. We propose a method to extract the strange-baryon spectrum from the lattice data. The result is consistent with the trend set by the unconfirmed strange baryons resonances listed by the PDG, suggesting that most of the missing interaction strength for the strange baryons reside in the | S| = 1 sector. This scenario is also supported by recent lattice calculations, and might be important in the energy region covered by the NICA accelerator in Dubna, where in the heavy-ion collisions, baryons are the dominating degrees of freedom in the final state.

  11. The resonator handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jerry D.; Zhou, Shiliang

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to extend resonator theory into the region in which the planar mirror is quite small. Results of the theoretical description are then extended to resonator design and experimental arrangements as discussed in further sections of this work. Finally, a discussion of dielectric measurements for small samples is included as a specific application of this work.

  12. The Concept of Resonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2007-01-01

    A general example of a delocalization system associated with a higher energy than the localized one, which suggests that it is wrong to consider delocalization as equivalent to resonance stabilization, is presented. The meaning of resonance energy as it appears in valence bond theory is described as the lowering of the calculated ground-state…

  13. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOEpatents

    Lai, J.S.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Chen, D.; Scudiere, M.B.; Ott, G.W. Jr.; White, C.P.; McKeever, J.W.

    1997-06-24

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 14 figs.

  14. Monolithic MACS micro resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann-Horn, J. A.; Jacquinot, J.-F.; Ginefri, J. C.; Bonhomme, C.; Sakellariou, D.

    2016-10-01

    Magic Angle Coil Spinning (MACS) aids improving the intrinsically low NMR sensitivity of heterogeneous microscopic samples. We report on the design and testing of a new type of monolithic 2D MACS resonators to overcome known limitations of conventional micro coils. The resonators' conductors were printed on dielectric substrate and tuned without utilizing lumped element capacitors. Self-resonance conditions have been computed by a hybrid FEM-MoM technique. Preliminary results reported here indicate robust mechanical stability, reduced eddy currents heating and negligible susceptibility effects. The gain in B1 /√{ P } is in agreement with the NMR sensitivity enhancement according to the principle of reciprocity. A sensitivity enhancement larger than 3 has been achieved in a monolithic micro resonator inside a standard 4 mm rotor at 500 MHz. These 2D resonators could offer higher performance micro-detection and ease of use of heterogeneous microscopic substances such as biomedical samples, microscopic specimens and thin film materials.

  15. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Chen, Daoshen; Scudiere, Matthew B.; Ott, Jr., George W.; White, Clifford P.; McKeever, John W.

    1997-01-01

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  16. Spin-orbit ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    In conventional magnetic resonance techniques the magnitude and direction of the oscillatory magnetic field are (at least approximately) known. This oscillatory field is used to probe the properties of a spin ensemble. Here, I will describe experiments that do the inverse. I will discuss how we use a magnetic resonance technique to map out the current-induced effective magnetic fields in the ferromagnetic semiconductors (Ga,Mn)As and (Ga,Mn)(As,P). These current-induced fields have their origin in the spin-orbit interaction. Effective magnetic fields are observed with symmetries which resemble the Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit interactions and which depend on the diagonal and off-diagonal strain respectively. Ferromagnetic semiconductor materials of different strains, annealing conditions and concentrations are studied and the results compared with theoretical calculations. Our original study measured the rectification voltage coming from the product of the oscillatory magnetoresistance, during magnetisation precession, and the alternating current. More recently we have developed an impedance matching technique which enables us to extract microwave voltages from these high resistance (10 k Ω) samples. In this way we measure the microwave voltage coming from the product of the oscillating magneto-resistance and a direct current. The direct current is observed to affect the magnetisation precession, indicating that anti-damping as well as field-like torques can originate from the spin-orbit interaction.

  17. High-Frequency Resonance in the Gerbil Medial Superior Olive

    PubMed Central

    Mikiel-Hunter, Jason; Kotak, Vibhakar; Rinzel, John

    2016-01-01

    A high-frequency, subthreshold resonance in the guinea pig medial superior olive (MSO) was recently linked to the efficient extraction of spatial cues from the fine structure of acoustic stimuli. We report here that MSO neurons in gerbil also have resonant properties and, based on our whole-cell recordings and computational modeling, that a low-voltage-gated potassium current, IKLT, underlies the resonance. We show that resonance was lost following dynamic clamp replacement of IKLT with a leak conductance and in the model when voltage-gating of IKLT was suppressed. Resonance was characterized using small amplitude sinusoidal stimuli to generate impedance curves as typically done for linear systems analysis. Extending our study into the nonlinear, voltage-dependent regime, we increased stimulus amplitude and found, experimentally and in simulations, that the subthreshold resonant frequency (242Hz for weak stimuli) increased continuously to the resonant frequency for spiking (285Hz). The spike resonance of these phasic-firing (type III excitable) MSO neurons and of the model is of particular interest also because previous studies of resonance typically involved neurons/models (type II excitable, such as the standard Hodgkin-Huxley model) that can fire tonically for steady inputs. To probe more directly how these resonances relate to MSO neurons as slope-detectors, we presented periodic trains of brief, fast-rising excitatory post-synaptic potentials (EPSCs) to the model. While weak subthreshold EPSC trains were essentially low-pass filtered, resonance emerged as EPSC amplitude increased. Interestingly, for spike-evoking EPSC trains, the threshold amplitude at spike resonant frequency (317Hz) was lower than the single ESPC threshold. Our finding of a frequency-dependent threshold for repetitive brief EPSC stimuli and preferred frequency for spiking calls for further consideration of both subthreshold and suprathreshold resonance to fast and precise temporal processing

  18. Extractant composition

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    An organic extracting solution useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form. The extracting solution consists of a primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

  19. LABCOM resonator Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Keres, L.J.

    1990-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop quartz crystal resonator designs, production processes, and test capabilities for 5-MHz, 6.2-MHz, and 10-MHz resonators for Tactical Miniature Crystal Oscillator (TMXO) applications. GE Neutron Devices (GEND) established and demonstrated the capability to produce and test quartz crystal resonators for use in the TMXO developed by the US Army ERADCOM (now LABCOM). The goals in this project were based on the ERADCOM statement of work. The scope of work indicated that the resonator production facilities for this project would not be completely independent, but that they would be supported in part by equipment and processes in place at GEND used in US Department of Energy (DOE) work. In addition, provisions for production test equipment or or eventual technology transfer costs to a commercial supplier were clearly excluded from the scope of work. The demonstrated technical capability of the deep-etched blank design is feasible and practical. It can be manufactured in quantity with reasonable yield, and its performance is readily predictable. The ceramic flatpack is a very strong package with excellent hermeticity. The four-point mount supports the crystal to reasonable shock levels and does not perturb the resonator's natural frequency-temperature behavior. The package can be sealed with excellent yields. The high-temperature, high-vacuum processing developed for the TMXO resonator, including bonding the piezoid to its mount with conductive polyimide adhesive, is consistent with precision resonator fabrication. 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  20. Spin Resonance Strength Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courant, E. D.

    2009-08-01

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  1. Resonances in UH

    SciTech Connect

    Badalyan, A.M.; Belova, T.I.; Konyukhova, N.B.; Efros, V.D.

    1985-06-01

    Resonances in UH are calculated using a microscopic approach with only central NN potentials. It is shown that there are broad resonances in the channels with S=1 and 0. P-wave resonances in UH are found at E/sub R/A 4.7-i2.7 MeV (S=1) and E/sub R/approx. = 6.4-i3.7 MeV (S=0) where the energy E is measured from the two-particle t + n threshold.

  2. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  3. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex K [Kensington, CA; Jensen, Kenneth J [Berkeley, CA; Girit, Caglar [Albany, CA; Mickelson, William E [San Francisco, CA; Grossman, Jeffrey C [Berkeley, CA

    2011-03-29

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  4. Extractable resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The use of information from space systems in the operation of extractive industries, particularly in exploration for mineral and fuel resources was reviewed. Conclusions and recommendations reported are based on the fundamental premise that survival of modern industrial society requires a continuing secure flow of resources for energy, construction and manufacturing, and for use as plant foods.

  5. Dynamic Nuclear Spin Resonance in n-GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Reuter, D.; Wieck, A. D.; Bacher, G.

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance is studied in n-GaAs via time-resolved Kerr rotation using an on-chip microcoil for rf field generation. Both optically allowed and optically forbidden NMR are observed with a dynamics controlled by the interplay between dynamic nuclear polarization via hyperfine interaction with optically generated spin-polarized electrons and nuclear spin depolarization due to magnetic resonance absorption. Comparing the characteristic nuclear spin relaxation rate obtained in experiment with master equation simulations, the underlying nuclear spin depolarization mechanism for each resonance is extracted.

  6. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert

    1991-01-01

    A resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method provides a unique characterization of an object for use in distinguishing similar objects having physical differences greater than a predetermined tolerance. A resonant response spectrum is obtained for a reference object by placing excitation and detection transducers at any accessible location on the object. The spectrum is analyzed to determine the number of resonant response peaks in a predetermined frequency interval. The distribution of the resonance frequencies is then characterized in a manner effective to form a unique signature of the object. In one characterization, a small frequency interval is defined and stepped though the spectrum frequency range. Subsequent objects are similarly characterized where the characterizations serve as signatures effective to distinguish objects that differ from the reference object by more than the predetermined tolerance.

  7. Electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Goennenwein, S. T. B.; Schink, S. W.; Brandlmaier, A.; Boger, A.; Opel, M.; Gross, R.; Keizer, R. S.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Gupta, A.; Huebl, H.; Bihler, C.; Brandt, M. S.

    2007-04-16

    We study the magnetoresistance properties of thin ferromagnetic CrO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films under microwave irradiation. Both the sheet resistance {rho} and the Hall voltage V{sub Hall} characteristically change when a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) occurs in the film. The electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance (EDFMR) signals closely match the conventional FMR, measured simultaneously, in both resonance fields and line shapes. The sign and the magnitude of the resonant changes {delta}{rho}/{rho} and {delta}V{sub Hall}/V{sub Hall} can be consistently described in terms of a Joule heating effect. Bolometric EDFMR thus is a powerful tool for the investigation of magnetic anisotropy and magnetoresistive phenomena in ferromagnetic micro- or nanostructures.

  8. Micro-machined resonator

    DOEpatents

    Godshall, N.A.; Koehler, D.R.; Liang, A.Y.; Smith, B.K.

    1993-03-30

    A micro-machined resonator, typically quartz, with upper and lower micro-machinable support members, or covers, having etched wells which may be lined with conductive electrode material, between the support members is a quartz resonator having an energy trapping quartz mesa capacitively coupled to the electrode through a diaphragm; the quartz resonator is supported by either micro-machined cantilever springs or by thin layers extending over the surfaces of the support. If the diaphragm is rigid, clock applications are available, and if the diaphragm is resilient, then transducer applications can be achieved. Either the thin support layers or the conductive electrode material can be integral with the diaphragm. In any event, the covers are bonded to form a hermetic seal and the interior volume may be filled with a gas or may be evacuated. In addition, one or both of the covers may include oscillator and interface circuitry for the resonator.

  9. Micro-machined resonator

    DOEpatents

    Godshall, Ned A.; Koehler, Dale R.; Liang, Alan Y.; Smith, Bradley K.

    1993-01-01

    A micro-machined resonator, typically quartz, with upper and lower micro-machinable support members, or covers, having etched wells which may be lined with conductive electrode material, between the support members is a quartz resonator having an energy trapping quartz mesa capacitively coupled to the electrode through a diaphragm; the quartz resonator is supported by either micro-machined cantilever springs or by thin layers extending over the surfaces of the support. If the diaphragm is rigid, clock applications are available, and if the diaphragm is resilient, then transducer applications can be achieved. Either the thin support layers or the conductive electrode material can be integral with the diaphragm. In any event, the covers are bonded to form a hermetic seal and the interior volume may be filled with a gas or may be evacuated. In addition, one or both of the covers may include oscillator and interface circuitry for the resonator.

  10. Resonances in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Matthias F. M.; Lange, Jens Sören; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B.; Metag, Volker; Nakano, Takashi; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015 (Fig.~1). A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions; what is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD?; where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers?; and what experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus.This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  11. Triple-resonant transducers.

    PubMed

    Butler, Stephen C

    2012-06-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of two novel multiple-resonant transducers which produce a wider transmit response than that of a conventional Tonpilz-type transducer. These multi-resonant transducers are Tonpilz-type longitudinal vibrators that produce three coupled resonances and are referred to as triple-resonant transducers (TRTs). One of these designs is a mechanical series arrangement of a tail mass, piezoelectric ceramic stack, central mass, compliant spring, second central mass, second compliant spring, and a piston-radiating head mass. The other TRT design is a mechanical series arrangement of a tail mass, piezoelectric ceramic stack, central mass, compliant spring, and head mass with a quarter-wave matching layer of poly(methyl methacrylate) on the head mass. Several prototype transducer element designs were fabricated that demonstrated proof-of-concept.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-02-07

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor.

  13. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively .+-.60.degree. away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency.

  14. Injector with integrated resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; York, William David; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2014-07-29

    The system may include a turbine engine. The turbine engine may include a fuel nozzle. The fuel nozzle may include an air path. The fuel nozzle may also include a fuel path such that the fuel nozzle is in communication with a combustion zone of the turbine engine. Furthermore, the fuel nozzle may include a resonator. The resonator may be disposed in the fuel nozzle directly adjacent to the combustion zone.

  15. Resonant dielectric metamaterials

    DOEpatents

    Loui, Hung; Carroll, James; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-12-02

    A resonant dielectric metamaterial comprises a first and a second set of dielectric scattering particles (e.g., spheres) having different permittivities arranged in a cubic array. The array can be an ordered or randomized array of particles. The resonant dielectric metamaterials are low-loss 3D isotropic materials with negative permittivity and permeability. Such isotropic double negative materials offer polarization and direction independent electromagnetic wave propagation.

  16. Cylindrical laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Casperson, Lee W.

    1976-02-24

    The properties of an improved class of lasers is presented. In one configuration of these lasers the radiation propagates radially within the amplifying medium, resulting in high fields and symmetric illumination at the resonator axis. Thus there is a strong focusing of energy at the axis of the resonator. In a second configuration the radiation propagates back and forth in a tubular region of space.

  17. Resonant nonlinear ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Paul A.; TenCate, James A.; Guyer, Robert A.; Van Den Abeele, Koen E. A.

    2001-01-01

    Components with defects are identified from the response to strains applied at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies. The relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0.vertline., is determined as a function of applied strain amplitude for an acceptable component, where .function..sub.0 is the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak of a selected mode to determine a reference relationship. Then, the relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0 is determined as a function of applied strain for a component under test, where fo .function..sub.0 the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak to determine a quality test relationship. The reference relationship is compared with the quality test relationship to determine the presence of defects in the component under test.

  18. Fano resonances in prism-coupled multimode square micropillar resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Tong; Zhou, Linjie; Poon, Andrew W.

    2005-06-01

    We report Fano resonances in a multimode square glass micropillar resonator; the resonances were obtained by using angle-resolved prism coupling. Our experiments reveal characteristically asymmetric line shapes of high-Q resonances and of detuned low-Q resonances in multimode reflection spectra. The asymmetric resonance line shapes evolve for an approximately pi phase within a 0.5° range of reflection angles. We model our observed asymmetric multimode resonances by the far-field interference between a light wave that is evanescently coupled with a high-Q mode orbit and a coherent light wave that is refractively coupled with a detuned low-Q mode orbit.

  19. Extracting excited mesons from the finite volume

    SciTech Connect

    Doring, Michael

    2014-12-01

    As quark masses come closer to their physical values in lattice simulations, finite volume effects dominate the level spectrum. Methods to extract excited mesons from the finite volume are discussed, like moving frames in the presence of coupled channels. Effective field theory can be used to stabilize the determination of the resonance spectrum.

  20. URANIUM EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, C.D.; Opie, J.V.

    1958-07-01

    The recovery of uranium values from uranium ore such as pitchblende is described. The ore is first dissolved in nitric acid, and a water soluble nitrate is added as a salting out agent. The resulting feed solution is then contacted with diethyl ether, whereby the bulk of the uranyl nitrate and a portion of the impurities are taken up by the ether. This acid ether extract is then separated from the aqueous raffinate, and contacted with water causing back extractioa of the uranyl nitrate and impurities into the water to form a crude liquor. After separation from the ether extract, this crude liquor is heated to about 118 deg C to obtain molten uranyl nitrate hexahydratc. After being slightly cooled the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate is contacted with acid free diethyl ether whereby the bulk of the uranyl nitrate is dissolved into the ethcr to form a neutral ether solution while most of the impurities remain in the aqueous waste. After separation from the aqueous waste, the resultant ether solution is washed with about l0% of its volume of water to free it of any dissolved impurities and is then contacted with at least one half its volume of water whereby the uranyl nitrate is extracted into the water to form an aqueous product solution.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is highly sensitive for lipid-soluble metabolites.

    PubMed

    Dai, Haiyang; Hong, Bikai; Xu, Zhifeng; Ma, Lian; Chen, Yaowen; Xiao, Yeyu; Wu, Renhua

    2013-08-05

    Although the water-soluble metabolite profile of human mesenchymal stem cells is known, the lipid profile still needs further investigation. In this study, methanol-chloroform was used to extract pid-soluble metabolites and perchloric acid was used to extract water-soluble metabolites. Furthermore, a dual phase extraction method using methanol-chloroform and water was used to obtain both water and lipid fractions simultaneously. All metabolite extractions were analyzed on a 9.4T high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. Metabolite resonance peaks were assigned in the acquired spectra according to the chemical shift, and the extraction efficiency of ferent methods was compared. Results showed that in the spectra of water-soluble extracts, major metabolites comprised low molecular weight metabolites, including lactate, acetic acid, fatty acids, threonine, glutamic acid, creatine, choline and its derivatives, while in the spectra of lipid-soluble extracts, most metabolites were assigned to fatty acids. Among the different extraction procedures, perchloric acid was more efficient in extracting water-soluble metabolites and methanol-chloroform was efficient in extracting organic components compared with the dual phase extraction method. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that as low as 0.7 mg organic yield was enough to obtain clear resonance peaks, while about 6.0 mg water-soluble yield was needed to obtain relatively favorable spectral lines. These results show that the efficiency of extracting water and lipid fractions is higher using perchloric acid and methanol-chloroform compared with dual phase extraction and that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is highly sensitive for analyzing lipid-soluble extracts.

  2. Capture probabilities for secondary resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malhotra, Renu

    1990-01-01

    A perturbed pendulum model is used to analyze secondary resonances, and it is shown that a self-similarity between secondary and primary resonances exists. Henrard's (1982) theory is used to obtain formulas for the capture probability into secondary resonances. The tidal evolution of Miranda and Umbriel is considered as an example, and significant probabilities of capture into secondary resonances are found.

  3. Materials for Bulk Acoustic Resonators and Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebl, Hans-Peter

    2003-03-01

    Highly selective solidly mounted bulk acoustic wave (BAW) band pass filters are suited for mobile and wireless systems in the GHz frequency range between 0.8 and 10 GHz. Electro-acoustic thin film BAW resonators are the building blocks these BAW filters. Piezoelectric materials used in these resonators include mainly AlN or ZnO which can be deposited by dedicated thin film sputter deposition techniques. Using these piezo-electric materials and using suited materials for the acoustic Bragg reflector, BAW resonators with high quality factors can be fabricated. The achievable filter bandwidth is approximately 4Alternatively, also ferroelectric thin films might be used to achieve higher coupling coefficient and thus filter bandwidth. BAW resonators and filters have been designed and fabricated on 6" Silicon and glass wafers. Results are presented for resonators and filters operating between 1.95 and 8 GHz. The talk will give an overview of the material aspects which are important for BAW devices. It will be shown that modeling of the resonator and filter response using 1D electro-acoustic simulation (1,2) which includes losses is essential to extract acoustic and electrical material parameters. (1) Solidly Mounted Bulk Acoustic Wave Filters for the Ghz Frequency Range, H.P. Loebl, C. Metzmacher , D.N.Peligrad , R. Mauczok , M. Klee , W. Brand , R.F. Milsom , P.Lok , F.van Straten , A. Tuinhout , J.W.Lobeek, IEEE 2002 Ultrasonics Symposium Munich, October 2002. (2) Combined Acoustic-Electromagnetic Simulation Of Thin-Film Bulk Acoustic Wave Filters, R.F. Milsom, H-P. Löbl, D.N. Peligrad, J-W. Lobeek, A. Tuinhout, R. H. ten Dolle IEEE 2002 Ultrasonics Symposium Munich, October 2002.

  4. RESONANT CLUMPING AND SUBSTRUCTURE IN GALACTIC DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, Matthew; Smith, Martin C.; Shen, Juntai; Evans, N. Wyn E-mail: msmith@shao.ac.cn E-mail: nwe@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2015-05-10

    We describe a method to extract resonant orbits from N-body simulations, exploiting the fact that they close in frames rotating with a constant pattern speed. Our method is applied to the N-body simulation of the Milky Way by Shen et al. This simulation hosts a massive bar, which drives strong resonances and persistent angular momentum exchange. Resonant orbits are found throughout the disk, both close to the bar and out to the very edges of the disk. Using Fourier spectrograms, we demonstrate that the bar is driving kinematic substructure even in the very outer parts of the disk. We identify two major orbit families in the outskirts of the disk, one of which makes significant contributions to the kinematic landscape, namely, the m:l = 3:−2 family, resonating with the bar. A mechanism is described that produces bimodal distributions of Galactocentric radial velocities at selected azimuths in the outer disk. It occurs as a result of the temporal coherence of particles on the 3:−2 resonant orbits, which causes them to arrive simultaneously at pericenter or apocenter. This resonant clumping, due to the in-phase motion of the particles through their epicycle, leads to both inward and outward moving groups that belong to the same orbital family and consequently produce bimodal radial velocity distributions. This is a possible explanation of the bimodal velocity distributions observed toward the Galactic anticenter by Liu et al. Another consequence is that transient overdensities appear and dissipate (in a symmetric fashion), resulting in a periodic pulsing of the disk’s surface density.

  5. Resonance frequency in ferromagnetic superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Rong-ke; Huang, An-dong; Li, Da; Zhang, Zhi-dong

    2011-10-01

    The resonance frequency in two-layer and three-layer ferromagnetic superlattices is studied, using the Callen's Green function method, the Tyablikov decoupling approximation and the Anderson-Callen decoupling approximation. The effects of interlayer exchange coupling, anisotropy, external magnetic field and temperature on the resonance frequency are investigated. It is found that the resonance frequencies increase with increasing external magnetic field. In a parameter region of the asymmetric system, each sublayer corresponds to its own resonance frequency. The anisotropy of a sublayer affects only the resonance frequency corresponding to this sublayer. The stronger the anisotropy, the higher is the resonance frequency. The interlayer exchange coupling affects only the resonance frequencies belonging to the sublayers connected by it. The stronger the interlayer exchange coupling, the higher are the resonance frequencies. All the resonance frequencies decrease as the reduced temperature increases. The results direct the method to enhance and adjust the resonance frequency of magnetic multilayered materials with a wide band.

  6. Not-so-resonant, resonant absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunel, F.

    1987-07-01

    When an intense electromagnetic wave is incident obliquely on a sharply bounded overdense plasma, strong energy absorption can be accounted for by the electrons that are dragged into the vacuum and sent back into the plasma with velocities v~=vosc. This mechanism is more efficient than usual resonant absorption for vosc/ω>L, with L being the density gradient length. In the very high-intensity CO2-laser-target interaction, this mechanism may account for most of the energy absorption.

  7. Contrasting Extraction Types.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postal, Paul M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper grounds a novel typology yielding three major types of English (L(eft)-extraction, defined by their relationship to resumptive pronouns (RPs): (1) B-extractions, which require RPs in their extraction sites, (2) A1-extractions, which allow RPs in their extraction sites, and (3) A2-extractions, which forbid RPs in their extraction sites.…

  8. Hyperbolic resonances of metasurface cavities.

    PubMed

    Keene, D; Durach, M

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new class of optical resonator structures featuring one or two metasurface reflectors or metacavities and predict that such resonators support novel hyperbolic resonances. As an example of such resonances we introduce hyperbolic Tamm plasmons (HTPs) and hyperbolic Fabry-Perot resonances (HFPs). The hyperbolic optical modes feature low-loss incident power re-distribution over TM and TE polarization output channels, clover-leaf anisotropic dispersion, and other unique properties which are tunable and are useful for multiple applications.

  9. Unfolding the Second Riemann sheet with Pade Approximants: hunting resonance poles

    SciTech Connect

    Masjuan, Pere

    2011-05-23

    Based on Pade Theory, a new procedure for extracting the pole mass and width of resonances is proposed. The method is systematic and provides a model-independent treatment for the prediction and the errors of the approximation.

  10. MACHINERY RESONANCE AND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.; Fowley, M.

    2010-01-23

    New developments in vibration analysis better explain machinery resonance, through an example of drill bit chattering during machining of rusted steel. The vibration of an operating drill motor was measured, the natural frequency of an attached spring was measured, and the two frequencies were compared to show that the system was resonant. For resonance to occur, one of the natural frequencies of a structural component must be excited by a cyclic force of the same frequency. In this case, the frequency of drill bit chattering due to motor rotation equaled the spring frequency (cycles per second), and the system was unstable. A soft rust coating on the steel to be drilled permitted chattering to start at the drill bit tip, and the bit oscillated on and off of the surface, which increased the wear rate of the drill bit. This resonant condition is typically referred to as a motor critical speed. The analysis presented here quantifies the vibration associated with this particular critical speed problem, using novel techniques to describe resonance.

  11. Resonant ultrasound spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Visscher, William M.; Fisk, Zachary

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasound resonant spectrometer determines the resonant frequency spectrum of a rectangular parallelepiped sample of a high dissipation material over an expected resonant response frequency range. A sample holder structure grips corners of the sample between piezoelectric drive and receive transducers. Each transducer is mounted on a membrane for only weakly coupling the transducer to the holder structure and operatively contacts a material effective to remove system resonant responses at the transducer from the expected response range. i.e., either a material such as diamond to move the response frequencies above the range or a damping powder to preclude response within the range. A square-law detector amplifier receives the response signal and retransmits the signal on an isolated shield of connecting cabling to remove cabling capacitive effects. The amplifier also provides a substantially frequency independently voltage divider with the receive transducer. The spectrometer is extremely sensitive to enable low amplitude resonance to be detected for use in calculating the elastic constants of the high dissipation sample.

  12. Neutral Pion Electroproduction in the Δ Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Villano, Anthony

    2007-11-01

    The electroproduction of baryon resonances at high Q2 is examined. Analysis focuses on the Δ(1232) resonance via exclusive pseudoscalar meson production of π0 particles. Differential cross sections are extracted for exclusive π0 electroproduction. In the central invariant mass (W) region the cross sections are used to extract resonant multipole amplitudes. In particular, the ratio of the electric quadrupole to magnetic dipole amplitudes (E2/M1) will be discussed for the Δ(1232) resonance. The transition to pQCD is discussed in terms of E2/M1 and other multipoles. The helicity amplitude A3/2 can be used as a baryon helicity conservation meter in this context and will be discussed. The fast shrinking of the resonant contribution in the Δ region is observed at this high momentum transfer. Apart from the observables related to pQCD scaling, the transition form factor G$*\\atop{M}$ is extracted along with the scalar to magnetic dipole ratio C2/M1.

  13. Magnetostrictive resonance excitation

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    1992-01-01

    The resonance frequency spectrum of a magnetostrictive sample is remotely determined by exciting the magnetostrictive property with an oscillating magnetic field. The permeability of a magnetostrictive material and concomitant coupling with a detection coil varies with the strain in the material whereby resonance responses of the sample can be readily detected. A suitable sample may be a magnetostrictive material or some other material having at least one side coated with a magnetostrictive material. When the sample is a suitable shape, i.e., a cube, rectangular parallelepiped, solid sphere or spherical shell, the elastic moduli or the material can be analytically determined from the measured resonance frequency spectrum. No mechanical transducers are required and the sample excitation is obtained without contact with the sample, leading to highly reproducible results and a measurement capability over a wide temperature range, e.g. from liquid nitrogen temperature to the Curie temperature of the magnetostrictive material.

  14. Fundamental properties of resonances.

    PubMed

    Ceci, S; Hadžimehmedović, M; Osmanović, H; Percan, A; Zauner, B

    2017-03-27

    All resonances, from hydrogen nuclei excited by the high-energy gamma rays in deep space to newly discovered particles produced in Large Hadron Collider, should be described by the same fundamental physical quantities. However, two distinct sets of properties are used to describe resonances: the pole parameters (complex pole position and residue) and the Breit-Wigner parameters (mass, width, and branching fractions). There is an ongoing decades-old debate on which one of them should be abandoned. In this study of nucleon resonances appearing in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering we discover an intricate interplay of the parameters from both sets, and realize that neither set is completely independent or fundamental on its own.

  15. Nanowire Plasmon Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon, Nathalie; Shields, Brendan; Yu, Chun; Englund, Dirk; Akimov, Alexey; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun

    2011-05-01

    Strong interactions between light and matter can be engineered by confining light to a small volume for an extended period of time. Nanoscale plasmonic structures can concentrate lighte well below the diffraction limit, but realization of small mode-volume plasmon cavities remains an outstanding challenge. We propose and demonstrate a new approach for realization of nanoscale plasmon resonators enabling strong light-matter interaction. In our approach, chemically synthesized silver nanowires are surrounded by patterned dielectric to create resonators with mode volumes that are two orders of magnitude below the diffraction limit and quality factors approaching 100. We show that they can be used to enhance spontaneous emission rates of CdSe quantum dots and single diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers by a factor larger than 20 at the cavity resonance.

  16. Spectroscopy of baryon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Reinhard; Thoma, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Within project A.1 of the SFB/TR16 "Subnuclear Structure of Matter", a large amount of data on photoproduction reactions has been accumulated at the Bonn Electron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA with the CBELSA/TAPS detector and was analysed in detail. In particular, data have been taken with unpolarized or with linearly or circularly polarized photons and with unpolarized or with longitudinally or transversely polarized protons. Photoproduction off neutrons was studied to determine the helicity amplitudes for the excitation of resonances off neutrons. In a partial wave analysis of the data, new resonances have been found and the properties of new and of known resonances have been determined, including the measurement of partial widths of so far unmeasured decay modes.

  17. Quartz resonator processing system

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a single chamber ultra-high vacuum processing system for the oduction of hermetically sealed quartz resonators wherein electrode metallization and sealing are carried out along with cleaning and bake-out without any air exposure between the processing steps. The system includes a common vacuum chamber in which is located a rotatable wheel-like member which is adapted to move a plurality of individual component sets of a flat pack resonator unit past discretely located processing stations in said chamber whereupon electrode deposition takes place followed by the placement of ceramic covers over a frame containing a resonator element and then to a sealing stage where a pair of hydraulic rams including heating elements effect a metallized bonding of the covers to the frame.

  18. Collider Signal I :. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Tim M. P.

    2010-08-01

    These TASI lectures were part of the summer school in 2008 and cover the collider signal associated with resonances in models of physics beyond the Standard Model. I begin with a review of the Z boson, one of the best-studied resonances in particle physics, and review how the Breit-Wigner form of the propagator emerges in perturbation theory and discuss the narrow width approximation. I review how the LEP and SLAC experiments could use the kinematics of Z events to learn about fermion couplings to the Z. I then make a brief survey of models of physics beyond the Standard Model which predict resonances, and discuss some of the LHC observables which we can use to discover and identify the nature of the BSM physics. I finish up with a discussion of the linear moose that one can use for an effective theory description of a massive color octet vector particle.

