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Sample records for resonantly excited internal

  1. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  2. Resonant Tidal Excitation of Internal Waves in the Earth's Fluid Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, Robert H.; Kuang, Weijia

    2014-01-01

    It has long been speculated that there is a stably stratified layer below the core-mantle boundary, and two recent studies have improved the constraints on the parameters describing this stratification. Here we consider the dynamical implications of this layer using a simplified model. We first show that the stratification in this surface layer has sensitive control over the rate at which tidal energy is transferred to the core. We then show that when the stratification parameters from the recent studies are used in this model, a resonant configuration arrives whereby tidal forces perform elevated rates of work in exciting core flow. Specifically, the internal wave speed derived from the two independent studies (150 and 155 m/s) are in remarkable agreement with the speed (152 m/s) required for excitation of the primary normal mode of oscillation as calculated from full solutions of the Laplace Tidal Equations applied to a reduced-gravity idealized model representing the stratified layer. In evaluating this agreement it is noteworthy that the idealized model assumed may be regarded as the most reduced representation of the stratified dynamics of the layer, in that there are no non-essential dynamical terms in the governing equations assumed. While it is certainly possible that a more realistic treatment may require additional dynamical terms or coupling, it is also clear that this reduced representation includes no freedom for coercing the correlation described. This suggests that one must accept either (1) that tidal forces resonantly excite core flow and this is predicted by a simple model or (2) that either the independent estimates or the dynamical model does not accurately portray the core surface layer and there has simply been an unlikely coincidence between three estimates of a stratification parameter which would otherwise have a broad plausible range.

  3. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-01

    A cavity excitation circuit is described for rapidly building up and maintaining high-level oscillations in a resonant cavity. The circuit overcomes oscillation buildup slowing effects such as ion locking in the cavity by providing for the selective application of an amplified accelerating drive signal to the main cavity exciting oscillator during oscillation buildup and a direct drive signal to the oscillator thereafter.

  4. Magnetostrictive resonance excitation

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    1992-01-01

    The resonance frequency spectrum of a magnetostrictive sample is remotely determined by exciting the magnetostrictive property with an oscillating magnetic field. The permeability of a magnetostrictive material and concomitant coupling with a detection coil varies with the strain in the material whereby resonance responses of the sample can be readily detected. A suitable sample may be a magnetostrictive material or some other material having at least one side coated with a magnetostrictive material. When the sample is a suitable shape, i.e., a cube, rectangular parallelepiped, solid sphere or spherical shell, the elastic moduli or the material can be analytically determined from the measured resonance frequency spectrum. No mechanical transducers are required and the sample excitation is obtained without contact with the sample, leading to highly reproducible results and a measurement capability over a wide temperature range, e.g. from liquid nitrogen temperature to the Curie temperature of the magnetostrictive material.

  5. Acoustically excited heated jets. 1: Internal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of relatively strong upstream acoustic excitation on the mixing of heated jets with the surrounding air are investigated. To determine the extent of the available information on experiments and theories dealing with acoustically excited heated jets, an extensive literature survey was carried out. The experimental program consisted of flow visualization and flowfield velocity and temperature measurements for a broad range of jet operating and flow excitation conditions. A 50.8-mm-diam nozzle was used for this purpose. Parallel to the experimental study, an existing theoretical model of excited jets was refined to include the region downstream of the jet potential core. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment in moderately heated jets. However, the theory has not yet been confirmed for highly heated jets. It was found that the sensitivity of heated jets to upstream acoustic excitation varies strongly with the jet operating conditions and that the threshold excitation level increases with increasing jet temperature. Furthermore, the preferential Strouhal number is found not to change significantly with a change of the jet operating conditions. Finally, the effects of the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness appear to be similar for both heated and unheated jets at low Mach numbers.

  6. Artificial Excitation of Schumann Resonance with HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Chang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    We report results from the experiment aimed at the artificial excitation of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves with frequencies corresponding to the frequency of Schumann resonance (typically, 7.5 - 8.0 Hz frequency range). Electromagnetic waves with these frequencies can form a standing pattern inside the spherical cavity formed by the surface of the earth and the ionosphere. In the experiment the ELF waves were excited by heating the ionosphere with X-mode HF electromagnetic waves generated by the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. The experiment demonstrates that heating of the ionosphere can excite relatively large-amplitude electromagnetic waves with frequencies in the range of the Schumann resonance, when the ionosphere has a strong F-layer and an electric field greater than 5 mV/m is present in the E-region.

  7. Antiferromagnetic resonance excited by oscillating electric currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluka, Volker

    2017-12-01

    In antiferromagnetic materials the order parameter exhibits resonant modes at frequencies that can be in the terahertz range, making them interesting components for spintronic devices. Here, it is shown that antiferromagnetic resonance can be excited using the inverse spin-Hall effect in a system consisting of an antiferromagnetic insulator coupled to a normal-metal waveguide. The time-dependent interplay between spin torque, ac spin accumulation, and magnetic degrees of freedom is studied. It is found that the dynamics of the antiferromagnet affects the frequency-dependent conductivity of the normal metal. Further, a comparison is made between spin-current-induced and Oersted-field-induced excitation under the condition of constant power injection.

  8. Coulomb and nuclear excitations of narrow resonances in 17Ne

    DOE PAGES

    Marganiec, J.; Wamers, F.; Aksouh, F.; ...

    2016-05-25

    New experimental data for dissociation of relativistic 17Ne projectiles incident on targets of lead, carbon, and polyethylene targets at GSI are presented. Special attention is paid to the excitation and decay of narrow resonant states in 17Ne. Distributions of internal energy in the 15O+p +p three-body system have been determined together with angular and partial-energy correlations between the decay products in different energy regions. The analysis was done using existing experimental data on 17Ne and its mirror nucleus 17N. The isobaric multiplet mass equation is used for assignment of observed resonances and their spins and parities. A combination of datamore » from the heavy and light targets yielded cross sections and transition probabilities for the Coulomb excitations of the narrow resonant states. Finally, the resulting transition probabilities provide information relevant for a better understanding of the 17Ne structure.« less

  9. Broadband excitation in nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, Robert

    1984-10-01

    Theoretical methods for designing sequences of radio frequency (rf) radiation pulses for broadband excitation of spin systems in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are described. The sequences excite spins uniformly over large ranges of resonant frequencies arising from static magnetic field inhomogeneity, chemical shift differences, or spin couplings, or over large ranges of rf field amplitudes. Specific sequences for creating a population inversion or transverse magnetization are derived and demonstrated experimentally in liquid and solid state NMR. One approach to broadband excitation is based on principles of coherent averaging theory. A general formalism for deriving pulse sequences is given, along withmore » computational methods for specific cases. This approach leads to sequences that produce strictly constant transformations of a spin system. The importance of this feature in NMR applications is discussed. A second approach to broadband excitation makes use of iterative schemes, i.e. sets of operations that are applied repetitively to a given initial pulse sequences, generating a series of increasingly complex sequences with increasingly desirable properties. A general mathematical framework for analyzing iterative schemes is developed. An iterative scheme is treated as a function that acts on a space of operators corresponding to the transformations produced by all possible pulse sequences. The fixed points of the function and the stability of the fixed points are shown to determine the essential behavior of the scheme. Iterative schemes for broadband population inversion are treated in detail. Algebraic and numerical methods for performing the mathematical analysis are presented. Two additional topics are treated. The first is the construction of sequences for uniform excitation of double-quantum coherence and for uniform polarization transfer over a range of spin couplings. Double-quantum excitation sequences are demonstrated in a liquid crystal system

  10. Excitation of resonances of microspheres on an optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpengüzel, A.; Arnold, S.; Griffel, G.

    1995-04-01

    Morphology-dependent resonances (MDR's) of solid microspheres are excited by using an optical fiber coupler. The narrowest measured MDR linewidths are limited by the excitation laser linewidth ( < 0.025 nm). Only MDR's, with an on-resonance to off-resonance intensity ratio of 104, contribute to scattering. The intensity of various resonance orders is understood by the localization principle and the recently developed generalized Lorentz-Mie theory. The microsphere fiber system has potential for becoming a building block in dispersive microphotonics. The basic physics underlying our approach may be considered a harbinger for the coupling of active photonic microstructures such as microdisk lasers.

  11. Excitation of resonances of microspheres on an optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Serpengüzel, A; Arnold, S; Griffel, G

    1995-04-01

    Morphology-dependent resonances (MDR's) of solid microspheres are excited by using an optical fiber coupler. The narrowest measured MDR linewidths are limited by the excitation laser linewidth (<0.025 nm). Only MDR's, with an on-resonance to off-resonance intensity ratio of 10(4), contribute to scattering. The intensity of various resonance orders is understood by the localization principle and the recently developed generalized Lorentz-Mie theory. The microsphere fiber system has potential for becoming a building block in dispersive microphotonics. The basic physics underlying our approach may be considered a harbinger for the coupling of active photonic microstructures such as microdisk lasers.

  12. Transform analysis of the resonance Raman excitation profile of lycopene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    1992-10-01

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles (RREPs) of the ν 1, ν 2 and ν 3 vibrations of lycopene in acetone, ethyl alcohol, toluene and carbon disulphide solvents have been analyzed using the transform method for calculating resonance Raman excitation profiles. The tests show excellent agreement between the calculated and observed profiles for the ν 2 and ν 3 RREPs, but greater difference between experiment and theory occurs for the ν 1 RREP, especially in carbon disulphide solvent.

  13. Resonance of magnetization excited by voltage in magnetoelectric heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guoliang; Zhang, Huaiwu; Li, Yuanxun; Li, Jie; Zhang, Dainan; Sun, Nian

    2018-04-01

    Manipulation of magnetization dynamics is critical for spin-based devices. Voltage driven magnetization resonance is promising for realizing low-power information processing systems. Here, we show through Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations that magnetization resonance in nanoscale magnetic elements can be generated by a radio frequency (rf) voltage via the converse magnetoelectric (ME) effect. The magnetization dynamics induced by voltage in a ME heterostructures is simulated by taking into account the magnetoelastic and piezoelectric coupling mechanisms among magnetization, strain and voltage. The frequency of the excited magnetization resonance is equal to the driving rf voltage frequency. The proposed voltage driven magnetization resonance excitation mechanism opens a way toward energy-efficient spin based device applications.

  14. Exciting baryon resonances in isobar charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlliure, J.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, J. L.; Vargas, J.; Alavarez-Pol, H.; Aumann, T.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Beceiro, S.; Boretzky, K.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina, D.; Diaz, P.; Estrade, A.; Geissel, H.; Lenske, H.; Litvinov, Y.; Mostazo, M.; Paradela, C.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Takechi, M.; Vidaña, I.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J.

    2017-11-01

    Isobaric charge-exchange reactions induced by different tin isotopes have been investigated at GSI. The high-resolving power of the FRS spectrometer made it possible to separate elastic and inelastic components in the missing-energy spectra of the ejectiles. The inelastic component was associated to the in-medium excitation of nucleon resonances such as the Delta and Roper resonances. These data are expected to contribute to better understand the in-medium properties of baryon resonances but also to investigate the abundance of protons and neutrons at the nuclear periphery.

  15. Apparatus for time-resolved and energy-resolved measurement of internal conversion electron emission induced by nuclear resonant excitation with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawauchi, Taizo; Matsumoto, Masuaki; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2007-01-15

    A high-energy and large-object-spot type cylindrical mirror analyzer (CMA) was constructed with the aid of electron trajectory simulations. By adopting a particular shape for the outer cylinder, an energy resolution of 7% was achieved without guide rings as used in conventional CMAs. Combined with an avalanche photodiode as an electron detector, the K-shell internal conversion electrons were successfully measured under irradiation of synchrotron radiation at 14.4 keV in an energy-resolved and time-resolved manner.

  16. Energy harvesting by dynamic unstability and internal resonance for piezoelectric beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Chunbo; Qin, Weiyang, E-mail: 353481781@qq.com; Deng, Wangzheng

    We investigated the energy harvesting of a vertical beam with tip mass under vertical excitations. We applied dynamic unstability and internal resonance to improve the efficiency of harvesting. The experiments of harmonic excitation were carried out. Results show that for the beam there exist internal resonances in the dynamically unstable and the buckling bistable cases. The dynamic unstability is a determinant for strong internal resonance or mode coupling, which can be used to create a large output from piezoelectric patches. Then, the experiments of stochastic excitation were carried out. Results prove that the internal resonance or mode coupling can transfermore » the excitation energy to the low order modes, mainly the first and the second one. This can bring about a large output voltage. For a stochastic excitation, it is proved that there is an optimal weight of tip mass for realizing internal resonance and producing large outputs.« less

  17. Oncotripsy: Targeting cancer cells selectively via resonant harmonic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyden, S.; Ortiz, M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a method of selectively targeting cancer cells by means of ultrasound harmonic excitation at their resonance frequency, which we refer to as oncotripsy. The geometric model of the cells takes into account the cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus, as well as the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope. Material properties are varied within a pathophysiologically-relevant range. A first modal analysis reveals the existence of a spectral gap between the natural frequencies and, most importantly, resonant growth rates of healthy and cancerous cells. The results of the modal analysis are verified by simulating the fully-nonlinear transient response of healthy and cancerous cells at resonance. The fully nonlinear analysis confirms that cancerous cells can be selectively taken to lysis by the application of carefully tuned ultrasound harmonic excitation while simultaneously leaving healthy cells intact.

  18. Dual-excitation wavelength resonance Raman explosives detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellampalle, Balakishore; Sluch, Mikhail; Wu, Hai-Shan; Martin, Robert; McCormick, William; Ice, Robert; Lemoff, Brian E.

    2013-05-01

    Deep-ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy (DUVRRS) is a promising approach to stand-off detection of explosive traces due to: 1) resonant enhancement of Raman cross-section, 2) λ-4-cross-section enhancement, and 3) fluorescence and solar background free signatures. For trace detection, these signal enhancements more than offset the small penetration depth due to DUV absorption. A key challenge for stand-off sensors is to distinguish explosives, with high confidence, from a myriad of unknown background materials that may have interfering spectral peaks. To address this, we are developing a stand-off explosive sensor using DUVRRS with two simultaneous DUV excitation wavelengths. Due to complex interplay of resonant enhancement, self-absorption and laser penetration depth, significant amplitude variation is observed between corresponding Raman bands with different excitation wavelengths. These variations with excitation wavelength provide an orthogonal signature that complements the traditional Raman signature to improve specificity relative to single-excitation-wavelength techniques. As part of this effort, we are developing two novel CW DUV lasers, which have potential to be compact, and a compact dual-band high throughput DUV spectrometer, capable of simultaneous detection of Raman spectra in two spectral windows. We have also developed a highly sensitive algorithm for the detection of explosives under low signal-to-noise situations.

  19. Excited nuclei, resonances and reactions in neutron star crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takibayev, N.; Nasirova, D.; Katō, K.; Kurmangaliyeva, V.

    2018-01-01

    The short review of research results concerning the study of reactions and processes that occur in the neutron star crusts is given. The peculiarities of electron capture reactions by a nucleus in overdense crystalline structures have been demonstrated for various nuclei, in particular some even-even nuclei at electron capture reactions give daughter nuclei in excited states. Excited nuclei due to nonlinear interactions lead to a high-order harmonic generation. High energy gammas interact with charged particles, give a neutrino radiation and also knock out nucleons from neighbour nuclei. It is also shown that interactions of neutrons with two and more nuclei in an overdence lattice give a large number of new resonance states. These resonances result in a formation of specific local oscillations in the corresponding layers of the lattice. The periodic enhancement of these processes in the dependence on the elemental composition of the primary neutron star matter is considered.

  20. Excitation power quantities in phase resonance testing of nonlinear systems with phase-locked-loop excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Simon; Leine, Remco I.

    2017-11-01

    Phase resonance testing is one method for the experimental extraction of nonlinear normal modes. This paper proposes a novel method for nonlinear phase resonance testing. Firstly, the issue of appropriate excitation is approached on the basis of excitation power considerations. Therefore, power quantities known from nonlinear systems theory in electrical engineering are transferred to nonlinear structural dynamics applications. A new power-based nonlinear mode indicator function is derived, which is generally applicable, reliable and easy to implement in experiments. Secondly, the tuning of the excitation phase is automated by the use of a Phase-Locked-Loop controller. This method provides a very user-friendly and fast way for obtaining the backbone curve. Furthermore, the method allows to exploit specific advantages of phase control such as the robustness for lightly damped systems and the stabilization of unstable branches of the frequency response. The reduced tuning time for the excitation makes the commonly used free-decay measurements for the extraction of backbone curves unnecessary. Instead, steady-state measurements for every point of the curve are obtained. In conjunction with the new mode indicator function, the correlation of every measured point with the associated nonlinear normal mode of the underlying conservative system can be evaluated. Moreover, it is shown that the analysis of the excitation power helps to locate sources of inaccuracies in the force appropriation process. The method is illustrated by a numerical example and its functionality in experiments is demonstrated on a benchmark beam structure.

  1. Artificial excitation of ELF waves with frequency of Schumann resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Guido, T.; Tulegenov, B.; Labenski, J.; Chang, C.-L.

    2014-11-01

    We report results from the experiment aimed at the artificial excitation of extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves with frequencies corresponding to the frequency of Schumann resonance. Electromagnetic waves with these frequencies can form a standing pattern inside the spherical cavity formed by the surface of the Earth and the ionosphere. In the experiment the ELF waves were excited by heating the ionosphere with X-mode HF electromagnetic waves generated at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. The experiment demonstrates that heating of the ionosphere can excite relatively large-amplitude electromagnetic waves with frequencies in the range 7.8-8.0 Hz when the ionosphere has a strong F layer, the frequency of the HF radiation is in the range 3.20-4.57 MHz, and the electric field greater than 5 mV/m is present in the ionosphere.

  2. Interplay of Collective Excitations in Quantum Well Intersubband Resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Ning, C. Z.

    2003-01-01

    Intersubband resonances in a semiconductor quantum well (QW) display some of the most fascinating features involving various collective excitations such as Fermi-edge singularity (FES) and intersubband plasmon (ISP). Using a density matrix approach, we treated many-body effects such as depolarization, vertex correction, and self-energy consistently for a two-subband system. We found a systematic change in resonance spectra from FES-dominated to ISP-dominated features, as QW- width or electron density is varied. Such an interplay between FES and ISP significantly changes both line shape and peak position of the absorption spectrum. In particular, we found that a cancellation of FES and ISP undresses the resonant responses and recovers the single-particle features of absorption for semiconductors with a strong nonparabolicity such as InAs, leading to a dramatic broadening of the absorption spectrum.

  3. Parametrically excited helicopter ground resonance dynamics with high blade asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanches, L.; Michon, G.; Berlioz, A.; Alazard, D.

    2012-07-01

    The present work is aimed at verifying the influence of high asymmetries in the variation of in-plane lead-lag stiffness of one blade on the ground resonance phenomenon in helicopters. The periodical equations of motions are analyzed by using Floquet's Theory (FM) and the boundaries of instabilities predicted. The stability chart obtained as a function of asymmetry parameters and rotor speed reveals a complex evolution of critical zones and the existence of bifurcation points at low rotor speed values. Additionally, it is known that when treated as parametric excitations; periodic terms may cause parametric resonances in dynamic systems, some of which can become unstable. Therefore, the helicopter is later considered as a parametrically excited system and the equations are treated analytically by applying the Method of Multiple Scales (MMS). A stability analysis is used to verify the existence of unstable parametric resonances with first and second-order sets of equations. The results are compared and validated with those obtained by Floquet's Theory. Moreover, an explanation is given for the presence of unstable motion at low rotor speeds due to parametric instabilities of the second order.

  4. Compilation of giant electric dipole resonances built on excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, A.; Thoennessen, M.

    2007-07-01

    Giant Electric Dipole Resonance (GDR) parameters for γ decay to excited states with finite spin and temperature are compiled. Over 100 original works have been reviewed and from some 70 of them, about 350 sets of hot GDR parameters for different isotopes, excitation energies, and spin regions have been extracted. All parameter sets have been brought onto a common footing by calculating the equivalent Lorentzian parameters. The current compilation is complementary to an earlier compilation by Samuel S. Dietrich and Barry L. Berman (At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 38 (1988) 199-338) on ground-state photo-neutron and photo-absorption cross sections and their Lorentzian parameters. A comparison of the two may help shed light on the evolution of GDR parameters with temperature and spin. The present compilation is current as of July 2006.

  5. Resonant spin wave excitations in a magnonic crystal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N.; Prabhakar, A.

    2018-03-01

    Spin polarized electric current, injected into permalloy (Py) through a nano contact, exerts a torque on the magnetization. The spin waves (SWs) thus excited propagate radially outward. We propose an antidot magnonic crystal (MC) with a three-hole defect (L3) around the nano contact, designed so that the frequency of the excited SWs, lies in the band gap of the MC. L3 thus acts as a resonant SW cavity. The energy in this magnonic crystal cavity can be tapped by an adjacent MC waveguide (MCW). An analysis of the simulated micromagnetic power spectrum, at the output port of the MCW reveals stable SW oscillations. The quality factor of the device, calculated using the decay method, was estimated as Q > 105 for an injected spin current density of 7 ×1012 A/m2.

  6. Sensitivity of nonlinear photoionization to resonance substructure in collective excitation

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, T.; Karamatskou, A.; Ilchen, M.; Bakhtiarzadeh, S.; Rafipoor, A. J.; O'Keeffe, P.; Kelly, T. J.; Walsh, N.; Costello, J. T.; Meyer, M.; Santra, R.

    2015-01-01

    Collective behaviour is a characteristic feature in many-body systems, important for developments in fields such as magnetism, superconductivity, photonics and electronics. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the optically nonlinear response of collective excitations. Here we demonstrate how the nonlinear interaction of a many-body system with intense XUV radiation can be used as an effective probe for characterizing otherwise unresolved features of its collective response. Resonant photoionization of atomic xenon was chosen as a case study. The excellent agreement between experiment and theory strongly supports the prediction that two distinct poles underlie the giant dipole resonance. Our results pave the way towards a deeper understanding of collective behaviour in atoms, molecules and solid-state systems using nonlinear spectroscopic techniques enabled by modern short-wavelength light sources. PMID:25854939

  7. Sensitivity of nonlinear photoionization to resonance substructure in collective excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Mazza, T.; Karamatskou, A.; Ilchen, M.

    Collective behaviour is a characteristic feature in many-body systems, important for developments in fields such as magnetism, superconductivity, photonics and electronics. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the optically nonlinear response of collective excitations. Here we demonstrate how the nonlinear interaction of a many-body system with intense XUV radiation can be used as an effective probe for characterizing otherwise unresolved features of its collective response. Resonant photoionization of atomic xenon was chosen as a case study. The excellent agreement between experiment and theory strongly supports the prediction that two distinct poles underlie the giant dipole resonance. Our results pavemore » the way towards a deeper understanding of collective behaviour in atoms, molecules and solid-state systems using nonlinear spectroscopic techniques enabled by modern short-wavelength light sources.« less

  8. UV Resonant Raman Spectrometer with Multi-Line Laser Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L.; Kohel, James M.; Kirby, James P.; Morookian, John Michael; Pelletier, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    A Raman spectrometer employs two or more UV (ultraviolet) laser wavel engths to generate UV resonant Raman (UVRR) spectra in organic sampl es. Resonant Raman scattering results when the laser excitation is n ear an electronic transition of a molecule, and the enhancement of R aman signals can be several orders of magnitude. In addition, the Ra man cross-section is inversely proportional to the fourth power of t he wavelength, so the UV Raman emission is increased by another fact or of 16, or greater, over visible Raman emissions. The Raman-scatter ed light is collected using a high-resolution broadband spectrograph . Further suppression of the Rayleigh-scattered laser light is provi ded by custom UV notch filters.

  9. Sensitivity of nonlinear photoionization to resonance substructure in collective excitation

    DOE PAGES

    Mazza, T.; Karamatskou, A.; Ilchen, M.; ...

    2015-04-09

    Collective behaviour is a characteristic feature in many-body systems, important for developments in fields such as magnetism, superconductivity, photonics and electronics. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the optically nonlinear response of collective excitations. Here we demonstrate how the nonlinear interaction of a many-body system with intense XUV radiation can be used as an effective probe for characterizing otherwise unresolved features of its collective response. Resonant photoionization of atomic xenon was chosen as a case study. The excellent agreement between experiment and theory strongly supports the prediction that two distinct poles underlie the giant dipole resonance. Our results pavemore » the way towards a deeper understanding of collective behaviour in atoms, molecules and solid-state systems using nonlinear spectroscopic techniques enabled by modern short-wavelength light sources.« less

  10. Parametric excitation of multiple resonant radiations from localized wavepackets

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Matteo; Trillo, Stefano; Mussot, Arnaud; Kudlinski, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental physical phenomena such as laser-induced ionization, driven quantum tunneling, Faraday waves, Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations, and the control of new states of matter rely on time-periodic driving of the system. A remarkable property of such driving is that it can induce the localized (bound) states to resonantly couple to the continuum. Therefore experiments that allow for enlightening and controlling the mechanisms underlying such coupling are of paramount importance. We implement such an experiment in a special optical fiber characterized by a dispersion oscillating along the propagation coordinate, which mimics “time”. The quasi-momentum associated with such periodic perturbation is responsible for the efficient coupling of energy from the localized wave-packets (solitons in anomalous dispersion and shock fronts in normal dispersion) sustained by the fiber nonlinearity, into free-running linear dispersive waves (continuum) at multiple resonant frequencies. Remarkably, the observed resonances can be explained by means of a unified approach, regardless of the fact that the localized state is a soliton-like pulse or a shock front. PMID:25801054

  11. Excitation of Ionospheric Alfvén Resonator with HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Chang, C.; Labenski, J.; Milikh, G. M.; Vartanyan, A.; Snyder, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    We report results from numerical and experimental studies of the excitation of ULF waves inside the ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR) by heating the ionosphere with powerful HF waves launched from the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. Numerical simulations of the two-fluid MHD model describing IAR in a dipole magnetic field geometry with plasma parameters taken from the observations at HAARP during October-November 2010 experimental campaign reveal that the IAR quality is higher during night-time conditions, when the ionospheric conductivity is very low. Simulations also reveal that the resonance wave cannot be identified from the magnetic measurements on the ground or at an altitude above 600 km because the magnetic field in this wave has nodes on both ends of the resonator, and the best way to detect IAR modes is by measuring the electric field on low-Earth-orbit satellites. These theoretical predictions are in good, quantitative agreement with results from observations: In particular, 1) observations from the ground-based magnetometer at the HAARP site demonstrate no any significant difference in the amplitudes of the magnetic field generated by HAARP in the frequency range from 0 to 5 Hz, and 2) the DEMETER satellite detected the electric field of the IAR first harmonic at an altitude of 670 km above HAARP during the heating experiment.

  12. Polarization of resonantly excited X-ray lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Chintan; Amaro, Pedro; Steinbrügge, René; Bernitt, Sven; Fritzsche, Stephan; Surzhykov, Andrey; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, José R.; Tashenov, Stanislav

    2017-08-01

    For a wide range of temperatures, resonantly captured electrons with energies below the excitation threshold are the strongest source of X-ray line excitation in hot plasmas containing highly charged Fe ions. The angular distribution and polarization of X-rays emitted due to these processes were experimentally studied using an electron beam ion trap. The electron-ion collision energy was scanned over the KLL dielectronic, trielectronic, and quadruelectronic recombination resonances of Fe18+..24+ and Kr28+..34+ with an exemplary resolution of ~6 eV. The angular distribution of induced X-ray fluorescence was measured along and perpendicular to the electron beam propagation direction [1]. Subsequently, the polarization of X-ray fluorescence was also measured using a novel Compton polarimeter [2, 3].The experimental data reveal the alignment of the populated excited states and exhibit a high sensitivity to the relativistic Breit interaction [2, 4]. We observed that most of the transitions lead to polarization, including hitherto-neglected trielectronic and quadruelectronic recombination channels. Furthermore, these channels dominate the polarization of the prominent Kα X-rays emitted by hot anisotropic plasmas in a wide temperature range. The present experimental results comprehensively benchmark full-order atomic calculations carried out with the FAC [5] and RATIP [6] codes. We conclude that accurate polarization diagnostics of hot anisotropic plasmas, e.~g., of solar flares and active galactic nuclei, and laboratory fusion plasmas of tokamaks can only be obtained under the premise of careful inclusion of relativistic effects and higher-order resonances which were often neglected in previous works [1]. The present experiments also demonstrate the suitability of the applied technique for accurate directional diagnostics of electron or ion beams in hot plasmas [7].[1] C. Shah et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 061201 (R) (2016)[2] C. Shah et al., Phys. Rev. A 92, 042702 (2015

  13. Computer screen photo-excited surface plasmon resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Filippini, Daniel; Winquist, Fredrik; Lundström, Ingemar

    2008-09-12

    Angle and spectra resolved surface plasmon resonance (SPR) images of gold and silver thin films with protein deposits is demonstrated using a regular computer screen as light source and a web camera as detector. The screen provides multiple-angle illumination, p-polarized light and controlled spectral radiances to excite surface plasmons in a Kretchmann configuration. A model of the SPR reflectances incorporating the particularities of the source and detector explain the observed signals and the generation of distinctive SPR landscapes is demonstrated. The sensitivity and resolution of the method, determined in air and solution, are 0.145 nm pixel(-1), 0.523 nm, 5.13x10(-3) RIU degree(-1) and 6.014x10(-4) RIU, respectively, encouraging results at this proof of concept stage and considering the ubiquity of the instrumentation.

  14. The excitation of helium resonance lines in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, J. G.; Gebbie, K. B.; November, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Helium resonance line intensities are calculated for a set of six flare models corresponding to two rates of heating and three widely varying incident fluxes of soft X-rays. The differing ionization and excitation equilibria produced by these models, the processes which dominate the various cases, and the predicted helium line spectra are examined. The line intensities and their ratios are compared with values derived from Skylab NRL spectroheliograms for a class M flare, thus determining which of these models most nearly represents the density vs temperature structure and soft X-ray flux in the flaring solar transition region, and the temperature and dominant mechanaism of formation of the helium line spectrum during a flare.

  15. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong, E-mail: jingxd@buaa.edu.cn; Sun, Xiaofeng

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensionalmore » acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude.« less

  16. Resonant tunneling in frustrated total internal reflection.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Stefano

    2005-10-15

    Anomalous light transmission and resonant tunneling in frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) are theoretically predicted to occur at periodically curved interfaces. For a low-contrast index and for grazing incidence, it is shown that FTIR resonant tunneling provides an optical realization of field-induced barrier transparency in quantum tunneling.

  17. Can Internal Conversion BE Controlled by Mode-Specific Vibrational Excitation in Polyatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnov, Alexander; Epshtein, Michael; Bar, Ilana

    2017-06-01

    Nonadiabatic processes, dominated by dynamic passage of reactive fluxes through conical intersections (CIs) are considered to be appealing means for manipulating reaction paths. One approach that is considered to be effective in controlling the course of dissociation processes is the selective excitation of vibrational modes containing a considerable component of motion. Here, we have chosen to study the predissociation of the model test molecule, methylamine and its deuterated isotopologues, excited to well-characterized quantum states on the first excited electronic state, S_{1}, by following the N-H(D) bond fission dynamics through sensitive H(D) photofragment probing. The branching ratios between slow and fast H(D) photofragments, the internal energies of their counter radical photofragments and the anisotropy parameters for fast H photofragments, confirm correlated anomalies for predissociation initiated from specific rovibronic states, reflecting the existence of a dynamic resonance in each molecule. This resonance strongly depends on the energy of the initially excited rovibronic states, the evolving vibrational mode on the repulsive S_{1} part during N-H(D) bond elongation, and the manipulated passage through the CI that leads to radicals excited with C-N-H(D) bending and preferential perpendicular bond breaking, relative to the photolyzing laser polarization, in molecules containing the NH_{2} group. The indicated resonance plays an important role in the bifurcation dynamics at the CI and can be foreseen to exist in other photoinitiated processes and to control their outcome.

  18. Vibrational excitation of triatomic molecules near the shape resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishijima, Y.; Ohkawa, M.; Hoshino, M.; Campbell, L.; Brunger, M. J.; Tanaka, H.

    2012-11-01

    In this study we have measured angular distributions of differential cross sections (DCS) for vibrational excitation and superelastic scattering from vibrationally excited N2O. The results are analyzed and interpreted using the angular correlation theory by Read.

  19. Vibronic coupling and selectivity of vibrational excitation in the negative ion resonances of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Michael; Popovic̀, Duška B.

    1997-04-01

    A recent experimental paper reported two shape resonances in electron impact on ozone, A 1 and B 2, both causing vibrational excitation with a distinct pattern of selectivity. The present Letter attempts to rationalize this selectivity using approximate potential curves, calculated for the A 1 and B 2 resonances by adding the SCF energy of neutral ozone to electron attachment energies calculated from ab initio virtual orbital energies using the Koopmans' theorem and an empirical scaling relation. The slopes of the curves explain the efficient excitation of the symmetric stretch by both resonances and the lack of the bending excitation by the B 2 resonance. The A 1 and B 2 resonances are strongly coupled by the b 2 antisymmetric stretch vibration, causing a double minimum on the lower surface. Nonadiabatic effects caused by the strong vibronic coupling explain the observed excitation of the antisymmetric stretch vibration.

  20. Excitation of terahertz modes localized on a layered superconductor: Anomalous dispersion and resonant transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolov, S. S.; Makarov, N. M.; Yampol'skii, V. A.

    2018-01-01

    We study theoretically the optic transmission through a slab of layered superconductor separated from two dielectric leads by spatial gaps. Based on the transfer matrix formalism along with the Josephson plasma electrodynamic approach, we derive analytic expressions for the transmittance and identify the conditions for the perfect transmission. The special interest of the study is focused on the resonant transmission, which occurs when the wave does not propagate in the spatial gaps. Far from the resonance, the transmittance is exponentially small due to the total internal reflection from the lead-gap interface. However, the excitation of electromagnetic modes localized on the layered superconductor gives rise to a remarkable resonant enhancement of the transmission. Moreover, this phenomenon is significantly modified for the layered superconductors in comparison with usual dielectrics or conductors. The dispersion curves for the modes localized on the layered superconductor are proved to be nonmonotonic, thus resulting in the specific dependence of the transmittance T on the incidence angle θ . In particular, we predict the onset of two resonant peaks in the T (θ ) dependence and their subsequent merge into the broadened single peak with increasing of the wave frequency. Our analytical results are demonstrated by numerical data.

  1. Crossed-coil detection of two-photon excited nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eles, Philip T.; Michal, Carl A.

    2005-08-01

    Applying a recently developed theoretical framework for determining two-photon excitation Hamiltonians using average Hamiltonian theory, we calculate the excitation produced by half-resonant irradiation of the pure quadrupole resonance of a spin-3/2 system. This formalism provides expressions for the single-quantum and double-quantum nutation frequencies as well as the Bloch-Siegert shift. The dependence of the excitation strength on RF field orientation and the appearance of the free-induction signal along an axis perpendicular to the excitation field provide an unmistakable signature of two-photon excitation. We demonstrate single- and double-quantum excitation in an axially symmetric system using 35Cl in a single crystal of potassium chlorate ( ωQ = 28 MHz) with crossed-coil detection. A rotation plot verifies the orientation dependence of the two-photon excitation, and double-quantum coherences are observed directly with the application of a static external magnetic field.

  2. Coherent vs Incoherent Emission from Semiconductor Structures after Resonant Femtosecond Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurioli, Massimo; Bogani, Franco; Ceccherini, Simone; Colocci, Marcello

    1997-04-01

    We show that an interferometric correlation measurement with fs time resolution provides an unambiguous discrimination between coherent and incoherent emission after resonant femtosecond excitation. The experiment directly probes the most important difference between the two emissions, that is, the phase correlation with the excitation pulse. The comparison with cw frequency resolved measurements demonstrates that the relationship between coherent and incoherent emission is similar under femtosecond and steady-state excitation.

  3. Dynamical coupling of pygmy and giant resonances in relativistic Coulomb excitation

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, N. S.; Aumann, T.; Bertulani, C. A.; ...

    2016-04-20

    We study the Coulomb excitation of pygmy dipole resonances (PDR) in heavy ion reactions at 100 MeV/nucleon and above. The reactions Ni-68 + Au-197 and Ni-68 + Pb-208 are taken as practical examples. Our goal is to address the question of the influence of giant resonances on the PDR as the dynamics of the collision evolves. We show that the coupling to the giant resonances affects considerably the excitation probabilities of the PDR, a result that indicates the need of an improved theoretical treatment of the reaction dynamics at these bombarding energies. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Contact resonance atomic force microscopy imaging in air and water using photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kocun, Marta; Labuda, Aleksander; Gannepalli, Anil

    2015-08-15

    Contact Resonance Force Microscopy (CR-FM) is a leading atomic force microscopy technique for measuring viscoelastic nano-mechanical properties. Conventional piezo-excited CR-FM measurements have been limited to imaging in air, since the “forest of peaks” frequency response associated with acoustic excitation methods effectively masks the true cantilever resonance. Using photothermal excitation results in clean contact, resonance spectra that closely match the ideal frequency response of the cantilever, allowing unambiguous and simple resonance frequency and quality factor measurements in air and liquids alike. This extends the capabilities of CR-FM to biologically relevant and other soft samples in liquid environments. We demonstrate CR-FM inmore » air and water on both stiff silicon/titanium samples and softer polystyrene-polyethylene-polypropylene polymer samples with the quantitative moduli having very good agreement between expected and measured values.« less

  5. Contact resonance atomic force microscopy imaging in air and water using photothermal excitation.

    PubMed

    Kocun, Marta; Labuda, Aleksander; Gannepalli, Anil; Proksch, Roger

    2015-08-01

    Contact Resonance Force Microscopy (CR-FM) is a leading atomic force microscopy technique for measuring viscoelastic nano-mechanical properties. Conventional piezo-excited CR-FM measurements have been limited to imaging in air, since the "forest of peaks" frequency response associated with acoustic excitation methods effectively masks the true cantilever resonance. Using photothermal excitation results in clean contact, resonance spectra that closely match the ideal frequency response of the cantilever, allowing unambiguous and simple resonance frequency and quality factor measurements in air and liquids alike. This extends the capabilities of CR-FM to biologically relevant and other soft samples in liquid environments. We demonstrate CR-FM in air and water on both stiff silicon/titanium samples and softer polystyrene-polyethylene-polypropylene polymer samples with the quantitative moduli having very good agreement between expected and measured values.

  6. Excitation of ultrasharp trapped-mode resonances in mirror-symmetric metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shengyan; Liu, Zhe; Xia, Xiaoxiang; E, Yiwen; Tang, Chengchun; Wang, Yujin; Li, Junjie; Wang, Li; Gu, Changzhi

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a metamaterial structure composed of two mirror-symmetric joint split ring resonators (JSRRs) that support extremely sharp trapped-mode resonance with a large modulation depth in the terahertz region. Contrary to the regular mirror-arranged SRR arrays in which both the subradiant inductive-capacitive (LC) resonance and quadrupole-mode resonance can be excited, our designed structure features a metallic microstrip bridging the adjacent SRRs, which leads to the emergence of an otherwise inaccessible ultrahigh-quality-factor resonance. The ultrasharp resonance occurs near the Wood-Rayleigh anomaly frequency, and the underlying mechanism can be attributed to the strong coupling between the in-plane propagating collective lattice surface mode originating from the array periodicity and localized surface plasmon resonance in mirror-symmetric coupled JSRRs, which dramatically reduces radiative damping. The ultrasharp resonance shows great potential for multifunctional applications such as plasmonic switching, low-power nonlinear processing, and chemical and biological sensing.

  7. Space charge induced resonance excitation in high intensity rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousineau, S.; Lee, S. Y.; Holmes, J. A.; Danilov, V.; Fedotov, A.

    2003-03-01

    We present a particle core model study of the space charge effect on high intensity synchrotron beams, with specific emphasis on the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Our particle core model formulation includes realistic lattice focusing and dispersion. We transport both matched and mismatched beams through real lattice structure and compare the results with those of an equivalent uniform-focusing approximation. The effects of lattice structure and finite momentum spread on the resonance behavior are specifically targeted. Stroboscopic maps of the mismatched envelope are constructed and show high-order resonances and stochastic effects that dominate at high mismatch or high intensity. We observe the evolution of the envelope phase-space structure during a high intensity PSR beam accumulation. Finally, we examine the envelope-particle parametric resonance condition and discuss the possibility for halo growth in synchrotron beams due to this mechanism.

  8. Coherent quantum control of internal conversion: {S}_{2}\\;\\leftrightarrow \\;{S}_{1} in pyrazine via {S}_{0}\\;\\to \\;{S}_{2}/{S}_{1} weak field excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinev, Timur; Shapiro, Moshe; Brumer, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Coherent control of internal conversion (IC) between the first (S1) and second (S2) singlet excited electronic states in pyrazine, where the S2 state is populated from the ground singlet electronic state S0 by weak field excitation, is examined. Control is implemented by shaping the laser which excites S2. Excitation and IC are considered simultaneously, using the recently introduced resonance-based control approach. Highly successful control is achieved by optimizing both the amplitude and phase profiles of the laser spectrum. The dependence of control on the properties of resonances in S2 is demonstrated.

  9. Analysis of driving force and exciting voltage for a bi-material infrared resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Dacheng

    2018-01-01

    For a designed sensor with bi-material resonator which is used to detect infrared (IR) radiation by means of tracking the change in resonance frequency of the resonator with temperature attributed to the IR radiation from targets, in accordance with electromagnetic theory, the relationship between the electrical driving force exerted on the resonator and the exciting voltage applied across two electrodes of the capacitor in the sensor is presented. According to vibration theory, the dependence of the driving force on the exciting voltage is analyzed. The result of analysis is used to guide the vibration mode and frequency-amplitude response simulations of the resonator. The simulation value is approximately equal to the measured value, which demonstrates that the analysis result is effective and practicable.

  10. Excitation of Non-Axisymmetric g-MOde Oscillations by Corotation Resonance in Thin Relativistic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shoji

    2002-02-01

    Various modes of oscillations are trapped in the inner region of geometrically thin relativistic disks. Among these oscillations, non-axisymmetric g-mode oscillations have been less studied compared with other modes of oscillations. The modes are, however, interesting since a corotation resonance appears in the trapped region. We mathematically examine whether the modes can be excited by the effects of the corotation resonance. This examination is made under an assumption that the inner and outer Lindblad radii are sufficiently separated in the opposite directions from the corotation radius. The results of analyses suggest that the waves are excited by the corotation resonance. The presence of the excitation suggests that the non-axisymmetric trapped g-mode oscillations are one of possible candidates for the quasi-periodic oscillations of a few hundred to kHz observed in some X-ray sources.

  11. Collision broadened resonance localization in tokamaks excited with ICRF waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbel, G. D.; McCoy, M. G.

    1985-08-01

    Advanced wave models used to evaluate ICRH in tokamaks typically use warm plasma theory and allow inhomogeneity in one dimension. The authors have developed a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck quasilinear computational model which evolves the population of particles on more realistic orbits. Each wave-particle resonance has its own specific interaction amplitude within any given volume element. These data need only be generated once, and appropriately stored for efficient retrieval. The wave-particle resonant interaction then serves as a mechanism by which the diffusion of particle populations can proceed among neighboring orbits. Collisions affect the absorption of RF energy by two quite distinct processes: In addition to the usual relaxation towards the Maxwellian distribution creating velocity gradients which drive quasilinear diffusion, collisions also affect the wave-particle resonance through the mechanism of gyro-phase diffusion. The local specific spectral energy absorption rate is directly calculable once the orbit geometry and populations are determined. The code is constructed in such fashion as to accommodate wave propagation models which provide the wave spectral energy density on a poloidal cross-section. Information provided by the calculation includes the local absorption properties of the medium which can then be exploited to evolve the wave field.

  12. Asymmetric resonance response analysis of a thermally excited silicon microcantilever for mass-sensitive nanoparticle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertke, Maik; Hamdana, Gerry; Wu, Wenze; Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Peiner, Erwin

    2017-06-01

    The asymmetric resonance responses of a thermally actuated silicon microcantilever of a portable, cantilever-based nanoparticle detector (Cantor) is analysed. For airborne nanoparticle concentration measurements, the cantilever is excited in its first in-plane bending mode by an integrated p-type heating actuator. The mass-sensitive nanoparticle (NP) detection is based on the resonance frequency (f0) shifting due to the deposition of NPs. A homemade phase-locked loop (PLL) circuit is developed for tracking of f0. For deflection sensing the cantilever contains an integrated piezo-resistive Wheatstone bridge (WB). A new fitting function based on the Fano resonance is proposed for analysing the asymmetric resonance curves including a method for calculating the quality factor Q from the fitting parameters. To obtain a better understanding, we introduce an electrical equivalent circuit diagram (ECD) comprising a series resonant circuit (SRC) for the cantilever resonator and voltage sources for the parasitics, which enables us to simulate the asymmetric resonance response and discuss the possible causes. Furthermore, we compare the frequency response of the on-chip thermal excitation with an external excitation using an in-plane piezo actuator revealing parasitic heating of the WB as the origin of the asymmetry. Moreover, we are able to model the phase component of the sensor output using the ECD. Knowing and understanding the phase response is crucial to the design of the PLL and thus the next generation of Cantor.

  13. Dynamic response of a riser under excitation of internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Min; Yu, Chenglong; Chen, Peng

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the dynamic response of a marine riser under excitation of internal waves is studied. With the linear approximation, the governing equation of internal waves is given. Based on the rigid-lid boundary condition assumption, the equation is solved by Thompson-Haskell method. Thus the velocity field of internal waves is obtained by the continuity equation. Combined with the modified Morison formula, using finite element method, the motion equation of riser is solved in time domain with Newmark-β method. The computation programs are compiled to solve the differential equations in time domain. Then we get the numerical results, including riser displacement and transfiguration. It is observed that the internal wave will result in circular shear flow, and the first two modes have a dominant effect on dynamic response of the marine riser. In the high mode, the response diminishes rapidly. In different modes of internal waves, the deformation of riser has different shapes, and the location of maximum displacement shifts. Studies on wave parameters indicate that the wave amplitude plays a considerable role in response displacement of riser, while the wave frequency contributes little. Nevertheless, the internal waves of high wave frequency will lead to a high-frequency oscillation of riser; it possibly gives rise to fatigue crack extension and partial fatigue failure.

  14. Wave excitation at Lindblad resonances using the method of multiple scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horák, Jiří

    2017-12-01

    In this note, the method of multiple scales is adopted to the problem of excitation of non–axisymmetric acoustic waves in vertically integrated disk by tidal gravitational fields. We derive a formula describing a waveform of exited wave that is uniformly valid in a whole disk as long as only a single Lindblad resonance is present. Our formalism is subsequently applied to two classical problems: trapped p–mode oscillations in relativistic accretion disks and the excitation of waves in infinite disks.

  15. Modelling the excitation field of an optical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanini, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    Assuming the paraxial approximation, we derive efficient recursive expressions for the projection coefficients of a Gaussian beam over the Gauss--Hermite transverse electro-magnetic (TEM) modes of an optical cavity. While previous studies considered cavities with cylindrical symmetry, our derivation accounts for "simple" astigmatism and ellipticity, which allows to deal with more realistic optical systems. The resulting expansion of the Gaussian beam over the cavity TEM modes provides accurate simulation of the excitation field distribution inside the cavity, in transmission, and in reflection. In particular, this requires including counter-propagating TEM modes, usually neglected in textbooks. As an illustrative application to a complex case, we simulate reentrant cavity configurations where Herriott spots are obtained at cavity output. We show that the case of an astigmatic cavity is also easily modelled. To our knowledge, such relevant applications are usually treated under the simplified geometrical optics approximation, or using heavier numerical methods.

  16. Performance comparison of single and dual-excitation-wavelength resonance-Raman explosives detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellampalle, Balakishore; Martin, Robert; Witt, Kenneth; McCormick, William; Wu, Hai-Shan; Sluch, Mikhail; Ice, Robert; Lemoff, Brian

    2017-05-01

    Deep-ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy is a very useful approach for standoff detection of explosive traces. Using two simultaneous excitation wavelengths improves the specificity and sensitivity to standoff explosive detection. The High Technology Foundation developed a highly compact prototype of resonance Raman explosives detector. In this work, we discuss the relative performance of a dual-excitation sensor compared to a single-excitation sensor. We present trade space analysis comparing three representative Raman systems with similar size, weight, and power. The analysis takes into account, cost, spectral resolution, detection/identification time and the overall system benefit.

  17. Excitability and optical pulse generation in semiconductor lasers driven by resonant tunneling diode photo-detectors.

    PubMed

    Romeira, Bruno; Javaloyes, Julien; Ironside, Charles N; Figueiredo, José M L; Balle, Salvador; Piro, Oreste

    2013-09-09

    We demonstrate, experimentally and theoretically, excitable nanosecond optical pulses in optoelectronic integrated circuits operating at telecommunication wavelengths (1550 nm) comprising a nanoscale double barrier quantum well resonant tunneling diode (RTD) photo-detector driving a laser diode (LD). When perturbed either electrically or optically by an input signal above a certain threshold, the optoelectronic circuit generates short electrical and optical excitable pulses mimicking the spiking behavior of biological neurons. Interestingly, the asymmetric nonlinear characteristic of the RTD-LD allows for two different regimes where one obtain either single pulses or a burst of multiple pulses. The high-speed excitable response capabilities are promising for neurally inspired information applications in photonics.

  18. Resonance localization in tokamaks excited with ICRF waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbel, G. D.; McCoy, M. G.

    1985-06-01

    Advanced wave model used to evaluate ICRH in tokamaks typically used warm plasma theory and allow inhomogeneity in one dimension. The majority of these calculations neglect the fact that gyrocenters experience the inhomogeneity via their motion parallel to the magnetic field. In strongly driven systems, wave damping can distort the particle distribution function supporting the wave and this produces changes in the absorption. A bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck quasilinear computational model which evolves the population of particles on more realistic orbits is presented. Each wave-particle resonance has its own specific interaction amplitude within any given volume element; these data need only be generated once, and appropriately stored for efficient retrieval. The wave-particle resonant interaction then serves as a mechanism by which the diffusion of particle populations can proceed among neighboring orbits. The local specific spectral energy absorption rate is directly calculable once the orbit geometry and populations are determined. The code is constructed in such fashion as to accommodate wave propagation models which provide the wave spectral energy density on a poloidal cross-section. Information provided by the calculation includes the local absorption properties of the medium which can then be exploited to evolve the wave field.

  19. Modal analysis on resonant excitation of two-dimensional waveguide grating filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianyu; Sang, Tian; Li, Junlang; Wang, Rui; Wang, La; Wang, Benxin; Wang, Yueke

    2017-12-01

    Modal analysis on resonant excitation of two-dimensional (2-D) waveguide grating filters (WGFs) is proposed. It is shown that the 2-D WGFs can support the excitation of a resonant pair, and the locations of the resonant pair arising from the TE and TM guided-mode resonances (GMRs) can be estimated accurately based on the modal analysis. Multichannel filtering using the resonant pair is investigated, and the antireflection (AR) design of the 2-D WGFs is also studied. It is shown that the reflection sideband can be reduced by placing an AR layer on the bottom of the homogeneous layer, and the well-shaped reflection spectrum with near-zero sideband reflection can be achieved by using the double-faced AR design. By merely increasing the thickness of the homogeneous layer with other parameters maintained, the spectrally dense comb-like filters with good unpolarized filtering features can be achieved. The proposed modal analysis can be extended to study the resonant excitation of 2-D periodic nanoarrays with diverse surface profiles.

  20. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons couldmore » not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.« less

  1. Radiation of a resonant medium excited by few-cycle optical pulses at superluminal velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Pakhomov, A. V.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Babushkin, I.; Tolmachev, Yu A.; Rosanov, N. N.

    2017-05-01

    Recent progress in generation of optical pulses of durations comparable to one optical cycle has presented great opportunities for studies of the fundamental processes in matter as well as time-resolved spectroscopy of ultrafast processes in nonlinear media. It opened up a new area of research in modern ultrafast nonlinear optics and led to appearance of the attosecond science. In parallel, a new research area related to emission from resonant media excited by superluminally propagating ultrashort bursts of electromagnetic radiation has been actively developed over the last few years. In this paper, we review our recent results on theoretical analysis of the Cherenkov-type radiation of a resonant medium excited by few-cycle optical pulses propagating at superluminal velocity. This situation can be realized when an electromagnetic pulse with a plane wavefront incidents on a straight string of resonant atoms or a spot of light rotates at very large angular frequency and excites a distant circular string of resonant dipoles. Theoretical analysis revealed some unusual and remarkable features of the Cherenkov radiation generated in this case. This radiation arises in a transient regime which leads to the occurrence of new frequencies in the radiation spectrum. Analysis of the characteristics of this radiation can be used for the study of the resonant structure properties. In addition, a nonlinear resonant medium excited at superluminal velocity can emit unipolar optical pulses, which can be important in ultrafast control of wave-packet dynamics of matter. Specifics of the few-cycle pulse-driven optical response of a resonant medium composed of linear and nonlinear oscillators is discussed.

  2. Active control of the lifetime of excited resonance states by means of laser pulses.

    PubMed

    García-Vela, A

    2012-04-07

    Quantum control of the lifetime of a system in an excited resonance state is investigated theoretically by creating coherent superpositions of overlapping resonances. This control scheme exploits the quantum interference occurring between the overlapping resonances, which can be controlled by varying the width of the laser pulse that creates the superposition state. The scheme is applied to a realistic model of the Br(2)(B)-Ne predissociation decay dynamics through a three-dimensional wave packet method. It is shown that extensive control of the system lifetime is achievable, both enhancing and damping it remarkably. An experimental realization of the control scheme is suggested.

  3. Excitation of the lower oblique resonance by an artificial plasma jet in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, J.; Storey, L. R. O.; Bauer, O. H.; Jones, D.

    1984-04-01

    Aboard the Porcupine rockets, bursts of noise were detected in the electron whistler range during the operation of a xenon plasma gun on a package ejected from the main payload. These observations can be interpreted in terms of excitation of the lower oblique resonance by instabilities associated with the motion of the xenon ion beam through the ionospheric plasma.

  4. Pulsed excitation system to measure the resonant frequency of magnetoelastic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hong; Chai, Yating; Horikawa, Shin; Wikle, Howard C.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2014-05-01

    An electrical circuit was designed and tested to measure the resonant frequency of micron-scale magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors using a pulsed wave excitation technique. In this circuit, a square pulse current is applied to an excitation coil to excite the vibration of ME biosensors and a pick-up coil is used to sense the ME biosensor's mechanical vibration and convert it to an electrical output signal. The output signal is filtered and amplified by a custom designed circuit to allow the measurement of the resonant frequency of the ME biosensor from which the detection of specific pathogens can be made. As a proof-in-concept experiment, JRB7 phage-coated ME biosensors were used to detect different concentrations of Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain spores. A statistically significant difference was observed for concentrations of 5 × 102 spore/ml and above.

  5. Quantum resonances in a single plaquette of Josephson junctions: excitations of Rabi oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fistul, M. V.

    2002-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of a quantum regime of the resistive (whirling) state of dc driven anisotropic single plaquette containing small Josephson junctions. The current-voltage characteristics of such systems display resonant steps that are due to the resonant interaction between the time dependent Josephson current and the excited electromagnetic oscillations (EOs). The voltage positions of the resonances are determined by the quantum interband transitions of EOs. We show that in the quantum regime as the system is driven on the resonance, coherent Rabi oscillations between the quantum levels of EOs occur. At variance with the classical regime the magnitude and the width of resonances are determined by the frequency of Rabi oscillations that in turn, depends in a peculiar manner on an externally applied magnetic field and the parameters of the system.

  6. Resonance-enhanced electron-impact excitation of Cu-like gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Zhang, C. Y.; Si, R.; Guo, X. L.; Chen, Z. B.; Yan, J.; Li, S.; Chen, C. Y.; Wang, K.

    2017-09-01

    Employing the independent-process and isolated-resonance approximations using distorted-waves (IPIRDW), we have performed a series of calculations of the resonance-enhanced electron-impact excitations (EIE) among 27 singly excited levels from the n ≤ 6 configurations of Cu-like gold (Au, Z = 79). Resonance excitation (RE) contributions from both the n = 4 → 4 - 7 and n = 3 → 4 core excitations have been considered. Our results demonstrate that RE contributions are significant and enhance the effective collision strengths (ϒ) of certain excitations by up to an order of magnitude at low temperature (106.1 K), and are still important at relatively high temperature (107.5 K). Results from test calculations of the resonance-enhanced EIE processes among 16 levels from the n ≤ 5 configurations using both the Dirac R-matrix (DRM) and IPIRDW approaches agree very well with each other. This means that the close-coupling effects are not important for this ion, and thus warrants the reliability of present resonance-enhanced EIE data among the 27 levels. The results from the collisional-radiative model (CRM) show that, at 3000 eV, near where Cu-like Au is most abundant, RE contributions have important effects (up to 25%) on the density diagnostic line intensity ratios, which are sensitive near 1020 cm-3. The present work is the first EIE research including RE contributions for Cu-like Au. Our EIE data are more accurate than previous results due to our consideration of RE contributions, and the data should be helpful for modeling and diagnosing a variety of plasmas.

  7. Resonant Raman scattering in single crystal of congruent LiTaO 3 : Effect of excitation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaumik, Indranil; Kumar, Shailendra; Ganesamoorthy, S.; Bhatt, R.; Karnal, A. K.; Raja Sekhar, B. N.

    2011-12-01

    Large dispersion in the peak position of the OH - stretching mode (˜687.9 and ˜2167.7 cm -1/eV for fundamental and 3rd harmonic, respectively) is observed by Resonance Raman studies in congruent lithium tantalate single crystal under varying excitation energies. This is explained by considering the involvement of multiple LO phonons in the interaction with OH - stretching vibration and the resonantly excited electrons. The intensity of the peaks is also found to vary with the excitation energy. FWHM increases with the increase in excitation energy because of individual contributions of the increasing number of resonance steps to the broadening.

  8. Excitation of multipolar surface plasmon resonance in plasmonic nanoparticles by complex accelerating beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Li, Jiafang; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Chen, Yue-Gang

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, through a vector-spherical harmonics approach, we investigate the optical spectra of plasmonic Au nanoparticles excited by two special accelerating beams: a non-paraxial Airy beam and a Bessel beam. We systematically analyze the impacts of the beam profile, phase, and helical wave front of the electromagnetic fields on the optical spectrum and the excitation of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR). We find that the high-order phase in the Airy beam would result in strong plasmonic oscillations in the optical spectra, while the cone angle and orbital angular momentum carried by the Bessel beam could be employed to engineer the plasmon modes excited in Au nanoparticles. Furthermore, the optical spectrum excited by a combined Airy-Bessel-Gauss beam is discussed. The study could help to deeply explore new ways to manipulate SPR in metal nanoparticles via the wave front engineering of optical beams for enhancing light-matter interaction and optical sensing performance.

  9. Resonance-enhanced two-photon excitation of CaI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casero-Junquera, Elena; Lawruszczuk, Rafal; Rostas, Joëlle; Taieb, Guy

    1994-07-01

    Induced fluorescence following visible (620-655 nm) laser excitation of the CaI radical has been detected not only in the same region (B, A-X transitions), but also in the UV (315-330 nm). The UV two-photon excitation spectrum consists of narrow bands appearing at laser frequencies located within certain bands of the Δ v = 1, 0 sequences of the B 2Σ +-X 2Σ + and A 2Π 1/2-X 2Σ + systems. The main peaks are tentatively assigned to resonance-enhanced excitation of a single vibrational level of the lowest Rydberg D 2Σ + state from successive vibrational levels of the ground state. The excitation process is a one-color two-photon optical—optical-double-resonance via B 2Σ + and A 2Π 1/2 intermediate levels. This analysis is supported by the absorption spectrum observed long ago by Walters and Barratt. The absorption and laser excitation complementary data have been used to derive approximate molecular constants for the D state.

  10. Resonance Fluorescence of an InGaAs Quantum Dot in a Planar Cavity Using Orthogonal Excitation and Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Disheng; Lander, Gary R; Flagg, Edward B

    2017-10-13

    The ability to perform simultaneous resonant excitation and fluorescence detection is important for quantum optical measurements of quantum dots (QDs). Resonant excitation without fluorescence detection - for example, a differential transmission measurement - can determine some properties of the emitting system, but does not allow applications or measurements based on the emitted photons. For example, the measurement of photon correlations, observation of the Mollow triplet, and realization of single photon sources all require collection of the fluorescence. Incoherent excitation with fluorescence detection - for example, above band-gap excitation - can be used to create single photon sources, but the disturbance of the environment due to the excitation reduces the indistinguishability of the photons. Single photon sources based on QDs will have to be resonantly excited to have high photon indistinguishability, and simultaneous collection of the photons will be necessary to make use of them. We demonstrate a method to resonantly excite a single QD embedded in a planar cavity by coupling the excitation beam into this cavity from the cleaved face of the sample while collecting the fluorescence along the sample's surface normal direction. By carefully matching the excitation beam to the waveguide mode of the cavity, the excitation light can couple into the cavity and interact with the QD. The scattered photons can couple to the Fabry-Perot mode of the cavity and escape in the surface normal direction. This method allows complete freedom in the detection polarization, but the excitation polarization is restricted by the propagation direction of the excitation beam. The fluorescence from the wetting layer provides a guide to align the collection path with respect to the excitation beam. The orthogonality of the excitation and detection modes enables resonant excitation of a single QD with negligible laser scattering background.

  11. Detection of internal fields in double-metal terahertz resonators

    DOE PAGES

    Mitrofanov, Oleg; Han, Zhanghua; Ding, Fei; ...

    2017-02-06

    (THz) plasmonic double-metal resonators enable enhanced light-matter coupling by utilizing strong localization of the resonant field. The closed resonator design however restricts investigations of the light-matter interaction effects. We propose and demonstrate a method for spatial mapping and spectroscopic analysis of the internal resonant THz fields in plasmonic double-metal THz resonators. We use the aperture-type scanning near-field THz time-domain microscopy and the concept of image charges to probe the THz fields confined within the resonator. The experimental method opens doors to studies of light-matter coupling in deeply sub-wavelength volumes at THz frequencies.

