Science.gov

Sample records for resource management policies

  1. Integrating ecology into natural resource management policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Joel R.; MacLeod, Neil D.

    1996-05-01

    Traditional natural resource management policy has largely focused on implementing prescriptive solutions to maximize a production function. The fundamental assumptions of this approach were: (1) that ecosystems behaved in a linear, deterministic manner; (2) that there was general community agreement on the value of different ecosystem services; and (3) that land managers would accept and adopt the recommended technology. The result has generally been an unpredictable performance by ecosystems, conflicting expectations among users, and low adoption rates for the outputs of research and development (R&D). We propose that an approach that integrates the fundamentals of nonequilibrium ecology and “soft” systems methodologies to define options, make management decision recommendations, and implement programs will result in improved predictability of ecosystem response, more realistic expectations on the part of users of ecosystem services, and better uptake of technology by land managers.

  2. Water resources management. World Bank policy paper

    SciTech Connect

    Easter, K.W.; Feder, G.; Le Moigne, G.; Duda, A.M.; Forsyth, E.

    1993-01-01

    Water resources have been one of the most important areas of World Bank lending during the past three decades. Through its support for sector work and investments in irrigation, water supply, sanitation, flood control, and hydropower, the Bank has contributed to the development of many countries and helped provide essential services to many communities. Moreover, the Bank and governments have not taken sufficient account of environmental concerns in the management of water resources. (Copyright (c) 1993 International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank.)

  3. Water resources management. (Arabic version). World Bank policy paper

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-01

    A new approach, recognizing that water is a scarce natural resource-subject to many interdependencies in conveyance and use-should be adopted by the World Bank and its member countries. Chapter 2 discusses the management problems that have beset the sector in many countries and how these are being aggravated by increasing demands for water and rising costs of new supplies. Chapter 3 outlines the strategy for improving the management of water resources. Chapter 4 spells out the role of the World Bank in helping countries implement better approaches to water resources management. Five appendixes discuss in detail market failures and public policy; lessons learned about the relation among water, people, and the environment; privatization and user participation; Bank guidelines related to water resources; and Bank experience with investments in water resources.

  4. Integrating policy, disintegrating practice: water resources management in Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swatuk, Larry A.; Rahm, Dianne

    Botswana is generally regarded as an African ‘success story’. Nearly four decades of unabated economic growth, multi-party democracy, conservative decision-making and low-levels of corruption have made Botswana the darling of the international donor community. One consequence of rapid and sustained economic development is that water resources use and demands have risen dramatically in a primarily arid/semi-arid environment. Policy makers recognize that supply is limited and that deliberate steps must be taken to manage demand. To this end, and in line with other members of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), Botswana devised a National Water Master Plan (NWMP) and undertook a series of institutional and legal reforms throughout the 1990s so as to make water resources use more equitable, efficient and sustainable. In other words, the stated goal is to work toward Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in both policy and practice. However, policy measures have had limited impact on de facto practice. This paper reflects our efforts to understand the disjuncture between policy and practice. The information presented here combines a review of primary and secondary literatures with key informant interviews. It is our view that a number of constraints-cultural, power political, managerial-combine to hinder efforts toward sustainable forms of water resources use. If IWRM is to be realized in the country, these constraints must be overcome. This, however, is no small task.

  5. 48 CFR 1552.211-79 - Compliance with EPA Policies for Information Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Policies for Information Resources Management. 1552.211-79 Section 1552.211-79 Federal Acquisition... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.211-79 Compliance with EPA Policies for Information Resources... Information Resources Management (OCT 2000) (a) Definition. Information Resources Management (IRM) is...

  6. 48 CFR 1552.211-79 - Compliance with EPA Policies for Information Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Policies for Information Resources Management. 1552.211-79 Section 1552.211-79 Federal Acquisition... Information Resources Management (OCT 2000) (a) Definition. Information Resources Management (IRM) is defined... includes both information itself, and the management of information and related resources such as...

  7. 48 CFR 1552.211-79 - Compliance with EPA policies for information resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... policies for information resources management. 1552.211-79 Section 1552.211-79 Federal Acquisition... Information Resources Management (a) Definition. Information Resources Management (IRM) is defined as any... information itself and the management of information and related resources such as personnel, equipment,...

  8. 48 CFR 1552.211-79 - Compliance with EPA policies for information resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... policies for information resources management. 1552.211-79 Section 1552.211-79 Federal Acquisition... Information Resources Management (a) Definition. Information Resources Management (IRM) is defined as any... information itself and the management of information and related resources such as personnel, equipment,...

  9. Integrating science, policy and stakeholder perspectives for water resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Emily; Allan, Andrew; Whitehead, Paul; Salehin, Mashfiqus; Lazzar, Attila; Lim, Michelle; Munsur Rahman, Md.

    2015-04-01

    Successful management of water resources requires an integrated approach considering the complex relationships between different biophysical processes, governance frameworks and socio-economic factors. The Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) Deltas project has developed a range of socio-economic scenarios using a participatory approach, and applied these across different biophysical models as well as an integrated environmental, socio-economic model of the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) Delta. This work demonstrates a novel approach through the consideration of multiple ecosystem services and related socio-economic factors in the development of scenarios; the application of these to multiple models at multiple scales; and the participatory approach to improve project outcomes and engage national level stakeholders and policy makers. Scenarios can assist in planning for an uncertain future through exploring plausible alternatives. To adequately assess the potential impacts of future changes and management strategies on water resources, the wider biophysical, socio-economic and governance context needs to be considered. A series of stakeholder workshops have been held in Bangladesh to identify issues of main concern relating to the GBM Delta; to iteratively develop scenario narratives for business as usual, less sustainable, and more sustainable development pathways; and to translate these qualitative scenarios into a quantitative form suitable for analysis. The combined impact of these scenarios and climate change on water quantity and quality within the GBM Basin are demonstrated. Results suggest that climate change is likely to impact on both peak and low flows to a greater extent than most socio-economic changes. However, the diversion of water from the Ganges and Brahmaputra has the potential to significantly impact on water availability in Bangladesh depending on the timing and quantity of diversions. Both climate change and socio

  10. 33 CFR 157.415 - Bridge resource management policy and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bridge resource management policy... Petroleum Oils § 157.415 Bridge resource management policy and procedures. (a) Not later than February 1... in charge of the navigational watch concerning the need for continuously reassessing how...

  11. 33 CFR 157.415 - Bridge resource management policy and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bridge resource management policy... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK... Petroleum Oils § 157.415 Bridge resource management policy and procedures. (a) Not later than February...

  12. Definition of Earth Resource Policy and Management Problems in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churchman, C. W.; Clark, I.

    1971-01-01

    Management planning for the California water survey considers the use of satellite and airplane remote sensing information on water-source, -center, and -sink geographies. A model is developed for estimating the social benefit of water resource information and to identify the most important types of resource information relevant to regulatory agencies and the private sector.

  13. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Wisconsin. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushing, Ellen; Bhatt, Monica; Wraight, Sara; Behrstock, Ellen; Meyer, Cassandra

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  14. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Indiana. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Cassandra; Bhatt, Monica; Wraight, Sara; Behrstock, Ellen; Cushing, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  15. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Illinois. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Coby; Bhatt, Monica; Wraight, Sara; Behrstock, Ellen; Cushing, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  16. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Michigan. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Cassandra; Bhatt, Monica; Wraight, Sara; Behrstock, Ellen; Cushing, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  17. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Minnesota. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Monica; Behrstock, Ellen; Cushing, Ellen; Wraight, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  18. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Ohio. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Monica; Wraight, Sara; Behrstock, Ellen; Cushing, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  19. State Policies on Human Capital Resource Management: Iowa. Human Capital Resource Management Technical Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrstock, Ellen; Bhatt, Monica; Cushing, Ellen; Wraight, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Training, recruiting, developing, and supporting talented and effective educators throughout their careers is known as human capital resource management (HCRM) in education. HCRM has been identified in recent literature as one of the ways in which districts and states may increase school effectiveness and improve student learning (Heneman &…

  20. Definition of Earth Resources Policy and Management Problems in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churchman, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    The activities of the Social Sciences Group in solving earth resources management problems as related to social factors, are reported. Major efforts of the Group revolved around identifying potential users of ERTS data, ascertain the user's needs, and assay the organizational impacts of new and technologically advanced sources of information. Attempts were also made to develop a linear programming model to be used in decision making with respect to resources being observed by ERTS and other remote sensing vehicles. The cost effectiveness of solving these management problems is discussed.

  1. 77 FR 427 - EPAAR Clause for Compliance With EPA Policies for Information Resources Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... AGENCY 48 CFR Part 1552 EPAAR Clause for Compliance With EPA Policies for Information Resources Management AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA will amend the EPA... to update terminology and Web site links related to EPA policies for information resources...

  2. Water resources management. World Bank policy paper; Gestion des ressources en eau

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The management framework presented in this study addresses the demand for water in Asia caused by rapid population growth and economic development. It focuses on three key actions to meet the challenge: evaluate how the region manages water resources; identify guidelines for the Bank`s water resource programs; and develop country-specific strategies and promote joint programs. Reforms built into the framework seek to modernize institutions that affect water sources. The authors suggest ways to improve planning and long-term management, streamline economic and financial policy, and upgrade `real-time` management, operation, and maintenance.

  3. 76 FR 26235 - EPAAR Clause for Compliance with EPA Policies for Information Resources Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... Brooks Act of 1965. The Brooks Act has been repealed as it relates to Information Technology and has been... management of information and related resources such as personnel, equipment, funds, and technology. Examples... policy number CIO 2130.0, Accessible Electronic and Information Technology. Additional information...

  4. 33 CFR 157.415 - Bridge resource management policy and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Interim Measures for Certain Tank Vessels Without Double Hulls Carrying Petroleum Oils § 157.415 Bridge resource management policy and procedures. (a) Not later than February 1..., processing, and interpreting all essential information and making it conveniently available to other...

  5. 33 CFR 157.415 - Bridge resource management policy and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Interim Measures for Certain Tank Vessels Without Double Hulls Carrying Petroleum Oils § 157.415 Bridge resource management policy and procedures. (a) Not later than February 1..., processing, and interpreting all essential information and making it conveniently available to other...

  6. 33 CFR 157.415 - Bridge resource management policy and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Interim Measures for Certain Tank Vessels Without Double Hulls Carrying Petroleum Oils § 157.415 Bridge resource management policy and procedures. (a) Not later than February 1..., processing, and interpreting all essential information and making it conveniently available to other...

  7. Policy Change and Its Effect on Australian Community-Based Natural Resource Management Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Penelope R.; Hemmings, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    The authors of this article report on a qualitative study of Australian community-based natural resource management groups known as Landcare groups. They discuss how four Landcare groups contributed to sustainability practices and how a policy change implemented in 2003 influenced the efforts of the groups to remain active in their activities.…

  8. The Policy-Science Interface for Land Management in a Changing Climate -- Closing the Gap Between Scientists, Natural Resource Managers and Policy Makers. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley-Laursen, S. B.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change and related perturbations present significant challenges and opportunities for effective communications among natural resource managers, scientists and policy makers. Communication is important because of the potential dire and sometimes irreversible impacts of climate change, but challenges abound because of the lack of perceived immediacy and direct impact upon the public and land managers. The USGS national network of eight Climate Science Centers endeavors to increase communications among scientists, managers and policy makers through processes of consultation during the establishment of a science agenda and science prioritization based on inputs from a broad array of stakeholders. A Climate Science Boot Camp also fosters open dialogue and working relationships between early career climate scientists and an array of practicing natural resource managers. Professor of Natural Resources, former Dean of NR and University President Interim, PI Northwest Climate Science Center, Director Northwest Knowledge Network, Federal Relations Officer

  9. Implementing natural resources management policy in Africa: A document and literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkerhoff, D.W.; Gage, J.D.; Yeager, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    The organizational and management tasks involved in implementing natural resource management (NRM) policy in Africa are examined in the desk study. There are two main chapters. The first reviews 19 A.I.D. projects and programs in forestry/agroforestry, sustainable agriculture, and protected areas/biodiversity conservation in Africa. The study also identifies several troublesome features of NRM policies: the underlying contradiction between sustainable NRM and the prevailing economic development paradigm; the nature of NRM costs and benefits; the negative orientation of NRM regulations; and the tendency of NRM issues to generate conflict. A final section presents a set of strategic questions as a way to begin clarifying the complexity and multiplicity of factors and linkages that characterize NRM.

  10. Water resources and rural growth: a policy analysis of water resource management in the Sierra Nevada foothills

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Reverse migration has caused a phenomenal increase in population growth in the Sierra-Nevada region of California. The highest rate of growth is occurring in the unincorporated areas of rural counties where local government is least capable of providing public services. County government is the primary water-management entity in these areas, with land-use planning and the implementation of federal water-quality mandates the principal means of preventing water-resource exploitation and degradation from unrestricted growth and development. El Dorado, Placer, Sierra and Nevada counties constitute the study area of the report. The counties of Placer and Sierra were more successful in the resolution of water-management problems than either Nevada or El Dorado. In providing an analysis of water management policy in each of the four counties, the variables pertaining to success or failure in water management are identified and discussed. The research constituted a case study of decision making with respect to water availability, usage, and quality control. The principal competition for the limited water supply is between agriculture and residential land development - the latter the most prevalent form of land use activity in the study area. This competition has resulted in the overdrafting of ground water, threatening contamination.

  11. New directions in water resources management: The role of water pricing policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Eva; Blanco, MaríA.

    2008-06-01

    Water resources will face increasing competition and higher environmental concerns during this century. To meet these challenges, the new Water Framework Directive has drawn up an integrated framework and established the basic principles for a sustainable water policy in the European Union. The introduction of water prices reflecting the true cost of irrigation is one of its most innovative components. In this paper, a positive mathematical programming model is developed to assess the environmental and socio-economic impacts of water pricing policies in Spanish irrigated lands. The model interface allows friendly use and easy replication in a large number of irrigation districts, selected throughout the Spanish territory. The model results show the impact on environmental indicators, water consumption, cropping patterns, technology adoption, labor, farmers' income, and the water agency revenues when different scenarios of cost recovery are considered. It is argued that this modeling approach may be used as a management tool to assist in the implementation of the cost recovery approach of the new Water Framework Directive.

  12. Multi-resolution integrated modeling for basin-scale water resources management and policy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Hoshin V. ,; Brookshire, David S.; Springer, E. P.; Wagener, Thorsten

    2004-01-01

    Approximately one-third of the land surface of the Earth is considered to be arid or semi-arid with an annual average of less than 12-14 inches of rainfall. The availability of water in such regions is of course, particularly sensitive to climate variability while the demand for water is experiencing explosive population growth. The competition for available water is exerting considerable pressure on the water resources management. Policy and decision makers in the southwestern U.S. increasingly have to cope with over-stressed rivers and aquifers as population and water demands grow. Other factors such as endangered species and Native American water rights further complicate the management problems. Further, as groundwater tables are drawn down due to pumping in excess of natural recharge, considerable (potentially irreversible) environmental impacts begin to be felt as, for example, rivers run dry for significant portions of the year, riparian habitats disappear (with consequent effects on the bio-diversity of the region), aquifers compact resulting in large scale subsidence, and water quality begins to suffer. The current drought (1999-2002) in the southwestern U.S. is raising new concerns about how to sustain the combination of agricultural, urban and in-stream uses of water that underlie the socio-economic and ecological structure in the region. The water stressed nature of arid and semi-arid environments means that competing water uses of various kinds vie for access to a highly limited resource. If basin-scale water sustainability is to be achieved, managers must somehow achieve a balance between supply and demand throughout the basin, not just for the surface water or stream. The need to move water around a basin such as the Rio Grande or Colorado River to achieve this balance has created the stimulus for water transfers and water markets, and for accurate hydrologic information to sustain such institutions [Matthews et al. 2002; Brookshire et al 2003

  13. Integrating science and policy in natural resource management: Lessons and opportunities from North America

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.N.; Meidinger, E.E.; Miller, G.; Rayner, J.; Layseca, M.

    1998-09-01

    Relations between science and policy concerning many issues (e.g., health, energy, natural resources) have been changing worldwide. Public pressure to resolve such complex and often controversial issues has resulted in policymakers and policy implementers seeking better knowledge on which to base their decisions. As a result, scientists have become more activity engaged in the creation and evaluation of policy. In this paper, the authors summarize the literature and experience in how Canada, Mexico, and the United States approach the integration of science and policy; the authors describe some apparent barriers and lessons; and they suggest some issues that may prove fruitful for discussion and future collaboration.

  14. The Heritage of Earth Science Applications in Policy, Business, and Management of Natural Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macauley, M.

    2012-12-01

    From the first hand-held cameras on the Gemini space missions to present day satellite instruments, Earth observations have enhanced the management of natural resources including water, land, and air. Applications include the development of new methodology (for example, developing and testing algorithms or demonstrating how data can be used) and the direct use of data in decisionmaking and policy implementation. Using well-defined bibliographic search indices to systematically survey a broad social science literature, this project enables identification of a host of well-documented, practical and direct applications of Earth science data in resource management. This literature has not previously been well surveyed, aggregated, or analyzed for the heritage of lessons learned in practical application of Earth science data. In the absence of such a survey, the usefulness of Earth science data is underestimated and the factors that make people want to use -- and able to use -- the data are poorly understood. The project extends and updates previous analysis of social science applications of Landsat data to show their contemporary, direct use in new policy, business, and management activities and decisionmaking. The previous surveys (for example, Blumberg and Jacobson 1997; National Research Council 1998) find that the earliest attempts to use data are almost exclusively testing of methodology rather than direct use in resource management. Examples of methodology prototyping include Green et al. (1997) who demonstrate use of remote sensing to detect and monitor changes in land cover and use, Cowen et al. (1995) who demonstrate design and integration of GIS for environmental applications, Hutchinson (1991) who shows uses of data for famine early warning, and Brondizio et al. (1996) who show the link of thematic mapper data with botanical data. Blumberg and Jacobson (in Acevedo et al. 1996) show use of data in a study of urban development in the San Francisco Bay and the

  15. A risk-based framework for water resource management under changing water availability, policy options, and irrigation expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Elmira; Elshorbagy, Amin; Wheater, Howard; Gober, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Long-term water resource management requires the capacity to evaluate alternative management options in the face of various sources of uncertainty in the future conditions of water resource systems. This study proposes a generic framework for determining the relative change in probabilistic characteristics of system performance as a result of changing water availability, policy options and irrigation expansion. These probabilistic characteristics can be considered to represent the risk of failure in the system performance due to the uncertainty in future conditions. Quantifying the relative change in the performance risk can provide a basis for understanding the effects of multiple changing conditions on the system behavior. This framework was applied to the water resource system of the Saskatchewan River Basin (SaskRB) in Saskatchewan, Canada. A "bottom-up" flow reconstruction algorithm was used to generate multiple realizations for water availability within a feasible range of change in streamflow characteristics. Consistent with observed data and projected change in streamflow characteristics, the historical streamflow was perturbed to stochastically generate feasible future flow sequences, based on various combinations of changing annual flow volume and timing of the annual peak. In addition, five alternative policy options, with and without potential irrigation expansion, were considered. All configurations of water availability, policy decisions and irrigation expansion options were fed into a hydro-economic water resource system model to obtain empirical probability distributions for system performance - here overall and sectorial net benefits - under the considered changes. Results show that no one specific policy can provide the optimal option for water resource management under all flow conditions. In addition, it was found that the joint impacts of changing water availability, policy, and irrigation expansion on system performance are complex and

  16. Policies, Land Use, and Water Resource Management in an Arid Oasis Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xian; Liao, Jie; Hsing, Youtian; Huang, Cuihua; Liu, Famin

    2015-05-01

    This paper addresses two questions concerning the relationship between state policies and environmental transformation in China in the past four decades. The first one deals with the promotion of agricultural productivity since the 1980s; the second, the water conservation measures as a response to the water crisis that peaked in the early 2000s. We had chosen Minqin County in northwestern China, one of the most fragile arid oasis systems in the world, as the study area. We found that the irrigated farmland in up and midstream areas had greatly expanded between the 1980s and the 2000s under the government policy of promoting commodity grain production. As a result, the runoff flowing into Minqin Oasis had reduced 80 % from the 1950s to early 2000s. Irrigated farmland in Minqin Oasis expanded 15.76 % from 1995 to 2000. In the 2000s, because of the changing policy discourse that has shifted from productivity to conservation, a new set of environmentally framed policies has restructured agricultural production in Minqin by 2005. These new policies included establishing a watershed-level water management system, promoting drought resistant crops, introducing water-saving irrigation measures, and forced reduction of irrigated farming acreage. These policies have produced positive results in terms of greater coverage of vegetation, rising ground water table, and reduction of evaporation. Nevertheless, new policies have also brought new challenges to both farmers and policy makers to keep the balance between poverty reduction and environmental sustainability in Minqin Oasis in the historically poor region in China's Northwest.