  19. Fundamental properties of resonances

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, S.; Hadžimehmedović, M.; Osmanović, H.; Percan, A.; Zauner, B.

    2017-01-01

    All resonances, from hydrogen nuclei excited by the high-energy gamma rays in deep space to newly discovered particles produced in Large Hadron Collider, should be described by the same fundamental physical quantities. However, two distinct sets of properties are used to describe resonances: the pole parameters (complex pole position and residue) and the Breit-Wigner parameters (mass, width, and branching fractions). There is an ongoing decades-old debate on which one of them should be abandoned. In this study of nucleon resonances appearing in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering we discover an intricate interplay of the parameters from both sets, and realize that neither set is completely independent or fundamental on its own. PMID:28345595

  20. Rho resonance parameters from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Dehua; Alexandru, Andrei; Molina, Raquel; Döring, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We perform a high-precision calculation of the phase shifts for $\\pi$-$\\pi$ scattering in the I = 1, J = 1 channel in the elastic region using elongated lattices with two mass-degenerate quark favors ($N_f = 2$). We extract the $\\rho$ resonance parameters using a Breit-Wigner fit at two different quark masses, corresponding to $m_{\\pi} = 226$MeV and $m_{\\pi} = 315$MeV, and perform an extrapolation to the physical point. The extrapolation is based on a unitarized chiral perturbation theory model that describes well the phase-shifts around the resonance for both quark masses. We find that the extrapolated value, $m_{\\rho} = 720(1)(15)$MeV, is significantly lower that the physical rho mass and we argue that this shift could be due to the absence of the strange quark in our calculation.

  1. Nonlinear Resonance of Mechanically Excited Sessile Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    The spectrum of frequencies and mode shapes for an inviscid drop on a planar substrate have recently been documented. For vertical excitation, zonal modes respond to the driving frequency harmonically and non-zonal modes subharmonically, consistent with the prior literature. In this study, we report observations from the regime of nonlinear response. Here, zonals can respond non-harmonically, both sub- and super-harmonic responses are reported. The principal challenge to generating and observing superharmonic resonances of higher zonal modes is a mode-mixing behavior. However, using a simple visual simulation based on the ray-tracing technique, the individual contributions to the mixed resonance behavior can be extracted. In summary, results from experiment and theory show that the zonal modes, which respond harmonically and can mix with non-zonal modes without interfering with one another in the linear regime, tend to respond sub- or superharmonically and compete with non-zonal modes in the nonlinear regime.

  2. Reconfigurable optical routers based on Coupled Resonator Induced Transparency resonances.

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, M; Bettotti, P; Fedeli, J M; Pavesi, L

    2012-10-08

    The interferometric coupling of pairs of resonators in a resonator sequence generates coupled ring induced transparency (CRIT) resonances. These have quality factors an order of magnitude greater than those of single resonators. We show that it is possible to engineer CRIT resonances in tapered SCISSOR (Side Coupled Integrated Space Sequence of Resonator) to realize fast and efficient reconfigurable optical switches and routers handling several channels while keeping single channel addressing capabilities. Tapered SCISSORs are fabricated in silicon-on-insulator technology. Furthermore, tapered SCISSORs show multiple-channel switching behavior that can be exploited in DWDM applications.

  3. Resonance-assisted decay of nondispersive wave packets.

    PubMed

    Wimberger, Sandro; Schlagheck, Peter; Eltschka, Christopher; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2006-07-28

    We present a quantitative semiclassical theory for the decay of nondispersive electronic wave packets in driven, ionizing Rydberg systems. Statistically robust quantities are extracted combining resonance-assisted tunneling with subsequent transport across chaotic phase space and a final ionization step.

  4. Field resonance propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    A propulsion concept was developed based on a proposed resonance between coherent, pulsed electromagnetic wave forms, and gravitational wave forms (or space-time metrics). Using this concept a spacecraft propulsion system potentially capable of galactic and intergalactic travel without prohibitive travel times was designed. The propulsion system utilizes recent research associated with magnetic field line merging, hydromagnetic wave effects, free-electron lasers, laser generation of megagauss fields, and special structural and containment metals. The research required to determine potential, field resonance characteristics and to evaluate various aspects of the spacecraft propulsion design is described.

  5. Method for resonant measurement

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, George W.; Migliori, Albert; Dixon, Raymond D.

    1996-01-01

    A method of measurement of objects to determine object flaws, Poisson's ratio (.sigma.) and shear modulus (.mu.) is shown and described. First, the frequency for expected degenerate responses is determined for one or more input frequencies and then splitting of degenerate resonant modes are observed to identify the presence of flaws in the object. Poisson's ratio and the shear modulus can be determined by identification of resonances dependent only on the shear modulus, and then using that shear modulus to find Poisson's ratio using other modes dependent on both the shear modulus and Poisson's ratio.

  6. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    DOEpatents

    Peters, R.D.M.

    1982-11-02

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively [+-]60[degree] away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency. 3 figs.

  7. Method for resonant measurement

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Dixon, R.D.

    1996-03-05

    A method of measurement of objects to determine object flaws, Poisson`s ratio ({sigma}) and shear modulus ({mu}) is shown and described. First, the frequency for expected degenerate responses is determined for one or more input frequencies and then splitting of degenerate resonant modes are observed to identify the presence of flaws in the object. Poisson`s ratio and the shear modulus can be determined by identification of resonances dependent only on the shear modulus, and then using that shear modulus to find Poisson`s ratio using other modes dependent on both the shear modulus and Poisson`s ratio. 1 fig.

  8. Physics of Sports: Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, David

    2000-04-01

    When force is applied by an athlete to sports equipment resonances can occur. Just a few examples are: the ringing of a spiked volleyball, the strumming of a golf club shaft during a swing, and multiple modes induced in an aluminum baseball bat when striking a ball. Resonances produce acoustic waves which, if conditions are favorable, can be detected off the playing field. This can provide a means to evaluate athletic performance during game conditions. Results are given from the use of a simple hand-held acoustic detector - by a spectator sitting in the stands - to determine how hard volleyballs were spiked during college and high school games.

  9. Resonant elements contactless coupled to bolometric micro-stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadrado, Alexander; Silva-López, Manuel; López-Alonso, José M.; Martínez-Antón, Juan C.; Ezquerro, José M.; González, Francisco J.; Alda, Javier

    2015-08-01

    One of the main technical difficulties in the fabrication of optical antennas working as light detectors is the proper design and manufacture of auxiliary elements as load lines and signal extraction structures. These elements need to be quite small to reach the location of the antennas and should have a minimal effect on the response of the device. Unfortunately this is not an easy task and signal extraction lines resonate along with the antenna producing a complex signal that usually masks the one given by the antenna. In order to decouple the resonance from the transduction we present in this contribution a parametric analysis of the response of a bolometric stripe that is surrounded by resonant dipoles with different geometries and orientations. We have checked that these elements should provide a signal proportional to the polarization state of the incoming light.

  10. Probing Students' Understanding of Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Sytil; McBride, Dyan; Gross, Josh; Zollman, Dean

    2009-11-01

    Resonant phenomena play a crucial role in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a widely used medical tool in today's society. The basic features of the resonance in MRI can be taught by looking at the resonance of a compass driven by an electromagnetic field. However, resonance in a oscillating magnetic field is not a phenomenon that is familiar to most students. Thus, as a precursor to creating instructional materials, we investigated how students applied their learning about resonance as traditionally taught to this novel system.

  11. Review: Magnetic resonance imaging techniques in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the eye with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved difficult due to the eye’s propensity to move involuntarily over typical imaging timescales, obscuring the fine structure in the eye due to the resulting motion artifacts. However, advances in MRI technology help to mitigate such drawbacks, enabling the acquisition of high spatiotemporal resolution images with a variety of contrast mechanisms. This review aims to classify the MRI techniques used to date in clinical and preclinical ophthalmologic studies, describing the qualitative and quantitative information that may be extracted and how this may inform on ocular pathophysiology. PMID:23112569

  12. Hadron scattering and resonances in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.

    2016-05-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study pi pi elastic scattering, including the rho resonance, as well as coupled-channel pi K, eta K scattering. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  13. Hadron scattering and resonances in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, Jozef J.

    2016-05-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study ππ elastic scattering, including the ρ resonance, as well as coupled-channel π >K, ηK scattering. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  14. RESONATOR PARTICLE SEPARATOR

    DOEpatents

    Blewett, J.P.; Kiesling, J.D.

    1963-06-11

    A wave-guide resonator structure is designed for use in separating particles of equal momentum but differing in mass, having energies exceeding one billion eiectron volts. The particles referred to are those of sub-atomic size and are generally produced as a result of the bombardment of a target by a beam such as protons produced in a high energy accelerator. In the resonator a travelling electric wave is produced which travels at the same rate of speed as the unwanted particle which is thus deflected continuously over the length of the resonator. The wanted particle is slightly out of phase with the travelling wave so that over the whole length of the resonator it has a net deflection of substantially zero. The travelling wave is established in a wave guide of rectangular cross section in which stubs are provided to store magnetic wave energy leaving the electric wave energy in the main structure to obtain the desired travelling wave and deflection. The stubs are of such shape and spacing to establish a critical mathemitical relationship. (AEC)

  15. Resonance Ionization, Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, J. P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is an analytical technique that uses photons from lasers to resonantly excite an electron from some initial state of a gaseous atom through various excited states of the atom or molecule. Described are the apparatus, some analytical applications, and the precision and accuracy of the technique. Lists 26 references. (CW)

  16. Parametric Resonance Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broeck, C.; Bena, I.

    The phenomenon of parametric resonance is revisited. Several physical examples are reviewed and an exactly solvable model is discussed. A mean field theory is presented for globally coupled parametric oscillators with randomly distributed phases. A new type of collective instability appears, which is similar in nature to that of noise induced phase transitions.

  17. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  18. Micromachined double resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A micromachined resonator mountable to an external support structure has a proof mass coupled to a base structure by a first spring structure, the base structure having a plurality of electrodes, and a second spring structure coupling the base structure to the external support structure.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a review of magnetic resonance imaging. Many topics are explored from instrumentation, spectroscopy, blood flow and sodium imaging to detailed clinical applications such as the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or adrenal adenoma. The emphasis throughout is on descriptions of normal multiplanar anatomy and pathology as displayed by MRI.

  20. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.

    1982-09-23

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  1. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1984-01-01

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  2. Simulation of quartz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, M.; Radius, R.; Mohr, R.

    Quartz resonators are suitable as novel sensor elements in the field of profilometry and three dimensional measurement techniques. This application requires a tailoring of the oscillator circuit which is performed by a network analysis program. The equivalent network parameters are computed by a finite element analysis. The mechanical loading of the quartz is modeled by a viscous damping approach.

  3. Single spin magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Annual, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The inaugural volume of Magnetic Resonance Annual includes reviews of MRI of the posterior fossa, cerebral neoplasms, and the cardiovascular and genitourinary systems. A chapter on contrast materials outlines the mechanisms of paramagnetic contrast enhancement and highlights several promising contrast agents.

  5. Resonant scanning mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John; Newman, Mike; Gutierrez, Homero; Hoffman, Charlie; Quakenbush, Tim; Waldeck, Dan; Leone, Christopher; Ostaszewski, Miro

    2014-10-01

    Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. developed a Resonant Scanning Mechanism (RSM) capable of combining a 250- Hz resonant scan about one axis with a two-hertz triangular scan about the orthogonal axis. The RSM enables a rapid, high-density scan over a significant field of regard (FOR) while minimizing size, weight, and power requirements. The azimuth scan axis is bearing mounted allowing for 30° of mechanical travel, while the resonant elevation axis is flexure and spring mounted with five degrees of mechanical travel. Pointing-knowledge error during quiescent static pointing at room temperature across the full range is better than 100 μrad RMS per axis. The compact design of the RSM, roughly the size of a soda can, makes it an ideal mechanism for use on low-altitude aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles. Unique aspects of the opto-mechanical design include i) resonant springs which allow for a high-frequency scan axis with low power consumption; and ii) an independent lower-frequency scan axis allowing for a wide FOR. The pointing control system operates each axis independently and employs i) a position loop for the azimuth axis; and ii) a unique combination of parallel frequency and amplitude control loops for the elevation axis. All control and pointing algorithms are hosted on a 200-MHz microcontroller with 516 KB of RAM on a compact 3"×4" digital controller, also of Ball design.

  6. Single spin magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  7. Wireless ferroelectric resonating sensor.

    PubMed

    Viikari, Ville; Seppa, Heikki; Mattila, Tomi; Alastalo, Ari

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a passive wireless resonating sensor that is based on a ferroelectric varactor. The sensor replies with its data at an intermodulation frequency when a reader device illuminates it at 2 closely located frequencies. The paper derives a theoretical equation for the response of such a sensor, verifies the theory by simulations, and demonstrates a temperature sensor based on a ferroelectric varactor.

  8. Electroproduction of the {Delta}(1232) Resonance at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, V.V.; Adams, G.S.; Davidson, R.M.; Klusman, M.; Mukhopadhyay, N.C.; Napolitano, J.; Nozar, M.; Price, J.W.; Stoler, P.; Witkowski, M.; Bosted, P.; Armstrong, C.S.; Meekins, D.; Assamagan, K.; Avery, S.; Baker, O.K.; Eden, T.; Gaskell, D.; Gueye, P.; Hinton, W.; Keppel, C.; Madey, R.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Tang, L.; Ahmidouch, A.; Madey, R.; Kim, W.; Baker, O.K.; Burkert, V.; Carlini, R.; Dunne, J.; Ent, R.; Keppel, C.; Mack, D.; Mitchell, J.; Tang, L.; Wood, S.; Koltenuk, D.; Minehart, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Tadevosian, V.

    1999-01-01

    We studied the electroproduction of the {Delta}(1232) resonance via the reaction p(e,thinspe{sup {prime}}p){pi}{sup 0} at four-momentum transfers Q{sup 2}=2.8 and 4.0 GeV{sup 2} . This is the highest Q{sup 2} for which exclusive resonance electroproduction has ever been observed. Decay angular distributions for {Delta}{r_arrow}p{pi}{sup 0} were measured over a wide range of barycentric energies covering the resonance. The N{endash}{Delta} transition form factor G{sup {asterisk}}{sub M} and ratios of resonant multipoles E{sub 1+}/M{sub 1+} and S{sub 1+}/M{sub 1+} were extracted from the decay angular distributions. These ratios remain small, indicating that perturbative QCD is not applicable for this reaction at these momentum transfers. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews recent studies of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and vascular dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can detect structural alteration and biochemical abnormalities in the brain of demented subjects and may help in the differential diagnosis and early detection of affected individuals, monitoring disease progression, and evaluation of therapeutic effect. PMID:11563438

  10. Mode conversion losses in silicon-on-insulator photonic wire based racetrack resonators.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fengnian; Sekaric, Lidija; Vlasov, Yurii A

    2006-05-01

    Two complimentary types of SOI photonic wire based devices, the add/drop (A/D) filter using a racetrack resonator and the Mach-Zehnder interferometer with one arm consisting of an identical resonator in all-pass filter (APF) configuration, were fabricated and characterized in order to extract the optical properties of the resonators and predict the performance of the optical delay lines based on such resonators. We found that instead of well-known waveguide bending and propagation losses, mode conversion loss in the coupling region of such resonators dominates when the air gap between the racetrack resonator and access waveguide is smaller than 120nm. We also show that this additional loss significantly degrades the performance of the optical delay line containing cascaded resonators in APF configuration.

  11. Azimuthally unstable resonators for high-power CO[sub 2] lasers with annular gain media

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlichmann, D.; Habich, U.; Plum, H.D.; Loosen, P.; Herziger, G. )

    1994-06-01

    Stable-unstable resonators have proved suitable for the extraction of a high-quality beam from a gain area that consists of a rectangular slab. Such gain areas have two substantially different transverse dimensions, and the resonators are stable in the small dimension while unstable in the larger one. Using off-axis unstable resonators avoids a central beam obscuration and improves beam quality. The adaptation of stable-unstable resonators to annular gain areas is described in this paper. The resulting resonators are stable in the radial direction and unstable in the azimuthal direction. Different unstable resonators, wound to match the annular geometry, are presented. The resonator modes are calculated numerically using a 3D-diffraction code that considers gain and misalignment. Resonator design parameters are obtained from a geometrical description of the resonator. Experimental results from a diffusion-cooled CO[sub 2] laser confirm theoretical predictions and show that the resonators are capable of extracting beams that are nearly diffraction-limited with high efficiency from an annular gain medium. Output powers of 2 kW have been obtained from a gain length of 1.8 m.

  12. Coherent synchro-betatron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    Coherent synchro-betatron resonances can present a serious limit for low-energy synchrotrons with strong space charge. Here, an excitation of a dipole transverse mode is considered at resonance condition.

  13. Recoil-induced Resonances as All-optical Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narducci, F. A.; Desavage, S. A.; Gordon, K. H.; Duncan, D. L.; Welch, G. R.; Davis, J. P.

    2010-03-01

    We have measured recoil-induced resonances (RIR) [1,2] in our system of laser-cooled 85Rb atoms. Although this technique has been demonstrated to be useful for the purpose of extracting the cloud temperature [3], our aim was to demonstrate an all optical switch based on recoil-induced resonances. In addition to a very narrow ``free-space'' recoil-induced resonance of approximately 15 kHz, we also discovered a much broader resonance (˜30 MHz), caused by standing waves established by our trapping fields. We compare and contrast the switching dynamics of these two resonances and demonstrate optical switching using both resonances. Finally, we consider the applicability of the narrow, free-space resonance to the slowing of a weak probe field. [1] J. Guo, P.R. Berman, B. Dubetsky and G. Grynberg PRA, 46, 1426 (1992). [2] (a) P. Verkerk, B. Loumis, C. Salomon, C. Cohen-Tannoudji, J. Courtois PRL, 68, 3861 (1992). (b) G. Grynberg, J-Y Courtois, B. Lounis, P. Verkerk PRL, 72, 3017 (1994). [3] (a) T. Brzozowski, M. Brzozowska, J. Zachorowski, M. Zawada, W. Gawlik PRA, 71, 013401 (2005). (b) M. Brzozowska, T. Brzozowski J. Zachorowski, W. Gawlik PRA, 72, 061401(R), (2005).

  14. Design rules for core/shell nanowire resonant emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Da-Som; Kim, Sun-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    We study design principles to boost the extraction of light from core/shell GaN nanowire optical emitters. A full-vectorial electromagnetic simulation reveals that the extraction efficiency of an emitter within a nanowire cavity depends strongly on its position; the efficiency becomes maximized as the emitter's location approaches the center of the structure. The total extraction of light is sinusoidally modulated by the nanowire diameter, which is directly correlated with optical resonances. The introduction of a conformal dielectric coating on a nanowire leads to a dramatic enhancement in the extraction efficiency, which results from an increase in side emission owing to an optical antenna effect. A simple high-refractive-index dielectric coating approximately doubles the total extraction efficiency of a nanowire LED. These numerical findings will be valuable in providing strategies for high-efficiency nanowire-based optical emitters.

  15. Equivalent circuit for birdcage resonators.

    PubMed

    Harpen, M D

    1993-02-01

    We present an equivalent circuit analysis for both low pass and high pass birdcage resonators loaded with lossy samples. In a generalization of the method of Hoult and Lauterbur (J. Magn. Reson. 34, 425 (1979)), we also derive circuit component values by application of the laws of electrodynamics. Measured resonance spectra, quality factors, and feed point impedances in a test resonator are shown to be in agreement with those predicted by the proposed model.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  17. Secondary resonances of electrically actuated resonant microsensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Eihab M.; Nayfeh, Ali H.

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the response of a microbeam-based resonant sensor to superharmonic and subharmonic electric actuations using a model that incorporates the nonlinearities associated with moderately large displacements and electric forces. The method of multiple scales is used, in each case, to obtain two first-order nonlinear ordinary-differential equations that describe the modulation of the amplitude and phase of the response and its stability. We present typical frequency-response and force-response curves demonstrating, in both cases, the coexistence of multivalued solutions. The solution corresponding to a superharmonic excitation consists of three branches, which meet at two saddle-node bifurcation points. The solution corresponding to a subharmonic excitation consists of two branches meeting a branch of trivial solutions at two pitchfork bifurcation points. One of these bifurcation points is supercritical and the other is subcritical. The results provide an analytical tool to predict the microsensor response to superharmonic and subharmonic excitations, specifically the locations of sudden jumps and regions of hysteretic behavior, thereby enabling designers to safely use these frequencies as measurement signals. They also allow designers to examine the impact of various design parameters on the device behavior.

  18. Experiment study of an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yizhou; Wang, Yunmin; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2013-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonant plasma is one type of magnetised plasma generated by continuous microwave energy. It has the property of high degree of ionization and large volume at low gas pressure, which makes it useful for space propulsion and material processing. This article presents the experiment study of the plasma properties and ion beam extraction from an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity. Optical emission spectroscopy based on a simple collisional radiation model was used for plasma diagnosis. Experiment results show that, at microwave power setting ranging from 7.06 to 17.40 W and mass flow rate ranging from 1 to 10 sccm, argon gas can be ionized. Ion beam of 109.1 mA from the ion source can be extracted at microwave power of 30 W, mass flow rate of 10 sccm, and accel voltage of 800 V. The diagnosed plasma temperature and density are 2.4–5.2 eV and 2 × 10{sup 16}–4.8 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3}, respectively.

  19. Resonant Cascaded Downconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Weedbrook, Christian; Parrett, Ben; Kheruntsyan, Karen; Drummond, Peter; Pooser, Raphael C; Pfister, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    We analyze an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) in which cascaded down-conversion occurs inside a cavity resonant for all modes but the initial pump. Due to the resonant cascade design, the OPO presents two {chi}{sup (2)}-level oscillation thresholds that are therefore much lower than for a {chi}{sup (3)} OPO. This is promising for reaching the regime of an effective third-order nonlinearity well above both thresholds. Such a {chi}{sup (2)} cascaded device also has potential applications in frequency conversion to far-infrared regimes. But, most importantly, it can generate novel multipartite quantum correlations in the output radiation, which represent a step beyond squeezed or entangled light. The output can be highly non-Gaussian and therefore not describable by any semiclassical model. In this paper, we derive quantum stochastic equations in the positive-P representation and undertake an analysis of steady-state and dynamical properties of this system.

  20. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  1. Resonant magnetic vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Decanini, Yves; Folacci, Antoine

    2003-04-01

    By using the complex angular momentum method, we provide a semiclassical analysis of electron scattering by a magnetic vortex of Aharonov-Bohm type. Regge poles of the S matrix are associated with surface waves orbiting around the vortex and supported by a magnetic field discontinuity. Rapid variations of sharp characteristic shapes can be observed on scattering cross sections. They correspond to quasibound states which are Breit-Wigner-type resonances associated with surface waves and which can be considered as quantum analogues of acoustic whispering-gallery modes. Such a resonant magnetic vortex could provide a different kind of artificial atom while the semiclassical approach developed here could be profitably extended in various areas of the physics of vortices.

  2. Resonant diphoton phenomenology simplified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panico, Giuliano; Vecchi, Luca; Wulzer, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    A framework is proposed to describe resonant diphoton phenomenology at hadron colliders in full generality. It can be employed for a comprehensive model-independent interpretation of the experimental data. Within the general framework, few benchmark scenarios are defined as representative of the various phenomenological options and/or of motivated new physics scenarios. Their usage is illustrated by performing a characterization of the 750 GeV excess, based on a recast of available experimental results.

  3. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, I.J.; Wendt, J.R.

    1994-09-06

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors. 8 figs.

  4. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Ian J.; Wendt, Joel R.

    1994-01-01

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors.

  5. Cross resonant optical antenna.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, P; Huang, J S; Duò, L; Finazzi, M; Hecht, B

    2009-06-26

    We propose a novel cross resonant optical antenna consisting of two perpendicular nanosized gold dipole antennas with a common feed gap. We demonstrate that the cross antenna is able to convert propagating fields of any polarization state into correspondingly polarized, localized, and enhanced fields and vice versa. The cross antenna structure therefore opens the road towards the control of light-matter interactions based on polarized light as well as the analysis of polarized fields on the nanometer scale.

  6. Linear Resonance Cooler.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    for a Stirling cycle cryocooler . 26 * .*o .. * COMPRESSOR MOTOR FORCE VERSUS ROTOR AXIAL POSITION COMPRESSOR P-V DIAGRAM *COMPRESSOR MOTOR COMPRESSOR...potential. However, the limited test program has demonstrated the application of linear motor drive technology to a Stirling cycle cryocooler design. L...Ace-ss Ion& For flTIC TAB - TABLE OF CONTENTS TITLE IPAGE - 2. DETAILED DESIGN OF LINEAR RESONANCE CRYOCOOLER ......... 3 2.2 Expander

  7. RESONATOR PARTICLE SEPARATOR

    DOEpatents

    Blewett, J.P.

    1962-01-01

    A wave guide resonator structure is described for use in separating particles of equal momentum but differing in mass and having energies exceeding one billion electron volts. The particles are those of sub-atomic size and are generally produced as a result of the bombardment of a target by a beam such as protons produced in a high-energy accelerator. In this wave guide construction, the particles undergo preferential deflection as a result of the presence of an electric field. The boundary conditions established in the resonator are such as to eliminate an interfering magnetic component, and to otherwise phase the electric field to obtain a traveling wave such as one which moves at the same speed as the unwanted particle. The latter undergoes continuous deflection over the whole length of the device and is, therefore, eliminated while the wanted particle is deflected in opposite directions over the length of the resonator and is thus able to enter an exit aperture. (AEC)

  8. Resonant non-gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Flauger, Raphael; Pajer, Enrico E-mail: ep295@cornell.edu

    2011-01-01

    We provide a derivation from first principles of the primordial bispectrum of scalar perturbations produced during inflation driven by a canonically normalized scalar field whose potential exhibits small sinusoidal modulations. A potential of this type has been derived in a class of string theory models of inflation based on axion monodromy. We use this model as a concrete example, but we present our derivations and results for a general slow-roll potential with superimposed modulations. We show analytically that a resonance between the oscillations of the background and the oscillations of the fluctuations is responsible for the production of an observably large non-Gaussian signal. We provide an explicit expression for the shape of this resonant non-Gaussianity. We show that there is essentially no overlap between this shape and the local, equilateral, and orthogonal shapes, and we stress that resonant non-Gaussianity is not captured by the simplest version of the effective field theory of inflation. We hope our analytic expression will be useful to further observationally constrain this class of models.

  9. Resonant Alfven Wave Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameiri, Eliezer

    1999-11-01

    Much of the theory of the Alfven wave resonance phenomenon was developed for a tokamak configuration where the magnetic field winds around the torus without entering the boundary. Thus, boundary conditions did not have to be considered.( J. Tataronis and W. Grossmann, Z. Phys. 261), 203 (1973). In most space plasma situations such as the magnetosphere or the Sun, as well as in the scrape-off layer of a divertor tokamak, this is not the case. When boundary conditions are considered, it is generally assumed for simplicity that the boundary is perfectly conducting, which implies that the Alfven wave bounce frequencies are real and the resonance phenomenon can be detected by some singularity in the equations. The nature of the singularity is usually described in terms of a Frobenius series.( A.N. Wright and M.J. Thompson, Phys. Plamsas 1), 691 (1994). In this work we consider resistive boundaries, which imply that the fast wave eigenfrequency is real, but the Alfven frequency is not. Thus, there is no exact resonance and no singularity in the equations. The solution of the problem is carried out asymptotically by finding an exact Laplace integral representation for the solution and then matching various regions. The energy transferred to the Alfven wave appears to be rather small.

  10. Resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Robert, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy may yield precise information on the conformation of, and on the interactions assumed by, the chromophores involved in the first steps of the photosynthetic process, whether isolated in solvents, embedded in soluble or membrane proteins, or, as shown recently, in vivo. By making use of this technique, it is possible, for instance, to relate the electronic properties of these molecules to their structure and/or the physical properties of their environment, or to determine subtle changes of their conformation associated with regulatory processes. After a short introduction to the physical principles that govern resonance Raman spectroscopy, the information content of resonance Raman spectra of chlorophyll and carotenoid molecules is described in this review, together with the experiments which helped in determining which structural parameter each Raman band is sensitive to. A selection of applications of this technique is then presented, in order to give a fair and precise idea of which type of information can be obtained from its use in the field of photosynthesis.

  11. The {Delta}(1232) resonance transition form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Staurt, L.M. |; Bosted, P.E.; Lung, A.

    1993-08-01

    Old and new measurements of inclusive e--p cross sections in the {Delta}(1232) resonance region have been combined, and a global data fit has been made. Using this fit to parameterize the nonresonant background, the transition form factors have been extracted out to a four-momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}, of 9.8 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The results are systematically higher than those from a previous analysis, but agree within errors. A similar analysis has been done with e--d cross sections, and {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} in the {Delta}(1232) resonance region has been extracted out to a Q{sup 2} of 7.9 (GeV/c){sup 2}. {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} for {Delta}(1232) production is consistent with unity, while {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} for the nonresonant background is constant with Q{sup 2} at approximately 0.4.

  12. Electromagnetic excitation of the Delta(1232) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    V. Pascalutsa; M. Vanderhaeghen; Shin Nan Yang

    2006-09-05

    We review the description of the lowest-energy nucleon excitation--the Delta(1232)-resonance. Much of the recent effort has been focused on the precision measurements of the nucleon to Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes. We review the results of those measurements and confront them with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, and QCD-inspired models. Some of the theoretical approaches are reviewed in detail. In particular, we describe the chiral EFT of QCD in the energy domain of the Delta-resonance, and its applications to the electromagnetic nucleon-to-Delta transition (gamma N Delta). We also describe the recent dynamical and unitary-isobar models of pion electroproduction which are extensively used in the extraction of the gamma* N Delta form factors from experiment. Furthermore, we discuss the link of the gamma* N Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs), as well as the predictions of perturbative QCD for these transition form factors. The present status of understanding the Delta-resonance properties and the nature of its excitation is summarized.

  13. Electromagnetic Transition Form Factors of Nucleon Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2008-10-13

    Recent measurements of nucleon resonance transition form factors with CLAS at Jefferson Lab are discussed. The new data resolve a long-standing puzzle of the nature of the Roper resonance, and confirm the assertion of the symmetric constituent quark model of the Roper as the first radial excitation of the nucleon. The data on high Q{sup 2} n{pi}{sup +} production confirm the slow fall off of the S{sub 11}(1535) transition form factor with Q{sup 2}, and better constrain the branching ratios {beta}{sub N{pi}} = 0.50 and {beta}{sub N{eta}} = 0.45. For the first time, the longitudinal transition amplitude to the S{sub 11}(1535) was extracted from the n{pi}{sup +} data. Also, new results on the transition amplitudes for the D{sub 13}(1520) resonance are presented showing a rapid transition from helicity 3/2 dominance seen at the real photon point to helicty 1/2 dominance at higher Q{sup 2}.

  14. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality.

  15. Aberration correction of unstable resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Construction of aspheric reflectors for unstable resonator lasers to provide an arbitrary laser mode inside the resonator to correct aberrations of an output beam by the construction of the shape of an end reflector opposite the output reflector of the resonator cavity, such as aberrations resulting from refraction of a beam exiting the solid of the resonator having an index of refraction greater than 1 or to produce an aberration in the output beam that will precisely compensate for the aberration of an optical train into which the resonator beam is coupled.