  12. Topical applications of resonance internal conversion in laser produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2007-04-01

    Physical aspects of resonance effects arising in plasma due to interactions of nuclei with the electrons are considered. Among them are resonance conversion (TEEN) and the reverse process of NEET. These processes are of great importance for pumping the excited nuclear states (isomers) and for accelerating their decay. Experiment is discussed on studying the unique 3.5-eV 229m Th nuclide.

  13. Excited atoms in the free-burning Ar arc: treatment of the resonance radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubovskii, Yu; Kalanov, D.; Gortschakow, S.; Baeva, M.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2016-11-01

    The collisional-radiative model with an emphasis on the accurate treatment of the resonance radiation transport is developed and applied to the free-burning Ar arc plasma. This model allows for analysis of the influence of resonance radiation on the spatial density profiles of the atoms in different excited states. The comparison of the radial density profiles obtained using an effective transition probability approximation with the results of the accurate solution demonstrates the distinct impact of transport on the profiles and absolute densities of the excited atoms, especially in the arc fringes. The departures from the Saha-Boltzmann equilibrium distributions, caused by different radiative transitions, are analyzed. For the case of the DC arc, the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state holds close to the arc axis, while strong deviations from the equilibrium state on the periphery occur. In the intermediate radial positions the conditions of partial LTE are fulfilled.

  14. Parametric instability and wave turbulence driven by tidal excitation of internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Reun, Thomas; Favier, Benjamin; Le Bars, Michael

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the stability of stratified fluid layers undergoing homogeneous and periodic tidal deformation. We first introduce a local model which allows to study velocity and buoyancy fluctuations in a Lagrangian domain periodically stretched and sheared by the tidal base flow. While keeping the key physical ingredients only, such a model is efficient to simulate planetary regimes where tidal amplitudes and dissipation are small. With this model, we prove that tidal flows are able to drive parametric subharmonic resonances of internal waves, in a way reminiscent of the elliptical instability in rotating fluids. The growth rates computed via Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are in very good agreement with WKB analysis and Floquet theory. We also investigate the turbulence driven by this instability mechanism. With spatio-temporal analysis, we show that it is a weak internal wave turbulence occurring at small Froude and buoyancy Reynolds numbers. When the gap between the excitation and the Brunt-V\\"ais\\"al\\"a frequencies is increased, the frequency spectrum of this wave turbulence displays a -2 power law reminiscent of the high-frequency branch of the Garett and Munk spectrum (Garrett & Munk 1979) which has been measured in the oceans. In addition, we find that the mixing efficiency is altered compared to what is computed in the context of DNS of stratified turbulence excited at small Froude and large buoyancy Reynolds numbers and is consistent with a superposition of waves.

  15. Measurement of collective excitations in VO 2 by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE PAGES

    He, Haowei; Gray, A. X.; Granitzka, P.; ...

    2016-10-15

    Vanadium dioxide is of broad interest as a spin-1/2 electron system that realizes a metal-insulator transition near room temperature, due to a combination of strongly correlated and itinerant electron physics. Here, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering is used to measure the excitation spectrum of charge and spin degrees of freedom at the vanadium L edge under different polarization and temperature conditions, revealing excitations that differ greatly from those seen in optical measurements. Furthermore, these spectra encode the evolution of short-range energetics across the metal-insulator transition, including the low-temperature appearance of a strong candidate for the singlet-triplet excitation of a vanadium dimer.

  16. High-sensitivity explosives detection using dual-excitation-wavelength resonance-Raman detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellampalle, Balakishore; McCormick, William B.; Wu, Hai-Shan; Sluch, Mikhail; Martin, Robert; Ice, Robert V.; Lemoff, Brian

    2014-05-01

    A key challenge for standoff explosive sensors is to distinguish explosives, with high confidence, from a myriad of unknown background materials that may have interfering spectral peaks. To meet this challenge a sensor needs to exhibit high specificity and high sensitivity in detection at low signal-to-noise ratio levels. We had proposed a Dual-Excitation- Wavelength Resonance-Raman Detector (DEWRRED) to address this need. In our previous work, we discussed various components designed at WVHTCF for a DEWRRED sensor. In this work, we show a completely assembled laboratory prototype of a DEWRRED sensor and utilize it to detect explosives from two standoff distances. The sensor system includes two novel, compact CW deep-Ultraviolet (DUV) lasers, a compact dual-band high throughput DUV spectrometer, and a highly-sensitive detection algorithm. We choose DUV excitation because Raman intensities from explosive traces are enhanced and fluorescence and solar background are not present. The DEWRRED technique exploits the excitation wavelength dependence of Raman signal strength, arising from complex interplay of resonant enhancement, self-absorption and laser penetration depth. We show measurements from >10 explosives/pre-cursor materials at different standoff distances. The sensor showed high sensitivity in explosive detection even when the signalto- noise ratio was close to one (~1.6). We measured receiver-operating-characteristics, which show a clear benefit in using the dual-excitation-wavelength technique as compared to a single-excitation-wavelength technique. Our measurements also show improved specificity using the amplitude variation information in the dual-excitation spectra.

  17. Resonant coherent excitation of hydrogen-like ions planar channeled in a crystal; Transition into the first excited state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaev, A.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.

    2012-03-01

    The presented program is designed to simulate the characteristics of resonant coherent excitation of hydrogen-like ions planar-channeled in a crystal. The program realizes the numerical algorithm to solve the Schrödinger equation for the ion-bound electron at a special resonance excitation condition. The calculated wave function of the bound electron defines probabilities for the ion to be in the either ground or first excited state, or to be ionized. Finally, in the outgoing beam the fractions of ions in the ground state, in the first excited state, and ionized by collisions with target electrons, are defined. The program code is written on C++ and is designed for multiprocessing systems (clusters). The output data are presented in the table. Program summaryProgram title: RCE_H-like_1 Catalogue identifier: AEKX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2813 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 34 667 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ (g++, icc compilers) Computer: Multiprocessor systems (clusters) Operating system: Any OS based on LINUX; program was tested under Novell SLES 10 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. Contains MPI directives RAM: <1 MB per processor Classification: 2.1, 2.6, 7.10 External routines: MPI library for GNU C++, Intel C++ compilers Nature of problem: When relativistic hydrogen-like ion moves in the crystal in the planar channeling regime, in the ion rest frame the time-periodic electric field acts on the bound electron. If the frequency of this field matches the transition frequency between electronic energy levels, the resonant coherent excitation can take place. Therefore, ions in the different states may be

  18. Enhanced photoelectric detection of NV magnetic resonances in diamond under dual-beam excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, E.; Londero, E.; Buczak, K.; Hruby, J.; Gulka, M.; Balasubramaniam, Y.; Wachter, G.; Stursa, J.; Dobes, K.; Aumayr, F.; Trupke, M.; Gali, A.; Nesladek, M.

    2017-01-01

    The core issue for the implementation of NV center qubit technology is a sensitive readout of the NV spin state. We present here a detailed theoretical and experimental study of NV center photoionization processes, used as a basis for the design of a dual-beam photoelectric method for the detection of NV magnetic resonances (PDMR). This scheme, based on NV one-photon ionization, is significantly more efficient than the previously reported single-beam excitation scheme. We demonstrate this technique on small ensembles of ˜10 shallow NVs implanted in electronic grade diamond (a relevant material for quantum technology), on which we achieve a cw magnetic resonance contrast of 9%—three times enhanced compared to previous work. The dual-beam PDMR scheme allows independent control of the photoionization rate and spin magnetic resonance contrast. Under a similar excitation, we obtain a significantly higher photocurrent, and thus an improved signal-to-noise ratio, compared to single-beam PDMR. Finally, this scheme is predicted to enhance magnetic resonance contrast in the case of samples with a high proportion of substitutional nitrogen defects, and could therefore enable the photoelectric readout of single NV spins.

  19. Quanty for core level spectroscopy - excitons, resonances and band excitations in time and frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the material and edge under consideration, core level spectra manifest themselves as local excitons with multiplets, edge singularities, resonances, or the local projected density of states. Both extremes, i.e., local excitons and non-interacting delocalized excitations are theoretically well under control. Describing the intermediate regime, where local many body interactions and band-formation are equally important is a challenge. Here we discuss how Quanty, a versatile quantum many body script language, can be used to calculate a variety of different core level spectroscopy types on solids and molecules, both in the frequency as well as the time domain. The flexible nature of Quanty allows one to choose different approximations for different edges and materials. For example, using a newly developed method merging ideas from density renormalization group and quantum chemistry [1-3], Quanty can calculate excitons, resonances and band-excitations in x-ray absorption, photoemission, x-ray emission, fluorescence yield, non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and many more spectroscopy types. Quanty can be obtained from: http://www.quanty.org.

  20. Fiber pigtailed thin wall capillary coupler for excitation of microsphere WGM resonator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanzheng; Lan, Xinwei; Huang, Jie; Yuan, Lei; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Xiao, Hai

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a fiber pigtailed thin wall capillary coupler for excitation of Whispering Gallery Modes (WGMs) of microsphere resonators. The coupler is made by fusion-splicing an optical fiber with a capillary tube and consequently etching the capillary wall to a thickness of a few microns. Light is coupled through the peripheral contact between inserted microsphere and the etched capillary wall. The coupling efficiency as a function of the wall thickness was studied experimentally. WGM resonance with a Q-factor of 1.14 × 10(4) was observed using a borosilicate glass microsphere with a diameter of 71 μm. The coupler operates in the reflection mode and provides a robust mechanical support to the microsphere resonator. It is expected that the new coupler may find broad applications in sensors, optical filters and lasers.

  1. Dipole Excitation of Soft and Giant Resonances in 132Sn and neighboring unstable nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boretzky, Konstanze

    2006-04-01

    The evolution of dipole-strength distributions above the one-neutron threshold was investigated for exotic neutron-rich nuclei in a series of experiments using the electromagnetic projectile excitation at beam energies around 500 MeV/u. For halo nuclei, the large observed dipole strength (shown here for 11Be) is explained within the direct-breakup model to be of non-collective character. For neutron-rich oxygen isotopes, the origin of the observed low-lying strength is concluded to be due to single-particle transitions on theoretical grounds. The dipole strength spectra for 130,132Sn exhibit resonance-like structures observed at energies around 10 MeV exhausting a few percent of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn (TRK) sum rule, separated clearly from the dominant Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR). The data agree with predictions for a new dipole mode related to the oscillation of excess neutrons versus the core nucleons ("pygmy resonance").

  2. Non-resonant excitation of rare-earth ions via virtual Auger process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassievich, I. N.

    2011-05-01

    The luminescence of rare-earth ions (REI) is often intensified by defects associated with REIs or excitons bound to these defects. In this paper we show that the presence of such a state opens the possibility of non-resonance optical pumping via the process involving virtual Auger transition. It is the second order perturbation process when an electron arrives in an virtual intermediate state due to the optical transition (the first step) and the Auger transition is the second one. We have calculated the cross-section of such an excitation process when the optical transition is accompanied by creation of the exciton bound to the defect associated with REI and obtained a simple analytical expression for the cross-section. The excess energy of the excitation quanta is taken away by multiphonon emission. The electron-phonon interaction with local phonon vibrations of the bound exciton is assumed to determine the multiphonon process. It is shown that the probability of the process under study exceeds considerably the probability of direct optical 4f-4f absorption even in the case when the energy distance between the excitation quantum energy and the exciton energy is about 0.1 of the exciton energy. The excitation mechanism considered leads to the appearance of a broad unsymmetrical band in the excitation spectrum with the red side much wider and flatter than the blue one.

  3. Teetering Stars: Resonant Excitation of Stellar Obliquities by Hot and Warm Jupiters with External Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Kassandra; Lai, Dong

    2018-04-01

    Stellar spin-orbit misalignments (obliquities) in hot Jupiter systems have been extensively probed in recent years thanks to Rossiter-McLaughlin observations. Such obliquities may reveal clues about hot Jupiter dynamical and migration histories. Common explanations for generating stellar obliquities include high-eccentricity migration, or primordial disk misalignment. This talk investigates another mechanism for producing stellar spin-orbit misalignments in systems hosting a close-in giant planet with an external, inclined planetary companion. Spin-orbit misalignment may be excited due to a secular resonance, occurring when the precession rate of the stellar spin axis (due to the inner orbit) becomes comparable to the precession rate of the inner orbital axis (due to the outer companion). Due to the spin-down of the host star via magnetic braking, this resonance may be achieved at some point during the star's main sequence lifetime for a wide range of giant planet masses and orbital architectures. We focus on both hot Jupiters (with orbital periods less than ten days) and warm Jupiters (with orbital periods around tens of days), and identify the outer perburber properties needed to generate substantial obliquities via resonant excitation, in terms of mass, separation, and inclination. For hot Jupiters, the stellar spin axis is strongly coupled to the orbital axis, and resonant excitation of obliquity requires a close perturber, located within 1-2 AU. For warm Jupiters, the spin and orbital axes are more weakly coupled, and the resonance may be achieved for more distant perturbers (at several to tens of AU). Resonant excitation of the stellar obliquity is accompanied by a decrease in the planets' mutual orbital inclination, and can thus erase high mutual inclinations in two-planet systems. Since many warm Jupiters are known to have outer planetary companions at several AU or beyond, stellar obliquities in warm Jupiter systems may be common, regardless of the

  4. Resonant tidal excitation of planetary atmospheres and an explanation for the jets on Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, R.

    2017-12-01

    Resonant tidal excitation of an atmosphere will arrive in predictable situations where there is a match in form and frequency between tidal forces and the atmosphere's eigenmodes of oscillation. The resonant response is typically several orders of magnitude more energetic than in non-resonant configurations involving only slight differences in parameters, and the behavior can be quite different because different oscillation modes are favored in each. The work presented provides first a generic description of these resonant states by demonstrating the behavior of solutions within the very large parameter space of potential scenarios. This generic description of the range of atmospheric tidal response scenarios is further used to create a taxonomy for organizing and understanding various tidally driven dynamic regimes. The resonances are easily identified by associated peaks in the power. But because these peaks may be relatively narrow, millions of solutions can be required to complete the description of the solution's dependence over the range of parameter values. (Construction of these large solution spaces is performed using a fast, semi-analytical method that solves the forced, dissipative, Laplace Tidal Equations subject to the constraint of dynamical consistency (through a separation constant) with solutions describing the vertical structure.) Filling in the solution space in this way is used not only to locate the parameter coordinates of resonant scenarios but also to study allowed migration paths through this space. It is suggested that resonant scenarios do not arrive through happenstance but rather because secular variations in parameters make the configuration move into the resonant scenario, with associated feedbacks either accelerating or halting the configuration migration. These results are then used to show strong support for the hypothesis by R. Lindzen that the regular banding (belts/zones/jets) on Jupiter and Saturn are driven by tides. The

  5. Nuclear resonant scattering experiment with fast time response: Photonuclear excitation of 201Hg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimi, A.; Hara, H.; Hiraki, T.; Kasamatsu, Y.; Kitao, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Konashi, K.; Masuda, R.; Masuda, T.; Miyamoto, Y.; Okai, K.; Okubo, S.; Ozaki, R.; Sasao, N.; Sato, O.; Seto, M.; Schumm, T.; Shigekawa, Y.; Stellmer, S.; Suzuki, K.; Uetake, S.; Watanabe, M.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yasuda, Y.; Yoda, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; Yoshimura, M.

    2018-02-01

    Nuclear resonant excitation and detection of its decay signal for the 26.27-keV level of 201Hg is demonstrated with high-brilliance synchrotron radiation (SR) and a fast x-ray detector system. This SR-based photonuclear excitation scheme, known as nuclear resonant scattering (NRS) in the field of materials science, is also useful for investigating nuclear properties, such as the half-lives and radiative widths of excited nuclear levels. To date, because of the limited time response of the x-ray detector, the nuclear levels to which this method could be applied have been limited to the one whose half-lives are longer than ˜1 ns. The faster time response of the NRS measurement makes possible NRS experiments on nuclear levels with much shorter half-lives. We have fabricated an x-ray detector system that has a time resolution of 56 ps and a shorter tail function than that reported previously. With the implemented detector system, the NRS signal of the 26.27-keV state of 201Hg could be clearly discriminated from the electronic scattering signal at an elapsed time of 1 ns after the SR pulse. The half-life of the state was determined as 629 ± 18 ps, which has better precision by a factor of three compared with that reported to date obtained from nuclear decay spectroscopy.

  6. Modeling and Simulation of a Parametrically Resonant Micromirror With Duty-Cycled Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Wajiha; Qiu, Zhen; Duan, Xiyu; Li, Haijun; Wang, Thomas D.; Oldham, Kenn R.

    2014-01-01

    High frequency large scanning angle electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) mirrors are used in a variety of applications involving fast optical scanning. A 1-D parametrically resonant torsional micromirror for use in biomedical imaging is analyzed here with respect to operation by duty-cycled square waves. Duty-cycled square wave excitation can have significant advantages for practical mirror regulation and/or control. The mirror’s nonlinear dynamics under such excitation is analyzed in a Hill’s equation form. This form is used to predict stability regions (the voltage-frequency relationship) of parametric resonance behavior over large scanning angles using iterative approximations for nonlinear capacitance behavior of the mirror. Numerical simulations are also performed to obtain the mirror’s frequency response over several voltages for various duty cycles. Frequency sweeps, stability results, and duty cycle trends from both analytical and simulation methods are compared with experimental results. Both analytical models and simulations show good agreement with experimental results over the range of duty cycled excitations tested. This paper discusses the implications of changing amplitude and phase with duty cycle for robust open-loop operation and future closed-loop operating strategies. PMID:25506188

  7. Modeling and Simulation of a Parametrically Resonant Micromirror With Duty-Cycled Excitation.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Wajiha; Qiu, Zhen; Duan, Xiyu; Li, Haijun; Wang, Thomas D; Oldham, Kenn R

    2014-12-01

    High frequency large scanning angle electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) mirrors are used in a variety of applications involving fast optical scanning. A 1-D parametrically resonant torsional micromirror for use in biomedical imaging is analyzed here with respect to operation by duty-cycled square waves. Duty-cycled square wave excitation can have significant advantages for practical mirror regulation and/or control. The mirror's nonlinear dynamics under such excitation is analyzed in a Hill's equation form. This form is used to predict stability regions (the voltage-frequency relationship) of parametric resonance behavior over large scanning angles using iterative approximations for nonlinear capacitance behavior of the mirror. Numerical simulations are also performed to obtain the mirror's frequency response over several voltages for various duty cycles. Frequency sweeps, stability results, and duty cycle trends from both analytical and simulation methods are compared with experimental results. Both analytical models and simulations show good agreement with experimental results over the range of duty cycled excitations tested. This paper discusses the implications of changing amplitude and phase with duty cycle for robust open-loop operation and future closed-loop operating strategies.

  8. Resonant coherent excitation of relativistic Ar 17+ ions channeled in a Si crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, T.; Ito, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Komaki, K.; Sano, M.; Torikoshi, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Takada, E.; Murakami, T.

    1998-02-01

    We observed resonant coherent excitation (RCE) of 1s electron to n=2 states in Ar 17+ through measurements of the survived fraction of 390 MeV/u hydrogen-like Ar 17+ channeled in a Si crystal. We adopted a totally depleted Si surface barrier detector as a target crystal as well as a probe of the energy deposition. The charge state of emerged ions was measured by a combination of a charge separation magnet and a 2D-position sensitive detector. We observed the RCE for planar channeled ions by tilting the target Si crystal from the direction of [1 1 0] axis in the (2 2¯ 0) , (0 0 4) , and (1 1¯ 1) planes. Prominent resonances at tilt angles under the resonance condition were observed. Moreover, each resonance profile is split into several lines due to the l· s interaction and the Stark effect originating in the static crystal field. The energy deposition in the crystal gives the information of the amplitude of the ion trajectory. The resonance peak position, intensity and width in the survived fraction of Ar 17+ reflect the position dependent strength of the crystal field, the RCE and the electron loss probabilities. They are in good accord with our calculation of the transition energy and probability.

  9. Resonant Transparency and Non-Trivial Non-Radiating Excitations in Toroidal Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Fedotov, V. A.; Rogacheva, A. V.; Savinov, V.; Tsai, D. P.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2013-01-01

    Engaging strongly resonant interactions allows dramatic enhancement of functionalities of many electromagnetic devices. However, resonances can be dampened by Joule and radiation losses. While in many cases Joule losses may be minimized by the choice of constituting materials, controlling radiation losses is often a bigger problem. Recent solutions include the use of coupled radiant and sub-radiant modes yielding narrow asymmetric Fano resonances in a wide range of systems, from defect states in photonic crystals and optical waveguides with mesoscopic ring resonators to nanoscale plasmonic and metamaterial systems exhibiting interference effects akin to electromagnetically-induced transparency. Here we demonstrate theoretically and confirm experimentally a new mechanism of resonant electromagnetic transparency, which yields very narrow isolated symmetric Lorentzian transmission lines in toroidal metamaterials. It exploits the long sought non-trivial non-radiating charge-current excitation based on interfering electric and toroidal dipoles that was first proposed by Afanasiev and Stepanovsky in [J. Phys. A Math. Gen. 28, 4565 (1995)]. PMID:24132231

  10. Near-resonant excitation and propagation of eccentric density waves by external forcing. [in accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, Eve C.; Shu, Frank H.; Adams, Fred C.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the astronomical evidence that relatively massive, distended, gaseous disks form as a natural by-product of the process of star formation, and also the numerical evidence that SLING-amplified eccentric modes in the outer parts of such disks can drive one-armed spiral density waves in the inner parts by near-resonant excitation and propagation. An ordinary differential equation (ODE) of the second order that approximately governs the nonlocalized forcing of waves in a disk satisfying Lindblad resonance almost everywhere is derived. When transformed and appended with an extra model term, this ODE implies, for free waves, the usual asymptotic results of the WKBJ dispersion relationship and the propagation Goldreich-Tremaine (1978) formula for the resonant torque exerted on a localized Lindblad resonance. An analytical solution is given for the rate of energy and angular momentum transfer by nonlocalized near-resonant forcing in the case when the disk has power-law dependences on the radius of the surface density and temperature.

  11. Nonordinary excitation of hydroacoustic resonance in the hydroturbine circuit of the sayano-shushenskaya hydroelectric power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavosov, R. K.; Prozorov, A. G.

    2011-05-01

    Three cases of excitation of resonance oscillations in a circuit with an incompressible medium and a hydrodynamic source of narrow-band acoustic radiation are compared. It is asserted that the Francis turbine can transmit and reflect infrasonic disturbances. It is supposed that an array of immobile coaxial cylinders below the impeller will prevent hydroacoustic self-excitation in flow inside the water conduit.

  12. Resonance Raman spectra of organic molecules absorbed on inorganic semiconducting surfaces: Contribution from both localized intramolecular excitation and intermolecular charge transfer excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, ChuanXiang; Zhao, Yi, E-mail: yizhao@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn; Liang, WanZhen, E-mail: yizhao@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-10-21

    The time-dependent correlation function approach for the calculations of absorption and resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of organic molecules absorbed on semiconductor surfaces [Y. Zhao and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 044108 (2011)] is extended to include the contribution of the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) excitation from the absorbers to the semiconducting nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the bidirectionally interfacial CT significantly modifies the spectral line shapes. Although the intermolecular CT excitation makes the absorption spectra red shift slightly, it essentially changes the relative intensities of mode-specific RRS and causes the oscillation behavior of surface enhanced Raman spectra withmore » respect to interfacial electronic couplings. Furthermore, the constructive and destructive interferences of RRS from the localized molecular excitation and CT excitation are observed with respect to the electronic coupling and the bottom position of conductor band. The interferences are determined by both excitation pathways and bidirectionally interfacial CT.« less

  13. Resonant coherent excitation of 390 MeV/u Ar ions planar channeled in Si crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komaki, K.; Azuma, T.; Ito, T.; Takabayashi, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.; Sano, M.; Torikoshi, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Takada, E.; Murakami, T.

    1998-12-01

    Resonant coherent excitation of the 1s electron to n=2 states in a hydrogen-like ion was studied through measurements of the survived fraction of 390 MeV/u Ar17+ planar channeled in a Si crystal. Adopting a totally depleted Si surface barrier detector as a target crystal, the charge state of the individual emerged ion was measured in coincidence with the energy deposition in the target. By changing the incident direction along the (2 overline2 0), (0 0 4), and (1 overline1 1) planes, a series of clear resonances were observed as the decrease in the survived charge fraction due to higher electron loss probability for the excited state. Each resonance profile reflects energy splitting of the n=2 manifold originated from l-s interaction and Stark effect due to the crystal field. From the correlation between the energy loss and survived charge fraction, transition energy as a function of the ion trajectory amplitude is deduced which is in good agreement with calculated results.

  14. Resonant-type MEMS transducers excited by two acoustic emission simulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozevin, Didem; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Pessiki, Stephen

    2004-07-01

    Acoustic emission testing is a passive nondestructive testing technique used to identify the onset and characteristics of damage through the detection and analysis of transient stress waves. Successful detection and implementation of acoustic emission requires good coupling, high transducer sensitivity and ability to discriminate noise from real signals. We report here detection of simulated acoustic emission signals using a MEMS chip fabricated in the multi-user polysilicon surface micromachining (MUMPs) process. The chip includes 18 different transducers with 10 different resonant frequencies in the range of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. It was excited by two different source simulation techniques; pencil lead break and impact loading. The former simulation was accomplished by breaking 0.5 mm lead on the ceramic package. Four transducer outputs were collected simultaneously using a multi-channel oscilloscope. The impact loading was repeated for five different diameter ball bearings. Traditional acoustic emission waveform analysis methods were applied to both data sets to illustrate the identification of different source mechanisms. In addition, a sliding window Fourier transform was performed to differentiate frequencies in time-frequency-amplitude domain. The arrival and energy contents of each resonant frequency were investigated in time-magnitude plots. The advantages of the simultaneous excitation of resonant transducers on one chip are discussed and compared with broadband acoustic emission transducers.

  15. Pressure Dependence of Excitation Cross Sections for Resonant Levels of Rare Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Michael D.; Chilton, J. Ethan; Lin, Chun C.

    2000-06-01

    In the rare gases, the excited n'p^5ns and n'p^5nd levels with J = 1 are optically coupled to ground as well as lower lying p levels. Resonant photons emitted when the atom decays to ground can be reabsorbed by another ground-state atom. At low gas pressures this reabsorption occurs infrequently, but at higher pressures becomes increasingly likely until the resonant transition is completely suppressed. This enhances the cascade transitions into lower p levels, resulting in pressure dependent optical emission cross sections. This reabsorption process can be understood quantitatively with a model developed by Heddle et al(D. W. O. Heddle and N. J. Samuel, J. Phys. B 3), 1593 (1970).. The radiation from transitions into the nonresonant levels often lie in the ir, while the resonant radiation is always in the uv spectral region. Using a Fourier-transform spectrometer, one can measure the cross sections for the ir transitions as a function of pressure. The Heddle model can be fit to these data with the use of theoretical values for the Einstein A coefficients. This provides a test of the accuracy of calculated A values. Discussion will include cross section measurements for Ne, Ar, and Kr excited by electron impact over a range of gas pressures.

  16. Excited-state structure and electronic dephasing time of Nile blue from absolute resonance Raman intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawless, Mary K.; Mathies, Richard A.

    1992-06-01

    Absolute resonance Raman cross sections are measured for Nile blue 690 perchlorate dissolved in ethylene glycol with excitation at 514, 531, and 568 nm. These values and the absorption spectrum are modeled using a time-dependent wave packet formalism. The excited-state equilibrium geometry changes are quantitated for 40 resonance Raman active modes, seven of which (590, 1141, 1351, 1429, 1492, 1544, and 1640 cm-1 ) carry 70% of the total resonance Raman intensity. This demonstrates that in addition to the prominent 590 and 1640 cm-1 modes, a large number of vibrational degrees of freedom are Franck-Condon coupled to the electronic transition. After exposure of the explicit vibrational progressions, the residual absorption linewidth is separated into its homogeneous [350 cm-1 half-width at half-maximum (HWHM)] and inhomogeneous (313 cm-1 HWHM) components through an analysis of the absolute Raman cross sections. The value of the electronic dephasing time derived from this study (25 fs) compares well to previously published results. These data should be valuable in multimode modeling of femtosecond experiments on Nile blue.

  17. On selection of primary modes for generation of strong internally resonant second harmonics in plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Chillara, Vamshi Krishna; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2013-09-01

    The selection of primary shear-horizontal (SH) and Rayleigh-Lamb (RL) ultrasonic wave modes that generate cumulative second harmonics in homogeneous isotropic plates is analyzed by theoretical modeling. Selection criteria include: internal resonance (synchronism and nonzero power flux), group velocity matching, and excitability/receivability. The power flux, group velocity matching, and excitability are tabulated for the SH and RL internal resonance points. The analysis indicates that SH waves can generate cumulative symmetric RL secondary wave fields. Laboratory experiments on aluminum plates demonstrate that excitation of the SH3 primary mode generates the s4 secondary RL mode and that the secondary wave field amplitude increases linearly with propagation distance. Simple magnetostrictive transducers were used to excite the primary SH wave and to receive the SH and RL wave signals. Reception of these wave modes having orthogonal polarizations was achieved by simply reorienting the electrical coil. The experiment was complicated by the presence of a nonplanar primary wavefront, however finite element simulations were able to clarify the experimental results.

  18. Reconfigurable lateral optical force achieved by selectively exciting plasmonic dark modes near Fano resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huajin; Ye, Qian; Zhang, Yiwen; Shi, Lei; Liu, Shiyang; Jian, Zi; Lin, Zhifang

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate a reconfigurable lateral optical force (OF) on a plasmonic nanoparticle immersed in a simple optical field invariant along the lateral direction and formed by two interfering plane waves. This lateral OF is shown, from the multipolar expansion technique, attributed to several coupling channels established between multiple multipoles excited on a plasmonic nanoparticle, in particular, the adjacent electric multipole modes that bring about the Fano interferences, which can substantially enhance the lateral scattering asymmetry, leading to an augmented lateral OF comparable to the longitudinal OF. More importantly, by engineering Fano interference either intrinsically through particle size or extrinsically through selectively exciting narrow plasmonic dark modes the direction of the lateral OF is reversibly switchable. The lateral OF can even be modulated continuously from positive to negative by controlling the incident angle of the interfering plane waves due to the variation of relative phase of the excited plasmonic dark modes near Fano resonance, facilitating the plasmonic nanoparticle as a controllable conveyor as well as the optical selection and separation. Besides, a fundamental and counterintuitive physical consequence emerges in that the simple proportional relation between the lateral OF and the Belinfante spin momentum derived in the small particle limit breaks down when the Fano interference comes into play, in particular, a negative lateral OF opposite the Belinfante spin momentum can be induced by properly controlling the selective excitation.

  19. Excitation of Higher Order Modes of Cylindrical Dielectric Resonator Antenna using Dual-slot feed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, A. K.; Praveen Kumar, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    Excitation of the higher order modes (HOM) of a cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna(DRA) of high relative permittivity, using dual feed scheme is investigated. The feed scheme uses a pair of narrow slots and is chosen on the basis of the field distribution of the desired DRA modes. Numerical studies using ANSYS HFSS show that the dual-feed excited a combination of two HOMs, which are identified as HEM21δ and TM01δ. The mixed-up nature is further verified through studying the radiation pattern of the DRA which shows azimuthal asymmetry and low gain. It is suggested that if one of the HOM is suppressed, better antenna performance can be achieved.

  20. Far-infrared laser magnetic resonance of vibrationally excited CD2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, K. M.; Sears, T. J.; Mckellar, A. R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The detection of 13 rotational transitions in the first excited bending state (010) of CD2 using the technique of far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy is reported. Molecular parameters for this state are determined from these new data together with existing infrared observations of the v(2) band. Additional information on the ground vibrational state (000) is also provided by the observation of a new rotational transition, and this is combined with existing data to provide a refined set of molecular parameters for the CD2 ground state. One spectrum has been observed that is assigned as a rotational transition within the first excited symmetric stretching state (100) of CD2. These data will be of use in refining the structure and the potential function of the methylene radical.

  1. Multi-Channel Hyperspectral Fluorescence Detection Excited by Coupled Plasmon-Waveguide Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chan; Liu, Le; Zhang, Lin; Guo, Jun; Guo, Jihua; Ma, Hui; He, Yonghong

    2013-01-01

    We propose in this paper a biosensor scheme based on coupled plasmon-waveguide resonance (CPWR) excited fluorescence spectroscopy. A symmetrical structure that offers higher surface electric field strengths, longer surface propagation lengths and depths is developed to support guided waveguide modes for the efficient excitation of fluorescence. The optimal parameters for the sensor films are theoretically and experimentally investigated, leading to a detection limit of 0.1 nM (for a Cy5 solution). Multiplex analysis possible with the fluorescence detection is further advanced by employing the hyperspectral fluorescence technique to record the full spectra for every pixel on the sample plane. We demonstrate experimentally that highly overlapping fluorescence (Cy5 and Dylight680) can be distinguished and ratios of different emission sources can be determined accurately. This biosensor shows great potential for multiplex detections of fluorescence analytes. PMID:24129023

  2. Resonant generation of internal waves on the soft sea bed by a surface water wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Feng

    1995-08-01

    The nonlinear response of an initially flat sea bed to a monochromatic surface progressive wave was studied using the multiple scale perturbation method. Two opposite-traveling subliminal internal ``mud'' waves are selectively excited and form a resonant triad with the surface wave. The amplitudes of the internal waves grow on a time scale much longer than the period of the surface wave. It was found that the sea bed response is critically dependent on the density ratio of water and soil, depth of water, and depth and viscosity of the saturated soil. The result of instability analysis is in qualitative agreement with the result of a wave flume experiment.

  3. Elastic alpha-particle resonances as evidence of clustering at high excitation in 40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrby, M.; Lönnroth, T.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Rogachev, G. V.; Golovkov, M. S.; Källman, K.-M.; Lattuada, M.; Perov, S. V.; Romano, S.; Skorodumov, B. B.; Tiourin, G. P.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tumino, A.; Vorontsov, A. N.

    2011-08-01

    The elastic-scattering reaction 36Ar + α was studied using the Thick Target Inverse Kinematics technique. Data were taken at a beam energy of 150 MeV in a reaction chamber filled with 4He gas, corresponding to the excitation region of 12-20 MeV in 40Ca. Using a simplified R -matrix method of analysis energies, widths and spin assignments were obtained for 137 resonances. The structure is discussed within the concept of α-cluster structure in the quasi-continuum of 40Ca and is compared to other nuclei in the same mass region.

  4. Highly excited bound-state resonances of short-range inverse power-law potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2017-11-01

    We study analytically the radial Schrödinger equation with long-range attractive potentials whose asymptotic behaviors are dominated by inverse power-law tails of the form V(r)=-β _n r^{-n} with n>2. In particular, assuming that the effective radial potential is characterized by a short-range infinitely repulsive core of radius R, we derive a compact analytical formula for the threshold energy E^{ {max}}_l=E^{ {max}}_l(n,β _n,R), which characterizes the most weakly bound-state resonance (the most excited energy level) of the quantum system.

  5. Homodyne detection of ferromagnetic resonance by a non-uniform radio-frequency excitation current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikebuchi, Tetsuya; Moriyama, Takahiro; Shiota, Yoichi; Ono, Teruo

    2018-05-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is one of the most popular techniques to characterize dynamic properties of ferromagnetic materials. Among various FMR measurement techniques, the homodyne FMR detection has been frequently used to characterize thin-film ferromagnetic multilayers owing to its high sensitivity. However, a drawback of this technique was considered to be the requirement for a structural inversion asymmetry, which makes it unsuitable to characterize a single layer of ferromagnet. In this study, we demonstrate a homodyne FMR detection of the Kittel’s mode FMR dynamics of a single layer of FeNi by creating a non-uniform radio-frequency excitation current.

  6. Resonant states in 13C and 16,17O at high excitation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Ukita, G. M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cunsolo, A.; Carbone, D.; Bondi, M.; De Napoli, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Linares, R.; Lombardo, I.

    2014-12-01

    The 9Be(6Li,d)13C and 12,13C(6Li,d)16,17O reactions were measured at the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility at 25.5 MeV incident energy. The nuclear emulsion detection technique was applied. Several narrow resonances were populated up to approximately 17 MeV of excitation energy. An excellent energy resolution was obtained: 40 keV for 13C and 15-30 keV for 16O. The upper limit for the resonance widths were determined. Recently, d-a angular correlations were measured at θd = 0° with incident energy of 25 MeV using the LNS Tandem-MAGNEX Spectrometer facility.

  7. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M.

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of themore » exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.« less

  8. Red-excitation resonance Raman analysis of the nu(Fe=O) mode of ferryl-oxo hemoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kenichiro; Mukai, Masahiro; Shimada, Hideo; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Ogura, Takashi

    2008-11-05

    The Raman excitation profile of the nuFe O mode of horseradish peroxidase compound II exhibits a maximum at 580 nm. This maximum is located within an absorption band with a shoulder assignable to an oxygen-to-iron charge transfer band on the longer wavelength side of the alpha-band. Resonance Raman bands of the nuFe O mode of various ferryl-oxo type hemoproteins measured at 590 nm excitation indicate that many hemoproteins in the ferryl-oxo state have an oxygen-to-iron charge transfer band in the visible region. Since this red-excited resonance Raman technique causes much less photochemical damage in the proteins relative to blue-excited resonance Raman spectroscopy, it produces a higher signal-to-noise ratio and thus represents a powerful tool for investigations of ferryl-oxo intermediates of hemoproteins.

  9. Nonlinear standing wave excitation by series resonance-enhanced harmonics in low pressure capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Kawamura, Emi; Marakhtanov, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that standing waves having radially center-high rf voltage profiles exist in high frequency capacitive discharges. It is also known that in radially uniform discharges, the capacitive sheath nonlinearities excite strong nonlinear series resonance harmonics that enhance the electron power deposition. In this work, we consider the coupling of the series resonance-enhanced harmonics to the standing waves. A one-dimensional, asymmetric radial transmission line model is developed incorporating the wave and nonlinear sheath physics and a self-consistent dc potential. The resulting coupled pde equation set is solved numerically to determine the discharge voltages and currents. A 10 mT argon base case is chosen with plasma density 2 ×1016 m-3, gap width 2 cm and conducting electrode radius 15 cm, driven by a high frequency 500 V source with source resistance 0.5 ohms. We find that nearby resonances lead to an enhanced ratio of 4.5 of the electron power per unit area on axis, compared to the average. The radial dependence of electron power with frequency shows significant variations, with the central enhancement and sharpness of the spatial resonances depending in a complicated way on the harmonic structure. Work supported by DOE Fusion Energy Science Contract DE-SC000193 and by a gift from the Lam Research Corporation.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of riboflavin on nanostructured Ag surfaces: The role of excitation wavelength, plasmon resonance and molecular resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šubr, Martin; Kuzminova, Anna; Kylián, Ondřej; Procházka, Marek

    2018-05-01

    Optimization of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based sensors for (bio)analytical applications has received much attention in recent years. For optimum sensitivity, both the nanostructure fabrication process and the choice of the excitation wavelength used with respect to the specific analyte studied are of crucial importance. In this contribution, detailed SERS intensity profiles were measured using gradient nanostructures with the localized surface-plasmon resonance (LSPR) condition varying across the sample length and using riboflavin as the model biomolecule. Three different excitation wavelengths (633 nm, 515 nm and 488 nm) corresponding to non-resonance, pre-resonance and resonance excitation with respect to the studied molecule, respectively, were tested. Results were interpreted in terms of a superposition of the enhancement provided by the electromagnetic mechanism and intrinsic properties of the SERS probe molecule. The first effect was dictated mainly by the degree of spectral overlap between the LSPR band, the excitation wavelength along with the scattering cross-section of the nanostructures, while the latter was influenced by the position of the molecular resonance with respect to the excitation wavelength. Our experimental findings contribute to a better understanding of the SERS enhancement mechanism.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of riboflavin on nanostructured Ag surfaces: The role of excitation wavelength, plasmon resonance and molecular resonance.

    PubMed

    Šubr, Martin; Kuzminova, Anna; Kylián, Ondřej; Procházka, Marek

    2018-05-15

    Optimization of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based sensors for (bio)analytical applications has received much attention in recent years. For optimum sensitivity, both the nanostructure fabrication process and the choice of the excitation wavelength used with respect to the specific analyte studied are of crucial importance. In this contribution, detailed SERS intensity profiles were measured using gradient nanostructures with the localized surface-plasmon resonance (LSPR) condition varying across the sample length and using riboflavin as the model biomolecule. Three different excitation wavelengths (633 nm, 515 nm and 488 nm) corresponding to non-resonance, pre-resonance and resonance excitation with respect to the studied molecule, respectively, were tested. Results were interpreted in terms of a superposition of the enhancement provided by the electromagnetic mechanism and intrinsic properties of the SERS probe molecule. The first effect was dictated mainly by the degree of spectral overlap between the LSPR band, the excitation wavelength along with the scattering cross-section of the nanostructures, while the latter was influenced by the position of the molecular resonance with respect to the excitation wavelength. Our experimental findings contribute to a better understanding of the SERS enhancement mechanism. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. AlN-based piezoelectric bimorph microgenerator utilizing low-level non-resonant excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampl, Stefan; Cimalla, Volker; Polster, Tobias; Hoffmann, Martin

    2011-06-01

    This work aims for utilizing human ocular motion for the self-sufficient power supply of a minimally invasive implantable monitoring system for intraocular pressure (IOP). With a proven piezoelectric functionality (d33>5 pm/V), nanocrystalline thin films of aluminum nitride (AlN) provide a good capability for micromechanical energy harvesting (EH) in medical applications. Many d31-mode microcantilever architectures are poorly suited for human-induced EH: Resonant mass-spring-damper systems are tested under high, narrow-band excitation frequencies. However, human motions, e.g. vibrations of eyeballs are marked by their low frequency, unpredictable, mainly aperiodic and time-varying signature. Different vibration types and directions are 3-dimensionally superimposed. Saccadic eye movements are favorable for inertial microgenerators because of their high dynamic loading (ω<=1000°/s). Our generator concept (symmetric active/active-parallel-bimorph cantilever) enables a high structural compliance by maximizing the piezoactive volume at very low cantilever thicknesses (<1 μm). An increased length and seismic mass enable an effective excitation by low-level aperiodic vibrations such as saccadic acceleration impulses. Analytic calculations and FEA-simulations investigate the potential distribution and transient response of different bimorph structures (length 200- 1000 μm, width 20-200 μm) on broadband vibrations. First released monomorph and bimorph structures show very low resonant frequencies and an adequate robustness.

  13. Linear excitation and detection in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosshans, Peter B.; Chen, Ruidan; Limbach, Patrick A.; Marshall, Alan G.

    1994-11-01

    We present the first Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) ion trap designed to produce both a linear spatial variation of the excitation electric potential field and a linear response of the detection circuit to the motion of the confined ions. With this trap, the magnitude of the detected signal at a given ion cyclotron frequency varies linearly with both the number of ions of given mass-to-charge ratio and also with the magnitude-mode excitation signal at the ion cyclotron orbital frequency; the proportionality constant is mass independent. Interestingly, this linearization may be achieved with any ion trap geometry. The excitation/detection design consists of an array of capacitively coupled electrodes which provide a voltage-divider network that produces a nearly spatially homogeneous excitation electric field throughout the linearized trap; resistive coupling to the electrodes isolates the a.c. excitation (or detection) circuit from the d.c. (trapping) potential. The design is based on analytical expressions for the potential associated with each electrode, from which we are able to compute the deviation from linearity for a trap with a finite number of elements. Based on direct experimental comparisons to an unmodified cubic trap, the linearized trap demonstrates the following performance advantages at the cost of some additional mechanical complexity: (a) signal response linearly proportional to excitation electric field amplitude; (b) vastly reduced axial excitation/ejection for significantly improved ion relative abundance accuracy; (c) elimination of harmonics and sidebands of the fundamental frequencies of ion motion. As a result, FT-ICR mass spectra are now more reproducible. Moreover, the linearized trap should facilitate the characterization of other fundamental aspects of ion behavior in an ICR ion trap, e.g. effects of space charge, non-quadrupolar electrostatic trapping field, etc. Furthermore, this novel design should improve

  14. Resonant tidal excitation of oscillation modes in merging binary neutron stars: Inertial-gravity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenrui; Lai, Dong

    2017-10-01

    In coalescing neutron star (NS) binaries, tidal force can resonantly excite low-frequency (≲500 Hz ) oscillation modes in the NS, transferring energy between the orbit and the NS. This resonant tide can induce phase shift in the gravitational waveforms, and potentially provide a new window of studying NS interior using gravitational waves. Previous works have considered tidal excitations of pure g-modes (due to stable stratification of the star) and pure inertial modes (due to Coriolis force), with the rotational effect treated in an approximate manner. However, for realistic NSs, the buoyancy and rotational effects can be comparable, giving rise to mixed inertial-gravity modes. We develop a nonperturbative numerical spectral code to compute the frequencies and tidal coupling coefficients of these modes. We then calculate the phase shift in the gravitational waveform due to each resonance during binary inspiral. Given the uncertainties in the NS equation of state and stratification property, we adopt polytropic NS models with a parametrized stratification. We derive relevant scaling relations and survey how the phase shift depends on various properties of the NS. We find that for canonical NSs (with mass M =1.4 M⊙ and radius R =10 km ) and modest rotation rates (≲300 Hz ), the gravitational wave phase shift due to a resonance is generally less than 0.01 radian. But the phase shift is a strong function of R and M , and can reach a radian or more for low-mass NSs with larger radii (R ≳15 km ). Significant phase shift can also be produced when the combination of stratification and rotation gives rise to a very low frequency (≲20 Hz in the inertial frame) modified g-mode. As a by-product of our precise calculation of oscillation modes in rotating NSs, we find that some inertial modes can be strongly affected by stratification; we also find that the m =1 r -mode, previously identified to have a small but finite inertial-frame frequency based on the Cowling

  15. Dissociation dynamics of simple chlorine containing molecules upon resonant Cl K-σ{sup *} excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Bohinc, R., E-mail: rok.bohinc@ijs.si; Bučar, K.; Kavčič, M.

    2014-04-28

    A theoretical analysis of dissociation dynamics of chlorine K-σ{sup *} core-excited molecules is performed. The potential energy surfaces of HCl, Cl{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}Cl, CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, CHCl{sub 3}, CCl{sub 4}, CFCl{sub 3}, CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, and CF{sub 3}Cl are calculated along the normal vibrational modes of the ground electronic state yielding the widths of the corresponding Franck-Condon distributions. An insight into the potential energy surface of 1st σ{sup *} resonances shows that the initial dissociation dynamics of chloro(fluoro)methanes mainly involves the distancing of the carbon and the core-excited chlorine atom and is practically independent of other atoms in themore » molecule, which is in agreement with the recent experimental findings. The carbon atom pulls out the remaining three atoms shortly after piercing the three-atom plane resulting in a high vibrationally excited state of the fragment if the reconnection time is smaller than the lifetime of the L shell.« less

  16. Excited-state structure and isomerization dynamics of the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin from resonance Raman intensities.

    PubMed Central

    Loppnow, G R; Mathies, R A

    1988-01-01

    Resonance Raman excitation profiles have been measured for the bovine visual pigment rhodopsin using excitation wavelengths ranging from 457.9 to 647.1 nm. A complete Franck-Condon analysis of the absorption spectrum and resonance Raman excitation profiles has been performed using an excited-state, time-dependent wavepacket propagation technique. This has enabled us to determine the change in geometry upon electronic excitation of rhodopsin's 11-cis-retinal protonated Schiff base chromophore along 25 normal coordinates. Intense low-frequency Raman lines are observed at 98, 135, 249, 336, and 461 cm-1 whose intensities provide quantitative, mode-specific information about the excited-state torsional deformations that lead to isomerization. The dominant contribution to the width of the absorption band in rhodopsin results from Franck-Condon progressions in the 1,549 cm-1 ethylenic normal mode. The lack of vibronic structure in the absorption spectrum is shown to be caused by extensive progressions in low-frequency torsional modes and a large homogeneous linewidth (170 cm-1 half-width) together with thermal population of low-frequency modes and inhomogeneous site distribution effects. The resonance Raman cross-sections of rhodopsin are unusually weak because the excited-state wavepacket moves rapidly (approximately 35 fs) and permanently away from the Franck-Condon geometry along skeletal stretching and torsional coordinates. PMID:3416032

  17. Resonant Coherent Excitation of Hydrogen-Like Ar Ions to the n =: 3 States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, T.; Ito, T.; Takabayashi, Y.; Komaki, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.; Takada, E.; Murakami, T.

    We have succeeded in observing resonant coherent excitaion (RCE) of 1s electrons to the n = 3 states in 390 MeV/u hydrogen-like Ar17+ ions planar channeled in a silicon crystal through measurements of the charge-state distribution of ions transmitting the crystal. Furthermore, we directly confirmed RCE to the n = 3 states by observing the enhancement of the de-excitation X-rays, i.e., Kβ X-rays under the resonance condition. The resonance profiles of the charge-state distribution as functions of the incident angle to the crystal, which uniquely relates with the transition energy, have a characteristic structure consisting of several peaks. Compared with the profile of RCE to the n = 2 states, the present profiles show a large peak shift from the j = 1/2 and 3/2 levels in vacuum, and the profiles are much wider than those expected from the Stark-split level structure of the n = 3 manifolds due to the position- (distance from the channel center in the planar channel) dependent strong static field in the crystal.

  18. Excitation of the ionospheric Alfvén resonator from the ground: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Chang, C.-L.; Labenski, J.; Milikh, G.; Vartanyan, A.; Snyder, A. L.

    2011-10-01

    We report results from numerical and experimental studies of the excitation of ULF shear Alfvén waves inside the ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR) by heating the ionosphere with powerful HF waves launched from the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. Numerical simulations of the two-fluid MHD model describing IAR in a dipole magnetic field geometry with plasma parameters taken from the observations at HAARP during the October-November 2010 experimental campaign reveal that the IAR quality is higher during nighttime conditions, when the ionospheric conductivity is very low. Simulations also reveal that the resonance wave cannot be identified from the magnetic measurements on the ground or at an altitude above 600 km because the magnetic field in this wave has nodes on both ends of the resonator, and the best way to detect IAR modes is by measuring the electric field on low Earth orbit satellites. These theoretical predictions are in good, quantitative agreement with results from observations: In particular, (1) observations from the ground-based magnetometer at the HAARP site demonstrate no significant difference in the amplitudes of the magnetic field generated by HAARP in the frequency range from 0 to 5 Hz, and (2) the DEMETER satellite detected the electric field of the IAR first harmonic at an altitude of 670 km above HAARP during the heating experiment.

  19. Chloroplast biogenesis 87: Evidence of resonance excitation energy transfer between tetrapyrrole intermediates of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway and chlorophyll a.

    PubMed

    Kolossov, Vladimir L; Kopetz, Karen J; Rebeiz, Constantin A

    2003-08-01

    The thorough understanding of photosynthetic membrane assembly requires a deeper knowledge of the coordination of chlorophyll (Chl) and thylakoid apoprotein biosynthesis. As a working model for future investigations, we have proposed three Chl-thylakoid apoprotein biosynthesis models, namely, a single-branched Chl biosynthetic pathway (SBP) single-location model, an SBP multilocation model and a multibranched Chl biosynthetic pathway (MBP) sublocation model. Rejection or validation of these models can be probed by determination of resonance excitation energy transfer between various tetrapyrrole intermediates of the Chl biosynthetic pathway and various thylakoid Chl-protein complexes. In this study we describe the detection of resonance energy transfer between protoporphyrin IX (Proto), Mg-Proto and its monomethyl ester (Mp(e)) and divinyl and monovinyl protochlorophyllide a (Pchlide a) and several Chl-protein complexes. Induction of various amounts of tetrapyrrole accumulation in green photoperiodically grown cucumber cotyledons and barley leaves was achieved by dark incubation of excised tissues with delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and various concentrations of 2,2'-dipyridyl for various periods of time. Controls were incubated in distilled water. After plastid isolation, treated and control plastids were diluted in buffered glycerol to the same Chl concentration. Excitation spectra were then recorded at 77 K at emission maxima of about 686, 694 and 738 nm. Resonance excitation energy transfer from Proto, Mp(e) and Pchlide a to Chl-protein complexes emitting at 686, 694 and 738 nm was observed by calculation of treated minus control difference excitation spectra. The occurrence of resonance excitation energy transfer between anabolic tetrapyrroles and Chl-protein complexes appeared as well-defined excitation bands with excitation maxima corresponding to those of Proto, Mp(e) and Pchlide a. Furthermore, it appeared that resonance excitation energy transfer from

  20. Theory and computation of triply excited resonances: Application to states of He-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.; Piangos, Nicos A.; Komninos, Yannis

    1993-11-01

    Autoionizing multiply excited states offer unusual challenges to the theory of electronic structure and spectra because of the presence of strong electron correlations, of their occasional weak binding, of their proximity to more than one threshold, and of their degeneracy with many continua. Here we discuss a theory that addresses these difficulties in conjunction with the computation of their wave functions and intrinsic properties. Emphasis is given on the justification of the possible presence of self-consistently obtained open-channel-like (OCL) correlating configurations in the square-integrable representation of such states and on their effect on the energy E and the width Γ. Application of the theory has allowed the prediction of two hitherto unknown He- triply excited resonances, the 2s2p2 2P (E=59.71 eV, above the He ground state, Γ=79 meV) and the 2p3 2Do (E=59.46 eV, Γ=282 meV) (1 a.u.=27.2116 eV). These resonances are above the singly excited states of He and are embedded in its doubly excited spectrum. The relatively broad 2p3 2Do state interacts strongly with the He 2s2p 3Po ɛd continuum. The effect of this interaction has been studied in terms of the coupling with fixed core scattering states as well as with a self-consistently computed OCL bound configuration. The position of the He- 2p3 2Do resonance is below that of the He 2p2 1D autoionizing state at 59.91 eV and of the He 2p2 3P bound state at 59.68 eV. The partial decay widths to the three important open channels are γ(2s2p 3Po)=252 meV, γ(1s2p 3Po)=21 meV, γ(1s2p 1Po)=9 meV. The final core states are also represented by correlated (multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock) functions. The 2s2p2 2P state couples to four neighboring He thresholds, the 2s2p 3Po, 2p2 3P, 1D, and 2s2p 1Po. It is above the He 2s2p 3Po threshold at 58.31 eV, with respect to which it is a valence shape resonance, and below the He 2p2 1D and 2s2p 1Po autoionizing states. In the limit of an exact energy calculation, we

  1. Validation of PEP-II Resonantly Excited Turn-by-Turn BPM Data

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yiton T.; Cai, Yunhai; Colocho, William.

    2007-06-28

    For optics measurement and modeling of the PEP-II electron (HER) and position (LER) storage rings, we have been doing well with MIA [1] which requires analyzing turn-by-turn Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data that are resonantly excited at the horizontal, vertical, and longitudinal tunes. However, in anticipation that certain BPM buttons and even pins in the PEP-II IR region would be missing for the run starting in January 2007, we had been developing a data validation process to reduce the effect due to the reduced BPM data accuracy on PEP-II optics measurement and modeling. Besides the routine process for ranking BPMmore » noise level through data correlation among BPMs with a singular-value decomposition (SVD), we could also check BPM data symplecticity by comparing the invariant ratios. Results from PEP-II measurement will be presented.« less

  2. QPM Analysis of 205Tl Nuclear Excitations below the Giant Dipole Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benouaret, N.; Beller, J.; Isaak, J.; Kelley, J. H.; Pai, H.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Raut, R.; Romig, C.; Rusev, G.; Savran, D.; Scheck, M.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Sonnabend, K.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H. R.; Zweidinger, M.

    2015-05-01

    We analysed our experimental recent findings of the dipole response of the odd-mass stable nucleus 205Tl within the quasi-particle phonon model. Using the phonon basis constructed for the neighbouring 204Hg and wave function configurations for 205Tl consisting of a mixture of quasiparticle ⊗ N-phonon configurations (N=0,1,2), only one group of fragmented dipole excited states has been reproduced at 5.5 MeV in comparison to the experimental distribution which shows a second group at about 5 MeV. The computed dipole transition strengths are mainly of E1 character which could be associated to the pygmy dipole resonance.

  3. Resonant transfer excitation in collisions of F6+ and Mg9+ with H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, E. M.; Kamal, A.; Zaharakis, K. E.; Clark, M. W.; Tanis, J. A.; Ferguson, S. M.; Badnell, N. R.

    1991-10-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations of resonant transfer excitation (RTE) for F6++H2 and Mg9++H2 collisions have been made. For both collision systems good agreement is obtained between the measured cross sections for K-shell x-ray emission coincident with electron-capture and theoretical RTE calculations. For F6+ the present calculations are about 10% lower than previous results of Bhalla and Karim [Phys. Rev. A 39, 6060 (1989); 41, 4097(E) (1990]; the measured cross sections are a factor of 2.3 larger than earlier measurements of Schulz et al. [Phys. Rev. A 38, 5454 (1988)]. The previous disagreement between experiment and theory for F6+ is removed.

  4. Computer Simulations of Resonant Coherent Excitation of Heavy Hydrogen-Like Ions Under Planar Channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaev, A. A.; Pivovarov, Yu L.

    2010-04-01

    Resonant coherent excitation (RCE) of relativistic hydrogen-like ions is investigated by computer simulations methods. The suggested theoretical model is applied to the simulations of recent experiments on RCE of 390 MeV/u Ar17+ ions under (220) planar channeling in a Si crystal performed by T.Azuma et al at HIMAC (Tokyo). Theoretical results are in a good agreement with these experimental data and clearly show the appearance of the doublet structure of RCE peaks. The simulations are also extended to greater ion energies in order to predict the new RCE features at the future accelerator facility FAIR OSI and as an example, RCE of II GeV/u U91+ ions is considered in detail.

  5. Effect of Fermi surface nesting on resonant spin excitations in Ba{<_1-x}K{<_x}Fe{<_2}As{<_2}.

    SciTech Connect

    Castellan, J.-P.; Rosenkranz, S.; Goremychkin, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    We report inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the resonant spin excitations in Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} over a broad range of electron band filling. The fall in the superconducting transition temperature with hole doping coincides with the magnetic excitations splitting into two incommensurate peaks because of the growing mismatch in the hole and electron Fermi surface volumes, as confirmed by a tight-binding model with s{sub {+-}}-symmetry pairing. The reduction in Fermi surface nesting is accompanied by a collapse of the resonance binding energy and its spectral weight, caused by the weakening of electron-electron correlations.

  6. A Resonantly Excited Disk-Oscillation Model of High-Frequency QPOs of Microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shoji

    2012-12-01

    A possible model of twin high-frequency QPOs (HF QPOs) of microquasars is examined. The disk is assumed to have global magnetic fields and to be deformed with a two-armed pattern. In this deformed disk, a set of a two-armed (m = 2) vertical p-mode oscillation and an axisymmetric (m = 0) g-mode oscillation is considered. They resonantly interact through the disk deformation when their frequencies are the same. This resonant interaction amplifies the set of the above oscillations in the case where these two oscillations have wave energies of opposite signs. These oscillations are assumed to be excited most efficiently in the case where the radial group velocities of these two waves vanish at the same place. The above set of oscillations is not unique, depending on the node number n, of oscillations in the vertical direction. We consider that the basic two sets of oscillations correspond to the twin QPOs. The frequencies of these oscillations depend on the disk parameters, such as the strength of the magnetic fields. For observational mass ranges of GRS 1915+ 105, GRO J1655-40, XTE J1550-564, and HEAO H1743-322, the spins of these sources are estimated. High spins of these sources can be described if the disks have weak poloidal magnetic fields as well as toroidal magnetic fields of moderate strength. In this model the 3:2 frequency ratio of high-frequency QPOs is not related to their excitation, but occurs by chance.

  7. Excitation of the 229 m Th nuclear isomer via resonance conversion in ionized atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpeshin, F. F.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2015-09-01

    Pressing problems concerning the optical pumping of the 7.6-eV 229 m Th nuclear isomer, which is a candidate for a new nuclear optical reference point for frequencies, are examined. Physics behind the mechanism of the two-photon optical pumping of the isomer is considered. It is shown that, irrespective of the pumping scheme, a dominant contribution comes, in accord with what was proven earlier for the 3.5-eV isomer, from the resonance 8 s-7 s transition. Details of an optimum experimental scheme are discussed. It is shown that, after isomer excitation, the atom involved remains with a high probability in an excited state at an energy of about 0.5 eV rather than in the ground state, the required energy of the two photons being equal to the energy of the nuclear level plus the energy of the lowest 7 s state of the atom. The estimated pumping time is about 1.5 s in the case where the field strength of each laser is 1 V/cm.

  8. Excitation of the {sup 229m}Th nuclear isomer via resonance conversion in ionized atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F., E-mail: fkarpeshin@gmail.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2015-09-15

    Pressing problems concerning the optical pumping of the 7.6-eV {sup 229m}Th nuclear isomer, which is a candidate for a new nuclear optical reference point for frequencies, are examined. Physics behind the mechanism of the two-photon optical pumping of the isomer is considered. It is shown that, irrespective of the pumping scheme, a dominant contribution comes, in accord with what was proven earlier for the 3.5-eV isomer, from the resonance 8s–7s transition. Details of an optimum experimental scheme are discussed. It is shown that, after isomer excitation, the atom involved remains with a high probability in an excited state at anmore » energy of about 0.5 eV rather than in the ground state, the required energy of the two photons being equal to the energy of the nuclear level plus the energy of the lowest 7s state of the atom. The estimated pumping time is about 1.5 s in the case where the field strength of each laser is 1 V/cm.« less

  9. Multispectral code excited linear prediction coding and its application in magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Hu, J H; Wang, Y; Cahill, P T

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports a multispectral code excited linear prediction (MCELP) method for the compression of multispectral images. Different linear prediction models and adaptation schemes have been compared. The method that uses a forward adaptive autoregressive (AR) model has been proven to achieve a good compromise between performance, complexity, and robustness. This approach is referred to as the MFCELP method. Given a set of multispectral images, the linear predictive coefficients are updated over nonoverlapping three-dimensional (3-D) macroblocks. Each macroblock is further divided into several 3-D micro-blocks, and the best excitation signal for each microblock is determined through an analysis-by-synthesis procedure. The MFCELP method has been applied to multispectral magnetic resonance (MR) images. To satisfy the high quality requirement for medical images, the error between the original image set and the synthesized one is further specified using a vector quantizer. This method has been applied to images from 26 clinical MR neuro studies (20 slices/study, three spectral bands/slice, 256x256 pixels/band, 12 b/pixel). The MFCELP method provides a significant visual improvement over the discrete cosine transform (DCT) based Joint Photographers Expert Group (JPEG) method, the wavelet transform based embedded zero-tree wavelet (EZW) coding method, and the vector tree (VT) coding method, as well as the multispectral segmented autoregressive moving average (MSARMA) method we developed previously.