  17. Policies, land use, and water resource management in an arid oasis ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xian; Liao, Jie; Hsing, Youtian; Huang, Cuihua; Liu, Famin

    2015-05-01

    This paper addresses two questions concerning the relationship between state policies and environmental transformation in China in the past four decades. The first one deals with the promotion of agricultural productivity since the 1980s; the second, the water conservation measures as a response to the water crisis that peaked in the early 2000s. We had chosen Minqin County in northwestern China, one of the most fragile arid oasis systems in the world, as the study area. We found that the irrigated farmland in up and midstream areas had greatly expanded between the 1980s and the 2000s under the government policy of promoting commodity grain production. As a result, the runoff flowing into Minqin Oasis had reduced 80 % from the 1950s to early 2000s. Irrigated farmland in Minqin Oasis expanded 15.76 % from 1995 to 2000. In the 2000s, because of the changing policy discourse that has shifted from productivity to conservation, a new set of environmentally framed policies has restructured agricultural production in Minqin by 2005. These new policies included establishing a watershed-level water management system, promoting drought resistant crops, introducing water-saving irrigation measures, and forced reduction of irrigated farming acreage. These policies have produced positive results in terms of greater coverage of vegetation, rising ground water table, and reduction of evaporation. Nevertheless, new policies have also brought new challenges to both farmers and policy makers to keep the balance between poverty reduction and environmental sustainability in Minqin Oasis in the historically poor region in China's Northwest.

  18. Loss of Shallow Geothermal Resources in Urban Environment Due to the Absence of Thermal Management Policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Gil, A.; Vázquez-Suñé, E.; Sánchez-Navarro, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Shallow geothermal energy resources are of interest worldwide for the development of strategies against climate change. The current regulative framework for the sustainable implementation of the technologies exploiting this resources is facing several barriers. In the case of groundwater heat pumps, the thermal interference between exploitations may be endangering their feasibility in urban environments. Uncertainty in prediction of the sustainability of shallow geothermal energy development in urban groundwater bodies stems from the absence of a scientific-based legal regulatory framework which protects stakeholders from thermal interferences between existent exploitations systems. The present work consists of a numerical study aimed at understanding and predicting the thermal interference between groundwater heat pumps where several induced heat plumes in an urban ground water body coalesce, thus generating a heat island effect. A transient groundwater flow and heat transport model was developed to reproduce complex high-resolution data obtained from local monitoring specifically designed to control the aquifer respond to geothermal exploitation. The model aims to reproduce the groundwater flow and heat transport processes in a shallow alluvial aquifer exploited by 27 groundwater heat pumps and influenced by a river-aquifer relationship dominated by flood events mainly occurring in winter when the surface temperature is between 3 and 10 ºC. The results from the simulations have quantified the time-space thermal interference between exploitation systems and the consequences of river-aquifer thermal exchange. The results obtained showed the complexity of thermal management of the aquifer due to the transient activity of exploitations over space and time. With the actual exploitation regime of shallow geothermal resources in the investigated area the model predicts a temperature rising tendency in the production wells until 2019 which can compromise the coefficient

  19. Natural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Green, T.; Schwager, K.

    2016-10-01

    This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265-acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 15 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan works toward sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL’s ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text.

  20. A Drought Cyberinfrastructure System for Improving Water Resource Management and Policy Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AghaKouchak, Amir

    2015-04-01

    Development of reliable monitoring and prediction indices and tools are fundamental to drought preparedness, management, and response decision making. This presentation provides an overview of the Global Integrated Drought Monitoring and Prediction System (GIDMaPS) which offers near real-time drought information using both remote sensing observations and model simulations. Designed as a cyberinfrastructure system, GIDMaPS provides drought information based on a wide range of model simulations and satellite observations from different space agencies. Numerous indices have been developed for drought monitoring based on various indicator variables (e.g., precipitation, soil moisture, water storage). Defining droughts based on a single variable (e.g., precipitation, soil moisture or runoff) may not be sufficient for reliable risk assessment and decision making. GIDMaPS provides drought information based on multiple indices including Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), Standardized Soil Moisture Index (SSI) and the Multivariate Standardized Drought Index (MSDI) which combines SPI and SSI probabilistically. In other words, MSDI incorporates the meteorological and agricultural drought conditions for overall characterization of droughts, and better management and distribution of water resources among and across different users. The seasonal prediction component of GIDMaPS is based on a persistence model which requires historical data and near-past observations. The seasonal drought prediction component is designed to provide drought information for water resource management, and short-term decision making. In this presentation, both monitoring and prediction components of GIDMaPS will be discussed, and the results from several major droughts including the 2013 Namibia, 2012-2013 United States, 2011-2012 Horn of Africa, and 2010 Amazon Droughts will be presented. The presentation will highlight how this drought cyberinfrastructure system can be used to improve water

  1. The Social Process of Analyzing Real Water Resource Systems Plans and Management Policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loucks, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Developing and applying systems analysis methods for improving the development and management of real world water resource systems, I have learned, is primarily a social process. This talk is a call for more recognition of this reality in the modeling approaches we propose in the papers and books we publish. The mathematical models designed to inform planners and managers of water systems that we see in many of our journals often seem more complex than they need be. They also often seem not as connected to reality as they could be. While it may be easier to publish descriptions of complex models than simpler ones, and while adding complexity to models might make them better able to mimic or resemble the actual complexity of the real physical and/or social systems or processes being analyzed, the usefulness of such models often can be an illusion. Sometimes the important features of reality that are of concern or interest to those who make decisions can be adequately captured using relatively simple models. Finding the right balance for the particular issues being addressed or the particular decisions that need to be made is an art. When applied to real world problems or issues in specific basins or regions, systems modeling projects often involve more attention to the social aspects than the mathematical ones. Mathematical models addressing connected interacting interdependent components of complex water systems are in fact some of the most useful methods we have to study and better understand the systems we manage around us. They can help us identify and evaluate possible alternative solutions to problems facing humanity today. The study of real world systems of interacting components using mathematical models is commonly called applied systems analyses. Performing such analyses with decision makers rather than of decision makers is critical if the needed trust between project personnel and their clients is to be developed. Using examples from recent and ongoing

  2. Environment and natural resources. Policy paper

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    A.I.D. policy on natural resources and the environment aims at promoting environmentally sound, long-term economic growth by helping developing countries conserve and protect the environment and manage their exploited resources for sustained yields. Assistance focuses on: sustainable production, maintaining natural ecosystems, and meeting human needs by improving environmental quality. Within these areas, A.I.D. will support forestry, soil conservation and watershed management, resource inventories, environmental planning and education, land use planning, rangeland management, water and wastewater treatment systems, improved industrial and urban pollution control, and coastal resources management. A.I.D.'s policy, activities, and regulations are detailed, including cooperation with other donors and development banks in promoting environmental activities. Annexes also are included.

  3. Water Science, Management and Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifland, Jonathan

    2004-02-01

    A new AGU book, Water:Science, Management and Policy, edited by Richard Lawford, Denise Fort, Holly Hartmann, and Susanna Eden, explores the scientific and political issues behind water use and sustainability worldwide. The book investigates critical issues facing water managers, policy makers, and scientists in the 21st century, examining specific examples of water planning and decision-making. Among the topics discussed by the authors are the current state of water engineering, sharing resources across state and international borders, and the best methods for managing the resource with the future impact of climate change and additional pollution.

  4. SLA-aware Resource Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yih Leong; Perrott, Ron; Harmer, Terence J.; Cunningham, Christina; Wright, Peter; Kennedy, John; Edmonds, Andy; Bayon, Victor; Maza, Jacek; Berginc, Gregor; Hadalin, Primož

    The management of infrastructure resources in a large-scale environment such as Grid Computing is a challenging task and places significant demands on resource discovery, scheduling and the underlying communication channels. The fulfillment of the business goals and service quality in such an environment requires an infrastructure to cope with changes in demand and infrastructure performance. In this paper, we propose an abstract service-oriented framework for SLA-aware dynamic resource management. The framework provides selfmanaging, self-configuration and self-healing strategies in order to support autonomic and ambient service management. We study an SLA negotiation process at the infrastructure resource layer, live migration for resource re-provisioning, a multi-layer architecture framework to monitor infrastructure resources and a harmonized interface to access arbitrary sources of infrastructure resources based on SLA requirements. Resource usage will be optimized according to the provider policies and SLA requirements.

  5. 48 CFR 1552.211-79 - Compliance with EPA policies for information resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., and technology. Examples of these services include but are not limited to the following: (1) The... majority of the Agency's IRM policies, standards, and procedures. (c) Section 508 requirements (accessibility). Contract deliverables are required to be compliant with Section 508 requirements...

  6. Configuration Management Policy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Policy establishes an Agency-wide Configuration Management Program and to provide responsibilities, compliance requirements, and overall principles for Configuration and Change Management processes to support information technology management.

  7. International Resource Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schabel, H. G.

    The International Resource Management program enables undergraduate students of the University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point, College of Natural Resources to complete an academic minor in International Resource Management. The program attempts to alert students and faculty to global environmental issues and their interconnectedness with a variety of…

  8. Managing Information Resources for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Services Administration, Washington, DC. Clearinghouse on Computer Accommodation.

    This handbook presents guidance for federal managers and other personnel who are unfamiliar with the policy and practice of information accessibility to accommodate users with disabilities and to provide for their effective access to information resources. It addresses federal requirements for accessibility, adopting accessibility as a sound…

  9. How Labor Management Relations and Human Resource Policies Affect the Process of Teacher Assignment in Urban School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngs, Peter; Pogodzinski, Ben; Galey, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined how labor-management relations between school districts and teacher associations seem to affect teacher contract provisions regarding the role of seniority in teacher assignment and how contract provisions and teacher assignment policies seem to affect beginning teachers' perceptions about their work environments.…

  10. The City House and the Country House: Land-Use Policies and Rural Poverty in the Northeast. Coal, Poverty, and Development Policy in Eastern Kentucky. Development and Management of Forest Resources for Rural Development in the Pacific Northwest. Natural and Human Resources: Major Public Policy and Minority Rural Land Ownership, Management, and Use. Rural Development, Poverty, and Natural Resources Workshop Paper Series, Part V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popper, Frank J.; And Others

    This workshop collection contains four case studies regarding particular relationships between specific resources and clientele or user groups, and three discussions based on those four papers and/or conference discussions. The first paper discusses urban land use origins and compares urban policies with rural policies suggesting that future rural…

  11. Policy Sciences in Water Resources Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Ronald G.

    1984-07-01

    As the newly appointed Policy Sciences Editor for this journal, I would like to take this opportunity to introduce myself to WRR's readership as well as to offer a few comments concerning my views of policy sciences in water resources research. I am an economist working in the area of natural resources and environmental management. As such, I've spent a good part of my research career working with noneconomists. During 1969-1972, I worked in Mexico with hydrologists and engineers from Mexico's Water Resources Ministry in efforts to assess management/investment programs for reservoir systems and systems for interbasin water transfers. Between 1972 and 1975, while serving as Chairman of the Department of Resource Economics at the University of Rhode Island, my research involved collaborative efforts with biologists and soil scientists in studies concerning the conjunctive management of reservoirs for agricultural and lagoon systems and the control of salinity levels in soils and aquifers. Since 1975, at which time I joined the faculty at the University of New Mexico, I have worked with engineers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in developing operation/management models for hot, dry rock geothermal systems and, more recently, with legal scholars and hydrologists in analyses of water rights issues. Thus I am comfortable with and appreciative of research conducted by my colleagues in systems engineering, operations research, and hydrology, as well as those in economics, law, and other social sciences.

  12. Information Resources Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Pierrette

    1996-01-01

    Information, like other organizational resources, needs to be managed to help organizations improve productivity, competitiveness, and overall performance. Reviews developments (1986-96) in Information Resources Management (IRM). Examines the concept of IRM; IRM from information technology and integrative perspectives; IRM practices; IRM in the…

  13. Cockpit resource management training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yocum, M.; Foushee, C.

    1984-01-01

    Cockpit resource management which is a multifaceted concept is outlined. The system involves the effective coordination of many resources: aircraft systems, company, air traffic control, equipment, navigational aids, documents, and manuals. The main concept, however, is group interaction. Problems which arise from lack of coordination, decision making, and lack of communication are pointed out. Implementation by the regional airline industry of cockpit resource management, designed to deal with human interactions problems in the most cost effective manner, is discussed.

  14. A resource management architecture for metacomputing systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, K.; Foster, I.; Karonis, N.; Kesselman, C.; Martin, S.; Smith, W.; Tuecke, S.

    1999-08-24

    Metacomputing systems are intended to support remote and/or concurrent use of geographically distributed computational resources. Resource management in such systems is complicated by five concerns that do not typically arise in other situations: site autonomy and heterogeneous substrates at the resources, and application requirements for policy extensibility, co-allocation, and online control. We describe a resource management architecture that addresses these concerns. This architecture distributes the resource management problem among distinct local manager, resource broker, and resource co-allocator components and defines an extensible resource specification language to exchange information about requirements. We describe how these techniques have been implemented in the context of the Globus metacomputing toolkit and used to implement a variety of different resource management strategies. We report on our experiences applying our techniques in a large testbed, GUSTO, incorporating 15 sites, 330 computers, and 3600 processors.

  15. A Policy Based Approach for the Management of Web Browser Resources to Prevent Anonymity Attacks in Tor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Arribas, Guillermo; Garcia-Alfaro, Joaquin

    Web browsers are becoming the universal interface to reach applications and services related with these systems. Different browsing contexts may be required in order to reach them, e.g., use of VPN tunnels, corporate proxies, anonymisers, etc. By browsing context we mean how the user browsers the Web, including mainly the concrete configuration of its browser. When the context of the browser changes, its security requirements also change. In this work, we present the use of authorisation policies to automatise the process of controlling the resources of a Web browser when its context changes. The objective of our proposal is oriented towards easing the adaptation to the security requirements of the new context and enforce them in the browser without the need for user intervention. We present a concrete application of our work as a plug-in for the adaption of security requirements in Mozilla/Firefox browser when a context of anonymous navigation through the Tor network is enabled.

  16. Managing human resources to improve employee retention.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edwin

    2005-01-01

    Managers face increased challenges as the demand for health care services increases while the supply of employees with the requisite skills continues to lag. Employee retention will become more important in the effort to service health care needs. Appropriate human resource management strategies and policies implemented effectively can significantly assist managers in dealing with the employee retention challenges ahead.

  17. CERN Computing Resources Lifecycle Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselishchev, Alexey; Tedesco, Paolo; Ormancey, Emmanuel; Isnard, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Computing environments in High Energy Physics are typically complex and heterogeneous, with a wide variety of hardware resources, operating systems and applications. The research activity in all its aspects is carried out by international collaborations constituted by a growing number of participants with a high manpower turnover. These factors can increase the administrative workload required to manage the computing infrastructure and to track resource usage and inheritance. It is therefore necessary to rationalize and formalize the computing resources management, while respecting the requirement of flexibility of scientific applications and services. This paper shows how during the last years the CERN computing infrastructure has been moving in this direction, establishing well-defined policies and lifecycles for resource management. Applications are being migrated towards proposed common identity, authentication and authorization models, reducing their complexity while increasing security and usability. Regular tasks like the creation of primary user accounts are being automated, and self-service facilities are being introduced for common operations, like creation of additional accounts, group subscriptions and password reset. This approach is leading to more efficient and manageable systems.

  18. Resilience and Resource Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eleanor D.; Williams, Byron K.

    2015-12-01

    Resilience is an umbrella concept with many different shades of meaning. The use of the term has grown over the past several decades to the point that by now, many disciplines have their own definitions and metrics. In this paper, we aim to provide a context and focus for linkages of resilience to natural resources management. We consider differences and similarities in resilience as presented in several disciplines relevant to resource management. We present a conceptual framework that includes environmental drivers, management interventions, and system responses cast in terms of system resilience, as well as a process for decision making that allows learning about system resilience through experience and incorporation of that learning into management. We discuss the current state of operational management for resilience, and suggest ways to improve it. Finally, we describe the challenges in managing for resilience and offer some recommendations about the scientific information needs and scientific issues relevant to making resilience a more meaningful component of natural resources management.

  19. Incorporating permaculture and strategic management for sustainable ecological resource management.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Faiza; Lodhi, Suleman A; Khan, Safdar Shah; Sarwar, Farhana

    2016-09-01

    Utilization of natural assets to the best efficient level without changing natural balance has become a critical issue for researchers as awareness on climate change takes central position in global debate. Conventional sustainable resource management systems are based on neoclassical economic approach that ignores the nature's pattern and therefore are not actually capable of sustainable management of resources. Environmentalists are lately advocating incorporation of Permaculture as holistic approach based on ethics, equitable interaction with eco-systems to obtain sustainability. The paper integrates philosophy of permaculture with strategic management frameworks to develop a pragmatic tool for policy development. The policy design tool augments management tasks by integrating recording of natural assets, monitoring of key performance indicators and integration of sectorial policies in real time, bringing out policy as a truly live document. The tool enhances the edifice process, balancing short term viewpoints and long term development to secure renewability of natural resources.