  16. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  17. Persistence, resistance, resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsadka, Maayan

    Sound cannot travel in a vacuum, physically or socially. The ways in which sound operates are a result of acoustic properties, and the ways by which it is considered to be music are a result of social constructions. Therefore, music is always political, regardless of its content: the way it is performed and composed; the choice of instrumentation, notation, tuning; the medium of its distribution; its inherent hierarchy and power dynamics, and more. My compositional praxis makes me less interested in defining a relationship between music and politics than I am in erasing---or at least blurring---the borders between them. In this paper I discuss the aesthetics of resonance and echo in their metaphorical, physical, social, and musical manifestations. Also discussed is a political aesthetic of resonance, manifested through protest chants. I transcribe and analyze common protest chants from around the world, categorizing and unifying them as universal crowd-mobilizing rhythms. These ideas are explored musically in three pieces. Sumud: Rhetoric of Resistance in Three Movements, for two pianos and two percussion players, is a musical interpretation of the political/social concept of sumud, an Arabic word that literally means "steadfastness" and represents Palestinian non-violent resistance. The piece is based on common protest rhythms and uses the acoustic properties inherent to the instruments. The second piece, Three Piano Studies, extends some of the musical ideas and techniques used in Sumud, and explores the acoustic properties and resonance of the piano. The final set of pieces is part of my Critical Mess Music Project. These are site-specific musical works that attempt to blur the boundaries between audience, performers and composer, in part by including people without traditional musical training in the process of music making. These pieces use the natural structure and resonance of an environment, in this case, locations on the UCSC campus, and offer an active

  18. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  19. Resonance lidar detection of the mesospheric nickel layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martus, C. M.; Collins, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first reported detection of the mesospheric nickel (Ni) layer with resonance lidar. Ni is abundant in meteorites, the source of the metal layers, but has not been previously detected in the mesosphere. We detail the wavelength search we used to find the Ni absorption line and the SNR technique we used to extract the low resonance signal. Simulation results based on measurements of sodium (Na) with our system show that the signals received are as expected. We present an initial estimate of the Ni layer density and spatial parameters and find that the Ni layer characteristics are similar to those of the sodium layer.

  20. Resonance widths in open microwave cavities studied by harmonic inversion.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, U; Höhmann, R; Main, J; Stöckmann, H-J

    2008-06-27

    From the measurement of a reflection spectrum of an open microwave cavity, the poles of the scattering matrix in the complex plane have been determined. The resonances have been extracted by means of the harmonic inversion method. By this, it became possible to resolve the resonances in a regime where the linewidths exceed the mean level spacing up to a factor of 10, a value inaccessible in experiments up to now. The obtained experimental distributions of linewidths were found to be in perfect agreement with predictions from random matrix theory when wall absorption and fluctuations caused by couplings to additional channels are considered.

  1. Chaotic spectra: How to extract dynamic information

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, H.S.; Gomez Llorente, J.M.; Zakrzewski, J.; Kulander, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    Nonlinear dynamics is applied to chaotic unassignable atomic and molecular spectra with the aim of extracting detailed information about regular dynamic motions that exist over short intervals of time. It is shown how this motion can be extracted from high resolution spectra by doing low resolution studies or by Fourier transforming limited regions of the spectrum. These motions mimic those of periodic orbits (PO) and are inserts into the dominant chaotic motion. Considering these inserts and the PO as a dynamically decoupled region of space, resonant scattering theory and stabilization methods enable us to compute ladders of resonant states which interact with the chaotic quasi-continuum computed in principle from basis sets placed off the PO. The interaction of the resonances with the quasicontinuum explains the low resolution spectra seen in such experiments. It also allows one to associate low resolution features with a particular PO. The motion on the PO thereby supplies the molecular movements whose quantization causes the low resolution spectra. Characteristic properties of the periodic orbit based resonances are discussed. The method is illustrated on the photoabsorption spectrum of the hydrogen atom in a strong magnetic field and on the photodissociation spectrum of H/sub 3//sup +/. Other molecular systems which are currently under investigation using this formalism are also mentioned. 53 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Electroexcitation of nucleon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Inna Aznauryan, Volker D. Burkert

    2012-01-01

    We review recent progress in the investigation of the electroexcitation of nucleon resonances, both in experiment and in theory. The most accurate results have been obtained for the electroexcitation amplitudes of the four lowest excited states, which have been measured in a range of Q2 up to 8 and 4.5 GeV2 for the Delta(1232)P33, N(1535)S11 and N(1440)P11, N(1520)D13, respectively. These results have been confronted with calculations based on lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD (pQCD), and QCD-inspired models. The amplitudes for the Delta(1232) indicate large pion-cloud contributions at low Q2 and don't show any sign of approaching the pQCD regime for Q2<7 GeV2. Measured for the first time, the electroexcitation amplitudes of the Roper resonance, N(1440)P11, provide strong evidence for this state as a predominantly radial excitation of a three-quark (3q) ground state, with additional non-3-quark contributions needed to describe the low Q2 behavior of the amplitudes. The longitudinal transition amplitude for the N(1535)S11 was determined and has become a challenge for quark models. Explanations may require large meson-cloud contributions or alternative representations of this state. The N(1520)D13 clearly shows the rapid changeover from helicity-3/2 dominance at the real photon point to helicity-1/2 dominance at Q2 > 0.5 GeV2, confirming a long-standing prediction of the constituent quark model. The interpretation of the moments of resonance transition form factors in terms of transition transverse charge distributions in infinite momentum frame is presented.

  3. Seismic Resonant Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, V. A.

    2007-12-01

    There are several classes of underground objects which can produce resonant emission after being hit by incident seismic waves. Those objects include tunnels, pipes, buried containers, ground-filled excavations, unexploded ordinances, fluid-filled fractures, mine shafts, and the like. Being high contrast scatterers, these objects are capable of generating strong scattered waves where primary PP, PS, SS waves carry away most of the energy which was brought by incident waves. For both high- and low- velocity objects the primary scattered waves have the same order of magnitude as incident waves. The main difference between these groups of objects is in later arrivals of multiple scattered waves. While high-velocity objects effectively radiate most of the energy soon after impact, the low-velocity objects trap some fraction of incident wave energy in the form of circumferential waves which propagate rotating along the interface between the object and the embedding medium. Circumferential waves include surface Rayleigh-type waves (propagating mostly in the embedding medium), Stoneley waves (propagating mostly in the fluid, if present), and Frantz waves (body waves trapped in the object because of its curvature). Strong impedance contrast ensures small radiation loss for circumferential waves and they slowly decay in amplitude while rotating inside/around the object. Some circumferential waves exist in the high-velocity objects but their amplitudes decay very fast because of strong radiation in outer medium. Most of the secondary (multiply reflected from an object's boundaries or multiply circled around the object) resonant-scattered energy radiates in the embedding medium as shear waves. The possibility of neglecting P- waves in late scattering arrivals simplifies imaging as is demonstrated for the field and modeled data of the example. Resonant emission phenomenon provides an effective tool for active monitoring for a number of applications such as tunnel detection

  4. Resonance test system

    DOEpatents

    Musial, Walter [Boulder, CO; White, Darris [Superior, CO

    2011-05-31

    An apparatus (10) for applying at least one load to a specimen (12) according to one embodiment of the invention may comprise a mass (18). An actuator (20) mounted to the specimen (12) and operatively associated with the mass (18) moves the mass (18) along a linear displacement path (22) that is perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the specimen (12). A control system (26) operatively associated with the actuator (20) operates the actuator (20) to reciprocate the mass (18) along the linear displacement path (22) at a reciprocating frequency, the reciprocating frequency being about equal to a resonance frequency of the specimen (12) in a test configuration.

  5. Nanotube resonator devices

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  6. Ellipsometric surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wei-Liang; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2009-03-01

    We develop a new multifunctional optical biochip system that integrates an ellipsometer with a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) feature. This newly developed biochip biosensor, which we call ESPR for an ellipsometric SPR, provides us with a system to retrieve detailed information such as the optical properties of immobilized biomolecular monolayers, surface concentration variations of biomedical reactions, and kinetic affinity between biomolecules required for further biotech analysis. Our ESPR can also serve as both a research and development tool and a manufacturing tool for various biomedical applications.

  7. Vector and scalar charmonium resonances with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel; Prelovsek, Sasa

    2015-09-15

    We perform an exploratory lattice QCD simulation of DD¯ scattering, aimed at determining the masses as well as the decay widths of charmonium resonances above open charm threshold. Neglecting coupling to other channels, the resulting phase shift for DD¯ scattering in p-wave yields the well-known vector resonance ψ(3770). For mπ = 156 MeV, the extracted resonance mass and the decay width agree with experiment within large statistical uncertainty. The scalar charmonium resonances present a puzzle, since only the ground state Χc0(1P) is well understood, while there is no commonly accepted candidate for its first excitation. We simulate DD¯ scattering in s-wave in order to shed light on this puzzle. The resulting phase shift supports the existence of a yet-unobserved narrow resonance with a mass slightly below 4 GeV. A scenario with this narrow resonance and a pole at Χc0(1P) agrees with the energy-dependence of our phase shift. In addition, further lattice QCD simulations and experimental efforts are needed to resolve the puzzle of the excited scalar charmonia.

  8. Vector and scalar charmonium resonances with lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel; ...

    2015-09-15

    We perform an exploratory lattice QCD simulation of DD¯ scattering, aimed at determining the masses as well as the decay widths of charmonium resonances above open charm threshold. Neglecting coupling to other channels, the resulting phase shift for DD¯ scattering in p-wave yields the well-known vector resonance ψ(3770). For mπ = 156 MeV, the extracted resonance mass and the decay width agree with experiment within large statistical uncertainty. The scalar charmonium resonances present a puzzle, since only the ground state Χc0(1P) is well understood, while there is no commonly accepted candidate for its first excitation. We simulate DD¯ scattering inmore » s-wave in order to shed light on this puzzle. The resulting phase shift supports the existence of a yet-unobserved narrow resonance with a mass slightly below 4 GeV. A scenario with this narrow resonance and a pole at Χc0(1P) agrees with the energy-dependence of our phase shift. In addition, further lattice QCD simulations and experimental efforts are needed to resolve the puzzle of the excited scalar charmonia.« less

  9. Pressure dependent resonant frequency of micromechanical drumhead resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, D. R.; Craighead, H. G.; Parpia, J. M.

    2009-05-25

    We examine the relationship between squeeze film effects and resonance frequency in drum-type resonators. We find that the resonance frequency increases linearly with pressure as a result of the additional restoring force contribution from compression of gas within the drum cavity. We demonstrate trapping of the gas by squeeze film effects and geometry. The pressure sensitivity is shown to scale inversely with cavity height and sound radiation is found to be the predominant loss mechanism near and above atmospheric pressure. Drum resonators exhibit linearity and sensitivity suitable to barometry from below 10 Torr up to several atmospheres.

  10. Brain extraction using geodesic active contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Albert; Abugharbieh, Rafeef; Tam, Roger; Traboulsee, Anthony

    2006-03-01

    Extracting the brain cortex from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) head scans is an essential preprocessing step of which the accuracy greatly affects subsequent image analysis. The currently popular Brain Extraction Tool (BET) produces a brain mask which may be too smooth for practical use. This paper presents a novel brain extraction tool based on three-dimensional geodesic active contours, connected component analysis and mathematical morphology. Based on user-specified intensity and contrast levels, the proposed algorithm allows an active contour to evolve naturally and extract the brain cortex. Experiments on synthetic MRI data and scanned coronal and axial MRI image volumes indicate successful extraction of tight perimeters surrounding the brain cortex. Quantitative evaluations on both synthetic phantoms and manually labeled data resulted in better accuracy than BET in terms of true and false voxel assignment. Based on these results, we illustrate that our brain extraction tool is a robust and accurate approach for the challenging task of automatically extracting the brain cortex in MRI data.

  11. nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Karwacki, F. A.; Griffin, J.

    1985-04-02

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope which derives angular rotation thereof from the phases of precessing nuclear moments utilizes a single-resonance cell situated in the center of a uniform DC magnetic field. The field is generated by current flow through a circular array of coils between parallel plates. It also utilizes a pump and read-out beam and associated electronics for signal processing and control. Encapsulated in the cell for sensing rotation are odd isotopes of Mercury Hg/sup 199/ and Hg/sup 201/. Unpolarized intensity modulated light from a pump lamp is directed by lenses to a linear polarizer, quarter wave plate combination producing circularly polarized light. The circularly polarized light is reflected by a mirror to the cell transverse to the field for optical pumping of the isotopes. Unpolarized light from a readout lamp is directed by lenses to another linear polarizer. The linearly polarized light is reflected by another mirror to the cell transverse to the field and orthogonal to the pump lamp light. The linear light after transversing the cell strikes an analyzer where it is converted to an intensity-modulated light. The modulated light is detected by a photodiode processed and utilized as feedback to control the field and pump lamp excitation and readout of angular displacement.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Safety

    PubMed Central

    Sammet, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has a superior soft-tissue contrast compared to other radiological imaging modalities and its physiological and functional applications have led to a significant increase in MRI scans worldwide. A comprehensive MRI safety training to protect patients and other healthcare workers from potential bio-effects and risks of the magnetic fields in an MRI suite is therefore essential. The knowledge of the purpose of safety zones in an MRI suite as well as MRI appropriateness criteria is important for all healthcare professionals who will work in the MRI environment or refer patients for MRI scans. The purpose of this article is to give an overview of current magnetic resonance safety guidelines and discuss the safety risks of magnetic fields in an MRI suite including forces and torque of ferromagnetic objects, tissue heating, peripheral nerve stimulation and hearing damages. MRI safety and compatibility of implanted devices, MRI scans during pregnancy and the potential risks of MRI contrast agents will also be discussed and a comprehensive MRI safety training to avoid fatal accidents in an MRI suite will be presented. PMID:26940331

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, design, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael; Mirijanian, James

    2012-06-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation is concluding the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, and design basics of the NMRG including an overview of the NSD designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program. General performance results from phases 3 and 4 will also be presented.

  15. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Bulatowicz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This presentation will describe the operational principles, design basics, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  16. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  17. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  18. Tunable superconducting microstrip resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamyan, A. A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Danilov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a simple yet versatile design for a tunable superconducting microstrip resonator. Niobium nitride is employed as the superconducting material and aluminum oxide, produced by atomic layer deposition, as the dielectric layer. We show that the high quality of the dielectric material allows to reach the internal quality factors in the order of Qi˜104 in the single photon regime. Qi rapidly increases with the number of photons in the resonator N and exceeds 105 for N ˜10 -50 . A straightforward modification of the basic microstrip design allows to pass a current bias through the strip and to control its kinetic inductance. We achieve a frequency tuning δf =62 MHz around f0=2.4 GHz for a fundamental mode and δf =164 MHz for a third harmonic. This translates into a tuning parameter Qiδf /f0=150 . The presented design can be incorporated into essentially any superconducting circuitry operating at temperatures below 2.5 K.

  19. A mirrorless spinwave resonator

    PubMed Central

    Pinel, Olivier; Everett, Jesse L.; Hosseini, Mahdi; Campbell, Geoff T.; Buchler, Ben C.; Lam, Ping Koy

    2015-01-01

    Optical resonance is central to a wide range of optical devices and techniques. In an optical cavity, the round-trip length and mirror reflectivity can be chosen to optimize the circulating optical power, linewidth, and free-spectral range (FSR) for a given application. In this paper we show how an atomic spinwave system, with no physical mirrors, can behave in a manner that is analogous to an optical cavity. We demonstrate this similarity by characterising the build-up and decay of the resonance in the time domain, and measuring the effective optical linewidth and FSR in the frequency domain. Our spinwave is generated in a 20 cm long Rb gas cell, yet it facilitates an effective FSR of 83 kHz, which would require a round-trip path of 3.6 km in a free-space optical cavity. Furthermore, the spinwave coupling is controllable enabling dynamic tuning of the effective cavity parameters. PMID:26655839

  20. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices. PMID:27010103

  1. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-03-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices.

  2. DISSIPATIVE DIVERGENCE OF RESONANT ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Konstantin; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    A considerable fraction of multi-planet systems discovered by the observational surveys of extrasolar planets reside in mild proximity to first-order mean-motion resonances. However, the relative remoteness of such systems from nominal resonant period ratios (e.g., 2:1, 3:2, and 4:3) has been interpreted as evidence for lack of resonant interactions. Here, we show that a slow divergence away from exact commensurability is a natural outcome of dissipative evolution and demonstrate that libration of critical angles can be maintained tens of percent away from nominal resonance. We construct an analytical theory for the long-term dynamical evolution of dissipated resonant planetary pairs and confirm our calculations numerically. Collectively, our results suggest that a significant fraction of the near-commensurate extrasolar planets are in fact resonant and have undergone significant dissipative evolution.

  3. Optical resonator and laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  4. Fermi resonance in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chang-Hwan; Yu, Hyeon-Hye; Lee, Ji-Won; Kim, Chil-Min

    2015-04-01

    Fermi resonance is a phenomenon of quantum mechanical superposition, which most often occurs between normal and overtone modes in molecular systems that are nearly coincident in energy. We find that scarred resonances in deformed dielectric microcavities are the very phenomenon of Fermi resonance, that is, a pair of quasinormal modes interact with each other due to coupling and a pair of resonances are generated through an avoided resonance crossing. Then the quantum number difference of a pair of quasinormal modes, which is a consequence of quantum mechanical superposition, equals periodic orbits, whereby the resonances are localized on the periodic orbits. We derive the relation between the quantum number difference and the periodic orbits and confirm it in an elliptic, a rectangular, and a stadium-shaped dielectric microcavity.

  5. GAUSSIAN BEAM LASER RESONATOR PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    In designing a laser cavity, the laser engineer is frequently concerned with more than the stability of the resonator. Other considerations include the size of the beam at various optical surfaces within the resonator or the performance of intracavity line-narrowing or other optical elements. Laser resonators obey the laws of Gaussian beam propagation, not geometric optics. The Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators using Gaussian ray trace techniques. It can be used to determine the propagation of radiation through laser resonators. The algorithm used in the Gaussian Beam Resonator program has three major components. First, the ray transfer matrix for the laser resonator must be calculated. Next calculations of the initial beam parameters, specifically, the beam stability, the beam waist size and location for the resonator input element, and the wavefront curvature and beam radius at the input surface to the first resonator element are performed. Finally the propagation of the beam through the optical elements is computed. The optical elements can be modeled as parallel plates, lenses, mirrors, dummy surfaces, or Gradient Index (GRIN) lenses. A Gradient Index lens is a good approximation of a laser rod operating under a thermal load. The optical system may contain up to 50 elements. In addition to the internal beam elements the optical system may contain elements external to the resonator. The Gaussian Beam Resonator program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01). It was developed for the IBM PS/2 80-071 microcomputer and has been implemented on an IBM PC compatible under MS DOS 3.21. The program was developed in 1988 and requires approximately 95K bytes to operate.

  6. Resonance capture and Saturn's rings

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, C.W.

    1986-05-01

    We have assigned the resonances apparently responsible for the stabilization of the Saturn's shepherd satellites and for the substructure seen in the F-ring and the ringlets in the C-ring. We show that Saturn's narrow ringlets have a substructure determined by three-body resonances with Saturn's ringmoons and the sun. We believe such resonances have important implications to satellite formation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Coupled resonator vertical cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Chow, W.W.; Hou, H.Q.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    The monolithic integration of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. The authors report the first electrically injected coupled resonator vertical-cavity laser diode and demonstrate novel characteristics arising from the cavity coupling, including methods for external modulation of the laser. A coupled mode theory is used model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser.

  8. Extraction and characterization of montmorency (Prunus cerasus L.) sour cherry pit oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Montmorency sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) pit oil was extracted and characterized by various methods including: gas chromatography (GC), liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorime...

  9. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    PubMed

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  10. Fano resonances in nanoscale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Flach, Sergej; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2010-07-15

    Modern nanotechnology allows one to scale down various important devices (sensors, chips, fibers, etc.) and thus opens up new horizons for their applications. The efficiency of most of them is based on fundamental physical phenomena, such as transport of wave excitations and resonances. Short propagation distances make phase-coherent processes of waves important. Often the scattering of waves involves propagation along different paths and, as a consequence, results in interference phenomena, where constructive interference corresponds to resonant enhancement and destructive interference to resonant suppression of the transmission. Recently, a variety of experimental and theoretical work has revealed such patterns in different physical settings. The purpose of this review is to relate resonant scattering to Fano resonances, known from atomic physics. One of the main features of the Fano resonance is its asymmetric line profile. The asymmetry originates from a close coexistence of resonant transmission and resonant reflection and can be reduced to the interaction of a discrete (localized) state with a continuum of propagation modes. The basic concepts of Fano resonances are introduced, their geometrical and/or dynamical origin are explained, and theoretical and experimental studies of light propagation in photonic devices, charge transport through quantum dots, plasmon scattering in Josephson-junction networks, and matter-wave scattering in ultracold atom systems, among others are reviewed.

  11. Dynamic coupling of plasmonic resonators

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suyeon; Park, Q-Han

    2016-01-01

    We clarify the nature of dynamic coupling in plasmonic resonators and determine the dynamic coupling coefficient using a simple analytic model. We show that plasmonic resonators, such as subwavelength holes in a metal film which can be treated as bound charge oscillators, couple to each other through the retarded interaction of oscillating screened charges. Our dynamic coupling model offers, for the first time, a quantitative analytic description of the fundamental symmetric and anti-symmetric modes of coupled resonators which agrees with experimental results. Our model also reveals that plasmonic electromagnetically induced transparency arises in any coupled resonators of slightly unequal lengths, as confirmed by a rigorous numerical calculation and experiments. PMID:26911786

  12. Electromagnetic production of hyperon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    K. Hicks, D. Keller, W. Tang

    2011-10-01

    The study of hyperon resonances has entered a new era of precision with advent of high-statistics photoproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. These data have multi-particle final states, allowing clean identification of exclusive reactions associated with strange mesons and baryons. Examples of physics results are: evidence for isospin interference in the decay of the {Lambda}(1405) resonance; a strong suggestion of meson cloud effects in the structure of the {Sigma}(1385) resonance; data from K* photoproduction that will test the existence of the purported K{sub 0}(800)$ meson. Properties of other hyperon resonances will also be studied in the near future.

  13. Acoustic detection of microbubble resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. H.; Looney, P.; Steel, R.; Pelekasis, N.; McDicken, W. N.; Anderson, T.; Sboros, V.

    2009-06-01

    Large numbers of acoustic signals from single lipid-shelled Definity® microbubbles have been measured using a calibrated microacoustic system and a two population response observed. Theoretical results based on the Mooney-Rivlin strain softening shell model have been used to identify these populations as primary resonant and off-primary resonant scatter. An experimentally measured size distribution was used to provide the initial resting radius for the simulations, and the responses agree well with the experimental data. In this way, the primary resonant or off-primary resonant behavior of a microbubble can be studied, with potential benefits to both signal processing techniques and microbubble manufacture.

  14. Theory of Adiabatic Fountain Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2017-01-01

    The theory of "Adiabatic Fountain Resonance" with superfluid ^4{He} is clarified. In this geometry a film region between two silicon wafers bonded at their outer edge opens up to a central region with a free surface. We find that the resonance in this system is not a Helmholtz resonance as claimed by Gasparini et al., but in fact is a fourth sound resonance. We postulate that it occurs at relatively low frequency because the thin silicon wafers flex appreciably from the pressure oscillations of the sound wave.

  15. Electromagnetic production of hyperon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, K.; Keller, D.; Tang, W.

    2011-10-24

    The study of hyperon resonances has entered a new era of precision with advent of high-statistics photoproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. These data have multi-particle final states, allowing clean identification of exclusive reactions associated with strange mesons and baryons. Examples of physics results are: evidence for isospin interference in the decay of the {Lambda}(1405) resonance; a strong suggestion of meson cloud effects in the structure of the {Sigma}(1385) resonance; data from K* photoproduction that will test the existence of the purported K{sub 0}(800) meson. Properties of other hyperon resonances will also be studied in the near future.

  16. Orbital Resonances Around Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-01

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  17. Cylindrical coils near self-resonance.

    PubMed

    Harpen, M D

    1993-10-01

    We present a model of birdcage resonator operation when the size of the resonator approaches a quarter wave length resulting in significant phase shifts along the current conducting elements. In the model resonators are treated as generalized transmission lines. Line termination determines whether the resonator is of the low pass or high pass type. The model correctly describes the dependence of resonant frequency on resonant mode number as well as the distribution of current along the length of the resonator.

  18. Development and Application of the High Bandwidth Powered Resonance Tube

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-09

    19 2.4 Iso -surface extracted from three dimensional map of Figure 2.3. The 140 dB iso - surface represents the...from left to right ................ 32 2.14 Iso -Mach contours from a simulation of a powered resonance tube using the Wind code. The nozzle pressure...pressure and tube depth. (NPR_Standard - 1.15 NPR). 19 3.72 3.38 C- z 3.04 [.0 1.0 3. S/D 2.0 ý4.0 Figure 2.4: Iso -surface extracted from three dimensional

  19. Electromagnetic Meson Production in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Volker Burkert; T.-S. H. Lee

    2004-10-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical advances in investigating electromagnetic meson production reactions in the nucleon resonance region are reviewed. The article gives a description of current experimental facilities with electron and photon beams and presents a unified derivation of most of the phenomenological approaches being used to extract the resonance parameters from the data. The analyses of {pi} and {eta} production data and the resulting transition form factors for the {Delta}(1232)P{sub 33}, N(1535)S{sub 11}, N(1440)P{sub 11}, and N(1520)D{sub 13} resonances are discussed in detail. The status of our understanding of the reactions with production of two pions, kaons, and vector mesons is also reviewed.

  20. Surface-resistance measurements using superconducting stripline resonators.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Daniel; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to measure the absolute surface resistance of conductive samples at a set of GHz frequencies with superconducting lead stripline resonators at temperatures 1-6 K. The stripline structure can easily be applied for bulk samples and allows direct calculation of the surface resistance without the requirement of additional calibration measurements or sample reference points. We further describe a correction method to reduce experimental background on high-Q resonance modes by exploiting TEM-properties of the external cabling. We then show applications of this method to the reference materials gold, tantalum, and tin, which include the anomalous skin effect and conventional superconductivity. Furthermore, we extract the complex optical conductivity for an all-lead stripline resonator to find a coherence peak and the superconducting gap of lead.

  1. FERMILAB SWITCHYARD RESONANT BEAM POSITION MONITOR ELECTRONICS UPGRADE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, T.; Diamond, J.; Liu, N.; Prieto, P. S.; Slimmer, D.; Watts, A.

    2016-10-12

    The readout electronics for the resonant beam position monitors (BPMs) in the Fermilab Switchyard (SY) have been upgraded, utilizing a low noise amplifier transition board and Fermilab designed digitizer boards. The stripline BPMs are estimated to have an average signal output of between -110 dBm and -80 dBm, with an estimated peak output of -70 dBm. The external resonant circuit is tuned to the SY machine frequency of 53.10348 MHz. Both the digitizer and transition boards have variable gain in order to accommodate the large dynamic range and irregularity of the resonant extraction spill. These BPMs will aid in auto-tuning of the SY beamline as well as enabling operators to monitor beam position through the spill.

  2. Nonlinear Oscillations of Microscale Piezoelectric Resonators and Resonator Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-30

    static buckling deflection of the resonator d3E, kI(x) d 3 , k(x) can be expressed as Elt -t = Elk ----- T- at X = Xk-_ Here, it is important to note that...a number of the parameters can resonators clearly reveal nonlinear characteristics. Although b icted by usng the ro rg met ersal the dimensions of

  3. Slope tunable Fano resonances in asymmetric embedded microring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gencheng; Dai, Tingge; Jiang, Jianfei; Yu, Hui; Hao, Yinlei; Wang, Yuehai; Li, Yubo; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jianyi

    2017-02-01

    An asymmetric embedded microring resonant system is proposed and fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) to achieve slope tunable Fano resonances. The Fano resonances originate from the nonlinear phase shift produced by adding an inner ring coupling with the outer ring. The slope of the Fano resonance can be well tuned to be ultra-high by controlling the microheaters to adjust the phase condition. Experimentally, we observe Fano resonance with a maximum extinction ratio of about 40 dB, and the slope can be tuned from -35 dB nm-1 to -93 dB nm-1, which shows good agreement with the theoretical analysis. This device could find potential applications in ultra-high sensitivity sensing systems.

  4. Resonant algebras and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durka, R.

    2017-04-01

    The S-expansion framework is analyzed in the context of a freedom in closing the multiplication tables for the abelian semigroups. Including the possibility of the zero element in the resonant decomposition, and associating the Lorentz generator with the semigroup identity element, leads to a wide class of the expanded Lie algebras introducing interesting modifications to the gauge gravity theories. Among the results, we find all the Maxwell algebras of type {{B}m} , {{C}m} , and the recently introduced {{D}m} . The additional new examples complete the resulting generalization of the bosonic enlargements for an arbitrary number of the Lorentz-like and translational-like generators. Some further prospects concerning enlarging the algebras are discussed, along with providing all the necessary constituents for constructing the gravity actions based on the obtained results.

  5. Subinertial canyon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Allan J.; Van Gorder, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Near the bottom of a narrow canyon currents that oscillate back and forth along the bottom slope hx in a stratified ocean of buoyancy frequency N do so with a natural internal gravitational frequency Nhx. From May 2012 to May 2013 Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler measurements were made at 715 m depth in the deep narrow part of the DeSoto Canyon south of Pensacola, Florida, in water with 2π/Nhx ≈ 2.5 days. Above the canyon the flow follows the large-scale isobaths, but beneath the canyon rim the current oscillates along the canyon axis with 2-3 day periodicity, and is much stronger than and uncorrelated with the overlying flow. A simple theoretical model explains the resonant response. Published observations from the Hudson and Gully canyons suggest that the strong subinertial current oscillations observed in these canyons occur close to the relevant local frequency Nhx, consistent with the proposed simple model physics.

  6. Cascaded resonant bridge converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A converter for converting a low voltage direct current power source to a higher voltage, high frequency alternating current output for use in an electrical system where it is desired to use low weight cables and other circuit elements. The converter has a first stage series resonant (Schwarz) converter which converts the direct current power source to an alternating current by means of switching elements that are operated by a variable frequency voltage regulator, a transformer to step up the voltage of the alternating current, and a rectifier bridge to convert the alternating current to a direct current first stage output. The converter further has a second stage series resonant (Schwarz) converter which is connected in series to the first stage converter to receive its direct current output and convert it to a second stage high frequency alternating current output by means of switching elements that are operated by a fixed frequency oscillator. The voltage of the second stage output is controlled at a relatively constant value by controlling the first stage output voltage, which is accomplished by controlling the frequency of the first stage variable frequency voltage controller in response to second stage voltage. Fault tolerance in the event of a load short circuit is provided by making the operation of the first stage variable frequency voltage controller responsive to first and second stage current limiting devices. The second stage output is connected to a rectifier bridge whose output is connected to the input of the second stage to provide good regulation of output voltage wave form at low system loads.