  10. Kinetics of plasma formation in sodium vapor excited by nanosecond resonant laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, M. A.; Gamal, Y. E. E.

    2012-07-01

    We have studied theoretically formation of molecular ion Na2 + and the atomic ion Na+ which are created in laser excited sodium vapor at the first resonance transition, 3S1/2-3P1/2. A set of rate equations, which describe the temporal variation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF), the electron density, the population density of the excited states as well as the atomic Na+ and molecular ion Na2 +, are solved numerically. The calculations are carried out at different laser energy and different sodium atomic vapor densities. The numerical calculations of the EEDF show that a deviation from the Maxwellian distribution due to the superelastic collisions effect. In addition to the competition between associative ionization (3P-3P), associative ionization (3P-3D) and Molnar-Hornbeck ionization processes for producing Na2 +, the calculations have also shown that the atomic ions Na+ are formed through the Penning ionization and photoionization processes. These results are found to be consistent with the experimental observations.

  11. New Feature Observed in the Raman Resonance Excitation Profiles of (6 , 5) -Enriched, Selectively Bundled SWCNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hight Walker, A. R.; Simpson, J. R.; Roslyak, O.; Haroz, E.; Telg, H.; Duque, J. G.; Crochet, J. J.; Piryatinski, A.; Doorn, S. K.

    Understanding the photophysics of exciton behavior in single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles remains important for opto-electronic device applications. We report resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) measurements on (6 , 5) -enriched SWCNTs, dispersed in aqueous solutions and separated using density gradient ultracentrifugation into fractions of increasing bundling. Near-IR to UV absorption spectroscopy shows a redshift and broadening of the main excitonic transitions with increasing bundling. A continuously tunable dye laser coupled to a triple-grating spectrometer affords measurement of Raman resonance excitation profiles (REPs) over a range of wavelengths covering the (6 , 5) -E22 range (505 to 585) nm. REPs of both the radial breathing mode (RBM) and G-band reveal a redshifting and broadening of the (6 , 5) E22 transition energy with increasing bundling. Additionally, we observe an unexpected peak in the REP of bundled SWCNTs, which is shifted lower in energy than the main E22 and is anomalously narrow. We compare these observations to a theoretical model that examines the origin of this peak in relation to bundle polarization-enhanced exciton response.

  12. Real-time monitoring of human blood clotting using a lateral excited film bulk acoustic resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da; Wang, Jingjng; Wang, Peng; Guo, Qiuquan; Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Jilong

    2017-04-01

    Frequent assay of hemostatic status is an essential issue for the millions of patients using anticoagulant drugs. In this paper, we presented a micro-fabricated film bulk acoustic sensor for the real-time monitoring of blood clotting and the measurement of hemostatic parameters. The device was made of an Au/ZnO/Si3N4 film stack and excited by a lateral electric field. It operated under a shear mode resonance with the frequency of 1.42 GHz and had a quality factor of 342 in human blood. During the clotting process of blood, the resonant frequency decreased along with the change of blood viscosity and showed an apparent step-ladder curve, revealing the sequential clotting stages. An important hemostatic parameter, prothrombin time, was quantitatively determined from the frequency response for different dilutions of the blood samples. The effect of a typical anticoagulant drug (heparin) on the prothrombin time was exemplarily shown. The proposed sensor displayed a good consistency and clinical comparability with the standard coagulometric methods. Thanks to the availability of direct digital signals, excellent potentials of miniaturization and integration, the proposed sensor has promising application for point-of-care coagulation technologies.

  13. Probing Dynamically Tunable Localized Surface Plasmon Resonances of Film-Coupled Nanoparticles by Evanescent Wave Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Jack J.; Hill, Ryan T.; Tsai, Yu-Ju; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Smith, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectrum associated with a gold nanoparticle (NP) coupled to a gold film exhibits extreme sensitivity to the nano-gap region where the fields are tightly localized. The LSPR of an ensemble of film-coupled NPs can be observed using an illumination scheme similar to that used to excite the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a thin metallic film; however, in the present system, the light is used to probe the highly sensitive distance-dependent LSPR of the gaps between NPs and film rather than the delocalized SPR of the film. We show that the SPR and LSPR spectral contributions can be readily distinguished, and we compare the sensitivities of both modes to displacements in the average gap between a collection of NPs and the gold film. The distance by which the NPs are suspended in solution above the gold film is fixed via a thin molecular spacer layer, and can be further modulated by subjecting the NPs to a quasistatic electric field. The observed LSPR spectral shifts triggered by the applied voltage can be correlated with Angstrom scale displacements of the NPs, suggesting the potential for chip-scale or flow-cell plasmonic nanoruler devices with extreme sensitivity. PMID:22429053

  14. Resonant quantum kicked rotor with two internal levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Guzmán; Romanelli, Alejandro

    2013-04-01

    We study a system consisting of a quantum kicked rotor with an additional degree of freedom. We show analytically and numerically that this model is characterized by its quantum resonances with ballistic spreading and by the entanglement between the internal and momentum degrees of freedom. We conclude that the model shows certain interesting similarities with the standard quantum walk on the line.

  15. Internal resonance and low frequency vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Towfighian, Shahrzad

    2017-09-01

    A nonlinear vibration energy harvester with internal resonance is presented. The proposed harvester consists of two cantilevers, each with a permanent magnet on its tip. One cantilever has a piezoelectric layer at its base. When magnetic force is applied this two degrees-of-freedom nonlinear vibration system shows the internal resonance phenomenon that broadens the frequency bandwidth compared to a linear system. Three coupled partial differential equations are obtained to predict the dynamic behavior of the nonlinear energy harvester. The perturbation method of multiple scales is used to solve equations. Results from experiments done at different vibration levels with varying distances between the magnets validate the mathematical model. Experiments and simulations show the design outperforms the linear system by doubling the frequency bandwidth. Output voltage for frequency response is studied for different system parameters. The optimal load resistance is obtained for the maximum power in the internal resonance case. The results demonstrate that a design combining internal resonance and magnetic nonlinearity improves the efficiency of energy harvesting.

  16. Accurate Cross Sections for Excitation of Resonance Transitions in Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2004-01-01

    Electron collision excitation cross sections for the resonance 2p(sup)4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)S(sup 0), 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3d (sup 3)D(sup 0), 2p4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)D(sup 0), 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)P(sup 0) and 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2s2p(sup 5) (sup 3)P(sup 0) transitions have been calculated by using the R matrix with a pseudostates approach for incident electron energies from near threshold to 100 eV. The excitation of these transition sgives rise to strong atomic oxygen emission features at 1304, 1027, 989, 878, and 792 Angstrom in the spectra of several planetary atmospheres. We included 22 spectroscopic bound and autoionizing states and 30 pseudostates in the close-coupling expansion. The target wave functions are chosen to properly account for the important correlation and relaxation effects. The effect of coupling to the continuum is included through the use of pseudostates. The contribution of the ionization continuum is significant for resonance transitions. Measured absolute direct excitation cross sections of 0 I are reported by experimental groups from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Johns Hopkins University. Good agreement is noted for the 2p(sup)4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)S(sup 0) transition (lambda 1304 Ang) with measured cross sections from both groups that agree well with each other. There is disagreement between experiments for other transitions. Our results support the measured cross sections from the Johns Hopkins University for the 2p(sup 4) (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3d (sup 3)D(sup 0) and 2p4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)D(sup 0) transitions, while for the 2p4 (sup 3)P-2p(sup 3)3s (sup 3)D(sup 0) transition the agreement is switched to the measured cross sections from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  17. Even-parity resonances with synchrotron radiation from Laser Excited Lithium at 1s^22p State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Tie; Wehlitz, Ralf

    2010-03-01

    Correlated many-body dynamics is still one of the unsolved fundamental problems in physics. Such correlation effects can be most clearly studied in processes involving single atoms for their simplicity.Lithium, being the simplest open shell atom, has been under a lot of study. Most of the studies focused on ground state lithium. However, only odd parity resonances can be populated through single photon (synchrotron radiation) absorption from ground state lithium (1s^22s). Lithium atoms, after being laser excited to the 1s^22p state, allow the study of even parity resonances. We have measured some of the even parity resonances of lithium for resonant energies below 64 eV. A single-mode diode laser is used to excite lithium from 1s^22s ground state to 1s^22p (^2P3/2) state. Photoions resulting from the interaction between the excited lithium and synchrotron radiation were analyzed and collected by an ion time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer with a Z- stack channel plate detector. The Li^+ ion yield was recorded while scanning the undulator along with the monochromator. The energy scans have been analyzed regarding resonance energies and parameters of the Fano profiles. Our results for the observed resonances will be presented.

  18. Nano-polarization-converter based on magnetic plasmon resonance excitation in an L-shaped slot antenna.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zhang, Jiasen

    2013-04-08

    We propose a nano-polarization-converter made of a resonant L-shaped slot antenna in a gold film and study its optical properties using the finite-difference time-domain method. Phase retardation between the fast and slow axes of the nano-polarization-converter originates from the simultaneous excitation of both single-surface first-order magnetic plasmon resonance mode and second-order magnetic plasmon resonance mode at the working wavelength. By adjusting the size of the slot antenna, which is still much smaller than the wavelength, the working wavelength can be tuned within a large wavelength range.

  19. Vibrational spectroscopy of the electronically excited state. 4. Nanosecond and picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of carotenoid excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Dallinger, R.F.; Farquharson, S.; Woodruff, W.H.

    Resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra are reported for the S/sub 0/ and T/sub 1/ states of the carotenoids ..beta..-carotene, zeaxanthin, echinenone, canthaxanthin, dihydroxylycopene, astaxanthin, decapreno(C/sub 50/)-..beta..-carotene, ..beta..-apo-8'-carotenal, and ethyl ..beta..-apo-8'-carotenoate. The results reveal qualitatively similar ground-state spectra and similar frequency shifts in all observed resonance Raman modes between S/sub 0/ and T/sub 1/, regardless of carotenoid structure. Examinations of the relationship of the putative C--C and C==C frequencies in S/sub 0/ and T/sub 1/ reveals anomalous shifts to lower frequency in the ''single-bond'' mode upon electronic excitation. These shifts may be due to molecular distortions in the excited statemore » which force changes in molecular motions comprising the observed modes. However, another possibility requiring no distortion is that the interaction (off-diagonal) force constants connecting the C--C and C==C modes change sign upon electronic excitation. This latter phenomenon may provide a unitary explanation for the ''anomalous'' frequency shifts in the C--C and C==C modes, both in the T/sub 1/ states of carotenoids and in the S/sub 1/ states of simpler polyenes, without postulating large, unpredicted structural changes upon excitation or general errors in existing vibrational or theoretical analyses. Resonance Raman and absorbance studies with 35-ps time resolution suggest that S/sub 1/ lifetime (of the /sup 1/B/sub u/ and/or the /sup 1/A/sub g/* states) of ..beta..-carotene in benzene is less than 1 ps.« less

  20. Implementation of Dipolar Resonant Excitation for Collision Induced Dissociation with Ion Mobility/Time-of-Flight MS

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Ian K.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Danielson, William F.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    An ion mobility/time-of-flight mass spectrometer (IMS/TOF MS) platform that allows for resonant excitation collision induced dissociation (CID) is presented. Highly efficient, mass-resolved fragmentation without additional excitation of product ions was accomplished and over-fragmentation common in beam-type CID experiments was alleviated. A quadrupole ion guide was modified to apply a dipolar AC signal across a pair of rods for resonant excitation. The method was characterized with singly protonated methionine enkephalin and triply protonated peptide angiotensin I, yielding maximum CID efficiencies of 44% and 84%, respectively. The Mathieu qx,y parameter was set at 0.707 for these experiments to maximize pseudopotential well depths and CID efficiencies. Resonant excitation CID was compared to beam-type CID for the peptide mixture. The ability to apply resonant waveforms in mobility-resolved windows is demonstrated with a peptide mixture yielding fragmentation over a range of mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios within a single IMS-MS analysis. PMID:24470195

  1. Internal wave mode resonant triads in an arbitrarly stratified finite-depth ocean with background rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Dheeraj; Mathur, Manikandan

    2017-11-01

    Internal tides generated by barotropic tides on bottom topography or the spatially compact near-inertial mixed layer currents excited by surface winds can be conveniently represented in the linear regime as a superposition of vertical modes at a given frequency in an arbitrarily stratified ocean of finite depth. Considering modes (m , n) at a frequency ω in the primary wave field, we derive the weakly nonlinear solution, which contains a secondary wave at 2 ω that diverges when it forms a resonant triad with the primary waves. In nonuniform stratifications, resonant triads are shown to occur when the horizontal component of the classical RTI criterion k->1 +k->2 +k->3 = 0 is satisfied along with a non-orthogonality criterion. In nonuniform stratifications with a pycnocline, infinitely more pairs of primary wave modes (m , n) result in RTI when compared to a uniform stratification. Further, two nearby high modes at around the near-inertial frequency often form a resonant triad with a low mode at 2 ω , reminiscent of the features of PSI near the critical latitude. The theoretical framework is then adapted to investigate RTI in two different scenarios: low-mode internal tide scattering over topography, and internal wave beams incident on a pycnocline. The authors thank the Ministry of Earth Sciences, Government of India for financial support under the Monsoon Mission Grant MM/2014/IND-002.

  2. RESONANT POST-NEWTONIAN ECCENTRICITY EXCITATION IN HIERARCHICAL THREE-BODY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Naoz, Smadar; Kocsis, Bence; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-08-20

    We study the secular, hierarchical three-body problem to first-order in a post-Newtonian expansion of general relativity (GR). We expand the first-order post-Newtonian Hamiltonian to leading-order in the ratio of the semi-major axis of the two orbits. In addition to the well-known terms that correspond to the GR precession of the inner and outer orbits, we find a new secular post-Newtonian interaction term that can affect the long-term evolution of the triple. We explore the parameter space for highly inclined and eccentric systems, where the Kozai-Lidov mechanism can produce large-amplitude oscillations in the eccentricities. The standard lore, i.e., that GR effectsmore » suppress eccentricity, is only consistent with the parts of phase space where the GR timescales are several orders of magnitude shorter than the secular Newtonian one. In other parts of phase space, however, post-Newtonian corrections combined with the three-body ones can excite eccentricities. In particular, for systems where the GR timescale is comparable to the secular Newtonian timescales, the three-body interactions give rise to a resonant-like eccentricity excitation. Furthermore, for triples with a comparable-mass inner binary, where the eccentric Kozai-Lidov mechanism is suppressed, post-Newtonian corrections can further increase the eccentricity and lead to orbital flips even when the timescale of the former is much longer than the timescale of the secular Kozai-Lidov quadrupole perturbations.« less

  3. Micro ring cavity resonator incorporating total internal reflection mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doo Gun; Choi, Woon Kyung; Choi, Young Wan; Yi, Jong Chang; Chung, Youngchul; Dagli, Nadir

    2007-02-01

    We investigate the properties of a multimode-interference (MMI) coupled micro ring cavity resonator with total-internal-reflection (TIR) mirrors and a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). The TIR mirrors were fabricated by the self-aligned process with a loss of 0.7 dB per mirror. The length and width of an MMI are 142 μm and 10 μm, respectively. The resulting free spectral range (FSR) of the resonator was approximately 1.698 nm near 1571 nm and the extinction ratio was about 17 dB. These devices might be useful as optical switching and add-drop filters in a photonic integrated circuit or as small and fast resonator devices.

  4. Internal Resonance in a Vibrating Beam: A Zoo of Nonlinear Resonance Peaks

    PubMed Central

    Mangussi, Franco

    2016-01-01

    In oscillating mechanical systems, nonlinearity is responsible for the departure from proportionality between the forces that sustain their motion and the resulting vibration amplitude. Such effect may have both beneficial and harmful effects in a broad class of technological applications, ranging from microelectromechanical devices to edifice structures. The dependence of the oscillation frequency on the amplitude, in particular, jeopardizes the use of nonlinear oscillators in the design of time-keeping electronic components. Nonlinearity, however, can itself counteract this adverse response by triggering a resonant interaction between different oscillation modes, which transfers the excess of energy in the main oscillation to higher harmonics, and thus stabilizes its frequency. In this paper, we examine a model for internal resonance in a vibrating elastic beam clamped at its two ends. In this case, nonlinearity occurs in the form of a restoring force proportional to the cube of the oscillation amplitude, which induces resonance between modes whose frequencies are in a ratio close to 1:3. The model is based on a representation of the resonant modes as two Duffing oscillators, coupled through cubic interactions. Our focus is put on illustrating the diversity of behavior that internal resonance brings about in the dynamical response of the system, depending on the detailed form of the coupling forces. The mathematical treatment of the model is developed at several approximation levels. A qualitative comparison of our results with previous experiments and numerical calculations on elastic beams is outlined. PMID:27648829

  5. Fluctuation Reduction in a Si Micromechanical Resonator Tuned to Nonlinear Internal Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, B. Scott; Czaplewski, David; Chen, Changyao; Dykman, Mark; Lopez, Daniel; Shaw, Steven

    2015-03-01

    We describe experimental and theoretical results on an unusual behavior of fluctuations when the system exhibits internal resonance. We study the fundamental flexural mode (FFM) of a Si microbeam. The FFM is electrically actuated and detected. It is resonantly nonlinearly coupled to another mode, which is not directly accessible and has a frequency nearly three times the FFM frequency. Both the FFM and the passive mode have long lifetimes. We find that the passive mode can be a ``sink'' for fluctuations of the FFM. This explains the recently observed dramatic decrease of these fluctuations at nonlinear resonance. The re-distribution of the vibration amplitudes and the fluctuations is reminiscent of what happens at level anti-crossing in quantum mechanics. However, here it is different because of interplay of the dependence of the vibration frequency of the FFM on its amplitude due to internal nonlinearity and the nonlinear resonance with the passive mode. We study both the response of the system to external resonant driving and also the behavior of the system in the presence of a feedback loop. The experimental and theoretical results are in good agreement.

  6. Analysis of nuclear resonance fluorescence excitation measured with LaBr3(Ce) detectors near 2 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omer, Mohamed; Negm, Hani; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Daito, Izuru; Hayakawa, Takehito; Bakr, Mahmoud; Zen, Heishun; Hori, Toshitada; Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Hajima, Ryoichi; Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuzawa, Nobuhiro

    2013-11-01

    The performance of LaBr3(Ce) to measure nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) excitations is discussed in terms of limits of detection and in comparison with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors near the 2 MeV region where many NRF excitation levels from special nuclear materials are located. The NRF experiment was performed at the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS) facility. The incident γ-rays, of 2.12 MeV energy, hit a B4C target to excite the 11B nuclei to the first excitation level. The statistical-sensitive non-linear peak clipping (SNIP) algorithm was implemented to eliminate the background and enhance the limits of detection for the spectra measured with LaBr3(Ce). Both detection and determination limits were deduced from the experimental data.

  7. Peptide backbone orientation and dynamics in spider dragline silk and two-photon excitation in nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eles, Philip Thomas

    2005-07-01

    In the first part of the dissertation, spider dragline silk is studied by solid state NMR techniques. The dependence of NMR frequency on molecular orientation is exploited using the DECODER experiment to determine the orientation of the protein backbone within the silk fibre. Practical experimental considerations require that the silk fibres be wound about a cylindrical axis perpendicular to the external magnetic field, complicating the reconstruction of the underlying orientation distribution and necess-itating the development of numerical techniques for this purpose. A two-component model of silk incorporating static b-sheets and polyglycine II helices adequately fits the NMR data and suggests that the b-sheets are well aligned along the silk axis (20 FWHM) while the helices are poorly aligned (68 FWHM). The effects of fibre strain, draw rate and hydration on orientation are measured. Measurements of the time-scale for peptide backbone motion indicate that when wet, a strain-dependent frac-tion of the poorly aligned component becomes mobile. This suggests a mechanism for the supercontraction of silk involving latent entropic springs that undergo a local strain-dependent phase transition, driving supercontraction. In the second part of this dissertation a novel method is developed for exciting NMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) by rf irradiation at multiple frequencies that sum to (or differ by) the resonance frequency. This is fundamentally different than traditional NMR experiments where irradiation is applied on-resonance. With excitation outside the detection bandwidth, two-photon excitation allows for detection of free induction signals during excitation, completely eliminating receiver dead-time. A theoretical approach to describing two-photon excitation is developed based on average Hamiltonian theory. An intuition for two-photon excitation is gained by analogy to the coherent absorption of multiple photons requiring conservation of total energy and

  8. Vibration-response due to thickness loss on steel plate excited by resonance frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudus, S. A.; Suzuki, Y.; Matsumura, M.; Sugiura, K.

    2018-04-01

    The degradation of steel structure due to corrosion is a common problem found especially in the marine structure due to exposure to the harsh marine environment. In order to ensure safety and reliability of marine structure, the damage assessment is an indispensable prerequisite for plan of remedial action on damaged structure. The main goal of this paper is to discuss simple vibration measurement on plated structure to give image on overview condition of the monitored structure. The changes of vibration response when damage was introduced in the plate structure were investigated. The damage on plate was simulated in finite element method as loss of thickness section. The size of damage and depth of loss of thickness were varied for different damage cases. The plate was excited with lower order of resonance frequency in accordance estimate the average remaining thickness based on displacement response obtain in the dynamic analysis. Significant reduction of natural frequency and increasing amplitude of vibration can be observed in the presence of severe damage. The vibration analysis summarized in this study can serve as benchmark and reference for researcher and design engineer.

  9. Measurement of resonance parameters of orbitally excited narrow B0 mesons.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-03-13

    We report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L=1) narrow B0 mesons in decays to B;{(*)+}pi;{-} using 1.7 fb;{-1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B_{2};{*0} state are measured to be m(B_{2};{*0})=5740.2_{-1.8};{+1.7}(stat)-0.8+0.9(syst) MeV/c;{2} and Gamma(B_{2};{*0})=22.7_{-3.2};{+3.8}(stat)-10.2+3.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}. The mass difference between the B_{2};{*0} and B10 states is measured to be 14.9_{-2.5};{+2.2}(stat)-1.4+1.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}, resulting in a B10 mass of 5725.3_{-2.2};{+1.6}(stat)-1.5+1.4(syst) MeV/c;{2}. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B_{2};{*0} width.

  10. Convoy electron emission from resonant coherently excited 390 MeV/u hydrogen-like Ar ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, T.; Takabayashi, Y.; Ito, T.; Komaki, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Takada, E.; Murakami, T.

    2003-12-01

    Energetic ions traveling through a single crystal are excited by an oscillating crystal field produced by a periodic arrangement of the atomic strings/planes, which is called Resonant Coherent Excitation (RCE). We have observed enhancement of convoy electron yields associated with RCE of 1s electron to the n=2 excited states of 390 MeV/u hydrogen-like Ar 17+ ions passing through a Si crystal in the (2 2¯ 0) planar channeling condition. Lost electrons from projectile ions due to ionization contribute to convoy electrons emitted in the forward direction with the same velocity as the projectile ions. With combination of a magnet and a thick Si solid-state detector, we measured the energy spectra of convoy electrons of about 200 keV emitted at 0°. The convoy electron yield as a function of the transition energy, i.e. the resonance profile, has a similar structure to the resonance profile observed through the ionized fraction of the emerging ions. It is explained by the fact that both enhancements are due to increase in the fraction of the excited states from which electrons are more easily ionized by target electron impact in the crystal than from the ground state.

  11. Probing local bias-induced transitions using photothermal excitation contact resonance atomic force microscopy and voltage spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Qian; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; ...

    2015-01-05

    In this paper, nanomechanical properties are closely related to the states of matter, including chemical composition, crystal structure, mesoscopic domain configuration, etc. Investigation of these properties at the nanoscale requires not only static imaging methods, e.g., contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM), but also spectroscopic methods capable of revealing their dependence on various external stimuli. Here we demonstrate the voltage spectroscopy of CR-AFM, which was realized by combining photothermal excitation (as opposed to the conventional piezoacoustic excitation method) with the band excitation technique. We applied this spectroscopy to explore local bias-induced phenomena ranging from purely physical to surface electromechanical andmore » electrochemical processes. Our measurements show that the changes in the surface properties associated with these bias-induced transitions can be accurately assessed in a fast and dynamic manner, using resonance frequency as a signature. Finally, with many of the advantages offered by photothermal excitation, contact resonance voltage spectroscopy not only is expected to find applications in a broader field of nanoscience but also will provide a basis for future development of other nanoscale elastic spectroscopies.« less

  12. Electron Dynamics in the Core-Excited CS2 Molecule Revealed through Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, T.; Carniato, S.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Kawerk, E.; Žitnik, M.; Kavčič, M.; Bučar, K.; Bohinc, R.; Petric, M.; Vaz da Cruz, V.; Gel'mukhanov, F.; Simon, M.

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) in the carbon disulphide CS2 molecule near the sulfur K-absorption edge. We observe a strong evolution of the RIXS spectral profile with the excitation energy tuned below the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) absorption resonance. The reason for this is twofold. Reducing the photon energy in the vicinity of the LUMO absorption resonance leads to a relative suppression of the LUMO contribution with respect to the emission signal from the higher unoccupied molecular orbitals, which results in the modulation of the total RIXS profile. At even larger negative photon-energy detuning from the resonance, the excitation-energy dependence of the RIXS profile is dominated by the onset of electron dynamics triggered by a coherent excitation of multiple electronic states. Furthermore, our study demonstrates that in the hard x-ray regime, localization of the S 1s core hole occurs in CS2 during the RIXS process because of the orientational dephasing of interference between the waves scattering on the two sulfur atoms. Core-hole localization leads to violation of the symmetry selection rules for the electron transitions observed in the spectra.

  13. Ultrafast internal conversion dynamics of highly excited pyrrole studied with VUV/UV pump probe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Horton, Spencer L; Liu, Yusong; Chakraborty, Pratip; Matsika, Spiridoula; Weinacht, Thomas

    2017-02-14

    We study the relaxation dynamics of pyrrole after excitation with an 8 eV pump pulse to a state just 0.2 eV below the ionization potential using vacuum ultraviolet/ultraviolet pump probe spectroscopy. Our measurements in conjunction with electronic structure calculations indicate that pyrrole undergoes rapid internal conversion to the ground state in less than 300 fs. We find that internal conversion to the ground state dominates over dissociation.

  14. Photochemical fractionation of O-16 in the space medium modeled by resonance excitation of CO by H-Lyman alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrhenius, G.; Corrigan, M. J.; Fitzgerald, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Analyses of meteorite matter, the present structure of the solar system, and the evolution of matter in stellar systems are used to provide inferences concerning the formation of primordial matter in the solar system. Results indicate that molecular excitation processes similar to those observed today in circumstellar regions and dark interstellar clouds were operating in the early solar nebula. It is suggested that resonance excitation of broad isotopic bands by strong UV line sources may have resulted in the anomalous isotopic compositions noted in meteorites.

  15. Asymmetric resonance Raman excitation profiles and violation of the Condon approximation in single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doorn, Stephen; Duque, Juan; Telg, Hagen; Chen, Hang; Swan, Anna; Haroz, Erik; Kono, Junichiro; Tu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Ming

    2012-02-01

    DNA wrapping-based ion exchange chromatography and density gradient ultracentrifugation provide nanotube samples highly enriched in single chiralities. We present resonance Raman excitation profiles for the G-band of several single chirality semiconducting and metallic species. The expected incoming and outgoing resonance peaks are observed in the profiles, but contrary to long-held assumptions, the outgoing resonance is always significantly weaker than the ingoing resonance peak. This strong asymmetry in the profiles arises from a violation of the Condon approximation [1]. Results will be discussed in the context of theoretical models that suggest significant coordinate dependence in the transition dipole (non-Condon effects). The generality of the behavior across semiconducting and metallic types, nanotube family, phonon mode, and Eii will be demonstrated. [4pt] [1] J. Duque et. al., ACS Nano, 5, 5233 (2011).

  16. Cooling a Mechanical Resonator with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centres Using a Room Temperature Excited State Spin-Strain Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    MacQuarrie, E. R.; Otten, M.; Gray, S. K.

    Cooling a mechanical resonator mode to a sub-thermal state has been a long-standing challenge in physics. This pursuit has recently found traction in the field of optomechanics in which a mechanical mode is coupled to an optical cavity. An alternate method is to couple the resonator to a well-controlled two-level system. Here we propose a protocol to dissipatively cool a room temperature mechanical resonator using a nitrogen-vacancy centre ensemble. The spin ensemble is coupled to the resonator through its orbitally-averaged excited state, which has a spin-strain interaction that has not been previously studied. We experimentally demonstrate that the spin-strain couplingmore » in the excited state is 13.5 ± 0.5 times stronger than the ground state spin-strain coupling. Lastly, we then theoretically show that this interaction, combined with a high-density spin ensemble, enables the cooling of a mechanical resonator from room temperature to a fraction of its thermal phonon occupancy.« less

  17. Cooling a Mechanical Resonator with Nitrogen-Vacancy Centres Using a Room Temperature Excited State Spin-Strain Interaction

    DOE PAGES

    MacQuarrie, E. R.; Otten, M.; Gray, S. K.; ...

    2017-02-06

    Cooling a mechanical resonator mode to a sub-thermal state has been a long-standing challenge in physics. This pursuit has recently found traction in the field of optomechanics in which a mechanical mode is coupled to an optical cavity. An alternate method is to couple the resonator to a well-controlled two-level system. Here we propose a protocol to dissipatively cool a room temperature mechanical resonator using a nitrogen-vacancy centre ensemble. The spin ensemble is coupled to the resonator through its orbitally-averaged excited state, which has a spin-strain interaction that has not been previously studied. We experimentally demonstrate that the spin-strain couplingmore » in the excited state is 13.5 ± 0.5 times stronger than the ground state spin-strain coupling. Lastly, we then theoretically show that this interaction, combined with a high-density spin ensemble, enables the cooling of a mechanical resonator from room temperature to a fraction of its thermal phonon occupancy.« less

  18. Development of Selective Excitation Methods in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Investigation of Hemoglobin Oxygenation in Erythrocytes Using Proton and Phosphorus -31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetler, Bayard Keith

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) offers a potential method for making measurements of the percent oxygenation of hemoglobin (Hb) in living tissue non-invasively. As a demonstration of the feasibility of such measurements, we measured the percent oxygenation of Hb in red blood cells (erythrocytes) using resonances in the proton-NMR (^1H-NMR) spectrum which are characteristic of oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (deoxy-Hb), and are due to the unique magnetic properties of these molecules. To perform these measurements, we developed a new NMR method of selectively exciting signals in a region of interest with uniform phase and amplitude, while suppressing the signal of the water resonance. With this method, we are able to make exact calculations distinguishing between uniform phase excitation produced at large flip-angles using the non-linear properties of the Bloch equations, and uniform phase excitation produced at small flip-angles using asymmetric pulse excitation functions. We measured the percent oxygenation of three characteristic ^1H-NMR resonances of Hb: two from deoxy-Hb, originating from the N_delta H protons of histidine residue F8, which occur at different frequencies for the alpha and beta chains of Hb; and one from oxy-Hb, originating from the gamma_2 -CH_3 protons of valine residue E11. We performed experiments both on fresh erythrocytes and on erythrocytes depleted of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), and found that oxygen is more tightly bound to Hb in the former case. In both fresh and 2,3-DPG-depleted samples, we found that: (i) from the deoxy-Hb marker resonances, there is a small but significant difference in the oxygen saturation between the alpha and beta chains; (ii) the decrease in the areas of the deoxy-Hb marker resonances correlates well with the increase in the percent oxygenation of Hb as measured optically; (iii) the area of the oxy-Hb marker resonance may be up to ~15% less than the optically measured Hb saturation. We are

  19. Infrared Auroral Emissions Driven by Resonant Electron Impact Excitation of NO Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, L.; Brunger, M. J.; Petrovic, Z. Lj.; Jelisavcic, M.; Panajotovic, R.; Buckman, S. J.

    2004-05-01

    Although only a minor constituent of the earth's upper atmosphere, nitric oxide (NO) plays a major role in infrared auroral emissions due to radiation from vibrationally excited (NO*) states. The main process leading to the production of these excited molecules was thought to be chemiluminescence, whereby excited nitrogen atoms interact with oxygen molecules to form vibrationally excited nitric oxide (NO*) and atomic oxygen. Here we show evidence that a different production mechanism for NO*, due to low energy electron impact excitation of NO molecules, is responsible for more than 30% of the NO auroral emission near 5 μm.

  20. Spin-Orbital Excitations in Ca2 RuO4 Revealed by Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, L.; Forte, F.; Fittipaldi, R.; Fatuzzo, C. G.; Granata, V.; Ivashko, O.; Horio, M.; Schindler, F.; Dantz, M.; Tseng, Yi; McNally, D. E.; Rønnow, H. M.; Wan, W.; Christensen, N. B.; Pelliciari, J.; Olalde-Velasco, P.; Kikugawa, N.; Neupert, T.; Vecchione, A.; Schmitt, T.; Cuoco, M.; Chang, J.

    2018-01-01

    The strongly correlated insulator Ca2 RuO4 is considered as a paradigmatic realization of both spin-orbital physics and a band-Mott insulating phase, characterized by orbitally selective coexistence of a band and a Mott gap. We present a high resolution oxygen K -edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering study of the antiferromagnetic Mott insulating state of Ca2 RuO4 . A set of low-energy (about 80 and 400 meV) and high-energy (about 1.3 and 2.2 eV) excitations are reported, which show strong incident light polarization dependence. Our results strongly support a spin-orbit coupled band-Mott scenario and explore in detail the nature of its exotic excitations. Guided by theoretical modeling, we interpret the low-energy excitations as a result of composite spin-orbital excitations. Their nature unveils the intricate interplay of crystal-field splitting and spin-orbit coupling in the band-Mott scenario. The high-energy excitations correspond to intra-atomic singlet-triplet transitions at an energy scale set by Hund's coupling. Our findings give a unifying picture of the spin and orbital excitations in the band-Mott insulator Ca2 RuO4 .

  1. Conditions of excitation and sensitivity of diffractively-coupled surface lattice resonances over plasmonic nanoparticle arrays in ATR geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, Artem; Tselikov, Gleb; Wu, Fan; Kravets, Vasyl G.; Ozerov, Igor; Bedu, Frederic; Grigorenko, Alexander N.; Kabashin, Andrei V.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate conditions of excitation and properties of Plasmonic Surface Lattice Resonances (PSLR) over glass substrate-supported Au nanoparticle dimers ( 100-200 nm) arranged in a periodic metamaterial lattice, in Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) optical excitation geometry, and assess their sensitivities to variations of refractive index (RI) of the adjacent sample dielectric medium. We show that spectral sensitivity of PSLR to RI variations is determined by the lattice periodicity ( 320 nm per RIU change in our case), while ultranarrow resonance lineshapes (down to a few nm full-widthat-half-maximum) provide very high figure-of-merit values evidencing the possibility of ultrasensitive biosensing measurements. Combining advantages of nanoscale architectures, including a strong concentration of electric field, the possibility of manipulation at the nanoscale etc, and high phase and spectral sensitivities, PSLRs promise a drastic advancement of current state-of-the-art plasmonic biosensing technology.

  2. Resonant excitation of coupled Rayleigh waves in a short and narrow fluid channel clad between two identical metal plates

    DOE PAGES

    García-Chocano, Victor M.; López-Rios, Tomás; Krokhin, Arkadii; ...

    2011-12-23

    Transmission of ultrasonic waves through a slit between two water immersed brass plates is studied for sub-wavelength plate thicknesses and slit apertures. Extraordinary high absorption is observed at discrete frequencies corresponding to resonant excitation of Rayleigh waves on the both sides of the channel. The coupling of the Rayleigh waves occurs through the fluid and the corresponding contribution to the dispersion has been theoretically derived and also experimentally confirmed. Symmetric and anti-symmetric modes are predicted but only the symmetric mode resonances have been observed. It follows from the dispersion equation that the coupled Rayleigh waves cannot be excited in amore » channel with apertures less than the critical one. The calculated critical aperture is in a good agreement with the measured acoustic spectra. These findings could be applied to design a broadband absorptive metamaterial.« less

  3. Polarization-Dependent Interference of Coherent Scattering from Orthogonal Dipole Moments of a Resonantly Excited Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Chen, Disheng; Lander, Gary R; Solomon, Glenn S; Flagg, Edward B

    2017-01-20

    Resonant photoluminescence excitation (RPLE) spectra of a neutral InGaAs quantum dot show unconventional line shapes that depend on the detection polarization. We characterize this phenomenon by performing polarization-dependent RPLE measurements and simulating the measured spectra with a three-level quantum model. The spectra are explained by interference between fields coherently scattered from the two fine structure split exciton states, and the measurements enable extraction of the steady-state coherence between the two exciton states.

  4. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr₂IrO₄ using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Dean, M P M; Liu, J; Chiuzbăian, S G; Jaouen, N; Nicolaou, A; Yin, W G; Rayan Serrao, C; Ramesh, R; Ding, H; Hill, J P

    2015-05-27

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr2IrO4, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edge RIXS energy resolution in the hard x-ray region is usually poor.

  5. Analysis of asymmetric resonance response of thermally excited silicon micro-cantilevers for mass-sensitive nanoparticle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertke, Maik; Hamdana, Gerry; Wu, Wenze; Suryo Wasisto, Hutomo; Uhde, Erik; Peiner, Erwin

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the asymmetric resonance frequency (f 0) responses of thermally in-plane excited silicon cantilevers for a pocket-sized, cantilever-based airborne nanoparticle detector (Cantor) are analysed. By measuring the shift of f 0 caused by the deposition of nanoparticles (NPs), the cantilevers are used as a microbalance. The cantilever sensors are low cost manufactured from silicon by bulk-micromachining techniques and contain an integrated p-type heating actuator and a sensing piezoresistive Wheatstone bridge. f 0 is tracked by a homemade phase-locked loop (PPL) for real-time measurements. To optimize the sensor performance, a new cantilever geometry was designed, fabricated and characterized by its frequency responses. The most significant characterisation parameters of our application are f 0 and the quality factor (Q), which have high influences on sensitivity and efficiency of the NP detector. Regarding the asymmetric resonance signal, a novel fitting function based on the Fano resonance replacing the conventionally used function of the simple harmonic oscillator and a method to calculate Q by its fitting parameters were developed for a quantitative evaluation. To obtain a better understanding of the resonance behaviours, we analysed the origin of the asymmetric line shapes. Therefore, we compared the frequency response of the on-chip thermal excitation with an external excitation using an in-plane piezo actuator. In correspondence to the Fano effect, we could reconstruct the measured resonance curves by coupling two signals with constant amplitude and the expected signal of the cantilever, respectively. Moreover, the phase of the measurement signal can be analysed by this method, which is important to understand the locking process of the PLL circuit. Besides the frequency analysis, experimental results and calibration measurements with different particle types are presented. Using the described analysis method, decent results to optimize a next

  6. Reflection of a TE-polarised Gaussian beam from a layered structure under conditions of resonance excitation of waveguide modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, V I; Marusin, N V; Molchanova, S I

    2014-11-30

    The problem of reflection of a TE-polarised Gaussian light beam from a layered structure under conditions of resonance excitation of waveguide modes using a total internal reflection prism is considered. Using the spectral approach we have derived the analytic expressions for the mode propagation lengths, widths and depths of m-lines (sharp and narrow dips in the angular dependence of the specular reflection coefficient), depending on the structure parameters. It is shown that in the case of weak coupling, when the propagation lengths l{sub m} of the waveguide modes are mainly determined by the extinction coefficient in the film, the depthmore » of m-lines grows with the mode number m. In the case of strong coupling, when l{sub m} is determined mainly by the radiation of modes into the prism, the depth of m-lines decreases with increasing m. The change in the TE-polarised Gaussian beam shape after its reflection from the layered structure is studied, which is determined by the energy transfer from the incident beam into waveguide modes that propagate along the structure by the distance l{sub m}, are radiated in the direction of specular reflection and interfere with a part of the beam reflected from the working face of the prism. It is shown that this interference can lead to the field intensity oscillations near m-lines. The analysis of different methods for determining the parameters of thin-film structures is presented, including the measurement of mode angles θ{sub m} and the reflected beam shape. The methods are based on simultaneous excitation of a few waveguide modes in the film with a strongly focused monochromatic Gaussian beam, the waist width of which is much smaller than the propagation length of the modes. As an example of using these methods, the refractive index and the thickness of silicon monoxide film on silica substrate at the wavelength 633 nm are determined. (fibre and integrated-optical structures)« less

  7. Electrode-shaping for the excitation and detection of permitted arbitrary modes in arbitrary geometries in piezoelectric resonators.

    PubMed

    Pulskamp, Jeffrey S; Bedair, Sarah S; Polcawich, Ronald G; Smith, Gabriel L; Martin, Joel; Power, Brian; Bhave, Sunil A

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports theoretical analysis and experimental results on a numerical electrode shaping design technique that permits the excitation of arbitrary modes in arbitrary geometries for piezoelectric resonators, for those modes permitted to exist by the nonzero piezoelectric coefficients and electrode configuration. The technique directly determines optimal electrode shapes by assessing the local suitability of excitation and detection electrode placement on two-port resonators without the need for iterative numerical techniques. The technique is demonstrated in 61 different electrode designs in lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film on silicon RF micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) plate, beam, ring, and disc resonators for out-of-plane flexural and various contour modes up to 200 MHz. The average squared effective electromechanical coupling factor for the designs was 0.54%, approximately equivalent to the theoretical maximum value of 0.53% for a fully electroded length-extensional mode beam resonator comprised of the same composite. The average improvement in S(21) for the electrode-shaped designs was 14.6 dB with a maximum improvement of 44.3 dB. Through this piezoelectric electrodeshaping technique, 95% of the designs showed a reduction in insertion loss.

  8. Communication: X-ray excited optical luminescence from TbCl3 at the giant resonance of terbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heigl, F.; Jürgensen, A.; Zhou, X.-T.; Hu, Y.-F.; Zuin, L.; Sham, T. K.

    2013-02-01

    We have studied the optical recombination channels of TbCl3 using x-ray excited optical luminescence at the N4,5 absorption edge of Tb (giant resonance) in both the energy and time domain. The luminescence exhibits a relatively fast 5D3, and a slow 5D4 decay channel in the blue and green, respectively. The rather short lifetime of the 5D3 state indicates that the decay is mainly driven by Tb-Tb ion interaction via non-radiative energy transfer (cross-relaxation). At the giant resonance the X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) recorded using partial photoluminescence yield is inverted. In the pre-edge region the contrast of the spectral feature is significantly better in optical XANES than in total electron yield. Changes in the intensity of 5D3-7F5 (544 nm) and 5D4-7F6 (382 nm) optical transitions as the excitation energy is tuned across the giant resonance are also noted. The results provide detailed insight into the dynamics of the optical recombination channels and an alternative method to obtain high sensitivity, high energy resolution XANES at the giant resonance of light emitting rare-earth materials.

  9. Mass selectivity of dipolar resonant excitation in a linear quadrupole ion trap.

    PubMed

    Douglas, D J; Konenkov, N V

    2014-03-15

    For mass analysis, linear quadrupole ion traps operate with dipolar excitation of ions for either axial or radial ejection. There have been comparatively few computer simulations of this process. We introduce a new concept, the excitation contour, S(q), the fraction of the excited ions that reach the trap electrodes when trapped at q values near that corresponding to the excitation frequency. Ion trajectory calculations are used to calculate S(q). Ions are given Gaussian distributions of initial positions in x and y, and thermal initial velocity distributions. To model gas damping, a drag force is added to the equations of motion. The effects of the initial conditions, ejection Mathieu parameter q, scan speed, excitation voltage and collisional damping, are modeled. We find that, with no buffer gas, the mass resolution is mostly determined by the excitation time and is given by R~dβ/dq qn, where β(q) determines the oscillation frequency, and n is the number of cycles of the trapping radio frequency during the excitation or ejection time. The highest resolution at a given scan speed is reached with the lowest excitation amplitude that gives ejection. The addition of a buffer gas can increase the mass resolution. The simulation results are in broad agreement with experiments. The excitation contour, S(q), introduced here, is a useful tool for studying the ejection process. The excitation strength, excitation time and buffer gas pressure interact in a complex way but, when set properly, a mass resolution R0.5 of at least 10,000 can be obtained at a mass-to-charge ratio of 609. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Synchronized excitability in a network enables generation of internal neuronal sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingxue; Roth, Zachary; Pastalkova, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal place field sequences are supported by sensory cues and network internal mechanisms. In contrast, sharp-wave (SPW) sequences, theta sequences, and episode field sequences are internally generated. The relationship of these sequences to memory is unclear. SPW sequences have been shown to support learning and have been assumed to also support episodic memory. Conversely, we demonstrate these SPW sequences were present in trained rats even after episodic memory was impaired and after other internal sequences – episode field and theta sequences – were eliminated. SPW sequences did not support memory despite continuing to ‘replay’ all task-related sequences – place- field and episode field sequences. Sequence replay occurred selectively during synchronous increases of population excitability -- SPWs. Similarly, theta sequences depended on the presence of repeated synchronized waves of excitability – theta oscillations. Thus, we suggest that either intermittent or rhythmic synchronized changes of excitability trigger sequential firing of neurons, which in turn supports learning and/or memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20697.001 PMID:27677848

  11. Relativistic Coulomb excitation of the giant dipole resonance in nuclei: How to calculate transition probabilities without invoking the Lienard-Wiechert relativistic scalar and vector potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Dasso, C.H.; Gallardo, M.

    2006-01-15

    The conclusions extracted from a recent study of the excitation of giant dipole resonances in nuclei at relativistic bombarding energies open the way for a further simplification of the problem. It consists in the elimination of the relativistic scalar and vector electromagnetic potentials and the familiar numerical difficulties associated with their presence in the calculation scheme. The inherent advantage of a reformulation of the problem of relativistic Coulomb excitation of giant dipole resonances along these lines is discussed.

  12. Strong excitation of surface and bulk spin waves in yttrium iron garnet placed in a split ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, Z. J.; Soh, W. T.; Ong, C. K.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in a bilayer consisting of a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and platinum (Pt) loaded on a metamaterial split ring resonator (SRR). The system is excited by a microstrip feed line which generates both surface and bulk spin waves in the YIG. The spin waves subsequently undergo spin pumping from the YIG film to an adjacent Pt layer, and is converted into a charge current via the ISHE. It is found that the presence of the SRR causes a significant enhancement of the mangetic field near the resonance frequency of the SRR, resulting in a significant increase in the ISHE signal. Furthermore, the type of spin wave generated in the system can be controlled by changing the external applied magnetic field angle (θH ). When the external applied magnetic field is near parallel to the microstrip line (θH = 0 ), magnetostatic surface spin waves are predominantly excited. On the other hand, when the external applied magnetic field is perpendicular to the microstrip line (θH = π/2 ), backward volume magnetostatic spin waves are predominantly excited. Hence, it can be seen that the SRR structure is a promising method of achieving spin-charge conversion, which has many advantages over a coaxial probe.

  13. Resonant tunneling effects on cavity-embedded metal film caused by surface-plasmon excitation.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yung-Chiang; Chang, Che-Jung; Lee, Peng-Hsiao

    2009-01-01

    We investigate cavity-modulated resonant tunneling through a silver film with periodic grooves on both surfaces. A strip cavity embedded in the film affects tunneling frequencies via a coupling mode and waveguide mode. In the coupling mode, both the resonant tunneling through the gap between the groove and the cavity and the cavity itself form an entire resonant structure. In the waveguide mode, however, the cavity functions as a surface-plasmon waveguide. Hence, tunneling frequencies are close to resonant absorption frequencies of the groove structure and are irrelevant to cavity properties.

  14. Anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering for atom specific and excited state selective dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Josefsson, Ida; Rajkovic, Ivan

    Here, ultrafast electronic and structural dynamics of matter govern rate and selectivity of chemical reactions, as well as phase transitions and efficient switching in functional materials. Since x-rays determine electronic and structural properties with elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity, short pulse x-ray sources have become central enablers of ultrafast science. Despite of these strengths, ultrafast x-rays have been poor at picking up excited state moieties from the unexcited ones. With time-resolved anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering (AS-RXRS) performed at the LCLS, and ab initio theory we establish background free excited state selectivity in addition to the elemental, chemical, orbitalmore » and magnetic selectivity of x-rays. This unparalleled selectivity extracts low concentration excited state species along the pathway of photo induced ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 in ethanol. Conceptually a full theoretical treatment of all accessible insights to excited state dynamics with AS-RXRS with transform-limited x-ray pulses is given—which will be covered experimentally by upcoming transform-limited x-ray sources.« less

  15. Anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering for atom specific and excited state selective dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Josefsson, Ida; Rajkovic, Ivan; ...

    2016-10-07

    Here, ultrafast electronic and structural dynamics of matter govern rate and selectivity of chemical reactions, as well as phase transitions and efficient switching in functional materials. Since x-rays determine electronic and structural properties with elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity, short pulse x-ray sources have become central enablers of ultrafast science. Despite of these strengths, ultrafast x-rays have been poor at picking up excited state moieties from the unexcited ones. With time-resolved anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering (AS-RXRS) performed at the LCLS, and ab initio theory we establish background free excited state selectivity in addition to the elemental, chemical, orbitalmore » and magnetic selectivity of x-rays. This unparalleled selectivity extracts low concentration excited state species along the pathway of photo induced ligand exchange of Fe(CO)5 in ethanol. Conceptually a full theoretical treatment of all accessible insights to excited state dynamics with AS-RXRS with transform-limited x-ray pulses is given—which will be covered experimentally by upcoming transform-limited x-ray sources.« less

  16. Vibrational response of a rectangular duct of finite length excited by a turbulent internal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Antoine; Hugues, Florian; Dauchez, Nicolas; Perrey-Debain, Emmanuel

    2018-05-01

    Gas transport ductwork in industrial plants or air conditioning networks can be subject to vibrations induced by the internal flow. Most studies in this matter have been carried out on circular ducts. This paper focuses specifically on the vibratory response of a rectangular duct of finite length excited by an internal turbulent flow. A semi-analytical model taking into account the modal response of the structure due to both aerodynamic and acoustic contributions is derived. The aerodynamic component of the excitation is applied on the basis of Corcos model where the power spectral density of the wall pressure is determined experimentally. The acoustic component is based on the propagating modes in the duct where the acoustic modal contribution are extracted via cross-spectral densities. The vibrational response is given for a 0.2 × 0.1 × 0.5 m3 duct made of 3 mm steel plates excited by 20 m/s or 30 m/s flows. Comparisons between experimental results and numerical predictions show a good agreement. The competition between acoustic and aerodynamic components is highlighted.

  17. Classification of the nonlinear dynamics and bifurcation structure of ultrasound contrast agents excited at higher multiples of their resonance frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojahrood, Amin Jafari; Kolios, Michael C.

    2012-07-01

    Through numerical simulation of the Hoff model we show that when ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are excited at frequencies which are close to integer (m>2) multiples of their natural resonance frequency, the bifurcation structure of the UCA oscillations as a function of pressure may be characterized by 3 general distinct regions. The UCA behavior starts with initial period one oscillations which undergoes a saddle node bifurcation to m coexisting attractors for an acoustic pressure above a threshold, P. Further increasing the pressure above a second threshold P, is followed by a sudden transition to period 1 oscillations.

  18. An analytical study on excitation of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability due to seismically induced resonance in BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Masashi

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a scoping study on seismically induced resonance of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability in BWRs, which was conducted by using TRAC-BF1 within a framework of a point kinetics model. As a result of the analysis, it is shown that a reactivity insertion could occur accompanied by in-surge of coolant into the core resulted from the excitation of the nuclear-coupled instability by the external acceleration. In order to analyze this phenomenon more in detail, it is necessary to couple a thermal-hydraulic code with a three-dimensional nuclear kinetics code.

  19. Dynamic analysis of a fibre-optic ring resonator excited by a sinewave-modulated laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandian, G. Soundra; Seraji, Faramarz

    1990-10-01

    The present theoretical dynamic analysis of a fiber-optic ring resonator upon excitation by a sinusoidally-modulated laser diode (LD) yields results for such resonator conditions as modulating frequency, amplitude-modulation index, coupler power-coupling coefficient, loop-delay time (tau), and the phase angle between the LD's AM and FM responses. It is found that when the modulation frequency f(m) exceeds a threshold value such that f(m)tau exceeds 0.0002, the output response diverges from steady state and engages in an oscillatory behavior characterized by overshoots. When f(m)tau exceeds 1.0, the output approximates the intensity modulation of the LD.

  20. Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET) Velocimetry in Flow and Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Naibo; Halls, Benjamin R.; Stauffer, Hans U.; Roy, Sukesh; Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET), a non-seeded ultrafast-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in reactive and non-reactive flows. STARFLEET is pumped via a two-photon resonance in N2 using 202.25-nm 100-fs light. STARFLEET greatly reduces the per-pulse energy required (30 µJ/pulse) to generate the signature FLEET emission compared to the conventional FLEET technique (1.1 mJ/pulse). This reduction in laser energy results in less energy deposited in the flow, which allows for reduced flow perturbations (reactive and non-reactive), increased thermometric accuracy, and less severe damage to materials. Velocity measurements conducted in a free jet of N2 and in a premixed flame show good agreement with theoretical velocities and further demonstrate the significantly less-intrusive nature of STARFLEET.

  1. Ultrasonic Resonance Spectrometry with Fourier Synthesized Pseudorandom Noise Excitation and Its Application to a Lyotropiec Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Haruki; Naito, Yasushi; Tsuboi, Yukitoshi; Mitaku, Shigeki; Okano, Koji

    1982-11-01

    Time domain measurement to obtain ultrasonic resonance spectra was made using Fourier Synthesized Pseudorandom Noise (FSPN) excitation in order to observe the viscoelastic property of a lyotropic liquid crystal. The FSPN with multiple frequency components was amplitude-modulated by a carrier signal with a much higher single frequency component, and a quadrature detection technique was used to obtain a shear ultrasonic resonance spectrum produced between two transducers. A reflection method was applied to observe mechanical impedance of viscous and elastic materials at about 3 MHz. The viscosities obtained for standard viscous materials agreed well with literature values, and the rigidity and viscosity of a lyotropic liquid crystal of Sodium Lauryl Sulfate with water were measured; they were ˜ 106 dyn/cm2 and ˜0.1 P, respectively.

  2. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization in the resonant laser excitation of an InGaAs quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Högele, A; Kroner, M; Latta, C; Claassen, M; Carusotto, I; Bulutay, C; Imamoglu, A

    2012-05-11

    Resonant optical excitation of lowest-energy excitonic transitions in self-assembled quantum dots leads to nuclear spin polarization that is qualitatively different from the well-known optical orientation phenomena. By carrying out a comprehensive set of experiments, we demonstrate that nuclear spin polarization manifests itself in quantum dots subjected to finite external magnetic field as locking of the higher energy Zeeman transition to the driving laser field, as well as the avoidance of the resonance condition for the lower energy Zeeman branch. We interpret our findings on the basis of dynamic nuclear spin polarization originating from noncollinear hyperfine interaction and find excellent agreement between experiment and theory. Our results provide evidence for the significance of noncollinear hyperfine processes not only for nuclear spin diffusion and decay, but also for buildup dynamics of nuclear spin polarization in a coupled electron-nuclear spin system.

  3. Excited states with internally contracted multireference coupled-cluster linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Pradipta Kumar; Mukherjee, Debashis; Hanauer, Matthias; Köhn, Andreas

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, the linear response (LR) theory for the variant of internally contracted multireference coupled cluster (ic-MRCC) theory described by Hanauer and Köhn [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 204211 (2011)] has been formulated and implemented for the computation of the excitation energies relative to a ground state of pronounced multireference character. We find that straightforward application of the linear-response formalism to the time-averaged ic-MRCC Lagrangian leads to unphysical second-order poles. However, the coupling matrix elements that cause this behavior are shown to be negligible whenever the internally contracted approximation as such is justified. Hence, for the numerical implementation of the method, we adopt a Tamm-Dancoff-type approximation and neglect these couplings. This approximation is also consistent with an equation-of-motion based derivation, which neglects these couplings right from the start. We have implemented the linear-response approach in the ic-MRCC singles-and-doubles framework and applied our method to calculate excitation energies for a number of molecules ranging from CH2 to p-benzyne and conjugated polyenes (up to octatetraene). The computed excitation energies are found to be very accurate, even for the notoriously difficult case of doubly excited states. The ic-MRCC-LR theory is also applicable to systems with open-shell ground-state wavefunctions and is by construction not biased towards a particular reference determinant. We have also compared the linear-response approach to the computation of energy differences by direct state-specific ic-MRCC calculations. We finally compare to Mk-MRCC-LR theory for which spurious roots have been reported [T.-C. Jagau and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044116 (2012)], being due to the use of sufficiency conditions to solve the Mk-MRCC equations. No such problem is present in ic-MRCC-LR theory.

  4. Resonant vibrational-excitation cross sections and rate constants for low-energy electron scattering by molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporta, V.; Celiberto, R.; Tennyson, J.

    2013-04-01

    Resonant vibrational-excitation cross sections and rate constants for electron scattering by molecular oxygen are presented. Transitions between all 42 vibrational levels of O_2({X}\\, ^3\\Sigma_g^{-}) are considered. Molecular rotations are parametrized by the rotational quantum number J, which is considered in the range 1-151. The lowest four resonant states of O_2^- , 2Πg, 2Πu, ^4\\Sigma_u^- and ^2\\Sigma_u^- are taken into account. The calculations are performed using the fixed-nuclei R-matrix approach to determine the resonance positions and widths, and the boomerang model to characterize the nuclei motion. Two energy regions below and above 4 eV are investigated: the first one is characterized by sharp structures in the cross section and the second by a broad resonance peaked at 10 eV. The computed cross sections are compared with theoretical and experimental results available in the literature for both energy regions, and are made available for use by modelers. The effect of including rotational motion is found to be non-negligible.

  5. Tuning excitation laser wavelength for secondary resonance in low-intensity phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for in-situ analytical measurement of nanoaerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Gang; Li, Shuiqing; Tse, Stephen D.

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, a novel low-intensity phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (PS-LIBS) technique has been developed for unique elemental-composition identification of aerosolized nanoparticles, where only the solid-phase nanoparticles break down, forming nanoplasmas, without any surrounding gas-phase breakdown. Additional work has demonstrated that PS-LIBS emissions can be greatly enhanced with secondary resonant excitation by matching the excitation laser wavelength with an atomic transition line in the formed nanoplasma, thereby achieving low limits of detection. In this work, a tunable dye laser is employed to investigate the effects of excitation wavelength and irradiance on in-situ PS-LIBS measurements of TiO2 nanoaerosols. The enhancement factor by resonant excitation can be 220 times greater than that for non-resonant cases under similar conditions. Moreover, the emitted spectra are unique for the selected resonant transition lines for a given element, suggesting the potential to make precise phase-selective and analyte-selective measurements of nanoparticles in a multicomponent multiphase system. The enhancement factor by resonant excitation is highly sensitive to excitation laser wavelength, with narrow excitation spectral windows, i.e., 0.012 to 0.023 nm (FWHM, full width at half maximum) for Ti (I) neutral atomic lines, and 0.051 to 0.139 nm (FWHM) for Ti (II) single-ionized atomic lines. Boltzmann analysis of the emission intensities, temporal response of emissions, and emission dependence on excitation irradiance are investigated to understand aspects of the generated nanoplasmas such as temperature, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), and excitation mechanism.

  6. Evidence of Intertube Excitons Observed in the Raman Resonance Excitation Profiles of (6 , 5) -Enriched SWCNT Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. R.; Hight Walker, A. R.; Roslyak, O.; Haroz, E.; Telg, H.; Duque, J. G.; Crochet, J. J.; Piryatinkski, A.; Doorn, S. K.

    Understanding the photophysics of exciton behavior in single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles remains important for opto-electronic device applications. We report resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) measurements on (6 , 5) -enriched SWCNTs, dispersed in aqueous solutions and separated using density gradient ultracentrifugation into fractions of increasing bundle size. Near-IR to UV absorption spectroscopy demonstrates a redshift and broadening of the main excitonic transitions with bundling. A continuously tunable dye laser coupled to a triple-grating spectrometer affords measurement of Raman resonance excitation profiles (REPs) over a range of wavelengths, (505 to 585) nm, covering the (6 , 5) -E22S excitation. REPs of both the radial breathing mode (RBM) and GLO+reveal a redshifting and broadening of the (6 , 5) E22S transition energy with increasing bundle size. Most interestingly, we observe an additional peak in both the RBM and GLO+REPs of bundled SWCNTs, which is shifted lower in energy than the main E22S and is anomalously narrow. We attribute this additional peak to a transverse, intertube exciton.

  7. Novel micro-Raman setup with tunable laser excitation for time-efficient resonance Raman microscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Stürzl, Ninette; Lebedkin, Sergei; Klumpp, Stefanie; Hennrich, Frank; Kappes, Manfred M

    2013-05-07

    We describe a micro-Raman setup allowing for efficient resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS), i.e., mapping of Raman spectra as a function of tunable laser excitation wavelength. The instrument employs angle-tunable bandpass optical filters which are integrated into software-controlled Raman and laser cleanup filter devices. These automatically follow the excitation laser wavelength and combine tunability with high bandpass transmission as well as high off-band blocking of light. Whereas the spectral intervals which can be simultaneously acquired are bandpass limited to ~350 cm(-1), they can be tuned across the spectrum of interest to access all characteristic Raman features. As an illustration of performance, we present Raman mapping of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs): (i) in a small volume of water-surfactant dispersion as well as (ii) after deposition onto a substrate. A significant improvement in the acquisition time (and efficiency) is demonstrated compared to previous RRS implementations. These results may help to establish (micro) Raman spectral mapping as a routine tool for characterization of SWNTs as well as other materials with a pronounced resonance Raman response in the visible-near-infrared spectral region.