  20. Distributional conflicts in environmental-resource policy

    SciTech Connect

    Schnaiberg, A.; Watts, N.; Zimmerman, K.

    1986-01-01

    Why is an allocation-oriented policy like environmental and resources policy relatively unsuccessful. How could this problem be overcome-by means of what institutional reform or policy initiatives. These two questions are addressed in this book. CONTENTS: Preface Introduction: From Consensus to Dissensus; Efficiency and Distribution in Corrective Mechanisms for Environmental Externality; Equity and Efficiency in Environmental Policy Analysis; The Welfare State, the New Regulation and the Rule of Law; How and Why Environmental Consciousness Has Trickled Down; Capitol and Labor Reallocation in the Face of Environmental Policy; Contradictions and Changes in Labor Response to Distributional Implications of Environmental-Resource Policies; State Roles in the Articulation and Mediation of Distributional Conflicts; Solidarity Between Generations; Future Projectories of Resource Distributional Conflicts.

  1. [Management human resources].

    PubMed

    Schena, F P

    2004-01-01

    The management of human resources may follow different models, defined as bureaucratic, technocratic or managerial-entrepreneurial models. The latter being the most used. However, the relationship individual-enterprise is based on both a legal and a psychological contract regardless of the model used. The winning concept considers the personnel as the first and most important customer to be trained, informed and kept updated. For these reasons it is necessary to create a warm working environment, which is the first marketing tool, thus improving the marketing skills (enterprise-customer). The improved results (products, processes and publications) will be achieved by total quality management, which includes training and transformation of the chief's role from the hierarchical management to a coaching approach. This approach will recreativity, personality and competence of the personnel. This new type of leadership is based on the authority recognised by the personnel, service and motivation.

  2. Resources Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Delta Data Systems, Inc. was originally formed by NASA and industry engineers to produce a line of products that evolved from ELAS, a NASA-developed computer program. The company has built on that experience, using ELAS as the basis for other remote sensing products. One of these is AGIS, a computer package for geographic and land information systems. AGIS simultaneously processes remotely sensed and map data. The software is designed to operate on a low cost microcomputer, putting resource management tools within reach of small operators.

  3. Managing our water resources

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    Water is a plentiful, renewable resource if it is properly managed. The US allocates 82% of its water to agriculture, 10% to industries and utilities. American farmers are beginning to adopt water-conserving techniques long used in the world's arid regions because past profligate use and recent droughts lowered both water tables and farm productivity. Runoff and pollution are responsible for much of the waste of usable water. Because of local water shortages, there is interest in drip irrigation, setting aside more land for reservoirs, and other conservation techniques to ensure adequate supplies for industrial development and economic growth. American faith in technology has led to schemes for desalination, cloud seeding, iceberg towing, and aquifer recharging, as well as the existing system of dams. Proper management of river basins is an important step in the process. 1 figure. (DCK)

  4. Laboratories of Reform? Human Resource Management Strategies in Illinois Charter Schools. Policy Research: IERC 2016-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Bradford R.

    2016-01-01

    Charter schools are publicly-funded educational entities that operate independently from local school districts and are exempt from certain state and local requirements, particularly with regard to teacher personnel policy. In exchange for this flexibility, charter schools are held more accountable for results and may be shut down if they fail to…

  5. Evaluating the evolution of the Heihe River basin using the ecological network analysis: Efficiency, resilience, and implications for water resource management policy.

    PubMed

    Kharrazi, Ali; Akiyama, Tomohiro; Yu, Yadong; Li, Jia

    2016-12-01

    One of the most critical challenges in the anthropocentric age is the sustainable management of the planet's increasingly strained water resources. In this avenue, there is a need to advance holistic approaches and objective tools which allow policy makers to better evaluate system-level properties and trade-offs of water resources. This research contributes to the expanding literature in this area by examining the changes to system-level network configurations of the middle reaches of the Heihe River basin from 2000 to 2009. Specifically, through the ecological network analysis (ENA) approach, this research examines changes to the system-level properties of efficiency, redundancy, and evaluates the trade-offs to the resiliency of ecosystem water services of the middle reaches of the Heihe River basin. Our results indicate that while the efficiency of the middle reaches has increased from 2000 to 2009 by 6% and 78% more water is released to the lower reaches, the redundancy of the system has also decreased by 6%. The lower level of redundancy, particularly due to the changes in the groundwater body levels, has critical long-term consequences for the resilience of the water ecosystem services of the middle reaches. In consideration of these holistic trade-offs, two hypothetical alternative scenarios, based on water recycling and saving strategies, are developed to improve the long-term health and resilience of the water system.

  6. Integrating policies for the management of animal genetic resources with demand for livestock products and environmental sustainability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recognition of the need to conserve animal genetic resources comes at a time when the global livestock sector faces significant challenges in meeting the growing demand for livestock products and the mitigation of negative environmental impacts caused by livestock. Outside of the U.S. it would seem ...

  7. 2011 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Conservation Law Enforcement Technology. (Program CIP: 03.0208 - Natural Resources Management and Policy, Other)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Luke; Myrick, Dwight

    2011-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  8. 78 FR 65688 - Recovery Policy, RP9525.2, Donated Resources

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Recovery Policy, RP9525.2, Donated Resources AGENCY: Federal... accepting comments on Recovery Policy RP9525.2, Donated Resources. DATES: Comments must be received by... Recovery Directorate policies are consistent with current laws and regulations. The proposed...

  9. Leasing policies for the extractive resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Johnson, S.R.

    1976-01-01

    Much of the available analysis of policies for the disposal of publicly held resources is based on comparatively straightforward extensions of the neoclassical pricing and allocation theory. As such, these analyses have to a large extent not fully incorporated the fact that firms normally acquire rights to these resources in sealed tender markets. In this paper, a simple bidding model is used to show that the choice of disposal policies can influence the firm's bid and also the public revenues obtained from the sale of the resource. It is additionally shown that the implications of such policy choices are conditioned by the firm's attitudes towards risk. Finally, it is argued that a modification of existing prescriptions may be necessary if a more realistic specification of the disposal problem taking account of the sealed tender market in which rights are obtained, is considered. ?? 1976 Annals of Regional Science.

  10. Human resource policies and older workers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Clark, R L; Ogawa, N

    1996-10-01

    Substantial changes in human resource policies are occurring in Japanese firms in response to the rapid aging of the population. Employers are reconsidering the concept of lifetime employment, seniority-based wages, retirement policies, and employment opportunities for older workers. In response to government pressure, mandatory retirement ages are being raised. These trends are examined using a variety of sources of information concerning employment practices in Japan. The analysis indicates that important changes in human resource management practices are underway and further changes are anticipated as the labor force continues to age.

  11. Review and analysis of selected natural resource policy in Missouri state government

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, C.G.

    1983-01-01

    This study provides new information on basic policy theory that deals with resource management in Missouri. Four goals are used. First, resource policy systems in other states are reviewed to identify similar policy frameworks. Second, the policy framework that exists in Missouri is identified and used as a standard against which changes in resource policy can be measured. Third, Missouri policy is compared to that in other states. Lastly, improvements to the Missouri policy systems are suggested. The study consists of an inventory of the resource policy of the Departments of Natural Resources and Conservation, which are analyzed for discrepancies that weaken sound policy or prevent its development in the first place. The Annual Reports, Annual Budgets, and Management By Objective statements are used as sources of policy information. The conclusions reached are that, first, state resource policy development and implementation is inadequate to function effectively. Second, policy problems are compounded by the synergistic effect created by their presence in a bureaucracy. Third, state government has a questionable commitment to natural resource policy development, and lastly, agencies should be more responsible concerning resource policy.

  12. Human resources for health policies: a critical component in health policies

    PubMed Central

    Dussault, Gilles; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2003-01-01

    In the last few years, increasing attention has been paid to the development of health policies. But side by side with the presumed benefits of policy, many analysts share the opinion that a major drawback of health policies is their failure to make room for issues of human resources. Current approaches in human resources suggest a number of weaknesses: a reactive, ad hoc attitude towards problems of human resources; dispersal of accountability within human resources management (HRM); a limited notion of personnel administration that fails to encompass all aspects of HRM; and finally the short-term perspective of HRM. There are three broad arguments for modernizing the ways in which human resources for health are managed: • the central role of the workforce in the health sector; • the various challenges thrown up by health system reforms; • the need to anticipate the effect on the health workforce (and consequently on service provision) arising from various macroscopic social trends impinging on health systems. The absence of appropriate human resources policies is responsible, in many countries, for a chronic imbalance with multifaceted effects on the health workforce: quantitative mismatch, qualitative disparity, unequal distribution and a lack of coordination between HRM actions and health policy needs. Four proposals have been put forward to modernize how the policy process is conducted in the development of human resources for health (HRH): • to move beyond the traditional approach of personnel administration to a more global concept of HRM; • to give more weight to the integrated, interdependent and systemic nature of the different components of HRM when preparing and implementing policy; • to foster a more proactive attitude among human resources (HR) policy-makers and managers; • to promote the full commitment of all professionals and sectors in all phases of the process. The development of explicit human resources policies is a crucial link

  13. Human Resource Management. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Cynthia D.; And Others

    This book offers students, practicing managers, and human resource professionals a comprehensive, current, research-based introduction to the human resource management (HRM) function. It is organized in eight sections, logically following the progression of individuals into, through, and out of the organization. Part 1, overview and introduction,…

  14. Information resource management concepts for records managers

    SciTech Connect

    Seesing, P.R.

    1992-10-01

    Information Resource Management (ERM) is the label given to the various approaches used to foster greater accountability for the use of computing resources. It is a corporate philosophy that treats information as it would its other resources. There is a reorientation from simply expenditures to considering the value of the data stored on that hardware. Accountability for computing resources is expanding beyond just the data processing (DP) or management information systems (MIS) manager to include senior organization management and user management. Management`s goal for office automation is being refocused from saving money to improving productivity. A model developed by Richard Nolan (1982) illustrates the basic evolution of computer use in organizations. Computer Era: (1) Initiation (computer acquisition), (2) Contagion (intense system development), (3) Control (proliferation of management controls). Data Resource Era: (4) Integration (user service orientation), (5) Data Administration (corporate value of information), (6) Maturity (strategic approach to information technology). The first three stages mark the growth of traditional data processing and management information systems departments. The development of the IRM philosophy in an organization involves the restructuring of the DP organization and new management techniques. The three stages of the Data Resource Era represent the evolution of IRM. This paper examines each of them in greater detail.

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2009-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2011-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of

  17. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Braun Williams

    2013-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at Idaho National Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The Idaho National Laboratory is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through regular reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices

  18. Information resource management concepts for records managers

    SciTech Connect

    Seesing, P.R.

    1992-10-01

    Information Resource Management (ERM) is the label given to the various approaches used to foster greater accountability for the use of computing resources. It is a corporate philosophy that treats information as it would its other resources. There is a reorientation from simply expenditures to considering the value of the data stored on that hardware. Accountability for computing resources is expanding beyond just the data processing (DP) or management information systems (MIS) manager to include senior organization management and user management. Management's goal for office automation is being refocused from saving money to improving productivity. A model developed by Richard Nolan (1982) illustrates the basic evolution of computer use in organizations. Computer Era: (1) Initiation (computer acquisition), (2) Contagion (intense system development), (3) Control (proliferation of management controls). Data Resource Era: (4) Integration (user service orientation), (5) Data Administration (corporate value of information), (6) Maturity (strategic approach to information technology). The first three stages mark the growth of traditional data processing and management information systems departments. The development of the IRM philosophy in an organization involves the restructuring of the DP organization and new management techniques. The three stages of the Data Resource Era represent the evolution of IRM. This paper examines each of them in greater detail.

  19. User Centric Policy Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Gorrell P.

    2013-01-01

    Internet use, in general, and online social networking sites, in particular, are experiencing tremendous growth with hundreds of millions of active users. As a result, there is a tremendous amount of privacy information and content online. Protecting this information is a challenge. Access control policy composition is complex, laborious and…

  20. Resource management in rangeland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate assessments of vast expanses of rangeland—a primary prerequisite to effective conservation planning—requires landscape-scale evaluations that accurately represent the resources (e.g., soil, vegetation, wildlife, water ), the structure and function of the resource-providing systems, and the ...

  1. Cultural resource management: The risk of compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.A.

    1994-02-01

    The statutory mandate for federal agencies to involve American Indians in the management of cultural resources may create a cultural risk for the people those statutes are intended to protect. A conceptual framework is given to help understand this dilemma. Factors that can exacerbate the severity of the adverse cultural impacts for tribal people are also examined. Policy recommendations are offered for reducing tensions among an the participants in the statutory process.

  2. Integrated Cultural Resources Management Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    Trachinotus sp. (pompano). Marine invertebrates are comprised of the following five species: Callinectes sapidus (Blue crab), Crassostrea virginica ...Coordinate with other MCRD components to manage cu Advise and educate other MCRD components, contracto requirements. Monitor resource condition

  3. Automation and Human Resource Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of the automation of personnel administration in libraries covers (1) new developments in human resource management systems; (2) system requirements; (3) software evaluation; (4) vendor evaluation; (5) selection of a system; (6) training and support; and (7) benefits. (MES)

  4. Managing Human Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    The author challenges traditional views of productivity and offers alternative concepts and models for evaluating resources and their relationships to productivity. He discusses how to measure productivity, how to measure effectiveness, applying a productivity formula, coping with a cost cutback, adjusting to a variable workload, and benefits from…

  5. NASA information resources management handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Handbook (NHB) implements recent changes to Federal laws and regulations involving the acquisition, management, and use of Federal Information Processing (FIP) resources. This document defines NASA's Information Resources Management (IRM) practices and procedures and is applicable to all NASA personnel. The dynamic nature of the IRM environment requires that the controlling management practices and procedures for an Agency at the leading edge of technology, such as NASA, must be periodically updated to reflect the changes in this environment. This revision has been undertaken to accommodate changes in the technology and the impact of new laws and regulations dealing with IRM. The contents of this document will be subject to a complete review annually to determine its continued applicability to the acquisition, management, and use of FIP resources by NASA. Updates to this document will be accomplished by page changes. This revision cancels NHB 2410.1D, dated April 1985.

  6. Graphic engine resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautin, Mikhail; Dwarakinath, Ashok; Chiueh, Tzi-cker

    2008-01-01

    Modern consumer-grade 3D graphic cards boast a computation/memory resource that can easily rival or even exceed that of standard desktop PCs. Although these cards are mainly designed for 3D gaming applications, their enormous computational power has attracted developers to port an increasing number of scientific computation programs to these cards, including matrix computation, collision detection, cryptography, database sorting, etc. As more and more applications run on 3D graphic cards, there is a need to allocate the computation/memory resource on these cards among the sharing applications more fairly and efficiently. In this paper, we describe the design, implementation and evaluation of a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) scheduler based on Deficit Round Robin scheduling that successfully allocates to every process an equal share of the GPU time regardless of their demand. This scheduler, called GERM, estimates the execution time of each GPU command group based on dynamically collected statistics, and controls each process's GPU command production rate through its CPU scheduling priority. Measurements on the first GERM prototype show that this approach can keep the maximal GPU time consumption difference among concurrent GPU processes consistently below 5% for a variety of application mixes.

  7. Resource Management for Distributed Parallel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, B. Clifford; Rao, Santosh

    1993-01-01

    Multiprocessor systems should exist in the the larger context of distributed systems, allowing multiprocessor resources to be shared by those that need them. Unfortunately, typical multiprocessor resource management techniques do not scale to large networks. The Prospero Resource Manager (PRM) is a scalable resource allocation system that supports the allocation of processing resources in large networks and multiprocessor systems. To manage resources in such distributed parallel systems, PRM employs three types of managers: system managers, job managers, and node managers. There exist multiple independent instances of each type of manager, reducing bottlenecks. The complexity of each manager is further reduced because each is designed to utilize information at an appropriate level of abstraction.

  8. Orbital surveys and state resource management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wukelic, G. E.; Wells, T. L.; Brace, B. R.

    1972-01-01

    The resource management implications of satellite earth resource surveys for the state of Ohio are discussed. Discussions cover environmental problems, planning future developments, and short- and long-range benefits of such resource management.

  9. Environmental cost-effectiveness analysis in intertemporal natural resource policy: evaluation of selective fishing gear.

    PubMed

    Kronbak, Lone Grønbæk; Vestergaard, Niels

    2013-12-15

    In most decision-making involving natural resources, the achievements of a given policy (e.g., improved ecosystem or biodiversity) are rather difficult to measure in monetary units. To address this problem, the current paper develops an environmental cost-effectiveness analysis (ECEA) to include intangible benefits in intertemporal natural resource problems. This approach can assist managers in prioritizing management actions as least cost solutions to achieve quantitative policy targets. The ECEA framework is applied to a selective gear policy case in Danish mixed trawl fisheries in Kattegat and Skagerrak. The empirical analysis demonstrates how a policy with large negative net benefits might be justified if the intangible benefits are included.

  10. RIMS: Resource Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symes, J.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is given of the capabilities and functions of the resource management system (RIMS). It is a simple interactive DMS tool which allows users to build, modify, and maintain data management applications. The RIMS minimizes programmer support required to develop/maintain small data base applications. The RIMS also assists in bringing the United Information Services (UIS) budget system work inhouse. Information is also given on the relationship between the RIMS and the user community.

  11. Evaluating cockpit resource management training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.; Wilhelm, John A.

    1987-01-01

    The determinants of effective or ineffective cockpit resurce management and the difficulties these multiple factors pose for validation of the effectiveness of cockpit resource management (CRM) training are discussed. A model of an evaluation design that may be applied to this type of training is presented. Concept validation is discussed as well as criteria for judging crew proficiency. Attention is given to accidents and proficiency checks, incidents and repeated maneuvers, attitude measuremet, and self-report evauation of training.