  7. White Light Emission from Vegetable Extracts.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikram; Mishra, Ashok K

    2015-06-17

    A mixture of extracts from two common vegetables, red pomegranate and turmeric, when photoexcited at 380 nm, produced almost pure white light emission (WLE) with Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity index (0.35, 0.33) in acidic ethanol. It was also possible to obtain WLE in polyvinyl alcohol film (0.32, 0.25), and in gelatin gel (0.26, 0.33) using the same extract mixture. The colour temperature of the WLE was conveniently tunable by simply adjusting the concentrations of the component emitters. The primary emitting pigments responsible for contributing to WLE were polyphenols and anthocyanins from pomegranate, and curcumin from turmeric. It was observed that a cascade of Forster resonance energy transfer involving polyphenolics, curcumin and anthocyanins played a crucial role in obtaining a CIE index close to pure white light. The optimized methods of extraction of the two primary emitting pigments from their corresponding plant sources are simple, cheap and fairly green.

  8. Whispering Gallery Mode Optomechanical Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aveline, David C.; Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nan; Yee, Karl Y.

    2012-01-01

    Great progress has been made in both micromechanical resonators and micro-optical resonators over the past decade, and a new field has recently emerged combining these mechanical and optical systems. In such optomechanical systems, the two resonators are strongly coupled with one influencing the other, and their interaction can yield detectable optical signals that are highly sensitive to the mechanical motion. A particularly high-Q optical system is the whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator, which has many applications ranging from stable oscillators to inertial sensor devices. There is, however, limited coupling between the optical mode and the resonator s external environment. In order to overcome this limitation, a novel type of optomechanical sensor has been developed, offering great potential for measurements of displacement, acceleration, and mass sensitivity. The proposed hybrid device combines the advantages of all-solid optical WGM resonators with high-quality micro-machined cantilevers. For direct access to the WGM inside the resonator, the idea is to radially cut precise gaps into the perimeter, fabricating a mechanical resonator within the WGM. Also, a strategy to reduce losses has been developed with optimized design of the cantilever geometry and positions of gap surfaces.

  9. Resonating feathers produce courtship song.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Kimberly S; Elias, Damian O; Mason, Andrew; Montealegre-Z, Fernando

    2010-03-22

    Male Club-winged Manakins, Machaeropterus deliciosus (Aves: Pipridae), produce a sustained tonal sound with specialized wing feathers. The fundamental frequency of the sound produced in nature is approximately 1500 Hz and is hypothesized to result from excitation of resonance in the feathers' hypertrophied shafts. We used laser Doppler vibrometry to determine the resonant properties of male Club-winged Manakin's wing feathers, as well as those of two unspecialized manakin species. The modified wing feathers exhibit a response peak near 1500 Hz, and unusually high Q-values (a measure of resonant tuning) for biological objects (Q up to 27). The unmodified wing feathers of the Club-winged Manakin do not exhibit strong resonant properties when measured in isolation. However, when measured still attached to the modified feathers (nine feathers held adjacent by an intact ligament), they resonate together as a unit near 1500 Hz, and the wing produces a second harmonic of similar or greater amplitude than the fundamental. The feathers of the control species also exhibit resonant peaks around 1500 Hz, but these are significantly weaker, the wing does not resonate as a unit and no harmonics are produced. These results lend critical support to the resonant stridulation hypothesis of sound production in M. deliciosus.

  10. The Resonance of Renaissance Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenblatt, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    Discusses reading and teaching Renaissance poetry in terms of the poem's "resonance," its capacity to speak to contemporary readers directly and draw them into its historical world. Advises teachers to expand the resonance to illuminate the poem's background, as exemplified by the poetry of Thomas Wyatt in the court of Henry VIII. (DF)

  11. Negative-Frequency Resonant Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, E.; McLenaghan, J.; Kehr, S. C.; Belgiorno, F.; Townsend, D.; Rohr, S.; Kuklewicz, C. E.; Leonhardt, U.; König, F.; Faccio, D.

    2012-06-01

    Optical solitons or solitonlike states shed light to blueshifted frequencies through a resonant emission process. We predict a mechanism by which a second propagating mode is generated. This mode, called negative resonant radiation, originates from the coupling of the soliton mode to the negative-frequency branch of the dispersion relation. Measurements in both bulk media and photonic-crystal fibers confirm our predictions.

  12. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lai, J.S.; Peng, F.Z.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Ott, G.W. Jr.

    1998-01-20

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 36 figs.

  13. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Peng, Fang Zheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Ott, Jr., George W.

    1998-01-01

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  14. Collisional activation of ions by off-resonance irradiation in ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seung Koo; Han, Seung-Jin; Seo, Jongcheol

    2009-06-01

    Collisional activation of ions in the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cell by short off-resonance burst irradiation (ORBI) was studied by time-resolved photodissociation of the meta-bromotoluene radical cation. Off-resonance chirp or single-frequency burst was applied for 2 ms to the probe ion in the presence of Ar buffer gas. The amount of internal energy imparted to the probe ion by collision under ORBI was precisely determined by time-resolved photodissociation spectroscopy. The rate of unimolecular dissociation of the probe ion following the photolysis at 532 nm was measured by monitoring the real-time appearance of the C7H7+ product ion. The internal energy of the probe ion was extracted from the known rate-energy curve. To help understand the collisional activation of an ion under ORBI, we simulated the radial trajectory of the ion using Green's method. The calculated radial kinetic energy was converted to the collision energy in the center-of-mass frame, and the collision frequency was estimated by using a reactive hard-sphere collision model with an ion-induced dipole potential. Both experiments and trajectory simulations suggest that chirp irradiation leads to less collisional activation of ions than other waveforms.

  15. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  16. Proton Spin Structure in the Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    F. R. Wesselmann; K. Slifer; S. Tajima; A. Aghalaryan; A. Ahmidouch; R. Asaturyan; F. Bloch; W. Boeglin; P. Bosted; C. Carasco; R. Carlini; J. Cha; J. P. Chen; M. E. Christy; L. Cole; L. Coman; D. Crabb; S. Danagoulian; D. Day; J. Dunne; M. Elaasar; R. Ent; H. Fenker; E. Frlez; L. Gan; D. Gaskell; J. Gomez; B. Hu; M. K. Jones; J. Jourdan; C. Keith; C. E. Keppel; M. Khandaker; A. Klein; L. Kramer; Y. Liang; J. Lichtenstadt; R. Lindgren; D. Mack; P. McKee; D. McNulty; D. Meekins; H. Mkrtchyan; R. Nasseripour; I. Niculescu; K. Normand; B. Norum; D. Pocanic; Y. Prok; B. Raue; J. Reinhold; J. Roche; D. Rohe; O. A. Rondon; N. Savvinov; B. Sawatzky; M. Seely; I. Sick; C. Smith; G. Smith; S. Stepanyan; L. Tang; G. Testa; W. Vulcan; K. Wang; G. Warren; S. Wood; C. Yan; L. Yuan; Junho Yun; Markus Zeier; Hong Guo Zhu

    2006-10-11

    The RSS collaboration has measured the spin structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} of the proton at Jefferson Lab using the lab's polarized electron beam, the Hall C HMS spectrometer and the UVa polarized solid target. The asymmetries A{sub parallel} and A{sub perp} were measured at the elastic peak and in the region of the nucleon resonances (1.085 GeV < W < 1.910 GeV) at an average four momentum transfer of Q{sup 2} = 1.3 GeV{sup 2}. The extracted spin structure functions and their kinematic dependence make a significant contribution in the study of higher-twist effects and polarized duality tests.

  17. Auxiliary resonant DC tank converter

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Z.

    2000-01-01

    An auxiliary resonant dc tank (ARDCT) converter is provided for achieving soft-switching in a power converter. An ARDCT circuit is coupled directly across a dc bus to the inverter to generate a resonant dc bus voltage, including upper and lower resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, first and second dc tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and an auxiliary resonant circuit comprising a series combination of a resonant inductor and a pair of auxiliary switching devices. The ARDCT circuit further includes first clamping means for holding the resonant dc bus voltage to the dc tank voltage of the tank leg, and second clamping means for clamping the resonant dc bus voltage to zero during a resonant period. The ARDCT circuit resonantly brings the dc bus voltage to zero in order to provide a zero-voltage switching opportunity for the inverter, then quickly rebounds the dc bus voltage back to the dc tank voltage after the inverter changes state. The auxiliary switching devices are turned on and off under zero-current conditions. The ARDCT circuit only absorbs ripples of the inverter dc bus current, thus having less current stress. In addition, since the ARDCT circuit is coupled in parallel with the dc power supply and the inverter for merely assisting soft-switching of the inverter without participating in real dc power transmission and power conversion, malfunction and failure of the tank circuit will not affect the functional operation of the inverter; thus a highly reliable converter system is expected.

  18. Resonance parameter measurements and analysis of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Barry, D. P.; Trbovich, M. J.; Burke, J. A.; Drindak, N. J.; Knox, H. D.; Ballad, R. V.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.; Severnyak, L. I.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of gadolinium accurately. Gd has the highest thermal absorption cross section of any natural element. Therefore it is an important element for thermal reactor applications Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Gd samples. The liquid samples were isotopically-enriched in either {sup 155}Gd or {sup 157}Gd. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a sodium iodide detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. The multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY was used to extract resonance parameters. The results of the thermal region analysis are significant. Resonance parameters for the low energy doublet, at 0.025 and 0.032 eV, are presented. The thermal (2200 m/s) capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd has been measured to be 11% smaller than that calculated from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 8. Thermal capture cross sections and capture resonance integrals for each isotope as well as elemental gadolinium are presented. In the epithermal region, natural metal samples were measured in capture and transmission. Neutron interaction data up to 300 eV have been analyzed. Substantial improvement to the understanding of gadolinium cross sections is presented, particularly above 180 eV where the ENDF resolved region for {sup 155}Gd ends. (authors)

  19. Mercury's resonant rotation from secular orbital elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen; Hussmann, Hauke

    2015-11-01

    We used recently produced Solar System ephemerides, which incorporate 2 years of ranging observations to the MESSENGER spacecraft, to extract the secular orbital elements for Mercury and associated uncertainties. As Mercury is in a stable 3:2 spin-orbit resonance, these values constitute an important reference for the planet's measured rotational parameters, which in turn strongly bear on physical interpretation of Mercury's interior structure. In particular, we derive a mean orbital period of (87.96934962 ± 0.00000037) days and (assuming a perfect resonance) a spin rate of (6.138506839± 0.000000028)°/day. The difference between this rotation rate and the currently adopted rotation rate (Archinal et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 109(2):101-135, 2011. doi:10.1007/s10569-010-9320-4), corresponds to a longitudinal displacement of approx. 67 m per year at the equator. Moreover, we present a basic approach for the calculation of the orientation of the instantaneous Laplace and Cassini planes of Mercury. The analysis allows us to assess the uncertainties in physical parameters of the planet, when derived from observations of Mercury's rotation.

  20. Resonance wave pumping: wave mass transport pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmigniani, Remi; Violeau, Damien; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    It has been previously reported that pinching at intrinsic resonance frequencies a valveless pump (or Liebau pump) results in a strong pulsating flow. A free-surface version of the Liebau pump is presented. The experiment consists of a closed tank with a submerged plate separating the water into a free-surface and a recirculation section connected through two openings at each end of the tank. A paddle is placed at an off-centre position at the free-surface and controlled in a heaving motion with different frequencies and amplitudes. Near certain frequencies identified as resonance frequencies through a linear potential theory analysis, the system behaves like a pump. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is performed in the near free surface region and compared with simulations using Volume of Fluid (VOF) method. The mean eulerian mass flux field (ρ) is extracted. It is observed that the flow is located in the vicinity of the surface layer suggesting Stokes Drift (or Wave Mass Transport) is the source of the pumping. A model is developped to extend the linear potential theory to the second order to take into account these observations. The authors would like to acknowledge the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation for their generous support.

  1. Resonance Parameter Adjustment Based on Integral Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz; Arbanas, Goran; Forget, Benoit

    2016-06-02

    Our project seeks to allow coupling of differential and integral data evaluation in a continuous-energy framework and to use the generalized linear least-squares (GLLS) methodology in the TSURFER module of the SCALE code package to update the parameters of a resolved resonance region evaluation. We recognize that the GLLS methodology in TSURFER is identical to the mathematical description of a Bayesian update in SAMMY, the SAMINT code was created to use the mathematical machinery of SAMMY to update resolved resonance parameters based on integral data. Traditionally, SAMMY used differential experimental data to adjust nuclear data parameters. Integral experimental data, such as in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project, remain a tool for validation of completed nuclear data evaluations. SAMINT extracts information from integral benchmarks to aid the nuclear data evaluation process. Later, integral data can be used to resolve any remaining ambiguity between differential data sets, highlight troublesome energy regions, determine key nuclear data parameters for integral benchmark calculations, and improve the nuclear data covariance matrix evaluation. Moreover, SAMINT is not intended to bias nuclear data toward specific integral experiments but should be used to supplement the evaluation of differential experimental data. Using GLLS ensures proper weight is given to the differential data.

  2. Resonance Parameter Adjustment Based on Integral Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz; Arbanas, Goran; ...

    2016-06-02

    Our project seeks to allow coupling of differential and integral data evaluation in a continuous-energy framework and to use the generalized linear least-squares (GLLS) methodology in the TSURFER module of the SCALE code package to update the parameters of a resolved resonance region evaluation. We recognize that the GLLS methodology in TSURFER is identical to the mathematical description of a Bayesian update in SAMMY, the SAMINT code was created to use the mathematical machinery of SAMMY to update resolved resonance parameters based on integral data. Traditionally, SAMMY used differential experimental data to adjust nuclear data parameters. Integral experimental data, suchmore » as in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project, remain a tool for validation of completed nuclear data evaluations. SAMINT extracts information from integral benchmarks to aid the nuclear data evaluation process. Later, integral data can be used to resolve any remaining ambiguity between differential data sets, highlight troublesome energy regions, determine key nuclear data parameters for integral benchmark calculations, and improve the nuclear data covariance matrix evaluation. Moreover, SAMINT is not intended to bias nuclear data toward specific integral experiments but should be used to supplement the evaluation of differential experimental data. Using GLLS ensures proper weight is given to the differential data.« less

  3. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process.

  4. Seismic metasurfaces: Sub-wavelength resonators and Rayleigh wave interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colquitt, D. J.; Colombi, A.; Craster, R. V.; Roux, P.; Guenneau, S. R. L.

    2017-02-01

    We consider the canonical problem of an array of rods, which act as resonators, placed on an elastic substrate; the substrate being either a thin elastic plate or an elastic half-space. In both cases the flexural plate, or Rayleigh surface, waves in the substrate interact with the resonators to create interesting effects such as effective band-gaps for surface waves or filters that transform surface waves into bulk waves; these effects have parallels in the field of optics where such sub-wavelength resonators create metamaterials in the bulk and metasurfaces at the free surfaces. Here we carefully analyse this canonical problem by extracting the dispersion relations analytically thereby examining the influence of both the flexural and compressional resonances on the propagating wave. For an array of resonators atop an elastic half-space we augment the analysis with numerical simulations. Amongst other effects, we demonstrate the striking effect of a dispersion curve which corresponds to a mode that transitions from Rayleigh wave-like to shear wave-like behaviour and the resultant change in the fields from surface to bulk waves.

  5. Multiple pass unstable resonator for an annular gain CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, V. A.; Seguin, H. J. J.; Capjack, C. E.; Nikumb, S. K.; Reshef, H.

    1986-11-01

    The design, construction, and operational characteristics of an optical resonator for an annular gain media are described. The system, developed for laser power extraction investigations in a new type of coaxial discharge geometry, features a folded multipass unstable resonator concept, fabricated from lightweight uncoated diamond-turned aluminum substrates. The resulting CW CO2 device incorporates excitation aspects of the nonself-sustained PIE excitation process in addition to a new magnetic discharge stabilization technique. Laser performance and output beam characteristics are presented.

  6. Effect of three-pion unitarity on resonance poles from heavy meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi X. Nakamura

    2011-10-01

    We study the final state interaction in 3-pion decay of meson resonances at the Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) of JLab. We apply the dynamical coupled-channels formulation which has been extensively used by EBAC to extract N* information. The formulation satisfies the 3-pion unitarity condition which has been missed in the existing works with the isobar models. We report the effect of the 3-pion unitarity on the meson resonance pole positions and Dalitz plot.

  7. Nonlinear optical whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators comprising nonlinear optical materials, where the nonlinear optical material of a WGM resonator includes a plurality of sectors within the optical resonator and nonlinear coefficients of two adjacent sectors are oppositely poled.

  8. Quartz crystal and superconductive resonators and oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    A general overview of piezoelectric resonators is given with emphasis on evolution of the resonator design. Superconducting cavities and crystals at low temperature and the use of resonant frequencies are also discussed.

  9. Proton magnetic resonance spectrum of polywater.

    PubMed

    Petsko, G A

    1970-01-09

    With the aid of a time average computer, the proton magnetic resonance spectrum of anomalous water (polywater) is obtained. The spectrum conisists of a single broad resonance shifted approximately 300 hertz downfield from the resonance of ordinary water.

  10. Simulation and beamline experiments for the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, Damon S.; Leitner, Daniela; Lyneis, Claude M.; Grote, David P.

    2008-02-15

    The particle-in-cell code WARP has been enhanced to incorporate both two- and three-dimensional sheath extraction models giving WARP the capability of simulating entire ion beam transport systems including the extraction of beams from plasma sources. In this article, we describe a method of producing initial ion distributions for plasma extraction simulations in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources based on experimentally measured sputtering on the source biased disk. Using this initialization method, we present preliminary results for extraction and transport simulations of an oxygen beam and compare them with experimental beam imaging on a quartz viewing plate for the superconducting ECR ion source VENUS.

  11. TANGO standard software to control the Nuclotron beam slow extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V. A.; Volkov, V. I.; Gorbachev, E. V.; Isadov, V. A.; Kirichenko, A. E.; Romanov, S. V.; Sedykh, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    TANGO Controls is a basis of the NICA control system. The report describes the software which integrates the Nuclotron beam slow extraction subsystem into the TANGO system of NICA. Objects of control are power supplies for resonance lenses. The software consists of the subsystem device server, remote client and web-module for viewing the subsystem data.

  12. Nucleon Resonance Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2016-10-01

    Recent results of meson photo-production at the existing electron machines with polarized real photon beams and the measurement of polarization observables of the final state baryons have provided high precision data that led to the discovery of new excited nucleon and Δ states using multi-channel partial wave analyses procedures. The internal structure of several prominent excited states has been revealed employing meson electroproduction processes. On the theoretical front, lattice QCD is now predicting the baryon spectrum with very similar characteristics as the constituent quark model, and continuum QCD, such as is represented in the Dyson-Schwinger equations approach and in light front relativistic quark models, describes the non-perturbative behavior of resonance excitations at photon virtuality of Q^2 > 1.5 GeV^2. In this talk I discuss the need to continue a vigorous program of nucleon spectroscopy and the study of the internal structure of excited states as a way to reveal the effective degrees of freedom underlying the excited states and their dependence on the distance scale probed.

  13. Nucleon Resonance Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2016-07-25

    Recent results of meson photo-production at the existing electron machines with polarized real photon beams and the measurement of polarization observables of the final state baryons have provided high precision data that led to the discovery of new excited nucleon and $\\Delta$ states using multi-channel partial wave analyses procedures. The internal structure of several prominent excited states has been revealed employing meson electroproduction processes. On the theoretical front, lattice QCD is now predicting the baryon spectrum with very similar characteristics as the constituent quark model, and continuum QCD, such as is represented in the Dyson-Schwinger Equations approach and in light front relativistic quark models, describes the non-perturbative behavior of resonance excitations at photon virtuality of $Q^2 > 1.5GeV^2$. In this talk I discuss the need to continue a vigorous program of nucleon spectroscopy and the study of the internal structure of excited states as a way to reveal the effective degrees of freedom underlying the excited states and their dependence on the distance scale probed.

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael; Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Mirijanian, James; Pavell, James

    2015-05-01

    The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) is being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC). Cold and hot atom interferometer based gyroscopes have suffered from Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) challenges and limits in bandwidth, scale factor stability, dead time, high rotation rate, vibration, and acceleration. NMRG utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as a reference for determining rotation, providing continuous measurement, high bandwidth, stable scale factor, high rotation rate measurement, and low sensitivity to vibration and acceleration in a low SWaP package. The sensitivity to vibration has been partially tested and demonstrates no measured sensitivity within error bars. Real time closed loop implementation of the sensor significantly decreases environmental and systematic sensitivities and supports a compact and low power digital signal processing and control system. Therefore, the NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost SWaP package. The poster will describe the history, operation, and design of the NMRG. General performance results will also be presented along with recent vibration test results.

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks.

  16. Tunable Micro- and Nanomechanical Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Hu, Kai-Ming; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Advances in micro- and nanofabrication technologies have enabled the development of novel micro- and nanomechanical resonators which have attracted significant attention due to their fascinating physical properties and growing potential applications. In this review, we have presented a brief overview of the resonance behavior and frequency tuning principles by varying either the mass or the stiffness of resonators. The progress in micro- and nanomechanical resonators using the tuning electrode, tuning fork, and suspended channel structures and made of graphene have been reviewed. We have also highlighted some major influencing factors such as large-amplitude effect, surface effect and fluid effect on the performances of resonators. More specifically, we have addressed the effects of axial stress/strain, residual surface stress and adsorption-induced surface stress on the sensing and detection applications and discussed the current challenges. We have significantly focused on the active and passive frequency tuning methods and techniques for micro- and nanomechanical resonator applications. On one hand, we have comprehensively evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy, including active methods such as electrothermal, electrostatic, piezoelectrical, dielectric, magnetomotive, photothermal, mode-coupling as well as tension-based tuning mechanisms, and passive techniques such as post-fabrication and post-packaging tuning processes. On the other hand, the tuning capability and challenges to integrate reliable and customizable frequency tuning methods have been addressed. We have additionally concluded with a discussion of important future directions for further tunable micro- and nanomechanical resonators. PMID:26501294

  17. Parametric Resonance for Material Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Laszlo; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2009-03-01

    While studying finite amplitude ultrasonic wave resonance in a one dimensional liquid filled cavity, formed by a narrow band transducer and a plane reflector, fractional harmonics of the driver's frequency were observed in addition to the expected high harmonics. Subsequently it was realized that the system was one of the many examples where parametric resonance takes place and the observed fractional harmonics are parametrically generated. Parametric resonance occurs in any physical system which has a periodically modulated natural frequency. The generation mechanism also requires a sufficiently high threshold value of the driving amplitude and the system becomes nonlinear. Further increase of the driving amplitude above the threshold produces additional fractional harmonics and at a certain value an almost continuous spectrum is produced and the phenomenon becomes chaotic. Our recently developed frequency modulated angle beam ultrasonic method for adhesive bond evaluation is an additional example of the use of a resonance parametric system. The acoustic resonator is formed by an adhesive layer with the resonance frequency affected by the bond quality between the adhesive and the substrates. In this case the interfacial stresses (due to an external low frequency excitation) may or may not produce parametric shift of the resonance depending on the quality of the interfacial bond.

  18. Shedding light on diphoton resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Nathaniel; Draper, Patrick; Kilic, Can; Thomas, Scott

    2016-06-01

    The experimental and theoretical implications of heavy digauge boson resonances that couple to, or are comprised of, new charged and strongly interacting matter are investigated. Observation and measurement of ratios of the resonant digauge boson channels W W , Z Z , γ γ , Z γ , and g g in the form of dijets provide a rather direct—and for some ratios a rather robust—probe of the gauge representations of the new matter. For a spin-zero resonance with the quantum numbers of the vacuum, the ratios of resonant W W and Z Z to γ γ channels, as well as the longitudinal vs transverse polarization fractions in the W W and Z Z channels, provide probes for possible mixing with the Higgs boson, while di-Higgs and ditop resonant channels, h h and t t , provide somewhat less sensitivity. We present a survey of possible underlying models for digauge boson resonances by considering various limits for the mass of the new charged and strongly interacting matter fields as well as the confinement scale of new hypergauge interactions under which they may also be charged. In these limits, resonances may be included as elementary weakly coupled spin-zero states or can correspond to hyperglueballs, hyperonia, or pseudoscalar hypermesons. For each of these cases, we make predictions for additional states that could be resonantly or pair produced and observed at the Large Hadron Collider or in future collider experiments. Heavy digauge boson resonances can provide a unified explanation for a number of small discrepancies and excesses in reported data from the Large Hadron Collider.

  19. Evaluation of the Chromium Resonance Parameters Including Resonance Parameter Covariance

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Derrien, Herve; Guber, Klaus H; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this work is to report the results and describe the procedures utilized to evaluate the chromium isotopes' cross sections, i.e., (50)Cr, (52)Cr, (53)Cr, and (54)Cr, for criticality safety applications. The evaluations were done in the resolved resonance region using the reduced Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. The novel aspect of this evaluation is the inclusion of new transmission and capture cross-section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) for energies below 100 keV and the extension of the (53)Cr energy region. The resonance analysis was performed with the multilevel R-matrix code, SAMMY, which utilizes the generalized least-squares technique based on the Bayes' theory. Complete sets of resonance parameters and resonance parameter covariance matrices (RPCMs) were obtained for each of the chromium isotopes from the SAMMY analysis of the experimental database.

  20. Stepped impedance resonators for high-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Akgun, Can E; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high-field magnetic resonance imaging. In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections, referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs), is investigated. Single-element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 T (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 T in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in a transmit magnetic field, as well as RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus specific absorption rate) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements.

  1. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) is investigated. Single element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 tesla (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 tesla in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in transmit magnetic field, as well as, RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus SAR) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements. PMID:23508243

  2. Cavity resonator coil for high field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Solis, S E; Tomasi, D; Rodriguez, A O

    2007-01-01

    A variant coil of the high frequency cavity resonator coil was experimentally developed according to the theoretical frame proposed by Mansfield in 1990. This coil design is similar to the popular birdcage coil but it has the advantage that it can be easily built following the physical principles of the cavity resonators [1]. The equivalent circuit approach was used to compute the resonant frequency of this coil design, and compared the results with those frequency values obtained with theory. A transceiver coil composed of 4 cavities with a rod length of 4.5 cm, and a resonant frequency of 170.29 MHz was built. Phantom images were then acquired to test its viability using standard imaging sequences. The theory facilitates its development for high frequency MRI applications of animal models.

  3. High Q silica microbubble resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnesi, D.; Barucci, A.; Berneschi, S.; Brenci, M.; Cosi, F.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Pelli, S.; Righini, G. C.; Soria, S.

    2012-01-01

    Microbubble resonators (MBRs) combine the unique properties of whispering gallery mode resonators with the intrinsic capability of integrated microfluidics. Here an improved fabrication method of MBRs is presented, based on the heating of a slightly pressurized capillary by a rotating arc discharge. Rotation of the electrodes ensures an homogeneous distribution of the heat all over the capillary surface. The demonstrated MBRs have Q factors up to 107 at 773 nm. Microbubbles were filled with water and aqueous solutions of ethanol in order to test the refractive index sensing capabilities of such resonators, which also show a good temporal stability.

  4. Introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Mlynárik, Vladimír

    2016-05-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a useful tool for studying normal and pathological biochemical processes in tissues. In this review, the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance and methods of obtaining nuclear magnetic resonance spectra are briefly outlined. The origin of the most important spectroscopic parameters-chemical shifts, coupling constants, longitudinal and transverse relaxation times, and spectroscopic line intensities-is explained, and the role of these parameters in interpretation of spectra is addressed. Basic methodological concepts of localized spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging for the study of tissue metabolism in vivo are also described.

  5. Mechanical resonant immunospecific biological detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilic, B.; Czaplewski, D.; Craighead, H. G.; Neuzil, P.; Campagnolo, C.; Batt, C.

    2000-07-01

    We have demonstrated high-sensitivity detection of bacteria using an array of bulk micromachined resonant cantilevers. The biological sensor is a micromechanical oscillator that consists of an array of silicon-nitride cantilevers with an immobilized antibody layer on the surface of the resonator. Measured resonant frequency shift as a function of the additional cell loading was observed and correlated to the mass of the specifically bound Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells. Deposition and subsequent detection of E. coli cells was achieved under ambient conditions.

  6. Nonlinear behavior of Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersh, A. S.

    1990-10-01

    A semi-empirical fluid mechanical model has been derived to predict the nonlinear acoustic behavior of thin-walled, single-orifice Helmholtz resonators. The model assumed that the sound particle velocity field approaches the resonator in a spherically symmetric manner. The incident and cavity sound pressure fields are connected in terms of an orifice discharge coefficient and an end correction parameter whose values are determined empirically. The accuracy of the model was verified by comparing predicted with measured impedance over a wide range of sound amplitudes and frequencies for two different resonator geometries and with measurements conducted by Ingard and Ising.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  9. Single-resonator double-negative metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry K.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Langston, William L.; Johnson, William A.; Ihlefeld, Jon; Ginn, III, James C.; Clem, Paul G.; Sinclair, Michael B.

    2016-06-21

    Resonances can be tuned in dielectric resonators in order to construct single-resonator, negative-index metamaterials. For example, high-contrast inclusions in the form of metallic dipoles can be used to shift the first electric resonance down (in frequency) to the first magnetic resonance, or alternatively, air splits can be used to shift the first magnetic resonance up (in frequency) near the first electric resonance. Degenerate dielectric designs become especially useful in infrared- or visible-frequency applications where the resonator sizes associated with the lack of high-permittivity materials can become of sufficient size to enable propagation of higher-order lattice modes in the resulting medium.

  10. {sup 12}O resonant structure evaluated by the two-proton emission process

    SciTech Connect

    Leite, T. N.; Teruya, N.; Dimarco, A.; Duarte, S. B.; Tavares, O. A. P.

    2009-07-15

    The characteristics of the {sup 12}O resonant ground state are investigated through the analysis of the experimental data for the two-proton decay process. The sequential and simultaneous two-proton emission decay modes have been considered in a statistical calculation of the decay energy distribution. The resonant structures of {sup 11}N have been employed as intermediate states for the sequential mode, having their parameters determined by considering the structure of single particle resonance in quantum scattering problem. The width of the {sup 12}O resonant ground state has been extracted from a best fit to the experimental data. The contributions from the different channels to the decay energy distribution have been evaluated, and width and peak location parameters of the {sup 12}O resonant ground state are compared with results of other works for the sequential and simultaneous two-proton decay modes.

  11. The light filtering and guiding properties of high finesse phase resonant compound gratings.

    PubMed

    Bendoym, Igor; Golovin, Andrii B; Crouse, David T

    2012-09-24

    Phase resonances in compound gratings are studied in the frequency and time domains, with the gratings having two dissimilar grooves within the unit cell that each support waveguide cavity modes that couple. Described in this work are the dependence of the phase resonances' Q on the degree of difference between the grooves in the unit cell, their optical properties, a closed-form expression describing their dispersion, their excitation, and the extraction of energy from the phase resonances into free space and into a waveguide. Application to optical filters and corrugated surface antennas are discussed.

  12. Method of infusion extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  13. NEPTUNIUM SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, L.R.; Fields, P.R.

    1959-10-01

    The separation of neptunium from an aqueous solution by solvent extraction and the extraction of neptunium from the solvent solution are described. Neptunium is separated from an aqueous solution containing tetravalent or hexavalent neptunium nitrate, nitric acid, and a nitrate salting out agent, such as sodium nitrate, by contacting the solution with an organic solvent such as diethyl ether. Subsequently, the neptunium nitrate is extracted from the organic solvent extract phase with water.