  8. A total internal reflection-fluorescence correlation spectroscopy setup with pulsed diode laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weger, Lukas; Hoffmann-Jacobsen, Kerstin

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measures fluctuations in a (sub-)femtoliter volume to analyze the diffusive behavior of fluorescent particles. This highly sensitive method has proven to be useful for the analysis of dynamic biological systems as well as in chemistry, physics, and material sciences. It is routinely performed with commercial fluorescence microscopes, which provide a confined observation volume by the confocal technique. The evanescent wave of total internal reflectance (TIR) is used in home-built systems to permit a surface sensitive FCS analysis. We present a combined confocal and TIR-FCS setup which uses economic low-power pulsed diode lasers for excitation. Excitation and detection are coupled to time-correlated photon counting hardware. This allows simultaneous fluorescence lifetime and FCS measurements in a surface-sensitive mode. Moreover, the setup supports fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy at surfaces. The excitation can be easily switched between TIR and epi-illumination to compare the surface properties with those in liquid bulk. The capabilities of the presented setup are demonstrated by measuring the diffusion coefficients of a free dye molecule, a labeled polyethylene glycol, and a fluorescent nanoparticle in confocal as well as in TIR-FCS.

  9. Numerical simulation of a slit resonator in a grazing flow under acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Ju, Hongbin; Walker, Bruce E.

    2008-06-01

    It is known experimentally that a grazing flow has significant influence on the performance of a resonant acoustic liner. As yet, detailed understanding of the effect in fluid dynamics or acoustics terms is not available. One principal reason for this is the small size of the openings of the resonators of present day jet engine acoustic liners. The small size of the holes makes in-depth experimental observation and mapping of the fluid flow field around the opening of a resonator in the presence of a grazing flow extremely difficult. As a result, there is a genuine lack of data leading directly to a lack of understanding. The face sheet of an acoustic liner is entirely covered with holes (the openings of resonators underneath). There is, therefore, a possibility of fluid mechanical interaction between neighboring resonators. However, evidence for such interaction is not available at this time. One of the objectives of the present work is to shed light on whether this is possible and what is a possible interaction mechanism. In this study, numerical simulations of the flow field around a slit resonator in the presence of a grazing flow under acoustic forcing are carried out. It is observed that at high sound pressure level, vortices are shed from the corners of the resonator opening. Some of these vortices merge together. Others are absorbed by the wall boundary layer or dissipated by viscosity. The simulated results indicate that a strong merged vortex is convected downstream by the grazing flow and persists for a long distance. This suggests that possible fluid mechanical interaction between neighboring resonators of an acoustic liner could, indeed, be possible because of the interference of this convected vortex with the flow field of the downstream resonator. This interaction, as far as is known, has not been included in any theoretical or semi-empirical model of acoustic liners. Detailed formulation of the computational model, as well as computational algorithm

  10. First measurement of the isoscalar excitation above the neutron emission threshold of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in 68Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martorana, N. S.; Cardella, G.; Lanza, E. G.; Acosta, L.; Andrés, M. V.; Auditore, L.; Catara, F.; De Filippo, E.; De Luca, S.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Gnoffo, B.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Maiolino, C.; Norella, S.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Santonocito, D.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Vigilante, M.; Vitturi, A.

    2018-07-01

    The excitation of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) in the 68Ni nucleus, above the neutron emission threshold, via an isoscalar probe has been observed for the first time. The excitation has been produced in reactions where a 68Ni beam, obtained by the fragmentation of a 70Zn primary beam at INFN-LNS, impinged on a 12C target. The γ-ray decay was detected using the CsI(Tl) detectors of the CHIMERA multidetector sphere. The 68Ni isotope as well as other heavy ion fragments were detected using the FARCOS array. The population of the PDR was evidenced by comparing the detected γ-ray energy spectra with statistical code calculations. The isotopic resolution of the detection system allows also to directly compare neutron decay channels with the 68Ni channel, better evidencing the PDR decay response function. This comparison allows also the extraction of the PDR cross section and the relative γ-ray angular distribution. The measured γ-ray angular distribution confirms the E1 character of the transition. The γ decay cross section for the excitation of the PDR was measured to be 0.32 mb with a 18% of statistical error.

  11. Probing ultrafast ππ*/nπ* internal conversion in organic chromophores via K-edge resonant absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, T. J. A.; Myhre, R. H.; Cryan, J. P.

    Many photoinduced processes including photosynthesis and human vision happen in organic molecules and involve coupled femtosecond dynamics of nuclei and electrons. Organic molecules with heteroatoms often possess an important excited-state relaxation channel from an optically allowed ππ* to a dark nπ* state. The ππ*/nπ* internal conversion is difficult to investigate, as most spectroscopic methods are not exclusively sensitive to changes in the excited-state electronic structure. Here, we report achieving the required sensitivity by exploiting the element and site specificity of near-edge soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy. As a hole forms in the n orbital during ππ*/nπ* internal conversion, the absorption spectrummore » at the heteroatom K-edge exhibits an additional resonance. We demonstrate the concept using the nucleobase thymine at the oxygen K-edge, and unambiguously show that ππ*/nπ* internal conversion takes place within (60 ± 30) fs. Furthermore, high-level-coupled cluster calculations confirm the method’s impressive electronic structure sensitivity for excited-state investigations.« less

  12. Probing ultrafast ππ*/nπ* internal conversion in organic chromophores via K-edge resonant absorption

    DOE PAGES

    Wolf, T. J. A.; Myhre, R. H.; Cryan, J. P.; ...

    2017-06-22

    Many photoinduced processes including photosynthesis and human vision happen in organic molecules and involve coupled femtosecond dynamics of nuclei and electrons. Organic molecules with heteroatoms often possess an important excited-state relaxation channel from an optically allowed ππ* to a dark nπ* state. The ππ*/nπ* internal conversion is difficult to investigate, as most spectroscopic methods are not exclusively sensitive to changes in the excited-state electronic structure. Here, we report achieving the required sensitivity by exploiting the element and site specificity of near-edge soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy. As a hole forms in the n orbital during ππ*/nπ* internal conversion, the absorption spectrummore » at the heteroatom K-edge exhibits an additional resonance. We demonstrate the concept using the nucleobase thymine at the oxygen K-edge, and unambiguously show that ππ*/nπ* internal conversion takes place within (60 ± 30) fs. Furthermore, high-level-coupled cluster calculations confirm the method’s impressive electronic structure sensitivity for excited-state investigations.« less

  13. Formation of H{sub 2} from internally heated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Excitation energy dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T., E-mail: tao.chen@fysik.su.se, E-mail: henning@fysik.su.se; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.

    2015-04-14

    We have investigated the effectiveness of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) formation from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) which are internally heated by collisions with keV ions. The present and earlier experimental results are analyzed in view of molecular structure calculations and a simple collision model. We estimate that H{sub 2} formation becomes important for internal PAH temperatures exceeding about 2200 K, regardless of the PAH size and the excitation agent. This suggests that keV ions may effectively induce such reactions, while they are unlikely due to, e.g., absorption of single photons with energies below the Lyman limit. The present analysis alsomore » suggests that H{sub 2} emission is correlated with multi-fragmentation processes, which means that the [PAH-2H]{sup +} peak intensities in the mass spectra may not be used for estimating H{sub 2}-formation rates.« less

  14. Resonant circuit which provides dual-frequency excitation for rapid cycling of an electromagnet

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, W.F.

    1982-03-09

    Disclosed is a novel ring-magnet control circuit that permits synchrotron repetition rates much higher than the frequency of the sinusoidal guide field of the ring magnet during particle acceleration. The control circuit generates sinusoidal excitation currents of different frequencies in the half waves. During radio-frequency acceleration of the synchrotron, the control circuit operates with a lower frequency sine wave and, thereafter, the electromagnets are reset with a higher-frequency half sine wave.

  15. 1.05-GHz CMOS oscillator based on lateral- field-excited piezoelectric AlN contour- mode MEMS resonators.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Chengjie; Van der Spiegel, Jan; Piazza, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the first demonstration of a 1.05-GHz microelectromechanical (MEMS) oscillator based on lateral-field-excited (LFE) piezoelectric AlN contourmode resonators. The oscillator shows a phase noise level of -81 dBc/Hz at 1-kHz offset frequency and a phase noise floor of -146 dBc/Hz, which satisfies the global system for mobile communications (GSM) requirements for ultra-high frequency (UHF) local oscillators (LO). The circuit was fabricated in the AMI semiconductor (AMIS) 0.5-microm complementary metaloxide- semiconductor (CMOS) process, with the oscillator core consuming only 3.5 mW DC power. The device overall performance has the best figure-of-merit (FoM) when compared with other gigahertz oscillators that are based on film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR), surface acoustic wave (SAW), and CMOS on-chip inductor and capacitor (CMOS LC) technologies. A simple 2-mask process was used to fabricate the LFE AlN resonators operating between 843 MHz and 1.64 GHz with simultaneously high Q (up to 2,200) and kt 2 (up to 1.2%). This process further relaxes manufacturing tolerances and improves yield. All these advantages make these devices suitable for post-CMOS integrated on-chip direct gigahertz frequency synthesis in reconfigurable multiband wireless communications.

  16. Resonance Raman scattering of β-carotene solution excited by visible laser beams into second singlet state.

    PubMed

    Lu, Luyao; Shi, Lingyan; Secor, Jeff; Alfano, Robert

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to use self-absorption correction to determine the Raman enhancement of β-carotene. The Raman spectra of β-carotene solutions were measured using 488nm, 514nm, 532nm and 633nm laser beams, which exhibited significant resonance Raman (RR) enhancement when the laser energy approaches the electronic transition energy from S 0 to S 2 state. The Raman intensity and the actual resonance Raman gain without self-absorption from S 2 state by β-carotene were also obtained to evaluate the effect of self-absorption on RR scattering. Moreover, we observed the Raman intensity strength followed the absorption spectra. Our study found that, although 488nm and 514nm pumps seemed better for stronger RR enhancement, 532nm would be the optimum Raman pump laser with moderate RR enhancement due to reduced fluorescence and self-absorption. The 532nm excitation will be helpful for applying resonance Raman spectroscopy to investigate biological molecules in tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Forced Longitudinal Oscillations of a Gas in an Open Pipe Near the Resonance Excitation Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaripov, R. G.; Tkachenko, L. A.; Shaidullin, L. R.

    2017-11-01

    Results of theoretical and experimental investigations of forced longitudinal oscillations of a homogeneous gas in an open pipe near the first natural frequency are presented. It has been established that at the resonance frequency the shape of the gas pressure wave changes with time by a law different from the harmonic one. The amplitude-frequency characteristics of the indicated oscillations have been derived. Satisfactory agreement of the theoretical calculation of the gas pressure oscillation range with experimental data has been obtained.

  18. Two mechanisms of resonance overlapping in excitation of azimuthal surface waves by rotating relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girka, Igor O.; Pavlenko, Ivan V.; Thumm, Manfred

    2018-05-01

    Azimuthal surface waves are electromagnetic eigenwaves of cylindrical plasma-filled metallic waveguides with a stationary axial magnetic field. These waves with extraordinary polarization can effectively interact with relativistic electron beams rotating along large Larmor orbits in the gap, which separates the plasma column from the waveguide wall. Both widening the layer and increasing the beam particle density are demonstrated to cause resonance overlapping seen from the perspective of the growth rate dependence on the effective wave number.

  19. Resonance Raman and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectra of LH2 antenna complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ectothiorhodospira sp. excited in the Qx and Qy transitions.

    PubMed

    Chumanov, G; Picorel, R; Ortiz de Zarate, I; Cotton, T M; Seibert, M

    2000-05-01

    Well-resolved vibrational spectra of LH2 complex isolated from two photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ectothiorhodospira sp., were obtained using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) exciting into the Qx and the Qy transitions of bacteriochlorophyll a. High-quality SERRS spectra in the Qy region were accessible because the strong fluorescence background was quenched near the roughened Ag surface. A comparison of the spectra obtained with 590 nm and 752 nm excitation in the mid- and low-frequency regions revealed spectral differences between the two LH2 complexes as well as between the LH2 complexes and isolated bacteriochlorophyll a. Because peripheral modes of pigments contribute mainly to the low-frequency spectral region, frequencies and intensities of many vibrational bands in this region are affected by interactions with the protein. The results demonstrate that the microenvironment surrounding the pigments within the two LH2 complexes is somewhat different, despite the fact that the complexes exhibit similar electronic absorption spectra. These differences are most probably due to specific pigment-pigment and pigment-protein interactions within the LH2 complexes, and the approach might be useful for addressing subtle static and dynamic structural variances between pigment-protein complexes from different sources or in complexes altered chemically or genetically.

  20. Photoabsorption and S 2p photoionization of the SF6 molecule: resonances in the excitation energy range of 200-280 eV.

    PubMed

    Stener, M; Bolognesi, P; Coreno, M; O'Keeffe, P; Feyer, V; Fronzoni, G; Decleva, P; Avaldi, L; Kivimäki, A

    2011-05-07

    Photoabsorption and S 2p photoionization of the SF(6) molecule have been studied experimentally and theoretically in the excitation energy range up to 100 eV above the S 2p ionization potentials. In addition to the well-known 2t(2g) and 4e(g) shape resonances, the spin-orbit-resolved S 2p photoionization cross sections display two weak resonances between 200 and 210 eV, a wide resonance around 217 eV, a Fano-type resonance around 240 eV, and a second wide resonance around 260 eV. Calculations based on time-dependent density functional theory allow us to assign the 217-eV and 260-eV features to the shape resonances in S 2p photoionization. The Fano resonance is caused by the interference between the direct S 2p photoionization channel and the resonant channel that results from the participator decay of the S 2s(-1)6t(1u) excited state. The weak resonances below 210-eV photon energy, not predicted by theory, are tentatively suggested to originate from the coupling between S 2p shake-up photoionization and S 2p single-hole photoionization. The experimental and calculated angular anisotropy parameters for S 2p photoionization are in good agreement.

  1. High-Speed Rotor Analytical Dynamics on Flexible Foundation Subjected to Internal and External Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivkov, Venelin S.; Zahariev, Evtim V.

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents a geometrical approach to dynamics simulation of a rigid and flexible system, compiled of high speed rotating machine with eccentricity and considerable inertia and mass. The machine is mounted on a vertical flexible pillar with considerable height. The stiffness and damping of the column, as well as, of the rotor bearings and the shaft are taken into account. Non-stationary vibrations and transitional processes are analyzed. The major frequency and modal mode of the flexible column are used for analytical reduction of its mass, stiffness and damping properties. The rotor and the foundation are modelled as rigid bodies, while the flexibility of the bearings is estimated by experiments and the requirements of the manufacturer. The transition effects as a result of limited power are analyzed by asymptotic methods of averaging. Analytical expressions for the amplitudes and unstable vibrations throughout resonance are derived by quasi-static approach increasing and decreasing of the exciting frequency. Analytical functions give the possibility to analyze the influence of the design parameter of many structure applications as wind power generators, gas turbines, turbo-generators, and etc. A numerical procedure is applied to verify the effectiveness and precision of the simulation process. Nonlinear and transitional effects are analyzed and compared to the analytical results. External excitations, as wave propagation and earthquakes, are discussed. Finite elements in relative and absolute coordinates are applied to model the flexible column and the high speed rotating machine. Generalized Newton - Euler dynamics equations are used to derive the precise dynamics equations. Examples of simulation of the system vibrations and nonstationary behaviour are presented.

  2. Electromagnetic torques in the core and resonant excitation of decadal polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mound, Jon E.

    2005-02-01

    Motion of the rotation axis of the Earth contains decadal variations with amplitudes on the order of 10 mas. The origin of these decadal polar motions is unknown. A class of rotational normal modes of the core-mantle system termed torsional oscillations are known to affect the length of day (LOD) at decadal periods and have also been suggested as a possible excitation source for the observed decadal polar motion. Torsional oscillations involve relative motion between the outer core and the surrounding solid bodies, producing electromagnetic torques at the inner-core boundary (ICB) and core-mantle boundary (CMB). It has been proposed that the ICB torque can explain the excitation of the approximately 30-yr-period polar motion termed the Markowitz wobble. This paper uses the results of a torsional oscillation model to calculate the torques generated at Markowitz and other decadal periods and finds, in contrast to previous results, that electromagnetic torques at the ICB can not explain the observed polar motion.

  3. Extreme secular excitation of eccentricity inside mean motion resonance. Small bodies driven into star-grazing orbits by planetary perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichierri, Gabriele; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Lai, Dong

    2017-09-01

    Context. It is well known that asteroids and comets fall into the Sun. Metal pollution of white dwarfs and transient spectroscopic signatures of young stars like β-Pic provide growing evidence that extra solar planetesimals can attain extreme orbital eccentricities and fall into their parent stars. Aims: We aim to develop a general, implementable, semi-analytical theory of secular eccentricity excitation of small bodies (planetesimals) in mean motion resonances with an eccentric planet valid for arbitrary values of the eccentricities and including the short-range force due to General Relativity. Methods: Our semi-analytic model for the restricted planar three-body problem does not make use of series expansion and therefore is valid for any eccentricity value and semi-major axis ratio. The model is based on the application of the adiabatic principle, which is valid when the precession period of the longitude of pericentre of the planetesimal is much longer than the libration period in the mean motion resonance. In resonances of order larger than 1 this is true except for vanishingly small eccentricities. We provide prospective users with a Mathematica notebook with implementation of the model allowing direct use. Results: We confirm that the 4:1 mean motion resonance with a moderately eccentric (e' ≲ 0.1) planet is the most powerful one to lift the eccentricity of planetesimals from nearly circular orbits to star-grazing ones. However, if the planet is too eccentric, we find that this resonance is unable to pump the planetesimal's eccentricity to a very high value. The inclusion of the General Relativity effect imposes a condition on the mass of the planet to drive the planetesimals into star-grazing orbits. For a planetesimal at 1 AU around a solar mass star (or white dwarf), we find a threshold planetary mass of about 17 Earth masses. We finally derive an analytical formula for this critical mass. Conclusions: Planetesimals can easily fall into the central star

  4. Resonant transfer excitation in collisions of F sup 6+ and Mg sup 9+ with H sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, E.M.; Kamal, A.; Zaharakis, K.E.

    1991-10-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations of resonant transfer excitation (RTE) for F{sup 6+}+H{sub 2} and Mg{sup 9+}+H{sub 2} collisions have been made. For both collision systems good agreement is obtained between the measured cross sections for {ital K}-shell x-ray emission coincident with electron-capture and theoretical RTE calculations. For F{sup 6+} the present calculations are about 10% lower than previous results of Bhalla and Karim (Phys. Rev. A 39, 6060 (1989); 41, 4097(E) (1990)); the measured cross sections are a factor of 2.3 larger than earlier measurements of Schulz {ital et} {ital al}. (Phys. Rev. A 38, 5454 (1988)). The previous disagreementmore » between experiment and theory for F{sup 6+} is removed.« less

  5. The first detection of the 3A g- state in carotenoids using resonance-Raman excitation profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuichi, Kentaro; Sashima, Tokutake; Koyama, Yasushi

    2002-04-01

    The singlet 3Ag- state that had been theoretically predicted in shorter polyenes [P. Tavan and K. Schulten J. Chem. Phys. 85 (1986) 6602; Phys. Rev. B 36 (1987) 4337] was first identified in bacterial carotenoids by measurements of resonance-Raman excitation profiles. It is almost overlapped with the 1Bu+ state in spheroidene (the number of conjugated double bonds, n=10), and located in-between the 1Bu+ and 1Bu- states in lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin and spirilloxanthin (n=11-13). The slopes when the 2Ag--, 1Bu-- and 3Ag--state energies were expressed as linear functions of 1/(2n+1) exhibited the ratio of 2:3.1:3.8 in excellent agreement with that theoretically predicted, 2:3.1:3.7.

  6. Characterization of a microwave-excited atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet using two-parallel-wires transmission line resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Eom, I. S.; Kim, S. J.; Kwon, Y. W.; Joh, H. M.; Jeong, B. S.; Chung, T. H.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a method to produce a microwave-excited atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (ME-APPJ) with argon. The plasma was generated by a microwave-driven micro-plasma source that uses a two-parallel-wire transmission line resonator (TPWR) operating at around 900 MHz. The TPWR has a simple structure and is easier to fabricate than coaxial transmission line resonator (CTLR) devices. In particular, the TPWR can sustain more stable ME-APPJ than the CTLR can because the gap between the electrodes is narrower than that in the CTLR. In experiments performed with an Ar flow rate from 0.5 to 8.0 L.min-1 and an input power from 1 to 6 W, the rotational temperature was determined by comparing the measured and simulated spectra of rotational lines of the OH band and the electron excitation temperature determined by the Boltzmann plot method. The rotational temperature obtained from OH(A-X) spectra was 700 K to 800 K, whereas the apparent gas temperature of the plasma jet remains lower than ˜325 K, which is compatible with biomedical applications. The electron number density was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of the hydrogen Hβ line, and the measured electron density ranged from 6.5 × 1014 to 7.6 × 1014 cm-3. TPWR ME-APPJ can be operated at low flows of the working gas and at low power and is very stable and effective for interactions of the plasma with cells.

  7. Carrier-envelope-offset phase control of ultrafast optical rectification in resonantly excited semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Van Vlack, C; Hughes, S

    2007-04-20

    Ultrashort pulse light-matter interactions in a semiconductor are investigated within the regime of resonant optical rectification. Using pulse envelope areas of around 1.5-3.5 pi, a single-shot dependence on carrier-envelope-offset phase (CEP) is demonstrated for 5 fs pulse durations. A characteristic phase map is predicted for several different frequency regimes using parameters for thin-film GaAs. We subsequently suggest a possible technique to extract the CEP, in both sign and amplitude, using a solid state detector.

  8. Two-magnon excitations in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studied within spin density wave formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takuji

    2017-10-01

    We study two-magnon excitations in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the transition-metal K edge. Instead of working with effective Heisenberg spin models, we work with a Hubbard-type model (d -p model) for a typical insulating cuprate La2CuO4 . For the antiferromagnetic ground state within the spin density wave (SDW) mean-field formalism, we calculate the dynamical correlation function within the random-phase approximation (RPA), and then obtain two-magnon excitation spectra by calculating the convolution of it. Coupling between the K -shell hole and the magnons in the intermediate state is calculated by means of diagrammatic perturbation expansion in the Coulomb interaction. The calculated momentum dependence of RIXS spectra agrees well with that of experiments. A notable difference from previous calculations based on the Heisenberg spin models is that RIXS spectra have a large two-magnon weight near the zone center, which may be confirmed by further careful high-resolution experiments.

  9. Resonant circuit which provides dual frequency excitation for rapid cycling of an electromagnet

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a ring magnet control circuit that permits synchrotron repetition rates much higher than the frequency of the cosinusoidal guide field of the ring magnet during particle acceleration. the control circuit generates cosinusoidal excitation currents of different frequencies in the half waves. During radio frequency acceleration of the particles in the synchrotron, the control circuit operates with a lower frequency cosine wave and thereafter the electromagnets are reset with a higher frequency half cosine wave. Flat-bottom and flat-top wave shaping circuits maintain the magnetic guide field in a relatively time-invariant mode during times when the particles are being injected into the ring magnets and when the particles are being ejected from the ring magnets.

  10. Breaking of axial symmetry in excited heavy nuclei as identified in giant dipole resonance data

    DOE PAGES

    Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Massarczyk, R.

    2017-11-28

    Here, a recent theoretical prediction of a breaking of axial symmetry in quasi all heavy nuclei is confronted to a new critical analysis of photon strength functions of nuclei in the valley of stability. For the photon strength in the isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR) regime a parameterization of GDR shapes by the sum of three Lorentzians (TLO) is extrapolated to energies below and above the IVGDR. The impact of non-GDR modes adding to the low energy slope of photon strength is discussed including recent data on photon scattering and other radiative processes. These are shown to be concentrated inmore » energy regions where various model calculations predict intermediate collective strength; thus they are obviously separate from the IVGDR tail. The triple Lorentzian (TLO) ansatz for giant dipole resonances is normalized in accordance to the dipole sum rule. The nuclear droplet model with surface dissipation accounts well for positions and widths without local, nuclide specific, parameters. Very few and only global parameters are needed when a breaking of axial symmetry already in the valley of stability is admitted and hence a reliable prediction for electric dipole strength functions also outside of it is expected.« less

  11. Breaking of axial symmetry in excited heavy nuclei as identified in giant dipole resonance data

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Massarczyk, R.

    Here, a recent theoretical prediction of a breaking of axial symmetry in quasi all heavy nuclei is confronted to a new critical analysis of photon strength functions of nuclei in the valley of stability. For the photon strength in the isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR) regime a parameterization of GDR shapes by the sum of three Lorentzians (TLO) is extrapolated to energies below and above the IVGDR. The impact of non-GDR modes adding to the low energy slope of photon strength is discussed including recent data on photon scattering and other radiative processes. These are shown to be concentrated inmore » energy regions where various model calculations predict intermediate collective strength; thus they are obviously separate from the IVGDR tail. The triple Lorentzian (TLO) ansatz for giant dipole resonances is normalized in accordance to the dipole sum rule. The nuclear droplet model with surface dissipation accounts well for positions and widths without local, nuclide specific, parameters. Very few and only global parameters are needed when a breaking of axial symmetry already in the valley of stability is admitted and hence a reliable prediction for electric dipole strength functions also outside of it is expected.« less

  12. Tidal interactions of a Maclaurin spheroid - II. Resonant excitation of modes by a close, misaligned orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braviner, Harry J.; Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2015-02-01

    We model a tidally forced star or giant planet as a Maclaurin spheroid, decomposing the motion into the normal modes found by Bryan. We first describe the general prescription for this decomposition and the computation of the tidal power. Although this formalism is very general, forcing due to a companion on a misaligned, circular orbit is used to illustrate the theory. The tidal power is plotted for a variety of orbital radii, misalignment angles, and spheroid rotation rates. Our calculations are carried out including all modes of degree l ≤ 4, and the same degree of gravitational forcing. Remarkably, we find that for close orbits (a/R* ≈ 3) and rotational deformations that are typical of giant planets (e ≈ 0.4) the l = 4 component of the gravitational potential may significantly enhance the dissipation through resonance with surface gravity modes. There are also a large number of resonances with inertial modes, with the tidal power being locally enhanced by up to three orders of magnitude. For very close orbits (a/R* ≈ 3), the contribution to the power from the l = 4 modes is roughly the same magnitude as that due to the l = 3 modes.

  13. Resonant excited UV luminescence of the Gd3+ centres in borate glasses, co-doped with Gd and Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padlyak, B. V.; Drzewiecki, A.; Padlyak, T. B.; Adamiv, V. T.; Teslyuk, I. M.

    2018-05-01

    The Li2B4O7:Gd, CaB4O7:Gd, LiCaBO3:Gd, and Li2B4O7:Gd, Ag glasses of high optical quality, obtained by standard technology, have been investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical spectroscopy at room temperature. The Gd impurity was added in the raw materials as Gd2O3 oxide in amounts 0.5 and 1.0 mol.%. The Ag impurity was introduced into the Li2B4O7 composition as AgNO3 and as highly dispersed metallic Ag in amount 2.0 mol.%. In all Gd-doped glasses was observed typical for glasses EPR U-spectrum of the Gd3+ (8S7/2, 4f7) ions. In the Gd-doped glasses upon the 273 nm excitation was observed weak UV emission line at 311 nm that is attributed to the 6P7/2 → 8S7/2 intraconfiguration 4f - 4f transition of the Gd3+ ions. In the Li2B4O7:Gd, Ag glass has been observed significant (∼100 times) increasing of peak intensity of the Gd3+ emission line at 311 nm in comparison with this line in CaB4O7:Gd glass. In luminescence excitation spectra of the CaB4O7:Gd and Li2B4O7:Gd, Ag glasses are observed characteristic groups of lines corresponding to the 8S7/2 → 6IJ, 6DJ transitions of the Gd3+ ions. Significant increasing of the Gd3+ emission line at 311 nm in the Li2B4O7:Gd, Ag glass is explained by energy transfer from Ag+ (4d10) to Gd3+ (4f7) upon 273 nm excitation that is resonant for 4d10 → 4d9 5s1 (1S0 → 1D2) and 8S7/2 → 6IJ transitions of the Ag+ and Gd3+ ions. Luminescence kinetics of the Gd3+ and Ag+ centres was investigated and analysed. Obtained results show that the borate glasses, co-activated by Gd3+ and Ag+, can be promising materials for effective UVB light sources for biomedical applications.

  14. Resonance of scroll rings with periodic external fields in excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, De-Bei; Li, Qi-Hao; Zhang, Hong

    2018-06-01

    By direct numerical simulations of a chemical reaction-diffusion system coupled to a periodic external AC electric field with frequency equal to double frequency of the scroll wave rotation, we find that scroll rings resonate with the electric field and exhibit various dynamical behaviors, for example, their reversals, collapses, or growths, depending both on the initial phase of AC electric fields and on the initial phase of scroll rings. A kinematical model characterizing the drift velocity of the scroll rings along their radial directions as well as that of the scroll rings along their symmetry axes is proposed, which can effectively account for the numerical observations and predict the behaviors of the scroll rings. Besides, the existence of the equilibrium state of a scroll ring under the AC electric fields is predicted by the kinematical model and the predictions agree well with the simulations.

  15. Temperature determination of resonantly excited plasmonic branched gold nanoparticles by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Van de Broek, Bieke; Grandjean, Didier; Trekker, Jesse; Ye, Jian; Verstreken, Kris; Maes, Guido; Borghs, Gustaaf; Nikitenko, Sergey; Lagae, Liesbet; Bartic, Carmen; Temst, Kristiaan; Van Bael, Margriet J

    2011-09-05

    The fields of bioscience and nanomedicine demand precise thermometry for nanoparticle heat characterization down to the nanoscale regime. Since current methods often use indirect and less accurate techniques to determine the nanoparticle temperature, there is a pressing need for a direct and reliable element-specific method. In-situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy is used to determine the thermo-optical properties of plasmonic branched gold nanoparticles upon resonant laser illumination. With EXAFS, the direct determination of the nanoparticle temperature increase upon laser illumination is possible via the thermal influence on the gold lattice parameters. More specifically, using the change of the Debye-Waller term representing the lattice disorder, the temperature increase is selectively measured within the plasmonic branched nanoparticles upon resonant laser illumination. In addition, the signal intensity shows that the nanoparticle concentration in the beam more than doubles during laser illumination, thereby demonstrating that photothermal heating is a dynamic process. A comparable temperature increase is measured in the nanoparticle suspension using a thermocouple. This good correspondence between the temperature at the level of the nanoparticle and at the level of the suspension points to an efficient heat transfer between the nanoparticle and the surrounding medium, thus confirming the potential of branched gold nanoparticles for hyperthermia applications. This work demonstrates that X-ray absorption spectroscopy-based nanothermometry could be a valuable tool in the fast-growing number of applications of plasmonic nanoparticles, particularly in life sciences and medicine. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Capture of a neutron to excited states of a {sup 9}Be nucleus taking into account resonance at 622 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovichenko, S. B., E-mail: dubovichenko@gmail.com

    2013-10-15

    Radiative capture of a neutron to the ground and excited states of the 9Be nucleus is considered using the potential cluster model with forbidden states and with classification of cluster states by the Young schemes taking into account resonance at 622 keV for thermal and astrophysical energies.

  17. Theoretical investigation of the hyper-Raman scattering in hexagonal semiconductors under two-photon excitation near resonance with the An=2 exciton level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, L. E.

    2018-04-01

    The hyper-Raman scattering of light by LO-phonons under two-photon excitation near resonance with the An=2 exciton level in the wurtzite semiconductors A2B6 was theoretically investigated, taking into account the influence of the complex structure of the top valence band.

  18. Resonant electronic excitation energy transfer by exchange mechanism in the quantum dot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikalova-Luzina, O. P.; Samosvat, D. M.; Vyatkin, V. M.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2017-11-01

    A microscopic theory of nonradiative resonance energy transfer between spherical A3B5 semiconductor quantum dots by the exchange mechanism is suggested. The interdot Coulomb interaction is taken into consideration. It is assumed that the quantum dot-donor and the quantum dot-acceptor are made from the same A3B5 compound and are embedded in the matrix of another material that produces potential barriers for electrons and holes. The dependences of the energy transfer rate on the quantum-dot system parameters are found in the frame of the Kane model that provides the most adequate description of the real spectra of A3B5 semiconductors. The analytical treatment is carried out with using the density matrix method, which enabled us to perform an energy transfer analysis both in the weak-interaction approximation and in the strong-interaction approximation. The numerical calculations showed the saturation of the energy transfer rate at the distances between the donor and the acceptor approaching the contact one. The contributions of the exchange and direct Coulomb intractions can be of the same order at the small distances and can have the same value in the saturation range.

  19. Positive parity states in {sup 208}Pb excited by the proton decay of the isobaric analog intruder resonance j{sub 15/2} in {sup 209}Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Heusler, A.; Graw, G.; Hertenberger, R.

    2010-07-15

    With the Q3D magnetic spectrograph of the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium at Muenchen at a resolution of about 3 keV, angular distributions and excitation functions of the reaction {sup 208}Pb(p,p{sup '}) were measured at some scattering angles 20 deg. - 138 deg. for several proton energies 14.8-18.1 MeV. All seven known isobaric analog resonances in {sup 209}Bi are covered. By the excitation near the j{sub 15/2} intruder resonance in {sup 209}Bi, several new positive parity states in {sup 208}Pb with excitation energies 4.6-6.2 MeV are identified by comparison of the mean cross section to the known single particle widths. The dominant configuration formore » 27 positive parity states is determined and compared to the schematic shell model.« less

  20. Effect of Intense Optical Excitation on Internal Electric Field Evolution in CdTe Gamma-Ray Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Ichinohe, Y.; Seto, S.

    2018-03-01

    The time-of-flight (TOF) transient currents in radiation detectors made of CdTe and Cd0.9Zn0.1Te (CZT) have been measured at several optical excitation intensities to investigate the effect of drifting carriers on the internal field. Both detectors show so-called space-charge-perturbed (SCP) current under intense optical excitation. A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation combined with an iterative solution of Poisson's equation is used to reproduce the observed currents under several bias voltages and excitation intensities. The SCP theory describes well the transient current in the CZT detector, whereas injection of holes from the anode and a corresponding reduction of the electron lifetime are further required to describe that in the CdTe detector. We visualize the temporal changes in the charge distribution and internal electric field profiles of both detectors.

  1. Nanoscale elasticity mappings of micro-constituents of abalone shell by band excitation-contact resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Zeng, Kaiyang

    2014-01-01

    The macroscopic mechanical properties of the abalone shell have been studied extensively in the literature, but the in situ nanoscale elasticity of various micro-constituents in the shell have not been characterized and reported yet. In this study, the nanoscale elasticity mappings including different micro-constituents in abalone shell were observed by using the Contact Resonance Force Microscopy (CR-FM) technique. CR-FM is one of the advanced scanning probe microscopy techniques that is able to quantify the local elastic moduli of various materials in a non-destructive manner. Instead of an average value, an elasticity mapping that reveals the nanoscale variations of elastic moduli with location can be extracted and correlated with the topography of the structure. Therefore in this study, by adopting the CR-FM technique that is incorporated with the band excitation technique, the elasticity variations of the abalone shell caused by different micro-constituents and crystal orientations are reported, and the elasticity values of the aragonite and calcite nanograins are quantified.The macroscopic mechanical properties of the abalone shell have been studied extensively in the literature, but the in situ nanoscale elasticity of various micro-constituents in the shell have not been characterized and reported yet. In this study, the nanoscale elasticity mappings including different micro-constituents in abalone shell were observed by using the Contact Resonance Force Microscopy (CR-FM) technique. CR-FM is one of the advanced scanning probe microscopy techniques that is able to quantify the local elastic moduli of various materials in a non-destructive manner. Instead of an average value, an elasticity mapping that reveals the nanoscale variations of elastic moduli with location can be extracted and correlated with the topography of the structure. Therefore in this study, by adopting the CR-FM technique that is incorporated with the band excitation technique, the

  2. Principal component analysis acceleration of rovibrational coarse-grain models for internal energy excitation and dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellemans, Aurélie; Parente, Alessandro; Magin, Thierry

    2018-04-01

    The present work introduces a novel approach for obtaining reduced chemistry representations of large kinetic mechanisms in strong non-equilibrium conditions. The need for accurate reduced-order models arises from compression of large ab initio quantum chemistry databases for their use in fluid codes. The method presented in this paper builds on existing physics-based strategies and proposes a new approach based on the combination of a simple coarse grain model with Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The internal energy levels of the chemical species are regrouped in distinct energy groups with a uniform lumping technique. Following the philosophy of machine learning, PCA is applied on the training data provided by the coarse grain model to find an optimally reduced representation of the full kinetic mechanism. Compared to recently published complex lumping strategies, no expert judgment is required before the application of PCA. In this work, we will demonstrate the benefits of the combined approach, stressing its simplicity, reliability, and accuracy. The technique is demonstrated by reducing the complex quantum N2(g+1Σ) -N(S4u ) database for studying molecular dissociation and excitation in strong non-equilibrium. Starting from detailed kinetics, an accurate reduced model is developed and used to study non-equilibrium properties of the N2(g+1Σ) -N(S4u ) system in shock relaxation simulations.

  3. Time-resolved infrared and resonance Raman studies of benzil. Vibrational analysis and structures of the excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Misao; Iwata, Koichi; Takahashi, Hiroaki

    2003-12-01

    Structures of the S 1 and T 1 states of benzil are examined based on the experimental results from nanosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy and picosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy. Nanosecond time-resolved infrared spectra of the T 1 state of benzil as well as its three isotopically substituted analogues were measured in carbon tetrachloride. The observed infrared bands of T 1 benzil were assigned based on the frequency shifts on isotopic ( 18O, and deuteration) substitutions. The infrared band at 1312 cm -1 is assigned to the CO anti-symmetric stretch vibration. An infrared band that has large contribution from the central C-C stretch is not observed. Picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectra of the S 1 state of benzil were also measured. It has been reported that after the photoexcitation, the benzil molecule shows an ultrafast conformational change in the S 1 state. The observed resonance Raman bands are attributable to the vibrations of the relaxed form of the S 1 state. By comparing the Raman and infrared spectra of the S 0, S 1, and T 1 states of benzil, the structures of benzil in the excited states are discussed. Upon going from the S 0 state to the S 1 or T 1 state, the bond order of the CO bond decreases while that of the central C-C bond increases. Although several ground-state bands appear in both the infrared and Raman spectra, there is no band observed simultaneously in the infrared and Raman spectra of the T 1 state, except for bands attributable to the phenyl ring vibrations. We conclude that T 1 benzil has the inversion center that arises from the trans-planar structure. The spectral pattern of the resonance Raman scattering of the relaxed S 1 state is very similar to that of the T 1 state. This implies that the molecular structure of the relaxed S 1 state is similar to that of the T 1 state. The structure of the relaxed form of the S 1 state is also considered to be trans-planar.

  4. Resonance Raman and excitation energy dependent charge transfer mechanism in halide-substituted hybrid perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Byung-wook; Jain, Sagar M; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2015-02-24

    Organo-metal halide perovskites (OMHPs) are materials with attractive properties for optoelectronics. They made a recent introduction in the photovoltaics world by methylammonium (MA) lead triiodide and show remarkably improved charge separation capabilities when chloride and bromide are added. Here we show how halide substitution in OMHPs with the nominal composition CH3NH3PbI2X, where X is I, Br, or Cl, influences the morphology, charge quantum yield, and local interaction with the organic MA cation. X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence data demonstrate that halide substitution affects the local structure in the OMHPs with separate MAPbI3 and MAPbCl3 phases. Raman spectroscopies as well as theoretical vibration calculations reveal that this at the same time delocalizes the charge to the MA cation, which can liberate the vibrational movement of the MA cation, leading to a more adaptive organic phase. The resonance Raman effect together with quantum chemical calculations is utilized to analyze the change in charge transfer mechanism upon electronic excitation and gives important clues for the mechanism of the much improved photovoltage and photocurrent also seen in the solar cell performance for the materials when chloride compounds are included in the preparation.

  5. Resonant excitation of high order modes in the 3.9 GHz cavity of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunin, A.; Khabiboulline, T.; Solyak, N.; Sukhanov, A.; Yakovlev, V.

    2018-02-01

    Construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) is underway for the world's first hard x-ray free-electron laser. A central part of the LCLS-II project is a 4 GeV superconducting radio frequency electron linac that will operate in the continuous wave (cw) mode. The linac is segmented into four sections named as L 0 , L 1 , L 2 , and L 3 . Two 3.9 GHz cryomodules, each housing of eight third-harmonic cavities similar to the cavities developed for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL), will be used in section L 1 of the linac for linearizing the longitudinal beam profile. In this paper, we present a study of trapped high order modes (HOMs) excited by a cw electron beam in the third-harmonic cavities of the LCLS-II linac. A detailed comparison of the original XFEL design and the LCLS-II design with a modified end group is performed in order to estimate the effect of a reduced beam pipe aperture on the efficiency of HOM damping. Furthermore, we apply a statistical analysis of the eigenmode spectrum for the estimation of the probability of resonant HOM losses and influence of HOMs on beam dynamics.

  6. First-principles investigation on Rydberg and resonance excitations: A case study of the firefly luciferin anion

    SciTech Connect

    Noguchi, Yoshifumi, E-mail: y.noguchi@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Hiyama, Miyabi; Akiyama, Hidefumi

    2014-07-28

    The optical properties of an isolated firefly luciferin anion are investigated by using first-principles calculations, employing the many-body perturbation theory to take into account the excitonic effect. The calculated photoabsorption spectra are compared with the results obtained using the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) employing the localized atomic orbital (AO) basis sets and a recent experiment in vacuum. The present method well reproduces the line shape at the photon energy corresponding to the Rydberg and resonance excitations but overestimates the peak positions by about 0.5 eV. However, the TDDFT-calculated positions of some peaks are closer to those of the experiment.more » We also investigate the basis set dependency in describing the free electron states above vacuum level and the excitons involving the transitions to the free electron states and conclude that AO-only basis sets are inaccurate for free electron states and the use of a plane wave basis set is required.« less

  7. Ion Internal Excitation and Co++ 2 Reactivity: Effect On The Titan, Mars and Venus Ionospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, C.; Zabka, J.; Thissen, R.; Dutuit, O.; Alcaraz, C.

    In planetary ionospheres, primary molecular and atomic photoions can be produced with substantial electronic and vibrational internal energy. In some cases, this is known to strongly affect both the rate constants and the branching ratio between the reac- tion products. A previous experimental study (Nicolas et al.) made at the Orsay syn- chrotron radiation facility has shown that many endothermic charge transfer reactions which were not considered in the ionospheric chemistry models of Mars, Venus and Earth have to be included because they are driven by electronic excitation of the parent ions. New measurements on two important reactions for Titan and Mars ionospheres, N+ + CH4 and O+ + CO2, will be presented. Branching ratios between products are very different when the parent atomic ions are prepared in their ground states, N+(3P) and O+(4S), or in their first electronic metastable states N+(1D) and O+(2D or P). 2 As the lifetime of these states are long enough, they survive during the mean time be- tween two collisions in the ionospheric conditions. So, the reactions of these excited states must be included in the ionospheric models. Absolute cross section measurements of the reactivity of stable doubly charged molec- ular ions CO++ and their implications for the Martian ionosphere will also be pre- 2 sented. The molecular dication CO++ production by VUV photoionisation and elec- 2 tron impact in the upper ionosphere of Mars is far from being negligible. However, to determine its concentration, it was necessary to evaluate the major loss channels of these ions. For this purpose, we measured the absolute reaction cross section of the sta- ble dications with CO2, the major neutral species of the Mars ionosphere. CO++ ions 2 were produced either by photoionisation or by electron impact, and a reaction cross section of 45 Å2 with 13CO2 was measured. The reaction leads to charge transfer or to collision induced dissociation. These results were integrated in a model

  8. Etats excites en couche interne de haut spin de neon hautement ionise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapierre, Alain

    En plus d'être observés lors de plusieurs phénomènes d'interactions multi- électroniques et multi-atomiques, la description des états excités en couche interne est un test sensible à celle de la corrélation électronique. Suivant une spectroscopie faisceau- lame effectuée antérieurement des régions spectrales de l'ultraviolet et du visible (1800-5300 Å) de néon à 10 MeV, des raies spectrales (d'émission) satellites de celles des transitions hydrogéniques (l = n - 1) et l < n - 1, n = 6 - n' = 7, n = 7 - n' = 8 et n = 8 - n' = 9 du néon lithiumoïde (Ne VIII) sont assignées à l'aide de calculs Hartree-Fock, à des transitions de mêmes nombres quantiques principaux entre des états quadruplet dont le cœur est excité en 1s2s 3S. Quelques raies sont assignées à des transitions entre des niveaux n = 3 pour le Ne VI, VII et IX. Par la suite, les transitions quadruplet, quintuplet et sextuplet n = 2 - n' = 3 et n = 2 - n' = 4 du néon lithiumoïde, bérylliumoïde (Ne VII) et boroïde (Ne VI), respectivement, ont été investiguées par spectroscopie faisceau-lame dans la région spectrale des XUV (60-125 Å). Ces investigations sont supportées par des calculs Hartree-Fock et des régressions linéaires sur les séquences isoélectroniques, effectués en parallèle. Des mesures de la durée de vie moyenne de termes n = 3 ont été réalisées et plusieurs raies sont nouvellement identifiées à des transitions de Ne VI à IX.

  9. Internal transitions of neutral (X) and negatively charged (X(-)) magneto-excitons investigated by optically detected resonance (ODR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, Hans Andreas

    Optically detected resonance (ODR) spectroscopy, an experimental technique combining spectroscopy in the far-infrared and visible regimes of the spectrum, has been applied to non-intentionally- and modulation-doped, quasi-2D GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures at low temperatures and high magnetic fields to study internal transitions of neutral (X) and negatively charged (X--) magneto-excitons. In quasi-2D GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures with a low density of free carriers, such as undoped multiple-quantum-wells, the ground state of optical excitations is the neutral exciton. This hydrogenic system was studied by far-infrared ODR spectroscopy, and internal excitonic transitions (IETs) 1s → np+/- from the ground state (1s) to excited states (np+/-) were found. Three samples of different well widths were studied systematically, and the behavior of the observed transitions as a function of the sample well-width was as expected. A predicted consequence of an inherent symmetry to the system was verified experimentally for the first time by the simultaneous observation of IETs and electron and hole cyclotron resonance in one sample in one experiment. In addition, it was also found, that the observability of IETs is destroyed as soon as there is a sign of X---recombination in the photoluminescence spectrum. In quantum wells with a small number of excess electrons the ground state of the system under optical excitation is the negatively charged exciton, X--. This mobile system of a hole binding two electrons differs significantly in certain aspects from its immobile impurity analogue, the negatively charged donor ion D-- . The mobility of the charged complex is tied to a hidden symmetry of magnetic translations, which leads to a new selection rule, that forbids X-- bound-to-bound transitions, in contrast to the D -- system, in which these transitions are dominant. In this dissertation, several samples that show X-- recombination in photoluminescence measurements were studied with

  10. Design and implementation of improved LsCpLp resonant circuit for power supply for high-power electromagnetic acoustic transducer excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zao, Yongming; Ouyang, Qi; Chen, Jiawei; Zhang, Xinglan; Hou, Shuaicheng

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the design and implementation of an improved series-parallel inductor-capacitor-inductor (LsCpLp) resonant circuit power supply for excitation of electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs). The main advantage of the proposed resonant circuit is the absence of a high-permeability dynamic transformer. A high-frequency pulsating voltage gain can be achieved through a double resonance phenomenon. Both resonant tailing behavior and higher harmonics are suppressed by the improved resonant circuit, which also contributes to the generation of ultrasonic waves. Additionally, the proposed circuit can realize impedance matching and can also optimize the transduction efficiency. The complete design and implementation procedure for the power supply is described and has been validated by implementation of the proposed power supply to drive a portable EMAT. The circuit simulation results show close agreement with the experimental results and thus confirm the validity of the proposed topology. The proposed circuit is suitable for use as a portable EMAT excitation power supply that is fed by a low-voltage source.

  11. Amplitude-dependent internal friction, hysteretic nonlinearity, and nonlinear oscillations in a magnesite resonator.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, V E; Kolpakov, A B; Radostin, A V

    2012-07-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of low-frequency nonlinear acoustics phenomena (amplitude-dependent loss, resonance frequency shifts, and a generation of second and third harmonics) in a magnesite rod resonator are presented. Acceleration and velocity oscillograms of vibrations of the free boundary of the resonator caused by harmonic excitations were measured and analyzed. A theoretical description of the observed amplitude dependences was carried out within the framework of the phenomenological state equations that contain either of the two types of hysteretic nonlinearity (elastic and inelastic). The type of hysteresis and parameters of acoustic nonlinearity of magnesite were established from comparing the experimental measurements with the theoretical dependences. The values of the parameters were anomalously high even when compared to those of other strongly nonlinear polycrystalline materials such as granite, marble, limestone, sandstone, etc.

  12. Direct observation of spin-quadrupolar excitations in Sr2CoGe2O7 by high-field electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaki, Mitsuru; Yoshizawa, Daichi; Okutani, Akira; Kida, Takanori; Romhányi, Judit; Penc, Karlo; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2017-12-01

    Exotic spin-multipolar ordering in spin transition metal insulators has so far eluded unambiguous experimental observation. A less studied, but perhaps more feasible fingerprint of multipole character emerges in the excitation spectrum in the form of quadrupolar transitions. Such multipolar excitations are desirable as they can be manipulated with the use of light or electric field and can be captured by means of conventional experimental techniques. Here we study single crystals of multiferroic Sr2CoGe2O7 and observe a two-magnon spin excitation appearing above the saturation magnetic field in electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra. Our analysis of the selection rules reveals that this spin excitation mode does not couple to the magnetic component of the light, but it is excited by the electric field only, in full agreement with the theoretical calculations. Due to the nearly isotropic nature of Sr2CoGe2O7 , we identify this excitation as a purely spin-quadrupolar two-magnon mode.

  13. Pulsed-laser excitation of acoustic modes in open high-Q photoacoustic resonators for trace gas monitoring: results for C2H4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Christian; Winkler, Andreas; Hess, Peter; Miklós, András; Bozóki, Zoltán; Sneider, János

    1995-06-01

    The pulsed excitation of acoustic resonances was studied with a continuously monitoring photoacoustic detector system. Acoustic waves were generated in C2H4/N 2 gas mixtures by light absorption of the pulses from a transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser. The photoacoustic part consisted of high-Q cylindrical resonators (Q factor 820 for the first radial mode in N2) and two adjoining variable acoustic filter systems. The time-resolved signal was Fourier transformed to a frequency spectrum of high resolution. For the first radial mode a Lorentzian profile was fitted to the measured data. The outside noise suppression and the signal-to-noise ratio were investigated in a normal laboratory environment in the flow-through mode. The acoustic and electric filter system combined with the

  14. Internal polarization dynamics of vector dissipative-soliton-resonance pulses in normal dispersion fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Daojing; Shen, Deyuan; Li, Lei; Tang, Dingyuan; Su, Lei; Zhao, Luming

    2018-03-15

    Internal polarization dynamics of vector dissipative-soliton-resonance (DSR) pulses in a mode-locked fiber laser are investigated. By utilizing a wave plate analyzer configuration to analyze the special structure of a DSR pulse, we find that polarization state is not uniform across a resonant dissipative soliton. Specifically, although the central plane wave of the resonant dissipative soliton acquires nearly a single fixed polarization, the dissipative fronts feature polarization states that are different and spatially varying. This distinct polarization distribution is maintained while the whole soliton extends with increasing gain. Numerical simulation further confirms the experimental observations.

  15. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering study of charge excitations in superconducting and nonsuperconducting PrFeAsO₁₋ y

    DOE PAGES

    Jarrige, I.; Nomura, T.; Ishii, K.; ...

    2012-09-05

    We report the first observation by momentum-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering of charge excitations in an iron-based superconductor and its parent compound, PrFeAsO₀.₇ and PrFeAsO, respectively, with two main results. First, using calculations based on a 16-band dp model, we show that the energy of the lowest-lying excitations, identified as dd interband transitions of dominant xz,yz orbital character, exhibits a dramatic dependence on electron correlation. This enables us to estimate the Coulomb repulsion U and Hund's coupling J, and to highlight the role played by J in these peculiar orbital-dependent electron correlation effects. Second, we show that short-range antiferromagnetic correlations,more » which are a prerequisite to the occurrence of these excitations at the Γ point, are still present in the superconducting state.« less

  16. On-chip beamsplitter operation on single photons from quasi-resonantly excited quantum dots embedded in GaAs rib waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Rengstl, U.; Schwartz, M.; Herzog, T.

    2015-07-13

    We present an on-chip beamsplitter operating on a single-photon level by means of a quasi-resonantly driven InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot. The single photons are guided by rib waveguides and split into two arms by an evanescent field coupler. Although the waveguides themselves support the fundamental TE and TM modes, the measured degree of polarization (∼90%) reveals the main excitation and propagation of the TE mode. We observe the preserved single-photon nature of a quasi-resonantly excited quantum dot by performing a cross-correlation measurement on the two output arms of the beamsplitter. Additionally, the same quantum dot is investigated under resonant excitation, wheremore » the same splitting ratio is observed. An autocorrelation measurement with an off-chip beamsplitter on a single output arm reveal the single-photon nature after evanescent coupling inside the on-chip splitter. Due to their robustness, adjustable splitting ratio, and their easy implementation, rib waveguide beamsplitters with embedded quantum dots provide a promising step towards fully integrated quantum circuits.« less

  17. Internal resonance of an elastic body levitated above high-Tc superconducting bulks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokuzawa, T.; Toshihiko, S.; Yoshizawa, M.

    2010-06-01

    In high-Tc superconducting magnetic levitation systems, levitated bodies can keep stable levitation with no contact and no control and thus their damping is very small. Thanks to these features, their applications to various apparatus are expected. However, on account of their small damping, the nonlinearity of electromagnetic levitation force can give notable effects upon motion of the levitated bodies. Therefore this nonlinearity must be taken into account to accurately analyze the dynamical behavior of the levitated bodies. Structures of such a levitated body can show elastic deformation if the large electromagnetic force acts on it. Therefore, we need to deal with the model as an elastic body. As mentioned above, nonlinear characteristics easily appear in this elastic vibration on account of the small damping. Especially when the ratio of the natural frequencies of the eigenmodes is integer, internal resonance can occur. This nonlinear resonance is derived from nonlinear interactions among the eigenmodes of the elastic levitated body. This kind of internal resonance of an elastic body appearing in high-Tc superconducting levitation systems has not been studied so far. This research especially deals with internal resonance of a beam supported at both its ends by electromagnetic forces acting on permanent magnets. The governing equation with the nonlinear boundary conditions for the dynamics of a levitated beam has been derived. Numerical results show internal resonance of the 1st mode and the 3rd mode. Experimental results are qualitatively in good agreement with numerical ones.

  18. Dissociation and Internal Excitation of Molecular Nitrogen Due to N + N2 Collisions Using Direct Molecular Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grover, Maninder S.; Schwartzentruber, Thomas E.; Jaffe, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present a molecular level study of N2+N collisions, focusing on excitation of internal energy modes and non-equilibrium dissociation. The computation technique used here is the direct molecular simulation (DMS) method and the molecular interactions have been modeled using an ab-initio potential energy surface (PES) developed at NASA's Ames Research Center. We carried out vibrational excitation calculations between 5000K and 30000K and found that the characteristic vibrational excitation time for the N + N2 process was an order of magnitude lower than that predicted by the Millikan and White correlation. It is observed that during vibrational excitation the high energy tail of the vibrational energy distribution gets over populated first and the lower energy levels get populated as the system evolves. It is found that the non-equilibrium dissociation rate coefficients for the N + N2 process are larger than those for the N2 + N2 process. This is attributed to the non-equilibrium vibrational energy distributions for the N + N2 process being less depleted than that for the N2 +N2 process. For an isothermal simulation we find that the probability of dissociation goes as 1/T(sub tr) for molecules with internal energy (epsilon(sub int)) less than approximately 9.9eV, while for molecules with epsilon (sub int) greater than 9.9eV the dissociation probability was weakly dependent on translational temperature of the system. We compared non-equilibrium dissociation rate coefficients and characteristic vibrational excitation times obtained by using the ab-initio PES developed at NASA's Ames Research Center to those obtained by using an ab-initio PES developed at the University of Minnesota. Good agreement was found between the macroscopic properties and molecular level description of the system obtained by using the two PESs.

  19. Photoresponse of 60Ni below 10-MeV excitation energy: Evolution of dipole resonances in fp-shell nuclei near N=Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheck, M.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Fritzsche, M.; Joubert, J.; Aumann, T.; Beller, J.; Isaak, J.; Kelley, J. H.; Kwan, E.; Pietralla, N.; Raut, R.; Romig, C.; Rusev, G.; Savran, D.; Schorrenberger, L.; Sonnabend, K.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H. R.; Zilges, A.; Zweidinger, M.

    2013-10-01

    Background: Within the last decade, below the giant dipole resonance the existence of a concentration of additional electric dipole strength has been established. This accumulation of low-lying E1 strength is commonly referred to as pygmy dipole resonance (PDR).Purpose: The photoresponse of 60Ni has been investigated experimentally and theoretically to test the evolution of the PDR in a nucleus with only a small neutron excess. Furthermore, the isoscalar and isovector M1 resonances were investigated.Method: Spin-1 states were excited by exploiting the (γ,γ') nuclear resonance fluorescence technique with unpolarized continuous bremsstrahlung as well as with fully linearly polarized, quasimonochromatic, Compton-backscattered laser photons in the entrance channel of the reaction.Results: Up to 10 MeV a detailed picture of J=1 levels was obtained. For the preponderant number of the individual levels spin and parity were firmly assigned. Furthermore, branching ratios, transition widths, and reduced B(E1) or B(M1) excitation probability were calculated from the measured scattering cross sections. A comparison with theoretical results obtained within the quasiparticle phonon model allows an insight into the microscopic structure of the observed states.Conclusions: Below 10 MeV the directly observed E1 strength [∑B(E1)↑=(153.8±9.5) e2(fm)2] exhausts 0.5% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule. This value increases to 0.8% of the sum rule [∑B(E1)↑=(250.9±31.1) e2(fm)2] when indirectly observed branches to lower-lying levels are considered. Two accumulations of M1 excited spin-1 states near 8 and 9 MeV excitation energy are identified as isoscalar and isovector M1 resonances dominated by proton and neutron f7/2→f5/2 spin-flip excitations. The B(M1)↑ strength of these structures accumulates to 3.94(27)μN2.

  20. Whole body traveling wave magnetic resonance imaging at high field strength: homogeneity, efficiency, and energy deposition as compared with traditional excitation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bei; Sodickson, Daniel K; Lattanzi, Riccardo; Duan, Qi; Stoeckel, Bernd; Wiggins, Graham C

    2012-04-01

    In 7 T traveling wave imaging, waveguide modes supported by the scanner radiofrequency shield are used to excite an MR signal in samples or tissue which may be several meters away from the antenna used to drive radiofrequency power into the system. To explore the potential merits of traveling wave excitation for whole-body imaging at 7 T, we compare numerical simulations of traveling wave and TEM systems, and juxtapose full-wave electrodynamic simulations using a human body model with in vivo human traveling wave imaging at multiple stations covering the entire body. The simulated and in vivo traveling wave results correspond well, with strong signal at the periphery of the body and weak signal deep in the torso. These numerical results also illustrate the complicated wave behavior that emerges when a body is present. The TEM resonator simulation allowed comparison of traveling wave excitation with standard quadrature excitation, showing that while the traveling wave B +1 per unit drive voltage is much less than that of the TEM system, the square of the average B +1 compared to peak specific absorption rate (SAR) values can be comparable in certain imaging planes. Both systems produce highly inhomogeneous excitation of MR signal in the torso, suggesting that B(1) shimming or other parallel transmission methods are necessary for 7 T whole body imaging. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Stability of two-mode internal resonance in a nonlinear oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanette, Damián H.

    2018-05-01

    We analyze the stability of synchronized periodic motion for two coupled oscillators, representing two interacting oscillation modes in a nonlinear vibrating beam. The main oscillation mode is governed by the forced Duffing equation, while the other mode is linear. By means of the multiple-scale approach, the system is studied in two situations: an open-loop configuration, where the excitation is an external force, and a closed-loop configuration, where the system is fed back with an excitation obtained from the oscillation itself. The latter is relevant to the functioning of time-keeping micromechanical devices. While the accessible amplitudes and frequencies of stationary oscillations are identical in the two situations, their stability properties are substantially different. Emphasis is put on resonant oscillations, where energy transfer between the two coupled modes is maximized and, consequently, the strong interdependence between frequency and amplitude caused by nonlinearity is largely suppressed.