  12. A Natural Resources Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, George B.

    1977-01-01

    Three years of instruction in natural resources management (NRM) are offered at Louisa County High School, Mineral, Virginia, with 30 acres of land for use as outdoor classrooms. Instructional areas are grouped under forestry; crops and soils; and surveying, air, water, recreation, and general. Two years of basic agriculture science and mechanics…

  13. Hanford cultural resources management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Chatters, J.C.

    1989-06-01

    As a federal agency, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been directed by Congress and the President to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historical, and cultural resources on lands it administers, to manage these in a spirit of stewardship for future generations, and to protect and preserve the rights of Native Americans to religious freedom. The purpose of this document is to describe how the DOE-Richland Operations (DOE-RL) will meet those responsibilities on the Hanford Site, pursuant to guidelines for Agency Responsibilities under the Historic Preservation Act (FR 53:31, February 17, 1988). This document is intended for multiple uses. Among other things, the text is designed as a manual for cultural resource managers to follow and as an explanation of the process of cultural resource regulatory compliance for the DOE-RL and Site contractors. 10 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Current Issues for Higher Education Information Resources Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Issues identified as important to the future of information resources management and use in higher education include information policy in a networked environment, distributed computing, integrating information resources and college planning, benchmarking information technology, integrated digital libraries, technology integration in teaching,…

  15. Modeling sustainable groundwater management: packaging and sequencing of policy interventions.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Encarna; Dinar, Ariel

    2013-04-15

    Of the many studies estimating effectiveness of policy reforms most have been considering various types of policy reforms in isolation from each other. Such pattern has also been the case in water resource regulations. In the case of groundwater almost all policy interventions considered in the literature have been implemented individually, without taking into account the possible interactions and impacts among them. In this paper, we focus on two policy instruments: water quota and uniform water tax. The paper demonstrates how packaging and sequencing sets of policy interventions, with possible triggers to initiate their time of implementation, may be more effective in achieving a sustainable groundwater management than single policies when environmental externalities exist. The policy instruments are applied to the Western la Mancha aquifer in Southeast Spain, a major aquifer that is managed by a command and control approach.

  16. Implementing CORAL: An Electronic Resource Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    A 2010 electronic resource management survey conducted by Maria Collins of North Carolina State University and Jill E. Grogg of University of Alabama Libraries found that the top six electronic resources management priorities included workflow management, communications management, license management, statistics management, administrative…

  17. Upstream water resource management to address downstream pollution concerns: A policy framework with application to the Nakdong River basin in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Taeyeon; Rhodes, Charles; Shah, Farhed A.

    2015-02-01

    An empirical framework for assisting with water quality management is proposed that relies on open-source hydrologic data. Such data are measured periodically at fixed water stations and commonly available in time-series form. To fully exploit the data, we suggest that observations from multiple stations should be combined into a single long-panel data set, and an econometric model developed to estimate upstream management effects on downstream water quality. Selection of the model's functional form and explanatory variables would be informed by rating curves, and idiosyncrasies across and within stations handled in an error term by testing contemporary correlation, serial correlation, and heteroskedasticity. Our proposed approach is illustrated with an application to the Nakdong River basin in South Korea. Three alternative policies to achieve downstream BOD level targets are evaluated: upstream water treatment, greater dam discharge, and development of a new water source. Upstream water treatment directly cuts off incoming pollutants, thereby presenting the smallest variation in its downstream effects on BOD levels. Treatment is advantageous when reliability of water quality is a primary concern. Dam discharge is a flexible tool, and may be used strategically during a low-flow season. We consider development of a new water corridor from an extant dam as our third policy option. This turns out to be the most cost-effective way for securing lower BOD levels in the downstream target city. Even though we consider a relatively simple watershed to illustrate the usefulness of our approach, it can be adapted easily to analyze more complex upstream-downstream issues.

  18. Managing Scarce Water Resources in China's Coal Power Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Zhong, Lijin; Fu, Xiaotian; Zhao, Zhongnan

    2016-06-01

    Coal power generation capacity is expanding rapidly in the arid northwest regions in China. Its impact on water resources is attracting growing concerns from policy-makers, researchers, as well as mass media. This paper briefly describes the situation of electricity-water conflict in China and provides a comprehensive review on a variety of water resources management policies in China's coal power industry. These policies range from mandatory regulations to incentive-based instruments, covering water withdrawal standards, technological requirements on water saving, unconventional water resources utilization (such as reclaimed municipal wastewater, seawater, and mine water), water resources fee, and water permit transfer. Implementing these policies jointly is of crucial importance for alleviating the water stress from the expanding coal power industry in China.

  19. RFF reader in environmental and resource management

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, W.E.

    1998-12-31

    For decades RFF`s [Resources For the Future] quarterly publication Resources has provided concise original essays that address environmental and resource issues. Teachers and students, journalists, policy analysts, and government officials look to Resources for readable, impartial, and often semiannual treatments of troublesome questions. Esteemed environmental economist and RFF University Fellow Wallace Oats has compiled much of RFF`s best work in this new volume. The book combines material from the oft-cited pages of Resources with other important RFF writings in critical areas such as pollution control and climate change. The book`s design is patterned on the college syllabus, making it ideally suited for course use in environmental studies and policy, natural resources, environmental studies and policy, environmental and resource economics, and public policy.

  20. SNL/CA Cultural Resources Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2005-11-01

    The SNL/CA Cultural Resources Management Plan satisfies the site's Environmental Management System requirement to promote long-term stewardship of cultural resources. The plan summarizes the cultural and historical setting of the site, identifies existing procedures and processes that support protection and preservation of resources, and outlines actions that would be initiated if cultural resources were discovered onsite in the future.3

  1. 7 CFR 2.92 - Director, Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Director, Office of Human Resources Management. 2.92... Secretary for Administration § 2.92 Director, Office of Human Resources Management. (a) Delegations... Human Resources Management: (1) Formulate and issue Department policy, standards, rules and...

  2. Human resources for health planning and management in the Eastern Mediterranean region: facts, gaps and forward thinking for research and policy

    PubMed Central

    El-Jardali, Fadi; Jamal, Diana; Abdallah, Ahmad; Kassak, Kassem

    2007-01-01

    Background The early decades of the 21st century are considered to be the era of human resources for health (HRH). The World Health Report (WHR) 2006 launched the Health Workforce Decade (2006–2015), with high priority given for countries to develop effective workforce policies and strategies. In many countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR), particularly those classified as Low and Low-Middle Income Countries (LMICs), the limited knowledge about the nature, scope, composition and needs of HRH is hindering health sector reform. This highlights an urgent need to understand the current reality of HRH in several EMR countries. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) lay out the facts on what we know about the HRH for EMR countries; (2) generate and interpret evidence on the relationship between HRH and health status indicators for LMICs and middle and high income countries (MHICs) in the context of EMR; (3) identify and analyze the information gaps (i.e. what we do not know) and (4) provide forward thinking by identifying priorities for research and policy. Methods The variables used in the analysis were: nurse and physician density, gross national income, poverty, female literacy, health expenditure, Infant Mortality Rate (IMR), Under 5 Mortality Rate (U5MR), Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR) and Life Expectancy (LE). Univariate (charts), bivariate (Pearson correlation) and multivariate analysis (linear regression) was conducted using SPSS 14.0, besides a synthesis of HRH literature. Results Results demonstrate the significant disparities in physician and nurse densities within the EMR, particularly between LMICs and MHICs. Besides this, significant differences exist in health status indicators within the EMR. Results of the Pearson correlation revealed that physician and nurse density, as well as female literacy in EMR countries were significantly correlated with lower mortality rates and higher life expectancy. Results of the regression analysis for both

  3. Forest Resource Management Plans: A Sustainability Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pile, Lauren S.; Watts, Christine M.; Straka, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Forest Resource Management Plans is the capstone course in many forestry and natural resource management curricula. The management plans are developed by senior forestry students. Early management plans courses were commonly technical exercises, often performed on contrived forest "tracts" on university-owned or other public lands, with a goal of…

  4. Strategic Information Resources Management: Fundamental Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caudle, Sharon L.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses six fundamental information resources management (IRM) practices in successful organizations that can improve government service delivery performance. Highlights include directing changes, integrating IRM decision making into a strategic management process, performance management, maintaining an investment philosophy, using business…

  5. 76 FR 59155 - Notice of Availability of South Coast Draft Resource Management Plan Revision and Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... demands on the resources of the public lands; changing policies and emphasis on the management of public... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of South Coast Draft Resource Management Plan Revision and Draft Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION:...

  6. Educating Librarians and Information Resource Managers: Differing Management Perspectives?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouthillier, France

    1993-01-01

    Examines differences between library management and information resource management (IRM). Highlights include a historical perspective of library management education and IRM; the organizational perspective of library management and the emphasis of information as a resource in IRM; library management and advances in information technology; and…

  7. 7 CFR 210.14 - Resource management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Resource management. 210.14 Section 210.14 Agriculture... Participation § 210.14 Resource management. (a) Nonprofit school food service. School food authorities shall....C. 3001 et seq.). (b) Net cash resources. The school food authority shall limit its net...

  8. 7 CFR 210.14 - Resource management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Resource management. 210.14 Section 210.14 Agriculture... Participation § 210.14 Resource management. (a) Nonprofit school food service. School food authorities shall....C. 3001 et seq.). (b) Net cash resources. The school food authority shall limit its net...

  9. 7 CFR 210.14 - Resource management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Resource management. 210.14 Section 210.14 Agriculture... Participation § 210.14 Resource management. (a) Nonprofit school food service. School food authorities shall....C. 3001 et seq.). (b) Net cash resources. The school food authority shall limit its net...

  10. 7 CFR 210.14 - Resource management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Resource management. 210.14 Section 210.14 Agriculture... Participation § 210.14 Resource management. (a) Nonprofit school food service. School food authorities shall....C. 3001 et seq.). (b) Net cash resources. The school food authority shall limit its net...

  11. Educational Resource Management: An International Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Derek; Levacic, Rosalind

    2007-01-01

    This book offers practical guidance on management of financial and real resources in schools and college, and critically evaluates current tensions involved in the area of educational resource management. It is essential reading for educational leaders who wish to improve the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of their resource utilisation…

  12. 15 CFR 930.153 - Coordination between States in developing coastal management policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... high priority to: (a) Coordinating State coastal management planning, policies, and programs with... developing coastal management policies. 930.153 Section 930.153 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FEDERAL CONSISTENCY WITH APPROVED...

  13. Eco-informatics and natural resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cushing, J.B.; Wilson, T.; Borning, A.; Delcambre, L.; Bowker, G.; Frame, M.; Schnase, J.; Sonntag, W.; Fulop, J.; Hert, C.; Hovy, E.; Jones, J.; Landis, E.; Schweik, C.; Brandt, L.; Gregg, V.; Spengler, S.

    2006-01-01

    This project highlight reports on the 2004 workshop [1], as well as follow-up activities in 2005 and 2006, regarding how informatics tools can help manage natural resources and decide policy. The workshop was sponsored jointly by sponsored by the NSF, NBII, NASA, and EPA, and attended by practitioners from government and non-government agencies, and university researchers from the computer, social, and ecological sciences. The workshop presented the significant information technology (IT) problems that resource managers face when integrating ecological or environmental information to make decisions. These IT problems fall into five categories: data presentation, data gaps, tools, indicators, and policy making and implementation. To alleviate such problems, we recommend informatics research in four IT areas, as defined in this abstract and our final report: modeling and simulation, data quality, information integration and ontologies, and social and human aspects. Additionally, we recommend that funding agencies provide infrastructure and some changes in funding habits to assure cycles of innovation in the domain were addressed. Follow-on activities to the workshop subsequent to dg.o 2005 included: an invited talk presenting workshop results at DILS 2005, publication of the workshop final report by the NBII [1], and a poster at the NBII All Hands Meeting (Oct. 2005). We also expect a special issue of the JIIS to appear in 2006 that addresses some of these questions. As we go to press, no solicitation by funding agencies has as yet been published, but various NASA and NBII, and NSF cyber-infrastructure and DG research efforts now underway address the above issues.

  14. 78 FR 29132 - Environmental Management Resources, Inc.; Transfer of Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... AGENCY Environmental Management Resources, Inc.; Transfer of Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Management Resources, Inc. Environmental Management Resources, Inc. has been awarded a contract to perform work for OPP, and access to this information will enable Environmental Management Resources, Inc....

  15. A Regional Training Course in Natural Resources Management and Environmental Monitoring in Humid-Tropical Ecosystems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ffolliott, Peter F.

    Presented are the basic concepts, methods, and considerations relevant to formulating watershed resources goals, policies, and management practices. Intended primarily for resource managers and land use planners concerned with water resources, this regional training course manual emphasizes material which applies to humid and tropical ecosystems.…

  16. Situating School District Resource Decision Making in Policy Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spain, Angeline K.

    2016-01-01

    Decentralization and deregulation policies assume that local educational leaders make better resource decisions than state policy makers do. Conceptual models drawn from organizational theory, however, offer competing predictions about how district central office administrators are likely to leverage their professional expertise in devolved…

  17. Practical Precautionary Resource Management Using Robust Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Richard T.; Tomberlin, David

    2014-10-01

    Uncertainties inherent in fisheries motivate a precautionary approach to management, meaning an approach specifically intended to avoid bad outcomes. Stochastic dynamic optimization models, which have been in the fisheries literature for decades, provide a framework for decision making when uncertain outcomes have known probabilities. However, most such models incorporate population dynamics models for which the parameters are assumed known. In this paper, we apply a robust optimization approach to capture a form of uncertainty nearly universal in fisheries, uncertainty regarding the values of model parameters. Our approach, developed by Nilim and El Ghaoui (Oper Res 53(5):780-798, 2005), establishes bounds on parameter values based on the available data and the degree of precaution that the decision maker chooses. To demonstrate the applicability of the method to fisheries management problems, we use a simple example, the Skeena River sockeye salmon fishery. We show that robust optimization offers a structured and computationally tractable approach to formulating precautionary harvest policies. Moreover, as better information about the resource becomes available, less conservative management is possible without reducing the level of precaution.

  18. Energy resources development: Politics and policies

    SciTech Connect

    Ender, R.L.; Kim, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is designed to address the diverse set of energy issues from both policy and political perspectives. The articles raise more questions than they answer, but agree on one point in the energy debate: short-term changes in supply and price are largely irrelevant to long-term issues. The contributions to this book were written after the crisis of the 1970s and before the free fall of prices in the mid-1980s. However, public interest had already waned and energy was no longer a ''national agenda'' issue. While this book would seem to be addressing an issue of less public importance, the authors realize that the cycle of world events will again bring energy forward for greater scrutiny and debate. Although the attention given to energy policy waxes and wanes, the need persists to formulate consistent public approaches and solutions to the problems posed in providing energy to an industrial nation. The wide divergence of energy policy problems under the four administrations demonstrates the lack of consensus on what the real problems are, or what should be done. The articles for this book were selected to address what the current energy issues are, what policy attempts have been made to solve energy problems, and what the policy implications in the future are. Fifteen articles cannot encompass all the aspects of the subject; however, they make significant contributions in analyzing many of its important facts.

  19. Natural resources accounting: A tool for water resources management in Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambira, Wame L.

    Natural Resource Accounting (NRA) has become an important environmental/natural resources management tool in recent years. It provides information on stocks of a resource available at a particular point in time and what activities the resource is being used for. The conventional System of National Income Accounts (SNA) normally does not capture the cost of depletion, degradation or pollution of natural resources. This encourages unsustainable use of natural resources since the costs are not reflected when assessing the country’s economic performance or development progress. NRA is thus an attempt to integrate environmental issues into the conventional national accounts. The water sector is one sector that could greatly benefit from this natural resource management tool. Botswana has adopted NRA as a natural resource management tool and has so far developed accounts for minerals, livestock and water. The focus of this paper is on Water Accounting (WA) in relation to Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM). IWRM is concerned with coordinated development and management of water in order to maximise economic and social welfare without compromising the sustainability of ecosystems. WA helps fill data gaps since it provides the required information for IWRM to be achieved. The aim of this paper therefore is to evaluate the Water Accounts of Botswana Report of 2006 to determine the extent to which it can contribute to integrated water resources management. The paper is based on literature review and the results show that: the available water stocks vary depending on rainfall patterns, well fields are over utilised, there has been growth in consumption, and more than 80% of the waste water produced is not being put to use. These results calls for changes in policies, role of institutions and practices pertaining to water resources management which is what IWRM is all about hence the paper concludes that indeed WA can contribute to the realisation of IWRM.

  20. Policy-Based Management Natural Language Parser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The Policy-Based Management Natural Language Parser (PBEM) is a rules-based approach to enterprise management that can be used to automate certain management tasks. This parser simplifies the management of a given endeavor by establishing policies to deal with situations that are likely to occur. Policies are operating rules that can be referred to as a means of maintaining order, security, consistency, or other ways of successfully furthering a goal or mission. PBEM provides a way of managing configuration of network elements, applications, and processes via a set of high-level rules or business policies rather than managing individual elements, thus switching the control to a higher level. This software allows unique management rules (or commands) to be specified and applied to a cross-section of the Global Information Grid (GIG). This software embodies a parser that is capable of recognizing and understanding conversational English. Because all possible dialect variants cannot be anticipated, a unique capability was developed that parses passed on conversation intent rather than the exact way the words are used. This software can increase productivity by enabling a user to converse with the system in conversational English to define network policies. PBEM can be used in both manned and unmanned science-gathering programs. Because policy statements can be domain-independent, this software can be applied equally to a wide variety of applications.

  1. DE-FG02-04ER25606 Identity Federation and Policy Management Guide: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, Marty, A

    2011-05-25

    The goal of this 3-year project was to facilitate a more productive dynamic matching between resource providers and resource consumers in Grid environments by explicitly specifying policies. There were broadly two problems being addressed by this project. First, there was a lack of an Open Grid Services Architecture (OGSA)-compliant mechanism for expressing, storing and retrieving user policies and Virtual Organization (VO) policies. Second, there was a lack of tools to resolve and enforce policies in the Open Services Grid Architecture. To address these problems, our overall approach in this project was to make all policies explicit (e.g., virtual organization policies, resource provider policies, resource consumer policies), thereby facilitating policy matching and policy negotiation. Policies defined on a per-user basis were created, held, and updated in MyPolMan, thereby providing a Grid user to centralize (where appropriate) and manage his/her policies. Organizationally, the corresponding service was VOPolMan, in which the policies of the Virtual Organization are expressed, managed, and dynamically consulted. Overall, we successfully defined, prototyped, and evaluated policy-based resource management and access control for OGSA-based Grids. This DOE project partially supported 17 peer-reviewed publications on a number of different topics: General security for Grids, credential management, Web services/OGSA/OGSI, policy-based grid authorization (for remote execution and for access to information), policy-directed Grid data movement/placement, policies for large-scale virtual organizations, and large-scale policy-aware grid architectures. In addition to supporting the PI, this project partially supported the training of 5 PhD students.

  2. SLURM: Simplex Linux Utility for Resource Management

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, M; Grondona, M

    2003-04-22

    Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management (SLURM) is an open source, fault-tolerant, and highly scalable cluster management and job scheduling system for Linux clusters of thousands of nodes. Components include machine status, partition management, job management, scheduling, and stream copy modules. This paper presents an overview of the SLURM architecture and functionality.

  3. SLURM: Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, M; Grondona, M

    2002-12-19

    Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management (SLURM) is an open source, fault-tolerant, and highly scalable cluster management and job scheduling system for Linux clusters of thousands of nodes. Components include machine status, partition management, job management, scheduling and stream copy modules. This paper presents an overview of the SLURM architecture and functionality.