  14. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  15. Information extraction system

    DOEpatents

    Lemmond, Tracy D; Hanley, William G; Guensche, Joseph Wendell; Perry, Nathan C; Nitao, John J; Kidwell, Paul Brandon; Boakye, Kofi Agyeman; Glaser, Ron E; Prenger, Ryan James

    2014-05-13

    An information extraction system and methods of operating the system are provided. In particular, an information extraction system for performing meta-extraction of named entities of people, organizations, and locations as well as relationships and events from text documents are described herein.

  16. Resonance Trapping in Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour, Nader H.

    1998-09-01

    We study dynamics of a planetary system that consists of a star and two planets taking into account dynamical friction. Numerical integrations of a restricted planar circular three body model of this system indicate resonance capture. The main purpose of this paper is to present the results of an extensive numerical experiment performed on this model and also to present analytical arguments for the observed resonance trapping and its consequences. The equations of motion are written in terms of Delaunay variables and the recently developed method of partial averaging near resonance* is employed in order to account for the behavior of the system at resonance. * C.Chicone, B.Mashhoon and D.Retzloff, Ann.Inst.Henri Poincare, Vol.64, no 1, 1996, p.87-125.

  17. Nested trampoline resonators for optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M. J. Pepper, B.; Luna, F.; Perock, B.; Buters, F. M.; Eerkens, H. J.; Welker, G.; Heeck, K.; Man, S. de; Bouwmeester, D.

    2016-01-18

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with a distributed Bragg reflector mirror. We design a nested double resonator structure with 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface at the inner resonator frequency, and we demonstrate up to 45 dB of isolation at lower frequencies in agreement with the design. We reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400 000 at room temperature. In addition, these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181 000 ± 1000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators.

  18. Morphological resonances for multicomponent immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitten, W. B.; Shapiro, M. J.; Ramsey, J. M.; Bronk, B. V.

    1995-06-01

    An immunoassay technique capable of detecting and identifying a number of species of microorganisms in a single analysis is described. The method uses optical-resonance size discrimination of microspheres to identify antibodies to which stained microorganisms are bound.

  19. Ring Laser Gyro Resonator Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-20

    vibration environment could cause errors in measured RLG rotation rates due to vibration (tilt) of the resonator mirrors . Vibration-induced mirror tilt...the RLG resonator design theoretically and calculated pertinent parameters such as the beam diameter at the aperture, cavity mirror alignment...sensitivities, and power loss due to aperture occlusion. The mirror vibration levels required to significantly affect the laser power were then calculated for

  20. Electromagnetic properties of baryon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiator, Lothar

    2013-10-01

    Longitudinal and transverse transition form factors for most of the four-star nucleon resonances have been obtained from high-quality cross section data and polarization observables measured at MAMI, ELSA, BATES, GRAAL and CEBAF. As an application, we further show how the transition form factors can be used to obtain empirical transverse charge densities. Contour plots of the thus derived densities are shown and compared for the Roper and S11 nucleon resonances.

  1. Tunable Superconducting Split Ring Resonators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-19

    devices and the associated dissipative losses therein. This way an almost dissipationless active supercon- ducting circuit with magnetic control...capacitance of the gap to form a resonator circuit . The advantage of such a circuit is its quite low resonance frequency compared to other structures...of similar size. Figure 1: A schematic SSRR (left) and an equivalent circuit (right). C is the gap and surface capacitance, LGC is the magnetic

  2. Electromechanical resonators from graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Bunch, J Scott; van der Zande, Arend M; Verbridge, Scott S; Frank, Ian W; Tanenbaum, David M; Parpia, Jeevak M; Craighead, Harold G; McEuen, Paul L

    2007-01-26

    Nanoelectromechanical systems were fabricated from single- and multilayer graphene sheets by mechanically exfoliating thin sheets from graphite over trenches in silicon oxide. Vibrations with fundamental resonant frequencies in the megahertz range are actuated either optically or electrically and detected optically by interferometry. We demonstrate room-temperature charge sensitivities down to 8 x 10(-4) electrons per root hertz. The thinnest resonator consists of a single suspended layer of atoms and represents the ultimate limit of two-dimensional nanoelectromechanical systems.

  3. Asymmetric liberations in exterior resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauge, C.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a general analysis of the planar circular restricted problem of three bodies in the case of exterior mean-motion resonances. Particularly, our aim is to map the phase space of various commensurabilities and determine the singular solutions of the averaged system, comparing them to the well-known case of interior resonances. In some commensurabilities (e.g. 1/2, 1/3) we show the existence of asymmetric librations; that is, librations in which the stationary value of the critical angle theta = (p+q) lambda1-p lambda-q pi is not equal to either zero or pi. The origin, stability and morphogenesis of these solutions are discussed and compared to symmetric librations. However, in some other resonances (e.g. 2/3, 3/4), these fixed points of the mean system seem to be absent. Librations in such cases are restricted to theta = O mod(pi). Asymmetric singular solutions of the plane circular problem are unknown in the case of interior resonances and cannot be reproduced by the reduced Andoyer Hamiltonian known as the Second Fundamental Model for Resonance. However, we show that the extended version of this Hamiltonian function, in which harmonics up to order two are considered, can reproduce fairly well the principal topological characteristics of the phase space and thereby constitutes a simple and useful analytical approximation for these resonances.

  4. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Bivens, H.M.; Wessendorf, K.O.

    1994-08-16

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a telemetered sensor beacon'' that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20--100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available. 21 figs.

  5. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Bivens, Hugh M.; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    1994-01-01

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a "telemetered sensor beacon" that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20-100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available.

  6. Universal formalism of Fano resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Luo, Hong-Gang; Grebogi, Celso

    2015-01-15

    The phenomenon of Fano resonance is ubiquitous in a large variety of wave scattering systems, where the resonance profile is typically asymmetric. Whether the parameter characterizing the asymmetry should be complex or real is an issue of great experimental interest. Using coherent quantum transport as a paradigm and taking into account of the collective contribution from all available scattering channels, we derive a universal formula for the Fano-resonance profile. We show that our formula bridges naturally the traditional Fano formulas with complex and real asymmetry parameters, indicating that the two types of formulas are fundamentally equivalent (except for an offset). The connection also reveals a clear footprint for the conductance resonance during a dephasing process. Therefore, the emergence of complex asymmetric parameter when fitting with experimental data needs to be properly interpreted. Furthermore, we have provided a theory for the width of the resonance, which relates explicitly the width to the degree of localization of the close-by eigenstates and the corresponding coupling matrices or the self-energies caused by the leads. Our work not only resolves the issue about the nature of the asymmetry parameter, but also provides deeper physical insights into the origin of Fano resonance. Since the only assumption in our treatment is that the transport can be described by the Green’s function formalism, our results are also valid for broad disciplines including scattering problems of electromagnetic waves, acoustics, and seismology.

  7. The use of nested sampling in the extraction of polarisation observables at CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, S.

    2012-09-01

    The extraction of polarisation observables from photoproduction experiments provides an insight into the spectrum of nucleon resonances and the "missing resonance" problem. Experiments carried out at JLab, Mainz and Bonn cover a wide range of reactions, which will soon result in the first "complete measurement" in pseudoscalar meson photoproduction. Traditionally, these measurements have been analysed using frequentist statistics, where parameters are extracted by fitting distributions. An alternative method is the application of Bayesian statistics, where any existing knowledge about the results can be used in the initial conditions. One such application of this is nested sampling. This work discusses nested sampling and how it can be applied to the extraction of spin observables.

  8. Internal Pair Decay of Giant Resonances in Hot LEAD-200.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, Susan

    Electron-positron pairs emitted during the de -excitation of the hot ^{200}Pb were detected with the Stony Brook pair detector, a phoswich array, in order to observe the internal pair decay of giant resonances (GR) built on excited states. These collective excitations are particularly well defined in heavy nuclei, and the full GR sum rule had been found in the ground state excitations of both the giant dipole resonance and the isoscalar monopole resonance. The excited compound nucleus was formed by bombarding a ^{181} Ta target with a 95 MeV pulsed ^ {19}F beam. While the gamma-decay from giant resonances of multipolarities L >=q 1 results in cross-sections 3-4 orders of magnitudes bigger than the internal pair decay, the decay of giant monopole resonances via a collective E0 transition can only be observed in the e^+ - e^ --decay channel. Another advantage of investigating electro-magnetic transitions via the pair decay channel is the fact that the correlation angle (and also the energy sharing) between the electron and the positron provides insight in the multipolarity of the observed transition. Especially the angular correlation distribution of an L = 0 transition is easily distinguished from the L >=q 1 cases. In the data analysis, the pair spectra were compared to calculations using the statistical model code CASCADE, which was modified to include the internal pair decay of giant resonances from the compound nucleus as well as from the fission fragments. In addition, gamma measurements from the same reaction at a comparable excitation energy (93 MeV) were available. The extracted pair spectra confirmed the CASCADE prediction that the giant dipole resonance dominates the pair decay from a hot, heavy nucleus. Superior statistics would be necessary in order to extract weaker modes like the monopole or quadrupole resonances and due to the lack in statistics this work can only offer a rough estimate for the width and position of the isoscalar giant monopole

  9. METAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, G.W. Jr.; Rhodes, D.E.

    1957-11-01

    An improved method for extracting uranium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is presented. A difficulty encountered in solvent extraction operations using an organic extractant (e.g., tributyl phosphate dissolved in kerosene or carbon tetrachloride) is that emulsions sometimes form, and phase separation is difficult or impossible. This difficulty is overcome by dissolving the organic extractant in a molten wax which is a solid at operating temperatures. After cooling, the wax which now contains the extractant, is broken into small particles (preferably flakes) and this wax complex'' is used to contact the uranium bearing solutions and extract the metal therefrom. Microcrystalline petroleum wax and certain ethylene polymers have been found suitable for this purpose.

  10. Mass detection using capacitive resonant silicon resonator employing LC resonant circuit technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Jin; Ono, Takahito; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2007-08-01

    Capacitive resonant mass sensing using a single-crystalline silicon resonator with an electrical LC oscillator was demonstrated in ambient atmosphere. Using capacitive detection method, the detectable minimum mass of 1 x 10(-14) g was obtained in the self-oscillation of cantilever with a thickness of 250 nm. The noise amplitude of the sensor output corresponds to a vibration amplitude of 0.05 nm(Hz)(0.5) in the frequency domain compared with the actuation signal, which is equivalent to the detectable minimum capacitance variation of 2.4 x 10(-21) F. Using the capacitive detection method, mass/stress induced resonance frequency shift due to the adsorption of ethanol and moist vapor in a pure N(2) gas as a carrier is successfully demonstrated. These results show the high potential of capacitive silicon resonator for high mass/stress-sensitive sensor.

  11. Stochastic resonance in nanomechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badzey, Robert L.

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance is a counter-intuitive one: adding noise to a noisy nonlinear system under the influence of a modulation results in coherent behavior. The signature of the effect is a resonance in the signal-to-noise ratio of the response over a certain range of noise power; this behavior is absent if either the modulation or the noise are absent. Stochastic resonance has attracted considerable interest over the past several decades, having been seen in a great number of physical and biological systems. Here, observation of stochastic resonance is reported for nanomechanical systems consisting of a doubly-clamped beam resonators fabricated from single-crystal silicon. Such oscillators have been found to display nonlinear and bistable behavior under the influence of large driving forces. This bistability is exploited to produce a controllable nanomechanical switch, a device that may be used as the basis for a new generation of computational memory elements. These oscillators possess large intrinsic resonance frequencies (MHz range or higher) due to their small size and relatively high stiffness; thus they have the potential to rival the current state-of-the-art of electronic and magnetic storage technologies. This small size also allows them to be packed in densities which meet or exceed the superparamagnetic limit for magnetic storage media of 100 GB/in2. Two different doubly-clamped beams were cooled to low temperatures (300 mK--4 K), and excited with a magnetomotive technique. They were driven into the nonlinear response regime, and then modulated to induce switching between their bistable states. When the modulation was reduced, the switching died out. Application of noise, either with an external broadband source or via an increase in temperature, resulted in a distinct resonance in the signal-to-noise ratio. Aside from establishing the phenomenon of stochastic resonance in yet another physical system, the observation of this effect has

  12. Magnetic resonance force detection using a membrane resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scozzaro, N.; Ruchotzke, W.; Belding, A.; Cardellino, J.; Blomberg, E. C.; McCullian, B. A.; Bhallamudi, V. P.; Pelekhov, D. V.; Hammel, P. C.

    2016-10-01

    The availability of compact, low-cost magnetic resonance imaging instruments would further broaden the substantial impact of this technology. We report highly sensitive detection of magnetic resonance using low-stress silicon nitride (SiNx) membranes. We use these membranes as low-loss, high-frequency mechanical oscillators and find they are able to mechanically detect spin-dependent forces with high sensitivity enabling ultrasensitive magnetic resonance detection. The high force detection sensitivity stems from their high mechanical quality factor Q ∼106 [1,2] combined with the low mass of the resonator. We use this excellent mechanical force sensitivity to detect the electron spin magnetic resonance using a SiNx membrane as a force detector. The demonstrated force sensitivity at 300 K is 4 fN/√{Hz } , indicating a potential low temperature (4 K) sensitivity of 25 aN/√{Hz } . Given their sensitivity, robust construction, large surface area and low cost, SiNx membranes can potentially serve as the central component of a compact room-temperature ESR and NMR instrument having spatial resolution superior to conventional approaches.

  13. Graded-index whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode optical resonators which have spatially-graded refractive indices. In one implementation, the refractive index spatially increases with a distance from an exterior surface of such a resonator towards an interior of the resonator to produce substantially equal spectral separations for different whispering gallery modes. An optical coupler may be used with such a resonator to provide proper optical coupling.

  14. Astrophysics of resonant orbits in the Kerr metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-04-01

    band of space-based gravitational wave detectors such as eLISA. When interpreted within the context of the supermassive black hole at the Galactic center, Sgr A*, this implies that characteristic length scales of 41 μ as and 55 μ as and time scales of 50 min and 79 min respectively should be associated with resonant effects if Sgr A* is nonspinning, while spin decreases these values by up to ˜32 % and ˜28 %. These length scales are potentially resolvable with radio very-long-baseline interferometry measurements using the Event Horizon Telescope. We find that all low-order resonances are localized to the strong field region. In particular, for distances r >50 Rs from the black hole, the order of the resonances is sufficiently large that resonant effects of generic perturbations are not expected to lead to drastic changes in the dynamics. This fact guarantees the validity of using approximations based on averaging to model the orbital trajectory and frequency evolution of a test object in this region. Observing orbital motion in the intermediate region 50 Rsextracting the multipole moments of the central object by observing the orbit of a pulsar—since the object is close enough to be sensitive to the quadruple moment of the central object but far enough away not to be subjected to resonant effects.

  15. Statistical Assignment of Neutron Orbital Angular Momentum to a Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Soo-Youl; Chang, Jonghwa; Leal, Luiz C.

    2004-09-15

    We have derived formulas in a general form for suggesting the neutron orbital angular momentum quantum number l to each neutron resonance if it is not identified experimentally. By assuming the (2J + 1) law of level density, these general formulas are reduced to the formulas found in previous works. The suggestion of l is based on the probability that a resonance having a certain value of g{gamma}{sub n} is an l-wave resonance. The probability is calculated from the Bayes theorem on conditional probability. For each l, the probability density function (pdf) of g{gamma}{sub n} was derived from the {chi}{sup 2} distribution proposed by Porter and Thomas. The pdf takes into account two possible channel spins that result in the same total spin for a given l larger than zero. Meanwhile, regardless of the resolution of measurement, we suggest adopting the level density as the prior probability in the Bayesian approach, as Gyulassy et al. did. As a sample problem, we presented the result of l-assignment for {sup 109}Ag resonances. The SUGGEL code, in which the methodology is incorporated, correctly assigned l's for 67 among 70 resonances for which l's had been determined experimentally. The other test for {sup 27}Al showed the applicability of the code as a preanalysis tool, even though such applicability is limited to a certain extent for light nuclides. The use of the code SUGGEL is expected to reduce the number of repeated runs of a fitting code such as SAMMY, thus reducing time and effort for the extraction of resonance parameters from measurements.

  16. Microelectromechanical resonator and method for fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Olsson, Roy H.

    2009-11-10

    A method is disclosed for the robust fabrication of a microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator. In this method, a pattern of holes is formed in the resonator mass with the position, size and number of holes in the pattern being optimized to minimize an uncertainty .DELTA.f in the resonant frequency f.sub.0 of the MEM resonator due to manufacturing process variations (e.g. edge bias). A number of different types of MEM resonators are disclosed which can be formed using this method, including capacitively transduced Lame, wineglass and extensional resonators, and piezoelectric length-extensional resonators.

  17. Microelectromechanical resonator and method for fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Olsson, Roy H.

    2010-01-26

    A method is disclosed for the robust fabrication of a microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator. In this method, a pattern of holes is formed in the resonator mass with the position, size and number of holes in the pattern being optimized to minimize an uncertainty .DELTA.f in the resonant frequency f.sub.0 of the MEM resonator due to manufacturing process variations (e.g. edge bias). A number of different types of MEM resonators are disclosed which can be formed using this method, including capacitively transduced Lame, wineglass and extensional resonators, and piezoelectric length-extensional resonators.

  18. Quantum Phase Extraction in Isospectral Electronic Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Christopher

    2010-04-28

    Quantum phase is not a direct observable and is usually determined by interferometric methods. We present a method to map complete electron wave functions, including internal quantum phase information, from measured single-state probability densities. We harness the mathematical discovery of drum-like manifolds bearing different shapes but identical resonances, and construct quantum isospectral nanostructures possessing matching electronic structure but divergent physical structure. Quantum measurement (scanning tunneling microscopy) of these 'quantum drums' [degenerate two-dimensional electron states on the Cu(111) surface confined by individually positioned CO molecules] reveals that isospectrality provides an extra topological degree of freedom enabling robust quantum state transplantation and phase extraction.

  19. Evolution of the pygmy dipole resonance in Sn isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toft, H. K.; Larsen, A. C.; Bürger, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Görgen, A.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrøm, T.; Siem, S.; Tveten, G. M.; Voinov, A.

    2011-04-01

    Nuclear level density and γ-ray strength functions of Sn121,122 below the neutron separation energy are extracted with the Oslo method using the (He3,He3'γ) and (He3,αγ) reactions. The level densities of Sn121,122 display steplike structures, interpreted as signatures of neutron pair breaking. An enhancement in both strength functions, compared to standard models for radiative strength, is observed in our measurements for Eγ≳5.2 MeV. This enhancement is compatible with pygmy resonances centered at ≈8.4(1) and ≈8.6(2) MeV, respectively, and with integrated strengths corresponding to ≈1.8-5+1% of the classical Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule. Similar resonances were also seen in Sn116-119. Experimental neutron-capture cross reactions are well reproduced by our pygmy resonance predictions, while standard strength models are less successful. The evolution as a function of neutron number of the pygmy resonance in Sn116-122 is described as a clear increase of centroid energy from 8.0(1) to 8.6(2) MeV, but with no observable difference in integrated strengths.

  20. Surface Plasmon Resonance Evaluation of Colloidal Metal Aerogel Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Cronise, Raymond J.; Noever, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging has in the past been applied to the characterization of thin films. In this study we apply the surface plasmon technique not to determine macroscopic spatial variations but rather to determine average microscopic information. Specifically, we deduce the dielectric properties of the surrounding gel matrix and information concerning the dynamics of the gelation process from the visible absorption characteristics of colloidal metal nanoparticles contained in aerogel pores. We have fabricated aerogels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Because the dielectric constant of the metal particles is linked to that of the host matrix at the surface plasmon resonance, any change 'in the dielectric constant of the material surrounding the metal nanoparticles results in a shift in the surface plasmon wavelength. During gelation the surface plasmon resonance shifts to the red as the average or effective dielectric constant of the matrix increases. Conversely, formation of an aerogel or xerogel through supercritical extraction or evaporation of the solvent produces a blue shift in the resonance indicating a decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix. From the magnitude of this shift we deduce the average fraction of air and of silica in contact with the metal particles. The surface area of metal available for catalytic gas reaction may thus be determined.

  1. Constructive role of Brownian motion: Brownian motors and Stochastic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänggi, Peter

    2005-03-01

    Noise is usually thought of as the enemy of order rather as a constructive influence. For the phenomena of Stochastic Resonance [1] and Brownian motors [2], however, stochastic noise can play a beneficial role in enhancing detection and/or facilitating directed transmission of information in absence of biasing forces. Brownian motion assisted Stochastic Resonance finds useful applications in physical, technological, biological and biomedical contexts [1,3]. The basic principles that underpin Stochastic Resonance are elucidated and novel applications for nonlinear classical and quantum systems will be addressed. The presence of non-equilibrium disturbances enables to rectify Brownian motion so that quantum and classical objects can be directed around on a priori designed routes in biological and physical systems (Brownian motors). In doing so, the energy from the haphazard motion of (quantum) Brownian particles is extracted to perform useful work against an external load. This very concept together with first experimental realizations are discussed [2,4,5]. [1] L. Gammaitoni, P. Hä'nggi, P. Jung and F. Marchesoni, Stochastic Resonance, Rev. Mod. Phys. 70, 223 (1998).[2] R. D. Astumian and P. Hä'nggi, Brownian motors, Physics Today 55 (11), 33 (2002).[3] P. Hä'nggi, Stochastic Resonace in Physics and Biology, ChemPhysChem 3, 285 (2002).[4] H. Linke, editor, Special Issue on Brownian Motors, Applied Physics A 75, No. 2 (2002).[5] P. Hä'nggi, F. Marchesoni, F. Nori, Brownian motors, Ann. Physik (Leipzig) 14, xxx (2004); cond-mat/0410033.

  2. Matryoshka locally resonant sonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Elford, Daniel P; Chalmers, Luke; Kusmartsev, Feodor V; Swallowe, Gerry M

    2011-11-01

    The results of numerical modeling of sonic crystals with resonant array elements are reported. The investigated resonant elements include plain slotted cylinders as well as their various combinations, in particular, Russian doll or Matryoshka configurations. The acoustic band structure and transmission characteristics of such systems have been computed with the use of finite element methods. The general concept of a locally resonant sonic crystal is proposed that utilizes acoustic resonances to form additional band gaps that are decoupled from Bragg gaps. An existence of a separate attenuation mechanism associated with the resonant elements that increases performance in the lower frequency regime has been identified. The results show a formation of broad band gaps positioned significantly below the first Bragg frequency. For low frequency broadband attenuation, a most optimal configuration is the Matryoshka sonic crystal, where each scattering unit is composed of multiple concentric slotted cylinders. This system forms numerous gaps in the lower frequency regime, below Bragg bands, while maintaining a reduced crystal size viable for noise barrier technology. The finding opens alternative perspectives for the construction of sound barriers in the low frequency range usually inaccessible by traditional means including conventional sonic crystals.

  3. Matryoshka locally resonant sonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elford, Daniel P.; Chalmers, Luke; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.; Swallowe, Gerry M.

    The results of numerical modelling of sonic crystals with resonant array elements are reported. The investigated resonant elements include plain slotted cylinders as well as various their combinations, in particular, Russian doll or Matryoshka configurations. The acoustic band structure and transmission characteristics of such systems have been computed with the use of finite element methods. The general concept of a locally resonant sonic crystal is proposed, which utilises acoustic resonances to form additional band gaps that are decoupled from Bragg gaps. An existence of a separate attenuation mechanism associated with the resonant elements, which increases performance in the lower frequency regime has been identified. The results show a formation of broad band gaps positioned significantly below the first Bragg frequency. For low frequency broadband attenuation a most optimal configuration is the Matryoshka sonic crystal, where each scattering unit is composed of multiple concentric slotted cylinders. This system forms numerous gaps in the lower frequency regime, below Bragg bands, whilst maintaining a reduced crystal size viable for noise barrier technology. The finding opens new perspectives for construction of sound barriers in the low frequency range usually inaccessible by traditional means including conventional sonic crystals.

  4. Bimodal loop-gap resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, W.; Froncisz, W.; Hyde, James S.

    1996-05-01

    A bimodal loop-gap resonator for use in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at S band is described. It consists of two identical one-loop-one-gap resonators in coaxial juxtaposition. In one mode, the currents in the two loops are parallel and in the other antiparallel. By introducing additional capacitors between the loops, the frequencies of the two modes can be made to coincide. Details are given concerning variable coupling to each mode, tuning of the resonant frequency of one mode to that of the other, and adjustment of the isolation between modes. An equivalent circuit is given and network analysis carried out both experimentally and theoretically. EPR applications are described including (a) probing of the field distributions with DPPH, (b) continuous wave (cw) EPR with a spin-label line sample, (c) cw electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR), (d) modulation of saturation, and (e) saturation-recovery (SR) EPR. Bloch induction experiments can be performed when the sample extends half way through the structure, but microwave signals induced by Mx and My components of magnetization cancel when it extends completely through. This latter situation is particularly favorable for SR, modulation of saturation, and ELDOR experiments, which depend on observing Mz indirectly using a second weak observing microwave source.

  5. Extensive screening for herbal extracts with potent antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Niwano, Yoshimi; Saito, Keita; Yoshizaki, Fumihiko; Kohno, Masahiro; Ozawa, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes our research for herbal extracts with potent antioxidant activity obtained from a large scale screening based on superoxide radical (O(2) (•-)) scavenging activity followed by characterization of antioxidant properties. Firstly, scavenging activity against O(2) (•-) was extensively screened from ethanol extracts of approximately 1000 kinds of herbs by applying an electron spin resonance (ESR)-spin trapping method, and we chose four edible herbal extracts with prominently potent ability to scavenge O(2) (•-). They are the extracts from Punica granatum (Peel), Syzygium aromaticum (Bud), Mangifera indica (Kernel), and Phyllanthus emblica (Fruit). These extracts were further examined to determine if they also scavenge hydroxyl radical ((•)OH), by applying the ESR spin-trapping method, and if they have heat resistance as a desirable characteristic feature. Experiments with the Fenton reaction and photolysis of H(2)O(2) induced by UV irradiation demonstrated that all four extracts have potent ability to directly scavenge (•)OH. Furthermore, the scavenging activities against O(2) (•-) and (•)OH of the extracts of P. granatum (peel), M. indica (kernel) and P. emblica (fruit) proved to be heat-resistant.The results of the review might give useful information when choosing a potent antioxidant as a foodstuff. For instance, the four herbal extracts chosen from extensive screening possess desirable antioxidant properties. In particular, the extracts of the aforementioned three herbs are expected to be suitable for food processing in which thermal devices are used, because of their heat resistance.

  6. Extractant Design by Covalency

    SciTech Connect

    Gaunt, Andrew James; Olson, Angela Christine; Kozimor, Stosh Anthony; Cross, Justin Neil; Batista, Enrique Ricardo; Macor, Joe; Peterman, Dean R.; Grimes, Travis

    2016-01-21

    This project aims to provide an electronic structure-to-function understanding of extractants for actinide selective separation processes. The research entails a multi-disciplinary approach that integrates chemical syntheses, structural determination, K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. In FY15, the project reached the final stage of testing the extraction performance of a new ligand design and preparing an americium-extractant complex for analysis.

  7. [Hemorrhage in cataract extraction].

    PubMed

    Radian, A B; Corşatea, L; Alupei, L

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents the evolution at ten eyes (nine patients) that presented expulsive hemorrhage during surgical act of extracapsular extraction with implant of crystalline lens. There are several cases of extracapsular extraction than intracapsular extraction which were more short like duration. The frequency of female was 90% from cases. The good results show the efficiency of associated treatment: closing of the eyeball with scleral punctura and internal tamponing. Only one eye was lost functionally.

  8. Supercritical solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Yields of soluble organic extract are increased up to about 50% by the supercritical extraction of particulate coal at a temperature below the polymerization temperature for coal extract fragments (450 C.) and a pressure from 500 psig to 5,000 psig by the conjoint use of a solvent mixture containing a low volatility, high critical temperature coal dissolution catalyst such as phenanthrene and a high volatility, low critical temperature solvent such as toluene.

  9. Photoproduction of exotic baryon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    We point out that the new exotic resonances recently reported by LHCb in the J / ψ p channel are excellent candidates for photoproduction off a proton target. This test is crucial to confirming the resonant nature of such states, as opposed to their being kinematical effects. We specialize to an interpretation of the heavier narrow state as a molecule composed of Σc and Dbar*, and estimate its production cross section using vector dominance. The relevant photon energies and fluxes are well within the capabilities of the GlueX and CLAS12 detectors at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB). A corresponding calculation is also performed for photoproduction of an analogous resonance which is predicted to exist in the ϒp channel.

  10. Discussion of human resonant frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownjohn, James M. W.; Zheng, Xiahua

    2001-06-01

    Human bodies are often exposed to vertical vibrations when they are in the workplace or on vehicles. Prolonged exposure may cause undue stress and discomfort in the human body especially at its resonant frequency. By testing the response of the human body on a vibrating platform, many researchers found the human whole-body fundamental resonant frequency to be around 5 Hz. However, in recent years, an indirect method has been prosed which appears to increase the resonant frequency to approximately 10 Hz. To explain this discrepancy, experimental work was carried out in NTU. The study shows that the discrepancy lies in the vibration magnitude used in the tests. A definition of human natural frequency in terms of vibration magnitude is proposed.

  11. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  12. Sound resonance in pipes with discrete Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljalal, Abdulaziz M.

    2015-09-01

    Sound resonance in pipes is investigated using a readily available setup consisting of a pipe, loudspeaker, microphone, and laptop. Discrete Fourier transform is used to extract the amplitude and phase spectra from the recorded sound enabling determination of locations and shapes of resonance peaks accurately. Either white noise signal or sharp pulse signal is used as an excited input sound signal. Both have broad frequency spectra and the difference between them is explored. The shapes of the amplitude and phase spectra are found to be well fitted to the predicted shapes. The pipe is either closed at both ends, closed at only one end, or open at both ends. The speed of sound and the effective location of reflection at the open end are in excellent agreement with theory.

  13. Imaging atoms from resonance fluorescence spectrum beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Al-Amri, Mohammad; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2014-03-01

    We calculate the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a linear chain of two-level atoms driven by a gradient coherent laser field. The result shows that we can determine the positions of atoms from the spectrum even when the atoms locate within subwavelength range and the dipole-dipole interaction is significant. This far-field resonance fluorescence localization microscopy method does not require point-by-point scanning and it may be more time-efficient. We also give a possible scheme to extract the position information in an extended region without requiring more peak power of laser. We also briefly discuss how to do a 2D imaging based on our scheme. This work is supported by grants from the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and the Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF) under the NPRP project.

  14. Resonance X(5568) as an exotic axial-vector state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaev, S. S.; Azizi, K.; Barsbay, B.; Sundu, H.

    2017-01-01

    The mass and meson-current coupling constant of the resonance X(5568), as well as the width of the decay X(5568)→ Bs^{ast}π are calculated by modeling the exotic X(5568) resonance as a diquark-antidiquark state Xb=[su][bd] with quantum numbers JP=1+. The calculations are made employing QCD two-point sum rule method, where the quark, gluon and mixed vacuum condensates up to dimension eight are taken into account. The sum rule approach on the light-cone in its soft-meson approximation is used to explore the vertex XbBs^{ast}π and extract the strong coupling g_{XbBs^{ast}π}, which is a necessary ingredient to find the width of the Xb→ Bs^{ast}π+ decay process. The obtained predictions are compared with the experimental data of the D0 Collaboration, and results of other theoretical works.

  15. Nucleon resonances in exclusive reactions of photo- and electroproduction of mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Skorodumina, Iu. A.; Burkert, V. D.; Golovach, E. N.; Gothe, R. W.; Isupov, E. L.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Mokeev, V. I.; Fedotov, G. V.