  2. Internal additive noise effects in stochastic resonance using organic field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yoshiharu; Asakawa, Naoki; Matsubara, Kiyohiko

    Stochastic resonance phenomenon was observed in organic field effect transistor using poly(3-hexylthiophene), which enhances performance of signal transmission with application of noise. The enhancement of correlation coefficient between the input and output signals was low, and the variation of correlation coefficient was not remarkable with respect to the intensity of external noise, which was due to the existence of internal additive noise following the nonlinear threshold response. In other words, internal additive noise plays a positive role on the capability of approximately constant signal transmission regardless of noise intensity, which can be said “homeostatic” behavior or “noise robustness” against externalmore » noise. Furthermore, internal additive noise causes emergence of the stochastic resonance effect even on the threshold unit without internal additive noise on which the correlation coefficient usually decreases monotonically.« less

  3. Realistic vs sudden turn-on of natural incoherent light: Coherences and dynamics in molecular excitation and internal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Grinev, Timur; Brumer, Paul

    2015-12-28

    Molecular excitation with incoherent light is examined using realistic turn-on time scales, and results are compared to those obtained via commonly used sudden turn-on, or pulses. Two significant results are obtained. First, in contrast to prior studies involving sudden turn-on, realistic turn-on is shown to lead to stationary coherences for natural turn-on time scales. Second, the time to reach the final stationary mixed state, known to result from incoherent excitation, is shown to depend directly on the inverse of the molecular energy level spacings, in both sudden and realistic turn-on cases. The S{sub 0} → S{sub 2}/S{sub 1} internal conversionmore » process in pyrazine is used as an example throughout. Implications for studies of natural light harvesting systems are noted.« less

  4. 808 nm-excited upconversion nanoprobes with low heating effect for targeted magnetic resonance imaging and high-efficacy photodynamic therapy in HER2-overexpressed breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Leyong; Pan, Yuanwei; Zou, Ruifen; Zhang, Jinchao; Tian, Ying; Teng, Zhaogang; Wang, Shouju; Ren, Wenzhi; Xiao, Xueshan; Zhang, Jichao; Zhang, Lili; Li, Aiguo; Lu, Guangming; Wu, Aiguo

    2016-10-01

    To avoid the overheating effect of excitation light and improve the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of upconversion nanoplatform, a novel nanoprobe based on 808 nm-excited upconversion nanocomposites (T-UCNPs@Ce6@mSiO2) with low heating effect and deep penetration has been successfully constructed for targeted upconversion luminescence, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high-efficacy PDT in HER2-overexpressed breast cancer. In this nanocomposite, photosensitizers (Ce6) were covalently conjugated inside of mesoporous silica to enhance the PDT efficacy by shortening the distance of fluorescence resonance energy transfer and to decrease the cytotoxicity by preventing the undesired leakage of Ce6. Compared with UCNPs@mSiO2@Ce6, UCNPs@Ce6@mSiO2 greatly promoted the singlet oxygen generation and amplified the PDT efficacy under the excitation of 808 nm laser. Importantly, the designed nanoprobe can greatly improve the uptake of HER2-positive cells and tumors by modifying the site-specific peptide, and the in vivo experiments showed excellent MRI and PDT via intravenous injection by modeling MDA-MB-435 tumor-bearing nude mice. Our strategy may provide an effective solution for overcoming the heating effect and improving the PDT efficacy of upconversion nanoprobes, and has potential application in visualized theranostics of HER2-overexpressed breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Integer ratios of S{sub n}/E{sub n} in {sup 40}Ca+n resonances suggesting two-oscillator excitations in the target nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, Makio

    2009-08-15

    In s-wave neutron resonances of {sup 40}Ca at E{sub n}{<=}2.5 MeV, S{sub n}/E{sub n} for many levels is found to be of the form 17(n/m) where n, m are small integers. Statistical tests show small probabilities for the observed dispositions of many levels at E{sub n}=(j/k)(1/70)G (j, k; small integers). To meet the requirement of time periodicity of the compound nucleus at resonance, a breathing model is developed, where the excitation energies E{sub x} are written as a sum of inverse integers; E{sub x}=S{sub n}+E{sub n}=G{sigma}(1/k) (k: integer). In {sup 40}Ca+n, the separation energy S{sub n}=8362 keV is written asmore » S{sub n}=(17/70)G=(1/7+1/10)G, where G=34.4 MeV. G is almost equal to the Fermi energy of the nucleus. It is suggested that two oscillators of energy (1/7)G and (1/10)G are excited in {sup 40}Ca by neutron incidence, in which the recurrence energy (1/70)G is resonant with neutrons of energies at (j/k)(1/70)G, forming a simple compound nucleus.« less

  6. Rate coefficients for dissociative attachment and resonant electron-impact dissociation involving vibrationally excited O{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laporta, V.; Celiberto, R.; Tennyson, J.

    Rate coefficients for dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact dissociation processes, involving vibrationally excited molecular oxygen, are presented. Analytical fits of the calculated numerical data, useful in the applications, are also provided.

  7. Internally resonating lattices for bandgap generation and low-frequency vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baravelli, Emanuele; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2013-12-01

    The paper reports on a structural concept for high stiffness and high damping performance. A stiff external frame and an internal resonating lattice are combined in a beam-like assembly which is characterized by high frequency bandgaps and tuned vibration attenuation at low frequencies. The resonating lattice consists of an elastomeric material arranged according to a chiral topology which is designed to resonate at selected frequencies. The concept achieves high damping performance by combining the frequency-selective properties of internally resonating structures, with the energy dissipation characteristics of their constituent material. The flexible ligaments, the circular nodes and the non-central interactions of the chiral topology lead to dynamic deformation patterns which are beneficial to energy dissipation. Furthermore, tuning and grading of the elements of the lattice allows for tailoring of the resonating properties so that vibration attenuation is obtained over desired frequency ranges. Numerical and experimental results demonstrate the tuning flexibility of this concept and suggest its potential application for load-carrying structural members parts of vibration and shock prone systems.

  8. Simulation of the excitation of quasi-plane wake waves in a plasma by a resonant sequence of laser pulses with a variable envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinnikova, E. I.; Levchenko, V. D.

    2008-04-15

    Results are presented from full-scale numerical simulations of the excitation of wake waves by a sequence of weakly relativistic laser pulses in a subcritical plasma. Computations were carried out with a 2D3V version of the SUR-CA code that is based on the local-recursive nonlocal-asynchronous algorithm of the particle-in-cell method. The parameters of a train of laser pulses were chosen to correspond to the resonant excitation of the wake field. The curvature of the envelope of the pulses was chosen to depend on the number of the pulse in the train. Numerical simulations showed that there are plane waves during themore » first period of the plasma wave behind the pulse train.« less

  9. Multi-directional energy harvesting by piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum with internal resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Tang, J., E-mail: jtang@engr.uconn.edu

    This letter reports a piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum design for multi-directional energy harvesting. A pendulum is attached to the tip of a piezoelectric cantilever-type energy harvester. This design aims at taking advantage of the nonlinear coupling between the pendulum motion in 3-dimensional space and the beam bending vibration at resonances. Experimental studies indicate that, under properly chosen parameters, 1:2 internal resonance can be induced, which enables the multi-directional energy harvesting with a single cantilever. The advantages of the design with respect to traditional piezoelectric cantilever are examined.

  10. State-specific approach and computation of resonance states: Identification and properties of the lowest 2Po and 2D triply excited states of He-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.; Piangos, Nicos A.

    2001-11-01

    We discuss aspects of the theory and computation of resonance (autoionizing) states of polyelectronic atoms and their positive and negative ions, in the context of the state-specific approach, using as paradigms the He-2s22p 2Po and 2s2p2 2D triply excited states. The He- 2D resonance has been the subject of controversy about its nature and its very existence, with ramifications as to the physics of electron-He scattering measurements and as to the theory of resonance states in multiparticle systems in general. By carrying out a series of computations, we show how (quasi)localization of these resonances takes place. The results confirm the existence of the 2D resonance just below the energy of the He 2s2p 3Po resonance, with which it overlaps. The localization of the two He- resonances is achieved already at the single-configuration level, provided the orbitals are calculated by solving state-specific restricted Hartree-Fock (HF) equations. Accounting for orbital flexibility and relaxation due to the self-consistent interactions is essential to the achievement of a local energy minimum. The localized nature of the wavepacket is revealed even more definitely by solving appropriate multiconfigurational HF (MCHF) equations containing the information from the self-consistent interaction with closed channels as well as with the neighboring significant open ones. Reaching a reliable MCHF solution for a variety of polyelectronic multiply excited states may often be difficult, but once it is achieved it provides the overwhelmingly dominant characteristics of the state. It is then used as the reference wave function for computing variationally the remaining of the localized electron correlation in terms of optimized analytic orbitals representing very nearly the full space of the electron virtual excitations. The calculation of the localized part Ψ0 and of E0=<Ψ0/H/Ψ0>, is done by nonorthonormal configuration interaction (NONCI) since parts of Ψ0 are optimized

  11. High-energy magnetic excitations in overdoped La 2-xSr xCuO 4 studied by neutron and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Wakimoto, S.; Ishii, K.; Kimura, H.; ...

    2015-05-21

    We have performed neutron inelastic scattering and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu-L 3 edge to study high-energy magnetic excitations at energy transfers of more than 100 meV for overdoped La 2₋xSr xCuO 4 with x=0.25 (T c=15 K) and x=0.30 (nonsuperconducting) using identical single-crystal samples for the two techniques. From constant-energy slices of neutron-scattering cross sections, we have identified magnetic excitations up to ~250 meV for x=0.25. Although the width in the momentum direction is large, the peak positions along the (π,π) direction agree with the dispersion relation of the spin wave in the nondoped La 2CuOmore » 4 (LCO), which is consistent with the previous RIXS results of cuprate superconductors. Using RIXS at the Cu-L 3 edge, we have measured the dispersion relations of the so-called paramagnon mode along both (π,π) and (π,0) directions. Although in both directions the neutron and RIXS data connect with each other and the paramagnon along (π,0) agrees well with the LCO spin-wave dispersion, the paramagnon in the (π,π) direction probed by RIXS appears to be less dispersive and the excitation energy is lower than the spin wave of LCO near (π/2,π/2). Thus, our results indicate consistency between neutron inelastic scattering and RIXS, and elucidate the entire magnetic excitation in the (π,π) direction by the complementary use of two probes. The polarization dependence of the RIXS profiles indicates that appreciable charge excitations exist in the same energy range of magnetic excitations, reflecting the itinerant character of the overdoped sample. Lastly, we find a possible anisotropy in the charge excitation intensity might explain the apparent differences in the paramagnon dispersion in the (π,π) direction as detected by the x-ray scattering.« less

  12. Dorsoventral differences in Kv7/M-current and its impact on resonance, temporal summation and excitability in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Hönigsperger, Christoph; Marosi, Máté; Murphy, Ricardo; Storm, Johan F

    2015-01-01

    Key points Kv7 (KCNQ/M) channels are known to control excitability and generate subthreshold M-resonance in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells, but their properties and functions have not previously been compared along the dorsoventral (septotemporal) axis We used whole-cell recordings to compare electrophysiological properties of dorsal and ventral CA1 pyramidal cells in hippocampal slices from 3- to 4-week-old rats Blockade of Kv7/M-channels with 10,10-bis(4-pyridinylmethyl)-9(10H)-anthracenone dihydrochloride (XE991) had a stronger impact on electrical properties in dorsal than ventral pyramidal cells, including input resistance, temporal summation, M-resonance, spike threshold, medium after-hyperpolarization, excitability, and spike frequency adaptation. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed a larger amplitude and left-shifted voltage dependence of XE991-sensitive current (IM) in dorsal vs. ventral cells. IM-dependent differences in excitability and resonance may be important for rate and phase coding of CA1 place cells along the dorsoventral axis and may enhance epileptiform activity in ventral pyramidal cells. Abstract In rodent hippocampi, the connections, gene expression and functions differ along the dorsoventral (D–V) axis. CA1 pyramidal cells show increasing excitability along the D–V axis, although the underlying mechanism is not known. In the present study, we investigated how the M-current (IM), caused by Kv7/M (KCNQ) potassium channels, and known to often control neuronal excitability, contributes to D–V differences in intrinsic properties of CA1 pyramidal cells. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings and the selective Kv7/M blocker 10,10-bis(4-pyridinylmethyl)-9(10H)-anthracenone dihydrochloride (XE991) in hippocampal slices from 3- to 4-week-old rats, we found that: (i) IM had a stronger impact on subthreshold electrical properties in dorsal than ventral CA1 pyramidal cells, including input resistance, temporal summation of artificial synaptic

  13. Resonant frequency of microstrip antennas calculated from TE-excitation of an infinite strip embedded in a grounded dielectric slab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.

    1979-01-01

    The calculation of currents induced by a plane wave normally incident upon an infinite strip embedded in a grounded dielectric slab is used to infer the resonant width (or frequency) of rectangular microstrip antennas. By placing the strip inside the dielectric, the effect of a dielectric cover of the same material as the substrate can be included in the calculation of resonant frequency. A comparison with measured results indicated agreement of 1 percent or better for rectangular microstrip antennas constructed on Teflon-fiberglass substrate.

  14. Quantification of disc displacement in internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Arayasantiparb, Raweewan; Tsuchimochi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Many measures have been developed to determine the extent of disc displacement in internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this study was to develop a quantitative method of analyzing disc position and to evaluate the positions of the disc in internal derangements of the TMJ (group 1, with reduction; group 2, without reduction). Magnetic resonance images of 150 TMJs in 20 healthy volunteers and 55 patients with internal derangements were evaluated. The anatomical points of interest of the TMJ, including the anterior (DA) and posterior (DP) points of the disc, were marked on parasagittal magnetic resonance images of the TMJ disc taken in both the closed- and the open-mouth positions. All points were recorded using an x-y coordinate system, with reference to a referral line. In the closed-mouth position, the DP in patients in group 1 was situated in a more-anterior direction than the DP in volunteers. The DP in group 2 was located further anterior and inferior than the DP in group 1. However, the position of the DA did not differ between group 1 and group 2. In the open-mouth position, the DP was displaced anteroinferiorly to a greater extent in group 2 than in group 1 (one-way ANOVA, followed by Scheffe's test; P < 0.0001). The distance between the disc points in the closed- and open-mouth positions was also evaluated. Comparison of the disc point position in the closed- and open-mouth positions in symptomatic and asymptomatic displaced TMJ discs revealed no significant difference. In conclusion, most of our results quantitatively support previously reported findings in imaging, surgical, and histopathological studies of TMJ internal derangement. We suggest that our measure of disc position of the TMJ would be useful to assess the status and response to treatment of internal derangements of the TMJ.

  15. Chirality, Metallicity, and Transition Dependent Asymmetries in Resonance Raman Excitation Profiles of Chirality-Enriched Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doorn, Stephen; Duque, Juan; Telg, Hagen; Haroz, Erik; Tu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Ming

    2014-03-01

    Access to carbon nanotube samples enriched in single chiralities allows the observation of new photophysical behaviors obscured or difficult to demonstrate in mixed-chirality ensembles. Recent examples include the observation of strongly asymmetric G-band excitation profiles resulting from non-Condon effects1 and the unambiguous demonstration of Raman interference effects.2 We present here our most recent results demonstrating the generality of the non-Condon behavior to include metallic species (specifically several armchair chiralities). Additionally, the Eii dependence in non-Condon behavior with excitations from E11 thru E44 for both RBM and G modes will be discussed. 1. J.G. Duque, et. al., ACS Nano, 5, 5233 (2011). 2. J.G. Duque, et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 117404 (2012).

  16. Raman Laser Spectrometer internal Optical Head current status: opto-mechanical redesign to minimize the excitation laser trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Miguel; Ramos, Gonzalo; Moral, Andoni; Pérez, Carlos; Belenguer, Tomás; del Rosario Canchal, María; Zuluaga, Pablo; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Santiago, Amaia; Rull, Fernando; Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA); Ingeniería de Sistemas para la Defesa de España S.A. (ISDEFE)

    2016-10-01

    Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) is the Pasteur Payload instruments of the ExoMars mission, within the ESA's Aurora Exploration Programme, that will perform for the first time in an out planetary mission Raman spectroscopy. RLS is composed by SPU (Spectrometer Unit), iOH (Internal Optical Head), and ICEU (Instrument Control and Excitation Unit). iOH focuses the excitation laser on the samples (excitation path), and collects the Raman emission from the sample (collection path, composed on collimation system and filtering system). The original design presented a high laser trace reaching to the detector, and although a certain level of laser trace was required for calibration purposes, the high level degrades the Signal to Noise Ratio confounding some Raman peaks.The investigation revealing that the laser trace was not properly filtered as well as the iOH opto-mechanical redesign are reported on. After the study of the Long Pass Filters Optical Density (OD) as a function of the filtering stage to the detector distance, a new set of filters (Notch filters) was decided to be evaluated. Finally, and in order to minimize the laser trace, a new collection path design (mainly consisting on that the collimation and filtering stages are now separated in two barrels, and on the kind of filters to be used) was required. Distance between filters and collimation stage first lens was increased, increasing the OD. With this new design and using two Notch filters, the laser trace was reduced to assumable values, as can be observed in the functional test comparison also reported on this paper.

  17. Two-point active microrheology in a viscous medium exploiting a motional resonance excited in dual-trap optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Shuvojit; Kumar, Randhir; Banerjee, Ayan

    2018-04-01

    Two-point microrheology measurements from widely separated colloidal particles approach the bulk viscosity of the host medium more reliably than corresponding single-point measurements. In addition, active microrheology offers the advantage of enhanced signal to noise over passive techniques. Recently, we reported the observation of a motional resonance induced in a probe particle in dual-trap optical tweezers when the control particle was driven externally [Paul et al., Phys. Rev. E 96, 050102(R) (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevE.96.050102]. We now demonstrate that the amplitude and phase characteristics of the motional resonance can be used as a sensitive tool for active two-point microrheology to measure the viscosity of a viscous fluid. Thus, we measure the viscosity of viscous liquids from both the amplitude and phase response of the resonance, and demonstrate that the zero crossing of the phase response of the probe particle with respect to the external drive is superior compared to the amplitude response in measuring viscosity at large particle separations. We compare our viscosity measurements with those using a commercial rheometer and obtain an agreement ˜1 % . The method can be extended to viscoelastic material where the frequency dependence of the resonance may provide further accuracy for active microrheological measurements.

  18. Fragmentation patterns of multicharged C60r+ (r=3-5) studied with well-controlled internal excitation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S.; Chen, L.; Salmoun, A.; Li, B.; Bernard, J.; Brédy, R.

    2008-04-01

    We have studied the relaxation of triply charged C60 obtained in collisions F2++C60→F-+C603+∗ at low impact energy (E=6.8keV) . Depending on the excitation energy, these initial parent ions decay following a variety of channels, such as thermal electronic ionization, evaporation of C2 units, asymmetrical fission, and multifragmentation. Using a recently developed experimental method, named collision-induced dissociation under energy control, we were able to measure the energy deposited in C603+∗ for each collision event and to obtain an excitation energy profile of the parent ions associated with each decay channel. In our chosen observation time scale of the order of 1μs , evaporations and asymmetrical fissions of C603+,4+ occur when the internal energy is in the range from 40 to 100 eV. The multifragmentation becomes dominant for multicharged C604+,5+ parent ions from 100 to 210 eV. In the case of C604+ , the multifragmentation channel is opened at low energy (40 eV). Therefore, in the energy range 40-100 eV, the asymmetrical fission, evaporation, and multifragmentation channels are in competition.

  19. All-dielectric reflective half-wave plate metasurface based on the anisotropic excitation of electric and magnetic dipole resonances.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhijie; Hanham, Stephen M; Gong, Yandong; Hong, Minghui

    2018-02-15

    We present an all-dielectric metasurface that simultaneously supports electric and magnetic dipole resonances for orthogonal polarizations. At resonances, the metasurface reflects the incident light with nearly perfect efficiency and provides a phase difference of π in the two axes, making a low-loss half-wave plate in reflection mode. The polarization handedness of the incident circularly polarized light is preserved after reflection; this is different from either a pure electric mirror or magnetic mirror. With the features of high reflection and circular polarization conservation, the metamirror is an ideal platform for the geometric phase-based gradient metasurface functioning in reflection mode. Anomalous reflection with the planar meta-mirror is demonstrated as a proof of concept. The proposed meta-mirror can be a good alternative to plasmonic metasurfaces for future compact and high-efficiency metadevices for polarization and phase manipulation in reflection mode.

  20. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, Joshua J.; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; ...

    2015-04-11

    This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm⁻¹ electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed.

  1. Enhanced production of electron cyclotron resonance plasma by exciting selective microwave mode on a large-bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnet.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Daiju; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Imai, Youta; Kumakura, Sho; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    We are constructing a tandem type ECRIS. The first stage is large-bore with cylindrically comb-shaped magnet. We optimize the ion beam current and ion saturation current by a mobile plate tuner. They change by the position of the plate tuner for 2.45 GHz, 11-13 GHz, and multi-frequencies. The peak positions of them are close to the position where the microwave mode forms standing wave between the plate tuner and the extractor. The absorbed powers are estimated for each mode. We show a new guiding principle, which the number of efficient microwave mode should be selected to fit to that of multipole of the comb-shaped magnets. We obtained the excitation of the selective modes using new mobile plate tuner to enhance ECR efficiency.

  2. Effect of specific antibodies on the excitability of internally perfused squid axons.

    PubMed

    Huneeus, F C; Fernandez, H L

    1967-11-01

    Giant axons from the squid Dosidicus gigas were internally perfused with rabbit antiaxoplasm antibodies and their effect upon the action potential and the membrane potential was studied. Necessary requirements for the antibodies to affect these parameters in a consistent manner were: (a) removal of the bulk of axoplasm from the perfused zone, accomplished by initially perfusing with a cysteine-rich (400 mM) solution, and (b) addition of small amounts of cysteine (30 mM) to the antibody-containing solution. When these experimental conditions were met, conduction block ensued generally within 3 hr of the first contact of the axon inner surface with the antibody Antineurofilament antibodies and nonspecific antibodies had no effect. External application of antiaxoplasm antibodies had no effect.

  3. Do Not Resonate with Actions: Sentence Polarity Modulates Cortico-Spinal Excitability during Action-Related Sentence Reading

    PubMed Central

    Liuzza, Marco Tullio; Candidi, Matteo; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background Theories of embodied language suggest that the motor system is differentially called into action when processing motor-related versus abstract content words or sentences. It has been recently shown that processing negative polarity action-related sentences modulates neural activity of premotor and motor cortices. Methods and Findings We sought to determine whether reading negative polarity sentences brought about differential modulation of cortico-spinal motor excitability depending on processing hand-action related or abstract sentences. Facilitatory paired-pulses Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (pp-TMS) was applied to the primary motor representation of the right-hand and the recorded amplitude of induced motor-evoked potentials (MEP) was used to index M1 activity during passive reading of either hand-action related or abstract content sentences presented in both negative and affirmative polarity. Results showed that the cortico-spinal excitability was affected by sentence polarity only in the hand-action related condition. Indeed, in keeping with previous TMS studies, reading positive polarity, hand action-related sentences suppressed cortico-spinal reactivity. This effect was absent when reading hand action-related negative polarity sentences. Moreover, no modulation of cortico-spinal reactivity was associated with either negative or positive polarity abstract sentences. Conclusions Our results indicate that grammatical cues prompting motor negation reduce the cortico-spinal suppression associated with affirmative action sentences reading and thus suggest that motor simulative processes underlying the embodiment may involve even syntactic features of language. PMID:21347305

  4. Excitation of epsilon-near-zero resonance in ultra-thin indium tin oxide shell embedded nanostructured optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Minn, Khant; Anopchenko, Aleksei; Yang, Jingyi; Lee, Ho Wai Howard

    2018-02-05

    We report a novel optical waveguide design of a hollow step index fiber modified with a thin layer of indium tin oxide (ITO). We show an excitation of highly confined waveguide mode in the proposed fiber near the wavelength where permittivity of ITO approaches zero. Due to the high field confinement within thin ITO shell inside the fiber, the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) mode can be characterized by a peak in modal loss of the hybrid waveguide. Our results show that such in-fiber excitation of ENZ mode is due to the coupling of the guided core mode to the thin-film ENZ mode. We also show that the phase matching wavelength, where the coupling takes place, varies depending on the refractive index of the constituents inside the central bore of the fiber. These ENZ nanostructured optical fibers have many potential applications, for example, in ENZ nonlinear and magneto-optics, as in-fiber wavelength-dependent filters, and as subwavelength fluid channel for optical and bio-photonic sensing.

  5. On the basically single-type excitation source of resonance in the wind tunnel and in the hydroturbine channel of a hydraulic power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavosov, R. K.; Prozorov, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the spectra of pressure pulsations in the near field of the open working section of the wind tunnel with a vortex flow behind the tunnel blower formed like the flow behind the hydroturbine of a hydraulic power plant. We have made a comparison between the measurement data for pressure pulsations and the air stream velocity in tunnels of the above type and in tunnels in which a large-scale vortex structure behind the blower is not formed. It has been established that the large-scale vortex formation in the incompressible medium behind the blade system in the wind tunnel is a source of narrow-band acoustic radiation capable of exciting resonance self-oscillations in the tunnel channel.

  6. Molecular Imaging for Breast Cancer Using Magnetic Resonance-Guided Positron Emission Mammography and Excitation-Resolved Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaedu

    The aim of this work is to develop novel breast-specific molecular imaging techniques for management of breast cancer. In this dissertation, we describe two novel molecular imaging approaches for breast cancer management. In Part I, we introduce our multimodal molecular imaging approach for breast cancer therapy monitoring using magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission mammography (MR/PEM). We have focused on the therapy monitoring technique for aggressive cancer molecular subtypes, which is challenging due to time constraint. Breast cancer therapy planning relies on a fast and accurate monitoring of functional and anatomical change. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept of sequential dual-modal magnetic resonance and positron emission mammography (MR/PEM) for the cancer therapy monitoring. We have developed dedicated breast coils with breast compression mechanism equipped with MR-compatible PEM detector heads. We have designed a fiducial marker that allows straightforward image registration of data obtained from MRI and PEM. We propose an optimal multimodal imaging procedure for MR/PEM. In Part II, we have focused on the development of a novel intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging system (NIRF) for image-guided breast cancer surgery. Conventional spectrally-resolved NIRF systems are unable to resolve various NIR fluorescence dyes for the following reasons. First, the fluorescence spectra of viable NIR fluorescence dyes are heavily overlapping. Second, conventional emission-resolved NIRF suffers from a trade-off between the fluence rate and the spectral resolution. Third, the multiple scattering in tissue degrades not only the spatial information but also the spectral contents by the red-shift. We develop a wavelength-swept laser-based NIRF system that can resolve the excitation shift of various NIR fluorescence dyes without substantial loss of the fluence rate. A linear ratiometric model is employed to measure the relative shift of the excitation

  7. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microemulsions composed of tripled-chain surface active ionic liquids, RTILs, and biological solvent: an excitation wavelength dependence study.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Chiranjib; Kundu, Niloy; Ghosh, Surajit; Mandal, Sarthak; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2013-08-15

    In this article we have reported the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study in our earlier characterized surface active ionic liquids (SAILs)-containing microemulsion, i.e., N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([P13][Tf2N])/[CTA][AOT]/isopropyl myristate ([IPM]) and N,N,N-trimethyl-N-propylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([N3111][Tf2N])/[CTA][AOT]/[IPM] microemulsions (Banerjee, C.; Mandal, S.; Ghosh, S.; Kuchlyan, J.; Kundu, N.; Sarkar, N. J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 3927-3934). The occurrence of effective FRET from the donor, coumarin-153 (C-153) to the acceptor rhodamine 6G (R6G) is evident from the decrease in the steady state fluorescence intensity of the donor with addition of acceptor and subsequent increase in the fluorescence intensity of the acceptor in the presence of donor. The excitation wavelength dependent FRET from C-153 to R6G has also been performed to assess the dynamic heterogeneity of these confined systems. In time-resolved experiments, the significant rise time of the acceptor in the presence of the donor further confirms the occurrence of FRET. The multiple donor-acceptor (D-A) distances, for various microemulsions, obtained from the rise times of the acceptor emission in the presence of a donor can be rationalized from the varying distribution of the donor, C-153, in the different regions of the microemulsion. Time-resolved measurement reveals that with increasing excitation wavelength from 408 to 440 nm, the contribution of the faster rise component of FRET increases significantly due to the close proximity of the C-153 and R6G in the polar region of the microemulsion where occurrence of FRET is very high. Moreover, we have also studied the FRET with variation of R (R = [room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs)]/[surfactant]) and shown that the effect of excitation wavelength on FRET is similar irrespective of R values.

  8. Duffing revisited: phase-shift control and internal resonance in self-sustained oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, Sebastián I.; Zanette, Damián H.

    2016-01-01

    We address two aspects of the dynamics of the forced Duffing oscillator which are relevant to the technology of micromechanical devices and, at the same time, have intrinsic significance to the field of nonlinear oscillating systems. First, we study the stability of periodic motion when the phase shift between the external force and the oscillation is controlled - contrary to the standard case, where the control parameter is the frequency of the force. Phase-shift control is the operational configuration under which self-sustained oscillators - and, in particular, micromechanical oscillators - provide a frequency reference useful for time keeping. We show that, contrary to the standard forced Duffing oscillator, under phase-shift control oscillations are stable over the whole resonance curve, and provide analytical approximate expressions for the time dependence of the oscillation amplitude and frequency during transients. Second, we analyze a model for the internal resonance between the main Duffing oscillation mode and a higher-harmonic mode of a vibrating solid bar clamped at its two ends. We focus on the stabilization of the oscillation frequency when the resonance takes place, and present preliminary experimental results that illustrate the phenomenon. This synchronization process has been proposed to counteract the undesirable frequency-amplitude interdependence in nonlinear time-keeping micromechanical devices. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file and one gif file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2015-60517-3

  9. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Internal Gravity Waves Excited by Turbulent Penetrative Convection in Water Around Its Density Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrard, Stéphane; Le Bars, Michaël; Le Gal, Patrice

    This study is devoted to the experimental and numerical analysis of the excitation of gravity waves by turbulent convection. This situation is representative of many geophysical or astrophysical systems such as the convective bottom layer of the atmosphere that radiates internal waves in the stratosphere, or the interaction between the convective and the radiative zones in stars. In our experiments, we use water as a working fluid as it possesses the remarkable property of having a maximum density at 4 °C. Therefore, when establishing on a water layer a temperature gradient between 0 °C at the bottom and room temperature at the top, a turbulent convective region appears spontaneously under a stably stratified zone. In these conditions, gravity waves are excited by the convective fluid motions penetrating the stratified layer. Although this type of flow, called penetrative convection, has already been described, we present here the first velocity field measurement of wave emission and propagation. We show in particular that an intermediate layer that we call the buffer layer emerges between the convective and the stratified zones. In this buffer layer, the angle of propagation of the waves varies with the altitude since it is slaved to the Brunt-Väisälä frequency which evolves rapidly between the convective and the stratified layer. A minimum angle is reached at the end of the buffer layer. Then we observe that an angle of propagation is selected when the waves travel through the stratified layer. We expect this process of wave selection to take place in natural situations.

  10. Self-broadening of the sodium resonance lines and excitation transfer between the 3P32 and 3P12 levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huennekens, J.; Gallagher, A.

    1983-04-01

    Sodium vapor, in the density range 1013 to 5 × 1014 cm-3, was excited by a cw dye laser, tuned 20-150 GHz from either the D1 or D2 resonance line. We observed a three-peak scattered spectrum, consisting of the Rayleigh component at the laser frequency, and the two fluorescence components (direct and sensitized) at the atomic resonance-line frequencies. Corrections to the Rayleigh signals for anisotropy and polarization effects, and to the fluorescence signals for radiation trapping, were made in order to obtain the ratio of the sum of the total intensities of the two fluorescence components to that of the Rayleigh component. This ratio combined with a measurement of the line-wing absorption coefficient yields the sodium density and the D-line self-broadening rate coefficients [kbr=4.67×10-7 cm3s-1 (+/-15%) for the D2 line and kbr=3.07×10-7 cm3s-1 (+/-15%) for the D1 line]. Asymmetry in the self-broadened line wings due to fine-structure recoupling was observed. The measured intensity ratio of the D lines, combined with pulsed measurements of the effective radiative decay rates in the presence of radiation trapping, yields the fine-structure collisional-mixing cross section [σ(3P32-->3P12)=172Å2(+/-18%)] at T≅300° C. Our results are compared to other experiments and to theory.

  11. Geometrically nonlinear resonance of higher-order shear deformable functionally graded carbon-nanotube-reinforced composite annular sector plates excited by harmonic transverse loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Raheb; Ansari, Reza

    2018-02-01

    This article presents an attempt to study the nonlinear resonance of functionally graded carbon-nanotube-reinforced composite (FG-CNTRC) annular sector plates excited by a uniformly distributed harmonic transverse load. To this purpose, first, the extended rule of mixture including the efficiency parameters is employed to approximately obtain the effective material properties of FG-CNTRC annular sector plates. Then, the focus is on presenting the weak form of discretized mathematical formulation of governing equations based on the variational differential quadrature (VDQ) method and Hamilton's principle. The geometric nonlinearity and shear deformation effects are considered based on the von Kármán assumptions and Reddy's third-order shear deformation plate theory, respectively. The discretization process is performed via the generalized differential quadrature (GDQ) method together with numerical differential and integral operators. Then, an efficient multi-step numerical scheme is used to obtain the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the FG-CNTRC annular sector plates near their primary resonance as the frequency-response curve. The accuracy of the present results is first verified and then a parametric study is presented to show the impacts of CNT volume fraction, CNT distribution pattern, geometry of annular sector plate and sector angle on the nonlinear frequency-response curve of FG-CNTRC annular sector plates with different edge supports.

  12. Simple systematization of vibrational excitation cross-section calculations for resonant electron-molecule scattering in the boomerang and impulse models.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Manabendra; Adhikari, S; Mishra, Manoj K

    2007-01-28

    Vibrational excitation (nu(f)<--nu(i)) cross-sections sigma(nu(f)<--nu(i) )(E) in resonant e-N(2) and e-H(2) scattering are calculated from transition matrix elements T(nu(f),nu(i) )(E) obtained using Fourier transform of the cross correlation function , where psi(nu(i))(R,t) approximately =e(-iH(A(2))-(R)t/h phi(nu(i))(R) with time evolution under the influence of the resonance anionic Hamiltonian H(A(2) (-))(A(2) (-)=N(2)(-)/H(2) (-)) implemented using Lanczos and fast Fourier transforms. The target (A(2)) vibrational eigenfunctions phi(nu(i))(R) and phi(nu(f))(R) are calculated using Fourier grid Hamiltonian method applied to potential energy (PE) curves of the neutral target. Application of this simple systematization to calculate vibrational structure in e-N(2) and e-H(2) scattering cross-sections provides mechanistic insights into features underlying presence/absence of structure in e-N(2) and e-H(2) scattering cross-sections. The results obtained with approximate PE curves are in reasonable agreement with experimental/calculated cross-section profiles, and cross correlation functions provide a simple demarcation between the boomerang and impulse models.

  13. Origin of optical non-linear response in TiN owing to excitation dynamics of surface plasmon resonance electronic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya, S.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Mujeeb, A.

    2014-08-01

    TiN nanoparticles of average size 55 nm were investigated for their optical non-linear properties. During the experiment the irradiated laser wavelength coincided with the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak of the nanoparticle. The large non-linearity of the nanoparticle was attributed to the plasmon resonance, which largely enhanced the local field within the nanoparticle. Both open and closed aperture Z-scan experiments were performed and the corresponding optical constants were explored. The post-excitation absorption spectra revealed the interesting phenomenon of photo fragmentation leading to the blue shift in band gap and red shift in the SPR. The results are discussed in terms of enhanced interparticle interaction simultaneous with size reduction. Here, the optical constants being intrinsic constants for a particular sample change unusually with laser power intensity. The dependence of χ(3) is discussed in terms of the size variation caused by photo fragmentation. The studies proved that the TiN nanoparticles are potential candidates in photonics technology offering huge scope to study unexplored research for various expedient applications.

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging examination of two modular architectures for switching multiple internal models.

    PubMed

    Imamizu, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Tomoe; Yoshioka, Toshinori; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2004-02-04

    An internal model is a neural mechanism that can mimic the input-output properties of a controlled object such as a tool. Recent research interests have moved on to how multiple internal models are learned and switched under a given context of behavior. Two representative computational models for task switching propose distinct neural mechanisms, thus predicting different brain activity patterns in the switching of internal models. In one model, called the mixture-of-experts architecture, switching is commanded by a single executive called a "gating network," which is different from the internal models. In the other model, called the MOSAIC (MOdular Selection And Identification for Control), the internal models themselves play crucial roles in switching. Consequently, the mixture-of-experts model predicts that neural activities related to switching and internal models can be temporally and spatially segregated, whereas the MOSAIC model predicts that they are closely intermingled. Here, we directly examined the two predictions by analyzing functional magnetic resonance imaging activities during the switching of one common tool (an ordinary computer mouse) and two novel tools: a rotated mouse, the cursor of which appears in a rotated position, and a velocity mouse, the cursor velocity of which is proportional to the mouse position. The switching and internal model activities temporally and spatially overlapped each other in the cerebellum and in the parietal cortex, whereas the overlap was very small in the frontal cortex. These results suggest that switching mechanisms in the frontal cortex can be explained by the mixture-of-experts architecture, whereas those in the cerebellum and the parietal cortex are explained by the MOSAIC model.

  15. Pump-probe photoelectron velocity-map imaging of autoionizing singly excited 4s{sup 1}4p{sup 6}np{sup 1}(n=7,8) and doubly excited 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}5s{sup 1}6p{sup 1} resonances in atomic krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Benjamin; Haber, Louis H.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2011-10-15

    Pump-probe photoelectron velocity-map imaging, using 27-eV high-harmonic excitation and 786-nm ionization, is used to resolve overlapping autoionizing resonances in atomic krypton, obtaining two-photon photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) for singly and doubly excited states. Two features in the photoelectron spectrum are assigned to singly excited 4s{sup 1}4p{sup 6}np{sup 1} (n = 7,8) configurations and four features provide information about double excitation configurations. The anisotropy parameters for the singly excited 7p configuration are measured to be {beta}{sub 2} = 1.61 {+-} 0.06 and {beta}{sub 4} = 1.54 {+-} 0.16 while the 8p configuration gives {beta}{sub 2} = 1.23 {+-} 0.19 and {beta}{submore » 4} = 0.60 {+-} 0.15. These anisotropies most likely represent the sum of overlapping PADs from states of singlet and triplet spin multiplicities. Of the four bands corresponding to ionization of doubly excited states, two are assigned to 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}5s{sup 1}6p{sup 1} configurations that are probed to different J-split ion states. The two remaining doubly excited states are attributed to a previously observed, but unassigned, resonance in the vacuum-ultraviolet photoabsorption spectrum. The PADs from each of the double excitation states are also influenced by overlap from neighboring states that are not completely spectrally resolved. The anisotropies of the observed double excitation states are reported, anticipating future theoretical and experimental work to separate the overlapping PADs into the state resolved PADs. The results can be used to test theories of excited state ionization.« less

  16. Asynchronous partial contact motion due to internal resonance in multiple degree-of-freedom rotordynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, A. D.; Champneys, A. R.; Friswell, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    Sudden onset of violent chattering or whirling rotor-stator contact motion in rotational machines can cause significant damage in many industrial applications. It is shown that internal resonance can lead to the onset of bouncing-type partial contact motion away from primary resonances. These partial contact limit cycles can involve any two modes of an arbitrarily high degree-of-freedom system, and can be seen as an extension of a synchronization condition previously reported for a single disc system. The synchronization formula predicts multiple drivespeeds, corresponding to different forms of mode-locked bouncing orbits. These results are backed up by a brute-force bifurcation analysis which reveals numerical existence of the corresponding family of bouncing orbits at supercritical drivespeeds, provided the damping is sufficiently low. The numerics reveal many overlapping families of solutions, which leads to significant multi-stability of the response at given drive speeds. Further, secondary bifurcations can also occur within each family, altering the nature of the response and ultimately leading to chaos. It is illustrated how stiffness and damping of the stator have a large effect on the number and nature of the partial contact solutions, illustrating the extreme sensitivity that would be observed in practice.

  17. Energy dissipation channels affecting photoluminescence from resonantly excited Er{sup 3+} ions doped in epitaxial ZnO host films

    SciTech Connect

    Akazawa, Housei, E-mail: akazawa.housei@lab.ntt.co.jp; Shinojima, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-21

    We identified prerequisite conditions to obtain intense photoluminescence at 1.54 μm from Er{sup 3+} ions doped in ZnO host crystals. The epitaxial ZnO:Er films were grown on sapphire C-plane substrates by sputtering, and Er{sup 3+} ions were resonantly excited at a wavelength of 532 nm between energy levels of {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}. There is a threshold deposition temperature between 500 and 550 °C, above which epitaxial ZnO films become free of miss-oriented domains. In this case, Er{sup 3+} ions are outside ZnO crystallites, having the same c-axis lattice parameters as those of undoped ZnO crystals. The improved crystallinity wasmore » correlated with enhanced emissions peaking at 1538 nm. Further elevating the deposition temperature up to 650 °C generated cracks in ZnO crystals to relax the lattice mismatch strains, and the emission intensities from cracked regions were three times as large as those from smooth regions. These results can be consistently explained if we assume that emission-active Er{sup 3+} ions are those existing at grain boundaries and bonded to single-crystalline ZnO crystallites. In contrast, ZnO:Er films deposited on a ZnO buffer layer exhibited very weak emissions because of their degraded crystallinity when most Er{sup 3+} ions were accommodated into ZnO crystals. Optimizing the degree of oxidization of ZnO crystals is another important factor because reduced films suffer from non-radiative decay of excited states. The optimum Er content to obtain intense emissions was between 2 and 4 at. %. When 4 at. % was exceeded, the emission intensity was severely attenuated because of concentration quenching as well as the degradation in crystallinity. Precipitation of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals was clearly observed at 22 at. % for films deposited above 650 °C. Minimizing the number of defects and impurities in ZnO crystals prevents energy dissipation, thus exclusively utilizing the excitation energy to

  18. Internal friction and velocity measurements. [vacuum effects on lunar basalt resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittmann, B. R.; Ahlberg, L.; Curnow, J.

    1976-01-01

    The Q of a lunar basalt sample was measured under varying vacuum conditions, and it was found that even at pressures as low as 10 to the -7th to 10 to the -10th torr, substantial increases in Q with decreasing pressure are observed, while the resonant frequency increases only slightly. This suggests that only small amounts of volatiles are sufficient to increase the internal friction (lower the Q) dramatically. The technique of vibrating encapsulated samples in the torsional mode was used to measure Q of terrestrial rocks as a function of hydrostatic pressure under lunar vacuum conditions. Young's modulus measurements in the temperature range 25-600 C under a variety of conditions including high vacuum show no evidence of any irreversibility upon temperature cycling and no indication that the high Q-values obtained are associated with any permanent structure changes such as the formation of lossless 'welded' contacts.

  19. Pharmaceutical Applications of Relaxation Filter-Selective Signal Excitation Methods for ¹⁹F Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Case Study With Atorvastatin in Dosage Formulation.

    PubMed

    Asada, Mamiko Nasu; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi

    2016-03-01

    We recently developed several new relaxation filter-selective signal excitation (RFS) methods for (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that allow (13)C signal extraction of the target components from pharmaceuticals. These methods were successful in not only qualification but also quantitation over the wide range of 5% to 100%. Here, we aimed to improve the sensitivity of these methods and initially applied them to (19)F solid-state NMR, on the basis that the fluorine atom is one of the most sensitive NMR-active nuclei. For testing, we selected atorvastatin calcium (ATC), an antilipid BCS class II drug that inhibits 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and is marketed in crystalline and amorphous forms. Tablets were obtained from 2 generic drug suppliers, and the ATC content occurred mainly as an amorphous form. Using the RFS method with (19)F solid-state NMR, we succeeded in qualifying trace amounts (less than 0.5% w/w level) of crystalline phase (Form I) of ATC in the tablets. RFS methods with (19)F solid-state NMR are practical and time efficient and can contribute not only to the study of pharmaceutical drugs, including those with small amounts of a highly potent active ingredient within a formulated product, but also to the study of fluoropolymers in material sciences. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Resonant excitation of high order modes in the 3.9 GHz cavity of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Lunin, A.; Khabiboulline, T.; Solyak, N.; ...

    2018-02-06

    Construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) is underway for the world’s first hard x-ray free-electron laser. A central part of the LCLS-II project is a 4 GeV superconducting radio frequency electron linac that will operate in the continuous wave (cw) mode. The linac is segmented into four sections named as L0, L1, L2, and L3. Two 3.9 GHz cryomodules, each housing of eight third-harmonic cavities similar to the cavities developed for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL), will be used in section L1 of the linac for linearizing the longitudinal beam profile. Here in this paper, we presentmore » a study of trapped high order modes (HOMs) excited by a cw electron beam in the third-harmonic cavities of the LCLS-II linac. A detailed comparison of the original XFEL design and the LCLS-II design with a modified end group is performed in order to estimate the effect of a reduced beam pipe aperture on the efficiency of HOM damping. Furthermore, we apply a statistical analysis of the eigenmode spectrum for the estimation of the probability of resonant HOM losses and influence of HOMs on beam dynamics.« less

  1. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering study of spin-wave excitations in the cuprate parent compound Ca 2CuO 2Cl 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lebert, B. W.; Dean, M.; Nicolaou, A.

    By means of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the Cu L 3 edge, we measured the spin wave dispersion along <100> and <110> in the undoped cuprate Ca 2CuO 2Cl 2. The data yields a reliable estimate of the superexchange parameter J = 135 ± 4 meV using a classical spin-1/2 2D Heisenberg model with nearest-neighbor interactions and including quantum fluctuations. Including further exchange interactions increases the estimate to J = 141 meV. The 40 meV dispersion between the magnetic Brillouin zone boundary points (1/2, 0) and (1/4, 1/4) indicates that next-nearest neighbor interactions in this compound are intermediate betweenmore » the values found in La 2CuO 4 and Sr 2CuO 2Cl 2. Here by owing to the low- Z elements composing Ca 2CuOCl 2, the present results may enable a reliable comparison with the predictions of quantum many-body calculations, which would improve our understanding of the role of magnetic excitations and of electronic correlations in cuprates.« less

  2. Optical and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of the excited triplet states of UV-B absorbers: 2-ethylhexyl salicylate and homomenthyl salicylate.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Kazuto; Tsuchiya, Takumi; Kikuchi, Azusa; Yagi, Mikio

    2015-09-26

    The energy levels and lifetimes of the lowest excited triplet (T1) states of UV-B absorbers, 2-ethylhexyl salicylate (EHS) and homomenthyl salicylate (HMS), and their deprotonated anions (EHS(-) and HMS(-)) were determined through measurements of phosphorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra in rigid solutions at 77 K. The observed T1 energies of EHS and HMS are higher than those of butylmethoxydibenzoylmethane, the most widely used UV-A absorber, and octyl methoxycinnamate, the most widely used UV-B absorber. The T1 states of EHS, HMS, EHS(-) and HMS(-) were assigned to almost pure (3)ππ* state from the observed T1 lifetimes and zero-field splitting parameters. EHS and HMS with an intramolecular hydrogen bond show a photoinduced phosphorescence enhancement in ethanol at 77 K. The EPR signals of the T1 states of EHS and HMS also increase in intensity with UV-irradiation time (photoinduced EPR enhancement). The T1 lifetimes of EHS and HMS at room temperature were determined through triplet-triplet absorption measurements in ethanol. The quantum yields of singlet oxygen production by EHS and HMS were determined by using time-resolved near-IR phosphorescence.

  3. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering study of spin-wave excitations in the cuprate parent compound Ca 2CuO 2Cl 2

    DOE PAGES

    Lebert, B. W.; Dean, M.; Nicolaou, A.; ...

    2017-04-07

    By means of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the Cu L 3 edge, we measured the spin wave dispersion along <100> and <110> in the undoped cuprate Ca 2CuO 2Cl 2. The data yields a reliable estimate of the superexchange parameter J = 135 ± 4 meV using a classical spin-1/2 2D Heisenberg model with nearest-neighbor interactions and including quantum fluctuations. Including further exchange interactions increases the estimate to J = 141 meV. The 40 meV dispersion between the magnetic Brillouin zone boundary points (1/2, 0) and (1/4, 1/4) indicates that next-nearest neighbor interactions in this compound are intermediate betweenmore » the values found in La 2CuO 4 and Sr 2CuO 2Cl 2. Here by owing to the low- Z elements composing Ca 2CuOCl 2, the present results may enable a reliable comparison with the predictions of quantum many-body calculations, which would improve our understanding of the role of magnetic excitations and of electronic correlations in cuprates.« less

  4. Pituitary adenylate cyclase 1 receptor internalization and endosomal signaling mediate the pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide-induced increase in guinea pig cardiac neuron excitability.

    PubMed

    Merriam, Laura A; Baran, Caitlin N; Girard, Beatrice M; Hardwick, Jean C; May, Victor; Parsons, Rodney L

    2013-03-06

    After G-protein-coupled receptor activation and signaling at the plasma membrane, the receptor complex is often rapidly internalized via endocytic vesicles for trafficking into various intracellular compartments and pathways. The formation of signaling endosomes is recognized as a mechanism that produces sustained intracellular signals that may be distinct from those generated at the cell surface for cellular responses including growth, differentiation, and survival. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP; Adcyap1) is a potent neurotransmitter/neurotrophic peptide and mediates its diverse cellular functions in part through internalization of its cognate G-protein-coupled PAC1 receptor (PAC1R; Adcyap1r1). In the present study, we examined whether PAC1R endocytosis participates in the regulation of neuronal excitability. Although PACAP increased excitability in 90% of guinea pig cardiac neurons, pretreatment with Pitstop 2 or dynasore to inhibit clathrin and dynamin I/II, respectively, suppressed the PACAP effect. Subsequent addition of inhibitor after the PACAP-induced increase in excitability developed gradually attenuated excitability with no changes in action potential properties. Likewise, the PACAP-induced increase in excitability was markedly decreased at ambient temperature. Receptor trafficking studies with GFP-PAC1 cell lines demonstrated the efficacy of Pitstop 2, dynasore, and low temperatures at suppressing PAC1R endocytosis. In contrast, brefeldin A pretreatments to disrupt Golgi vesicle trafficking did not blunt the PACAP effect, and PACAP/PAC1R signaling still increased neuronal cAMP production even with endocytic blockade. Our results demonstrate that PACAP/PAC1R complex endocytosis is a key step for the PACAP modulation of cardiac neuron excitability.

  5. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference and Young Scientist School ''Magnetic resonance imaging in biomedical research''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumova, A. V.; Khodanovich, M. Y.; Yarnykh, V. L.

    2016-02-01

    The Second International Conference and Young Scientist School ''Magnetic resonance imaging in biomedical research'' was held on the campus of the National Research Tomsk State University (Tomsk, Russia) on September 7-9, 2015. The conference was focused on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications for biomedical research. The main goal was to bring together basic scientists, clinical researchers and developers of new MRI techniques to bridge the gap between clinical/research needs and advanced technological solutions. The conference fostered research and development in basic and clinical MR science and its application to health care. It also had an educational purpose to promote understanding of cutting-edge MR developments. The conference provided an opportunity for researchers and clinicians to present their recent theoretical developments, practical applications, and to discuss unsolved problems. The program of the conference was divided into three main topics. First day of the conference was devoted to educational lectures on the fundamentals of MRI physics and image acquisition/reconstruction techniques, including recent developments in quantitative MRI. The second day was focused on developments and applications of new contrast agents. Multinuclear and spectroscopic acquisitions as well as functional MRI were presented during the third day of the conference. We would like to highlight the main developments presented at the conference and introduce the prominent speakers. The keynote speaker of the conference Dr. Vasily Yarnykh (University of Washington, Seattle, USA) presented a recently developed MRI method, macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) mapping, as a unique tool for modifying image contrast and a unique tool for quantification of the myelin content in neural tissues. Professor Yury Pirogov (Lomonosov Moscow State University) described development of new fluorocarbon compounds and applications for biomedicine. Drs. Julia Velikina and Alexey

  6. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy, E-mail: ramamoor@umich.edu

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferredmore » to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.« less

  7. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  8. Simulation of Non-resonant Internal Kink Mode with Toroidal Rotation in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Guoyong

    2013-07-16

    Plasmas in spherical and conventional tokamaks, with weakly reversed shear q pro le and minimum q above but close to unity, are susceptible to an non-resonant (m, n ) = (1, 1) internal kink mode. This mode can saturate and persist and can induce a (2; 1) seed island for Neoclassical Tearing Mode (NTMs)1 . The mode can also lead to large energetic particle transport and signi cant broadening of beam-driven current. Motivated by these important e ects, we have carried out extensive nonlinear simulations of the mode with nite toroidal rotation using parameters and pro les of an NTSXmore » plasma with a weakly reversed shear pro le. The numerical results show that, at the experimental level, plasma rotation has little e ect on either equilibrium or linear stability. However, rotation can signi cantly inuence the nonlinear dynamics of the (1, 1) mode and the the induced (2, 1) magnetic island. The simulation results show that a rotating helical equilibrium is formed and maintained in the nonlinear phase at nite plasma rotation. In contrast, for non-rotating cases, the nonlinear evolution exhibits dynamic oscillations between a quasi-2D state and a helical state. Furthermore, the e ects of rotation are found to greatly suppress the (2, 1) magnetic island even at a low level.« less

  9. Chloroplast biogenesis 89: development of analytical tools for probing the biosynthetic topography of photosynthetic membranes by determination of resonance excitation energy transfer distances separating metabolic tetrapyrrole donors from chlorophyll a acceptors.

    PubMed

    Kopetz, Karen J; Kolossov, Vladimir L; Rebeiz, Constantin A

    2004-06-15

    The thorough understanding of photosynthetic membrane assembly requires a deeper knowledge of the coordination and regulation of the chlorophyll (Chl) and thylakoid apoprotein biosynthetic pathways. As a working hypothesis we have recently proposed three different Chl-thylakoid apoprotein biosynthesis models: a single-branched Chl biosynthetic pathway (SBP)-single location model, a SBP-multilocation model, and a multibranched Chl biosynthetic pathway (MBP)-sublocation model. The detection of resonance excitation energy transfer between tetrapyrrole precursors of Chl, and several Chl-protein complexes, has made it possible to test the validity of the proposed Chl-thylakoid apoprotein biosynthesis models by resonance excitation energy transfer determinations. In this work, resonance excitation energy transfer techniques that allow the determination of distances separating tetrapyrrole donors from Chl-protein acceptors in green plants by using readily available electronic spectroscopic instrumentation are developed. It is concluded that the calculated distances are compatible with the MBP-sublocation model and incompatible with the operation of the SBP-single location Chl-protein biosynthesis model.

  10. Extending single molecule fluorescence observation time by amplitude-modulated excitation

    PubMed Central

    Kisley, Lydia; Chang, Wei-Shun; Cooper, David; Mansur, Andrea P; Landes, Christy F

    2014-01-01

    We present a hardware-based method that can improve single molecule fluorophore observation time by up to 1500% and super-localization by 47% for the experimental conditions used. The excitation was modulated using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) synchronized to the data acquisition and inherent data conversion time of the detector. The observation time and precision in super-localization of four commonly used fluorophores were compared under modulated and traditional continuous excitation, including direct total internal reflectance excitation of Alexa 555 and Cy3, non-radiative Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) excited Cy5, and direct epi-fluorescence wide field excitation of Rhodamine 6G. The proposed amplitude-modulated excitation does not perturb the chemical makeup of the system or sacrifice signal and is compatible with multiple types of fluorophores. Amplitude-modulated excitation has practical applications for any fluorescent study utilizing an instrumental setup with time-delayed detectors. PMID:24587894

  11. UV Resonance Raman Elucidation of the Terminal and Internal Peptide Bond Conformations of Crystalline and Solution Oligoglycines.

    PubMed

    Bykov, Sergei V; Asher, Sanford A

    2010-11-30

    Spectroscopic investigations of macromolecules generally attempt to interpret the measured spectra in terms of the summed contributions of the different molecular fragments. This is the basis of the local mode approximation in vibrational spectroscopy. In the case of resonance Raman spectroscopy independent contributions of molecular fragments require both a local mode-like behavior and the uncoupled electronic transitions. Here we show that the deep UV resonance Raman spectra of aqueous solution phase oligoglycines show independent peptide bond molecular fragment contributions indicating that peptide bonds electronic transitions and vibrational modes are uncoupled. We utilize this result to separately determine the conformational distributions of the internal and penultimate peptide bonds of oligoglycines. Our data indicate that in aqueous solution the oligoglycine terminal residues populate conformations similar to those found in crystals (3(1)-helices and β-strands), but with a broader distribution, while the internal peptide bond conformations are centered around the 3(1)-helix Ramachandran angles.

  12. Analysis of the coupled electron-ripplon oscillations resonance spectra in the Wigner solid at different temperatures and modeling of the excitation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syvokon, V. E.; Sharapova, I. V.

    2018-05-01

    The spectrum of coupled electron-ripplon oscillations in a Wigner crystal on the surface of superfluid helium at various temperatures and excitation voltages, leading to spectrum distortion, was studied experimentally. It was shown that at all temperatures, increasing excitation voltage leads to the appearance of non-axisymmetric vibrational modes, which indicates distortions of the crystal lattice. The possibility of excitation of the non-axisymmetric modes in a cell was demonstrated by modeling electronic crystal oscillations using the molecular dynamics method. At several fixed frequencies, the amplitudes of the response of the electronic crystal to external excitation were measured as a function of the magnitude of excitation voltage, and jumps were detected at certain critical voltages. Using the Lindemann criterion, a correlation was found between the critical stress and stability limit of the crystal lattice. It was concluded that when the critical voltage is reached, dynamic melting of the electronic crystal occurs.

  13. Effects of Resonant and Random Excitations on the Proton Beam in the Large Hadron Collider, with Applications to the Design of Pulsed Hollow Electron Lenses for Active Halo Control

    SciTech Connect

    Fitterer, Miriam; Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander

    We present the results of numerical simulations and experimental studies about the effects of resonant and random excitations on proton losses, emittances, and beam distributions in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In addition to shedding light on complex nonlinear effects, these studies are applied to the design of hollow electron lenses (HEL) for active beam halo control. In the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), a considerable amount of energy will be stored in the beam tails. To control and clean the beam halo, the installation of two hollow electron lenses, one per beam, is being considered. In standard electron-lens operation,more » a proton bunch sees the same electron current at every revolution. Pulsed electron beam operation (i.e., different currents for different turns) is also considered, because it can widen the range of achievable halo removal rates. For an axially symmetric electron beam, only protons in the halo are excited. If a residual field is present at the location of the beam core, these particles are exposed to time-dependent transverse kicks and to noise. We discuss the numerical simulations and the experiments conducted in 2016 and 2017 at injection energy in the LHC. The excitation patterns were generated by the transverse feedback and damping system, which acted as a flexible source of dipole kicks. Proton beam losses, emittances, and transverse distributions were recorded as a function of excitation patterns and strengths. The resonant excitations induced rich dynamical effects and nontrivial changes of the beam distributions, which, to our knowledge, have not previously been observed and studied in this detail. We conclude with a discussion of the tolerable and achievable residual fields and proposals for further studies.« less

  14. Cryogenic exciter

    DOEpatents

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  15. Fully phase-encoded MRI near metallic implants using ultrashort echo times and broadband excitation.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Curtis N; Artz, Nathan S; Jang, Hyungseok; McMillan, Alan B; Koch, Kevin M; Reeder, Scott B

    2018-04-01

    To develop a fully phase-encoded MRI method for distortion-free imaging near metallic implants, in clinically feasible acquisition times. An accelerated 3D fully phase-encoded acquisition with broadband excitation and ultrashort echo times is presented, which uses a broadband radiofrequency pulse to excite the entire off-resonance induced by the metallic implant. Furthermore, fully phase-encoded imaging is used to prevent distortions caused by frequency encoding, and to obtain ultrashort echo times for rapidly decaying signal. Phantom and in vivo acquisitions were used to describe the relationship among excitation bandwidth, signal loss near metallic implants, and T 1 weighting. Shorter radiofrequency pulses captured signal closer to the implant by improving spectral coverage and allowing shorter echo times, whereas longer pulses improved T 1 weighting through larger maximum attainable flip angles. Comparisons of fully phase-encoded acquisition with broadband excitation and ultrashort echo times to T 1 -weighted multi-acquisition with variable resonance image combination selective were performed in phantoms and subjects with metallic knee and hip prostheses. These acquisitions had similar contrast and acquisition efficiency. Accelerated fully phase-encoded acquisitions with ultrashort echo times and broadband excitation can generate distortion free images near metallic implants in clinically feasible acquisition times. Magn Reson Med 79:2156-2163, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Temperature dependence of the hydrated electron's excited-state relaxation. I. Simulation predictions of resonance Raman and pump-probe transient absorption spectra of cavity and non-cavity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zho, Chen-Chen; Farr, Erik P.; Glover, William J.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2017-08-01

    We use one-electron non-adiabatic mixed quantum/classical simulations to explore the temperature dependence of both the ground-state structure and the excited-state relaxation dynamics of the hydrated electron. We compare the results for both the traditional cavity picture and a more recent non-cavity model of the hydrated electron and make definite predictions for distinguishing between the different possible structural models in future experiments. We find that the traditional cavity model shows no temperature-dependent change in structure at constant density, leading to a predicted resonance Raman spectrum that is essentially temperature-independent. In contrast, the non-cavity model predicts a blue-shift in the hydrated electron's resonance Raman O-H stretch with increasing temperature. The lack of a temperature-dependent ground-state structural change of the cavity model also leads to a prediction of little change with temperature of both the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time of the hydrated electron following photoexcitation. This is in sharp contrast to the predictions of the non-cavity model, where both the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time are expected to decrease significantly with increasing temperature. These simulation-based predictions should be directly testable by the results of future time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. Finally, the temperature-dependent differences in predicted excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time of the two models also lead to different predicted pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy of the hydrated electron as a function of temperature. We perform such experiments and describe them in Paper II [E. P. Farr et al., J. Chem. Phys. 147, 074504 (2017)], and find changes in the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time with temperature that match well with the predictions of the non-cavity model. In particular, the experiments

  17. Gamma rays from the de-excitation of C-12 resonance 15.11 MeV and C-12 resonance 4.44 MeV as probes of energetic particle spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Crannell, H.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    The flux of 15.11 MeV gamma rays relative to the flux 4.44 MeV gamma rays was calculated from measured cross sections for excitation of the corresponding states of C-12 and from experimental determinations of the branching ratios for direct de-excitation of these states to the ground state. Because of the difference in threshold energies for excitation of these two levels, the relative intensities in the two lines are particularly sensitive to the spectral distribution of energetic particles which excite the corresponding nuclear levels. For both solar and cosmic emission, the observability of the 15.11 MeV line is expected to be enhances by low source-background continuum in this energy range.

  18. Temperature and excitation power influence on the velocity-selective optical pumping resonances of 133Cs atoms confined in an extremely thin cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, T.; Polishchuk, V.; Sargsyan, A.; Krasteva, A.; Cartaleva, St.; Todorov, G.