  4. Electronic Resource Management and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Kimberly R.

    2015-01-01

    We have now reached a tipping point at which electronic resources comprise more than half of academic library budgets. Because of the increasing work associated with the ever-increasing number of e-resources, there is a trend to distribute work throughout the library even in the presence of an electronic resources department. In 2013, the author…

  5. Managing Information Technology in the Federal Government: Assessing the Development and Application of Agency-wide Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Stephen H.

    1996-01-01

    Examines factors that support or impede federal agency application and enforcement of information technology (IT) management policy. Describes the results of a study on the efficacy of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) information resource policy. Six tables present information on the policy framework for managing IT. (AEF)

  6. Strategic Planning for Information Resources Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penrod, James; Dolence, Michael

    1987-01-01

    In 1985, California State University/Los Angeles changed the management of its information resources by hiring a vice president for information resources management; reorganizing existing units into an IRM organization; engaging in a detailed, integrated, participative strategic planning process; and initiating several significant projects.…

  7. Managing Human Resources in a Multinational Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumetzberger, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To develop more sensitivity for different patterns of human resource management in multinational companies. Design/methodology/approach: Systemic approach; the concepts and models are based on the evaluation of consulting projects in the field of human resource management. Findings: A concept of four typical varieties of human resource…

  8. Program Management Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Program Management Collection, which covers the topics of Assessment, Learning Disabilities, and Program Improvement. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program Management,…

  9. Natural Resources Management: Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingvalson, Brian

    The document presents a course outline for the study of natural resources management by junior and senior year high school students. Basic information and practical experiences are offered to the student in the classroom and through several field trips in order to acquire more knowledge in various areas of natural resources and their management.…

  10. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Management Plan (RMP) describes the NTS Stewardship Mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. The NTS Stewardship Mission is to manage the land and facilities at the NTS as a unique and valuable national resource. The RMP has defined goals for twelve resource areas based on the principles of ecosystem management. These goals were established using an interdisciplinary team of DOE/NV resource specialists with input from surrounding land managers, private parties, and representatives of Native American governments. The overall goal of the RMP is to facilitate improved NTS land use management decisions within the Great Basin and Mojave Desert ecoregions.

  11. Expert systems in agriculture and resource management

    SciTech Connect

    Plant, R.E.

    1993-05-01

    This paper gives a description of some representative examples of expert systems applied to problems in agriculture and biological resource management. The discussion of agricultural expert systems focuses on several decision support systems for crop management, describing the systems themselves and the implementation efforts surrounding them. The examples of the application of expert systems to biological resource management focus on the integration of expert systems with geographic information systems. A description of some of the more recent developments in agricultural expert systems, still in the prototype stage, is then given, followed by a summary discussion of possible environmental implications of the use of expert systems in agriculture and resource management. 63 refs.

  12. UPM: unified policy-based network management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Eddie; Saxena, Achint

    2001-07-01

    Besides providing network management to the Internet, it has become essential to offer different Quality of Service (QoS) to users. Policy-based management provides control on network routers to achieve this goal. The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has proposed a two-tier architecture whose implementation is based on the Common Open Policy Service (COPS) protocol and Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP). However, there are several limitations to this design such as scalability and cross-vendor hardware compatibility. To address these issues, we present a functionally enhanced multi-tier policy management architecture design in this paper. Several extensions are introduced thereby adding flexibility and scalability. In particular, an intermediate entity between the policy server and policy rule database called the Policy Enforcement Agent (PEA) is introduced. By keeping internal data in a common format, using a standard protocol, and by interpreting and translating request and decision messages from multi-vendor hardware, this agent allows a dynamic Unified Information Model throughout the architecture. We have tailor-made this unique information system to save policy rules in the directory server and allow executions of policy rules with dynamic addition of new equipment during run-time.

  13. Dynamic Resource Management in Clouds: A Probabilistic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Paulo; Roy, Shubhabrata; Begin, Thomas; Loiseau, Patrick

    Dynamic resource management has become an active area of research in the Cloud Computing paradigm. Cost of resources varies significantly depending on configuration for using them. Hence efficient management of resources is of prime interest to both Cloud Providers and Cloud Users. In this work we suggest a probabilistic resource provisioning approach that can be exploited as the input of a dynamic resource management scheme. Using a Video on Demand use case to justify our claims, we propose an analytical model inspired from standard models developed for epidemiology spreading, to represent sudden and intense workload variations. We show that the resulting model verifies a Large Deviation Principle that statistically characterizes extreme rare events, such as the ones produced by “buzz/flash crowd effects” that may cause workload overflow in the VoD context. This analysis provides valuable insight on expectable abnormal behaviors of systems. We exploit the information obtained using the Large Deviation Principle for the proposed Video on Demand use-case for defining policies (Service Level Agreements). We believe these policies for elastic resource provisioning and usage may be of some interest to all stakeholders in the emerging context of cloud networking.

  14. Classification systems for natural resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleckner, Richard L.

    1981-01-01

    Resource managers employ various types of resource classification systems in their management activities such as inventory, mapping, and data analysis. Classification is the ordering or arranging of objects into groups or sets on the basis of their relationships, and as such, provide the resource managers with a structure for organizing their needed information. In addition of conforming to certain logical principles, resource classifications should be flexible, widely applicable to a variety of environmental conditions, and useable with minimal training. The process of classification may be approached from the bottom up (aggregation) or the top down (subdivision) or a combination of both, depending on the purpose of the classification. Most resource classification systems in use today focus on a single resource and are used for a single, limited purpose. However, resource managers now must employ the concept of multiple use in their management activities. What they need is an integrated, ecologically based approach to resource classification which would fulfill multiple-use mandates. In an effort to achieve resource-data compatibility and data sharing among Federal agencies, and interagency agreement has been signed by five Federal agencies to coordinate and cooperate in the area of resource classification and inventory.

  15. Integrated Water Resources Management: A Global Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, V.; Cohen, M.; Akudago, J.; Keith, D.; Palaniappan, M.

    2011-12-01

    The diversity of water resources endowments and the societal arrangements to use, manage, and govern water makes defining a single paradigm or lens through which to define, prioritize and evaluate interventions in the water sector particularly challenging. Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) emerged as the dominant intervention paradigm for water sector interventions in the early 1990s. Since then, while many successful implementations of IWRM have been demonstrated at the local, basin, national and trans-national scales, IWRM has also been severely criticized by the global water community as "having a dubious record that has never been comprehensively analyzed", "curiously ambiguous", and "ineffective at best and counterproductive at worst". Does IWRM hold together as a coherent paradigm or is it a convenient buzzword to describe a diverse collection of water sector interventions? We analyzed 184 case study summaries of IWRM interventions on the Global Water Partnership (GWP) website. The case studies were assessed to find the nature, scale, objectives and outcomes of IWRM. The analysis does not suggest any coherence in IWRM as a paradigm - but does indicate distinct regional trends in IWRM. First, IWRM was done at very different scales in different regions. In Africa two-thirds of the IWRM interventions involved creating national or transnational organizations. In contrast, in Asia and South America, almost two-thirds were watershed, basin, or local body initiatives. Second, IWRM interventions involved very different types of activities in different regions. In Africa and Europe, IWRM entailed creation of policy documents, basin plans and institution building. In contrast, in Asia and Latin America the interventions were much more likely to entail new technology, infrastructure or watershed measures. In Australia, economic measures, new laws and enforcement mechanisms were more commonly used than anywhere else.

  16. Resource allocation for efficient environmental management.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Michael A; Thompson, Colin J; Hauser, Cindy; Burgman, Mark A; Possingham, Hugh P; Moir, Melinda L; Tiensin, Thanawat; Gilbert, Marius

    2010-10-01

    Environmental managers must decide how to invest available resources. Researchers have previously determined how to allocate conservation resources among regions, design nature reserves, allocate funding to species conservation programs, design biodiversity surveys and monitoring programs, manage species and invest in greenhouse gas mitigation schemes. However, these issues have not been addressed with a unified theory. Furthermore, uncertainty is prevalent in environmental management, and needs to be considered to manage risks. We present a theory for optimal environmental management, synthesizing previous approaches to the topic and incorporating uncertainty. We show that the theory solves a diverse range of important problems of resource allocation, including distributing conservation resources among the world's biodiversity hotspots; surveillance to detect the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus in Thailand; and choosing survey methods for the insect order Hemiptera. Environmental management decisions are similar to decisions about financial investments, with trade-offs between risk and reward.

  17. A policy system for Grid Management and Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagni, Federico; Santinelli, Roberto; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    Organizations using a Grid computing model are faced with non-traditional administrative challenges: the heterogeneous nature of the underlying resources requires professionals acting as Grid Administrators. Members of a Virtual Organization (VO) can use a subset of available resources and services in the grid infrastructure and in an ideal world, the more resoures are exploited the better. In the real world, the less faulty services, the better: experienced Grid administrators apply procedures for adding and removing services, based on their status, as it is reported by an ever-growing set of monitoring tools. When a procedure is agreed and well-exercised, a formal policy could be derived. For this reason, using the DIRAC framework in the LHCb collaboration, we developed a policy system that can enforce management and operational policies, in a VO-specific fashion. A single policy makes an assessment on the status of a subject, relative to one or more monitoring information. Subjects of the policies are monitored entities of an established Grid ontology. The status of a same entity is evaluated against a number of policies, whose results are then combined by a Policy Decision Point. Such results are enforced in a Policy Enforcing Point, which provides plug-ins for actions, like raising alarms, sending notifications, automatic addition and removal of services and resources from the Grid mask. Policy results are shown in the web portal, and site-specific views are provided also. This innovative system provides advantages in terms of procedures automation, information aggregation and problem solving.

  18. Climate change, uncertainty, and natural resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Koneff, M.D.; Heglund, P.J.; Knutson, M.G.; Seamans, M.E.; Lyons, J.E.; Morton, J.M.; Jones, M.T.; Boomer, G.S.; Williams, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    Climate change and its associated uncertainties are of concern to natural resource managers. Although aspects of climate change may be novel (e.g., system change and nonstationarity), natural resource managers have long dealt with uncertainties and have developed corresponding approaches to decision-making. Adaptive resource management is an application of structured decision-making for recurrent decision problems with uncertainty, focusing on management objectives, and the reduction of uncertainty over time. We identified 4 types of uncertainty that characterize problems in natural resource management. We examined ways in which climate change is expected to exacerbate these uncertainties, as well as potential approaches to dealing with them. As a case study, we examined North American waterfowl harvest management and considered problems anticipated to result from climate change and potential solutions. Despite challenges expected to accompany the use of adaptive resource management to address problems associated with climate change, we conclude that adaptive resource management approaches will be the methods of choice for managers trying to deal with the uncertainties of climate change. ?? 2010 The Wildlife Society.

  19. Integrated management of water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainerici, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    Water resources occupy an important place among other natural resources, water being the most widely large resource in the world. In different quantities, it can be found everywhere and play an important role in human life and environmental balance. Importance have a great freshwater resources, because all human activities and life itself are dependent on water, it not be substituted by other resources. Water resources of Romania are made up of surface waters - rivers, lakes, the Danube - and groundwater. The main water resource of Romania is an inside rivers. A basic feature of this type of resource is a very large variability in space: - mountain area, which makes half of the total elapsed; - variability specific environmental flow (1 l/s*km2 - in low areas up to 40 l/s*km2 - in high areas). Another feature is a very pronounced variability in time, so spring is important flood production, followed by prolonged drought. The river Danube, the second largest river in Europe, with a length of 2,850 km, of which 1,075 km within the territory of our country, with an average stock entering the country of 174 mild m3/year could be the most abundant source water. The international or impose certain limitations in the use of its waters and therefore the resource is considered only half the average volume multi elapsed on the Danube. Underground water resources consist of existing water storage in aquifer layers and layers of groundwater deep sea, assessing them difficult. Potential natural water resources in Romania is 137.8 bn m3/year of the Danube 87.8 billion m3/ year , inside rivers 40 billion m3/year and groundwater 10 billion m3/year Divided by the current population of the country, give a specific resource, in natural, cca.1840 m3/citizen.year, taking into consideration only the river intake inside situated our country, from this point of view, in the category of the country with reduced resources water as the average Europe 4700 which is m3/citizen.year

  20. A study of weeding policies in eleven TALON resource libraries.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, C H

    1981-07-01

    A study was made of the weeding policies and practices of eleven TALON resource libraries. The results indicated that although weeding, or collection evaluation as it is also known, was performed by most of the libraries, few had a written policy. The reasons for weeding and the types of weeding done by the libraries are described. A discussion of the prevalent means of disposition of withdrawn materials and of the obstacles to cooperative weeding is included.

  1. A study of weeding policies in eleven TALON resource libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, C H

    1981-01-01

    A study was made of the weeding policies and practices of eleven TALON resource libraries. The results indicated that although weeding, or collection evaluation as it is also known, was performed by most of the libraries, few had a written policy. The reasons for weeding and the types of weeding done by the libraries are described. A discussion of the prevalent means of disposition of withdrawn materials and of the obstacles to cooperative weeding is included. PMID:7248594

  2. New Zealand Freshwater Management: Changing Policy for a Changing World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, H. L.; Norton, N.

    2014-12-01

    Fresh water is essential to New Zealand's economic, environmental, cultural and social well-being. In line with global trends, New Zealand's freshwater resources are under pressure from increased abstraction and changes in land-use which contribute contaminants to our freshwater systems. Recent central government policy reform introduces greater national direction and guidance, to bring about a step-change in freshwater management. An existing national policy for freshwater management introduced in 2011 requires regional authorities to produce freshwater management plans containing clear freshwater objectives (measurable statements about the desired environmental state for water bodies) and associated limits to resource use (such as environmental flows and quantity allocation limits, and loads of contaminants to be discharged). These plans must integrate water quantity and quality management, consider climate change, and incorporate tangata whenua (New Zealand māori) roles and interests. In recent (2014) national policy amendments, the regional authorities are also required to implement national 'bottom-line' standards for certain attributes of the system to be managed; undertake accounting for all water takes and all sources of contaminants; and to develop and implement their plans in a collaborative way with communities. This rapid change in national policy has necessitated a new way of working for authorities tasked with implementation; many obstacles lie in their path. The scientific methods required to help set water quantity limits are well established, but water quality methods are less so. Collaborative processes have well documented benefits but also raise many challenges, particularly for the communication of complex and often uncertain scientific information. This paper provides background on the national policy changes and offers some early lessons learned by the regional authorities implementing collaborative freshwater management in New Zealand.

  3. Resource management and nonmarket valuation research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglas, A.J.; Taylor, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Survey based nonmarket valuation research is often regarded as economics research. However, resource economists need to be aware of and acknowledge the manifold information sources that they employ in order to enhance the policy credibility of their studies. Communication between resource economists and practitioners of allied disciplines including chemistry, civil engineering, sociology, and anthropology are often neglected. Recent resource allocation policy debates have given rise to an extensive discussion of methodological issues that narrow the scope of the subject. The present paper provides a format for the presentation of nonmarket valuation research results that emphasizes the manifold links between economics studies that employ different methodologies to estimate nonmarket resource values. A more robust emphasis on the interlocking features of the different approaches for estimating nonmarket benefits should foster appreciation of the transdisciplinary aspects of the subject.

  4. Environmental Management: the Ideology of Natural Resource Rational Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotukhin, V. M.; Gogolin, V. A.; Yazevich, M. Yu; Baumgarten, M. I.; Dyagileva, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents an analysis of the ontological and methodological principles of environmental management. These principles form the united ideology of natural resource rational use as the environment preservation basis. Consideration of environmental issues from the environmental management point of view is stipulated by the concern of the scientific community about the existence of mankind and the sphere of its inhabiting. The need to overcome the stereotypes existing in mass consciousness about safe and environmentally friendly consumption is stressed. The process of forming environmental management policy should contribute to the stabilization (balancing) of the consumers’ expectations and collective decision-making based on a public ecological consensus.

  5. Water resource management: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Khadse, G K; Labhasetwar, P K; Wate, S R

    2012-10-01

    Water is precious natural resource for sustaining life and environment. Effective and sustainable management of water resources is vital for ensuring sustainable development. In view of the vital importance of water for human and animal life, for maintaining ecological balance and for economic and developmental activities of all kinds, and considering its increasing scarcity, the planning and management of water resource and its optimal, economical and equitable use has become a matter of the utmost urgency. Management of water resources in India is of paramount importance to sustain one billion plus population. Water management is a composite area with linkage to various sectors of Indian economy including the agricultural, industrial, domestic and household, power, environment, fisheries and transportation sector. The water resources management practices should be based on increasing the water supply and managing the water demand under the stressed water availability conditions. For maintaining the quality of freshwater, water quality management strategies are required to be evolved and implemented. Decision support systems are required to be developed for planning and management of the water resources project. There is interplay of various factors that govern access and utilization of water resources and in light of the increasing demand for water it becomes important to look for holistic and people-centered approaches for water management. Clearly, drinking water is too fundamental and serious an issue to be left to one institution alone. It needs the combined initiative and action of all, if at all we are serious in socioeconomic development. Safe drinking water can be assured, provided we set our mind to address it. The present article deals with the review of various options for sustainable water resource management in India.

  6. Policy Windows, Policy Change, and Organizational Learning: Watersheds in the Evolution of Watershed Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Sarah; Goucher, Nancy P.; McCarthy, Dan

    2006-12-01

    Employing in-depth, elite interviews, this empirical research contributes to understanding the dynamics among policy windows, policy change, and organizational learning. First, although much of the research on agenda setting—how issues attract enough attention that action is taken to address them—has been conducted at the national scale, this work explores the subnational, regional scale. With decentralization, regional-scale environmental decision-making has become increasingly important. Second, this research highlights the role of policy windows and instances of related organizational learning identified by natural resources managers. Having practitioners identify focusing events contrasts with the more typical approach of the researcher identifying a particular focusing event or events to investigate. A focusing event is a sudden, exceptional experience that, because of how it leads to harm or exposes the prospect for great devastation, is perceived as the impetus for policy change.

  7. Policy windows, policy change, and organizational learning: watersheds in the evolution of watershed management.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Sarah; Goucher, Nancy P; McCarthy, Dan

    2006-12-01

    Employing in-depth, elite interviews, this empirical research contributes to understanding the dynamics among policy windows, policy change, and organizational learning. First, although much of the research on agenda setting-how issues attract enough attention that action is taken to address them-has been conducted at the national scale, this work explores the subnational, regional scale. With decentralization, regional-scale environmental decision-making has become increasingly important. Second, this research highlights the role of policy windows and instances of related organizational learning identified by natural resources managers. Having practitioners identify focusing events contrasts with the more typical approach of the researcher identifying a particular focusing event or events to investigate. A focusing event is a sudden, exceptional experience that, because of how it leads to harm or exposes the prospect for great devastation, is perceived as the impetus for policy change.