    2015-11-01

    Methods for extracting nucleon resonance parameters from experimental data are reviewed. The formalism for the description of exclusive reactions of meson photo- and electroproduction off nucleons is discussed. Recent experimental data on exclusive meson production in the scattering of electrons and photons off protons are analyzed.

  16. Interventional Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Saikus, Christina E.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) combines excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar views, and dynamic imaging of cardiac function without ionizing radiation exposure. Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (iCMR) leverages these features to enhance conventional interventional procedures or to enable novel ones. Although still awaiting clinical deployment, this young field has tremendous potential. We survey promising clinical applications for iCMR. Next, we discuss the technologies that allow CMR-guided interventions and, finally, what still needs to be done to bring them to the clinic. PMID:19909937

  17. Early History of Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, N. F.

    1999-06-01

    The early history of magnetic resonance to around 1950 is discussed from the point of view of a participant in it. I. I. Rabi's theory of space quantization in a gyrating magnetic field and his molecular beam experiments in the 1930s laid the foundation of the magnetic resonance method, which he and his associates subsequently pursued and developed further at Columbia University, leading eventually to the development of NMR after World War II and the invention of the separated oscillatory fields method in 1950.

  18. Optical resonant Archimedean spiral antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hanqing; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Weiwei; Zhang, Jiasen

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the field enhancement properties of optical resonant Archimedean spiral antennas by using a finite difference time domain method. Due to the spiral structure, the antennas show a circular dichroism in the electric field enhancement, especially for a large turning angle. A large magnetic field enhancement is also obtained with a confinement in the nanometer size. When the turning angle equals π for a linearly polarized incident beam, the polarization of the enhanced field in the spiral antenna can be perpendicular to the incident polarization with a similar enhancement factor to the optical resonant dipole antennas.

  19. Optical Microbottle Resonators for Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Bianucci, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical microresonators have been shown to be the basis for sensors able to detect minute changes in their environment. This has made them a well-established platform for highly sensitive physical, chemical, and biological sensors. Microbottle resonators (MBR) are a type of WGM optical microresonator. They share characteristics with other, more established, resonator geometries such as cylinders and spheres, while presenting their unique spectral signature and other distinguishing features. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the theory and fabrication of different kinds of MBRs, including hollow ones, and their application to optofluidic sensing. PMID:27827834

  20. Dπ scattering and D meson resonances from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohler, Daniel; Prelovsek, Sasa; Woloshyn, R. M.

    2013-02-01

    A first exploratory lattice QCD simulation is presented, aimed at extracting the masses and widths of the broad scalar D0*(2400) and the axial D1(2430) charm-light resonances. For that purpose Dπ and D*π scattering are simulated, and the resonance parameters are extracted using a Breit-Wigner fit of the resulting phase shifts. We use a single two-flavor dynamical ensemble with mπ≈266MeV, a≃0.124fm and a rather small volume V=163×32. The resulting D0*(2400) mass is 351±21MeV above the spin average (1)/(4)(mD+3mD*), in agreement with the experimental value of 347±29MeV above. The resulting D0*→Dπ coupling, glat=2.55±0.21GeV, is close to the experimental value gexp⁡≤1.92±0.14GeV, where g parametrizes the width Γ≡g2p*/s. The resonance parameters for the broad D1(2430) are also found close to the experimental values; these are obtained by appealing to the heavy quark limit, where the neighboring resonance D1(2420) is narrow. The calculated I=1/2 scattering lengths are a0=0.81±0.14fm for Dπ and a0=0.81±0.17fm for D*π scattering. The simulation of the scattering in these channels incorporates quark-antiquark as well as multihadron interpolators, and the distillation method is used for contractions. In addition, the ground and several excited charm-light and charmonium states with various JP are calculated using standard quark-antiquark interpolators.

  1. Fractional tunnelling resonance in plasmonic media

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji-Hun; -Han Park, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Metals can transmit light by tunnelling when they possess skin-depth thickness. Tunnelling can be resonantly enhanced if resonators are added to each side of a metal film, such as additional dielectric layers or periodic structures on a metal surface. Here we show that, even with no additional resonators, tunnelling resonance can arise if the metal film is confined and fractionally thin. In a slit waveguide filled with a negative permittivity metallic slab of thickness L, resonance is shown to arise at fractional thicknesses (L = Const./m; m = 1,2,3,…) by the excitation of ‘vortex plasmons'. We experimentally demonstrate fractional tunnelling resonance and vortex plasmons using microwave and negative permittivity metamaterials. The measured spectral peaks of the fractional tunnelling resonance and modes of the vortex plasmons agree with theoretical predictions. Fractional tunnelling resonance and vortex plasmons open new perspectives in resonance physics and promise potential applications in nanotechnology. PMID:23939460

  2. Giant resonances: Progress, new directions, new challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, J.R.; Beene, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    A review of some recent developments in the field of giant multipole resonances is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on directions that the authors feel will be followed in this field during the next several years. In particular, the use of high-energy heavy ions to excite the giant resonances is shown to provide exciting new capabilities for giant resonance studies. Among subjects covered are: Coulomb excitation of giant resonances, photon decay of giant resonances, the recent controversy over the identity of the giant monopole resonance, the most recent value for incompressibility of nuclear matter from analysis of giant monopole data, the isospin character of the 63 A/sup /minus/1/3/ GQR, agreement between (e,e/prime/) and (hadron, hadron/prime/) excitation of the giant quadrupole resonance, prospects for multiphonon giant resonance observation, and isolation of the isovector giant quadrupole resonance. 55 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Temperature-stable double SAW resonators.

    PubMed

    Martin, Guenter; Kunze, Reinhard; Wall, Bert

    2008-01-01

    The temperature stability of SAW resonators on quartz can be enhanced by means of double resonators. The turnover temperatures of the double resonators' components, called single resonators, are positioned above and below room temperature. As a consequence, the temperature coefficients of frequency of the 1st order (TCF1) have opposite signs at room temperature, leading to the vanishing TCF1 of the double resonators. Frequently, different turnover temperatures are adjusted by different propagation directions on an ST cut of quartz. An overview of known and new methods for compensating the temperature coefficient of frequency of the 2nd order (TCF2) of two-port and one-port SAW double resonators is given. A concept by means of which temperature-stable circuits of single resonators are found is described. Two types of temperature-stable double resonators found by applying that concept are treated in detail: 1) a two-port resonator composed of two cascaded two-port resonators and a coupling inductance, and 2) a one-port resonator comprising a series connection of one-port resonators with an inductance in parallel with each single resonator. The substrates are 35.5 degrees rotY cuts of quartz. In both cases, the shift of resonance frequency within the temperature range from -30 degrees C to 70 degrees C is smaller than 20 ppm.

  4. Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator - MSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    A room temperature sapphire acoustics resonator incorporated into an oscillator represents a possible opportunity to improve on quartz ultrastable oscillator (USO) performance, which has been a staple for NASA missions since the inception of spaceflight. Where quartz technology is very mature and shows a performance improvement of perhaps 1 dB/decade, these sapphire acoustic resonators when integrated with matured quartz electronics could achieve a frequency stability improvement of 10 dB or more. As quartz oscillators are an essential element of nearly all types of frequency standards and reference systems, the success of MSAR would advance the development of frequency standards and systems for both groundbased and flight-based projects. Current quartz oscillator technology is limited by quartz mechanical Q. With a possible improvement of more than x 10 Q with sapphire acoustic modes, the stability limit of current quartz oscillators may be improved tenfold, to 10(exp -14) at 1 second. The electromagnetic modes of sapphire that were previously developed at JPL require cryogenic temperatures to achieve the high Q levels needed to achieve this stability level. However sapphire fs acoustic modes, which have not been used before in a high-stability oscillator, indicate the required Q values (as high as Q = 10(exp 8)) may be achieved at room temperature in the kHz range. Even though sapphire is not piezoelectric, such a high Q should allow electrostatic excitation of the acoustic modes with a combination of DC and AC voltages across a small sapphire disk (approximately equal to l mm thick). The first evaluations under this task will test predictions of an estimated input impedance of 10 kilohms at Q = 10(exp 8), and explore the Q values that can be realized in a smaller resonator, which has not been previously tested for acoustic modes. This initial Q measurement and excitation demonstration can be viewed similar to a transducer converting electrical energy to

  5. Antiferromagnetic resonance excitation by terahertz magnetic field resonantly enhanced with split ring resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Y.; Hirori, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kageyama, H.; Tanaka, K.

    2014-07-14

    Excitation of antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) in a HoFeO{sub 3} crystal combined with a split ring resonator (SRR) is studied using terahertz (THz) electromagnetic pulses. The magnetic field in the vicinity of the SRR is induced by the incident THz electric field component and excites spin oscillations that correspond to the AFMR, which are directly probed by the Faraday rotation of the polarization of a near-infrared probe pulse. The good agreement of the temperature-dependent magnetization dynamics with the calculation using the two-lattice Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation confirms that the AFMR is excited by the THz magnetic field, which is enhanced at the SRR resonance frequency by a factor of 20 compared to the incident magnetic field.

  6. Microwave Frequency Discriminator With Sapphire Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, David G.; Dick, G. John

    1994-01-01

    Cooled sapphire resonator provides ultralow phase noise. Apparatus comprises microwave oscillator operating at nominal frequency of about 8.1 GHz, plus frequency-discriminator circuit measuring phase fluctuations of oscillator output. One outstanding feature of frequency discriminator is sapphire resonator serving as phase reference. Sapphire resonator is dielectric ring resonator operating in "whispering-gallery" mode. Functions at room temperature, but for better performance, typically cooled to operating temperature of about 80 K. Similar resonator described in "Sapphire Ring Resonator for Microwave Oscillator" (NPO-18082).

  7. SNAKE DEPLORIZING RESONANCE STUDY IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; CAMERON, P.; LUCCIO, A.; HUANG, H.; PITISYN, V.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    Snake depolarizing resonances due to the imperfect cancellation of the accumulated perturbations on the spin precession between snakes were observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). During the RHIC 2005 and 2006 polarized proton runs, we mapped out the spectrum of odd order snake resonance at Q{sub y} = 7/10. Here, Q, is the beam vertical betatron tune. We also studied the beam polarization after crossing the 7/10th resonance as a function of resonance crossing rate. This paper reports the measured resonance spectrum as well as the results of resonance crossing.

  8. Wavelength-tunable optical ring resonators

    DOEpatents

    Watts, Michael R.; Trotter, Douglas C.; Young, Ralph W.; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2009-11-10

    Optical ring resonator devices are disclosed that can be used for optical filtering, modulation or switching, or for use as photodetectors or sensors. These devices can be formed as microdisk ring resonators, or as open-ring resonators with an optical waveguide having a width that varies adiabatically. Electrical and mechanical connections to the open-ring resonators are made near a maximum width of the optical waveguide to minimize losses and thereby provide a high resonator Q. The ring resonators can be tuned using an integral electrical heater, or an integral semiconductor junction.

  9. Wavelength-tunable optical ring resonators

    DOEpatents

    Watts, Michael R.; Trotter, Douglas C.; Young, Ralph W.; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2011-07-19

    Optical ring resonator devices are disclosed that can be used for optical filtering, modulation or switching, or for use as photodetectors or sensors. These devices can be formed as microdisk ring resonators, or as open-ring resonators with an optical waveguide having a width that varies adiabatically. Electrical and mechanical connections to the open-ring resonators are made near a maximum width of the optical waveguide to minimize losses and thereby provide a high resonator Q. The ring resonators can be tuned using an integral electrical heater, or an integral semiconductor junction.

  10. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Butler, J.P.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of neptuniunn from dissolver solutions by solvent extraction. The neptunium containing solution should be about 5N, in nitric acid.and about 0.1 M in ferrous ion. The organic extracting agent is tributyl phosphate, and the neptuniunn is recovered from the organic solvent phase by washing with water.

  11. Fractal dimension of cerebral surfaces using magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Prasad, R.R.

    1988-11-01

    The calculation of the fractal dimension of the surface bounded by the grey matter in the normal human brain using axial, sagittal, and coronal cross-sectional magnetic resonance (MR) images is presented. The fractal dimension in this case is a measure of the convolutedness of this cerebral surface. It is proposed that the fractal dimension, a feature that may be extracted from MR images, may potentially be used for image analysis, quantitative tissue characterization, and as a feature to monitor and identify cerebral abnormalities and developmental changes.

  12. N+CPT clock resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Crescimanno, M.; Hohensee, M.

    2008-12-15

    In a typical compact atomic time standard a current modulated semiconductor laser is used to create the optical fields that interrogate the atomic hyperfine transition. A pair of optical sidebands created by modulating the diode laser become the coherent population trapping (CPT) fields. At the same time, other pairs of optical sidebands may contribute to other multiphoton resonances, such as three-photon N-resonance [Phys. Rev. A 65, 043817 (2002)]. We analyze the resulting joint CPT and N-resonance (hereafter N+CPT) analytically and numerically. Analytically we solve a four-level quantum optics model for this joint resonance and perturbatively include the leading ac Stark effects from the five largest optical fields in the laser's modulation comb. Numerically we use a truncated Floquet solving routine that first symbolically develops the optical Bloch equations to a prescribed order of perturbation theory before evaluating. This numerical approach has, as input, the complete physical details of the first two excited-state manifolds of {sup 87}Rb. We test these theoretical approaches with experiments by characterizing the optimal clock operating regimes.

  13. Asteroid Secular Resonant Proper Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, Alessandro

    1993-09-01

    A practical algorithm for the computation of the dynamic evolution of asteroids which are inside or close to a secular resonance has been developed. The results are checked with many numerical simulations of both real and fictitious objects. These tests prove that the algorithm is able to identify the dynamic nature of resonant objects and distinguish between future planet crossers and regular bodies. The short CPU time necessary for its execution makes it a useful tool for studying the mechanisms of meteorite transport to the inner Solar System. For this purpose, the sets of initial conditions which lead to large eccentricity in the v6 secular resonance are identified. Finally, the dynamic behavior of 44 numbered asteroids very close to the v6 resonance is analyzed. Only 4 of these asteroids are found in regions dangerous for their stability. A few others become temporary Mars crossers. The rest of them, as 6 Hebe, have a moderate eccentricity during all their quasi-periodic dynamic evolution.

  14. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  15. Controlling metamaterial resonances with light

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Sangeeta; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha; Wanare, Harshawardhan

    2010-08-15

    We investigate the use of coherent optical fields as a means of dynamically controlling the resonant behavior of a variety of composite metamaterials, wherein the metamaterial structures are embedded in a dispersive dielectric medium. Control and switching are implemented by coherently driving the resonant permittivity of the embedding medium with applied optical radiation. The effect of embedding split ring resonators in a frequency-dispersive medium with Lorentz-like dispersion or with dispersion engineered by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is manifested in the splitting of the negative-permeability band, the modified (frequency-dependent) filling fractions, and the dissipation factors. The modified material parameters are strongly linked to the resonant frequencies of the medium, and for an embedding medium exhibiting EIT also to the strength and detuning of the control field. The robustness of control against the deleterious influence of dissipation associated with the metallic structures as well as the inhomogeneous broadening due to structural imperfections is demonstrated. Studies on plasmonic metamaterials that consist of metallic nanorods arranged in loops and exhibit a collective magnetic response at optical frequencies are presented. Control and switching in this class of plasmonic nanorod metamaterials is shown to be possible, for example, by embedding these arrays in a Raman-active liquid like CS{sub 2} and utilizing the inverse Raman effect.

  16. Microfabricated teeter-totter resonator

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas Ray; Heller, Edwin J.; Shul, Randy J.

    2004-11-23

    A microfabricated teeter-totter resonator comprises a frame, a paddle pivotably anchored to the frame by pivot arms that define an axis of rotation, a current conductor line on a surface of the paddle, means for applying a static magnetic field substantially perpendicular to the rotational axis and in the plane of the paddle, and means for energizing the current conductor line with an alternating current. A Lorentz force is generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the current flowing in the conductor line, causing the paddle to oscillate about the axis of rotation. The teeter-totter resonator can be fabricated with micromachining techniques with materials used in the integrated circuits manufacturing industry. The microfabricated teeter-totter resonator has many varied applications, both as an actuation device and as a sensor. When used as a chemical sensor, a chemically sensitive coating can be disposed on one or both surfaces of the paddle to enhance the absorption of chemical analytes from a fluid stream. The resulting mass change can be detected as a change in the resonant frequency or phase of the oscillatory motion of the paddle.

  17. Meson resonances on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Robert G.

    2016-06-01

    There has been recent, significant, advances in the determination of the meson spectrum of QCD. Current efforts have focused on the development and application of finite-volume formalisms that allow for the determination of scattering amplitudes as well as resonance behavior in coupled channel systems. I will review some of these recent developments, and demonstrate the viability of the method in meson systems

  18. Meson Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Robert G.

    2016-06-01

    There has been recent, significant, advances in the determination of the meson spectrum of QCD. Current efforts have focused on the development and application of finite-volume formalisms that allow for the determination of scattering amplitudes as well as resonance behavior in coupled channel systems. I will review some of these recent developments, and demonstrate the viability of the method in meson systems.

  19. Spin Motion Near Snake Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, D. P.; Vogt, M.

    2007-06-13

    We give a brief account of on-going work on the loss of polarisation during acceleration close to so-called snake resonances in proton storage rings. We show that within the model studied here the polarisation can be preserved if the rate of acceleration is low enough.

  20. Biosensing by WGM Microspherical Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Righini, Giancarlo C.; Soria, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) microresonators, thanks to their unique properties, have allowed researchers to achieve important results in both fundamental research and engineering applications. Among the various geometries, microspheres are the simplest 3D WGM resonators; the total optical loss in such resonators can be extremely low, and the resulting extraordinarily high Q values of 108–109 lead to high energy density, narrow resonant-wavelength lines and a lengthy cavity ringdown. They can also be coated in order to better control their properties or to increase their functionality. Their very high sensitivity to changes in the surrounding medium has been exploited for several sensing applications: protein adsorption, trace gas detection, impurity detection in liquids, structural health monitoring of composite materials, detection of electric fields, pressure sensing, and so on. In the present paper, after a general introduction to WGM resonators, attention is focused on spherical microresonators, either in bulk or in bubble format, to their fabrication, characterization and functionalization. The state of the art in the area of biosensing is presented, and the perspectives of further developments are discussed. PMID:27322282

  1. Magnetic Resonance Image Wavelet Enhancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    1Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico−DF, 09340, Mexico email:arog@xanum.uam.mx. Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics...Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico-DF

  2. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  3. Resonantly amplified vibronic symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbone, G. J.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Bozek, John D.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2001-05-01

    The energy dependence of the vibrational branching ratio for exciting one quantum of bending is determined for CO2 4σg-1 photoionization. This nominally forbidden transition becomes allowed for a photoionization transition as a result of instantaneous symmetry breaking due to zero point motion, and is strongly enhanced by a continuum shape resonance.

  4. Plasmon Resonators for Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    quantum dot. For free atoms this strong coupling is achieved using high Q optical resonators, such as ultra-low-loss bulk Fabry - Perot cavities or...TR-07-0487 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12a. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE Unlimited UL 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) The

  5. Auroral resonance line radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gladstone, G.R. )

    1992-02-01

    A model is developed for simulating the two-dimensional radiative transfer of resonance line emissions in auroras. The method of solution utilizes Fourier decomposition of the horizontal dependence in the intensity field so that the two-dimensional problem becomes a set of one-dimensional problems having different horizontal wavenumbers. The individual one-dimensional problems are solved for using a Feautrier-type solution of the differential-integral form of the radiative transfer equation. In the limit as the horizontal wavenumber becomes much larger than the local line-center extinction coefficient, the scattering integral becomes considerably simplified, and the final source function is evaluated in closed form. The two-dimensional aspects of the model are tested against results for nonresonance radiative transfer studies, and the resonance line part of the model is tested against results of existing plane-parallel resonance line radiative transfer codes. Finally, the model is used to simulate the intensity field of O{sub I} 1,304{angstrom} for hard and soft auroras of various Gaussian horizontal widths. The results demonstrate the importance of considering the effects of two-dimensional radiative transfer when analyzing auroral resonance line data.

  6. Composite Resonator Surface Emitting Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; CHOW,WENG W.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; GEIB,KENT M.

    2000-05-01

    The authors have developed electrically-injected coupled-resonator vertical-cavity lasers and have studied their novel properties. These monolithically grown coupled-cavity structures have been fabricated with either one active and one passive cavity or with two active cavities. All devices use a selectively oxidized current aperture in the lower cavity, while a proton implant was used in the active-active structures to confine current in the top active cavity. They have demonstrated optical modulation from active-passive devices where the modulation arises from dynamic changes in the coupling between the active and passive cavities. The laser intensity can be modulated by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity. They have also observed Q-switched pulses from active-passive devices with pulses as short as 150 ps. A rate equation approach is used to model the Q-switched operation yielding good agreement between the experimental and theoretical pulseshape. They have designed and demonstrated the operation of active-active devices which la.se simultaneously at both longitudinal cavity resonances. Extremely large bistable regions have also been observed in the light-current curves for active-active coupled resonator devices. This bistability can be used for high contrast switching with contrast ratios as high as 100:1. Coupled-resonator vertical-cavity lasers have shown enhanced mode selectivity which has allowed devices to lase with fundamental-mode output powers as high as 5.2 mW.

  7. Stochastic resonance on a circle

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesenfeld, K. ); Pierson, D.; Pantazelou, E.; Dames, C.; Moss, F. )

    1994-04-04

    We describe a new realization of stochastic resonance, applicable to a broad class of systems, based on an underlying excitable dynamics with deterministic reinjection. A simple but general theory of such single-trigger'' systems is compared with analog simulations of the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model, as well as experimental data obtained from stimulated sensory neurons in the crayfish.

  8. Coupling of a locally implanted rare-earth ion ensemble to a superconducting micro-resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Wisby, I. Tzalenchuk, A. Ya.; Graaf, S. E. de; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Gwilliam, R.; Meeson, P. J.; Lindström, T.

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate the coupling of rare-earth ions locally implanted in a substrate (Gd{sup 3+} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to a superconducting NbN lumped-element micro-resonator. The hybrid device is fabricated by a controlled ion implantation of rare-earth ions in well-defined micron-sized areas, aligned to lithographically defined micro-resonators. The technique does not degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remain above 10{sup 5}. Using microwave absorption spectroscopy, we observe electron-spin resonances in good agreement with numerical modelling and extract corresponding coupling rates of the order of 1 MHz and spin linewidths of 50–65 MHz.

  9. Resonance Effects in the NASA Transonic Flutter Cascade Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Capece, V. R.; Ford, C. T.

    2003-01-01

    Investigations of unsteady pressure loadings on the blades of fans operating near the stall flutter boundary are carried out under simulated conditions in the NASA Transonic Flutter Cascade facility (TFC). It has been observed that for inlet Mach numbers of about 0.8, the cascade flowfield exhibits intense low-frequency pressure oscillations. The origins of these oscillations were not clear. It was speculated that this behavior was either caused by instabilities in the blade separated flow zone or that it was a tunnel resonance phenomenon. It has now been determined that the strong low-frequency oscillations, observed in the TFC facility, are not a cascade phenomenon contributing to blade flutter, but that they are solely caused by the tunnel resonance characteristics. Most likely, the self-induced oscillations originate in the system of exit duct resonators. For sure, the self-induced oscillations can be significantly suppressed for a narrow range of inlet Mach numbers by tuning one of the resonators. A considerable amount of flutter simulation data has been acquired in this facility to date, and therefore it is of interest to know how much this tunnel self-induced flow oscillation influences the experimental data at high subsonic Mach numbers since this facility is being used to simulate flutter in transonic fans. In short, can this body of experimental data still be used reliably to verify computer codes for blade flutter and blade life predictions? To answer this question a study on resonance effects in the NASA TFC facility was carried out. The results, based on spectral and ensemble averaging analysis of the cascade data, showed that the interaction between self-induced oscillations and forced blade motion oscillations is very weak and can generally be neglected. The forced motion data acquired with the mistuned tunnel, when strong self-induced oscillations were present, can be used as reliable forced pressure fluctuations provided that they are extracted

  10. The principles of magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Longmore, D B

    1989-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR), which has no known biological hazard, is capable of producing high resolution thin tomographic images in any plane and blocks of 3-dimensional information. It can be used to study blood flow and to gain information about the composition of important materials seen and quantified on dimensionally accurate images. The MR image is a thin tomographic slice or a true three dimensional block of data which can be reconstructed in any desired way rather than a shadowgram of all the structures in the beam. It is the only imaging technique which can acquire data in a 3-dimensional format. CT images can be reconstructed to form a pseudo 3-D image or a hologram but the flexibility conferred by acquiring the data as a true 3-D block gives many advantages. The spatial resolution of MR images are theoretically those of low powered microscopy, the practical limits with the present generation of equipment are voxel sizes of one third by one third by two millimetres. The term Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is used commonly, particularly in the USA, avoiding association with the term, nuclear, and emphasizing the imaging potential of the technique. The terms Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) or Magnetic Resonance (MR) more correctly describe the most powerful diagnostic instrument yet devised. The simplified description of the phenomena involved in MR which follows is intended to be comprehensive and does not require foreknowledge of classical physics, quantum mechanics, fluency with mathematical formulae or an understanding of image reconstruction. There are many explanations of MR, some omitting the more difficult concepts. An accurate, comprehensive description is found on the textbook on MR by Gadian, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its Applications for Living Systems (Oxford University Press, 1982).

  11. Three-body resonance in meteoroid streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, A.; Asher, D. J.; Vaubaillon, J.

    2016-08-01

    Mean-motion resonances play an important role in the evolution of various meteoroid streams. Previous works have studied the effects of two-body resonances in different comets and streams. These already established two-body resonances were mainly induced either by Jovian or Saturnian effects but not both at the same time. Some of these resonances have led to spectacular meteor outbursts and storms in the past. In this work, we find a new resonance mechanism involving three bodies - i.e. meteoroid particle, Jupiter and Saturn, in the Perseid meteoroid stream. Long-term three-body resonances are not very common in real small bodies in our Solar system although they can mathematically exist at many resonant sweet spots in an abstract sense in any dynamical system. This particular resonance combination in the Perseid stream is such that it is close to the ratio of 1:4:10 if the orbital periods of Perseid particle, Saturn and Jupiter are considered, respectively. These resonant Perseid meteoroids stay resonant for typically about 2 kyr. Highly compact dust trails due to this unique resonance phenomenon are present in our simulations. Some past and future years are presented where three-body resonant meteoroids of different sizes (or subject to different radiation pressures) are computed to come near the Earth. This is the first theoretical example of an active and stable three-body resonance mechanism in the realm of meteoroid streams.

  12. Power meter ratio method of stabilizing a resonant modulator

    DOEpatents

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Cox, Jonathan Albert

    2016-10-11

    Methods and systems for stabilizing a resonant modulator include receiving pre-modulation and post-modulation portions of a carrier signal, determining the average power from these portions, comparing an average input power to the average output power, and operating a heater coupled to the modulator based on the comparison. One system includes a pair of input structures, one or more processing elements, a comparator, and a control element. The input structures are configured to extract pre-modulation and post-modulation portions of a carrier signal. The processing elements are configured to determine average powers from the extracted portions. The comparator is configured to compare the average input power and the average output power. The control element operates a heater coupled to the modulator based on the comparison.

  13. Electron extraction mechanisms of a micro-ECR neutralizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takao, Yoshinori; Hiramoto, Kenta; Nakagawa, Yuichi; Kasagi, Yusuke; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional particle simulations have been conducted to analyze the mechanisms of electron extraction through the orifices of a 4.2 GHz microwave discharge microneutralizer, using a xenon electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The dimensions of the neutralizer are 20 × 20 × 4 mm3, and a ring-shaped microwave antenna and permanent magnets are employed for its discharges. The numerical model is composed of a particle-in-cell simulation with a Monte Carlo collision algorithm for charged particle motions, a finite-difference time-domain method for microwaves, and a finite element analysis for magnetostatic fields. The simulation results have shown that the electrostatic field inside the plasma source has a dominant effect on electron extraction. The extracted electrons move along the magnetic field line to the orifice entrances and the E × B drift at the orifice edge induces electron extraction.

  14. NDI using mm-wave resonant techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, J.S.; Sachtjen, S.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1995-08-01

    Millimeter wave resonant measurements are commonly used for surface and near-surface materials characterization including the detection of cracks and defects, analysis of semiconducting and dielectric materials, and analysis of metallic electrical properties beneath coatings. Recent work has also shown the approach to be useful in evaluating corrosion products and the detection of incipient corrosion and corrosion cracking. In the analysis area, complex permittivity data of the corrosion products can be extracted, usually with accuracy of a few percent or better, to aid in identification of the product and possibly of mechanisms. In the detection area, corrosion-related cracks of order 100{mu}m or less near the surface have been detected and corrosion products have been detected beneath a variety of paints. Surface preparation requirements are minimal, particularly compared to some optical techniques, giving increased hope of field applicability. A number of examples of NDI on aircraft related materials and structures will be presented along with an assessment of detection and accuracy limits.

  15. Segmentation of neuroanatomy in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Andrew; Arridge, Simon R.; Barker, G. J.; Tofts, Paul S.

    1992-06-01

    Segmentation in neurological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is necessary for feature extraction, volume measurement and for the three-dimensional display of neuroanatomy. Automated and semi-automated methods offer considerable advantages over manual methods because of their lack of subjectivity, their data reduction capabilities, and the time savings they give. We have used dual echo multi-slice spin-echo data sets which take advantage of the intrinsically multispectral nature of MRI. As a pre-processing step, a rf non-uniformity correction is applied and if the data is noisy the images are smoothed using a non-isotropic blurring method. Edge-based processing is used to identify the skin (the major outer contour) and the eyes. Edge-focusing has been used to significantly simplify edge images and thus allow simple postprocessing to pick out the brain contour in each slice of the data set. Edge- focusing is a technique which locates significant edges using a high degree of smoothing at a coarse level and tracks these edges to a fine level where the edges can be determined with high positional accuracy. Both 2-D and 3-D edge-detection methods have been compared. Once isolated, the brain is further processed to identify CSF, and, depending upon the MR pulse sequence used, the brain itself may be sub-divided into gray matter and white matter using semi-automatic contrast enhancement and clustering methods.

  16. Identifying non-resonant Kepler planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri; Ford, Eric B.

    2012-02-01

    The Kepler mission has discovered a plethora of multiple transiting planet candidate exosystems, many of which feature putative pairs of planets near mean motion resonance commensurabilities. Identifying potentially resonant systems could help guide future observations and enhance our understanding of planetary formation scenarios. We develop and apply an algebraic method to determine which Kepler two-planet systems cannot be in a first-fourth order resonance, given the current, publicly available data. This method identifies when any potentially resonant angle of a system must circulate. We identify and list 70 near-resonant systems which cannot actually reside in resonance, assuming a widely used formulation for deriving planetary masses from their observed radii and that these systems do not contain unseen bodies that affect the interactions of the observed planets. This work strengthens the argument that a high fraction of exoplanetary systems may be near resonance but not actually in resonance.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth > For Parents > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain ... child may be given headphones to listen to music or earplugs to block the noise, and will ...

  18. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. ...

  20. The Nucleon Resonance Program at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Ralf W. Gothe

    2006-02-01

    The status of the program to study baryon resonances at Jefferson Lab will be exemplified by the latest results on resonance parameters and transition form factors in single and double-pion production as well as kaon-hyperon decays.