    2018-03-01

    Linear and nonlinear absorption spectra of 133Cs vapor confined in an extremely thin cell were computed via iterations with respect to the resonance radiation intensity. When the incident radiation intensity is low, the transient polarization of the atoms that undergo frequent collisions with the cell walls leads to sub-Doppler features in the absorption spectra. Higher incident radiation intensities result in the appearance of velocity-selective optical pumping resonances. The theory developed agrees quantitatively with the experimental findings.

  19. A small-displacement sensor using total internal reflection theory and surface plasmon resonance technology for heterodyne interferometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shinn-Fwu

    2009-01-01

    A small-displacement sensor based on total-internal reflection theory and surface plasmon resonance technology is proposed for use in heterodyne interferometry. A small displacement can be obtained simply by measuring the variation in phase difference between s- and p-polarization states with the small-displacement sensor. The theoretical displacement resolution of the small-displacement sensor can reach 0.45 nm. The sensor has some additional advantages, e.g., a simple optical setup, high resolution, high sensitivity and rapid measurement. Its feasibility is also demonstrated.

  20. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation and Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    The 13th International Conference on Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation and Resonance (μSR2014) organized by the Laboratory for Muon Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute in collaboration with the University of Zurich and the University of Fribourg, was held in Grindelwald, Switzerland from 1st to 6th June 2014. The conference provided a forum for researchers from around the world with interests in the applications of μSR to study a wide range of topics including condensed matter physics, materials and molecular sciences, chemistry and biology. Polarized muons provide a unique and versatile probe of matter, enabling studies at the atomic level of electronic structure and dynamics in a wide range of systems. The conference was the thirteenth in a series, which began in Rorschach in 1978 and it took place for the third time in Switzerland. The previous conferences were held in Cancun, Mexico (2011), Tsukuba, Japan (2008), Oxford, UK (2005), Williamsburg, USA (2002), Les Diablerets, Switzerland (1999), Nikko, Japan (1996), Maui, USA (1993), Oxford, UK (1990), Uppsala, Sweden (1986), Shimoda, Japan (1983), Vancouver, Canada (1980), and Rorschach, Switzerland (1978). These conference proceedings contain 67 refereed publications from presentations covering magnetism, superconductivity, chemistry, semiconductors, biophysics and techniques. The conference logo, displayed in the front pages of these proceedings, represents both the location of μSR2014 in the Alps and the muon-spin rotation technique. The silhouette represents the famous local mountains Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau as drawn by the Swiss painter Ferdinand Hodler and the apple with arrow is at the same time a citation of the Wilhelm Tell legend and a remembrance of the key role played by the muon spin and the asymmetric muon decay (which for the highest positron energy has an apple like shape). More than 160 participants (including 32 registered as students and 13 as accompanying persons) from 19 countries

  1. Exciter switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeak, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new exciter switch assembly has been installed at the three DSN 64-m deep space stations. This assembly provides for switching Block III and Block IV exciters to either the high-power or 20-kW transmitters in either dual-carrier or single-carrier mode. In the dual-carrier mode, it provides for balancing the two drive signals from a single control panel located in the transmitter local control and remote control consoles. In addition to the improved switching capabilities, extensive monitoring of both the exciter switch assembly and Transmitter Subsystem is provided by the exciter switch monitor and display assemblies.

  2. Implications of the 750 GeV γγ Resonance as a Case Study for the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Keisuke; Grojean, Christophe; Peskin, Michael E.

    If the γγ resonance at 750 GeV suggested by 2015 LHC data turns out to be a real effect, what are the implications for the physics case and upgrade path of the International Linear Collider? Whether or not the resonance is confirmed, this question provides an interesting case study testing the robustness of the ILC physics case. In this note, we address this question with two points: (1) Almost all models proposed for the new 750 GeV particle require additional new particles with electroweak couplings. The key elements of the 500 GeV ILC physics program - precision measurements of themore » Higgs boson, the top quark, and 4-fermion interactions - will powerfully discriminate among these models. This information will be important in conjunction with new LHC data, or alone, if the new particles accompanying the 750 GeV resonance are beyond the mass reach of the LHC. (2) Over a longer term, the energy upgrade of the ILC to 1 TeV already discussed in the ILC TDR will enable experiments in γγ and e +e - collisions to directly produce and study the 750 GeV particle from these unique initial states.« less

  3. Electromagnetic-field dependence of the internal excited state of the polaron and the qubit in quantum dot with thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Xin, Wei; Yin, Hong-Wu; Eerdunchaolu

    2017-06-01

    The electromagnetic-field dependence of the ground and the first excited-state (GFES) energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the strong-coupling polaron in a quantum dot (QD) was studied for various QD thicknesses by using the variational method of the Pekar type (VMPT). On this basis, we construct a qubit in the quantum dot (QQD) by taking a two-level structure of the polaron as the carrier. The results of numerical calculations indicate that the oscillation period of the qubit, {itT}{in0}, increases with increasing the thickness of the quantum dot (TQD) {itL}, but decreases with increasing the cyclotron frequency of the magnetic field (CFMF) ω{in{itc}}, electric-field strength {itF}, and electron-phonon coupling strength (EPCS) α. The probability density of the qubit |Ψ({itρ}, {itz}, {itt})|{su2} presents a normal distribution of the electronic transverse coordinate ρ, significantly influenced by the TQD and effective radius of the quantum dot (ERQD) {itR}{in0}, and shows a periodic oscillation with variations in the electronic longitudinal coordinate {itz}, polar angle φ and time {itt}. The decoherence time τ and the quality factor {itQ} of the free rotation increase with increasing the CFMF ω{in{itc}}, dispersion coefficient η, and EPCS α, but decrease with increasing the electric-field strength {itF}, TQD {itL}, and ERQD {itR}{in0}. The TQD is an important parameter of the qubit. Theoretically, the target, which is to regulate the oscillation period, decoherence time and quality factor of the free rotation of the qubit, can be achieved by designing different TQDs and regulating the strength of the electromagnetic field.

  4. Transonic Resonance Demonstrated To Be a Source of Internal Noise From Mixer-Ejector Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Khairul B.

    2002-01-01

    During noise field studies with mixer-ejector nozzles in NASA's High-Speed Research program, tones were often encountered. The tones would persist in the simulated "cutback" condition (shortly after takeoff). Unfortunately, we did not understand their origin and, thus, could not develop a logical approach for suppressing them. We naturally questioned whether or not some of those tones were due to the transonic resonance. This was studied with a 1/13th scale model of the High-Speed Civil Transport nozzle. The first objective was to determine if indeed tones could be detected in the radiated noise. The next objective was to diagnose if those tones were due to the transonic resonance. Agreement of the frequencies with the correlation equation and the effect of boundary layer tripping were to be used in the diagnosis.

  5. Magnetic excitations and phonons simultaneously studied by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in optimally doped Bi 1.5 Pb 0.55 Sr 1.6 La 0.4 CuO 6 + δ

    DOE PAGES

    Peng, Y. Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Sala, M. Moretti; ...

    2015-08-24

    In this paper, magnetic excitations in the optimally doped high-T c superconductor Bi 1.5Pb 0.55Sr 1.6La 0.4CuO 6+δ (OP-Bi2201, T c ≃ 34 K) are investigated by Cu L 3 edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), below and above the pseudogap opening temperature. At both temperatures the broad spectral distribution disperses along the (1,0) direction up to ~350 meV at zone boundary, similar to other hole-doped cuprates. However, above ~0.22 reciprocal lattice units, we observe a concurrent intensity decrease for magnetic excitations and quasielastic signals with weak temperature dependence. This anomaly seems to indicate a coupling between magnetic, lattice, andmore » charge modes in this compound. We also compare the magnetic excitation spectra near the antinodal zone boundary in the single layer OP-Bi2201 and in the bilayer optimally doped Bi 1.5Pb 0.6Sr 1.54CaCu 2O 8+δ (OP-Bi2212, T c ≃ 96 K). Finally, the strong similarities in the paramagnon dispersion and in their energy at zone boundary indicate that the strength of the superexchange interaction and the short-range magnetic correlation cannot be directly related to T c, not even within the same family of cuprates.« less

  6. Study of Orbitally Excited $$B_{(s)}$$ Mesons and Evidence for a New $$B\\pi$$ Resonance with the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kambeitz, Manuel

    This thesis presents an analysis of excited states of B0, B+ and B0 s mesons, decaying to B mesons while emitting a pion or kaon. They are reconstructed from their decay products and a selection is performed to discard wrongly reconstructed B(s) mesons with the multivariate analysis software NeuroBayes, as described in chapter 5. In the training process, the sPlot method and measured and simulated data are used. Chapter 6 describes how the properties of excited B(s) are determined by an unbinned maximum likelihood t to their mass spectra. The systematic uncertainties determined in this analysis are described in chaptermore » 7. The results of this thesis are presented in chapter 8 and a conclusion is given in chapter 9. The results shown in this thesis have been published before in [1].« less

  7. Low-threshold parametric excitation of the upper hybrid wave in experiments on electron-cyclotron resonance heating by an ordinary wave

    SciTech Connect

    Sysoeva, E. V., E-mail: tinlit@yandex.ru; Gusakov, E. Z.; Simonchik, L. V.

    2016-07-15

    The possibility of the low-threshold decay of an ordinary wave into an upper hybrid wave localized in a plasma column (or in an axisymmetric plasma filament) and a low-frequency wave is analyzed. It is shown that the threshold for such a decay, accompanied by the excitation of an ion-acoustic wave, can easily be overcome for plasma parameters typical of model experiments on the Granit linear plasma facility.

  8. Catheter-based flexible microcoil RF detectors for internal magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, M. M.; Syms, R. R. A.; Young, I. R.; Mathew, B.; Casperz, W.; Taylor-Robinson, S. D.; Wadsworth, C. A.; Gedroyc, W. M. W.

    2009-07-01

    Flexible catheter probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the bile duct are demonstrated. The probes consist of a cytology brush modified to accept a resonant RF detector based on a spiral microcoil and hybrid integrated capacitors, and are designed for insertion into the duct via a non-magnetic endoscope during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). The coil must be narrow enough (<3 mm) to pass through the biopsy channel of the endoscope and sufficiently flexible to turn through 90° to enter the duct. Coils are fabricated as multi-turn electroplated conductors on a flexible base, and two designs formed on SU-8 and polyimide substrates are compared. It is shown that careful control of thermal load is used to obtain useable mechanical properties from SU-8, and that polyimide/SU-8 composites offer improved mechanical reliability. Good electrical performance is demonstrated and sub-millimetre resolution is obtained in 1H MRI experiments at 1.5 T magnetic field strength using test phantoms and in vitro liver tissue.

  9. Impulse Excitation Internal Friction Study of Dislocation and Point Defect Interactions in Ultra-Low Carbon Bake-Hardenable Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Il-Chan; Kang, Deok-Gu; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2014-04-01

    The simultaneous presence of interstitial solutes and dislocations in an ultra-low carbon bake-hardenable steel gives rise to two characteristic peaks in the internal friction (IF) spectrum: the dislocation-enhanced Snoek peak and the Snoek-Kê-Köster peak. These IF peaks were used to study the dislocation structure developed by the pre-straining and the static strain aging effect of C during the bake-hardening process. A Ti-stabilized interstitial-free steel was used to ascertain the absence of a γ-peak in the IF spectrum of the deformed ultra-low carbon steel. The analysis of the IF data shows clearly that the bake-hardening effect in ultra-low carbon steel is entirely due to atmosphere formation, with the dislocation segment length being the main parameter affecting the IF peak amplitude. Recovery annealing experiments showed that the rearrangement of the dislocation structure lead to the elimination of the C atmosphere.

  10. A method to measure internal contact angle in opaque systems by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weiqin; Tian, Ye; Gao, Xuefeng; Jiang, Lei

    2013-07-23

    Internal contact angle is an important parameter for internal wettability characterization. However, due to the limitation of optical imaging, methods available for contact angle measurement are only suitable for transparent or open systems. For most of the practical situations that require contact angle measurement in opaque or enclosed systems, the traditional methods are not effective. Based upon the requirement, a method suitable for contact angle measurement in nontransparent systems is developed by employing MRI technology. In the Article, the method is demonstrated by measuring internal contact angles in opaque cylindrical tubes. It proves that the method also shows great feasibility in transparent situations and opaque capillary systems. By using the method, contact angle in opaque systems could be measured successfully, which is significant in understanding the wetting behaviors in nontransparent systems and calculating interfacial parameters in enclosed systems.

  11. 2D radially compensating excitation pulse in combination with an internal transceiver antenna for 3D MRI of the rectum at 7 T.

    PubMed

    van Kalleveen, I M L; Kroeze, H; Sbrizzi, A; Boer, V O; Reerink, O; Philippens, M E P; van de Berg, C A T; Luijten, P R; Klomp, D W J

    2016-07-01

    The high precession frequency in ultrahigh field MRI coincides with reduced RF penetration, increased RF power deposition and consequently can lead to reduced scan efficiency. However, the shorter wavelength enables the use of efficient antennas rather than loop coils. In fact, ultrathin monopole antennas have been demonstrated at 7 T, which fit in natural cavities like the rectum in the human body. As the RF field generated by the antenna provides an extremely nonuniform B1 field, the use of conventional RF pulses will lead to severe image distortions and highly nonuniform contrast. However, using the two predominant dimensions (orthogonal to the antenna), 2D RF pulses can be designed that counteract the nonuniform B1 into uniform flip angles. In this study the authors investigate the use of an ultrathin antenna not only for reception, but also for transmission in 7 T MRI of the rectum. The 2D radially compensating excitation (2D RACE) pulse was designed in matlab. SAR calculations between the 2D RACE pulse and an adiabatic RF pulse (BIR-4) have been obtained, to visualize the gain in decreasing the SAR when using the 2D RACE pulse instead of an adiabatic RF pulse. The authors used the 7 T whole body MR system in combination with an internally placed monopole antenna used for transceiving and obtained 3D gradient echo images with a conventional sinc pulse and with the 2D RACE pulse. For extra clarity, they also reconstructed an image where the receive field of the antenna was removed. Comparing the results of the SAR simulations of the 2D RACE pulse with a BIR-4 pulse shows that for low flip angles (θ < 41°) the SAR can be decreased with a factor of 4.8 or even more, when using the 2D RACE pulse. Relative to a conventional sinc excitation, the 2D RACE pulse achieves more uniform flip angle distributions than a BIR-4 pulse with a smaller SAR increase (16 × versus 64 ×). The authors have shown that the 2D RACE pulse provides more homogeneous flip angles for

  12. Exciting Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  13. Hourglass Dispersion and Resonance of Magnetic Excitations in the Superconducting State of the Single-Layer Cuprate HgBa 2 CuO 4 + δ Near Optimal Doping

    DOE PAGES

    Chan, M. K.; Tang, Y.; Dorow, C. J.; ...

    2016-12-29

    Here, we use neutron scattering to study magnetic excitations near the antiferromagnetic wave vector in the underdoped single-layer cuprate HgBa 2 CuO 4 + δ (superconducting transition temperature T c ≈ 88 K , pseudogap temperature T* ≈ 220 K ). The response is distinctly enhanced below T* and exhibits a Y -shaped dispersion in the pseudogap state, whereas the superconducting state features an X -shaped (hourglass) dispersion and a further resonancelike enhancement. We also observe a large spin gap of about 40 meV in both states. This phenomenology is reminiscent of that exhibited by bilayer cuprates. The resonance spectralmore » weight, irrespective of doping and compound, scales linearly with the putative binding energy of a spin exciton described by an itinerant-spin formalism.« less

  14. Investigation of Defect Distributions in SiO2/AlGaN/GaN High-Electron-Mobility Transistors by Using Capacitance-Voltage Measurement with Resonant Optical Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Soo; Lim, Seung-Young; Park, Yong-Keun; Jung, Gunwoo; Song, Jung-Hoon; Cha, Ho-Young; Han, Sang-Woo

    2018-06-01

    We investigated the distributions and the energy levels of defects in SiO2/AlGaN/GaN highelectron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) by using frequency-dependent ( F- D) capacitance-voltage ( C- V) measurements with resonant optical excitation. A Schottky barrier (SB) and a metal-oxidesemiconductor (MOS) HEMT were prepared to compare the effects of defects in their respective layers. We also investigated the effects of those layers on the threshold voltage ( V th ). A drastic voltage shift in the C- V curve at higher frequencies was caused by the large number of defect levels in the SiO2/GaN interface. A significant shift in V th with additional light illumination was observed due to a charging of the defect states in the SiO2/GaN interface. The voltage shifts were attributed to the detrapping of defect states at the SiO2/GaN interface.

  15. Excitation cross sections for the ns 2S yields np 2P resonance transitions in Mg(+) (n = 3) and Zn(+) (n = 4) using electron-energy-loss and merged-beams methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, A.; Mitroy, J.; Tayal, S. S.; Henry, Ronald J. W.; Man, K.-F.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Williams, I. D.

    1993-01-01

    Electron-excitation cross sections are reported for the 3s 2S yields 3p 2P(h, k) resonance transition in Mg(+) at energies from threshold (4.43 eV) to approximately 9 times threshold (40.0 eV). The electron-energy-loss merged-beams technique used in these measurements is described in detail. In addition, the method of separating contributions of the elastically scattered (Coulomb) and the inelastically scattered electrons in the present Mg(+) case and previously reported Zn(+) results is described. Comparisons in the experimental energy range are made for Mg(+) with the two five-state close-coupling theoretical calculations carried out herein, and with other published close-coupling, distorted-wave, and semiempirical calculations. The present Mg(+) cross sections and Zn(+) cross sections from earlier measurements are tabulated.

  16. Adiabatic excitation for 31 P MR spectroscopy in the human heart at 7 T: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Valkovič, Ladislav; Clarke, William T; Purvis, Lucian A B; Schaller, Benoit; Robson, Matthew D; Rodgers, Christopher T

    2017-11-01

    Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS) provides a unique tool for assessing cardiac energy metabolism, often quantified using the phosphocreatine (PCr)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio. Surface coils are typically used for excitation for 31 P-MRS, but they create an inhomogeneous excitation field across the myocardium, producing undesirable, spatially varying partial saturation. Therefore, we implemented adiabatic excitation in a 3D chemical shift imaging (CSI) sequence for cardiac 31 P-MRS at 7 Tesla (T). We optimized an adiabatic half passage pulse with bandwidth sufficient to excite PCr and γ-ATP together. In addition, the CSI sequence was modified to allow interleaved excitation of PCr and γ-ATP, then 2,3-DPG, to enable PCr/ATP determination with blood correction. Nine volunteers were scanned at 2 transmit voltages to confirm that measured PCr/ATP was independent of B1+ (i.e. over the adiabatic threshold). Six septal voxels were evaluated for each volunteer. Phantom experiments showed that adiabatic excitation can be reached at the depth of the heart using our pulse. The mean evaluated cardiac PCr/ATP ratio from all 9 volunteers corrected for blood signal was 2.14 ± 0.16. Comparing the two acquisitions with different voltages resulted in a minimal mean difference of -0.005. Adiabatic excitation is possible in the human heart at 7 T, and gives consistent PCr/ATP ratios. Magn Reson Med 78:1667-1673, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Elastic excitations in BaTiO3 single crystals and ceramics: Mobile domain boundaries and polar nanoregions observed by resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salje, Ekhard K. H.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Nataf, Guillaume F.; Picht, Gunnar; Webber, Kyle; Weerasinghe, Jeevaka; Lisenkov, S.; Bellaiche, L.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic properties of elastic domain walls in BaTiO3 were investigated using resonance ultrasonic spectroscopy (RUS). The sequence of phase transitions is characterized by minima in the temperature dependence of RUS resonance frequencies and changes in Q factors (resonance damping). Damping is related to the friction of mobile twin boundaries (90° ferroelectric walls) and distorted polar nanoregions (PNRs) in the cubic phase. Damping is largest in the tetragonal phase of ceramic materials but very low in single crystals. Damping is also small in the low-temperature phases of the ceramic sample and slightly increases with decreasing temperature in the single crystal. The phase angle between the real and imaginary part of the dynamic response function changes drastically in the cubic and tetragonal phases and remains constant in the orthorhombic phase. Other phases show a moderate dependence of the phase angle on temperature showing systematic changes of twin microstructures. Mobile twin boundaries (or sections of twin boundaries such as kinks inside twin walls) contribute strongly to the energy dissipation of the forced oscillation while the reduction in effective modulus due to relaxing twin domains is weak. Single crystals and ceramics show strong precursor softening in the cubic phase related to polar nanoregions (PNRs). The effective modulus decreases when the transition point of the cubic-tetragonal transformation is approached from above. The precursor softening follows temperature dependence very similar to recent results from Brillouin scattering. Between the Burns temperature (≈586 K) and Tc at 405 K, we found a good fit of the squared RUS frequency [˜Δ (C11-C12)] to a Vogel-Fulcher process with an activation energy of ˜0.2 eV. Finally, some first-principles-based effective Hamiltonian computations were carried out in BaTiO3 single domains to explain some of these observations in terms of the dynamics of the soft mode and central mode.

  18. Development of qualitative and quantitative analysis methods in pharmaceutical application with new selective signal excitation methods for 13 C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance using 1 H T1rho relaxation time.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Mamiko; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Most pharmaceutical drug substances and excipients in formulations exist in a crystalline or amorphous form, and an understanding of their state during manufacture and storage is critically important, particularly in formulated products. Carbon 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is useful for studying the chemical and physical state of pharmaceutical solids in a formulated product. We developed two new selective signal excitation methods in (13) C solid-state NMR to extract the spectrum of a target component from such a mixture. These methods were based on equalization of the proton relaxation time in a single domain via rapid intraproton spin diffusion and the difference in proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame ((1) H T1rho) of individual components in the mixture. Introduction of simple pulse sequences to one-dimensional experiments reduced data acquisition time and increased flexibility. We then demonstrated these methods in a commercially available drug and in a mixture of two saccharides, in which the (13) C signals of the target components were selectively excited, and showed them to be applicable to the quantitative analysis of individual components in solid mixtures, such as formulated products, polymorphic mixtures, or mixtures of crystalline and amorphous phases. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Bimagnon studies in cuprates with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the O K edge. I. Assessment on La2CuO4 and comparison with the excitation at Cu L3 and Cu K edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisogni, V.; Simonelli, L.; Ament, L. J. P.; Forte, F.; Moretti Sala, M.; Minola, M.; Huotari, S.; van den Brink, J.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Brookes, N. B.; Braicovich, L.

    2012-06-01

    We assess the capabilities of magnetic resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the O K edge in undoped cuprates by taking La2CuO4 as a benchmark case, based on a series of RIXS measurements that we present here. By combining the experimental results with basic theory we point out the fingerprints of bimagnon excitation in the O K edge RIXS spectra. These are a dominant peak around 450 meV, the almost complete absence of dispersion both with π and σ polarization, and the almost constant intensity vs the transferred momentum with σ polarization. This behavior is quite different from Cu L3 edge RIXS giving a strongly dispersing bimagnon tending to zero at the center of the Brillouin zone. This is clearly shown by RIXS measurements at the Cu L3 edge that we present. The Cu L3 bimagnon spectra and those at the Cu K edge—both from the literature and from our data—however, have the same shape. These similarities and differences are understood in terms of different sampling of the bimagnon continuum. This panorama points out the unique possibilities offered by O K RIXS in the study of magnetic excitations in cuprates near the center of the BZ.

  20. Combined electrical and resonant optical excitation characterization of multi-quantum well InGaN-based light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Presa, S., E-mail: silvino.presa@tyndall.ie; School of Engineering, University College Cork, Cork; Maaskant, P. P.

    We present a comprehensive study of the emission spectra and electrical characteristics of InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well light-emitting diode (LED) structures under resonant optical pumping and varying electrical bias. A 5 quantum well LED with a thin well (1.5 nm) and a relatively thick barrier (6.6 nm) shows strong bias-dependent properties in the emission spectra, poor photovoltaic carrier escape under forward bias and an increase in effective resistance when compared with a 10 quantum well LED with a thin (4 nm) barrier. These properties are due to a strong piezoelectric field in the well and associated reduced field in the thickermore » barrier. We compare the voltage ideality factors for the LEDs under electrical injection, light emission with current, photovoltaic mode (PV) and photoluminescence (PL) emission. The PV and PL methods provide similar values for the ideality which are lower than for the resistance-limited electrical method. Under optical pumping the presence of an n-type InGaN underlayer in a commercial LED sample is shown to act as a second photovoltaic source reducing the photovoltage and the extracted ideality factor to less than 1. The use of photovoltaic measurements together with bias-dependent spectrally resolved luminescence is a powerful method to provide valuable insights into the dynamics of GaN LEDs.« less

  1. Spatial resonance in a small artery excited by vibration input as a possible mechanism to cause hand-arm vascular disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattnaik, Shrikant; Banerjee, Rupak; Kim, Jay

    2012-04-01

    Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) is collectively a vasospastic and neurodegenerative occupational disease. One of the major symptoms of HAVS is vibration white finger (VWF) caused by exaggerated vasoconstriction of the arteries and skin arterioles. While VWF is a very painful and costly occupational illness, its pathology has not been well understood. In this study a small artery is modeled as a fluid filled elastic tube whose diameter changes along the axial direction. Equations of motion are developed by considering interactions between the fluid, artery wall and soft-tissue bed. It is shown that the resulting wave equation is the same as that of the basilar membrane in the cochlea of mammals. Therefore, the artery system shows a spatial resonance as in the basilar membrane, which responds with the highest amplitude at the location determined by the vibration frequency. This implies that a long-term use of one type of tool will induce high-level stresses at a few identical locations of the artery that correspond to the major frequency components of the tool. Hardening and deterioration of the artery at these locations may be a possible cause of VWF.

  2. Internal photopumping of Nd3+ (2H9/2, 4F5/2) states in yttrium aluminum garnet by excitation transfer from oxygen deficiency centers and Fe3+ continuum emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, J. D.; Spinka, T. M.; Senin, A. A.; Eden, J. G.

    2011-07-01

    Photoexcitation of Nd3+ (2H9/2, 4F5/2) states by the broad (˜70 nm FWHM), near-infrared continuum provided by Fe3+ has been observed at 300 K in bulk yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) crystals doped with trace concentrations (<50 ppm) of Fe, Cr, and Eu. Irradiation of YAG at 248 nm with a KrF laser, which excites the oxygen deficiency center (ODC) in YAG having peak absorption at ˜240 nm, culminates in ODC→Fe3+ excitation transfer and subsequent Fe3+ emission. This internal optical pumping mechanism for rare earth ions is unencumbered by the requirement for donor-acceptor proximity that constrains conventional Förster-Dexter excitation transfer in co-doped crystals.

  3. International Observe the Moon Night - An Opportunity to Participate in the Year of the Solar System While Sharing the Excitement of Lunar Science and Exploration with the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleacher, L.; Daou, D.; Day, B. H.; Hsu, B. C.; Jones, A. P.; Mitchell, B.; Shaner, A. J.; Shipp, S. S.

    2010-12-01

    International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) is a multi-nation effort to share the excitement of recent lunar missions and new science results with education communities, amateur astronomers, space enthusiasts, and the general public. It is also intended to encourage the world to experience the thrill of observing Earth’s closest neighbor. The inaugural InOMN took place on September 18, 2010. People in over 26 countries gathered together in groups big and small to learn about the Moon through presentations by scientists, astronomers, and engineers; participate in hands-on activities; and observe the Moon through telescopes, binoculars, and the naked eye. Next year’s InOMN will take place on October 8, 2011 during the Year of the Solar System (YSS). The October 2011 YSS theme will be “Moons/Rings Across the Solar System.” InOMN is perfectly suited as an event that any museum, science center, planetarium, university, school, or other group can implement to celebrate YSS. The InOMN Coordinating Committee has developed a variety of resources and materials to make it easy to host an InOMN event of any size. Interested groups are encouraged to utilize the InOMN website (observethemoonnight.org) in planning their InOMN event for 2011/YSS. The website contains links to Moon resources, educational activities, suggestions for hosting an event, free downloads of logos and flyers for advertising an event, and contests. New for 2011 will be a discussion forum for event hosts to share their plans, tips, and experiences. Together, YSS and InOMN will enable the public to maintain its curiosity about the Moon and to gain a better understanding of the Moon’s formation, evolution, and place in the night sky.

  4. Resonance Ionization, Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, J. P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is an analytical technique that uses photons from lasers to resonantly excite an electron from some initial state of a gaseous atom through various excited states of the atom or molecule. Described are the apparatus, some analytical applications, and the precision and accuracy of the technique. Lists 26 references. (CW)

  5. Voiced Excitations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    3701 North Fairfax Drive Arlington, VA 22203-1714 NA NA NA Radar & EM Speech, Voiced Speech Excitations 61 ULUNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED...New Ideas for Speech Recognition and Related Technologies”, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Report, UCRL -UR-120310 , 1995 . Available from...Livermore Laboratory report UCRL -JC-134775M Holzrichter 2003, Holzrichter J.F., Kobler, J. B., Rosowski, J.J., Burke, G.J., (2003) “EM wave

  6. IV INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ATOM AND MOLECULAR PULSED LASERS (AMPL'99): Radiative and photochemical properties of organic compounds excited by high-power XeCl laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, T. N.; Kuznetsova, Rimma T.; Svetlichnyi, Valerii A.; Sergeev, A. K.; Tel'minov, E. N.; Filinov, D. N.

    2000-06-01

    Radiative and photochemical properties of a number of laser dyes excited by focused radiation of a XeCl laser with intensity up to 200 MW cm-2 were studied. A method for measuring the gain of organic molecules under high-power excitation is proposed. The dependence of the dye transmittance for the pump radiation on its intensity was studied. It is shown that changes in energy, spectral, and time characteristics of radiation and the photostability of compounds under high-power excitation are associated with the formation of superluminescence.

  7. Correlation of III/V semiconductor etch results with physical parameters of high-density reactive plasmas excited by electron cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, FRANZ; Ralf, MEYER; Markus-Christian, AMANN

    2017-12-01

    Reactive ion etching is the interaction of reactive plasmas with surfaces. To obtain a detailed understanding of this process, significant properties of reactive composite low-pressure plasmas driven by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) were investigated and compared with the radial uniformity of the etch rate. The determination of the electronic properties of chlorine- and hydrogen-containing plasmas enabled the understanding of the pressure-dependent behavior of the plasma density and provided better insights into the electronic parameters of reactive etch gases. From the electrical evaluation of I(V) characteristics obtained using a Langmuir probe, plasmas of different compositions were investigated. The standard method of Druyvesteyn to derive the electron energy distribution functions by the second derivative of the I(V) characteristics was replaced by a mathematical model which has been evolved to be more robust against noise, mainly, because the first derivative of the I(V) characteristics is used. Special attention was given to the power of the energy dependence in the exponent. In particular, for plasmas that are generated by ECR with EM modes, the existence of Maxwellian distribution functions is not to be taken as a self-evident fact, but the bi-Maxwellian distribution was proven for Ar- and Kr-stabilized plasmas. In addition to the electron temperature, the global uniform discharge model has been shown to be useful for calculating the neutral gas temperature. To what extent the invasive method of using a Langmuir probe could be replaced with the non-invasive optical method of emission spectroscopy, particularly actinometry, was investigated, and the resulting data exhibited the same relative behavior as the Langmuir data. The correlation with etchrate data reveals the large chemical part of the removal process—most striking when the data is compared with etching in pure argon. Although the relative amount of the radial variation of plasma density and

  8. Measurements of hadronic B decays to excited-charm mesons, observation of a new charm resonance and construction of a silicon vertex detector for CLEO II.V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Timothy Knight

    We describe measurements of the branching ratios B(B --->D*+p- p-total) =(29.2+/-4.5+/-3.8+/-3.1) ×10-4 B(B- --> D*+p- p -non- res)=( 9.7+/-3.6+/-1.5+/-1.9)× 10- 4 B(B---> D1(2420) 0p-) B(D1( 2420)0--> D*+p- )= (6.9+1.8-1.4 +/-1.1+/-0.4)× 10-4 B(B---> D01( j= / )p- ) B(D01 (j= /) -->D* +p-) = ( 10.6+/-1.9+/-1.7+/-2.3)× 10-4 B(B---> D*2( 2460)0p- )B(D *2( 2460)0--> D*+p- )= (3.1+/- 0.84+/-0.46+/-0.28)×10 -4, using data collected by the CLEO II detector. These measurements provide the first observation of the D01(j=/) with a mass and width of 2.461+0.053- 0.049GeV and 290+110 - 91MeV respectively. The mixing angles between the partial waves and strong phase shifts among the resonances are also measured assuming one possible parameterization of the amplitude. A method allowing full reconstruction of the signal without reconstruction of the D meson in the final state is used. The measurements are extracted using an four-dimensional, unbinned, maximum- likelihood fit to the distributions of the D*+p- mass and the decay angles. The primary element of the CLEO II.V upgrade was the installation of a three-layer Silicon Vertexing Detector. The design and construction of this detector are described in detail.

  9. Sub-50 fs excited state dynamics of 6-chloroguanine upon deep ultraviolet excitation.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sayan; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2016-05-18

    The photophysical properties of natural nucleobases and their respective nucleotides are ascribed to the sub-picosecond lifetime of their first singlet states in the UV-B region (260-350 nm). Electronic transitions of the ππ* type, which are stronger than those in the UV-B region, lie at the red edge of the UV-C range (100-260 nm) in all isolated nucleobases. The lowest energetic excited states in the UV-B region of nucleobases have been investigated using a plethora of experimental and theoretical methods in gas and solution phases. The sub-picosecond lifetime of these molecules is not a general attribute of all nucleobases but specific to the five primary nucleobases and a few xanthine and methylated derivatives. To determine the overall UV photostability, we aim to understand the effect of more energetic photons lying in the UV-C region on nucleobases. To determine the UV-C initiated photophysics of a nucleobase system, we chose a halogen substituted purine, 6-chloroguanine (6-ClG), that we had investigated previously using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We have performed quantitative measurements of the resonance Raman cross-section across the Bb absorption band (210-230 nm) and constructed the Raman excitation profiles. We modeled the excitation profiles using Lee and Heller's time-dependent theory of resonance Raman intensities to extract the initial excited state dynamics of 6-ClG within 30-50 fs after photoexcitation. We found that imidazole and pyrimidine rings of 6-ClG undergo expansion and contraction, respectively, following photoexcitation to the Bb state. The amount of distortions of the excited state structure from that of the ground state structure is reflected by the total internal reorganization energy that is determined at 112 cm(-1). The contribution of the inertial component of the solvent response towards the total reorganization energy was obtained at 1220 cm(-1). In addition, our simulation also yields an instantaneous response of the first

  10. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  11. A comparative study of magnetic resonance venography techniques for the evaluation of the internal jugular veins in multiple sclerosis patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Tamizur; Sethi, Sean K.; Utriainen, David T.; Hewett, J. Joseph; Haacke, E. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess the vascular nature of diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) is a growing field of research. This work reports on the application of MR angiographic (MRA) and venographic (MRV) techniques in assessing the extracranial vasculature in MS patients. Materials and Methods A standardized MRI protocol containing 2D TOF-MRV and dynamic 3D contrast-enhanced (CE) MRAV was run for 170 MS patients and 40 healthy controls (HC). The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the internal jugular veins (IJVs) was measured at three neck levels in all subjects for both MRV techniques to determine the presence of venous stenoses. All data were analyzed retrospectively. Results For the values where both methods showed signal, the 3D method showed larger CSA measurement values compared to 2D methods in both IJVs, in both MS and HC subjects which was confirmed with student paired t-tests. Of the 170 MS patients, 93 (55%) in CE-MRAV and 103 (61%) in TOF-MRV showed stenosis in at least one IJV. The corresponding numbers for the 40 HC subjects were 2 (5%) and 4 (10%), respectively. Carotid ectasias with IJV stenosis were seen in 26 cases (15%) with 3D CE-MRAV and were not observable with 2D TOF-MRV. Carotid ectasias were not seen in the HC group. In the 2D TOF-MRV data, banding of the IJVs related to slow flow was seen in 58 (34%) MS cases and in no HC cases. MS patients showed lower average CSAs than the HC subjects. Conclusion The 3D CE MRAV depicted the vascular anatomy more completely than the 2D TOF-MRV. However, the 3D CE MRAV does not provide any information about the flow characteristics which are indirectly available in the 2D TOF-MRV in those cases where there is slow flow. PMID:23850076

  12. Direct Comparison of Respiration-Correlated Four-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reconstructed Using Concurrent Internal Navigator and External Bellows.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Wei, Jie; Olek, Devin; Kadbi, Mo; Tyagi, Neelam; Zakian, Kristen; Mechalakos, James; Deasy, Joseph O; Hunt, Margie

    2017-03-01

    To compare the image quality of amplitude-binned 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4DMRI) reconstructed using 2 concurrent respiratory (navigator and bellows) waveforms. A prospective, respiratory-correlated 4DMRI scanning program was used to acquire T2-weighted single-breath 4DMRI images with internal navigator and external bellows. After a 10-second training waveform of a surrogate signal, 2-dimensional MRI acquisition was triggered at a level (bin) and anatomic location (slice) until the bin-slice table was completed for 4DMRI reconstruction. The bellows signal was always collected, even when the navigator trigger was used, to retrospectively reconstruct a bellows-rebinned 4DMRI. Ten volunteers participated in this institutional review board-approved 4DMRI study. Four scans were acquired for each subject, including coronal and sagittal scans triggered by either navigator or bellows, and 6 4DMRI images (navigator-triggered, bellows-rebinned, and bellows-triggered) were reconstructed. The simultaneously acquired waveforms and resulting 4DMRI quality were compared using signal correlation, bin/phase shift, and binning motion artifacts. The consecutive bellows-triggered 4DMRI scan was used for indirect comparison. Correlation coefficients between the navigator and bellows signals were found to be patient-specific and inhalation-/exhalation-dependent, ranging from 0.1 to 0.9 because of breathing irregularities (>50% scans) and commonly observed bin/phase shifts (-1.1 ± 0.6 bin) in both 1-dimensional waveforms and diaphragm motion extracted from 4D images. Navigator-triggered 4DMRI contained many fewer binning motion artifacts at the diaphragm than did the bellows-rebinned and bellows-triggered 4DMRI scans. Coronal scans were faster than sagittal scans because of the fewer slices and higher achievable acceleration factors. Navigator-triggered 4DMRI contains substantially fewer binning motion artifacts than bellows-rebinned and bellows-triggered 4DMRI

  13. Random-order fractional bistable system and its stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shilong; Zhang, Li; Liu, Hui; Kan, Bixia

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the diffusion motion of Brownian particles in a viscous liquid suffering from stochastic fluctuations of the external environment is modeled as a random-order fractional bistable equation, and as a typical nonlinear dynamic behavior, the stochastic resonance phenomena in this system are investigated. At first, the derivation process of the random-order fractional bistable system is given. In particular, the random-power-law memory is deeply discussed to obtain the physical interpretation of the random-order fractional derivative. Secondly, the stochastic resonance evoked by random-order and external periodic force is mainly studied by numerical simulation. In particular, the frequency shifting phenomena of the periodical output are observed in SR induced by the excitation of the random order. Finally, the stochastic resonance of the system under the double stochastic excitations of the random order and the internal color noise is also investigated.

  14. Estimates of the Attenuation Rates of Baroclinic Tidal Energy Caused by Resonant Interactions Among Internal Waves based on the Weak Turbulence Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuki, Y.; Hibiya, T.

    2016-02-01

    The baroclinic tides are thought to be the dominant energy source for turbulent mixing in the ocean interior. In contrast to the geography of the energy conversion rates from the barotropic to baroclinic tides, which has been clarified in recent numerical studies, the global distribution of the energy sink for the resulting low-mode baroclinic tides remains obscure. A key to resolve this issue is the resonant wave-wave interactions, which transfer part of the baroclinic tidal energy to the background internal wave field enhancing the local energy dissipation rates. Recent field observations and numerical studies have pointed out that parametric subharmonic instability (PSI), one of the resonant interactions, causes significant energy sink of baroclinic tidal energy at mid-latitudes. The purpose of this study is to analyze the quantitative aspect of PSI to demonstrate the global distribution of the intensity of resonant wave interactions, namely, the attenuation rate of low-mode baroclinic tidal energy. Our approach is basically following the weak turbulence theory, which is the standard theory for resonant wave-wave interactions, where techniques of singular perturbation and statistical physics are employed. This study is, however, different from the classical theory in some points; we have reformulated the weak turbulence theory to be applicable to low-mode internal waves and also developed its numerical calculation method so that the effects of stratification profile and oceanic total depth can be taken into account. We have calculated the attenuation rate of low-mode baroclinic tidal waves interacting with the background Garrett-Munk internal wave field. The calculated results clearly show the rapid attenuation of baroclinic tidal energy at mid-latitudes, in agreement with the results from field observations and also show the zonal inhomogeneity of the attenuation rate caused by the density structures associated with the subtropical gyre. This study is expected

  15. A Broad G Protein-Coupled Receptor Internalization Assay that Combines SNAP-Tag Labeling, Diffusion-Enhanced Resonance Energy Transfer, and a Highly Emissive Terbium Cryptate.

    PubMed

    Levoye, Angélique; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Jaracz-Ros, Agnieszka; Klipfel, Laurence; Cottet, Martin; Maurel, Damien; Bdioui, Sara; Balabanian, Karl; Prézeau, Laurent; Trinquet, Eric; Durroux, Thierry; Bachelerie, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Although G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization has long been considered as a major aspect of the desensitization process that tunes ligand responsiveness, internalization is also involved in receptor resensitization and signaling, as well as the ligand scavenging function of some atypical receptors. Internalization thus contributes to the diversity of GPCR-dependent signaling, and its dynamics and quantification in living cells has generated considerable interest. We developed a robust and sensitive assay to follow and quantify ligand-induced and constitutive-induced GPCR internalization but also receptor recycling in living cells. This assay is based on diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer (DERET) between cell surface GPCRs labeled with a luminescent terbium cryptate donor and a fluorescein acceptor present in the culture medium. GPCR internalization results in a quantifiable reduction of energy transfer. This method yields a high signal-to-noise ratio due to time-resolved measurements. For various GPCRs belonging to different classes, we demonstrated that constitutive and ligand-induced internalization could be monitored as a function of time and ligand concentration, thus allowing accurate quantitative determination of kinetics of receptor internalization but also half-maximal effective or inhibitory concentrations of compounds. In addition to its selectivity and sensitivity, we provided evidence that DERET-based internalization assay is particularly suitable for characterizing biased ligands. Furthermore, the determination of a Z'-factor value of 0.45 indicates the quality and suitability of DERET-based internalization assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of compounds that may modulate GPCRs internalization.

  16. A Broad G Protein-Coupled Receptor Internalization Assay that Combines SNAP-Tag Labeling, Diffusion-Enhanced Resonance Energy Transfer, and a Highly Emissive Terbium Cryptate

    PubMed Central

    Levoye, Angélique; Zwier, Jurriaan M.; Jaracz-Ros, Agnieszka; Klipfel, Laurence; Cottet, Martin; Maurel, Damien; Bdioui, Sara; Balabanian, Karl; Prézeau, Laurent; Trinquet, Eric; Durroux, Thierry; Bachelerie, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Although G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization has long been considered as a major aspect of the desensitization process that tunes ligand responsiveness, internalization is also involved in receptor resensitization and signaling, as well as the ligand scavenging function of some atypical receptors. Internalization thus contributes to the diversity of GPCR-dependent signaling, and its dynamics and quantification in living cells has generated considerable interest. We developed a robust and sensitive assay to follow and quantify ligand-induced and constitutive-induced GPCR internalization but also receptor recycling in living cells. This assay is based on diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer (DERET) between cell surface GPCRs labeled with a luminescent terbium cryptate donor and a fluorescein acceptor present in the culture medium. GPCR internalization results in a quantifiable reduction of energy transfer. This method yields a high signal-to-noise ratio due to time-resolved measurements. For various GPCRs belonging to different classes, we demonstrated that constitutive and ligand-induced internalization could be monitored as a function of time and ligand concentration, thus allowing accurate quantitative determination of kinetics of receptor internalization but also half-maximal effective or inhibitory concentrations of compounds. In addition to its selectivity and sensitivity, we provided evidence that DERET-based internalization assay is particularly suitable for characterizing biased ligands. Furthermore, the determination of a Z′-factor value of 0.45 indicates the quality and suitability of DERET-based internalization assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of compounds that may modulate GPCRs internalization. PMID:26617570

  17. Magnetic Excitations of Stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Daoxin; Carlson, Erica; Campbell, David

    2005-03-01

    Competing tendencies in electronic systems with strong correlations can lead to spontaneous nanoscale structure, pattern formation, and even long-range spatial order. There has been continued interest in various ``stripe'' phases of electrons, as well as more recent interest in possible ``checkerboard'' patterns. New experimental techniques allow for the extraction of detailed and reproducible neutron scattering spectra in copper oxide superconductors and related nickelate compounds. We discuss the magnetic excitations of well-ordered stripe phases, including the high energy magnetic excitations of recent interest and possible connections to the ``resonance peak'' in cuprate superconductors. Using a suitably parametrized Heisenberg model and spin wave theory, we study a variety of possible stripe configurations, including vertical, diagonal, staircase, and zigzag stripes. We calculate the expected neutron scattering intensities as a function of energy and momentum. Constant energy cuts at high energy often reveal a square-like scattering pattern, and occasionally a circular pattern. Bond-centered stripes have weight gathered near (pi,pi) at low energy, indicating that only part of the spin wave cone is expected to be resolvable experimentally. In addition, we present a litmus test for experimentally distinguishing bond-centered stripes from site-centered stripes using low energy data.

  18. Acoustically excited surface waves on empty or fluid-filled cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahyi, A. Claude; Cao, H.; Raju, P. K.; Werby, M. F.; Bao, X. L.; Überall, H.

    2002-05-01

    A comparative study is presented of the acoustical excitation of circumferential (surface) waves on fluid-immersed cylindrical or spherical metal shells, which may be either evacuated, or filled with the same or a different fluid. The excited surface waves can manifest themselves by the resonances apparent in the sound scattering amplitude, which they cause upon phase matching following repeated circumnavigations of the target object, or by their re-radiation into the external fluid in the manner of head waves. We plot dispersion curves versus frequency of the surface waves, which for evacuated shells have a generally rising character, while the fluid filling adds an additional set of circumferential waves that descend with frequency. The resonances of these latter waves may also be interpreted as being due to phase matching, but they may alternately be interpreted as constituting the eigenfrequencies of the internal fluid contained in an elastic enclosure.

  19. Resonant recombination and autoionization in electron-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.

    1990-06-01

    The occurence of resonances in elastic and inelastic electron-ion collisions is discussed. Resonant processes involve excitation of the ion with simultaneous capture of the initially free electron. The decay mechanism subsequent to the formation of the intermediate multiply excited state determines whether a resonance is found in recombination, excitation, elastic scattering, in single or even in multiple ionization. This review concentrates on resonances in the ionization channel. Correlated two-electron transitions are considered.

  20. Isolated resonator gyroscope with isolation trimming using a secondary element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention discloses a resonator gyroscope including an isolated resonator. One or more flexures support the isolated resonator and a baseplate is affixed to the resonator by the flexures. Drive and sense elements are affixed to the baseplate and used to excite the resonator and sense movement of the gyroscope. In addition, at least one secondary element (e.g., another electrode) is affixed to the baseplate and used for trimming isolation of the resonator. The resonator operates such that it transfers substantially no net momentum to the baseplate when the resonator is excited. Typically, the isolated resonator comprises a proof mass and a counterbalancing plate.

  1. Development of PZT-excited stroboscopic shearography for full-field nondestructive evaluation.

    PubMed

    Asemani, Hamidreza; Park, Jinwoo; Lee, Jung-Ryul; Soltani, Nasser

    2017-05-01

    Nondestructive evaluation using shearography requires a way to stress the inspection target. This technique is able to directly measure the displacement gradient distribution on the object surface. Shearography visualizes the internal structural damages as the anomalous pattern in the shearograpic fringe pattern. A piezoelectric (PZT) excitation system is able to generate loadings in the vibrational, acoustic, and ultrasonic regimes. In this paper, we propose a PZT-excited stroboscopic shearography. The PZT excitation could generate vibrational loading, a stationary wavefield, and a nonstationary propagation wave to fulfill the external loading requirement of shearography. The sweeping of the PZT excitation frequency, the formation of a standing wave, and a small shearing to suppress the incident wave were powerful controllable tools to detect the defects. The sweeping of the PZT excitation frequency enabled us to determine one of the defect-sensitive frequencies almost in real time. In addition, because the defect sensitive frequencies always existed in wide and plural ranges, the risk of the defect being overlooked by the inspector could be alleviated. The results of evaluation using stroboscopic shearography showed that an artificial 20 mm-diameter defect could be visualized at the excitation frequencies of 5-8 kHz range and 12.5-15.5 kHz range. This technique provided full field reliable and repeatable inspection results. Additionally, the proposed method overcame the important drawback of the time-averaged shearography, being required to identify the resonance vibration frequency sensitive to the defect.

  2. Stochastic stability of parametrically excited random systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labou, M.

    2004-01-01

    Multidegree-of-freedom dynamic systems subjected to parametric excitation are analyzed for stochastic stability. The variation of excitation intensity with time is described by the sum of a harmonic function and a stationary random process. The stability boundaries are determined by the stochastic averaging method. The effect of random parametric excitation on the stability of trivial solutions of systems of differential equations for the moments of phase variables is studied. It is assumed that the frequency of harmonic component falls within the region of combination resonances. Stability conditions for the first and second moments are obtained. It turns out that additional parametric excitation may have a stabilizing or destabilizing effect, depending on the values of certain parameters of random excitation. As an example, the stability of a beam in plane bending is analyzed.

  3. Coupled-Resonator-Induced Transparency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hong-Rok; Fuller, Kirk A.; Rosenberger, A. T.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that a cancellation of absorption occurs on resonance for two (or any even number of) coupled optical resonators, due to mode splitting and classical destructive interference, particularly when the resonator finesse is large and the loss in the resonator furthest from the excitation waveguide is small. The linewidth and group velocity of a collection of such coupled-resonator structures may be decreased by using larger resonators of equal size, using larger resonators of unequal size where the optical path length of the larger resonator is an integer multiple of that of the smaller one, or by using a larger number of resonators per structure. We explore the analogy between these effects and electromagnetically induced transparency in an atomic system.

  4. Femtosecond excited state studies of the two-center three-electron bond driven twisted internal charge transfer dynamics in 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Balkowski, Grzegorz; Szemik-Hojniak, Anna; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Zhang, Hong; Buma, Wybren J

    2005-04-28

    Femtosecond fluorescence upconversion and transient absorption experiments have been performed to monitor the photoinduced electronic, geometry, and solvent relaxation dynamics of 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene dissolved in methylcyclohexane or n-hexane, n-dodecane, dichloromethane, and acetonitrile. The data have been analyzed by using a sequential global analysis method that gives rise to species associated difference spectra. The spectral features in these spectra and their dynamic behavior enable us to associate them with specific processes occurring in the molecule. The experiments show that the internal charge-transfer lpi* state is populated after internal conversion from the 1La state. In the lpi state the molecule is concluded to be subject to a large-amplitude motion, thereby confirming our previous predictions that internal charge transfer in this state is accompanied by the formation of a two-center three-electron bond between the two nitrogen atoms. Solvent relaxation and vibrational cooling in the lpi* state cannot be separated in polar solvents, but in apolar solvents a distinct vibrational cooling process in the lpi* state is discerned. The spectral and dynamic characteristics of the final species created in the experiments are shown to correspond well with what has been determined before for the relaxed emissive lpi state.

  5. Dynamics of a parametrically excited simple pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depetri, Gabriela I.; Pereira, Felipe A. C.; Marin, Boris; Baptista, Murilo S.; Sartorelli, J. C.

    2018-03-01

    The dynamics of a parametric simple pendulum submitted to an arbitrary angle of excitation ϕ was investigated experimentally by simulations and analytically. Analytical calculations for the loci of saddle-node bifurcations corresponding to the creation of resonant orbits were performed by applying Melnikov's method. However, this powerful perturbative method cannot be used to predict the existence of odd resonances for a vertical excitation within first order corrections. Yet, we showed that period-3 resonances indeed exist in such a configuration. Two degenerate attractors of different phases, associated with the same loci of saddle-node bifurcations in parameter space, are reported. For tilted excitation, the degeneracy is broken due to an extra torque, which was confirmed by the calculation of two distinct loci of saddle-node bifurcations for each attractor. This behavior persists up to ϕ≈7 π/180 , and for inclinations larger than this, only one attractor is observed. Bifurcation diagrams were constructed experimentally for ϕ=π/8 to demonstrate the existence of self-excited resonances (periods smaller than three) and hidden oscillations (for periods greater than three).

  6. Dynamics of a parametrically excited simple pendulum.

    PubMed

    Depetri, Gabriela I; Pereira, Felipe A C; Marin, Boris; Baptista, Murilo S; Sartorelli, J C

    2018-03-01

    The dynamics of a parametric simple pendulum submitted to an arbitrary angle of excitation ϕ was investigated experimentally by simulations and analytically. Analytical calculations for the loci of saddle-node bifurcations corresponding to the creation of resonant orbits were performed by applying Melnikov's method. However, this powerful perturbative method cannot be used to predict the existence of odd resonances for a vertical excitation within first order corrections. Yet, we showed that period-3 resonances indeed exist in such a configuration. Two degenerate attractors of different phases, associated with the same loci of saddle-node bifurcations in parameter space, are reported. For tilted excitation, the degeneracy is broken due to an extra torque, which was confirmed by the calculation of two distinct loci of saddle-node bifurcations for each attractor. This behavior persists up to ϕ≈7π/180, and for inclinations larger than this, only one attractor is observed. Bifurcation diagrams were constructed experimentally for ϕ=π/8 to demonstrate the existence of self-excited resonances (periods smaller than three) and hidden oscillations (for periods greater than three).

  7. Dipolar excitation in the third stability region.

    PubMed

    Konenkov, Nikolai V; Chernyak, Eugenii Ya; Stepanov, Vladimir A

    Dipole resonant excitation of ions creates instability bands which follow iso-β lines where β is the characteristic exponent (stability parameter). Instability bands are exited most effectively on the fundamental frequency π= βΩ/2. Here π is the angle resonance frequency of the dipolar voltage applied to x or y pair rods of the analyzer, and Ω is the angle frequency of the main drive voltage. Our goal is to study the mass peak shape in the third stability region with dipolar resonance excitation of the instability band with respect to the resonance frequency π and the dipolar potential amplitude. Numerical integration of the ion motion equations with a given ion source emittance is used to investigate peak shapes and ion transmission. We show that it is possible to vary the resolution power at any part of the third stability region. A change of the dipolar potential phase leads to a periodical variation of the resolution with period π.The most effective dipolar excitation in the y direction is along βy near the stability boundary. The mass peak shape is calculated also for a quadrupole with round rods. The best peak shape (small tails and high resolution) takes place for the rod set with r/r0=1.130. Dipolar excitation increases the transmission by approximately 5-10% at a given resolution.

  8. Resonant electrodynamic heating of stellar coronal loops: An LRC circuit analogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ionson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The electrodynamic coupling of stellar coronal loops to underlying beta velocity fields. A rigorous analysis revealed that the physics can be represented by a simple yet equivalent LRC circuit analogue. This analogue points to the existence of global structure oscillations which resonantly excite internal field line oscillations at a spatial resonance within the coronal loop. Although the width of this spatial resonance, as well as the induced currents and coronal velocity field, explicitly depend upon viscosity and resistivity, the resonant form of the generalized electrodynamic heating function is virtually independent of irreversibilities. This is a classic feature of high quality resonators that are externally driven by a broad band source of spectral power. Applications to solar coronal loops result in remarkable agreement with observations.

  9. Multiple-photon excitation of nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Peng; Balili, R.; Beaumariage, J.; Mukherjee, S.; Snoke, D.; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev

    2018-04-01

    We report the observation of multiphoton photoluminescence excitation (PLE) below the resonant energies of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. The quadratic and cubic dependence of the integrated fluorescence intensity as a function of excitation power indicates a two-photon excitation pathway for the NV- charge state and a three-photon process involved for the neutral NV0 charge state, respectively. Comparing the total multiphoton energy with its single-photon equivalent, the PLE spectra follows the absorption spectrum of single photon excitation. We also observed that the efficiency of photoluminescence for different charge states, as well as the decay time constant, was dependent on the excitation wavelength and power.

  10. Nonorthogonal orbital based N-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. I. Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted excited valence bond wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-01

    In this series, the n-body reduced density matrix (n-RDM) approach for nonorthogonal orbitals and their applications to ab initio valence bond (VB) methods are presented. As the first paper of this series, Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions are explicitly provided by means of nonorthogonal orbital based RDM approach. To this end, a more generalized Wick's theorem, called enhanced Wick's theorem, is presented both in arithmetical and in graphical forms, by which the deduction of expressions for the matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions is dramatically simplified, and the matrix elements are finally expressed in terms of tensor contractions of electronic integrals and n-RDMs of the reference VB self-consistent field wave function. A string-based algorithm is developed for the purpose of evaluating n-RDMs in an efficient way. Using the techniques presented in this paper, one is able to develop new methods and efficient algorithms for nonorthogonal orbital based many-electron theory much easier than by use of the first quantized formulism.

  11. Portable vibration exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  12. A z-gradient array for simultaneous multi-slice excitation with a single-band RF pulse.

    PubMed

    Ertan, Koray; Taraghinia, Soheil; Sadeghi, Alireza; Atalar, Ergin

    2018-07-01

    Multi-slice radiofrequency (RF) pulses have higher specific absorption rates, more peak RF power, and longer pulse durations than single-slice RF pulses. Gradient field design techniques using a z-gradient array are investigated for exciting multiple slices with a single-band RF pulse. Two different field design methods are formulated to solve for the required current values of the gradient array elements for the given slice locations. The method requirements are specified, optimization problems are formulated for the minimum current norm and an analytical solution is provided. A 9-channel z-gradient coil array driven by independent, custom-designed gradient amplifiers is used to validate the theory. Performance measures such as normalized slice thickness error, gradient strength per unit norm current, power dissipation, and maximum amplitude of the magnetic field are provided for various slice locations and numbers of slices. Two and 3 slices are excited by a single-band RF pulse in simulations and phantom experiments. The possibility of multi-slice excitation with a single-band RF pulse using a z-gradient array is validated in simulations and phantom experiments. Magn Reson Med 80:400-412, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Lateralization of Motor Excitability during Observation of Bimanual Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mottonen, Riikka; Farmer, Harry; Watkins, Kate E.

    2010-01-01

    Viewing another person's hand actions enhances excitability in an observer's left and right primary motor (M1) cortex. We aimed to determine whether viewing communicative hand actions alters this bilateral sensorimotor resonance. Using single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we measured excitability in the left and right M1 while…

  14. Estimation of error in maximal intensity projection-based internal target volume of lung tumors: a simulation and comparison study using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Read, Paul W; Baisden, Joseph M; Larner, James M; Benedict, Stanley H; Sheng, Ke

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)-based lung tumor internal target volume determination using a simulation method based on dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI). Eight healthy volunteers and six lung tumor patients underwent a 5-min MRI scan in the sagittal plane to acquire dynamic images of lung motion. A MATLAB program was written to generate re-sorted dMRI using 4D-CT acquisition methods (RedCAM) by segmenting and rebinning the MRI scans. The maximal intensity projection images were generated from RedCAM and dMRI, and the errors in the MIP-based internal target area (ITA) from RedCAM (epsilon), compared with those from dMRI, were determined and correlated with the subjects' respiratory variability (nu). Maximal intensity projection-based ITAs from RedCAM were comparatively smaller than those from dMRI in both phantom studies (epsilon = -21.64% +/- 8.23%) and lung tumor patient studies (epsilon = -20.31% +/- 11.36%). The errors in MIP-based ITA from RedCAM correlated linearly (epsilon = -5.13nu - 6.71, r(2) = 0.76) with the subjects' respiratory variability. Because of the low temporal resolution and retrospective re-sorting, 4D-CT might not accurately depict the excursion of a moving tumor. Using a 4D-CT MIP image to define the internal target volume might therefore cause underdosing and an increased risk of subsequent treatment failure. Patient-specific respiratory variability might also be a useful predictor of the 4D-CT-induced error in MIP-based internal target volume determination.

  15. Estimation of Error in Maximal Intensity Projection-Based Internal Target Volume of Lung Tumors: A Simulation and Comparison Study Using Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Jing; Read, Paul W.; Baisden, Joseph M.

    Purpose: To evaluate the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)-based lung tumor internal target volume determination using a simulation method based on dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI). Methods and Materials: Eight healthy volunteers and six lung tumor patients underwent a 5-min MRI scan in the sagittal plane to acquire dynamic images of lung motion. A MATLAB program was written to generate re-sorted dMRI using 4D-CT acquisition methods (RedCAM) by segmenting and rebinning the MRI scans. The maximal intensity projection images were generated from RedCAM and dMRI, and the errors in the MIP-based internal target area (ITA)more » from RedCAM ({epsilon}), compared with those from dMRI, were determined and correlated with the subjects' respiratory variability ({nu}). Results: Maximal intensity projection-based ITAs from RedCAM were comparatively smaller than those from dMRI in both phantom studies ({epsilon} = -21.64% {+-} 8.23%) and lung tumor patient studies ({epsilon} = -20.31% {+-} 11.36%). The errors in MIP-based ITA from RedCAM correlated linearly ({epsilon} = -5.13{nu} - 6.71, r{sup 2} = 0.76) with the subjects' respiratory variability. Conclusions: Because of the low temporal resolution and retrospective re-sorting, 4D-CT might not accurately depict the excursion of a moving tumor. Using a 4D-CT MIP image to define the internal target volume might therefore cause underdosing and an increased risk of subsequent treatment failure. Patient-specific respiratory variability might also be a useful predictor of the 4D-CT-induced error in MIP-based internal target volume determination.« less

  16. Top-down, decoupled control of constitutive parameters in electromagnetic metamaterials with dielectric resonators of internal anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Koo, Sukmo; Mason, Daniel R; Kim, Yunjung; Park, Namkyoo

    2017-02-10

    A meta-atom platform providing decoupled tuning for the constitutive wave parameters remains as a challenging problem, since the proposition of Pendry. Here we propose an electromagnetic meta-atom design of internal anisotropy (ε r  ≠ ε θ ), as a pathway for decoupling of the effective- permittivity ε eff and permeability μ eff . Deriving effective parameters for anisotropic meta-atom from the first principles, and then subsequent inverse-solving the obtained decoupled solution for a target set of ε eff and μ eff , we also achieve an analytic, top-down determination for the internal structure of a meta-atom. To realize the anisotropy from isotropic materials, a particle of spatial permittivity modulation in r or θ direction is proposed. As an application example, a matched zero index dielectric meta-atom is demonstrated, to enable the super-funneling of a 50λ-wide flux through a sub-λ slit; unharnessing the flux collection limit dictated by the λ-zone.