  8. Adaptive Resource Management Technology for Satellite Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Lonnie; Tjaden, Brett; Pfarr, Barbara B.; Hennessy, Joseph F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This manuscript describes the Sensor Web Adaptive Resource Manager (SWARM) project. The primary focus of the project is on the design and prototyping of middleware for managing computing and network resources in a way that enables the information systems of satellite constellations to provide realtime performance within dynamic environments. The middleware has been prototyped, and it has been evaluated by employing it to manage a pool of distributed resources for the ITOS (Integrated Test and Operations System) satellite command and control software system. The design of the middleware is discussed and a summary of the evaluation effort is provided.

  9. Issues in natural resources management in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Thapa, G B; Weber, K E

    1994-05-01

    The use and management of public and private natural resources is greatly affected by institutional, politicoeconomic, and socioeconomic factors. These factors operate in tandem at the household, regional, national, and international levels in affecting resource management. Any policy that focuses only on one dimension of the problem, such as population growth, and ignores such issues as poverty, environmentally unsuitable cropping systems, and the unavailability of nonfarm employment opportunities will be inadequate. National policies must consider structural factors: resource use, property rights regimes, poverty, unemployment, illiteracy, and population growth. A comprehensive strategy should account for these structural features, be tailored to regional circumstances, and have the input of local governments. Local governments and communities must be in a position to implement and monitor resource management. Hardin identified common property as a major contributor to land degradation and declining forest resources in developing countries. Only with a common agreement by the community to invest in planting trees and managing pastures can communal lands benefit multiple users in the long and short run. Social forestry projects have failed due to poor community participation, fragmented communities, poor social organization, and disputes over the distribution of profits. Traditional communal hunting and gathering activities adhered to institutional regulation; with the inception of urbanization, industrialization, and monetization of agriculture, the destruction of forests and pasture began. There was an increased need for food for the urban population; a small and powerful group of politicians, social leaders, and administrators retained access to public or "crown" lands and disenfranchised small and marginal farmers and the landless poor from previously accessible lands. Land redistribution schemes have not effectively distributed land resources. Commercial

  10. Resource Management and Conservation Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arey, David G.; Baumann, Duane D.

    1972-01-01

    The definition of conservation, the future of resource availability, the status of conservation education today are topics examined and suggestions are made on improving the content and emphasis of conservation courses. (Author)

  11. An integrated approach: managing resources for post-disaster reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan; Wilkinson, Suzanne; Brunsdon, David; Seville, Erica; Potangaroa, Regan

    2011-10-01

    A lack of resources for post-disaster housing reconstruction significantly limits the prospects for successful recovery. Following the earthquake in Wenchuan, China, in May 2008, housing reconstruction was not immune to resource shortages and price inflation. Difficulties in sourcing materials and labour considerably impeded recovery. This paper provides evidence of the resourcing bottlenecks inherent in the post-Wenchuan earthquake reconstruction process. Its aim is to present an integrated planning framework for managing resources for post-disaster housing rebuilding. The results are drawn from in-field surveys that highlight the areas where stakeholders need to concentrate effort, including revising legislation and policy, enhancing capacity for rebuilding in the construction industry, strengthening the transportation network, restructuring market mechanisms, and incorporating environmental considerations into overall planning. Although the case study presented here is country-specific, it is hoped that the findings provide a basis for future research to identify resourcing constraints and solutions in other disaster contexts.

  12. 78 FR 12347 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Resource Management Plan and Final Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Proposed Resource Management Plan and Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Lander Field Office Planning Area, WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... of 1969, as amended, and the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, as amended, the...

  13. Optimal radio resource management using hybrid handoffs in cellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huan; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    2002-07-01

    The optimal radio resource management (RRM) design is formulated as a Semi-Markov Decision Process optimization problem in this research. The stationary optimal call admission control policy, which adopts a hybrid handoff scheme, is determined by solving a set of linear programming equations under users' QoS constraints. The call admission control policy can choose actions of hard- or soft-handoff or simply rejecting the request, depending on the traffic conditions and QoS metrics. The performance is analyzed via simulation and compared with those of the non-controlled scheme and the fixed RRM scheme. Simulations are conducted by OPNET to study the performance under different traffic conditions.

  14. Army Ecosystem Management Policy Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    principles to manage biological and physical systems in a manner that safeguards the long-term ecological sustainability, natural diversity, and...focus on ecosystem management (e.g., biodiversity conservation; restoration of native ecological systems). In all fairness, such a judgment would be...decisions. Regardless of which view one adheres to, a region can be defined along multiple dimensions—biological, physical , socio -cultural and economic. The

  15. Project Management Methodology in Human Resource Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josler, Cheryl; Burger, James

    2005-01-01

    When charged with overseeing a project, how can one ensure that the project will be completed on time, within budget, and to the satisfaction of everyone involved? In this article, the authors examine project management methodology as a means of ensuring that projects are conducted in a disciplined, well-managed and consistent manner that serves…

  16. SLURM: Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, M; Dunlap, C; Garlick, J; Grondona, M

    2002-07-08

    Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management (SLURM) is an open source, fault-tolerant, and highly scalable cluster management and job scheduling system for Linux clusters of thousands of nodes. Components include machine status, partition management, job management, scheduling and stream copy modules. The design also includes a scalable, general-purpose communication infrastructure. This paper presents a overview of the SLURM architecture and functionality.

  17. Information resource management strategic business planning.

    PubMed

    Fogelsonger, L

    1995-08-01

    The business process and information management, rather than technology and systems, must be considered in today's health care environment. The article discusses the contents of an information resource management (IRM) strategic business plan and a five-step process used to construct the plan. Examples of strategic goals and objectives from an actual case study are provided. The resulting IRM strategic plan is designed to be used as a management tool that provides the flexibility and cohesiveness required to manage information in the current dynamic and resource-constrained environment.

  18. Space Flight Resource Management for ISS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Larry; Slack, Kelley; O'Keefe, William; Huning, Therese; Sipes, Walter; Holland, Albert

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the International Space Station (ISS) Operations space flight resource management, which was adapted to the ISS from the shuttle processes. It covers crew training and behavior elements.

  19. Spirit Lake Water Resource Management NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit ND-0031101, Spirit Lake Water Resource Management is authorized to discharge to an unnamed intermittent tributary to Devils Lake which is tributary to Sheyenne River in North Dakota.

  20. INEEL Cultural Resource Management Program Annual Report - 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton F. Marler

    2005-01-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site is located in southeastern Idaho, and is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,000-year span of human occupation in the region. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these resources with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory, while also cleaning up the waste left by past programs and processes. The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has administrative responsibility for most of the Site, excluding lands and resources managed by the Naval Reactors Facility and (in 2004) Argonne National Laboratory-West. The Department of Energy is committed to a cultural resource program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative requirements. This annual report is an overview of Cultural Resource Management Program activities conducted during Fiscal Year 2004 and is intended to be both informative to external stakeholders and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the Site.

  1. 77 FR 31615 - Improving Mail Management Policies, Procedures, and Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    ... ADMINISTRATION Improving Mail Management Policies, Procedures, and Activities AGENCY: Office of Governmentwide... Services Administration (GSA) has issued Federal Management Regulation (FMR) Bulletin G-03 which provides guidance to Executive Branch agencies for improving mail management policies, procedures, and...

  2. Science, Technology and Natural Resources Policy: Overcoming Congressional Gridlock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    The current status of Science, Technology and Natural Resources (STNR) policy in the United States provides an ideal context to examine the influence of committee seniority within the public policy process. Exemplars of the Policy Entrepreneur have been individuals in leadership positions, whether executive or legislative. The role of junior committee members in shaping policy innovation is less well understood, and is frequently masked either in cross-sectional research designs or in case studies. The House Natural Resources committee seniority patterns are compared to the House of Representatives Chamber data from 1975 to 2015. This expanse of congressional time captures both the policy innovation of the Class of 1974 who helped transform the public lands by pursuing a preservation agenda, along with the contemporaneous gridlock caused by disagreements about reducing the size of the federal government, a policy agenda championed and sustained by the Class of 1994. Several types of political actors have served as policy entrepreneurs, President Kennedy and Secretary of Interior Udall shepherding the Wilderness Act of 1964 from the Executive branch, or in the 111th Congress Committee chairmen Senator Christopher Dodd and Representative Barney Frank, having announced their retirements, spent their final Congress shaping the consensus that produced the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. A less studied policy phenomenon relies on "packing the committee" to outvote the leadership. This tactic can be used by the party leadership to overcome recalcitrant senior committee members, as was the case for Democrats in the House Interior and Insular Affairs Committee shift to preservation in the 1970s, or the tactic can be employed from the grassroots, as may be happening in the case of the House Natural Resources Committee in the 114th Congress. A policy making process analog to rivers is more appropriate than a mechanistic model. As there are multiple

  3. Texas Emergency Resource Management. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-30

    and the transportation of essential supplies such as food and medical . FINDINGS 1. Basic operational concepts contain.d in the Texas Emer- gency...19. (Cont.) Economic Stabilization Health and Medical Petroleum, Gas and Solid Fuel Electric Power, Water Industrial Production Manpower...Government - State of Texas Emergency Resources Management Organization, Health and Medical , State to Local Government - State of Texas Emergency Resources

  4. Collection Development Policies for the RWC Learning Resources Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Lucy, Comp.

    This manual begins by providing background on the program, collection, and acquisition processes of the Raymond Walters College (RWC) Learning Resources Center. The next section describes collection development policies for: (1) the academic departments (Animal Health; Behavioral Sciences; Biology; Business and Economics; Chemistry; Dental…

  5. Human Resource Management in Virtual Organizations. Research in Human Resource Management Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heneman, Robert L., Ed.; Greenberger, David B., Ed.

    This document contains 14 papers on human resources (HR) and human resource management (HRM) in virtual organizations. The following papers are included: "Series Preface" (Rodger Griffeth); "Volume Preface" (Robert L. Heneman, David B. Greenberger); "The Virtual Organization: Definition, Description, and…

  6. Water resources. [mapping and management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, V. V.

    1974-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in applying ERTS-1 data to water resources problems, nevertheless, more time and effort still appear necessary for further quantification of results, including the specification of thematic measurement accuracies. More modeling can be done very profitably. In particular, more strategy models describing the processes wherein ERTS-1 data would be acquired, analyzed, processed, and utilized in operational situations could be profitably accomplished. It is generally observed that the ERTS-1 data applicability is evident in several areas and that the next most general and substantive steps in the implementation of the data in operational situations would be greatly encouraged by the establishment of an operational earth resources satellite organization and capability. Further encouragement of this operational capability would be facilitated by all investigators striving to document their procedures as fully as possible and by providing time and cost comparisons between ERTS-1 and conventional acquisition approaches.

  7. Improved Management of Support Resources.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    Equinment (S&TE) - Includes development and procurement of peculiar S& TEZ (e.g., test program sets) and major items of common S&TE (automated test...support funding. This was demonstrated during the OSD-directed trial review of support resources associated with the Ml Tank and the AH 64 Apache ...NAVSTAR/GPS Sergeant York Air AV-8B IR MAVERICK Defense System TOMAHAWK GLCM APACHE ASPJ LANTIRN AHIP HARM ALCM MLRS TACTAS MX PATRIOT CG-47/AEGIS

  8. Natural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    green, T.

    2011-08-15

    This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265 acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 10 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan is an attempt at sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL's ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text. The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to sustainably integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, sustainability, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and the incorporation of community involvement, where applicable. The NRMP is periodically reviewed and updated, typically every five years. This review and update was delayed to develop documents associated with a new third party facility, the Long Island Solar Farm. This two hundred acre facility will result in

  9. Resource Management: Having Fun with the Sun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Catherine K.; Cowan, Donna L.

    1979-01-01

    Instead of a traditional home management house, the Home Economics Department of Hood College, Frederick, Maryland, is planning to build a "Resource Management Facility" in which students can also study the use of a variety of energy sources, including solar energy, to conserve fuels. (MF)

  10. Important features of Sustainable Aggregate Resource Management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solar, Slavko V.; Shields, Deborah J.; Langer, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Every society, whether developed, developing or in a phase of renewal following governmental change, requires stable, adequate and secure supplies of natural resources. In the latter case, there could be significant need for construction materials for rebuilding infrastructure, industrial capacity, and housing. It is essential that these large-volume materials be provided in a rational manner that maximizes their societal contribution and minimizes environmental impacts. We describe an approach to resource management based on the principles of sustainable developed. Sustainable Aggregate Resource Management offers a way of addressing the conflicting needs and interests of environmental, economic, and social systems. Sustainability is an ethics based concept that utilizes science and democratic processes to reach acceptable agreements and tradeoffs among interests, while acknowledging the fundamental importance of the environment and social goods. We discuss the features of sustainable aggregate resource management.

  11. Program/project management resource lists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Program/Project Management Collection at NASA Headquarters Library is part of a larger initiative by the Training and Development Division, Code FT, NASA Headquarters. The collection is being developed to support the Program/Project Management Initiative which includes the training of NASA managers. These PPM Resource Lists have proven to be a useful method of informing NASA employees nationwide about the subject coverage of the library collection. All resources included on the lists are available at or through NASA Headquarters Library. NASA employees at other Centers may request listed books through interlibrary loan, and listed articles by contacting me by phone, mail, or e-mail.

  12. 16 CFR 1000.22 - Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Office of Human Resources Management. 1000... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.22 Office of Human Resources Management. The Office of Human Resources Management, which is managed by the Director of the Office, provides human resources management support...

  13. 16 CFR 1000.22 - Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Office of Human Resources Management. 1000... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.22 Office of Human Resources Management. The Office of Human Resources Management, which is managed by the Director of the Office, provides human resources management support...

  14. 16 CFR 1000.22 - Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Human Resources Management. 1000... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.22 Office of Human Resources Management. The Office of Human Resources Management, which is managed by the Director of the Office, provides human resources management support...

  15. 16 CFR 1000.22 - Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Office of Human Resources Management. 1000... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.22 Office of Human Resources Management. The Office of Human Resources Management, which is managed by the Director of the Office, provides human resources management support...

  16. Integrated Resource Management at a Watershed Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, J. M.; MacDonald, R. J.; Cairns, D.; Barnes, C. C.; Mirmasoudi, S. S.; Lewis, D.

    2014-12-01

    Watershed hydrologists, managers and planners have a long list of resources to "manage." Our group has worked for over a decade to develop and apply the GENESYS (Generate Earth Systems Science) high-resolution spatial hydrometeorological model. GENESYS was intended for modelling of alpine snowpack, and that work has been the subject of a series of hydrometeorology papers that applied the model to evaluate how climate change may impact water resources for a series of climate warming scenarios through 2100. GENESYS has research modules that have been used to assess alpine glacier mass balance, soil water and drought, forest fire risk under climate change, and a series of papers linking GENESYS to a water temperature model for small headwater streams. Through a major commercialization grant, we are refining, building, adopting, and adapting routines for flood hydrology and hydraulics, surface and groundwater storage and runoff, crop and ecosystem soil water budgets, and biomass yields. The model will be available for research collaborations in the near future. The central goal of this development program is to provide a series of research and development tools for non-profit integrated resource management in the developed and developing world. A broader question that arises is what are the bounds of watershed management, if any? How long should our list of "managed" resources be? Parallel work is evaluating the relative values of watershed specialists managing many more resources with the watershed. Hydroelectric power is often a key resource complimentary to wind, solar and biomass renewable energy developments; and biomass energy is linked to water supply and agriculture. The August 2014 massive tailings dam failure in British Columbia threatens extensive portions of the Fraser River sockeye salmon run, millions of fish, and there are concerns about long-term contamination of water supplies for many British Columbians. This disaster, and many others that may occur

  17. Adaptive management of watersheds and related resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Byron K.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of learning about natural resources through the practice of management has been around for several decades and by now is associated with the term adaptive management. The objectives of this paper are to offer a framework for adaptive management that includes an operational definition, a description of conditions in which it can be usefully applied, and a systematic approach to its application. Adaptive decisionmaking is described as iterative, learning-based management in two phases, each with its own mechanisms for feedback and adaptation. The linkages between traditional experimental science and adaptive management are discussed.

  18. Remote sensing strategies for global resource exploration and environmental management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Frederick B.

    Since 1972, satellite remote sensing, when integrated with other exploration techniques, has demonstrated operational exploration and engineering cost savings and reduced exploration risks through improved geological mapping. Land and ocean remote sensing satellite systems under development for the 1990's by the United States, France, Japan, Canada, ESA, Russia, China, and others, will significantly increase our ability to explore for, develop, and manage energy and mineral resources worldwide. A major difference between these systems is the "Open Skies" and "Non-Discriminatory Access to Data" policies as have been practiced by the U.S. and France and the restrictive nationalistic data policies as have been practiced by Russia and India. Global exploration will use satellite remote sensing to better map regional structural and basin-like features that control the distribution of energy and mineral resources. Improved sensors will better map lithologic and stratigraphic units and identify alteration effects in rocks, soils, and vegetation cover indicative of undiscovered subsurface resources. These same sensors will also map and monitor resource development. The use of satellite remote sensing data will grow substantially through increasing integration with other geophysical, geochemical, and geologic data using improved geographic information systems (GIS). International exploration will focus on underdeveloped countries rather than on mature exploration areas such as the United States, Europe, and Japan. Energy and mineral companies and government agencies in these countries and others will utilize available remote sensing data to acquire economic intelligence on global resources. If the "Non-Discriminatory Access to Data" principle is observed by satellite producing countries, exploration will remain competitive "on the ground". In this manner, remote sensing technology will continue to be developed to better explore for and manage the world's needed resources

  19. Resource Management in the Microgravity Science Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casselle, Justine

    2004-01-01

    In the Microgravity Science Division, the primary responsibilities of the Business Management Office are resource management and data collection. Resource management involves working with a budget to do a number of specific projects, while data collection involves collecting information such as the status of projects and workforce hours. This summer in the Business Management Office I assisted Margie Allen with resource planning and the implementation of specific microgravity projects. One of the main duties of a Project Control Specialists, such as my mentor, is to monitor and analyze project manager s financial plans. Project managers work from the bottom up to determine how much money their project will cost. They then set up a twelve month operating plan which shows when money will be spent. I assisted my mentor in checking for variances in her data against those of the project managers. In order to successfully check for those variances, we had to understand: where the project is including plans vs. actual performance, why it is in its present condition, and what the future impact will be based on known budgetary parameters. Our objective was to make sure that the plan, or estimated resources input, are a valid reflection of the actual cost. To help with my understanding of the process, over the course of my tenure I had to obtain skills in Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access.