  1. Clamping instability and van der Waals forces in carbon nanotube mechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Aykol, Mehmet; Hou, Bingya; Dhall, Rohan; Chang, Shun-Wen; Branham, William; Qiu, Jing; Cronin, Stephen B

    2014-05-14

    We investigate the role of weak clamping forces, typically assumed to be infinite, in carbon nanotube mechanical resonators. Due to these forces, we observe a hysteretic clamping and unclamping of the nanotube device that results in a discrete drop in the mechanical resonance frequency on the order of 5-20 MHz, when the temperature is cycled between 340 and 375 K. This instability in the resonant frequency results from the nanotube unpinning from the electrode/trench sidewall where it is bound weakly by van der Waals forces. Interestingly, this unpinning does not affect the Q-factor of the resonance, since the clamping is still governed by van der Waals forces above and below the unpinning. For a 1 μm device, the drop observed in resonance frequency corresponds to a change in nanotube length of approximately 50-65 nm. On the basis of these findings, we introduce a new model, which includes a finite tension around zero gate voltage due to van der Waals forces and shows better agreement with the experimental data than the perfect clamping model. From the gate dependence of the mechanical resonance frequency, we extract the van der Waals clamping force to be 1.8 pN. The mechanical resonance frequency exhibits a striking temperature dependence below 200 K attributed to a temperature-dependent slack arising from the competition between the van der Waals force and the thermal fluctuations in the suspended nanotube.

  2. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Jonke, A.A.

    1957-10-01

    In improved solvent extraction process is described for the extraction of metal values from highly dilute aqueous solutions. The process comprises contacting an aqueous solution with an organic substantially water-immiscible solvent, whereby metal values are taken up by a solvent extract phase; scrubbing the solvent extract phase with an aqueous scrubbing solution; separating an aqueous solution from the scrubbed solvent extract phase; and contacting the scrubbed solvent phase with an aqueous medium whereby the extracted metal values are removed from the solvent phase and taken up by said medium to form a strip solution containing said metal values, the aqueous scrubbing solution being a mixture of strip solution and an aqueous solution which contains mineral acids anions and is free of the metal values. The process is particularly effective for purifying uranium, where one starts with impure aqueous uranyl nitrate, extracts with tributyl phosphate dissolved in carbon tetrachloride, scrubs with aqueous nitric acid and employs water to strip the uranium from the scrubbed organic phase.

  3. Gaussian-Beam Laser-Resonator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Patricia L.; Bair, Clayton H.; Barnes, Norman

    1989-01-01

    Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators by use of Gaussian-beam-propagation techniques. Used to determine radii of beams as functions of position in laser resonators. Algorithm used in program has three major components. First, ray-transfer matrix for laser resonator must be calculated. Next, initial parameters of beam calculated. Finally, propagation of beam through optical elements computed. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01).

  4. Thermal Properties of Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-22

    F01m 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 ABSTRACT Number of Papers published in peer-reviewed journals: Thermal Properties of Whispering...Gallery Mode Resonators Report Title In this project, we studied the thermal properties of ultra-high-quality whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid...resonators. More specifically, we measured the thermal relaxation time of the resonator to estimate the response time of the resonator based infrared (IR

  5. Analysis of Alternative Ring Resonator Designs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    the ring strip of the antenna as in the case of the original design. Both the alternative dielectric laminate and the increased thickness laminate...adjustments to the geometry parameters. 2. Ring Resonator Antenna Design The ring resonator is a two port antenna consisting of a ring strip and two...differing thicknesses for resonator antennas of the same design suggests that the RF fields penetrate slightly more or that the resonator can “see” a

  6. Identification of benzethonium chloride in commercial grapefruit seed extracts.

    PubMed

    Takeoka, G; Dao, L; Wong, R Y; Lundin, R; Mahoney, N

    2001-07-01

    Commercial grapefruit seed extracts (GSE) were extracted with chloroform. The solvent was evaporated, and the resulting solid was subsequently analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and elemental analysis (by proton-induced X-ray emission [PIXE] analysis). The main constituent was identified as benzethonium chloride, a synthetic antimicrobial agent commonly used in cosmetics and other topical applications. This compound comprised 8.03% (n = 2) of the liquid GSE sample. Higher amounts of benzethonium chloride were found in powder GSE samples.

  7. Noise in nonlinear nanoelectromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra Vidal, Diego N.

    Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems (NEMS), due to their nanometer scale size, possess a number of desirable attributes: high sensitivity to applied forces, fast response times, high resonance frequencies and low power consumption. However, ultra small size and low power handling result in unwanted consequences: smaller signal size and higher dissipation, making the NEMS devices more susceptible to external and intrinsic noise. The simplest version of a NEMS, a suspended nanomechanical structure with two distinct excitation states, can be used as an archetypal two state system to study a plethora of fundamental phenomena such as Duffing nonlinearity, stochastic resonance, and macroscopic quantum tunneling at low temperatures. From a technical perspective, there are numerous applications such nanomechanical memory elements, microwave switches and nanomechanical computation. The control and manipulation of the mechanical response of these two state systems can be realized by exploiting a (seemingly) counterintuitive physical phenomenon, Stochastic Resonance: in a noisy nonlinear mechanical system, the presence of noise can enhance the system response to an external stimulus. This Thesis is mainly dedicated to study possible applications of Stochastic Resonance in two-state nanomechanical systems. First, on chip signal amplification by 1/falpha is observed. The effectiveness of the noise assisted amplification is observed to decrease with increasing a. Experimental evidence shows an increase in asymmetry between the two states with increasing noise color. Considering the prevalence of 1/f alpha noise in the materials in integrated circuits, the signal enhancement demonstrated here, suggests beneficial use of the otherwise detrimental noise. Finally, a nanomechanical device, operating as a reprogrammable logic gate, and performing fundamental logic functions such as AND/OR and NAND/NOR is presented. The logic function can be programmed (from AND to OR) dynamically, by

  8. Resonant and secular orbital interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke

    In stable solar systems, planets remain in nearly elliptical orbits around their stars. Over longer timescales, however, their orbital shapes and sizes change due to mutual gravitational perturbations. Orbits of satellites around a planet vary for the same reason. Because of their interactions, the orbits of planets and satellites today are different from what they were earlier. In order to determine their original orbits, which are critical constraints on formation theories, it is crucial to understand how orbits evolve over the age of the Solar System. Depending on their timescale, we classify orbital interactions as either short-term (orbital resonances) or long-term (secular evolution). My work involves examples of both interaction types. Resonant history of the small Neptunian satellites. In satellite systems, tidal migration brings satellite orbits in and out of resonances. During a resonance passage, satellite orbits change dramatically in a very short period of time. We investigate the resonant history of the six small Neptunian moons. In this unique system, the exotic orbit of the large captured Triton (with a circular, retrograde, and highly tilted orbit) influences the resonances among the small satellites very strongly. We derive an analytical framework which can be applied to Neptune's satellites and to similar systems. Our numerical simulations explain the current orbital tilts of the small satellites as well as constrain key physical parameters of both Neptune and its moons. Secular orbital interactions during eccentricity damping. Long-term periodic changes of orbital shape and orientation occur when two or more planets orbit the same star. The variations of orbital elements are superpositions of the same number of fundamental modes as the number of planets in the system. We investigate how this effect interacts with other perturbations imposed by external disturbances, such as the tides and relativistic effects. Through analytical studies of a

  9. Electromagnetic Transmission Through Resonant Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Steven M.

    Electromagnetic resonators store energy in the form of oscillatory electric and magnetic fields and gradually exchange that energy by coupling with their environment. This coupling process can have profound effects on the transmission and reflection properties of nearby interfaces, with rapid transitions from high transmittance to high reflectance over narrow frequency ranges, and has been exploited to design useful optical components such as spectral filters and dielectric mirrors. This dissertation includes analytic, numeric, and experimental investigations of three different electromagnetic resonators, each based on a different method of confining electromagnetic fields near the region of interest. First, we show that a structure with two parallel conducting plates, each containing a subwavelength slit, supports a localized resonant mode bound to the slits and therefore exhibits (in the absence of nonradiative losses), perfect resonant transmission over a narrow frequency range. In practice, the transmission is limited by conduction losses in the sidewalls; nevertheless, experimental results at 10 GHz show a narrowband transmission enhancement by a factor of 104 compared to the non-resonant transmission, with quality factor (ratio of frequency to peak width) Q ~ 3000. Second, we describe a narrowband transmission filter based on a single-layer dielectric grating. We use a group theory analysis to show that, due to their symmetry, several of the grating modes cannot couple to light at normal incidence, while several others have extremely large coupling. We then show how selectively breaking the system symmetry using off-normal light incidence can produce transmission peaks by enabling weak coupling to some of the previously protected modes. The narrowband filtering capabilities are validated by an experimental demonstration in the long wavelength infrared, showing transmission peaks of quality factor Q ~ 100 within a free-spectral range of 8-15 mum. Third, we

  10. Modal analysis of Bragg onion resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong; Liang, Wei; Yariv, Amnon; Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2004-03-01

    From analysis of the high Q modes in a Bragg onion resonator with an omnidirectional reflector cladding, we establish a close analogy between such a resonator and a spherical hollow cavity in perfect metal. We demonstrate that onion resonators are ideal for applications that require a large spontaneous-emission factor ß, such as thresholdless lasers and single-photon devices.

  11. Plant extracts in BPH.

    PubMed

    Di Silverio, F; Flammia, G P; Sciarra, A; Caponera, M; Mauro, M; Buscarini, M; Tavani, M; D'Eramo, G

    1993-12-01

    In Italy plant extracts represent 8.6% of all pharmacological prescriptions for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (data from 1991). This review evaluates all the suggested mechanisms of action for plant extracts. Recently we demonstrated an antiestrogenic effect of Serenoa Repens in BPH patients. Clinical trials with plant extracts have yielded conflicting results. In a recent review by Dreikorn and Richter, only five placebo controlled studies were found. Moreover, as opposed to chemically defined drugs, it is possible that for these extracts the active ingredients are not known; consequently pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic data are often missing. The International Consultation of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (Paris, June 1991) concluded that, to date, phytotherapeutic agents must be considered as a symptomatic treatment. Now more adequate pharmacological and clinical studies, placebo controlled, should determine the exact role of these drugs in the treatment of BPH.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Suh, B.J.; Roukes, M.L.; Midzor, M.; Wigen, P.E.; Childress, J.R.

    1999-06-03

    Our objectives were to develop the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) into an instrument capable of scientific studies of buried structures in technologically and scientifically important electronic materials such as magnetic multilayer materials. This work resulted in the successful demonstration of MRFM-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) as a microscopic characterization tool for thin magnetic films. Strong FMR spectra obtained from microscopic Co thin films (500 and 1000 angstroms thick and 40 x 200 microns in lateral extent) allowed us to observe variations in sample inhomogeneity and magnetic anisotropy field. We demonstrated lateral imaging in microscopic FMR for the first time using a novel approach employing a spatially selective local field generated by a small magnetically polarized spherical crystallite of yttrium iron garnet. These successful applications of the MRFM in materials studies provided the basis for our successful proposal to DOE/BES to employ the MRF M in studies of buried interfaces in magnetic materials.

  13. AK-cut crystal resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahan, A.; Euler, F. K.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations have predicted the existence of crystallographically doubly rotated quartz orientations with turnover temperatures which are considerably less sensitive to angular misorientation then comparable AT- or BT-cuts. These crystals are arbitrarily designated as the AK-cut. Experimental data is given for seven orientations, phi-angle variations between 30-46 deg and theta-angle variations between 21-28 deg measured on 3.3-3.4 MHz fundamental mode resonators vibrating in the thickness shear c-mode. The experimental turnover temperatures of these resonators are between 80 C and 150 C, in general agreement with calculated values. The normalized frequency change as a function of temperature has been fitted with a cubic equation.

  14. Optical antennas as nanoscale resonators.

    PubMed

    Agio, Mario

    2012-02-07

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has enabled us to fabricate sub-wavelength architectures that function as antennas for improving the exchange of optical energy with nanoscale matter. We describe the main features of optical antennas for enhancing quantum emitters and review the designs that increase the spontaneous emission rate by orders of magnitude from the ultraviolet up to the near-infrared spectral range. To further explore how optical antennas may lead to unprecedented regimes of light-matter interactions, we draw a relationship between metal nanoparticles, radio-wave antennas and optical resonators. Our analysis points out how optical antennas may function as nanoscale resonators and how these may offer unique opportunities with respect to state-of-the-art microcavities.

  15. A MEMS diamond hemispherical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, J. J.; Bancu, M. G.; Cook, E. H.; Chaparala, M. V.; Teynor, W. A.; Weinberg, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we report the fabrication of hemispherical polycrystalline diamond resonators fabricated on a novel high-temperature glass substrate. The hemispherical resonator gyroscope is one of the most accurate and rugged of the mechanical gyroscopes, and can be operated in either rate or whole-angle mode due to its high degree of symmetry. A fabrication sequence for creating extremely symmetric 3D MEMS hemispheres is presented. Mode shapes and frequencies obtained with a laser vibrometer are shown, as well as curves of Q versus pressure, and the dependence of frequency on anchor size. Fundamental mode frequency matching to <0.1% in as-fabricated devices has been achieved, which is essential to gyroscope operation in whole-angle mode.

  16. Dipole Resonances in 4He

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, E.; Nakayama, S.; Hayami, R.; Fushimi, K.; Kawasuso, H.; Yasuda, K.; Yamagata, T.; Akimune, H.; Ikemizu, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Yosoi, M.; Nakanishi, K.; Kawase, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Oota, T.; Sagara, K.; Kudoh, T.; Asaji, S.; Ishida, T.; Tanaka, M.

    2007-02-26

    We investigated the analogs of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) and spin-dipole resonance (SDR) of 4He by using the 4He(7Li,7Be) reaction at an incident energy of 455 MeV and at forward scattering angles. The {delta}S=0 and {delta}S=1 spectra for 4He were obtained by measuring the 0.43-MeV 7Be {gamma}-ray in coincidence with the scattered 7Be. From the {delta}S=0 and {delta}S=1 spectra thus obtained, the strength distributions of the GDR and SDR in 4He can be derived and the results are compared with the previous data.

  17. Resonantly amplified vibronic symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliakoff, E. D.; Rathbone, G. J.; Bozek, J. D.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2002-05-01

    In photoelectron spectroscopy, it is normally assumed that excitation of a single quantum of a non-totally symmetric vibrational mode is forbidden owing to symmetry constraints. Using vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy over a broad spectral range, we have shown that a previously overlooked mechanism can lead to these nominally forbidden transitions. Specifically, the photoelectron can mediate the oscillator strength for such a transition via resonantly amplified vibronic symmetry breaking, and this effect results from intrachannel rather than interchannel coupling. In our first experiments, we focused on bending excitation accompanying CO2 photoionization. Photoelectron spectroscopy on the CO_2^+(C^2Σ_g^+) state showed that the excitation of the (010) vibrational mode is mediated by a shape resonant continuum electron. The degree of vibrational excitation can be substantial, and extensions to other types of symmetry breaking are currently being investigated.

  18. Pediatric Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging modality with excellent contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Since ionizing radiation is an important concern in the pediatric population, MRI serves as a useful alternative to computed tomography (CT) and also provides additional clues to diagnosis, not discernible on other investigations. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), urography, angiography, enterography, dynamic multiphasic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging provide wealth of information. The main limitations include, long scan time, need for sedation/anesthesia, cost and lack of widespread availability. With the emergence of newer sequences and variety of contrast agents, MRI has become a robust modality and may serve as a one-stop shop for both anatomical and functional information.

  19. Increased damping of irregular resonators.

    PubMed

    Russ, S; Sapoval, B

    2002-03-01

    It is shown that fractal drums and jagged geometry resonators may be more damped than ordinary Euclidean systems. Several damping mechanisms are examined and studied by numerical calculations. The results depend on the dissipation mechanisms but globally they increase with localization, frequency, and the irregularity of the resonator. The increased dissipation is due to the uneven spatial distribution of the vibrational amplitude in two different ways. First, it is related to the partial confinement of the vibrational modes. Secondly, increased dissipation may be due to singularities in the amplitude distribution. This is the case when a few points exist where the vibration is pinned to zero inducing local logarithmic singularities. This last effect can be spectacular: a single defect can dominate the surface damping by viscous forces of a square drum.

  20. Resonance microwave volume plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Kop'ev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Malykh, N. I.; Misakyan, M. A.; Taktakishvili, M. I.; Temchin, S. M.; Lee, Young Dong

    2007-07-15

    A conceptual design of a microwave gas-discharge plasma source is described. The possibility is considered of creating conditions under which microwave energy in the plasma resonance region would be efficiently converted into the energy of thermal and accelerated (fast) electrons. Results are presented from interferometric and probe measurements of the plasma density in a coaxial microwave plasmatron, as well as the data from probe measurements of the plasma potential and electron temperature. The dynamics of plasma radiation was recorded using a streak camera and a collimated photomultiplier. The experimental results indicate that, at relatively low pressures of the working gas, the nonlinear interaction between the microwave field and the inhomogeneous plasma in the resonance region of the plasmatron substantially affects the parameters of the ionized gas in the reactor volume.

  1. Resonant relaxation in electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christopher; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2005-04-01

    We compute the leading, chiral charge-changing relaxation term in the quantum transport equations that govern electroweak baryogenesis using the closed time path formulation of nonequilibrium quantum field theory. We show that the relaxation transport coefficients may be resonantly enhanced under appropriate conditions on electroweak model parameters and that such enhancements can mitigate the impact of similar enhancements in the CP-violating source terms. We also develop a power counting in the time and energy scales entering electroweak baryogenesis and include effects through second order in ratios ɛ of the small and large scales. We illustrate the implications of the resonantly enhanced O(ɛ2) terms using the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, focusing on the interplay between the requirements of baryogenesis and constraints obtained from collider studies, precision electroweak data, and electric dipole moment searches.

  2. A silicon microelectromechanical resonant gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingying; Fan, Shangchun; Ren, Jie; Guo, Zhanshe

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents recent work on the design of a silicon microelectromechanical resonant gyroscope, and also describes the detailed principle of operation and simulation results with Matlab. The structure consists of comb drive actuators, a plate proof mass, lever mechanisms and double-ended tuning forks (DETF). The plate proof mass is driven by the comb drive actuators, and if an external rotation is applied, the Coriolis force acting on it is transmitted to the lever mechanisms attached. The lever mechanisms amplify the periodic force prior to being communicated axially onto the two symmetrical DETFs to provide a differential output. By demodulating the oscillators' frequency output, the rotation rate can then be estimated. This new design has several advantages including high sensitivity, high resolution and a quasi-digital FM output. Simulations include tests of the scale factor of the sensor and the resonant frequency of the DETF oscillators as a function of beam geometric parameters and the applied force.

  3. Fano resonances in kagome fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincetti, L.; Setti, V.; Zoboli, M.

    2012-06-01

    Confinement Loss of microstructured fibers whose cladding is composed by a triangular arrangement of tubes of various shapes is theoretically and numerically investigated. Kagome Fibers belong from this family of fibers with cladding tubes with hexagonal shape. The shape of the cladding tubes is proved to strongly affect the performance of the microstructured fiber. In order to understand the reasons for this behavior, the spectral properties of the tubes that constitute the cladding are investigated first. It is proved that also these tubes suffer from additional Fano Resonances when they are given a polygonal shape. It is proved that, by using the analytical model developed for the stand alone polygonal tubes, it is possible to predict the spectral position of Fano Resonances also in microstructured fibers. This is extremely important since it suggest new ways to reduce confinement loss in kagome fibers and microstructured fibers in general.

  4. Resonance enhanced dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Plum, Markus A; Menges, Bernhard; Fytas, George; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Steffen, Werner

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel light scattering setup that enables probing of dynamics near solid surfaces. An evanescent wave generated by a surface plasmon resonance in a metal layer is the incident light field in the dynamic light scattering experiment. The combination of surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering leads to a spatiotemporal resolution extending a few hundred nanometers from the surface and from microseconds to seconds. The comparison with evanescent wave dynamic light scattering identifies the advantages of the presented technique, e.g., surface monitoring, use of metal surfaces, and biorelevant systems. For both evanescent wave geometries, we define the scattering wave vector necessary for the analysis of the experimental relaxation functions.

  5. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.; Xie, J.

    1999-06-15

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). 6 figs.

  6. Resonance ionization for analytical spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, George S.; Payne, Marvin G.; Wagner, Edward B.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the sensitive and selective analysis of an atomic or molecular component of a gas. According to this method, the desired neutral component is ionized by one or more resonance photon absorptions, and the resultant ions are measured in a sensitive counter. Numerous energy pathways are described for accomplishing the ionization including the use of one or two tunable pulsed dye lasers.

  7. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K. Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  8. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam C.; Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Mathur, Nilmani; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  9. Modal Analysis of Unstable Resonators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-03

    follows is based upon this reference. 1. Defining Equations The linear prolate functions can be considered as solutions to a Sturm - Liouville differential...orthonormal on the infinite interval. Since the LPF satisfy a Sturm - Liouville problem, they are a complete set on the finite interval. (The LPF are square...34The analysis of the modes of optical resonators is crucial to understanding how actual laser devices operate . A consistent formulation that

  10. Electromagnetic Resonances of Metallic Bodies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    complex objects. MOM creates a discrete model of the object by dividing the object into electrically small charge and current segments referred to as the...distribution is unlimited ELECROMAGNETIC RESONANCES OF METALLIC BODIES William A. Lintz Lieutenant, United States Navy B.E.E., Villanova University, 1992...Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL June

  11. Nucleon Resonance Transition Form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker D.; Mokeev, Viktor I.; Aznauryan, Inna G.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss recent results from CLAS on electromagnetic resonance transition amplitudes and their dependence on the distance scale (Q2). From the comparison of these results with most advanced theoretical calculations within QCD-based approaches there is clear evidence that meson-baryon contributions are present and important at large distances, i.e. small Q2, and that quark core contributions dominate the short distance behavior.

  12. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, Jr, J F

    2009-07-27

    This report summarizes work supported by the DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER40990 during its duration from June 1996 to May 2009. Topics studied include (1) statistical descriptions of nuclear levels and measurements of proton resonances relevant to such descriptions, including measurements toward a complete level scheme for 30P, (2) the development of methods to estimate the missing fraction of levels in a given measurement, and (3) measurements at HRIBF relevant to nuclear astrophysics.

  13. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.; Xie, Jinchun

    1999-01-01

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS).

  14. Stochastic resonance across bifurcation cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolis, C.; Nicolis, G.

    2017-03-01

    The classical setting of stochastic resonance is extended to account for parameter variations leading to transitions between a unique stable state, bistability, and multistability regimes, across singularities of various kinds. Analytic expressions for the amplitude and the phase of the response in terms of key parameters are obtained. The conditions for optimal responses are derived in terms of the bifurcation parameter, the driving frequency, and the noise strength.

  15. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Retrospective Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyukha, Alex; Trompier, Francois

    2011-05-05

    Necessity for, principles of, and general concepts of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) retrospective dosimetry are presented. Also presented and given in details are examples of EPR retrospective dosimetry applications in tooth enamel, bone, and fingernails with focus on general approaches for solving technical and methodological problems. Advantages, drawbacks, and possible future developments are discussed and an extensive bibliography on EPR retrospective dosimetry is provided.

  16. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF RUTHENIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Leader, G.R.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is described. According to the invention, a nitrite selected from the group consisting of alkali nitrite and alkaline earth nitrite in an equimolecular quantity with regard to the quantity of rathenium present is added to an aqueous solution containing ruthenium tetrantrate to form a ruthenium complex. Adding an organic solvent such as ethyl ether to the resulting mixture selectively extracts the rathenium complex.

  17. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  18. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  19. NLC extraction line studies

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Y.

    1999-12-09

    In this note, the authors briefly review the current lattice of the NLC extraction line which was designed for the nominal NLC beam parameters. Then the authors describe the beam parameters for the high luminosity option with larger beam disruption parameter and discuss its effect on beam loss in the extraction line. Finally, the authors present a summary of the optics study aimed at minimizing the beam loss with high disruption beams.

  20. The ep -->e'p eta reaction at and above the S11(1535) baryon resonance.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R; Dytman, S; Kim, K Y; Mueller, J; Adams, G S; Amaryan, M J; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Auger, T; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bertozzi, W; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W; Burkert, V D; Calarco, J R; Capitani, G; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Connelly, J; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J; Day, D; Degtyarenko, P V; Demirchyan, R A; Dennis, L C; Deppman, A; De Sanctis, E; De Vita, R; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Eckhause, M; Efremenko, Y V; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Farhi, L; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Fissum, K; Freyberger, A; Funsten, H; Gai, M; Gavrilov, V B; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K; Gilad, S; Girard, P; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Gyurjyan, V; Hancock, D; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Heisenberg, J; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hicks, R S; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Kane, J; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Kuang, Y; Laget, J M; Lawrence, D; Leskin, G A; Longhi, A; Loukachine, K; Lucas, M; Magahiz, R; Major, R W; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; Matthews, S K; McAleer, S; McCarthy, J; McNabb, J W; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Muccifora, V; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Niyazov, R A; Ohandjanyan, M S; O'Brien, J T; Opper, A; Patois, Y; Peterson, G A; Philips, S; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Reolon, A R; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Roudot, F; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Salgado, C W; Sanzone, M; Sapunenko, V; Sarty, A; Sargsyan, M; Schumacher, R A; Shafi, A; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Shuvalov, S M; Skabelin, A; Smith, T; Smith, C; Smith, E S; Sober, D I; Spraker, M; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D; Tung, T Y; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A; Weller, H; Weinstein, L B; Welsh, R; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, S; Witkowski, M; Wolin, E; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zhou, Z; Zhao, J

    2001-02-26

    New cross sections for the reaction e p-->e p eta are reported for total center of mass energy W = 1.5--1.86 GeV and invariant momentum transfer Q2 = 0.25--1.5 (GeV/c)(2). This large kinematic range allows extraction of important new information about response functions, photocouplings, and eta N coupling strengths of baryon resonances. Newly observed structure at W approximately 1.65 GeV is shown to come from interference between S and P waves and can be interpreted with known resonances. Improved values are derived for the photon coupling amplitude for the S11(1535) resonance.

  1. Casimir effect on graphene resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically investigated the influence of the Casimir effect on mechanical properties of a graphene resonator, where a graphene sheet is located in parallel with a perfectly conducting plate. The Casimir force arising from this effect strongly attracts a graphene sheet to a perfectly conducting plate and increases the tension of a graphene sheet as the separation distance between them decreases. The maximum vertical displacement of a graphene sheet to the substrate increases obeying a power law of a separation distance with an exponent of 4/3 as the separation distance decreases. For small separation distances, the Casimir force is excessively strong for the graphene sheet to maintain a free-standing shape, consequently resulting in the adhesion of the sheet to the substrate below a critical separation distance. The resonant frequency increases over a wide range as the separation distance decreases for large separation distances. However, it then rapidly decreases for small separations and converges to zero at a critical separation. These various behaviors enable the control of a graphene resonator.

  2. Vector-Resonance-Multimode Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeyev, S. V.; Kbashi, H.; Tarasov, N.; Loiko, Yu.; Kolpakov, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The modulation and multimode instabilities are the main mechanisms which drive spontaneous spatial and temporal pattern formation in a vast number of nonlinear systems ranging from biology to laser physics. Using an Er-doped fiber laser as a test bed, here for the first time we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically a new type of a low-threshold vector-resonance-multimode instability which inherits features of multimode and modulation instabilities. The same as for the multimode instability, a large number of longitudinal modes can be excited without mode synchronization. To enable modulation instability, we modulate the state of polarization of the lasing signal with the period of the beat length by an adjustment of the in-cavity birefringence and the state of polarization of the pump wave. As a result, we show the regime's tunability from complex oscillatory to periodic with longitudinal mode synchronization in the case of resonance matching between the beat and cavity lengths. Apart from the interest in laser physics for unlocking the tunability and stability of dynamic regimes, the proposed mechanism of the vector-resonance-multimode instability can be of fundamental interest for the nonlinear dynamics of various distributed systems.

  3. Diphoton resonance confronts dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Hyun Min

    2016-07-01

    As an interpretation of the 750 GeV diphoton excesses recently reported by both ATLAS and CMS collaborations, we consider a simple extension of the Standard Model with a Dirac fermion dark matter where a singlet complex scalar field mediates between dark matter and SM particles via effective couplings to SM gauge bosons and/or Higgs-portal. In this model, we can accommodate the diphoton events through the direct and/or cascade decays of pseudo-scalar and real scalar partners of the complex scalar field. We show that mono-jet searches and gamma-ray observations are complementary in constraining the region where the width of the diphoton resonance can be enhanced due to the couplings of the resonance to dark matter and the correct relic density is obtained. In the case of cascade decay of the resonance, the effective couplings of singlet scalars can be smaller, but the model is still testable by the future discrimination between single photon and photon-jet at the LHC as well as the gamma-ray searches for the cascade annihilation of dark matter.

  4. Relativistic resonance and decay phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Hai V.

    2015-04-01

    The exact relation τ = ℏ/Γ between the width Γ of a resonance and the lifetime τ for the decay of this resonance could not be obtained in standard quantum theory based on the Hilbert space or Schwartz space axiom in non-relativistic physics as well as in the relativistic regime. In order to obtain the exact relation, one has to modify the Hilbert space axiom or the Schwartz space axiom and choose new boundary conditions based on the Hardy space axioms in which the space of the states and the space of the observables are described by two different Hardy spaces. As consequences of the new Hardy space axioms, one obtains, instead of the symmetric time evolution for the states and the observables, asymmetrical time evolutions for the states and observables which are described by two semi-groups. A relativistic resonance obeying the exponential time evolution can be described by a relativistic Gamow vector, which is defined as superposition of the exact out-plane wave states with a Breit-Wigner energy distribution of the width Γ.

  5. Traces of a triboson resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Collins, J. H.; Lombardo, S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that the relatively small but coincident excesses observed around 2 TeV in the ATLAS Run 1 and Run 2 hadronic diboson searches — when a cut on the number of tracks in the fat jets is not applied — and the null results of all remaining high-mass diboson searches are compatible with the decay of a triboson resonance R into WZ plus an extra particle X. These decays can take place via new neutral ( Y 0) or charged ( Y ±) particles, namely R → Y 0 W, with Y 0 → ZX, or R → Y ± Z, with Y ± → WX. An obvious candidate for such intermediate particle is a neutral one Y 0, given a 3 .9 σ excess found at 650 GeV by the CMS Collaboration in searches for intermediate mass diboson resonances decaying to ZV, with V = W, Z. We discuss discovery strategies for triboson resonances with small modifications of existing hadronic searches.

  6. Brownian motors and stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Mateos, José L; Alatriste, Fernando R

    2011-12-01

    We study the transport properties for a walker on a ratchet potential. The walker consists of two particles coupled by a bistable potential that allow the interchange of the order of the particles while moving through a one-dimensional asymmetric periodic ratchet potential. We consider the stochastic dynamics of the walker on a ratchet with an external periodic forcing, in the overdamped case. The coupling of the two particles corresponds to a single effective particle, describing the internal degree of freedom, in a bistable potential. This double-well potential is subjected to both a periodic forcing and noise and therefore is able to provide a realization of the phenomenon of stochastic resonance. The main result is that there is an optimal amount of noise where the amplitude of the periodic response of the system is maximum, a signal of stochastic resonance, and that precisely for this optimal noise, the average velocity of the walker is maximal, implying a strong link between stochastic resonance and the ratchet effect.