  17. Top-down, decoupled control of constitutive parameters in electromagnetic metamaterials with dielectric resonators of internal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Sukmo; Mason, Daniel R.; Kim, Yunjung; Park, Namkyoo

    2017-02-01

    A meta-atom platform providing decoupled tuning for the constitutive wave parameters remains as a challenging problem, since the proposition of Pendry. Here we propose an electromagnetic meta-atom design of internal anisotropy (εr ≠ εθ), as a pathway for decoupling of the effective- permittivity εeff and permeability μeff. Deriving effective parameters for anisotropic meta-atom from the first principles, and then subsequent inverse-solving the obtained decoupled solution for a target set of εeff and μeff, we also achieve an analytic, top-down determination for the internal structure of a meta-atom. To realize the anisotropy from isotropic materials, a particle of spatial permittivity modulation in r or θ direction is proposed. As an application example, a matched zero index dielectric meta-atom is demonstrated, to enable the super-funneling of a 50λ-wide flux through a sub-λ slit; unharnessing the flux collection limit dictated by the λ-zone.

  18. Resonant responses and chaotic dynamics of composite laminated circular cylindrical shell with membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Liu, T.; Xi, A.; Wang, Y. N.

    2018-06-01

    This paper is focused on the resonant responses and chaotic dynamics of a composite laminated circular cylindrical shell with radially pre-stretched membranes at both ends and clamped along a generatrix. Based on the two-degree-of-freedom non-autonomous nonlinear equations of this system, the method of multiple scales is employed to obtain the four-dimensional nonlinear averaged equation. The resonant case considered here is the primary parametric resonance-1/2 subharmonic resonance and 1:1 internal resonance. Corresponding to several selected parameters, the frequency-response curves are obtained. From the numerical results, we find that the hardening-spring-type behaviors and jump phenomena are exhibited. The jump phenomena also occur in the amplitude curves of the temperature parameter excitation. Moreover, it is found that the temperature parameter excitation, the coupling degree of two order modes and the detuning parameters can effect the nonlinear oscillations of this system. The periodic and chaotic motions of the composite laminated circular cylindrical shell clamped along a generatrix are demonstrated by the bifurcation diagrams, the maximum Lyapunov exponents, the phase portraits, the waveforms, the power spectrums and the Poincaré map. The temperature parameter excitation shows that the Pomeau-Manneville type intermittent chaos occur under the certain initial conditions. It is also found that there exist the twin phenomena between the Pomeau-Manneville type intermittent chaos and the period-doubling bifurcation.

  19. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert

    1991-01-01

    A resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method provides a unique characterization of an object for use in distinguishing similar objects having physical differences greater than a predetermined tolerance. A resonant response spectrum is obtained for a reference object by placing excitation and detection transducers at any accessible location on the object. The spectrum is analyzed to determine the number of resonant response peaks in a predetermined frequency interval. The distribution of the resonance frequencies is then characterized in a manner effective to form a unique signature of the object. In one characterization, a small frequency interval is defined and stepped though the spectrum frequency range. Subsequent objects are similarly characterized where the characterizations serve as signatures effective to distinguish objects that differ from the reference object by more than the predetermined tolerance.

  20. Photoplasma of optically excited metal vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Bezuglov, N.N.; Llyucharev, A.N.; Stacewicz, T.

    1994-09-01

    A wide range of questions associated with various aspects of photoplasma physics is considered. A comprehensive analysis of processes of optical excitation and de-excitation depending on optical characteristics of an absorbing gas medium is given. Analytical methods used for determining the excitation degree of photoresonance plasma in conditions of resonance radiation transfer are described. The accuracy of the Biberman approximation for effective lifetimes in population kinetics of resonance plasma states is analyzed for many experimental conditions. A detailed discussion of primary ionization mechanisms in photoplasma is given; the kinetics of ionization processes is discussed; and systematization of various types ofmore » photoresonance plasma is presented. Basis aspects of the LIBORS model, which is widely used for studying ionization kinetics of laser photoresonance plasma, and its limitations are considered. An ingenious method used to analytically solve a class of decay-type nonlinear problems, which arise for the capture equation in the case of noticeable saturation of a resonance transition by a short laser pulse, is described. A reliable quantitative description of fluorescence decay curve peculiarities that are associated with the bleaching of gases at resonance line frequencies can be obtained by this method. Some possible applications of photoplasma in problems of optics and spectroscopy are considered. 75 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.« less

  1. Intrinsic line shape of electromagnetic radiation from a stack of intrinsic Josephson junctions synchronized by an internal cavity resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelev, Alexei

    2013-03-01

    Stacks of intrinsic Josephson-junctions are realized in mesas fabricated out of layered superconducting single crystals, such as Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 (BSCCO). Synchronization of phase oscillations in different junctions can be facilitated by the coupling to the internal cavity mode leading to powerful and coherent electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz frequency range. An important characteristic of this radiation is the shape of the emission line. A finite line width appears due to different noise sources leading to phase diffusion. We investigated the intrinsic line shape caused by the thermal noise for a mesa fabricated on the top of a BSCCO single crystal. In the ideal case of fully synchronized stack the finite line width is coming from two main contributions, the quasiparticle-current noise inside the mesa and the fluctuating radiation in the base crystal. We compute both contributions and conclude that for realistic mesa's parameters the second mechanism typically dominates. The role of the cavity quality factor in the emission line spectrum is clarified. Analytical results were verified by numerical simulations. In real mesa structures part of the stack may not be synchronized and chaotic dynamics of unsynchronized junctions may determine the real line width. Work supported by UChicago Argonne, LLC, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  2. Luminescence quantum yields of gold nanoparticles varying with excitation wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuqing; He, Yingbo; Zhao, Jingyi; Shen, Hongming; Xia, Keyu; Lua, Guowei; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-11-01

    Luminescence quantum yields (QYs) of gold nanoparticles including nanorods, nanobipyramids and nanospheres are measured elaborately at single nanoparticle level with different excitation wavelengths. It is found that the QYs of the nanostructures are essentially dependent on the excitation wavelength. The QY is higher when the excitation wavelength is blue-detuned and close to the nanoparticles' surface plasmon resonant peak. A phenomenological model based on plasmonic resonator concept is proposed to understand the experimental findings. The excitation wavelength dependent of QY is attributed to the wavelength dependent coupling efficiency between the free electrons oscillation and the intrinsic plasmon resonant radiative mode. These studies should contribute to the understanding of one-photon luminescence from metallic nanostructures and plasmonic surface enhanced spectroscopy.

  3. Effect of the tidal-seismic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Zheng, Y.

    2017-12-01

    For a moon spiraling inward to its planet, the tidal force frequency of a moon is increasing. When the distance of the moon to the planet is close enough, the tidal force frequency can intrude into the frequency range of planet normal modes. Usually the football mode, also known as 0S2, has the lowest frequency. This mode is most likely to be excited and coupled first. When the tidal force has the same frequency with the normal modes, the resonance can happen. The existence of the topography or internal heterogeneities of the planet can have mode coupling. So the energy of gravity force with higher spatial frequencies can be transferred to the low spatial 0S2 mode. The resonant mode 0S2 can exert a negative torque to the rotating moon so its orbit decays. With our 3D numerical boundary element method which takes into account planet surface topography (i.e., Mars as example), we found that the closer the moon is to the planet, the greater falling rate of the moon would be. We applied our method to a planet with equal size of Mars and elastic constants in possible range. The vibration amplitude on the planet surface can reach to the scale of meters when as the moon drop down to about 1.04 radius of the planet to achieve resonance with the 0S2 mode. Our modeling showed that the influence of tidal force caused resonance could not be neglected in the process of moon falling. On the other hand, the resonance may also be able to speed up the accretion of the early forming planet by absorbing the dust of small asteroid nearby by the tidal-seismic resonance.

  4. Development and internal validation of a side-specific, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging-based nomogram for the prediction of extracapsular extension of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Martini, Alberto; Gupta, Akriti; Lewis, Sara C; Cumarasamy, Shivaram; Haines, Kenneth G; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco; Tewari, Ashutosh K

    2018-04-19

    To develop a nomogram for predicting side-specific extracapsular extension (ECE) for planning nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy. We retrospectively analysed data from 561 patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy between February 2014 and October 2015. To develop a side-specific predictive model, we considered the prostatic lobes separately. Four variables were included: prostate-specific antigen; highest ipsilateral biopsy Gleason grade; highest ipsilateral percentage core involvement; and ECE on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI). A multivariable logistic regression analysis was fitted to predict side-specific ECE. A nomogram was built based on the coefficients of the logit function. Internal validation was performed using 'leave-one-out' cross-validation. Calibration was graphically investigated. The decision curve analysis was used to evaluate the net clinical benefit. The study population consisted of 829 side-specific cases, after excluding negative biopsy observations (n = 293). ECE was reported on mpMRI and final pathology in 115 (14%) and 142 (17.1%) cases, respectively. Among these, mpMRI was able to predict ECE correctly in 57 (40.1%) cases. All variables in the model except highest percentage core involvement were predictors of ECE (all P ≤ 0.006). All variables were considered for inclusion in the nomogram. After internal validation, the area under the curve was 82.11%. The model demonstrated excellent calibration and improved clinical risk prediction, especially when compared with relying on mpMRI prediction of ECE alone. When retrospectively applying the nomogram-derived probability, using a 20% threshold for performing nerve-sparing, nine out of 14 positive surgical margins (PSMs) at the site of ECE resulted above the threshold. We developed an easy-to-use model for the prediction of side-specific ECE, and hope it serves as a tool for planning nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy and in the reduction of PSM in

  5. The resonant body transistor.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Dana; Bhave, Sunil A

    2010-04-14

    This paper introduces the resonant body transistor (RBT), a silicon-based dielectrically transduced nanoelectromechanical (NEM) resonator embedding a sense transistor directly into the resonator body. Combining the benefits of FET sensing with the frequency scaling capabilities and high quality factors (Q) of internal dielectrically transduced bar resonators, the resonant body transistor achieves >10 GHz frequencies and can be integrated into a standard CMOS process for on-chip clock generation, high-Q microwave circuits, fundamental quantum-state preparation and observation, and high-sensitivity measurements. An 11.7 GHz bulk-mode RBT is demonstrated with a quality factor Q of 1830, marking the highest frequency acoustic resonance measured to date on a silicon wafer.

  6. 1H Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the internal capsule in human brain: a feasibility study to detect lactate following contralateral motor activity.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Jop P; Sijens, Paul E; Oudkerk, Matthijs; De Keyser, Jacques

    2005-07-01

    Animal experiments suggest that astrocytic glycogen may act as an energy source for axons especially during heightened activity. In this model astrocytic glycogen breaks down to lactate that is shuttled to axons where it is metabolized oxidatively to generate ATP. The aim of this study was to investigate whether (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy could be used to detect a rise in lactate levels in human white matter during enhanced axonal activation. Six healthy volunteers (four women and two men; age range 21-38 years) participated in the study. We were unable to detect any significant MR spectral change, i.e. neither in the peak areas of inositol, choline, creatine, glutamate and N-acetylaspartate nor in the lactate level, in the contralateral posterior limb of the internal capsule during intense motor activation of the hand (four successive episodes of squeezing a soft ball for 7 min followed by 7 min rest). Possible explanations are that the technique is not sensitive enough to detect a small rise in lactate, or lactate turnover is too fast to be detected, or that another monocarboxylate different from lactate may be involved in axonal energy metabolism.

  7. Laser engines operating by resonance absorption. [thermodynamic feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Pechersky, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    Basic tutorial article on the thermodynamic feasibility of laser engines at the present state of the art. Three main options are considered: (1) laser power applied externally to a heat reservoir (boiler approach); (2) internal heating of working fluid by resonance absorption; and (3) direct conversion of selective excitation into work. Only (2) is considered practically feasible at present. Basic concepts and variants, efficiency relations, upper temperature limits of laser engines, selection of absorbing gases, engine walls, bleaching, thermodynamic cycles of optimized laser engines, laser-powered turbines, laser heat pumps are discussed. Photon engines and laser dissociation engines are also considered.

  8. Isotopologue-selective excitation studied via optical-optical double resonance using the E3 Σ1+(63S1) ←A3Π0+(53P1) ←X1Σ0+(51S0) transitions in CdAr and CdKr van der Waals complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbańczyk, T.; Dudek, J.; Koperski, J.

    2018-06-01

    A method of experimental selection of molecular isotopologues using optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme and supersonic beam source of van der Waals (vdW) complexes is presented. Due to an appropriately large isotopic shift, the proper choice of a wavenumber of a sufficiently narrowband laser in the first transition of OODR scheme can lead to a selective isotopologue excitation to the intermediate state. Thanks to this approach, it is possible to select some of the isotopologues which subsequently give a contribution to laser induced fluorescence (LIF) signal originated from the final state of OODR. In this article, results of tests of the proposed method that employs the E3 Σ1+ ←A3Π0+ ←X1Σ0+ transitions in two vdW complexes, CdKr and CdAr, are presented and analysed.

  9. Electron Excitation Cross Sections for the 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3) (sup 4)S -> 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3) (sup 2d) ->2s2p(sup 4) (sup 4p) (Resonance) Transitions in Oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuo, M.; Smith, S.; Chutjian, A.; Williams, I.; Tayal, S.; McLaughlin, B.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical excitation cross sections are reported for the first forbidden transition xxx and the first allowed (resonance) transition xxx in OII. Use is made of electron-energy loss and merged beams methods. The electron energy range covered is 3.33 eV (threshold) to 15 eV for the S->D transition, and 14.9 eV (threshold) to 40 eV for the S->P transition. Care was taken to assess and minimize the metastable fraction of the OII beam. An electron mirror was designed and tested to reflect inelastically back-scattered electrons into the forward direction to account for the full range of polar scattering angles. Comparisons are made between present experiments and 11-state R-Matrix calculations. Calculations are also presented for the xxx transition.

  10. Wave excitation by inhomogeneous suprathermal electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, H. P.; Dillenburg, D.; Wu, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Wave excitation by an inhomogeneous suprathermal electron beam in a homogeneous magnetized plasma is studied. Not only is the beam density nonuniform, but the beam electrons possess a sheared bulk velocity. The general dispersion equation encompassing both electrostatic and electromagnetic effects is derived. Particular attention is given to the whistler mode. It is established that the density-gradient and velocity-shear effects are important for waves with frequencies close to the lower-hybrid resonance frequency.

  11. Parametric array technique for microbubble excitation.

    PubMed

    Vos, Hendrik J; Goertz, David E; van der Steen, Antonius F W; de Jong, Nico

    2011-05-01

    This study investigates the use of an acoustic parametric array as a means for microbubble excitation. The excitation wave is generated during propagation in a nonlinear medium of two high-frequency carrier waves, whereby the frequency of the excitation wave is the difference frequency of the carrier waves. Carrier waves of around 10 and 25 MHz are used to generate low-frequency waves between 0.5 and 3.5 MHz at amplitudes in the range of 25 to 80 kPa in water. We demonstrate with high-speed camera observations that it is possible to induce microbubble oscillations with the low frequency signal arising from the nonlinear propagation process. As an application, we determined the resonance frequency of Definity contrast agent microbubbles with radius ranging from 1.5 to 5 μm by sweeping the difference frequency in the range from 0.5 to 3.5 MHz.

  12. Excitation of atomic nitrogen by electron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. J.; Zipf, E. C.

    1972-01-01

    Absolute cross sections were measured for the excitation of the N I(1134, 1164, 1168, 1200, 1243, and 1743 A) multiplets by electron impact on atomic nitrogen. The presence of vibrationally excited molecular nitrogen in the discharged gas was confirmed, and its effect on the measurements is discussed. The ratio of the oscillator strengths of the 1200 and 1134 A resonance transitions is presented, as well as the branching ratio for the N I(1311/1164 A) multiplets. Striking differences in the distribution of intensity between the spectra of atomic nitrogen and molecular nitrogen excited by energetic electrons suggest an optical method for measuring the density of atomic nitrogen in the upper atmosphere.

  13. Isolated resonator gyroscope with a drive and sense plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention discloses a resonator gyroscope comprising a vibrationally isolated resonator including a proof mass, a counterbalancing plate having an extensive planar region, and one or more flexures interconnecting the proof mass and counterbalancing plate. A baseplate is affixed to the resonator by the one or more flexures and sense and drive electrodes are affixed to the baseplate proximate to the extensive planar region of the counterbalancing plate for exciting the resonator and sensing movement of the gyroscope. The isolated resonator transfers substantially no net momentum to the baseplate when the resonator is excited.

  14. Fragmentation mechanism of UV-excited peptides in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Zabuga, Aleksandra V., E-mail: aleksandra.zabuga@epfl.ch; Kamrath, Michael Z.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.

    We present evidence that following near-UV excitation, protonated tyrosine- or phenylalanine–containing peptides undergo intersystem crossing to produce a triplet species. This pathway competes with direct dissociation from the excited electronic state and with dissociation from the electronic ground state subsequent to internal conversion. We employ UV-IR double-resonance photofragment spectroscopy to record conformer-specific vibrational spectra of cold peptides pre-excited to their S{sub 1} electronic state. The absorption of tunable IR light by these electronically excited peptides leads to a drastic increase in fragmentation, selectively enhancing the loss of neutral phenylalanine or tyrosine side-chain, which are not the lowest dissociation channels inmore » the ground electronic state. The recorded IR spectra evolve upon increasing the time delay between the UV and IR pulses, reflecting the dynamics of the intersystem crossing on a timescale of ∼80 ns and <10 ns for phenylalanine- and tyrosine-containing peptides, respectively. Once in the triplet state, phenylalanine-containing peptides may live for more than 100 ms, unless they absorb IR photons and undergo dissociation by the loss of an aromatic side-chain. We discuss the mechanism of this fragmentation channel and its possible implications for photofragment spectroscopy and peptide photostability.« less

  15. Magnetic excitations in praseodymium

    SciTech Connect

    Houmann, J.G.; Rainford, B.D.; Jensen, J.

    1979-08-01

    The magnetic excitations in a single crystal of dhcp Pr have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. The excitations on the hexagonal sites, and their dependence on magnetic fields up to 43 kOe applied in the basal plane, have been analyzed in terms of a Hamiltonian in which exchange, crystal-field, and magnetoelastic interactions are included. The exchange is found to be strongly anisotropic, and this anisotropy is manifested directly in a splitting of most branches of the dispersion relations. By considering a variety of magnetic properties, we have been able to determine the crystal-field level scheme for the hexagonal sitesmore » fairly unambiguously. The first excited level is 3.5 meV above the ground state. The value of the magnetoelastic coupling deduced from the excitations is in good agreement with values obtained from other measurements. A field-dependent interaction with the phonons has been observed, and a pronounced broadening of the acoustic excitations of long wavelength is ascribed to the influence of the conduction electrons. The first excited state on the cubic ions is about 8.3 meV above the ground state. The corresponding excitations show a pronounced dispersion, but the exchange anisotropy is of less importance than for the hexagonal sites.« less

  16. Infrared resonance Raman, and excitation profile studies of Os/sub 2/(O/sub 2/CCH/sub 3/)/sub 4/Cl/sub 2/ and Os/sub 2/(O/sub 2/CCD/sub 3/)/sub 4/Cl/sub 2/. The assignment of the osmium-osmium stretching vibration for a complex involving an osmium-osmium multiple bond

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.J.H.; Hempleman, A.J.; Tocher, D.A.

    1988-08-31

    Extensive Raman studies (1525-40 cm/sup /minus/1/) of Os/sub 2/(O/sub 2/CCH/sub 3/)/sub 4/Cl/sub 2/ have led to the identification of the three strong bands, /nu//sub 1/, /nu//sub 2/, and /nu//sub 3/, at 229, 393, and 292 cm/sup /minus/1/ to the key skeletal stretching modes, /nu/(OsOs), /nu/(OsO), and /nu/(OsCl), respectively. Raman spectra of the complex at resonance with the intense electronic band at /lambda//sub max/ = 383 nm lead to the development of a six-membered overtone progression in /nu//sub 1/ as well as combination band progressions in /nu//sub 1/ based upon one quantum of either /nu//sub 2/ or /nu//sub 3/. This indicatesmore » that the principal structural change attendant upon excitation to the resonant state is along the OsOs coordinate. Fourier transform infrared spectra (3500-40 cm/sup /minus/1/) have also been obtained. Acetate deuteriation provides conclusive evidence for many of the infrared and Raman band assignments. The study provides the first firm identification of /nu/(OsOs) for a multiply bonded species.« less

  17. Spectroscopy of baryon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Reinhard; Thoma, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Within project A.1 of the SFB/TR16 "Subnuclear Structure of Matter", a large amount of data on photoproduction reactions has been accumulated at the Bonn Electron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA with the CBELSA/TAPS detector and was analysed in detail. In particular, data have been taken with unpolarized or with linearly or circularly polarized photons and with unpolarized or with longitudinally or transversely polarized protons. Photoproduction off neutrons was studied to determine the helicity amplitudes for the excitation of resonances off neutrons. In a partial wave analysis of the data, new resonances have been found and the properties of new and of known resonances have been determined, including the measurement of partial widths of so far unmeasured decay modes.

  18. Fundamental properties of resonances

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, S.; Hadžimehmedović, M.; Osmanović, H.; Percan, A.; Zauner, B.

    2017-01-01

    All resonances, from hydrogen nuclei excited by the high-energy gamma rays in deep space to newly discovered particles produced in Large Hadron Collider, should be described by the same fundamental physical quantities. However, two distinct sets of properties are used to describe resonances: the pole parameters (complex pole position and residue) and the Breit-Wigner parameters (mass, width, and branching fractions). There is an ongoing decades-old debate on which one of them should be abandoned. In this study of nucleon resonances appearing in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering we discover an intricate interplay of the parameters from both sets, and realize that neither set is completely independent or fundamental on its own. PMID:28345595

  19. 16. EXCITERS, AND SYNCHROSCOPE GAUGE ON WALL. ACTIVE ELECTRIC EXCITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. EXCITERS, AND SYNCHROSCOPE GAUGE ON WALL. ACTIVE ELECTRIC EXCITER AT REAR; UNUSED WATER-DRIVEN EXCITER IN FOREGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTH-SOUTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  20. Hemodynamic vascular biomarkers for initiation of paraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysms using patient-specific computational fluid dynamic simulation based on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomoya; Isoda, Haruo; Takehara, Yasuo; Terada, Masaki; Naito, Takehiro; Kosugi, Takafumi; Onishi, Yuki; Tanoi, Chiharu; Izumi, Takashi

    2018-05-01

    We performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for patients with and without paraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms to evaluate the distribution of vascular biomarkers at the aneurysm initiation sites of the paraclinoid ICA. This study included 35 patients who were followed up for aneurysms using 3D time of flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and 3D cine phase-contrast MR imaging. Fifteen affected ICAs were included in group A with the 15 unaffected contralateral ICAs in group B. Thirty-three out of 40 paraclinoid ICAs free of aneurysms and arteriosclerotic lesions were included in group C. We deleted the aneurysms in group A based on the 3D TOF MRA dataset. We performed CFD based on MR data set and obtained wall shear stress (WSS), its derivatives, and streamlines. We qualitatively evaluated their distributions at and near the intracranial aneurysm initiation site among three groups. We also calculated and compared the normalized highest (nh-) WSS and nh-spatial WSS gradient (SWSSG) around the paraclinoid ICA among three groups. High WSS and SWSSG distribution were observed at and near the aneurysm initiation site in group A. High WSS and SWSSG were also observed at similar locations in group B and group C. However, nh-WSS and nh-SWSSG were significantly higher in group A than in group C, and nh-SWSSG was significantly higher in group A than in group B. Our findings indicated that nh-WSS and nh-SWSSG were good biomarkers for aneurysm initiation in the paraclinoid ICA.

  1. Influence of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features on Surgical Decision-Making in Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: Results from a Global Survey of AOSpine International Members.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Aria; Martin, Allan R; Nater, Anick; Witiw, Christopher D; Kato, So; Tetreault, Lindsay; Reihani-Kermani, Hamed; Santaguida, Carlo; Fehlings, Michael G

    2017-09-01

    We conducted a survey to understand how specific pathologic features on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) influence surgeons toward an anterior or posterior surgical approach in degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). A questionnaire was sent out to 6179 AOSpine International members via e-mail. This included 18 questions on a 7-point Likert scale regarding how MRI features influence the respondent's decision to perform an anterior or posterior surgical approach. Influence was classified based on the mean and mode. Variations in responses were assessed by region and training. Of 513 respondents, 51.7% were orthopedic surgeons, 36.8% were neurosurgeons, and the remainder were fellows, residents, or other. In ascending order, multilevel bulging disks, cervical kyphosis, and a high degree of anterior cord compression had a moderate to strong influence toward an anterior approach. A high degree of posterior cord compression had a moderate to strong influence, whereas multilevel compression, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, ligamentum flavum enlargement, and congenital stenosis had a moderate influence toward a posterior approach. Neurosurgeons chose anterior approaches more and posterior approaches less in comparison with orthopedic surgeons (P < 0.01). Of note, 59.8% of respondents were equally comfortable performing multilevel (3 or more levels) anterior and posterior procedures, whereas 61.5% did not feel comfortable in determining the surgical approach based on MRI alone. Specific DCM pathology influences the choice for anterior or posterior surgical approach. These data highlight factors based on surgeon experience, training, and region of practice. They will be helpful in defining future areas of investigation in an effort to provide individualized surgical strategies and optimize patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Volumetry in Predicting Myometrial Invasion, Lymphovascular Space Invasion, and Tumor Grade: Is It Valuable in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage I Endometrial Cancer?

    PubMed

    Sahin, Hilal; Sarioglu, Fatma Ceren; Bagci, Mustafa; Karadeniz, Tugba; Uluer, Hatice; Sanci, Muzaffer

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this retrospective single-center study was to evaluate the relationship between maximum tumor size, tumor volume, tumor volume ratio (TVR) based on preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry, and negative histological prognostic parameters (deep myometrial invasion [MI], lymphovascular space invasion, tumor histological grade, and subtype) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I endometrial cancer. Preoperative pelvic MR imaging studies of 68 women with surgical-pathologic diagnosis of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I endometrial cancer were reviewed for assessment of MR volumetry and qualitative assessment of MI. Volume of the tumor and uterus was measured with manual tracing of each section on sagittal T2-weighted images. Tumor volume ratio was calculated according to the following formula: TVR = (total tumor volume/total uterine volume) × 100. Receiver operating characteristics curve was performed to investigate a threshold for TVR associated with MI. The Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and linear regression analysis were applied to evaluate possible differences between tumor size, tumor volume, TVR, and negative prognostic parameters. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis of TVR for prediction of deep MI was statistically significant (P = 0.013). An optimal TVR threshold of 7.3% predicted deep myometrial invasion with 85.7% sensitivity, 46.8% specificity, 41.9% positive predictive value, and 88.0% negative predictive value. Receiver operating characteristics curve analyses of TVR, tumor size, and tumor volume for prediction of tumor histological grade or lymphovascular space invasion were not significant. The concordance between radiologic and pathologic assessment for MI was almost excellent (κ value, 0.799; P < 0.001). Addition of TVR to standard radiologic assessment of deep MI increased the sensitivity from 90.5% to 95.2%. Tumor volume ratio, based on preoperative

  3. Electron impact excitation of argon in the extreme vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentall, J. E.; Morgan, H. D.

    1976-01-01

    Polarization-free excitation cross sections in the extreme vacuum ultraviolet have been measured for electron impact on Ar. Observed spectral features were those lines of Ar I and Ar II which lie between 700 and 1100 A. Excitation functions were measured for the Ar I resonance line at 1048 A and the Ar II resonance line at 920 A. Peak cross sections for these two lines were found to be (39.4 plus or minus 7.9) x 10 to the -18th and (6.9 plus or minus 1.4) x 10 to the -18th, respectively. At low energies, excitation of the Ar II resonance line is dominated by an electron exchange transition.

  4. Dipole Excitation With A Paul Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    MacAskill, J. A.; Madzunkov, S. M.; Chutjian, A.

    Preliminary results are presented for the use of an auxiliary radiofrequency (rf) excitation voltage in combination with a high purity, high voltage rf generator to perform dipole excitation within a high precision Paul ion trap. These results show the effects of the excitation frequency over a continuous frequency range on the resultant mass spectra from the Paul trap with particular emphasis on ion ejection times, ion signal intensity, and peak shapes. Ion ejection times are found to decrease continuously with variations in dipole frequency about several resonant values and show remarkable symmetries. Signal intensities vary in a complex fashion withmore » numerous resonant features and are driven to zero at specific frequency values. Observed intensity variations depict dipole excitations that target ions of all masses as well as individual masses. Substantial increases in mass resolution are obtained with resolving powers for nitrogen increasing from 114 to 325.« less

  5. The response of multidegree-of-freedom systems with quadratic non-linearities to a harmonic parametric resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1983-09-01

    An analysis is presented of the response of multidegree-of-freedom systems with quadratic non-linearities to a harmonic parametric excitation in the presence of an internal resonance of the combination type ω3 ≈ ω2 + ω1, where the ωn are the linear natural frequencies of the systems. In the case of a fundamental resonance of the third mode (i.e., Ω ≈ω 3, where Ω is the frequency of the excitation), one can identify two critical values ζ 1 and ζ 2, where ζ 2 ⩾ ζ 1, of the amplitude F of the excitation. The value F = ζ2 corresponds to the transition from stable to unstable solutions. When F < ζ1, the motion decays to zero according to both linear and non-linear theories. When F > ζ2, the motion grows exponentially with time according to the linear theory but the non-linearity limits the motion to a finite amplitude steady state. The amplitude of the third mode, which is directly excited, is independent of F, whereas the amplitudes of the first and second modes, which are indirectly excited through the internal resonance, are functions of F. When ζ1 ⩽ F ⩽ ζ2, the motion decays or achieves a finite amplitude steady state depending on the initial conditions according to the non-linear theory, whereas it decays to zero according to the linear theory. This is an example of subcritical instability. In the case of a fundamental resonance of either the first or second mode, the trivial response is the only possible steady state. When F ⩽ ζ2, the motion decays to zero according to both linear and non-linear theories. When F > ζ2, the motion grows exponentially with time according to the linear theory but it is aperiodic according to the non-linear theory. Experiments are being planned to check these theoretical results.

  6. Decays of excited baryons in DTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żenczykowski, P.

    1981-03-01

    Properties of the decays of excited strange baryons into ground state baryon and pseudoscalar meson are examined in the framework of the linear baryonic string model. The agreement between the predictions and the data is good. The single model's parameter ɛ, the deviation of which from 1 measures SU (3) breaking, is found to decrease with increasing internal orbital angular momentum of a baryon.

  7. Three-photon Gaussian-Gaussian-Laguerre-Gaussian excitation of a localized atom to a highly excited Rydberg state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashhadi, L.

    2017-12-01

    Optical vortices are currently one of the most intensively studied topics in light-matter interaction. In this work, a three-step axial Doppler- and recoil-free Gaussian-Gaussian-Laguerre-Gaussian (GGLG) excitation of a localized atom to the highly excited Rydberg state is presented. By assuming a large detuning for intermediate states, an effective quadrupole excitation related to the Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) excitation to the highly excited Rydberg state is obtained. This special excitation system radially confines the single highly excited Rydberg atom independently of the trapping system into a sharp potential landscape into the so-called ‘far-off-resonance optical dipole-quadrupole trap’ (FORDQT). The key parameters of the Rydberg excitation to the highly excited state, namely the effective Rabi frequency and the effective detuning including a position-dependent AC Stark shift, are calculated in terms of the basic parameters of the LG beam and of the polarization of the excitation lasers. It is shown that the obtained parameters can be tuned to have a precise excitation of a single atom to the desired Rydberg state as well. The features of transferring the optical orbital and spin angular momentum of the polarized LG beam to the atom via quadrupole Rydberg excitation offer a long-lived and controllable qudit quantum memory. In addition, in contrast to the Gaussian laser beam, the doughnut-shaped LG beam makes it possible to use a high intensity laser beam to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in quadrupole excitation with minimized perturbations coming from stray light broadening in the last Rydberg excitation process.

  8. Observation of Excited Quadrupole-Bound States in Cold Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guo-Zhu; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2017-07-01

    We report the first observation of an excited quadrupole-bound state (QBS) in an anion. High-resolution photoelectron imaging of cryogenically cooled 4-cyanophenoxide (4 CP- ) anions yields an electron detachment threshold of 24 927 cm-1 . The photodetachment spectrum reveals a resonant transition 20 cm-1 below the detachment threshold, which is attributed to an excited QBS of 4 CP- because neutral 4CP has a large quadrupole moment with a negligible dipole moment. The QBS is confirmed by observation of seventeen above-threshold resonances due to autodetachment from vibrational levels of the QBS.

  9. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  10. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  11. Raman scattering excitation spectroscopy of monolayer WS2.

    PubMed

    Molas, Maciej R; Nogajewski, Karol; Potemski, Marek; Babiński, Adam

    2017-07-11

    Resonant Raman scattering is investigated in monolayer WS 2 at low temperature with the aid of an unconventional technique, i.e., Raman scattering excitation (RSE) spectroscopy. The RSE spectrum is made up by sweeping the excitation energy, when the detection energy is fixed in resonance with excitonic transitions related to either neutral or charged excitons. We demonstrate that the shape of the RSE spectrum strongly depends on the selected detection energy. The resonance of outgoing light with the neutral exciton leads to an extremely rich RSE spectrum, which displays several Raman scattering features not reported so far, while no clear effect on the associated background photoluminescence is observed. Instead, when the outgoing photons resonate with the negatively charged exciton, a strong enhancement of the related emission occurs. Presented results show that the RSE spectroscopy can be a useful technique to study electron-phonon interactions in thin layers of transition metal dichalcogenides.

  12. One Photon Can Simultaneously Excite Two or More Atoms.

    PubMed

    Garziano, Luigi; Macrì, Vincenzo; Stassi, Roberto; Di Stefano, Omar; Nori, Franco; Savasta, Salvatore

    2016-07-22

    We consider two separate atoms interacting with a single-mode optical or microwave resonator. When the frequency of the resonator field is twice the atomic transition frequency, we show that there exists a resonant coupling between one photon and two atoms, via intermediate virtual states connected by counterrotating processes. If the resonator is prepared in its one-photon state, the photon can be jointly absorbed by the two atoms in their ground state which will both reach their excited state with a probability close to one. Like ordinary quantum Rabi oscillations, this process is coherent and reversible, so that two atoms in their excited state will undergo a downward transition jointly emitting a single cavity photon. This joint absorption and emission process can also occur with three atoms. The parameters used to investigate this process correspond to experimentally demonstrated values in circuit quantum electrodynamics systems.

  13. Charmonium resonances on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Gunnar; Collins, Sara; Mohler, Daniel; Padmanath, M.; Piemonte, Stefano; Prelovsek, Sasa; Weishäupl, Simon

    2018-03-01

    The nature of resonances and excited states near decay thresholds is encoded in scattering amplitudes, which can be extracted from single-particle and multiparticle correlators in finite volumes. Lattice calculations have only recently reached the precision required for a reliable study of such correlators. The distillation method represents a significant improvement insofar as it simplifies quark contractions and allows one to easily extend the operator basis used to construct interpolators. We present preliminary results on charmonium bound states and resonances on the Nf = 2+1 CLS ensembles. The long term goal of our investigation is to understand the properties of the X resonances that do not fit into conventional models of quark-antiquark mesons. We tune various parameters of the distillation method and the charm quark mass. As a first result, we present the masses of the ground and excited states in the 0++ and 1- channels

  14. Improved tolerance to off-resonance in spectral-spatial EPI of hyperpolarized [1-13 C]pyruvate and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lau, Justin Y C; Geraghty, Benjamin J; Chen, Albert P; Cunningham, Charles H

    2018-09-01

    For 13 C echo-planar imaging (EPI) with spectral-spatial excitation, main field inhomogeneity can result in reduced flip angle and spatial artifacts. A hybrid time-resolved pulse sequence, multi-echo spectral-spatial EPI, is proposed combining broader spectral-spatial passbands for greater off-resonance tolerance with a multi-echo acquisition to separate signals from potentially co-excited resonances. The performance of the imaging sequence and the reconstruction pipeline were evaluated for 1 H imaging using a series of increasingly dilute 1,4-dioxane solutions and for 13 C imaging using an ethylene glycol phantom. Hyperpolarized [1- 13 C]pyruvate was administered to two healthy rats. Multi-echo data of the rat kidneys were acquired to test realistic cases of off-resonance. Analysis of separated images of water and 1,4-dioxane following multi-echo signal decomposition showed water-to-dioxane 1 H signal ratios that were in agreement with the independent measurements by 1 H spectroscopy for all four concentrations of 1,4-dioxane. The 13 C signal ratio of two co-excited resonances of ethylene glycol was accurately recovered after correction for the spectral profile of the redesigned spectral-spatial pulse. In vivo, successful separation of lactate and pyruvate-hydrate signals was achieved for all except the early time points during which signal variations exceeded the temporal resolution of the multi-echo acquisition. Improved tolerance to off-resonance in the new 13 C data acquisition pipeline was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Magn Reson Med 80:925-934, 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Parametrically excited multidegree-of-freedom systems with repeated frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1983-05-01

    An analysis is presented of the linear response of multidegree-of-freedom systems with a repeated frequency of order three to a harmonic parametric excitation. The method of multiple scales is used to determine the modulation of the amplitudes and phases for two cases: fundamental resonance of the modes with the repeated frequency and combination resonance involving these modes and another mode. Conditions are then derived for determining the stability of the motion.

  16. Laser-induced transitions between triply excited hollow states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, L. B.; Schlagheck, P.; Lambropoulos, P.

    2000-12-01

    Using complex scaling and a correlated basis constructed in terms of B splines, we calculate the Li+ photoion yield in the presence of a laser-induced coupling between the triply excited 2s22p(2Po) and 2s2p2(2De) resonances in lithium, the first of which is assumed to be excited by synchrotron radiation from the ground state. The laser coupling between the triply excited states is shown to lead to a significant and readily measurable modification of the line profile which provides a unique probe of the dipole strength between highly correlated triply excited states. We also present results for some higher-lying triply excited states of 2Po symmetry.

  17. Pure-phase selective excitation in fast-relaxing systems.

    PubMed

    Zangger, K; Oberer, M; Sterk, H

    2001-09-01

    Selective pulses have been used frequently for small molecules. However, their application to proteins and other macromolecules has been limited. The long duration of shaped-selective pulses and the short T(2) relaxation times in proteins often prohibited the use of highly selective pulses especially on larger biomolecules. A very selective excitation can be obtained within a short time by using the selective excitation sequence presented in this paper. Instead of using a shaped low-intensity radiofrequency pulse, a cluster of hard 90 degrees pulses, delays of free precession, and pulsed field gradients can be used to selectively excite a narrow chemical shift range within a relatively short time. Thereby, off-resonance magnetization, which is allowed to evolve freely during the free precession intervals, is destroyed by the gradient pulses. Off-resonance excitation artifacts can be removed by random variation of the interpulse delays. This leads to an excitation profile with selectivity as well as phase and relaxation behavior superior to that of commonly used shaped-selective pulses. Since the evolution of scalar coupling is inherently suppressed during the double-selective excitation of two different scalar-coupled nuclei, the presented pulse cluster is especially suited for simultaneous highly selective excitation of N-H and C-H fragments. Experimental examples are demonstrated on hen egg white lysozyme (14 kD) and the bacterial antidote ParD (19 kD). Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  18. Phonon-wave-induced resonance fluorescence in semiconductor nanostructures: acoustoluminescence in the terahertz range.

    PubMed

    Ahn, K J; Milde, F; Knorr, A

    2007-01-12

    Acoustic wave excitation of semiconductor quantum dots generates resonance fluorescence of electronic intersublevel excitations. Our theoretical analysis predicts acoustoluminescence, in particular, a conversion of acoustic into electromagnetic THz waves over a broad spectral range.

  19. Fluorescence excitation and imaging of single molecules near dielectric-coated and bare surfaces: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Microscopic fluorescent samples of interest to cell and molecular biology are commonly embedded in an aqueous medium near a solid surface that is coated with a thin film such as a lipid multilayer, collagen, acrylamide, or a cell wall. Both excitation and emission of fluorescent single molecules near film-coated surfaces are strongly affected by the proximity of the coated surface, the film thickness, its refractive index and the fluorophore's orientation. For total internal reflection excitation, multiple reflections in the film can lead to resonance peaks in the evanescent intensity versus incidence angle curve. For emission, multiple reflections arising from the fluorophore's near field emission can create a distinct intensity pattern in both the back focal plane and the image plane of a high aperture objective. This theoretical analysis discusses how these features can be used to report film thickness and refractive index, and fluorophore axial position and orientation. © 2012 The Author Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. Excited-state Raman spectroscopy with and without actinic excitation: S{sub 1} Raman spectra of trans-azobenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Dobryakov, A. L.; Quick, M.; Ioffe, I. N.

    We show that femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy can record excited-state spectra in the absence of actinic excitation, if the Raman pump is in resonance with an electronic transition. The approach is illustrated by recording S{sub 1} and S{sub 0} spectra of trans-azobenzene in n-hexane. The S{sub 1} spectra were also measured conventionally, upon nπ* (S{sub 0} → S{sub 1}) actinic excitation. The results are discussed and compared to earlier reports.

  1. Search for excited states in 25O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. D.; Fossez, K.; Baumann, T.; DeYoung, P. A.; Finck, J. E.; Frank, N.; Kuchera, A. N.; Michel, N.; Nazarewicz, W.; Rotureau, J.; Smith, J. K.; Stephenson, S. L.; Stiefel, K.; Thoennessen, M.; Zegers, R. G. T.

    2017-11-01

    Background: Theoretical calculations suggest the presence of low-lying excited states in 25O. Previous experimental searches by means of proton knockout on 26F produced no evidence for such excitations. Purpose: We search for excited states in 25O using the 24O(d ,p ) 25O reaction. The theoretical analysis of excited states in unbound O,2725 is based on the configuration interaction approach that accounts for couplings to the scattering continuum. Method: We use invariant-mass spectroscopy to measure neutron-unbound states in 25O. For the theoretical approach, we use the complex-energy Gamow Shell Model and Density Matrix Renormalization Group method with a finite-range two-body interaction optimized to the bound states and resonances of O-2623, assuming a core of 22O. We predict energies, decay widths, and asymptotic normalization coefficients. Results: Our calculations in a large s p d f space predict several low-lying excited states in 25O of positive and negative parity, and we obtain an experimental limit on the relative cross section of a possible Jπ=1/2 + state with respect to the ground state of 25O at σ1 /2 +/σg .s .=0 .25-0.25+1.0 . We also discuss how the observation of negative parity states in 25O could guide the search for the low-lying negative parity states in 27O. Conclusion: Previous experiments based on the proton knockout of 26F suffered from the low cross sections for the population of excited states in 25O because of low spectroscopic factors. In this respect, neutron transfer reactions carry more promise.

  2. Piezoelectric shear wave resonator and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wang, J.S.; Lakin, K.M.; Landin, A.R.

    1985-05-20

    An acoustic shear wave resonator comprising a piezoelectric film having its C-axis substantially inclined from the film normal such that the shear wave coupling coefficient significantly exceeds the longitudinal wave coupling coefficient, whereby the film is capable of shear wave resonance, and means for exciting said film to resonate. The film is prepared by deposition in a dc planar magnetron sputtering system to which a supplemental electric field is applied. The resonator structure may also include a semiconductor material having a positive temperature coefficient of resonance such that the resonator has a temperature coefficient of resonance approaching 0 ppM//sup 0/C.

  3. Piezoelectric shear wave resonator and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wang, J.S.; Lakin, K.M.; Landin, A.R.

    1983-10-25

    An acoustic shear wave resonator comprising a piezoelectric film having its C-axis substantially inclined from the film normal such that the shear wave coupling coefficient significantly exceeds the longitudinal wave coupling coefficient, whereby the film is capable of shear wave resonance, and means for exciting said film to resonate. The film is prepared by deposition in a dc planar magnetron sputtering system to which a supplemental electric field is applied. The resonator structure may also include a semiconductor material having a positive temperature coefficient of resonance such that the resonator has a temperature coefficient of resonance approaching 0 ppM//sup 0/C.

  4. Piezoelectric shear wave resonator and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jin S.; Lakin, Kenneth M.; Landin, Allen R.

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic shear wave resonator comprising a piezoelectric film having its C-axis substantially inclined from the film normal such that the shear wave coupling coefficient significantly exceeds the longitudinal wave coupling coefficient, whereby the film is capable of shear wave resonance, and means for exciting said film to resonate. The film is prepared by deposition in a dc planar magnetron sputtering system to which a supplemental electric field is applied. The resonator structure may also include a semiconductor material having a positive temperature coefficient of resonance such that the resonator has a temperature coefficient of resonance approaching 0 ppm/.degree.C.

  5. Method of making a piezoelectric shear wave resonator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jin S.; Lakin, Kenneth M.; Landin, Allen R.

    1987-02-03

    An acoustic shear wave resonator comprising a piezoelectric film having its C-axis substantially inclined from the film normal such that the shear wave coupling coefficient significantly exceeds the longitudinal wave coupling coefficient, whereby the film is capable of shear wave resonance, and means for exciting said film to resonate. The film is prepared by deposition in a dc planar magnetron sputtering system to which a supplemental electric field is applied. The resonator structure may also include a semiconductor material having a positive temperature coefficient of resonance such that the resonator has a temperature coefficient of resonance approaching 0 ppm/.degree.C.

  6. Decoherence at constant excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. M.; Sadurní, E.; Seligman, T. H.

    2012-02-01

    We present a simple exactly solvable extension of the Jaynes-Cummings model by adding dissipation. This is done such that the total number of excitations is conserved. The Liouville operator in the resulting master equation can be reduced to blocks of 4×4 matrices.

  7. Laser pulses for coherent xuv Raman excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenman, Loren; Koch, Christiane P.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-07-01

    We combine multichannel electronic structure theory with quantum optimal control to derive femtosecond-time-scale Raman pulse sequences that coherently populate a valence excited state. For a neon atom, Raman target populations of up to 13% are obtained. Superpositions of the ground and valence Raman states with a controllable relative phase are found to be reachable with up to 4.5% population and arbitrary phase control facilitated by the pump pulse carrier-envelope phase. Analysis of the optimized pulse structure reveals a sequential mechanism in which the valence excitation is reached via a fast (femtosecond) population transfer through an intermediate resonance state in the continuum rather than avoiding intermediate-state population with simultaneous or counterintuitive (stimulated Raman adiabatic passage) pulse sequences. Our results open a route to coupling valence excitations and core-hole excitations in molecules and aggregates that locally address specific atoms and represent an initial step towards realization of multidimensional spectroscopy in the xuv and x-ray regimes.

  8. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S.; Roth, Arnd

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  9. Two different pathways of internal conversion in carotenoids depending on the length of the conjugated chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ritsuko; Inaba, Toru; Watanabe, Yasutaka; Koyama, Yasushi; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2003-02-01

    Near-infrared, subpicosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopy of all- trans carotenoids having the number of conjugated double bonds, n=9-13, identified two different pathways of internal conversion in accordance with the energy diagram recently determined by measurements of resonance-Raman excitation profiles (RREPs) [K. Furuichi, T. Sashima, Y. Koyama, Chem. Phys. Lett. 356 (2002) 547]: the 1B u+→1B u-→2A g- internal conversion for neurosporene ( n=9) and spheroidene ( n=10), whereas the 1B u+→3A g-→2A g- internal conversion for lycopene ( n=11), anhydrorhodovibrin ( n=12) and spirilloxanthin ( n=13).

  10. Electron excitation cross sections for the 2s(2)2p(3)4S(O) -- 2s(2)2p(3)2D(O) (forbidden) and 4S(O) -- 2s2p(4) 4P (resonance) transitions in O II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuo, M.; Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, A.; Williams, I. D.; Tayal, S. S.; Mclaughlin, Brendan M.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical excitation cross sections are reported for the first forbidden transition 4S(O) -- 2S(2)2p(3) 2D(O) (lambda-lambda 3726, 3729) and the first allowed (resonance) transition 4S(O) -- 2s2p(4) 4P(lambda-833) in O II. Use is made of electron energy loss and merged-beams methods. The electron energy range covered is 3.33 (threshold) to 15 eV for the S -- D transition, and 14.9 (threshold) to 40 eV for the S -- P transition. Care was taken to assess and minimize the metastable fraction of the O II beam. An electron mirror was designed and tested to reflect inelastically backscattered electrons into the forward direction to account for the full range of polar scattering angles. Comparisons are made between present experiments and 11-state R-matrix calculations. Calculations are also presented for the 4S(O) -- 2s(2)2p(3)2P(O) (lambda-2470) transition.

  11. Interatomic Coulombic decay cascades in multiply excited neon clusters

    PubMed Central

    Nagaya, K.; Iablonskyi, D.; Golubev, N. V.; Matsunami, K.; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Sakai, T.; Tachibana, T.; Mondal, S.; Wada, S.; Prince, K. C.; Callegari, C.; Miron, C.; Saito, N.; Yabashi, M.; Demekhin, Ph. V.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Kuleff, A. I.; Yao, M.; Ueda, K.

    2016-01-01

    In high-intensity laser light, matter can be ionized by direct multiphoton absorption even at photon energies below the ionization threshold. However on tuning the laser to the lowest resonant transition, the system becomes multiply excited, and more efficient, indirect ionization pathways become operative. These mechanisms are known as interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD), where one of the species de-excites to its ground state, transferring its energy to ionize another excited species. Here we show that on tuning to a higher resonant transition, a previously unknown type of interatomic Coulombic decay, intra-Rydberg ICD occurs. In it, de-excitation of an atom to a close-lying Rydberg state leads to electron emission from another neighbouring Rydberg atom. Moreover, systems multiply excited to higher Rydberg states will decay by a cascade of such processes, producing even more ions. The intra-Rydberg ICD and cascades are expected to be ubiquitous in weakly-bound systems exposed to high-intensity resonant radiation. PMID:27917867

  12. Rydberg Excitation of a Single Trapped Ion.

    PubMed

    Feldker, T; Bachor, P; Stappel, M; Kolbe, D; Gerritsma, R; Walz, J; Schmidt-Kaler, F

    2015-10-23

    We demonstrate excitation of a single trapped cold (40)Ca(+) ion to Rydberg levels by laser radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet at a wavelength of 122 nm. Observed resonances are identified as 3d(2)D(3/2) to 51F, 52F and 3d(2)D(5/2) to 64F. We model the line shape and our results imply a large state-dependent coupling to the trapping potential. Rydberg ions are of great interest for future applications in quantum computing and simulation, in which large dipolar interactions are combined with the superb experimental control offered by Paul traps.

  13. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  14. Instrumentation and methodology for simultaneous excitation/detection of ions in an FTICR mass spectrometer

    PubMed

    Schmidt; Fiorentino; Arkin; Laude

    2000-08-01

    A method for direct and continuous detection of ion motion during different perturbation events of the fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) experiment is demonstrated. The modifications necessary to convert an ordinary FTICR cell into one capable of performing simultaneous excitation/detection (SED) using a capacitive network are outlined. With these modifications, a 200-fold reduction in the detection of the coupled excitation signal is achieved. This allows the unique ability not only to observe the response to the perturbation but to observe the perturbation event itself. SED is used successfully to monitor the ion cyclotron transient during single-frequency excitation, remeasurement and exciter-excite experiments.

  15. Dielectric resonator antenna for coupling to NV centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitanova, Polina; Soshenko, Vladimir; Vorobyov, Vadim; Dobrykh, Dmitry; Bolshedvorskiih, Stepan; Sorokin, Vadim; Akimov, Alexey

    2017-09-01

    Here we present the design of a dielectric resonator antenna for spin manipulation of large volume ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers in a bulk diamond. The proposed antenna design is based on a high permittivity hollow dielectric resonator excited by a symmetric microstrip loop. We present the result of numerical simulation of the magnetic field excited at the TE01δ mode of the dielectric resonator. We analyze the uniformity of the magnetic field in volume and discuss the possibility to use the antenna for efficient excitation of nitrogen-vacancy centers in whole commercially available sample.

  16. Laser engines operating by resonance absorption.

    PubMed

    Garbuny, M; Pechersky, M J

    1976-05-01

    The coherence properties and power levels of lasers available at present lend themselves to the remote operation of mechanical engines by resonance absorption in a working gas. Laser radiation is capable of producing extremely high temperatures in a gas. Limits to the achievable temperatures in the working gas of an engine are imposed by the solid walls and by loss of resonance absorption due to thermal saturation, bleaching, and dissociation. However, it is shown that by proper control of the laser beam in space, time, and frequency, as well as by choice of the absorbing gas, these limits are to a great extent removed so that very high temperatures are indeed attainable. The working gas is largely monatomic, preferably helium with the addition of a few volume percent of an absorber. Such a gas mixture, internally heated, permits an optimization of the expansion ratio, with resulting thermal efficiencies and work ratios, not achievable in conventional engines. A relationship between thermal efficiency and work ratio is derived that is quite general for the optimization condition. The performance of laser piston engines, turbines, and the Stirling cycle based on these principles is discussed and compared with conventional engine operation. Finally, a brief discussion is devoted to the possibility and concepts for the direct conversion of selective vibrational or electronic excitation into mechanical work, bypassing the translational degrees of freedom.

  17. Dipole Resonances of 76Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, R. S.; Cooper, N.; Werner, V.; Rusev, G.; Pietralla, N.; Kelly, J. H.; Tornow, W.; Yates, S. W.; Crider, B. P.; Peters, E.

    2013-10-01

    Dipole resonances in 76Ge have been studied using the method of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF). The experiment was performed using the Free Electron Laser facility at HI γS/TUNL, which produced linearly polarised quasi-monoenergetic photons in the 4-9 MeV energy range. Photon strength, in particular dipole strength, is an important ingredient in nuclear reaction calculations, and recent interest in its study has been stimulated by observations of a pygmy dipole resonance near the neutron separation energy Sn of certain nuclei. Furthermore, 76Ge is a candidate for 0 ν 2 β -decay. The results are complimentary to a relevant experiment done at TU Darmstadt using Bremsstrahlung beams. Single-resonance parities and a preliminary estimate of the total photo-excitation cross section will be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under grant no. DE-FG02-91ER40609.

  18. Selective excitation of exciton transitions in PTCDA crystals and films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangilenka, V. R.; Titova, L. V.; Smith, L. M.; Wagner, H. P.; Desilva, L. A. A.; Gisslén, L.; Scholz, R.

    2010-04-01

    Photoluminescence excitation studies on 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) single crystals and polycrystalline PTCDA films are compared to the calculated excitonic dispersion deduced from an exciton model including the coupling between Frenkel and charge transfer (CT) excitons along the stacking direction. For excitation energies below the 0-0 Frenkel exciton absorption band at 5 K these measurements enable the selective excitation of several CT states. The CT2 state involving stacked PTCDA molecules reveals two excitation resonances originating from different vibronic sublevels. Moreover, the fundamental transition of the CT1 exciton state delocalized over both basis molecules in the crystal unit cell has been identified from the corresponding excitation resonance. From the excitation energy dependence the fundamental transition energies of the CT2 and CT1 excitons have been deduced to occur at 1.95 and 1.98 eV, respectively. When the excitation energy exceeds ˜2.08eV , we observe a strong emission channel which is related to the indirect minimum of the lowest dispersion branch dominated by Frenkel excitons. Photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy measurements on polycrystalline PTCDA films reveal a strong CT2 signal intensity which is attributed to an increased density of defect-related CT2 states that are preferentially formed by slightly deformed or compressed stacked PTCDA molecules in the vicinity of defects or at grain boundaries. Temperature-dependent PL measurements in polycrystalline PTCDA films between 10 and 300 K at an excitation of 1.88 eV further allow a detailed investigation of the CT2 transition and its vibronic subband.

  19. Roles of the Excitation in Harvesting Energy from Vibrations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Ma, Tianwei

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the role of excitation in energy harvesting applications. While the energy ultimately comes from the excitation, it was shown that the excitation may not always behave as a source. When the device characteristics do not perfectly match the excitation, the excitation alternately behaves as a source and a sink. The extent to which the excitation behaves as a sink determines the energy harvesting efficiency. Such contradictory roles were shown to be dictated by a generalized phase defined as the instantaneous phase angle between the velocity of the device and the excitation. An inductive prototype device with a diamagnetically levitated seismic mass was proposed to take advantage of the well established phase changing mechanism of vibro-impact to achieve a broader device bandwidth. Results suggest that the vibro-impact can generate an instantaneous, significant phase shift in response velocity that switches the role of the excitation. If introduced properly outside the resonance zone it could dramatically increase the energy harvesting efficiency. PMID:26496183

  20. Excitations in confined helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaja, V.; Krotscheck, E.

    2003-05-01

    We design models for helium in matrices such as aerogel, Vycor, or Geltech from a manifestly microscopic point of view. For that purpose, we calculate the dynamic structure function of 4He on Si substrates and between two Si walls as a function of energy, momentum transfer, and the scattering angle. The angle-averaged results are in good agreement with the neutron scattering data; the remaining differences can be attributed to the simplified model used here for the complex pore structure of the materials. A focus of the present work is the detailed identification of coexisting layer modes and bulklike excitations, and, in the case of thick films, ripplon excitations. Involving essentially two-dimensional motion of atoms, the layer modes are sensitive to the scattering angle.

  1. Normal mode selectivity in ultrafast Raman excitations in C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guoping; George, Thomas F.

    2006-05-01

    Ultrafast Raman spectra are a powerful tool to probe vibrational excitations, but inherently they are not normal-mode specific. For a system as complicated as C60, there is no general rule to target a specific mode. A detailed study presented here aims to investigate normal mode selectivity in C60 by an ultrafast laser. To accurately measure mode excitation, we formally introduce the kinetic energy-based normal mode analysis which overcomes the difficulty with the strong lattice anharmonicity and relaxation. We first investigate the resonant excitation and find that mode selectivity is normally difficult to achieve. However, for off-resonant excitations, it is possible to selectively excite a few modes in C60 by properly choosing an optimal laser pulse duration, which agrees with previous experimental and theoretical findings. Going beyond the phenomenological explanation, our study shines new light on the origin of the optimal duration: The phase matching between laser field and mode vibration determines which mode is strongly excited or suppressed. This finding is very robust and may be a useful guide for future experimental and theoretical studies in more complicated systems.

  2. Aperture excited dielectric antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Chatterjee, J. S.; Mason, V. B.; Tai, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the effect of placing dielectric objects over the aperture of waveguide antennas are presented. Experimental measurements of the radiation patterns, gain, impedance, near-field amplitude, and pattern and impedance coupling between pairs of antennas are given for various Plexiglas shapes, including the sphere and the cube, excited by rectangular, circular, and square waveguide feed apertures. The waveguide excitation of a dielectric sphere is modeled using the Huygens' source, and expressions for the resulting electric fields, directivity, and efficiency are derived. Calculations using this model show good overall agreement with experimental patterns and directivity measurements. The waveguide under an infinite dielectric slab is used as an impedance model. Calculations using this model agree qualitatively with the measured impedance data. It is concluded that dielectric loaded antennas such as the waveguide excited sphere, cube, or sphere-cylinder can produce directivities in excess of that obtained by a uniformly illuminated aperture of the same cross section, particularly for dielectric objects with dimensions of 2 wavelengths or less. It is also shown that for certain configurations coupling between two antennas of this type is less than that for the same antennas without dielectric loading.

  3. Dual structure in the charge excitation spectrum of electron-doped cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejas, Matías; Yamase, Hiroyuki; Greco, Andrés

    2017-12-01

    Motivated by the recent resonant x-ray scattering (RXS) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments for electron-doped cuprates, we study the charge excitation spectrum in a layered t -J model with the long-range Coulomb interaction. We show that the spectrum is not dominated by a specific type of charge excitations, but by different kinds of charge fluctuations, and is characterized by a dual structure in the energy space. Low-energy charge excitations correspond to various types of bond-charge fluctuations driven by the exchange term (J term), whereas high-energy charge excitations are due to usual on-site charge fluctuations and correspond to plasmon excitations above the particle-hole continuum. The interlayer coupling, which is frequently neglected in many theoretical studies, is particularly important to the high-energy charge excitations.

  4. Ultrasonic Resonance Spectroscopy of Composite Rings for Flywheel Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, Laura M.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2001-01-01

    Flywheel energy storage devices comprising multilayered composite rotor systems are being studied extensively for utilization in the International Space Station. These composite material systems were investigated with a recently developed ultrasonic resonance spectroscopy technique. The system employs a swept frequency approach and performs a fast Fourier transform on the frequency spectrum of the response signal. In addition. the system allows for equalization of the frequency spectrum, providing all frequencies with equal amounts of energy to excite higher order resonant harmonics. Interpretation of the second fast Fourier transform, along with equalization of the frequency spectrum, offers greater assurance in acquiring and analyzing the fundamental frequency, or spectrum resonance spacing. The range of frequencies swept in a pitch-catch mode was varied up to 8 MHz, depending on the material and geometry of the component. Single and multilayered material samples, with and without known defects, were evaluated to determine how the constituents of a composite material system affect the resonant frequency. Amplitude and frequency changes in the spectrum and spectrum resonance spacing domains were examined from ultrasonic responses of a flat composite coupon, thin composite rings, and thick composite rings. Also, the ultrasonic spectroscopy responses from areas with an intentional delamination and a foreign material insert, similar to defects that may occur during manufacturing malfunctions, were compared with those from defect-free areas in thin composite rings. A thick composite ring with varying thickness was tested to investigate the full-thickness resonant frequency and any possible bulk interfacial bond issues. Finally, the effect on the frequency response of naturally occurring single and clustered voids in a composite ring was established.