  20. Archaeological resource management plan of the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This Archaeological Resource management Plan addresses the future cultural resource management needs of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). The archaeological information contained herein is based on prehistoric and historic archaeological syntheses prepared by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) for the SRS. The syntheses also address future research directions that will facilitate better management of the cultural resources. This document is a prelude to a Programmatic Memorandum of Agreement (PMOA) which, in conjunction with this Archaeological Resource Management Plan, will assure SRS continued compliance with all applicable federal laws and regulations in concert with any DOE plans, policies and directives. 225 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Resource conservation program in terms of Vostokgazprom environmental policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsibulnikova, M. R.; Nadyumov, S. V.; Adam, A. M.; Korotchenko, T. V.

    2016-09-01

    The article examines a number of key areas of environmental policy of Vostokgazprom. The Associated Petroleum Gas program is an important step within the resource conservation and environmental protection framework. In addition, the company undertakes the extensive work on emergency response programs, and carries out continuous protection of the subsurface and control over environmental safety in all production sites. Vostokgazprom continuously modernizes the basic industrial facilities and invests money in new projects. The study analyzes the steps being taken by the company within the energy saving policy that leads to significant costs cut.

  2. 40 CFR 1.33 - Office of Administration and Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provides national program policy and technical guidance for: The acquisition of all information technology... ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.33 Office of Administration and Resources Management. The..., organization and management analysis and systems development, information management and services,...

  3. SLURM: Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, M; Dunlap, C; Garlick, J; Grondona, M

    2002-04-24

    Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management (SLURM) is an open source, fault-tolerant, and highly scalable cluster management and job scheduling system for Linux clusters of thousands of nodes. Components include machine status, partition management, job management, and scheduling modules. The design also includes a scalable, general-purpose communication infrastructure. Development will take place in four phases: Phase I results in a solid infrastructure; Phase II produces a functional but limited interactive job initiation capability without use of the interconnect/switch; Phase III provides switch support and documentation; Phase IV provides job status, fault-tolerance, and job queuing and control through Livermore's Distributed Production Control System (DPCS), a meta-batch and resource management system.

  4. Hierarchical Policy Model for Managing Heterogeneous Security Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Young; Kim, Minsoo

    2007-12-01

    The integrated security management becomes increasingly complex as security manager must take heterogeneous security systems, different networking technologies, and distributed applications into consideration. The task of managing these security systems and applications depends on various systems and vender specific issues. In this paper, we present a hierarchical policy model which are derived from the conceptual policy, and specify means to enforce this behavior. The hierarchical policy model consist of five levels which are conceptual policy level, goal-oriented policy level, target policy level, process policy level and low-level policy.

  5. Decentralized Resource Management in Distributed Computer Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    processor at a given point in time. The second activity is the cooperation of processors in balancing their loads. The method by which processors...given synchronization method will be practical if it is easy to use at the user level. At the user level, the user should be required only to specify...access the shared resources. Such a - method , however, neither supports concurrent access, nor supports any priority policy other than round-robin

  6. Virtual Control Policy for Binary Ordered Resources Petri Net Class

    PubMed Central

    Rovetto, Carlos A.; Concepción, Tomás J.; Cano, Elia Esther

    2016-01-01

    Prevention and avoidance of deadlocks in sensor networks that use the wormhole routing algorithm is an active research domain. There are diverse control policies that will address this problem being our approach a new method. In this paper we present a virtual control policy for the new specialized Petri net subclass called Binary Ordered Resources Petri Net (BORPN). Essentially, it is an ordinary class constructed from various state machines that share unitary resources in a complex form, which allows branching and joining of processes. The reduced structure of this new class gives advantages that allow analysis of the entire system’s behavior, which is a prohibitive task for large systems because of the complexity and routing algorithms. PMID:27548170

  7. Virtual Control Policy for Binary Ordered Resources Petri Net Class.

    PubMed

    Rovetto, Carlos A; Concepción, Tomás J; Cano, Elia Esther

    2016-08-18

    Prevention and avoidance of deadlocks in sensor networks that use the wormhole routing algorithm is an active research domain. There are diverse control policies that will address this problem being our approach a new method. In this paper we present a virtual control policy for the new specialized Petri net subclass called Binary Ordered Resources Petri Net (BORPN). Essentially, it is an ordinary class constructed from various state machines that share unitary resources in a complex form, which allows branching and joining of processes. The reduced structure of this new class gives advantages that allow analysis of the entire system's behavior, which is a prohibitive task for large systems because of the complexity and routing algorithms.

  8. Cockpit resource management training at People Express

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Keith D.; Jensen, Doug

    1987-01-01

    In January 1986 in a continuing effort to maintain and improve flight safety and solve some Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) problems, People Express implemented a new CRM training program. It is a continuously running program, scheduled over the next three years and includes state-of-the-art full-mission simulation (LOFT), semi-annual seminar workshops and a comprehensive academic program authored by Robert W. Mudge of Cockpit Management Resources Inc. That program is outlined and to maximize its contribution to the workshop's goals, is organized into four topic areas: (1) Program content: the essential elements of resource management training; (2) Training methods: the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches; (3) Implementation: the implementation of CRM training; and (4) Effectiveness: the effectiveness of training. It is confined as much as possible to concise descriptions of the program's basic components. Brief discussions of rationale are included, however no attempt is made to discuss or review popular CRM tenets or the supporting research.

  9. Optimization and resilience in natural resources management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Byron K.; Johnson, Fred A.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the putative tradeoff between optimization and resilience in the management of natural resources, using a framework that incorporates different sources of uncertainty that are common in natural resources management. We address one-time decisions, and then expand the decision context to the more complex problem of iterative decision making. For both cases we focus on two key sources of uncertainty: partial observability of system state and uncertainty as to system dynamics. Optimal management strategies will vary considerably depending on the timeframe being considered and the amount and quality of information that is available to characterize system features and project the consequences of potential decisions. But in all cases an optimal decision making framework, if properly identified and focused, can be useful in recognizing sound decisions. We argue that under the conditions of deep uncertainty that characterize many resource systems, an optimal decision process that focuses on robustness does not automatically induce a loss of resilience.

  10. Texas Emergency Resource Management. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-30

    based on existing National and State plans. Urgent needs for resources that cannot be met from locally available supplies are reported to the...or his legal successor upon implementing crisis relocation of declaration of a national emergency for civil defense purposes by the President of the...mobilization, management and use of resources in crisis relocation situation or a nuclear emergency are set forth in the National Plan. b. State: In

  11. Integrated water resources management: Concepts and issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, H. H. G.; Van der Zaag, P.

    After the describing the historical developments that led the development of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), the paper defines this important concept. It subsequently deals with the thorny issue of water security as well as water conflict, after which the major issues over which thus far no consensus has been achieved are briefly reviewed. The paper concludes with an analysis of the role of the IAHS International Commission on Water Resources Systems (ICWRS) in promoting IWRM.

  12. [The characteristics of public health resources management].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses the position of human health in the system of social economic relationships. The notion of material and technical resources in health institutions is defined. It is demonstrated that they are characterized by number of health institutions, their structure according levels and stages of medical care provision, costs of fixed assets, their structure and wear. The conceptual characteristics of actual management of public health resources are analyzed.

  13. AOIPS water resources data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, E. S.; Shotwell, R. L.; Place, M. C.; Belknap, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    A geocoded data management system applicable for hydrological applications was designed to demonstrate the utility of the Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System (AOIPS) for hydrological applications. Within that context, the geocoded hydrology data management system was designed to take advantage of the interactive capability of the AOIPS hardware. Portions of the Water Resource Data Management System which best demonstrate the interactive nature of the hydrology data management system were implemented on the AOIPS. A hydrological case study was prepared using all data supplied for the Bear River watershed located in northwest Utah, southeast Idaho, and western Wyoming.

  14. The Perceptions and Experiences of School Management Teams and Teachers of the Management of Physical Resources in Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mestry, Raj; Bodalina, Kishan

    2015-01-01

    The effective management of physical resources significantly impacts on the quality of teaching and learning in schools. The procurement, utilization and maintenance of physical resources through organized structures, well-designed policies and rigid processes are critical for quality education. According to the South African Schools Act 1996, a…

  15. The U.S. National Ocean Policy: Science for Sustaining Ocean Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. L.; Babb-Brott, D.

    2012-12-01

    The United States' National Ocean Policy recognizes the need to advance fundamental scientific knowledge through exploration and research that will enhance stewardship of our ocean, coasts, and Great Lakes. Created by Executive Order in July 2010, it strongly affirms the critical role of robust science, research, monitoring, modeling, and assessments in effectively sustaining our ocean resources regionally, nationally, and globally. The National Ocean Council drafted, and made available for public comment earlier this year, an Implementation Plan designed to address the nine priority objectives of the Policy. These include five areas of special emphasis: 1) Resiliency and Adaptation to Climate Change and Ocean Acidification, 2) Regional Ecosystem Protection and Restoration, 3) Water Quality and Sustainable Practices on Land, 4) Changing Conditions in the Arctic, and 5) Ocean, Coastal, and Great Lakes Observations, Mapping, and Infrastructure. Each of these requires a solid scientific basis to ensure sustainable approaches to ocean resource management and is underpinned by two of the other priority objectives (Ecosystem-Based Management and Inform Decisions and Improve Understanding). Ecosystem-based management is viewed as a foundational principle for comprehensive ocean management and it, in turn, must be based on increased knowledge to continually inform and improve management and policy decisions as well as to respond to change and challenges. This paper reviews plans for ensuring the necessary scientific basis.

  16. 78 FR 76852 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Supplement to the Tri-County Draft Resource Management Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ...In compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended, and the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA), as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Las Cruces District Office, Las Cruces, New Mexico, intends to prepare a Supplement to the Tri-County Draft Resource Management Plan (RMP) and Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), and by this......

  17. Workplan and Annex: Solar Resource Knowledge Management

    SciTech Connect

    Renne, D.

    2005-01-01

    ''Solar Resource Knowledge Management'' will be a new task under the International Energy Agency's Solar Heating and Cooling Programme. The task development has involved researchers from Germany, France, Switzerland, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Canada, the U.S. that have been engaged in the use of satellite imagery to develop solar resource maps and datasets around the world. The task will address three major areas: (1) ''Benchmarking'' of satellite-based solar resource methods so that resource information derived from approaches developed in one country or based on a specific satellite can be quantitatively intercompared with methods from other countries using different satellites, as well as with ground data; (2) Data archiving and dissemination procedures, especially focusing on access to the data by end users; and (3) basic R&D for improving the reliability and usability of the data, and for examining new types of products important to the solar industry, such as solar resource forecasts.

  18. 43 CFR 1610.1 - Resource management planning guidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Resource management planning guidance... Resource Management Planning § 1610.1 Resource management planning guidance. (a) Guidance for preparation and amendment of resource management plans may be provided by the Director and State Director,...

  19. 43 CFR 1610.1 - Resource management planning guidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Resource management planning guidance... Resource Management Planning § 1610.1 Resource management planning guidance. (a) Guidance for preparation and amendment of resource management plans may be provided by the Director and State Director,...

  20. 48 CFR 1511.011-79 - Information resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Information resources... AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS 1511.011-79 Information resources management. The... Resource Management, in all solicitations and contracts....

  1. 48 CFR 1511.011-79 - Information resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Information resources... AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS 1511.011-79 Information resources management. The... Resource Management, in all solicitations and contracts....

  2. 48 CFR 1511.011-79 - Information resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Information resources... AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS 1511.011-79 Information resources management. The... Resource Management, in all solicitations and contracts....

  3. 48 CFR 1511.011-79 - Information resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Information resources... AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS 1511.011-79 Information resources management. The... Resource Management, in all solicitations and contracts....

  4. 48 CFR 1511.011-79 - Information resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Information resources... AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS 1511.011-79 Information resources management. The... Resource Management, in all solicitations and contracts....

  5. Policy-based Distributed Data Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    The analysis and understanding of climate variability and change builds upon access to massive collections of observational and simulation data. The analyses involve distributed computing, both at the storage systems (which support data subsetting) and at compute engines (for assimilation of observational data into simulations). The integrated Rule Oriented Data System (iRODS) organizes the distributed data into collections to facilitate enforcement of management policies, support remote data processing, and enable development of reference collections. Currently at RENCI, the iRODS data grid is being used to manage ortho-photos and lidar data for the State of North Carolina, provide a unifying storage environment for engagement centers across the state, support distributed access to visualizations of weather data, and is being explored to manage and disseminate collections of ensembles of meteorological and hydrological model results. In collaboration with the National Climatic Data Center, an iRODS data grid is being established to support data transmission from NCDC to ORNL, and to integrate NCDC archives with ORNL compute services. To manage the massive data transfers, parallel I/O streams are used between High Performance Storage System tape archives and the supercomputers at ORNL. Further, we are exploring the movement and management of large RADAR and in situ datasets to be used for data mining between RENCI and NCDC, and for the distributed creation of decision support and climate analysis tools. The iRODS data grid supports all phases of the scientific data life cycle, from management of data products for a project, to sharing of data between research institutions, to publication of data in a digital library, to preservation of data for use in future research projects. Each phase is characterized by a broader user community, with higher expectations for more detailed descriptions and analysis mechanisms for manipulating the data. The higher usage

  6. POLICY AND SCIENCE IN NATURAL RESOURCE AGENCIES: SEARCHING FOR APPROPRIATE ROLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effectively resolving natural resource, ecological, and environmental policy problems often requires substantial input from scientists. The value of scientific information for informing policy deliberations is reduced when what is offered as "science" is inculcated with policy p...

  7. Natural resource damages: A legal, economic and policy overview

    SciTech Connect

    Connaughton, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    Natural resource damages liability is a major development in environmental law. Government authorities are increasingly seeking damage claims for injury to natural resources, invoking the natural resource damages (NRD) provisions of the federal Superfund statute and the Oil Pollution Act. The number of Claims asserted is increasing, and the amounts sought range to hundreds of millions of dollars, with some claims exceeding $1 billion. Some assert that the federal NRD program is an awakening sleeping giant that could threaten to rival the Superfund cleanup program in cost and the potential for imposing far-reaching liabilities on a wide range of businesses as well as the federal government. Lawyers, economists, and other experts on NRD have become fully engaged in comprehensive analyses of the legal, economic and policy issues presented by NRD claims, including a full review of the NRD litigating record. Many critics find that existing NRD law and practice is flawed; produces excessive liability claims, skewed incentives and economic waste; and urgently needs reform. Changes have been recommended to improve the law and refocus the NRD program on achieving cost-effective restoration of injured natural resources. These analytical endeavors are especially timely because Congress is currently considering significant changes in NRD law. This overview will provide a brief background summary of the NRD program and highlight some of the central legal and scientific issues facing government policy makers and litigants in NRD cases.

  8. 12 CFR 563.161 - Management and financial policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Management and financial policies. 563.161... ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS Financial Management Policies § 563.161 Management and financial policies. (a)(1) For... activities that involve a higher degree of risk than activities permitted to savings associations. (2)...

  9. Collaborative Research for Water Resource Management under Climate Change Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundiers, K.; Garfin, G. M.; Gober, P.; Basile, G.; Bark, R. H.

    2010-12-01

    We present an ongoing project to co-produce science and policy called Collaborative Planning for Climate Change: An Integrated Approach to Water-Planning, Climate Downscaling, and Robust Decision-Making. The project responds to motivations related to dealing with sustainability challenges in research and practice: (a) state and municipal water managers seek research that addresses their planning needs; (b) the scientific literature and funding agencies call for more meaningful engagement between science and policy communities, in ways that address user needs, while advancing basic research; and (c) empirical research contributes to methods for the design and implementation of collaborative projects. To understand how climate change might impact water resources and management in the Southwest US, our project convenes local, state, and federal water management practitioners with climate-, hydrology-, policy-, and decision scientists. Three areas of research inform this collaboration: (a) the role of paleo-hydrology in water resources scenario construction; (b) the types of uncertainties that impact decision-making beyond climate and modeling uncertainty; and (c) basin-scale statistical and dynamical downscaling of climate models to generate hydrologic projections for regional water resources planning. The project engages all participants in the research process, from research design to workshops that build capacity for understanding data generation and sources of uncertainty to the discussion of water management decision contexts. A team of “science-practice translators” facilitates the collaboration between academic and professional communities. In this presentation we contextualize the challenges and opportunities of use-inspired science-policy research collaborations by contrasting the initial project design with the process of implementation. We draw from two sources to derive lessons learned: literature on collaborative research, and evaluations provided by

  10. Collection Development Policy: Paul & Emily Douglas Library & Learning Resources. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toomer, Clarence; Bryson, Emily M.; Matlin, Katherine R.; Herrera, Mariana; Johnson, Jesse; Lazouksas, Lorraine; Meeker, Robert; Meyer, Beverly; Miletich, Ivo; Nuby, Mary

    This document presents the collection development policy for the Douglas Library and Learning Resources at Chicago State University. Collection development committee policies are presented in terms of planning (allocation of resources budget, implementation of resource sharing and related programs, development of policies and procedures, liaison…

  11. Resource reliability, accessibility and governance: pillars for managing water resources to achieve water security in Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, E. M.; Duncan, J.; Atkinson, P.; Dash, J.

    2013-12-01

    As one of the world's most water-abundant countries, Nepal has plenty of water yet resources are both spatially and temporally unevenly distributed. With a population heavily engaged in subsistence farming, whereby livelihoods are entirely dependent on rain-fed agriculture, changes in freshwater resources can substantially impact upon survival. The two main sources of water in Nepal come from monsoon precipitation and glacial runoff. The former is essential for sustaining livelihoods where communities have little or no access to perennial water resources. Much of Nepal's population live in the southern Mid-Hills and Terai regions where dependency on the monsoon system is high and climate-environment interactions are intricate. Any fluctuations in precipitation can severely affect essential potable resources and food security. As the population continues to expand in Nepal, and pressures build on access to adequate and clean water resources, there is a need for institutions to cooperate and increase the effectiveness of water management policies. This research presents a framework detailing three fundamental pillars for managing water resources to achieve sustainable water security in Nepal. These are (i) resource reliability; (ii) adequate accessibility; and (iii) effective governance. Evidence is presented which indicates that water resources are adequate in Nepal to sustain the population. In addition, aspects of climate change are having less impact than previously perceived e.g. results from trend analysis of precipitation time-series indicate a decrease in monsoon extremes and interannual variation over the last half-century. However, accessibility to clean water resources and the potential for water storage is limiting the use of these resources. This issue is particularly prevalent given the heterogeneity in spatial and temporal distributions of water. Water governance is also ineffective due to government instability and a lack of continuity in policy

  12. Library and Learning Resources Management: Current Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armsby, Allen; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The seven papers that make up this report focus on the impact of new information technology on curriculum and resource management at the college level in England and Wales. A brief preface, an introduction, and a foreword provide background information on the report and introduce the following papers: (1) "Curriculum Developments in Further…

  13. Developing an Information Resources Management Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montie, Irene C.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the development of an Information Resources Management (IRM) curriculum by the IRM Curriculum Advisory Committee established by the Graduate School, United States Department of Agriculture. Initial activities, models proposed for the program (standards, skills, users, operational), course selection, and structural proposals considered…

  14. Information Resources Management: An Overview for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Evelyn H.

    This paper presents an overview of the emerging information resources management (IRM) concept and suggests reasons why IRM would be a useful framework for educational institutions. An introductory look at current information problems precedes a review of definitions of information and IRM in the literature, and a definition of IRM as used in this…

  15. Information Resource Management: Meeting the Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Thomas W.

    1980-01-01

    The experience of Indiana University in managing information resources--computing, word processing, telephone services, mail services, microfilming, and duplicating services--in a more integrated fashion is described and strategies to overcome tradition, the fiefdom syndrome, and institutional inertia are detailed. (Author/MSE)

  16. Managing Academic Libraries with Fewer Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    A discussion of academic library management during retrenchment looks at a variety of issues, including staffing needs in the labor-intensive library environment, acquisitions budgeting, interlibrary cooperation (ownership vs. access to resources), entrepreneurship and strategic planning for problem solving, and use of total quality management…

  17. Organizational Restructuring for Better Information Resource Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. William; Groves, William E.