  7. Plasma effects on resonant fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, R. F.

    2012-11-01

    I investigate the effects of plasma interactions on resonance-enhanced fusion rates in stars. Starting from basic principles we derive an expression for the fusion rate that can serve as a basis for discussion of approximation schemes The present state-of-the-art correction algorithms, based on the classical correlation function for the fusing particles and the classical energy shift for the resonant state, do not follow from this result, even as an approximation. The results of expanding in a perturbation solution for the case of a weakly coupled plasma are somewhat enlightening. But at this point we are at a loss as to how to do meaningful calculations in systems with even moderate plasma coupling strength. Examples where this can matter are the effect of a possible low-energy 12C+12C resonance on x-ray bursts from accreting neutron stars or on supernova 1A simulations, and the calculation of the triple α rate in some of the more strongly coupled regions in which the process enters, such as accretion onto a neutron star.

  8. Antiangiogenic Activity of Glycyrrhiza Extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying-Qiu

    The bioactivity of extract of glycyrrhiza was detected by zebrafish antiangiogenic model after 70% ethanol extract of glycyrrhiza was extracted with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, n-butanol. The inhibition of the extracts in antiangiogenic activity showed that the highest active components existed in ethyl acetate extract of glycyrrhiza. The ethyl acetate extract of glycyrrhiza was separated by polyamide column chromatography to obtain 7 fractions (Fr1-Fr7), which Fr5 and Fr6 showed antiangiogenic activity.

  9. Planetary gearbox fault diagnosis using an adaptive stochastic resonance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yaguo; Han, Dong; Lin, Jing; He, Zhengjia

    2013-07-01

    Planetary gearboxes are widely used in aerospace, automotive and heavy industry applications due to their large transmission ratio, strong load-bearing capacity and high transmission efficiency. The tough operation conditions of heavy duty and intensive impact load may cause gear tooth damage such as fatigue crack and teeth missed etc. The challenging issues in fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes include selection of sensitive measurement locations, investigation of vibration transmission paths and weak feature extraction. One of them is how to effectively discover the weak characteristics from noisy signals of faulty components in planetary gearboxes. To address the issue in fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes, an adaptive stochastic resonance (ASR) method is proposed in this paper. The ASR method utilizes the optimization ability of ant colony algorithms and adaptively realizes the optimal stochastic resonance system matching input signals. Using the ASR method, the noise may be weakened and weak characteristics highlighted, and therefore the faults can be diagnosed accurately. A planetary gearbox test rig is established and experiments with sun gear faults including a chipped tooth and a missing tooth are conducted. And the vibration signals are collected under the loaded condition and various motor speeds. The proposed method is used to process the collected signals and the results of feature extraction and fault diagnosis demonstrate its effectiveness.

  10. Incorporating crystallographic orientation in the development of resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebisi, R. A.; Sathish, S.; Shade, P. A.

    2017-02-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) measures the mechanical resonance of solids and uses the resonance frequencies to extract a complete set of elastic constants of the solid material. One of the advantages of the RUS method is its applicability to small single crystals. In the past two decades, the RUS technique has gained more acceptance as a nondestructive method to measure elastic properties. The inherent assumptions in the conventional RUS algorithm include free boundary condition on the specimen faces and the faces of the specimens are normal/parallel to the principal crystallographic axes. This assumption is fulfilled through a time consuming procedure that typically involves multiple iterations of sample cutting and inspection using an x-ray Laue method. Such an intensive method is not suitable for many samples in engineering applications. To estimate the elastic constants of such samples, a modified RUS algorithm has been developed to incorporate the sample crystallographic orientation expressed in terms of Euler angles. This modified RUS algorithm has been applied to estimate the elastic constants of cubic and hexagonal crystal structure samples with known orientation. The obtained values are comparable to literature values. With the incorporation of crystal orientation into the RUS algorithm, the elastic constants of samples with random crystal orientation were obtained.

  11. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for materials with high damping and samples of arbitrary geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Remillieux, Marcel C.; Ulrich, T. J.; Payan, Cédric; Rivière, Jacques; Lake, Colton R.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves

    2015-07-23

    This paper describes resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) as a powerful and established technique for measuring elastic constants of a material with general anisotropy. The first step of this technique consists of extracting resonance frequencies and damping from the vibrational frequency spectrum measured on a sample with free boundary conditions. An inversion technique is then used to retrieve the elastic tensor from the measured resonance frequencies. As originally developed, RUS has been mostly applicable to (i) materials with small damping such that the resonances of the sample are well separated and (ii) samples with simple geometries for which analytical solutions exist. In this paper, these limitations are addressed with a new RUS approach adapted to materials with high damping and samples of arbitrary geometry. Resonances are extracted by fitting a sum of exponentially damped sinusoids to the measured frequency spectrum. The inversion of the elastic tensor is achieved with a genetic algorithm, which allows searching for a global minimum within a discrete and relatively wide solution space. First, the accuracy of the proposed approach is evaluated against numerical data simulated for samples with isotropic symmetry and transversely isotropic symmetry. Subsequently, the applicability of the approach is demonstrated using experimental data collected on a composite structure consisting of a cylindrical sample of Berea sandstone glued to a large piezoelectric disk. In the proposed experiments, RUS is further enhanced by the use of a 3-D laser vibrometer allowing the visualization of most of the modes in the frequency band studied.

  12. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for materials with high damping and samples of arbitrary geometry

    DOE PAGES

    Remillieux, Marcel C.; Ulrich, T. J.; Payan, Cédric; ...

    2015-07-23

    This paper describes resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) as a powerful and established technique for measuring elastic constants of a material with general anisotropy. The first step of this technique consists of extracting resonance frequencies and damping from the vibrational frequency spectrum measured on a sample with free boundary conditions. An inversion technique is then used to retrieve the elastic tensor from the measured resonance frequencies. As originally developed, RUS has been mostly applicable to (i) materials with small damping such that the resonances of the sample are well separated and (ii) samples with simple geometries for which analytical solutions exist.more » In this paper, these limitations are addressed with a new RUS approach adapted to materials with high damping and samples of arbitrary geometry. Resonances are extracted by fitting a sum of exponentially damped sinusoids to the measured frequency spectrum. The inversion of the elastic tensor is achieved with a genetic algorithm, which allows searching for a global minimum within a discrete and relatively wide solution space. First, the accuracy of the proposed approach is evaluated against numerical data simulated for samples with isotropic symmetry and transversely isotropic symmetry. Subsequently, the applicability of the approach is demonstrated using experimental data collected on a composite structure consisting of a cylindrical sample of Berea sandstone glued to a large piezoelectric disk. In the proposed experiments, RUS is further enhanced by the use of a 3-D laser vibrometer allowing the visualization of most of the modes in the frequency band studied.« less

  13. Observation of a Hybrid Spin Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, M.; Allgower, C.; Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Chu, C. M.; Courant, E. D.; Glenn, J. W.; Huang, H.; Jeon, D.; Kponou, A. E.; Krueger, K.; Luccio, A.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Lee, S. Y.; Ratner, L.; Reece, K.; Roser, T.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M. J.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D. G.; van Asselt, W.; Williams, N.; Yokosawa, A.

    2000-02-01

    A new type of spin depolarization resonance has been observed at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). This spin resonance is identified as a strong closed-orbit sideband around the dominant intrinsic spin resonance. The strength of the resonance was proportional to the 9th harmonic component of the horizontal closed orbit and proportional to the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude. This ``hybrid'' spin resonance cannot be overcome by the partial snake at the AGS, but it can be corrected by the harmonic orbit correctors.

  14. Resonant circuit model for efficient metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Sellier, Alexandre; Teperik, Tatiana V; de Lustrac, André

    2013-11-04

    The resonant absorption in a planar metamaterial is studied theoretically. We present a simple physical model describing this phenomenon in terms of equivalent resonant circuit. We discuss the role of radiative and dissipative damping of resonant mode supported by a metamaterial in the formation of absorption spectra. We show that the results of rigorous calculations of Maxwell equations can be fully retrieved with simple model describing the system in terms of equivalent resonant circuit. This simple model allows us to explain the total absorption effect observed in the system on a common physical ground by referring it to the impedance matching condition at the resonance.

  15. Intense, narrow atomic-clock resonances.

    PubMed

    Jau, Y-Y; Post, A B; Kuzma, N N; Braun, A M; Romalis, M V; Happer, W

    2004-03-19

    We present experimental and theoretical results showing that magnetic resonance transitions from the "end" sublevels of maximum or minimum spin in alkali-metal vapors are a promising alternative to the conventional 0-0 transition for small-size gas-cell atomic clocks. For these "end resonances," collisional spin-exchange broadening, which often dominates the linewidth of the 0-0 resonance, decreases with increasing spin polarization and vanishes for 100% polarization. The end resonances also have much stronger signals than the 0-0 resonance, and are readily detectable in cells with high buffer-gas pressure.

  16. Observation of a hybrid spin resonance

    PubMed

    Bai; Allgower; Ahrens; Alessi; Brown; Bunce; Cameron; Chu; Courant; Glenn; Huang; Jeon; Kponou; Krueger; Luccio; Makdisi; Lee; Ratner; Reece; Roser; Spinka; Syphers; Tsoupas; Underwood; van Asselt W; Williams

    2000-02-07

    A new type of spin depolarization resonance has been observed at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). This spin resonance is identified as a strong closed-orbit sideband around the dominant intrinsic spin resonance. The strength of the resonance was proportional to the 9th harmonic component of the horizontal closed orbit and proportional to the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude. This "hybrid" spin resonance cannot be overcome by the partial snake at the AGS, but it can be corrected by the harmonic orbit correctors.

  17. Extraordinary acoustic transmission mediated by Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koju, Vijay; Rowe, Ebony; Robertson, William M.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate perfect transmission of sound through a rigid barrier embedded with Helmholtz resonators. The resonators are confined within a waveguide and they are oriented such that one neck protrudes onto each side of the barrier. Perfect sound transmission occurs even though the open area of the necks is less than 3% of the barrier area. Maximum transmission occurs at the resonant frequency of the Helmholtz resonator. Because the dimensions of the Helmholtz resonators are much smaller than the resonant wavelength, the transmission is independent of the direction of sound on the barrier and of the relative placement of the necks. Further, we show that the transmitted sound experiences a continuous phase transition of π radians as a function of frequency through resonance. In simulations of adjacent resonators with slightly offset resonance frequencies, the phase difference leads to destructive interference. By expanding the simulation to a linear array of tuned Helmholtz resonators we show that it is possible to create an acoustic lens. The ability of Helmholtz resonator arrays to manipulate the phase of a plane acoustic wave enables a new class of sonic beam-forming devices analogous to diffractive optics.

  18. Systematics of shape resonances in reactive collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakimoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) methodology is used to undertake a systematic analysis of shape resonances in exoergic reactive collisions at low energies E , and examples investigated are Li +H+ , He (2 3S )+H , and He (2 3S )+Mu (muonium). In so doing, the resonance positions should be measured by the tunneling parameter α and not by E . The resonance peak height Pres of the reaction probability and the resonance width times the vibrational period of the quasibound resonance state can be given by simple closed-form expressions with two variables, α and P0, the latter of which is a reaction probability given at collision energies much above a centrifugal barrier top and is determined by only short-range interactions. The resonance promotes the reaction maximally (i.e., Pres=1 ) when the resonance satisfies α =α0=(2π ) -1ln[(1 -P0) /P0] , in other words, when the transmission coefficient of tunneling through the centrifugal barrier happens to be equal to P0 at the resonance energy. If α0≳1 , the reaction system is rich in tunneling resonances. If α0≲0 , the prominent resonances are mostly an over-barrier type. The resonances occurring at α ≫α0 are of no significance in the reaction.

  19. Extraordinary acoustic transmission mediated by Helmholtz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Koju, Vijay; Rowe, Ebony; Robertson, William M.

    2014-07-15

    We demonstrate perfect transmission of sound through a rigid barrier embedded with Helmholtz resonators. The resonators are confined within a waveguide and they are oriented such that one neck protrudes onto each side of the barrier. Perfect sound transmission occurs even though the open area of the necks is less than 3% of the barrier area. Maximum transmission occurs at the resonant frequency of the Helmholtz resonator. Because the dimensions of the Helmholtz resonators are much smaller than the resonant wavelength, the transmission is independent of the direction of sound on the barrier and of the relative placement of the necks. Further, we show that the transmitted sound experiences a continuous phase transition of π radians as a function of frequency through resonance. In simulations of adjacent resonators with slightly offset resonance frequencies, the phase difference leads to destructive interference. By expanding the simulation to a linear array of tuned Helmholtz resonators we show that it is possible to create an acoustic lens. The ability of Helmholtz resonator arrays to manipulate the phase of a plane acoustic wave enables a new class of sonic beam-forming devices analogous to diffractive optics.

  20. White Light Emission from Vegetable Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vikram; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2015-01-01

    A mixture of extracts from two common vegetables, red pomegranate and turmeric, when photoexcited at 380 nm, produced almost pure white light emission (WLE) with Commission Internationale d’Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity index (0.35, 0.33) in acidic ethanol. It was also possible to obtain WLE in polyvinyl alcohol film (0.32, 0.25), and in gelatin gel (0.26, 0.33) using the same extract mixture. The colour temperature of the WLE was conveniently tunable by simply adjusting the concentrations of the component emitters. The primary emitting pigments responsible for contributing to WLE were polyphenols and anthocyanins from pomegranate, and curcumin from turmeric. It was observed that a cascade of Forster resonance energy transfer involving polyphenolics, curcumin and anthocyanins played a crucial role in obtaining a CIE index close to pure white light. The optimized methods of extraction of the two primary emitting pigments from their corresponding plant sources are simple, cheap and fairly green. PMID:26083264

  1. White Light Emission from Vegetable Extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vikram; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2015-06-01

    A mixture of extracts from two common vegetables, red pomegranate and turmeric, when photoexcited at 380 nm, produced almost pure white light emission (WLE) with Commission Internationale d’Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity index (0.35, 0.33) in acidic ethanol. It was also possible to obtain WLE in polyvinyl alcohol film (0.32, 0.25), and in gelatin gel (0.26, 0.33) using the same extract mixture. The colour temperature of the WLE was conveniently tunable by simply adjusting the concentrations of the component emitters. The primary emitting pigments responsible for contributing to WLE were polyphenols and anthocyanins from pomegranate, and curcumin from turmeric. It was observed that a cascade of Forster resonance energy transfer involving polyphenolics, curcumin and anthocyanins played a crucial role in obtaining a CIE index close to pure white light. The optimized methods of extraction of the two primary emitting pigments from their corresponding plant sources are simple, cheap and fairly green.

  2. Ringing phenomenon of the fiber ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2007-08-01

    A resonator fiber-optic gyro (R-FOG) is a high-accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. A fiber ring resonator is the core sensing element in the R-FOG. When the frequency of the fiber ring resonator input laser is swept linearly with time, ringing of the output resonance curve is observed. The output field of the fiber ring resonator is derived from the superposition of the light transmitted through the directional coupler directly and the multiple light components circulated in the fiber ring resonator when the frequency of the laser is swept. The amplitude and phase of the output field are analyzed, and it is found that the difference in time for different light components in the fiber ring resonator to reach a point of destructive interference causes the ringing phenomenon. Finally the ringing phenomenon is observed in experiments, and the experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis well.

  3. Optical Microspherical Resonators for Biomedical Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Soria, Silvia; Berneschi, Simone; Brenci, Massimo; Cosi, Franco; Conti, Gualtiero Nunzi; Pelli, Stefano; Righini, Giancarlo C.

    2011-01-01

    Optical resonators play an ubiquitous role in modern optics. A particular class of optical resonators is constituted by spherical dielectric structures, where optical rays are total internal reflected. Due to minimal reflection losses and to potentially very low material absorption, these guided modes, known as whispering gallery modes, can confer the resonator an exceptionally high quality factor Q, leading to high energy density, narrow resonant-wavelength lines and a lengthy cavity ringdown. These attractive characteristics make these miniaturized optical resonators especially suited as laser cavities and resonant filters, but also as very sensitive sensors. First, a brief analysis is presented of the characteristics of microspherical resonators, of their fabrication methods, and of the light coupling techniques. Then, we attempt to overview some of the recent advances in the development of microspherical biosensors, underlining a number of important applications in the biomedical field. PMID:22346603

  4. Advances in mechanical detection of magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Seppe; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention and initial demonstration of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the early 1990s launched a renaissance of mechanical approaches to detecting magnetic resonance. This article reviews progress made in MRFM in the last decade, including the demonstration of scanned probe detection of magnetic resonance (electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance) and the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance from a single spin. Force and force-gradient approaches to mechanical detection are reviewed and recent related work using attonewton sensitivity cantilevers to probe minute fluctuating electric fields near surfaces is discussed. Given recent progress, pushing MRFM to single proton sensitivity remains an exciting possibility. We will survey some practical and fundamental issues that must be resolved to meet this challenge. PMID:18266413

  5. Gold nanodisk array surface plasmon resonance sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xueli

    Surface plasmon resonances in periodic metal nanostructures have been investigated for sensing applications over the last decade. The resonance wavelengths of the nanostructures are usually measured in the transmission or reflection spectrum for chemical and biological sensing. In this thesis, I introduce a nanoscale gap mediated surface plasmon resonance nanodisk array for displacement sensing and a super-period gold nanodisk grating enabled surface plasmon resonance spectrometer sensor. The super-period gold nanodisk grating has a small subwavelength period and a large diffraction grating period. Surface plasmon resonance spectra are measured in the first order diffraction spatial profiles captured by a charge-coupled device (CCD). A surface plasmon resonance sensor for the bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein nanolayer bonding is demonstrated by measuring the surface plasmon resonance shift in the first order diffraction spatial intensity profiles captured by the CCD.

  6. Dielectric square resonator investigated with microwave experiments.

    PubMed

    Bittner, S; Bogomolny, E; Dietz, B; Miski-Oglu, M; Richter, A

    2014-11-01

    We present a detailed experimental study of the symmetry properties and the momentum space representation of the field distributions of a dielectric square resonator as well as the comparison with a semiclassical model. The experiments have been performed with a flat ceramic microwave resonator. Both the resonance spectra and the field distributions were measured. The momentum space representations of the latter evidenced that the resonant states are each related to a specific classical torus, leading to the regular structure of the spectrum. Furthermore, they allow for a precise determination of the refractive index. Measurements with different arrangements of the emitting and the receiving antennas were performed and their influence on the symmetry properties of the field distributions was investigated in detail, showing that resonances with specific symmetries can be selected purposefully. In addition, the length spectrum deduced from the measured resonance spectra and the trace formula for the dielectric square resonator are discussed in the framework of the semiclassical model.

  7. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malara, P.; Campanella, C. E.; Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; de Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator’s quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes.

  8. Solvent extraction of the Avgamasya asphaltite of southeastern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Tolay, M.; Bartle, K.D.; Ekinci, E.; Erdem-Senatakr, A.; Kadioglu, E.

    1983-12-01

    The Avgamasya asphaltite of southeastern Turkey is geochemically classified as a solid aromatic-asphaltic oil containing mineral matter (mainly carbonates, sulphates, silicates and sulphides) derived from nearby Jurassic-Cretaceous oil deposits by alteration during migration. The asphaltite has been extracted by a variety of methods: Soxhlet at atmospheric pressure; with liquids under moderate pressure; and with supercritical gases. The effects of different extraction methods and solvents along with changes in temperature and pressure as well as prior acid treatment have been studied. The methods were fractionation of the extracts into pentane solubes and asphaltenes, followed by analyses by column chromatography, capillary gas chromatography, size exclusion chromatography and infra-red, (especially) /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. In comparison with Soxhlet extraction, liquid extraction under pressure produces further quantities of asphaltenes, with a more condensed average aromatic skeleton. On the other hand, extraction with supercritical toluene at 350/sup 0/C gives a similar yield to liquid extraction at 215/sup 0/C, but with a preponderance of low molecular mass petane soluble material.

  9. Immune effects of extractives on bamboo biomass self-plasticization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wanxi; Xue, Qiu; Ohkoshi, Makoto

    2014-07-01

    Bamboo is a fast-growing renewable bioresource. However, bamboo resources are wasted, and bamboo products release toxic gases. Bamboo biomass was therefore extracted and self-plasticized, and the immune effects of bamboo extractives were determined and investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed the following. (1) The 1H-NMR signals at ~5.5, 4-8, 7.4-10.2, and 12.22-12.37 ppm were attributed to the chemical shifts of active protons on carbons adjacent to R-OH, RAr-OH, oximes, and -COOH, respectively. This showed that there were highly reactive hydrogen atoms in bamboo benzene/ethanol extractives. The 13C-NMR spectrum gave further confirmation. (2) The extents of the effects of key process parameters were different: temperature > hot pressure > time. The optimal self-plasticizing conditions were temperature 170°C, hot pressure 9 MPa, time 40 min, and extraction of bamboo. (3) SEM, FT-IR, and XRD showed that contact and linkages among bamboo cells were significantly decreased by extractives, so the internal bond strengths of the self-plasticized samples were all higher after bamboo extraction. It was also found that the extractives created a significant barrier to bamboo self-plasticization as a result of their structure and chemical linkage reactions.

  10. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using medicinal Zizyphus xylopyrus bark extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumi Maria, Babu; Devadiga, Aishwarya; Shetty Kodialbail, Vidya; Saidutta, M. B.

    2015-08-01

    In the present paper, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Zizyphus xylopyrus bark extract is reported. Z. xylopyrus bark extract is efficiently used for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. UV-Visible spectroscopy showed surface plasmon resonance peaks in the range 413-420 nm confirming the formation of silver nanoparticles. Different factors affecting the synthesis of silver nanoparticles like methodology for the preparation of extract, concentration of silver nitrate solution used for biosynthesis and initial pH of the reaction mixture were studied. The extract prepared with 10 mM AgNO3 solution by reflux extraction method at optimum initial pH of 11, resulted in higher conversion of silver ions to silver nanoparticles as compared with those prepared by open heating or ultrasonication. SEM analysis showed that the biosynthesized nanoparticles are spherical in nature and ranged from 60 to 70 nm in size. EDX suggested that the silver nanoparticles must be capped by the organic components present in the plant extract. This simple process for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using aqueous extract of Z. xylopyrus is a green technology without the usage of hazardous and toxic solvents and chemicals and hence is environment friendly. The process has several advantages with reference to cost, compatibility for its application in medical and drug delivery, as well as for large-scale commercial production.

  11. Encapsulation of olive leaf extract in beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Mourtzinos, Ioannis; Salta, Fotini; Yannakopoulou, Konstantina; Chiou, Antonia; Karathanos, Vaios T

    2007-10-03

    Olive leaf extract, rich in oleuropein, formed an inclusion complex with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) upon mixing of the components in aqueous media and subsequent freeze-drying. Inclusion complex formation was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC thermograms indicated that the endothermic peaks of both the olive leaf extract and the physical mixture of olive leaf extract with beta-CD, attributed to the melting of crystals of the extract, were absent in DSC thermogram of inclusion complex. Moreover, DSC studies under oxidative conditions indicated that the complex of olive leaf extract with beta-CD was protected against oxidation, since it remained intact at temperatures where the free olive leaf extract was oxidized. Phase solubility studies afforded A L type diagrams, 1:1 complex stoichiometry, a moderate binding constant ( approximately 300 M (-1)), and an increase of the aqueous solubility by approximately 50%. The formation of the inclusion complex was also confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of beta-CD solutions in the presence of both pure oleuropein and olive leaf extract. The NMR data have established the formation of a 1:1 complex with beta-CD that involves deep insertion of the dihydroxyphenethyl moiety inside the cavity from its secondary side.

  12. On the K- 4He → Λπ- 3He resonant and non-resonant processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscicchia, K.; Wycech, S.; Curceanu, C.

    2016-10-01

    The ongoing data analyses by the AMADEUS/KLOE-2 Collaboration on the 2004-2005 KLOE data revive studies of the K ‾ nuclear absorption at low energies. The aim is to study K ‾ interactions at subthreshold energies and to search for signals of K ‾ meson nuclear states. In this paper the spectrum of the K- 4He → Λπ- 3He reaction is discussed. One - calculable - mode of decay involves P-wave intermediate Σ (1385) resonance. Another mode involves S-wave KN → Λπ amplitude which may be extracted from the experimental results. Comparison of these two allows a check of subthreshold extrapolations of multichannel K ‾ N S-wave interaction models. Given the established significance of the P wave interaction in the K ‾ N system presented here, the obtained spectra will serve for the AMADEUS/KLOE-2 data analysis, in order to properly extract the subthreshold non-resonant transition amplitude.

  13. Resonantly Detecting Axion-Mediated Forces with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A.

    2014-10-01

    We describe a method based on precision magnetometry that can extend the search for axion-mediated spin-dependent forces by several orders of magnitude. By combining techniques used in nuclear magnetic resonance and short-distance tests of gravity, our approach can substantially improve upon current experimental limits set by astrophysics, and probe deep into the theoretically interesting regime for the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion. Our method is sensitive to PQ axion decay constants between 109 and 1012 GeV or axion masses between 10-6 and 10-3 eV, independent of the cosmic axion abundance.

  14. Broadband electron spin resonance at low frequency without resonant cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Z.; Suh, B.; Corti, M.; Cattaneo, L.; Hajny, D.; Borsa, F.; Luban, M.

    2008-04-09

    We have developed a nonconventional broadband electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer operating continuously in the frequency range from 0.5 to 9 GHz. Dual antenna structure and the microwave absorbing environment differentiate the setup from the conventional one and enable broadband operation with any combination of frequency or magnetic field modulation and frequency or magnetic field sweeping. Its performance has been tested with the measurements on a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) sample and with the measurements on the single molecular magnet, V6, in solid state at low temperature.

  15. Terahertz near-field imaging of electric and magnetic resonances of a planar metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Bitzer, Andreas; Merbold, Hannes; Thoman, Andreas; Feurer, Thomas; Helm, Hanspeter; Walther, Markus

    2009-03-02

    Experimental investigations of the microscopic electric and in particular the magnetic near-fields in metamaterials remain highly challenging and current studies rely mostly on numerical simulations. Here we report a terahertz near-field imaging approach which provides spatially resolved measurements of the amplitude, phase and polarization of the electric field from which we extract the microscopic magnetic near-field signatures in a planar metamaterial constructed of split-ring resonators (SRRs). In addition to studying the fundamental resonances of an individual double SRR unit we further investigate the interaction with neighboring elements.

  16. Time-delay correlations and resonances in one-dimensional disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Mikhail; Fyodorov, Yan V.

    2000-01-01

    The frequency dependent time-delay correlation function K(Ω) is studied analytically for a particle reflected from a finite one-dimensional (1D) disordered system. In the long sample limit, K(Ω) can be used to extract the resonance width distribution ρ(Γ). Both quantities are found to decay algebraically as Γ-ν, and Ω-ν, ν~=1.25 in a large range of arguments. Numerical calculations for the resonance width distribution in the 1D non-Hermitian tight-binding model agree reasonably with the analytical formulas.

  17. Resonant Orbits and the High Velocity Peaks toward the Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, Matthew; Smith, Martin C.; Evans, N. Wyn; Shen, Juntai

    2015-10-01

    We extract the resonant orbits from an N-body bar that is a good representation of the Milky Way, using the method recently introduced by Molloy et al. By decomposing the bar into its constituent orbit families, we show that they are intimately connected to the boxy-peanut shape of the density. We highlight the imprint due solely to resonant orbits on the kinematic landscape toward the Galactic center. The resonant orbits are shown to have distinct kinematic features and may be used to explain the cold velocity peak seen in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment commissioning data. We show that high velocity peaks are a natural consequence of the motions of stars in the 2:1 orbit family and that stars on other higher order resonances can contribute to the peaks. The locations of the peaks vary with bar angle and, with the tacit assumption that the observed peaks are due to the 2:1 family, we find that the locations of the high velocity peaks correspond to bar angles in the range {10}\\circ ≲ {θ }{bar}≲ 25^\\circ . However, some important questions about the nature of the peaks remain, such as their apparent absence in other surveys of the Bulge and the deviations from symmetry between equivalent fields in the north and south. We show that the absence of a peak in surveys at higher latitudes is likely due to the combination of a less prominent peak and a lower number density of bar supporting orbits at these latitudes.

  18. Spoof localized surface plasmons on ultrathin textured MIM ring resonator with enhanced resonances.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong Jin; Xiao, Qian Xun; Yang, Bao Jia

    2015-09-30

    We numerically demonstrate that spoof localized surface plasmons (LSPs) resonant modes can be enhanced based on ultrathin corrugated metal-insulator-metal (MIM) ring resonator. Further enhancement of the LSPs modes has been achieved by incorporating an efficient and ease-of-integration exciting method. Quality factors of resonance peaks have become much larger and multipolar resonances modes can be easily observed on the textured MIM ring resonator excited by a microstrip line. Experimental results validate the high-efficiency excitation and resonance enhancements of spoof LSPs modes on the MIM ring resonator in the microwave frequencies. We have shown that the fabricated resonator is sensitive to the variation of both the dielectric constant and the thickness of surrounding materials under test. The spoof plasmonic resonator can be used as key elements to provide many important device functionalities such as optical communications, signal processing, and spectral engineering in the plasmonic integration platform.

  19. Spoof localized surface plasmons on ultrathin textured MIM ring resonator with enhanced resonances

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong Jin; Xiao, Qian Xun; Jia Yang, Bao

    2015-01-01

    We numerically demonstrate that spoof localized surface plasmons (LSPs) resonant modes can be enhanced based on ultrathin corrugated metal-insulator-metal (MIM) ring resonator. Further enhancement of the LSPs modes has been achieved by incorporating an efficient and ease-of-integration exciting method. Quality factors of resonance peaks have become much larger and multipolar resonances modes can be easily observed on the textured MIM ring resonator excited by a microstrip line. Experimental results validate the high-efficiency excitation and resonance enhancements of spoof LSPs modes on the MIM ring resonator in the microwave frequencies. We have shown that the fabricated resonator is sensitive to the variation of both the dielectric constant and the thickness of surrounding materials under test. The spoof plasmonic resonator can be used as key elements to provide many important device functionalities such as optical communications, signal processing, and spectral engineering in the plasmonic integration platform. PMID:26420668

  20. High-resolution α-amylase assay combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for expedited identification of α-amylase inhibitors: proof of concept and α-amylase inhibitor in cinnamon.

    PubMed

    Okutan, Leyla; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2014-11-26

    Type 2 diabetes affects millions of people worldwide, and new improved drugs or functional foods containing selective α-amylase inhibitors are needed for improved management of blood glucose. In this article the development of a microplate-based high-resolution α-amylase inhibition assay with direct photometric measurement of α-amylase activity is described. The inhibition assay is based on porcine pancreatic α-amylase with 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl-α-D-maltotriose as substrate, which this gives a stable, sensitive, and cheap inhibition assay as requested for high-resolution purposes. In combination with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR, this provides an analytical platform that allows simultaneous chemical and biological profiling of α-amylase inhibitors in plant extracts. Proof-of-concept with an artificial mixture of six compounds-of which three are known α-amylase inhibitors-showed that the high-resolution α-amylase inhibition profiles allowed detection of sub-microgram amounts of the α-amylase inhibitors. Furthermore, the high-resolution α-amylase inhibition assay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR platform allowed identification of cinnamaldehyde as the α-amylase inhibitor in cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum Presl.).