  5. Solid state optical refrigeration using stark manifold resonances in crystals

    DOEpatents

    Seletskiy, Denis V.; Epstein, Richard; Hehlen, Markus P.; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2017-02-21

    A method and device for cooling electronics is disclosed. The device includes a doped crystal configured to resonate at a Stark manifold resonance capable of cooling the crystal to a temperature of from about 110K to about 170K. The crystal host resonates in response to input from an excitation laser tuned to exploit the Stark manifold resonance corresponding to the cooling of the crystal.

  6. Self-excitation of single nanomechanical pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun S.; Qin, Hua; Blick, Robert H.

    2010-03-01

    Self-excitation is a mechanism that is ubiquitous for electromechanical power devices such as electrical generators. This is conventionally achieved by making use of the magnetic field component in electrical generators (Nedic and Lipo 2000 IEEE/IAS Conf. Records (Rome, Italy) vol 1 pp 51-6), a good and widely visible example of which is the wind turbine farm (Muljadi et al 2005 J. Sol. Energy Eng. 127 581-7). In other words, a static force, such as the wind acting on rotor blades, can generate a resonant excitation at a certain mechanical frequency. For nanomechanical systems (Craighead 2000 Science 290 1532-5 Roukes 2001 Phys. World 14 25-31 Cleland 2003 Foundations of Nanomechanics (Berlin: Springer); Ayari et al 2007 Nano Lett. 7 2252-7 Koenig et al 2008 Nat. Nanotechnol. 3 482-4) such a self-excitation (SE) mechanism is also highly desirable, because it can generate mechanical oscillations at radio frequencies by simply applying a dc bias voltage. This is of great importance for low-power signal communication devices and detectors, as well as for mechanical computing elements. For a particular nanomechanical system—the single electron shuttle—this effect was predicted some time ago by Gorelik et al (Phys. Rev. Lett. 80 4526-9). Here, we use a nanoelectromechanical single electron transistor (NEMSET) to demonstrate self-excitation for both the soft and hard regimes, respectively. The ability to use self-excitation in nanomechanical systems may enable the detection of quantum mechanical backaction effects (Naik et al 2006 Nature 443 193-6) in direct tunneling, macroscopic quantum tunneling (Savelev et al 2006 New J. Phys. 8 105-15) and rectification (Pistolesi and Fazio 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 036806-4). All these effects have so far been overshadowed by the large driving voltages that had to be applied.

  7. Apparatus for photon excited catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffren, M. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for increasing the yield of photonically excited gas phase reactions by extracting excess energy from unstable, excited species by contacting the species with the surface of a finely divided solid.

  8. Nonlinear Analysis of Mechanical Systems Under Combined Harmonic and Stochastic Excitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-27

    Namachchivaya and Naresh Malhotra Department of Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois...Aeronauticai and Astronautical Engineering, University of Illinois, 1991. 2. N. Sri Namachchivaya and N. Malhotra , Parametrically Excited Hopf Bifurcation...Namachchivaya and N. Malhotra , Parametrically Excited Hopf Bifurcation with Non-semisimple 1:1 Resonance, Nonlinear Vibrations, ASME-AMD, Vol. 114, 1992. 3

  9. Deviation from Boltzmann distribution in excited energy levels of singly-ionized iron in an argon glow discharge plasma for atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Kashiwakura, Shunsuke; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2012-01-01

    A Boltzmann plot for many iron ionic lines having excitation energies of 4.7-9.1 eV was investigated in an argon glow discharge plasma when the discharge parameters, such as the voltage/current and the gas pressure, were varied. A Grimm-style radiation source was employed in a DC voltage range of 400-800 V at argon pressures of 400-930 Pa. The plot did not follow a linear relationship over a wide range of the excitation energy, but it yielded a normal Boltzmann distribution in the range of 4.7-5.8 eV and a large overpopulation in higher-lying excitation levels of iron ion. A probable reason for this phenomenon is that excitations for higher excited energy levels of iron ion would be predominantly caused by non-thermal collisions with argon species, the internal energy of which is received by iron atoms for the ionization. Particular intense ionic lines, which gave a maximum peak of the Boltzmann plot, were observed at an excitation energy of ca. 7.7 eV. They were the Fe II 257.297-nm and the Fe II 258.111-nm lines, derived from the 3d54s4p 6P excited levels. The 3d54s4p 6P excited levels can be highly populated through a resonance charge transfer from the ground state of argon ion, because of good matching in the excitation energy as well as the conservation of the total spin before and after the collision. An enhancement factor of the emission intensity for various Fe II lines could be obtained from a deviation from the normal Boltzmann plot, which comprised the emission lines of 4.7-5.8 eV. It would roughly correspond to a contribution of the charge transfer excitation to the excited levels of iron ion, suggesting that the charge-transfer collision could elevate the number density of the corresponding excited levels by a factor of ca.104. The Boltzmann plots give important information on the reason why a variety of iron ionic lines can be emitted from glow discharge plasmas.

  10. Electromagnetic toroidal excitations in matter and free space.

    PubMed

    Papasimakis, N; Fedotov, V A; Savinov, V; Raybould, T A; Zheludev, N I

    2016-03-01

    The toroidal dipole is a localized electromagnetic excitation, distinct from the magnetic and electric dipoles. While the electric dipole can be understood as a pair of opposite charges and the magnetic dipole as a current loop, the toroidal dipole corresponds to currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Toroidal dipoles provide physically significant contributions to the basic characteristics of matter including absorption, dispersion and optical activity. Toroidal excitations also exist in free space as spatially and temporally localized electromagnetic pulses propagating at the speed of light and interacting with matter. We review recent experimental observations of resonant toroidal dipole excitations in metamaterials and the discovery of anapoles, non-radiating charge-current configurations involving toroidal dipoles. While certain fundamental and practical aspects of toroidal electrodynamics remain open for the moment, we envision that exploitation of toroidal excitations can have important implications for the fields of photonics, sensing, energy and information.

  11. Producing coherent excitations in pumped Mott antiferromagnetic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yao; Claassen, Martin; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2017-12-01

    Nonequilibrium dynamics in correlated materials has attracted attention due to the possibility of characterizing, tuning, and creating complex ordered states. To understand the photoinduced microscopic dynamics, especially the linkage under realistic pump conditions between transient states and remnant elementary excitations, we performed nonperturbative simulations of various time-resolved spectroscopies. We used the Mott antiferromagnetic insulator as a model platform. The transient dynamics of multiparticle excitations can be attributed to the interplay between Floquet virtual states and a modification of the density of states, in which interactions induce a spectral weight transfer. Using an autocorrelation of the time-dependent spectral function, we show that resonance of the virtual states with the upper Hubbard band in the Mott insulator provides the route towards manipulating the electronic distribution and modifying charge and spin excitations. Our results link transient dynamics to the nature of many-body excitations and provide an opportunity to design nonequilibrium states of matter via tuned laser pulses.

  12. Broadband transient absorption spectroscopy with 1- and 2-photon excitations: Relaxation paths and cross sections of a triphenylamine dye in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Dobryakov, A. L.; Hecht, S., E-mail: sh@chemie.hu-berlin.de, E-mail: skovale@chemie.hu-berlin.de

    2015-07-14

    1-photon (382 nm) and 2-photon (752 nm) excitations to the S{sub 1} state are applied to record and compare transient absorption spectra of a push-pull triphenylamine (TrP) dye in solution. After 1-photon excitation, ultrafast vibrational and structural molecular relaxations are detected on a 0.1 ps time scale in nonpolar hexane, while in polar acetonitrile, the spectral evolution is dominated by dipolar solvation. Upon 2-photon excitation, transient spectra in hexane reveal an unexpected growth of stimulated emission (SE) and excited-state absorption (ESA) bands. The behavior is explained by strong population transfer S{sub 1} → S{sub n} due to resonant absorption ofmore » a third pump photon. Subsequent S{sub n} → S{sub 1} internal conversion (with τ{sub 1} = 1 ps) prepares a very hot S{sub 1} state which cools down with τ{sub 2} = 13 ps. The pump pulse energy dependence proves the 2-photon origin of the bleach signal. At the same time, SE and ESA are strongly affected by higher-order pump absorptions that should be taken into account in nonlinear fluorescence applications. The 2-photon excitation cross sections σ{sup (2)} = 32 ⋅ 10{sup −50} cm{sup 4} s at 752 nm are evaluated from the bleach signal.« less

  13. CAVITY EXCITATION CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Franck, J.V.

    1959-10-20

    An electronic oscillator is described for energizing a resonant cavity and to a system for stabilizing the operatin g frequency of the oscillator at the particular frequency necessary to establish a particular preferred field configuration or mode in the cavity, in this instance a linear accelerator. A freely rnnning oscillator has an output coupled to a resonant cavity wherein a field may be built up at any one of several adjacent frequencies. A pickup loop in the cavity is suitably shielded and positioned in the cavity so that only energy at the panticular desired frequency is fed back to stabilize the oscillator. A phase and gain control is in cluded in the feedback line.

  14. Perpendicular State of an Electronically Excited Stilbene: Observation by Femtosecond-Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Quick, Martin; Dobryakov, Alexander L; Ioffe, Ilya N; Granovsky, Alex A; Kovalenko, Sergey A; Ernsting, Nikolaus P

    2016-10-20

    In the photoisomerization path of stilbene, a perpendicular state P on the S 1 potential energy surface is expected just before internal conversion through a conical intersection S 1 /S 0 . For decades the observation of P was thwarted by a short lifetime τ P in combination with slow population flow over a barrier. But these limitations can be overcome by ethylenic substitution. Following optical excitation of trans-1,1'-dicyanostilbene, P is populated significantly (τ P = 27 ps in n-hexane) and monitored by an exited-state absorption band at 370 nm. Here we report stimulated Raman lines of P. The strongest, at 1558 cm -1 , is attributed to stretching vibrations of the phenyl rings. Transient electronic states, resonance conditions, and corresponding Raman signals are discussed.

  15. Cytokines and brain excitability

    PubMed Central

    Galic, Michael A.; Riazi, Kiarash; Pittman, Quentin J.

    2012-01-01

    Cytokines are molecules secreted by peripheral immune cells, microglia, astrocytes and neurons in the central nervous system. Peripheral or central inflammation is characterized by an upregulation of cytokines and their receptors in the brain. Emerging evidence indicates that pro-inflammatory cytokines modulate brain excitability. Findings from both the clinical literature and from in vivo and in vitro laboratory studies suggest that cytokines can increase seizure susceptibility and may be involved in epileptogenesis. Cellular mechanisms that underlie these effects include upregulation of excitatory glutamatergic transmission and downregulation of inhibitory GABAergic transmission. PMID:22214786

  16. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  17. Electroexcitation of nucleon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Inna Aznauryan, Volker D. Burkert

    2012-01-01

    We review recent progress in the investigation of the electroexcitation of nucleon resonances, both in experiment and in theory. The most accurate results have been obtained for the electroexcitation amplitudes of the four lowest excited states, which have been measured in a range of Q2 up to 8 and 4.5 GeV2 for the Delta(1232)P33, N(1535)S11 and N(1440)P11, N(1520)D13, respectively. These results have been confronted with calculations based on lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD (pQCD), and QCD-inspired models. The amplitudes for the Delta(1232) indicate large pion-cloud contributions at low Q2 and don't show any sign of approaching the pQCD regimemore » for Q2<7 GeV2. Measured for the first time, the electroexcitation amplitudes of the Roper resonance, N(1440)P11, provide strong evidence for this state as a predominantly radial excitation of a three-quark (3q) ground state, with additional non-3-quark contributions needed to describe the low Q2 behavior of the amplitudes. The longitudinal transition amplitude for the N(1535)S11 was determined and has become a challenge for quark models. Explanations may require large meson-cloud contributions or alternative representations of this state. The N(1520)D13 clearly shows the rapid changeover from helicity-3/2 dominance at the real photon point to helicity-1/2 dominance at Q2 > 0.5 GeV2, confirming a long-standing prediction of the constituent quark model. The interpretation of the moments of resonance transition form factors in terms of transition transverse charge distributions in infinite momentum frame is presented.« less

  18. Stochastic Resonance and First Arrival Time for Excitable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duki, Solomon Fekade; Taye, Mesfin Asfaw

    2018-04-01

    We study the noise induced thermally activated barrier crossing of Brownian particles that hop in a piecewise linear potential. Using the exact analytic solutions and via numerical simulations not only we explore the dependence for the first passage time of a single particle but also we calculate the first arrival time for one particle out of N particles. The first arrival time decreases as the number of particles increases as expected. We then explore the thermally activated barrier crossing rate of the system in the presence of time varying signal. The dependence of signal to noise ratio SNR as well as the power amplification (η ) on model parameters is explored. η and SNR depict a pronounced peak at particular noise strength. In the presence of N particles, η is considerably amplified as N steps up showing the weak periodic signal plays a vital role in controlling the noise induced dynamics of the system. Moreover, for the sake of generality, the viscous friction γ is considered to decrease exponentially when the temperature T of the medium increases (γ =Be^{-A T} ) as proposed originally by Reynolds (Philos Trans R Soc Lond 177:157, 1886).

  19. Stochastic Resonance and First Arrival Time for Excitable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duki, Solomon Fekade; Taye, Mesfin Asfaw

    2018-06-01

    We study the noise induced thermally activated barrier crossing of Brownian particles that hop in a piecewise linear potential. Using the exact analytic solutions and via numerical simulations not only we explore the dependence for the first passage time of a single particle but also we calculate the first arrival time for one particle out of N particles. The first arrival time decreases as the number of particles increases as expected. We then explore the thermally activated barrier crossing rate of the system in the presence of time varying signal. The dependence of signal to noise ratio SNR as well as the power amplification (η ) on model parameters is explored. η and SNR depict a pronounced peak at particular noise strength. In the presence of N particles, η is considerably amplified as N steps up showing the weak periodic signal plays a vital role in controlling the noise induced dynamics of the system. Moreover, for the sake of generality, the viscous friction γ is considered to decrease exponentially when the temperature T of the medium increases (γ =Be^{-A T}) as proposed originally by Reynolds (Philos Trans R Soc Lond 177:157, 1886).

  20. Fermi resonance controlled product branching in the H + HOD reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Bin; Manthe, Uwe; Guo, Hua

    2018-01-01

    Excitation of the first overtone of bending mode results in a significant enhancement in the HD + OH channel due to the 1 : 2 Fermi resonance between the fundamental OD stretch and the first overtone of the bend.

  1. Fermi resonance controlled product branching in the H + HOD reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bin; Manthe, Uwe; Guo, Hua

    Excitation of the first overtone of bending mode results in a significant enhancement in the HD + OH channel due to the 1 : 2 Fermi resonance between the fundamental OD stretch and the first overtone of the bend.

  2. Structure of the Nucleon and its Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamleh, Waseem; Leinweber, Derek; Liu, Zhan-wei; Stokes, Finn; Thomas, Anthony; Thomas, Samuel; Wu, Jia-jun

    2018-03-01

    The structure of the ground state nucleon and its finite-volume excitations are examined from three different perspectives. Using new techniques to extract the relativistic components of the nucleon wave function, the node structure of both the upper and lower components of the nucleon wave function are illustrated. A non-trivial role for gluonic components is manifest. In the second approach, the parity-expanded variational analysis (PEVA) technique is utilised to isolate states at finite momenta, enabling a novel examination of the electric and magnetic form factors of nucleon excitations. Here the magnetic form factors of low-lying odd-parity nucleons are particularly interesting. Finally, the structure of the nucleon spectrum is examined in a Hamiltonian effective field theory analysis incorporating recent lattice-QCD determinations of low-lying two-particle scattering-state energies in the finite volume. The Roper resonance of Nature is observed to originate from multi-particle coupled-channel interactions while the first radial excitation of the nucleon sits much higher at approximately 1.9 GeV.

  3. Experiments on shells under base excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicano, Francesco; Barbieri, Marco; Zippo, Antonio; Strozzi, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present paper is a deep experimental investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of circular cylindrical shells. The specific problem regards the response of circular cylindrical shells subjected to base excitation. The shells are mounted on a shaking table that furnishes a vertical vibration parallel to the cylinder axis; a heavy rigid disk is mounted on the top of the shells. The base vibration induces a rigid body motion, which mainly causes huge inertia forces exerted by the top disk to the shell. In-plane stresses due to the aforementioned inertias give rise to impressively large vibration on the shell. An extremely violent dynamic phenomenon suddenly appears as the excitation frequency varies up and down close to the linear resonant frequency of the first axisymmetric mode. The dynamics are deeply investigated by varying excitation level and frequency. Moreover, in order to generalise the investigation, two different geometries are analysed. The paper furnishes a complete dynamic scenario by means of: (i) amplitude frequency diagrams, (ii) bifurcation diagrams, (iii) time histories and spectra, (iv) phase portraits and Poincaré maps. It is to be stressed that all the results presented here are experimental.

  4. Lattice QCD and nucleon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R. G.; Fiebig, H. R.; Fleming, G.; Richards, D. G.; LHP Collaboration

    2004-06-01

    Lattice calculations provide an ab initio means for the study of QCD. Recent progress at understanding the spectrum and structure of nucleons from lattice QCD studies is reviewed. Measurements of the masses of the lightest particles for the lowest spin values are described and related to predictions of the quark model. Measurements of the mass of the first radial excitation of the nucleon, the so-called Roper resonance, obtained using Bayesian statistical analyses, are detailed. The need to perform calculations at realistically light values of the pion mass is emphasised, and the exciting progress at attaining such masses is outlined. The talk concludes with future prospects, emphasising the importance of constructing a basis of interpolating operators that is sensitive to three-quark states, to multi-quark states, and to excited glue.

  5. The triplet excited state of Bodipy: formation, modulation and application.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianzhang; Xu, Kejing; Yang, Wenbo; Wang, Zhijia; Zhong, Fangfang

    2015-12-21

    Boron dipyrromethene (Bodipy) is one of the most extensively investigated organic chromophores. Most of the investigations are focused on the singlet excited state of Bodipy, such as fluorescence. In stark contrast, the study of the triplet excited state of Bodipy is limited, but it is an emerging area, since the triplet state of Bodipy is tremendously important for several areas, such as the fundamental photochemistry study, photodynamic therapy (PDT), photocatalysis and triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) upconversion. The recent developments in the study of the production, modulation and application of the triplet excited state of Bodipy are discussed in this review article. The formation of the triplet state of Bodipy upon photoexcitation, via the well known approach such as the heavy atom effect (including I, Br, Ru, Ir, etc.), and the new methods, such as using a spin converter (e.g. C60), charge recombination, exciton coupling and the doubly substituted excited state, are summarized. All the Bodipy-based triplet photosensitizers show strong absorption of visible or near IR light and the long-lived triplet excited state, which are important for the application of the triplet excited state in PDT or photocatalysis. Moreover, the methods for switching (or modulation) of the triplet excited state of Bodipy were discussed, such as those based on the photo-induced electron transfer (PET), by controlling the competing Förster-resonance-energy-transfer (FRET), or the intermolecular charge transfer (ICT). Controlling the triplet excited state will give functional molecules such as activatable PDT reagents or molecular devices. It is worth noting that switching of the singlet excited state and the triplet state of Bodipy may follow different principles. Application of the triplet excited state of Bodipy in PDT, hydrogen (H2) production, photoredox catalytic organic reactions and TTA upconversion were discussed. The challenges and the opportunities in these areas were

  6. Resonances in low-energy positron-alkali scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horbatsch, M.; Ward, S. J.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Close-coupling calculations were performed with up to five target states at energies in the excitation threshold region for positron scattering from Li, Na and K. Resonances were discovered in the L = 0, 1 and 2 channels in the vicinity of the atomic excitation thresholds. The widths of these resonances vary between 0.2 and 130 MeV. Evidence was found for the existence of positron-alkali bound states in all cases.

  7. A multimode electromechanical parametric resonator array

    PubMed Central

    Mahboob, I.; Mounaix, M.; Nishiguchi, K.; Fujiwara, A.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Electromechanical resonators have emerged as a versatile platform in which detectors with unprecedented sensitivities and quantum mechanics in a macroscopic context can be developed. These schemes invariably utilise a single resonator but increasingly the concept of an array of electromechanical resonators is promising a wealth of new possibilities. In spite of this, experimental realisations of such arrays have remained scarce due to the formidable challenges involved in their fabrication. In a variation to this approach, we identify 75 harmonic vibration modes in a single electromechanical resonator of which 7 can also be parametrically excited. The parametrically resonating modes exhibit vibrations with only 2 oscillation phases which are used to build a binary information array. We exploit this array to execute a mechanical byte memory, a shift-register and a controlled-NOT gate thus vividly illustrating the availability and functionality of an electromechanical resonator array by simply utilising higher order vibration modes. PMID:24658349

  8. Photoionization of ground and excited levels of P II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2017-01-01

    Photoionization cross section (σPI) of P II, (hν + P II → P III + e), from ground and a large number of excited levels are presented. The study includes the resonant structures and the characteristics of the background in photoionization cross sections. The present calculations were carried out in the Breit-Pauli R-matrix (BPRM) method that includes relativistic effects. The autoionizing resonances are delineated with a fine energy mesh to observe the fine structure effects. A singular resonance, formed by the coupling of channels in fine structure but not allowed in LS coupling, is seen at the ionization threshold of photoionization for the ground and many excited levels. The background cross section is seen enhanced compared to smooth decay for the excited levels. Examples are presented to illustrate the enhanced background cross sections at the energies of the core levels, 4P3/2 and 2D3/2, that are allowed for electric dipole transitions by the core ground level 2 P1/2o. In addition strong Seaton or photo-excitation-of-core (PEC) resonances are found in the photoionization of single valence electron excited levels. Calculations used a close coupling wave function expansion that included 18 fine structure levels of core P III from configurations 3s23p, 3s3p2, 3s23d, 3s24s, 3s24p and 3p3. Photoionization cross sections are presented for all 475 fine structure levels of P II found with n ≤ 10 and l ≤ 9. The present results will provide high precision parameters of various applications involving this less studied ion.

  9. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOEpatents

    Perkins, Jr., Francis W.; Chiu, Shiu-Chu; Parks, Paul; Rawls, John M.

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a resonant coil cavity wave launcher for energizing a plasma immersed in a magnetic field. Energization includes launching fast Alfven waves to excite ion cyclotron frequency resonances in the plasma. The cavity includes inductive and capacitive reactive members spaced no further than one-quarter wavelength from a first wall confinement chamber of the plasma. The cavity wave launcher is energized by connection to a waveguide or transmission line carrying forward power from a remote radio frequency energy source.

  10. Optimum resonance control knobs for sextupoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ögren, J.; Ziemann, V.

    2018-06-01

    We discuss the placement of extra sextupoles in a magnet lattice that allows to correct third-order geometric resonances, driven by the chromaticity-compensating sextupoles, in a way that requires the least excitation of the correction sextupoles. We consider a simplified case, without momentum-dependent effects or other imperfections, where suitably chosen phase advances between the correction sextupoles leads to orthogonal knobs with equal treatment of the different resonance driving terms.

  11. Lateralization of motor excitability during observation of bimanual signs.

    PubMed

    Möttönen, Riikka; Farmer, Harry; Watkins, Kate E

    2010-08-01

    Viewing another person's hand actions enhances excitability in an observer's left and right primary motor (M1) cortex. We aimed to determine whether viewing communicative hand actions alters this bilateral sensorimotor resonance. Using single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we measured excitability in the left and right M1 while right-handed non-signing participants observed bimanual communicative hand actions, i.e., meaningful signs in British Sign Language. TMS-induced motor evoked potentials were recorded from hand muscles during sign observation before and after teaching the participants to associate meanings with half of the signs. Before this teaching, when participants did not know that the presented hand actions were signs, excitability of left and right M1 was modulated equally. After learning the meanings of half the signs, excitability of the left, but not right, M1 was significantly enhanced. This left-lateralized enhancement of M1 excitability occurred during observation of signs with known and unknown meanings. The findings suggest that awareness of the communicative nature of another person's hand actions strengthens sensorimotor resonance in the left M1 cortex and alters hemispheric balance during action observation. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Absorption bleaching of squarylium dye J aggregates via a two-photon excitation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuki, Makoto; Tian, Minquan; Sato, Yasuhiro; Pu, Lyong Sun; Tatsuura, Satoshi; Abe, Shuji

    2001-08-01

    Squarylium dye J aggregates exhibit ultrafast nonlinear optical response of absorption saturation at the resonant wavelength of 770 nm. We studied the two-photon excitation process of J aggregates. By fluorescence measurement, we found the two-photon absorption band at 1.3 μm, which was different from that of the dye solution at 1.2 μm. Absorption saturation at 770 nm via a two-photon excitation process was observed by two-photon resonant excitation at 1.3 μm and also by off-resonant excitation at 1.55 μm, suggesting the possibility of J aggregates for optical switching materials working at the wavelength used in optical communications.

  13. Hour-glass magnetic excitations induced by nanoscopic phase separation in cobalt oxides.

    PubMed

    Drees, Y; Li, Z W; Ricci, A; Rotter, M; Schmidt, W; Lamago, D; Sobolev, O; Rütt, U; Gutowski, O; Sprung, M; Piovano, A; Castellan, J P; Komarek, A C

    2014-12-23

    The magnetic excitations in the cuprate superconductors might be essential for an understanding of high-temperature superconductivity. In these cuprate superconductors the magnetic excitation spectrum resembles an hour-glass and certain resonant magnetic excitations within are believed to be connected to the pairing mechanism, which is corroborated by the observation of a universal linear scaling of superconducting gap and magnetic resonance energy. So far, charge stripes are widely believed to be involved in the physics of hour-glass spectra. Here we study an isostructural cobaltate that also exhibits an hour-glass magnetic spectrum. Instead of the expected charge stripe order we observe nano phase separation and unravel a microscopically split origin of hour-glass spectra on the nano scale pointing to a connection between the magnetic resonance peak and the spin gap originating in islands of the antiferromagnetic parent insulator. Our findings open new ways to theories of magnetic excitations and superconductivity in cuprate superconductors.

  14. Laboratory Experiments for Exploring the Surface Plasmon Resonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluchery, Olivier; Vayron, Romain; Van, Kha-Man

    2011-01-01

    The surface plasmon wave is a surface wave confined at the interface between a dielectric and a metal. The excitation of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on a gold thin film is discussed within the Kretschmann configuration, where the coupling with the excitation light is achieved by means of a prism in total reflection. The electromagnetic…

  15. CINE: Comet INfrared Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-08-01

    CINE calculates infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. One of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets is the fluorescence by the solar radiation followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state. This command-line tool calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Fluorescence coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  16. Excitation of propagating surface plasmons with a scanning tunnelling microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Boer-Duchemin, E; Zhang, Y; Comtet, G; Dujardin, G

    2011-04-29

    Inelastic electron tunnelling excitation of propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on a thin gold film is demonstrated. This is done by combining a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) with an inverted optical microscope. Analysis of the leakage radiation in both the image and Fourier planes unambiguously shows that the majority (up to 99.5%) of the detected photons originate from propagating SPPs with propagation lengths of the order of 10  µm. The remaining photon emission is localized under the STM tip and is attributed to a tip-gold film coupled plasmon resonance as evidenced by the bimodal spectral distribution and enhanced emission intensity observed using a silver STM tip for excitation.

  17. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Bivens, Hugh M.; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    1994-01-01

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a "telemetered sensor beacon" that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20-100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available.

  18. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Bivens, H.M.; Wessendorf, K.O.

    1994-08-16

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a telemetered sensor beacon'' that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20--100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available. 21 figs.

  19. Hydrological excitation of polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Y.; Kolaczek, B.

    2006-08-01

    Hydrological excitation of the polar motion (HAM) were computed from the available recently hydrological data series (NCEP, ECMWF, CPC water storage and LaD World simulations of global continental water) and compared. Time variable seasonal spectra of these hydrological excitation functions and of the geodetic excitation function of polar motion computed from the polar motion COMB03 data were compared showing big differences in their temporal characteristics and the necessity of the further improvement of the HAM models. Seasonal oscillations of the global geophysical excitation functions (AAM + OAM + HAM) and their time variations were compared also. These hydrological excitation functions do not close the budget of the global geophysical excitation function of polar motion.

  20. Determination of Elastic Moduli of Fiber-Resin Composites Using an Impulse Excitation Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viens, Michael J.; Johnson, Jeffrey J.

    1996-01-01

    The elastic moduli of graphite/epoxy and graphite/cyanate ester composite specimens with various laminate lay-ups was determined using an impulse excitation/acoustic resonance technique and compared to those determined using traditional strain gauge and extensometer techniques. The stiffness results were also compared to those predicted from laminate theory using uniaxial properties. The specimen stiffnesses interrogated ranged from 12 to 30 Msi. The impulse excitation technique was found to be a relatively quick and accurate method for determining elastic moduli with minimal specimen preparation and no requirement for mechanical loading frames. The results of this investigation showed good correlation between the elastic modulus determined using the impulse excitation technique, strain gauge and extensometer techniques, and modulus predicted from laminate theory. The flexural stiffness determined using the impulse excitation was in good agreement with that predicted from laminate theory. The impulse excitation/acoustic resonance interrogation technique has potential as a quality control test.

  1. Experimental Investigations of the Internal Energy of Molecules Evaporated via Laser-induced Acoustic Desorption into a Fourier-transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (LIAD/FT-ICR)

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Ryan C.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Ji-ang; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2008-01-01

    The internal energy of neutral gas-phase organic and biomolecules, evaporated by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) into a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR), was investigated through several experimental approaches. The desorbed molecules were demonstrated not to undergo degradation during the desorption process by collecting LIAD-evaporated molecules and subjecting them to analysis by electrospray ionization/quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Previously established gas-phase basicity (GB) values were remeasured for LIAD-evaporated organic molecules and biomolecules with the use of the bracketing method. No endothermic reactions were observed. The remeasured basicity values are in close agreement with the values reported in the literature. The amount of internal energy deposited during LIAD is concluded to be less than a few kcal/mol. Chemical ionization with a series of proton transfer reagents was employed to obtain a breakdown curve for a protonated dipeptide, val-pro, evaporated by LIAD. Comparison of this breakdown curve with a previously published analogous curve obtained by using substrate-assisted laser desorption (SALD) to evaporate the peptide suggests that the molecules evaporated via LIAD have less internal energy than those evaporated via SALD. PMID:17263513

  2. Orientation-dependent imaging of electronically excited quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Goings, Joshua J.; Nguyen, Huy A.; Lyding, Joseph; Li, Xiaosong; Gruebele, Martin

    2018-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that we can image electronic excitations of quantum dots by single-molecule absorption scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM). With this technique, a modulated laser beam periodically saturates an electronic transition of a single nanoparticle, and the resulting tunneling current modulation ΔI(x0, y0) maps out the SMA-STM image. In this paper, we first derive the basic theory to calculate ΔI(x0, y0) in the one-electron approximation. For near-resonant tunneling through an empty orbital "i" of the nanostructure, the SMA-STM signal is approximately proportional to the electron density |φi) (x0,y0)|excited orbital in the tunneling region. Thus, the SMA-STM signal is approximated by an orbital density map (ODM) of the resonantly excited orbital at energy Ei. The situation is more complex for correlated electron motion, but either way a slice through the excited electronic state structure in the tunneling region is imaged. We then show experimentally that we can nudge quantum dots on the surface and roll them, thus imaging excited state electronic structure of a single quantum dot at different orientations. We use density functional theory to model ODMs at various orientations, for qualitative comparison with the SMA-STM experiment. The model demonstrates that our experimentally observed signal monitors excited states, localized by defects near the surface of an individual quantum dot. The sub-nanometer super-resolution imaging technique demonstrated here could become useful for mapping out the three-dimensional structure of excited states localized by defects within nanomaterials.

  3. Orientation-dependent imaging of electronically excited quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc; Goings, Joshua J; Nguyen, Huy A; Lyding, Joseph; Li, Xiaosong; Gruebele, Martin

    2018-02-14

    We previously demonstrated that we can image electronic excitations of quantum dots by single-molecule absorption scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM). With this technique, a modulated laser beam periodically saturates an electronic transition of a single nanoparticle, and the resulting tunneling current modulation ΔI(x 0 , y 0 ) maps out the SMA-STM image. In this paper, we first derive the basic theory to calculate ΔI(x 0 , y 0 ) in the one-electron approximation. For near-resonant tunneling through an empty orbital "i" of the nanostructure, the SMA-STM signal is approximately proportional to the electron density φ i x 0 ,y 0 2 of the excited orbital in the tunneling region. Thus, the SMA-STM signal is approximated by an orbital density map (ODM) of the resonantly excited orbital at energy E i . The situation is more complex for correlated electron motion, but either way a slice through the excited electronic state structure in the tunneling region is imaged. We then show experimentally that we can nudge quantum dots on the surface and roll them, thus imaging excited state electronic structure of a single quantum dot at different orientations. We use density functional theory to model ODMs at various orientations, for qualitative comparison with the SMA-STM experiment. The model demonstrates that our experimentally observed signal monitors excited states, localized by defects near the surface of an individual quantum dot. The sub-nanometer super-resolution imaging technique demonstrated here could become useful for mapping out the three-dimensional structure of excited states localized by defects within nanomaterials.

  4. The possibility of a new resonance of three-body linear chain structure in the reaction 12C+16O at Ec.mapprox-33.5MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangjing; P, L. Li; J, J. Kolata; A, Morsad; L, Goetting; R, A. Kryger; S, Dixit; R, Tighe; W, Chune

    1990-05-01

    There is a peak in the excitation function of total cross section of low energy α-particles in the reaction 12C+16O at Ec.m approx33.5MeV. The experimental distribution of α-particle emitted event has been obtained. The result of theoretical calculation roughly agrees with experimental data, gives an orientation where three-body resonances can be expected, and the information on internal structure of three-body linear chain molecule.

  5. Slice profile and B1 corrections in 2D magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dan; Coppo, Simone; Chen, Yong; McGivney, Debra F; Jiang, Yun; Pahwa, Shivani; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A

    2017-11-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize and improve the accuracy of 2D magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) scans in the presence of slice profile (SP) and B 1 imperfections, which are two main factors that affect quantitative results in MRF. The SP and B 1 imperfections are characterized and corrected separately. The SP effect is corrected by simulating the radiofrequency pulse in the dictionary, and the B 1 is corrected by acquiring a B 1 map using the Bloch-Siegert method before each scan. The accuracy, precision, and repeatability of the proposed method are evaluated in phantom studies. The effects of both SP and B 1 imperfections are also illustrated and corrected in the in vivo studies. The SP and B 1 corrections improve the accuracy of the T 1 and T 2 values, independent of the shape of the radiofrequency pulse. The T 1 and T 2 values obtained from different excitation patterns become more consistent after corrections, which leads to an improvement of the robustness of the MRF design. This study demonstrates that MRF is sensitive to both SP and B 1 effects, and that corrections can be made to improve the accuracy of MRF with only a 2-s increase in acquisition time. Magn Reson Med 78:1781-1789, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. The Role of Electronic and Phononic Excitation in the Optical Response of Monolayer WS 2 after Ultrafast Excitation

    DOE PAGES

    Ruppert, Claudia; Chernikov, Alexey; Hill, Heather M.; ...

    2017-01-06

    We study transient changes of the optical response of WS 2 monolayers by femtosecond broadband pump–probe spectroscopy. Time-dependent absorption spectra are analyzed by tracking the line width broadening, bleaching, and energy shift of the main exciton resonance as a function of time delay after the excitation. Two main sources for the pump-induced changes of the optical response are identified. Specifically, we find an interplay between modifications induced by many-body interactions from photoexcited carriers and by the subsequent transfer of the excitation to the phonon system followed by cooling of the material through the heat transfer to the substrate.

  7. The Role of Electronic and Phononic Excitation in the Optical Response of Monolayer WS 2 after Ultrafast Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, Claudia; Chernikov, Alexey; Hill, Heather M.

    We study transient changes of the optical response of WS 2 monolayers by femtosecond broadband pump–probe spectroscopy. Time-dependent absorption spectra are analyzed by tracking the line width broadening, bleaching, and energy shift of the main exciton resonance as a function of time delay after the excitation. Two main sources for the pump-induced changes of the optical response are identified. Specifically, we find an interplay between modifications induced by many-body interactions from photoexcited carriers and by the subsequent transfer of the excitation to the phonon system followed by cooling of the material through the heat transfer to the substrate.

  8. Strongly driven electron spins using a Ku band stripline electron paramagnetic resonance resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Yung Szen; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2013-07-01

    This article details our work to obtain strong excitation for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments by improving the resonator's efficiency. The advantages and application of strong excitation are discussed. Two 17 GHz transmission-type, stripline resonators were designed, simulated and fabricated. Scattering parameter measurements were carried out and quality factor were measured to be around 160 and 85. Simulation results of the microwave's magnetic field distribution are also presented. To determine the excitation field at the sample, nutation experiments were carried out and power dependence were measured using two organic samples at room temperature. The highest recorded Rabi frequency was rated at 210 MHz with an input power of about 1 W, which corresponds to a π/2 pulse of about 1.2 ns.

  9. GAUSSIAN BEAM LASER RESONATOR PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    In designing a laser cavity, the laser engineer is frequently concerned with more than the stability of the resonator. Other considerations include the size of the beam at various optical surfaces within the resonator or the performance of intracavity line-narrowing or other optical elements. Laser resonators obey the laws of Gaussian beam propagation, not geometric optics. The Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators using Gaussian ray trace techniques. It can be used to determine the propagation of radiation through laser resonators. The algorithm used in the Gaussian Beam Resonator program has three major components. First, the ray transfer matrix for the laser resonator must be calculated. Next calculations of the initial beam parameters, specifically, the beam stability, the beam waist size and location for the resonator input element, and the wavefront curvature and beam radius at the input surface to the first resonator element are performed. Finally the propagation of the beam through the optical elements is computed. The optical elements can be modeled as parallel plates, lenses, mirrors, dummy surfaces, or Gradient Index (GRIN) lenses. A Gradient Index lens is a good approximation of a laser rod operating under a thermal load. The optical system may contain up to 50 elements. In addition to the internal beam elements the optical system may contain elements external to the resonator. The Gaussian Beam Resonator program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01). It was developed for the IBM PS/2 80-071 microcomputer and has been implemented on an IBM PC compatible under MS DOS 3.21. The program was developed in 1988 and requires approximately 95K bytes to operate.

  10. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  11. Room temperature, very sensitive thermometer using a doubly clamped microelectromechanical beam resonator for bolometer applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y., E-mail: zhangya@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Watanabe, Y.; Hosono, S.

    We propose a room temperature, all electrical driving and detecting, very sensitive thermometer structure using a microelectromechanical (MEMS) resonator for bolometer applications. We have fabricated a GaAs doubly clamped MEMS beam resonator whose oscillation can be excited and detected by the piezoelectric effect. When a heating power is applied to a NiCr film deposited on the MEMS beam surface, internal thermal stress is generated in the beam, leading to a reduction in the resonance frequency. The present device detects the shift in the resonance frequency caused by heating and works as a very sensitive thermometer. When the resonator was drivenmore » by a voltage slightly below the threshold for the nonlinear, hysteretic oscillation, the thermometer showed a voltage responsivity of about 3300 V/W, while keeping a low noise spectral density of about 60 nV/Hz{sup 1/2}, demonstrating a noise equivalent power of <20 pW/Hz{sup 1/2} even at room temperature. The observed effect can be used for realizing high-sensitivity terahertz bolometers for room-temperature operation.« less

  12. Characterization of the International Humic Substances Society standard and reference fulvic and humic acids by solution state carbon-13 (13C) and hydrogen-1 (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Folan, Daniel W.; MacCarthy, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Standard and reference samples of the International Humic Substances Society have been characterized by solution state carbon-13 and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Samples included the Suwannee River, soil, and peat standard fulvic and humic acids, the Leonardite standard humic acid, the Nordic aquatic reference fulvic and humic acids, and the Summit Hill soil reference humic acid. Aqueous-solution carbon-13 NMR analyses included the measurement of spin-lattice relaxation times, measurement of nuclear Overhauser enhancement factors, measurement of quantitative carbon distributions, recording of attached proton test spectra, and recording of spectra under nonquantitative conditions. Distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer carbon-13 NMR spectra also were recorded on the Suwannee River fulvic acid in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide. Hydrogen-1 NMR spectra were recorded on sodium salts of the samples in deuterium oxide. The carbon aromaticities of the samples ranged from 0.24 for the Suwannee River fulvic acid to 0.58 for the Leonardite humic acid.

  13. Quasiparticle spin resonance and coherence in superconducting aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quay, C. H. L.; Weideneder, M.; Chiffaudel, Y.; Strunk, C.; Aprili, M.

    2015-10-01

    Conventional superconductors were long thought to be spin inert; however, there is now increasing interest in both (the manipulation of) the internal spin structure of the ground-state condensate, as well as recently observed long-lived, spin-polarized excitations (quasiparticles). We demonstrate spin resonance in the quasiparticle population of a mesoscopic superconductor (aluminium) using novel on-chip microwave detection techniques. The spin decoherence time obtained (~100 ps), and its dependence on the sample thickness are consistent with Elliott-Yafet spin-orbit scattering as the main decoherence mechanism. The striking divergence between the spin coherence time and the previously measured spin imbalance relaxation time (~10 ns) suggests that the latter is limited instead by inelastic processes. This work stakes out new ground for the nascent field of spin-based electronics with superconductors or superconducting spintronics.

  14. Quasiparticle spin resonance and coherence in superconducting aluminium.

    PubMed

    Quay, C H L; Weideneder, M; Chiffaudel, Y; Strunk, C; Aprili, M

    2015-10-26

    Conventional superconductors were long thought to be spin inert; however, there is now increasing interest in both (the manipulation of) the internal spin structure of the ground-state condensate, as well as recently observed long-lived, spin-polarized excitations (quasiparticles). We demonstrate spin resonance in the quasiparticle population of a mesoscopic superconductor (aluminium) using novel on-chip microwave detection techniques. The spin decoherence time obtained (∼100 ps), and its dependence on the sample thickness are consistent with Elliott-Yafet spin-orbit scattering as the main decoherence mechanism. The striking divergence between the spin coherence time and the previously measured spin imbalance relaxation time (∼10 ns) suggests that the latter is limited instead by inelastic processes. This work stakes out new ground for the nascent field of spin-based electronics with superconductors or superconducting spintronics.

  15. Quasiparticle spin resonance and coherence in superconducting aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Quay, C. H. L.; Weideneder, M.; Chiffaudel, Y.; Strunk, C.; Aprili, M.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional superconductors were long thought to be spin inert; however, there is now increasing interest in both (the manipulation of) the internal spin structure of the ground-state condensate, as well as recently observed long-lived, spin-polarized excitations (quasiparticles). We demonstrate spin resonance in the quasiparticle population of a mesoscopic superconductor (aluminium) using novel on-chip microwave detection techniques. The spin decoherence time obtained (∼100 ps), and its dependence on the sample thickness are consistent with Elliott–Yafet spin–orbit scattering as the main decoherence mechanism. The striking divergence between the spin coherence time and the previously measured spin imbalance relaxation time (∼10 ns) suggests that the latter is limited instead by inelastic processes. This work stakes out new ground for the nascent field of spin-based electronics with superconductors or superconducting spintronics. PMID:26497744

  16. Memory effects on stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiman, Alexander; Sung, Wokyung

    1996-02-01

    We study the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a bistable system with internal colored noise. In this situation the system possesses time-dependent memory friction connected with noise via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, so that in the absence of periodic driving the system approaches the thermodynamic equilibrium state. For this non-Markovian case we find that memory usually suppresses stochastic resonance. However, for a large memory time SR can be enhanced by the memory.

  17. Application of Time-Delay Absorber to Suppress Vibration of a Dynamical System to Tuned Excitation.

    PubMed

    El-Ganaini, W A A; El-Gohary, H A

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we present a comprehensive investigation of the time delay absorber effects on the control of a dynamical system represented by a cantilever beam subjected to tuned excitation forces. Cantilever beam is one of the most widely used system in too many engineering applications, such as mechanical and civil engineering. The main aim of this work is to control the vibration of the beam at simultaneous internal and combined resonance condition, as it is the worst resonance case. Control is conducted via time delay absorber to suppress chaotic vibrations. Time delays often appear in many control systems in the state, in the control input, or in the measurements. Time delay commonly exists in various engineering, biological, and economical systems because of the finite speed of the information processing. It is a source of performance degradation and instability. Multiple time scale perturbation method is applied to obtain a first order approximation for the nonlinear differential equations describing the system behavior. The different resonance cases are reported and studied numerically. The stability of the steady-state solution at the selected worst resonance case is investigated applying Runge-Kutta fourth order method and frequency response equations via Matlab 7.0 and Maple11. Time delay absorber is effective, but within a specified range of time delay. It is the critical factor in selecting such absorber. Time delay absorber is better than the ordinary one as from the effectiveness point of view. The effects of the different absorber parameters on the system behavior and stability are studied numerically. A comparison with the available published work showed a close agreement with some previously published work.

  18. Multiquark resonances

    DOE PAGES

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, Antonio D.

    2016-12-02

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building.more » Lastly, data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.« less

  19. Laser cooling at resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudkin, Yaakov; Khaykovich, Lev

    2018-05-01

    We show experimentally that three-dimensional laser cooling of lithium atoms on the D2 line is possible when the laser light is tuned exactly to resonance with the dominant atomic transition. Qualitatively, it can be understood by applying simple Doppler cooling arguments to the specific hyperfine structure of the excited state of lithium atoms, which is both dense and inverted. However, to build a quantitative theory, we must resolve to a full model which takes into account both the entire atomic structure of all 24 Zeeman sublevels and the laser light polarization. Moreover, by means of Monte Carlo simulations, we show that coherent processes play an important role in showing consistency between the theory and the experimental results.

  20. Dual frequency parametric excitation of a nonlinear, multi degree of freedom mechanical amplifier with electronically modified topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolev, A.; Bucher, I.

    2018-04-01

    Mechanical or electromechanical amplifiers can exploit the high-Q and low noise features of mechanical resonance, in particular when parametric excitation is employed. Multi-frequency parametric excitation introduces tunability and is able to project weak input signals on a selected resonance. The present paper addresses multi degree of freedom mechanical amplifiers or resonators whose analysis and features require treatment of the spatial as well as temporal behavior. In some cases, virtual electronic coupling can alter the given topology of the resonator to better amplify specific inputs. An analytical development is followed by a numerical and experimental sensitivity and performance verifications, illustrating the advantages and disadvantages of such topologies.

  1. Exciting an Initially Cold Asteroid Belt Through a Planetary Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deienno, Rogerio; Izidoro, Andre; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Gomes, Rodney; Nesvorny, David; Raymond, Sean N.

    2018-04-01

    The main asteroid belt (MB) is low in mass but dynamically excited, with much larger eccentricities and inclinations than the planets. In recent years, the Grand Tack model has been the predominant model capable of reconciling the formation of the terrestrial planets with a depleted but excited MB. Despite this success, the Grand Tack is still not generally accepted because of uncertainties in orbital migration. It was recently proposed that chaotic early evolution of Jupiter and Saturn could excite the initially cold MB. However, hydrodynamical simulations predict that the giant planets should generally emerge from the gas disk phase on orbits characterized by resonant and regular motion. Here we propose a new mechanism to excite the MB during the giant planets' ('Nice model') instability, which is expected to have included repeated close encounters between Jupiter and one or more ice giants ('Jumping Jupiter' -- JJ). We show that when Jupiter temporarily reaches a high enough level of excitation, both in eccentricity and inclination, it induces strong forced vectors of eccentricity and inclination within the MB region. Because during the JJ instability Jupiter's orbit 'jumps' around, forced vectors keep changing both in magnitude and phase throughout the whole MB region. The entire cold primordial MB can thus be excited as a natural outcome of the JJ instability. Furthermore, we show that the subsequent evolution of the Solar System is capable of reshaping the resultant MB to its present day orbital state, and that a strong mass depletion is always associated to the JJ instability phase.

  2. Effect of acoustic resonance phenomenon on fluid flow with light dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamakawa, Hiromitsu; Arshad, Azim B. M.; Ohta, Mitsuo

    2011-10-01

    In the present paper, the attention is focused on the characteristics of lightweight materials collection in the duct using acoustic resonance phenomena. The acoustic resonance was excited by using a controlled speaker at the middle of a test duct. We measured the sound pressure level, frequency response characteristics, acoustic damping ratio, mode shape, and lightweight materials response to acoustic resonance excited by a speaker. As a result, the acoustic damping ratio decreased as the mode number of acoustic resonance increased. The tissue strips and the lightweight materials were collected at the node of acoustic pressure when the acoustic resonance was excited. It was made clear that it is possible to control lightweight materials using acoustic resonance excited by a speaker.

  3. Isolated planar gyroscope with internal radial sensing and actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention discloses an inertial sensor comprising a planar mechanical resonator with embedded sensing and actuation for substantially in-plane vibration and having a central rigid support for the resonator. At least one excitation or torquer electrode is disposed within an interior of the resonator to excite in-plane vibration of the resonator and at least one sensing or pickoff electrode is disposed within the interior of the resonator for sensing the motion of the excited resonator. In one embodiment, the planar resonator includes a plurality of slots in an annular pattern; in another embodiment, the planar mechanical resonator comprises four masses; each embodiment having a simple degenerate pair of in-plane vibration modes.

  4. Optical biosensors using surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, Jiri; Brynda, Eduard; Tobiska, Petr; Tichy, Ivo; Skvor, Jiri

    1999-12-01

    We present a surface plasmon resonance sensor base on prism excitation of surface plasmons and spectral interrogation. For specific detection of biomolecular analytes, multilayers of monoclonal antibodies are immobilized on the surface of the sensor. Detection of biomolecular analytes such as human (beta) -2)-microglobulin, choriogonadotropin, hepatitis B surface antigen, salmonella enteritidis is demonstrated.

  5. Cosmos as Resonant Harmonies ˜ Singing International Year of Astronomy, 2009 ˜ the cultural significance of our new encounter with the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Kala

    2008-04-01

    UN Int'l Year of Astronomy (IYA), 2009 will celebrate 400 yrs. since Galileo's quests. Bringing the unifying dimensions of cosmos to the global community, sharing the wonder and calling forth the unparalleled ability of astronomy to dwarf our disputations, open our hearts to Einstein's ``cosmological feeling'' and propel us on this collective global adventure, is the nexus of intent. IYA is a global effort to bring the human creative endeavor into harmonic interplay with the universe that is singing us. We are cosmos creating ourselves, taking the reigns of our inherent potency and wondering how law and logos emerge into the entangled formulas and phenomenology of cosmic reason and reality. How is our cosmic encounter affecting our socio-cultural identity and psychology? What harmonies are emerging in researchers in response to our penetration into cosmic etudes of black holes, large-scale flows and stellar dynamics? We are learning to creatively resonate with the universe. Some excellent ideas being brewed for communicating the cosmos to students and the public will be explored.

  6. Effective excitation of DBD lamp with a long feedline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schitz, D. V.; Nechoroshev, V. O.

    2016-01-01

    The proposed solution makes possible the transfer of high-voltage excitation pulses through the long coaxial cable with the minimum losses and the excilamp efficiency. Use of resonant topology of the pulse converter provides ZCS at switching-ON and ZVC at switching- OFF of the transistors. The values of efficiency of radiation of ∼ 9% at the feedline of 2.5 m in length obtained during the experiments are about twice as much as the efficiency at the XeCl- excilamp excitation by the quasi-square pulses power supply due to the decrease of losses at switching and the increase of electric efficiency of a resonant power supply with the long coaxial feedline.

  7. Rotational excitation of the Hoyle state in 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, R.; Barton, C.; Diget, C. Aa; Courtin, S.; Fruet, G.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Howard, A.; Illana, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Marroquin, I.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Lund, M. V.; Moore, I.; Perea, A.; Refsgaard, J.; Riley, J. E.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Sinclair, L.; Tengblad, O.; IGISOL Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    12C is synthesised in stars by fusion of three α particles. This process occurs through a resonance in the 12C nucleus, famously known as the Hoyle state. In this state, the 12C nucleus exists as a cluster of α particles. The state is the band-head for a rotational band with the 2+ rotational excitation predicted in the energy region 9 - 11 MeV. This rotational excitation can affect the triple-α process reaction rate by more than an order of magnitude at high temperatures (109 K). Depending on the energy of the resonance, the knowledge of the state can also help determine the structure of the Hoyle state. In the work presented here, the state of interest is populated by beta decay of radioactive 12N ion beam delivered by the IGISOL facility at JYFL, Jyväskylä.

  8. Highlights in light-baryon spectroscopy and searches for gluonic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crede, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of excited hadrons - mesons and baryons - serves as an excellent probe of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of the strong interaction. The strong coupling however makes QCD challenging. It confines quarks and breaks chiral symmetry, thus providing us with the world of light hadrons. Highly-excited hadronic states are sensitive to the details of quark confinement, which is only poorly understood within QCD. This is the regime of non-perturbative QCD and it is one of the key issues in hadronic physics to identify the corresponding internal degrees of freedom and how they relate to strong coupling QCD. The quark model suggests mesons are made of a constituent quark and an antiquark and baryons consist of three such quarks. QCD predicts other forms of matter. What is the role of glue? Resonances with large gluonic components are predicted as bound states by QCD. The lightest hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers are estimated to have masses in the range from 1 to 2 GeV/c2 and are well in reach of current experimental programs. At Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) and other facilities worldwide, the high-energy electron and photon beams present a remarkably clean probe of hadronic matter, providing an excellent microscope for examining atomic nuclei and the strong nuclear force.

  9. Wireless power transfer based on dielectric resonators with colossal permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mingzhao; Belov, Pavel; Kapitanova, Polina

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic resonant wireless power transfer system based on dielectric disk resonators made of colossal permittivity (ɛ = 1000) and low loss (tan δ = 2.5 × 10-4) microwave ceramic is experimentally investigated. The system operates at the magnetic dipole mode excited in the resonators providing maximal power transfer efficiency of 90% at the frequency 232 MHz. By applying an impedance matching technique, the efficiency of 50% is achieved within the separation between the resonators d = 16 cm (3.8 radii of the resonator). The separation, misalignment and rotation dependencies of wireless power transfer efficiency are experimentally studied.

  10. Resonant Raman spectra of diindenoperylene thin films.

    PubMed

    Scholz, R; Gisslén, L; Schuster, B-E; Casu, M B; Chassé, T; Heinemeyer, U; Schreiber, F

    2011-01-07

    Resonant and preresonant Raman spectra obtained on diindenoperylene (DIP) thin films are interpreted with calculations of the deformation of a relaxed excited molecule with density functional theory (DFT). The comparison of excited state geometries based on time-dependent DFT or on a constrained DFT scheme with observed absorption spectra of dissolved DIP reveals that the deformation pattern deduced from constrained DFT is more reliable. Most observed Raman peaks can be assigned to calculated A(g)-symmetric breathing modes of DIP or their combinations. As the position of one of the laser lines used falls into a highly structured absorption band, we have carefully analyzed the Raman excitation profile arising from the frequency dependence of the dielectric tensor. This procedure gives Raman cross sections in good agreement with the observed relative intensities, both in the fully resonant and in the preresonant case.

  11. Resonant Raman spectra of diindenoperylene thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.; Gisslén, L.; Schuster, B.-E.; Casu, M. B.; Chassé, T.; Heinemeyer, U.; Schreiber, F.

    2011-01-01

    Resonant and preresonant Raman spectra obtained on diindenoperylene (DIP) thin films are interpreted with calculations of the deformation of a relaxed excited molecule with density functional theory (DFT). The comparison of excited state geometries based on time-dependent DFT or on a constrained DFT scheme with observed absorption spectra of dissolved DIP reveals that the deformation pattern deduced from constrained DFT is more reliable. Most observed Raman peaks can be assigned to calculated A_g-symmetric breathing modes of DIP or their combinations. As the position of one of the laser lines used falls into a highly structured absorption band, we have carefully analyzed the Raman excitation profile arising from the frequency dependence of the dielectric tensor. This procedure gives Raman cross sections in good agreement with the observed relative intensities, both in the fully resonant and in the preresonant case.

  12. The decay of highly excited open strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D.; Turok, N.; Wilkinson, R.; Jetzer, P.

    1988-01-01

    The decay rates of leading edge Regge trajectory states are calculated for very high level number in open bosonic string theories, ignoring tachyon final states. The optical theorem simplifies the analysis while enabling identification of the different mass level decay channels. The main result is that (in four dimensions) the greatest single channel is the emission of a single photon and a state of the next mass level down. A simple asymptotic formula for arbitrarily high level number is given for this process. Also calculated is the total decay rate exactly up to N=100. It shows little variation over this range but appears to decrease for larger N. The formalism is checked in examples and the decay rate of the first excited level calculated for open superstring theories. The calculation may also have implications for high spin meson resonances.

  13. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; ...

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting ofmore » levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.« less

  14. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  15. Get excited: reappraising pre-performance anxiety as excitement.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Alison Wood

    2014-06-01

    Individuals often feel anxious in anticipation of tasks such as speaking in public or meeting with a boss. I find that an overwhelming majority of people believe trying to calm down is the best way to cope with pre-performance anxiety. However, across several studies involving karaoke singing, public speaking, and math performance, I investigate an alternative strategy: reappraising anxiety as excitement. Compared with those who attempt to calm down, individuals who reappraise their anxious arousal as excitement feel more excited and perform better. Individuals can reappraise anxiety as excitement using minimal strategies such as self-talk (e.g., saying "I am excited" out loud) or simple messages (e.g., "get excited"), which lead them to feel more excited, adopt an opportunity mind-set (as opposed to a threat mind-set), and improve their subsequent performance. These findings suggest the importance of arousal congruency during the emotional reappraisal process. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Unwanted signal leakage in excitation sculpting with single axis gradients.

    PubMed

    Jerschow, A

    1999-03-01

    Excitation sculpting (T-L. Hwang and A. J. Shaka, J. Magn. Reson. A 112, 275-279 (1995)) used for solvent suppression and selective excitation in NMR bases its success on the ability to remove baseline and phase errors created by the application of selective rf pulses. This is achieved by the application of two pulsed field gradient (PFG) echoes in sequence. It is essential that the two pairs of PFGs select the coherence transfer steps independently of each other, which is conveniently achieved if they are applied along orthogonal spatial axes. Here, the much more common case where both PFG pairs must be applied along a single axis is investigated. This is shown to lead to complications for certain ratios of PFG strengths. The original theory of excitation sculpting is restated in the spherical basis for convenience. Some of the effects can only be explained by invoking the dipolar demagnetizing field. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. Noise-induced escape in an excitable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khovanov, I. A.; Polovinkin, A. V.; Luchinsky, D. G.; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2013-03-01

    We consider the stochastic dynamics of escape in an excitable system, the FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) neuronal model, for different classes of excitability. We discuss, first, the threshold structure of the FHN model as an example of a system without a saddle state. We then develop a nonlinear (nonlocal) stability approach based on the theory of large fluctuations, including a finite-noise correction, to describe noise-induced escape in the excitable regime. We show that the threshold structure is revealed via patterns of most probable (optimal) fluctuational paths. The approach allows us to estimate the escape rate and the exit location distribution. We compare the responses of a monostable resonator and monostable integrator to stochastic input signals and to a mixture of periodic and stochastic stimuli. Unlike the commonly used local analysis of the stable state, our nonlocal approach based on optimal paths yields results that are in good agreement with direct numerical simulations of the Langevin equation.

  18. Spin texture and magnetoroton excitations at nu=1/3.

    PubMed

    Groshaus, Javier G; Dujovne, Irene; Gallais, Yann; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F; Pinczuk, Aron; Tan, Yan-Wen; Stormer, Horst; Dennis, Brian S; Pfeiffer, Loren N; West, Ken W

    2008-02-01

    Neutral spin texture (ST) excitations at nu=1/3 are directly observed for the first time by resonant inelastic light scattering. They are determined to involve two simultaneous spin flips. At low magnetic fields, the ST energy is below that of the magnetoroton minimum. With increasing in-plane magnetic field these mode energies cross at a critical ratio of the Zeeman and Coulomb energies of eta(c)=0.020+/-0.001. Surprisingly, the intensity of the ST mode grows with temperature in the range in which the magnetoroton modes collapse. The temperature dependence is interpreted in terms of a competition between coexisting phases supporting different excitations. We consider the role of the ST excitations in activated transport at nu=1/3.

  19. In vivo excitation of nanoparticles using luminescent bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dragavon, Joe; Blazquez, Samantha; Rekiki, Abdessalem; Samson, Chelsea; Theodorou, Ioanna; Rogers, Kelly L.; Tournebize, Régis; Shorte, Spencer L.

    2012-01-01

    The lux operon derived from Photorhabdus luminescens incorporated into bacterial genomes, elicits the production of biological chemiluminescence typically centered on 490 nm. The light-producing bacteria are widely used for in vivo bioluminescence imaging. However, in living samples, a common difficulty is the presence of blue-green absorbers such as hemoglobin. Here we report a characterization of fluorescence by unbound excitation from luminescence, a phenomenon that exploits radiating luminescence to excite nearby fluorophores by epifluorescence. We show that photons from bioluminescent bacteria radiate over mesoscopic distances and induce a red-shifted fluorescent emission from appropriate fluorophores in a manner distinct from bioluminescence resonance energy transfer. Our results characterizing fluorescence by unbound excitation from luminescence, both in vitro and in vivo, demonstrate how the resulting blue-to-red wavelength shift is both necessary and sufficient to yield contrast enhancement revealing mesoscopic proximity of luminescent and fluorescent probes in the context of living biological tissues. PMID:22615349

  20. Subphotospheric Resonator and Local Oscillations in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhugzhda, Yu. D.

    2018-05-01

    The conditions under which the subphotospheric slow-wave resonator can be responsible for the local oscillations in a sunspot have been determined. A rich spectrum of local 3-min oscillations can be produced by the subphotospheric resonator only if the magnetic field in the resonator magnetic flux tube is much weaker than the surrounding sunspot magnetic field. Convective upflows of hot plasma in the sunspot magnetic field satisfy this condition. Consequently, there must be a correlation between the local oscillations and umbral dots, because the latter are produced by convective flows. Various modes of operation of the subphotospheric resonator give rise to wave packets of 3-min oscillations and umbral flashes. It is shown that giant local umbral flashes can emerge under certain conditions for the excitation of oscillations in the subphotospheric resonator.