    The revised organizational structure for computing at The Medical University of South Carolina, the planned computer and telecommunications architecture, and the current state of implementation of these projects are discussed. Recommendations concerning resource management, software, and hardware are presented. The college had several different…

  18. Money Management in a Media Resources Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Alvin

    1983-01-01

    Director of Iowa State University's Media Resources Center argues that fiscal progress is the most reliable measure of functional progress or growth. How money is controlled to allow for allocation of funds and manipulation of service priorities is described as well as how service functions are managed. (MBR)

  19. Managing Microcomputer Technology as an Organizational Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khosrowpour, Mehdi; Amoroso, Donald

    With the realization that microcomputers provide an extraordinary value to the organization follows the need to address a variety of issues in order to more effectively manage these resources. Each of the 14 chapters, consisting of papers written by different authors, represents a different perspective existing in organizations with respect to the…

  20. Resource Management in Tactical Military Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    FGAN FORSCHUNGSINSTITUT FÜR KOMMUNIKATION, INFORMATIONSVERARBEITUNG UND ERGONOMIE KIEKOMMUNIKATION Resource Management in Tactical Military Networks...Martin Lies, Peter Sevenich, Christoph Karg, Christoph Barz Nr: 2 FGAN FORSCHUNGSINSTITUT FÜR KOMMUNIKATION, INFORMATIONSVERARBEITUNG UND ERGONOMIE ...Communication with IPSec in Tunnelmode Nr: 3 FGAN FORSCHUNGSINSTITUT FÜR KOMMUNIKATION, INFORMATIONSVERARBEITUNG UND ERGONOMIE KIEKOMMUNIKATION IPSec in

  1. 7 CFR 210.14 - Resource management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Resource management. 210.14 Section 210.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... in the Consumers Price Index for All Urban Consumers used to increase the Federal reimbursement...

  2. 61 FR 42052 - Owyhee Resource Area, ID; Resource Management Plan, etc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1996-08-13

    ... Bureau of Land Management Owyhee Resource Area, ID; Resource Management Plan, etc. AGENCY: Bureau of Land... Management Plan (RMP) and associated draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Owyhee Resource Area... be sent to: Owyhee Area Manager, Bureau of Land Management, Boise Field Office, 3948...

  3. River resource management in the Grand Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The objective of GCES was to identify and predict the effects of variations in operating strategies on the riverine environment below Glen Canyon Dam within the physical and legal constraints under which the dam must operate. Critical elements for the development of GCES and other such projects include a list of resources directly or indirectly affected by management, a list of management options, and an ecosystem framework showing the causal connections among system components, potential management strategies that include humans as integral parts of the environment.

  4. The Centrality of the "Mediation" Concept in the Participatory Management of Water Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dos Santos, Irenilda Angela; Berlinck, Christian Niel; de Santana Araujo, Symone Christine; Steinke, Ercilia Torres; Steinke, Valdir Adilson; Pianta, Taissa Ferreira; Graebner, Ivete Teresinha; Saito, Carlos Hiroo

    2005-01-01

    This work presents questions related to the viability and the requirements for the implementation of a National Policy of Water Resources in Brazil, and identifies the means to bring about active participation by the population in the management of water resources. While social inequalities may be an impediment to the implementation of full…

  5. Earth observation for regional scale environmental and natural resources management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernknopf, R.; Brookshire, D.; Faulkner, S.; Chivoiu, B.; Bridge, B.; Broadbent, C.

    2013-12-01

    Earth observations (EO) provide critical information to natural resource assessment. Three examples are presented: conserving potable groundwater in intense agricultural regions, maximizing ecosystem service benefits at regional scales from afforestation investment and management, and enabling integrated natural and behavioral sciences for resource management and policy analysis. In each of these cases EO of different resolutions are used in different ways to help in the classification, characterization, and availability of natural resources and ecosystem services. To inform decisions, each example includes a spatiotemporal economic model to optimize the net societal benefits of resource development and exploitation. 1) EO is used for monitoring land use in intensively cultivated agricultural regions. Archival imagery is coupled to a hydrogeological process model to evaluate the tradeoff between agrochemical use and retention of potable groundwater. EO is used to couple individual producers and regional resource managers using information from markets and natural systems to aid in the objective of maximizing agricultural production and maintaining groundwater quality. The contribution of EO is input to a nitrate loading and transport model to estimate the cumulative impact on groundwater at specified distances from specific sites (wells) for 35 Iowa counties and two aquifers. 2) Land use/land cover (LULC) derived from EO is used to compare biological carbon sequestration alternatives and their provisioning of ecosystem services. EO is used to target land attributes that are more or less desirable for enhancing ecosystem services in two parishes in Louisiana. Ecological production functions are coupled with value data to maximize the expected return on investment in carbon sequestration and other ancillary ecosystem services while minimizing the risk. 3) Environmental and natural resources management decisions employ probabilistic estimates of yet-to-find or yet

  6. Chronic hepatitis B: management challenges in resource-poor countries.

    PubMed

    Nwokediuko, Sylvester Chuks

    2011-10-01

    Sylvester Chuks Nwokediuko, Department of Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku OzallaChronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a global public health problem because of its worldwide distribution and its potential to cause sequelae. HBV is most prevalent in China, South East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Amazon basin of South America where health care resources are most limited. Numerous challenges exist for effective management of chronic HBV infection, particularly in resource-limited regions. These challenges include lack of accurate prevalence data, absence of a surveillance program, and poor political will of governments in resource-poor countries to enforce effective measures to control the disease. There is a lack of understanding regarding HBV infec-tion by both the general public and health care providers. A better understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of this condition is necessary. The acute shortage of trained medical manpower necessary for accurate diagnosis and treatment of chronic hepati-tis B (CHB) in resource-poor countries is a formidable challenge. The condition is com-plicated by the continuing efflux of medical graduates from low-income economies to richer countries. The most critical problem in the management of CHB is the high cost of laboratory tests and drugs. Drugs are also not readily available. Other challenges in the manage-ment of CHB include stigmatization of patients, co-infection with other viruses, lack of management guidelines, and absence of an effective patient referral system. To address these challenges, governments of resource-poor nations must be committed to budg-etary allocation for the implementation of health programs. It is necessary to provide awareness campaigns, health education, proper screening of blood and blood products for transfusion, active screening, intensification of existing childhood immunization, technical and financial assistance from wealthier nations, and

  7. Forestry management for sustainable development. EDI Policy Seminar Report 32

    SciTech Connect

    D`Silva, E.; Appanah, S.

    1993-09-01

    Forests will continue to disappear rapidly, the authors contend, until they are recognized as a valuable economic resource. This paper examines the causes of deforestation in Asia and suggests practical ways to achieve sustainable forest management. The report focuses on commercial logging, demand for firewood and fodder, and clearing forest land for farming. Economic policies and forest institutions have failed to protect natural forests. The authors point out technical problems that hinder forest management, such as improper tree harvesting. They describe conflicting goals among forest users and government investments that deplete forests. The authors argue that sustainable forest management calls for sound pricing policies and strong institutions to enforce them. They discuss benefit-sharing schemes that give local people incentives to protect forests and new ways to manage tree plantations to serve many different users. Detailed case studies look at effective forest management programs in Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, and the Philippines. The paper examines profitable opportunities for trade in environmental services. Such trade would involve industrial countries paying developing nations not to clear their natural forests. The protected forests would help reduce global carbon emissions and preserve biodiversity.

  8. Integrating policy-based management and SLA performance monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tzong-Jye; Lin, Chin-Yi; Chang, Shu-Hsin; Yen, Meng-Tzu

    2001-10-01

    Policy-based management system provides the configuration capability for the system administrators to focus on the requirements of customers. The service level agreement performance monitoring mechanism helps system administrators to verify the correctness of policies. However, it is difficult for a device to process the policies directly because the policies are the management concept. This paper proposes a mechanism to decompose a policy into rules that can be efficiently processed by a device. Thus, the device may process the rule and collect the performance statistics information efficiently; and the policy-based management system may collect these performance statistics information and report the service-level agreement performance monitoring information to the system administrator. The proposed policy-based management system achieves both the policy configuration and service-level agreement performance monitoring requirements. A policy consists of a condition part and an action part. The condition part is a Boolean expression of a source host IP group, a destination host IP group, etc. The action part is the parameters of services. We say that an address group is compact if it only consists of a range of IP address that can be denoted by a pair of IP address and corresponding IP mask. If the condition part of a policy only consists of the compact address group, we say that the policy is a rule. Since a device can efficiently process a compact address and a system administrator prefers to define a range of IP address, the policy-based management system has to translate policy into rules and supplements the gaps between policy and rules. The proposed policy-based management system builds the relationships between VPN and policies, policy and rules. Since the system administrator wants to monitor the system performance information of VPNs and policies, the proposed policy-based management system downloads the relationships among VPNs, policies and rules to the

  9. Giving a New Focus to Resource Management,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    systematic feedback loop--the key step necessary to evaluate the quality of our decisions and to improve the quality of our future decision making. It is...7 11D-i6l 846 GIVING A NEW FOCUS TO RESOURCE MRNRGEMENT(U) i/i COMPTROLLER O THE ARMY WASHINGTON DC D C PRETTOL i985 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 5/1 ULmh...FEhE N1. 11111_L.25 MIRCP EOUI TEST CHAR NAINL UEU fSANADL16- 1111 I I ’- I jw j~ 11111 %I Giving A New Focus To Resource Management by o LTC Donald C

  10. Bayesian adaptive survey protocols for resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Transparency in resource management decisions requires a proper accounting of uncertainty at multiple stages of the decision-making process. As information becomes available, periodic review and updating of resource management protocols reduces uncertainty and improves management decisions. One of the most basic steps to mitigating anthropogenic effects on populations is determining if a population of a species occurs in an area that will be affected by human activity. Species are rarely detected with certainty, however, and falsely declaring a species absent can cause improper conservation decisions or even extirpation of populations. We propose a method to design survey protocols for imperfectly detected species that accounts for multiple sources of uncertainty in the detection process, is capable of quantitatively incorporating expert opinion into the decision-making process, allows periodic updates to the protocol, and permits resource managers to weigh the severity of consequences if the species is falsely declared absent. We developed our method using the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas), a threatened species precinctive to the Central Valley of California, as a case study. Survey date was negatively related to the probability of detecting the giant gartersnake, and water temperature was positively related to the probability of detecting the giant gartersnake at a sampled location. Reporting sampling effort, timing and duration of surveys, and water temperatures would allow resource managers to evaluate the probability that the giant gartersnake occurs at sampled sites where it is not detected. This information would also allow periodic updates and quantitative evaluation of changes to the giant gartersnake survey protocol. Because it naturally allows multiple sources of information and is predicated upon the idea of updating information, Bayesian analysis is well-suited to solving the problem of developing efficient sampling protocols for species of

  11. 16 CFR 1000.22 - Office of Human Resources Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.22 Office of Human Resources Management. The Office of Human Resources... executive development, employee and labor relations, employee benefits and retirement assistance,...

  12. Social Impact Management Plans: Innovation in corporate and public policy

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, Daniel M.; Vanclay, Frank

    2013-11-15

    Social Impact Assessment (SIA) has traditionally been practiced as a predictive study for the regulatory approval of major projects, however, in recent years the drivers and domain of focus for SIA have shifted. This paper details the emergence of Social Impact Management Plans (SIMPs) and undertakes an analysis of innovations in corporate and public policy that have put in place ongoing processes – assessment, management and monitoring – to better identify the nature and scope of the social impacts that might occur during implementation and to proactively respond to change across the lifecycle of developments. Four leading practice examples are analyzed. The International Finance Corporation (IFC) Performance Standards require the preparation of Environmental and Social Management Plans for all projects financed by the IFC identified as having significant environmental and social risks. Anglo American, a major resources company, has introduced a Socio-Economic Assessment Toolbox, which requires mine sites to undertake regular assessments and link these assessments with their internal management systems, monitoring activities and a Social Management Plan. In South Africa, Social and Labour Plans are submitted with an application for a mining or production right. In Queensland, Australia, Social Impact Management Plans were developed as part of an Environmental Impact Statement, which included assessment of social impacts. Collectively these initiatives, and others, are a practical realization of theoretical conceptions of SIA that include management and monitoring as core components of SIA. The paper concludes with an analysis of the implications for the practice of impact assessment including a summary of key criteria for the design and implementation of effective SIMPs. -- Highlights: • Social impact management plans are effective strategies to manage social issues. • They are developed in partnership with regulatory agencies, investors and community.

  13. Western Water Resources: Coming Problems and the Policy Alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Richard

    This quote from the book leads one to speculate as to what will happen to water policy in these times of increased concern for reducing federal spending, for more reliance on state and local governments as opposed to the federal government, and for more reliance on the private sector as opposed to any level of governmental control. Remembering that a wrenching debate preceded deregulation of oil and other energy prices, what are the opportunities for deregulation in the water resources field?Western Water Resources consists of the proceedings of a symposium held in Denver in September 1979 and Hosted by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. As in any conference, there is, in addition to the organized substantive content of the papers, a mixture of the clever and the banal, peppered with some humor and chit-chat. Among the contributors are economists, including Charles Howe, Allen Kneese, Emery Castle, and Kenneth Boulding; legal scholars, such as George Radosevich and Frank Trelease; and political figures, such as Scott Matheson, Governor of Utah, Guy Martin, former Assistant Secretary for Land and Water Resources of the Department of the Interior, and Leo Eisel, former Director of the Water Resources Council. Some papers are followed by a discussion from commentors.

  14. Managing Federal Information Technology: Conflicting Policies and Competing Philosophies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beachboard, John C.; McClure, Charles R.

    1996-01-01

    Examines information technology (IT) policies and the roles played by federal agencies in developing and implementing IT management policies. Illustrates how selected policy prescriptions can prove to be problematic and offers recommendations on how to improve federal IT management. Contains 62 references. (AEF)

  15. Outcomes of crew resource management training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.; Wilhelm, John A.

    1991-01-01

    Participants' self-reports and measures of attitudes regarding flightdeck management indicate that crew resource management training is favorably received and causes highly significant, positive changes in attitudes regarding crew coordination and personal capabilities. However, a subset of participants reacted negatively to the training and showed boomerangs (negative change) in attitudes. Explorations into the causes of this effect pinpoint personality factors and group dynamics as critical determinants of reactions to training and of the magnitude and direction of attitude changes. Implications of these findings for organizations desiring to enhance crew effectiveness are discussed, and areas of needed additional research are described.

  16. Storage resource managers: Middleware components for gridstorage

    SciTech Connect

    Shoshani, Arie; Sim, Alex; Gu, Junmin

    2005-08-18

    The amount of scientific data generated by simulations orcollected from large scale experiments have reached levels that cannot bestored in the researcher's workstation or even in his/her local computercenter. Such data are vital to large scientific collaborations dispersedover wide-area networks. In the past, the concept of a Gridinfrastructure [1]mainly emphasized the computational aspect ofsupporting large distributed computational tasks, and optimizing the useof the network by using bandwidth reservation techniques. In this paperwe discuss the concept of Storage Resource Managers (SRMs) as componentsthat complement this with the support for the storage management of largedistributed datasets. The access to data is becoming the main bottleneckin such "data intensive" applications because the data cannot bereplicated in all sites. SRMs can be used to dynamically optimize the useof storage resource to help unclog this bottleneck.

  17. Scientific basis of water-resource management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This volume contains 11 reports regarding water-resource management. Topics include: long-term and large-scale problems of water management, such as groundwater contamination due to toxic and nuclear-waste disposal; nonpoint sources of pollution on our stream systems; impacts of changes in both flow and water quality on the aquatic ecosystem; the frequency, duration, and impacts of droughts including long-term trends toward desertification; long-term hydrologic budgets for assessing the adequacy of regional or national water resources; global geochemical cycles such as the fate of nitrogen and sulfur; and protection of engineered systems against hydrologic extrema. These macroscale and long-term problems, involving large investments and the health and well-being of much of the world's population, demand increasingly precise and accurate predictive statements. Individual reports are indexed separately on the energy data base.

  18. Mission Critical Computer Resources Management Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    6 SOFTWARE TEST AND EVALUATION 6.1 TEST PLANNING ........ ..................... 6-1 6.1.1 System Support Computer Resources ....... . 6-1 6.1.2...7-14 CHAPTER 8 PLANNING FOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE 8.1 INTRODUCTION ........ ..................... 8-1 8.2 PLANS AND...DOCUMENTATION ..... .................. 8-1 8.2.1 Program Management Plan (PMP) .. ......... .. 8-1 8.2.2 Test and Evaluation Master Plan (TEMP) .... 8-1 8.2.3

  19. The costs of future polio risk management policies.

    PubMed

    Tebbens, Radboud J Duintjer; Sangrujee, Nalinee; Thompson, Kimberly M

    2006-12-01

    Decisionmakers need information about the anticipated future costs of maintaining polio eradication as a function of the policy options under consideration. Given the large portfolio of options, we reviewed and synthesized the existing cost data relevant to current policies to provide context for future policies. We model the expected future costs of different strategies for continued vaccination, surveillance, and other costs that require significant potential resource commitments. We estimate the costs of different potential policy portfolios for low-, middle-, and high-income countries to demonstrate the variability in these costs. We estimate that a global transition from routine immunization with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) to inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) would increase the costs of managing polio globally, although routine IPV use remains less costly than routine OPV use with supplemental immunization activities. The costs of surveillance and a stockpile, while small compared to routine vaccination costs, represent important expenditures to ensure adequate response to potential outbreaks. The uncertainty and sensitivity analyses highlight important uncertainty in the aggregated costs and demonstrates that the discount rate and uncertainty in price and administration cost of IPV drives the expected incremental cost of routine IPV vs. OPV immunization.

  20. Consideration of reference points for the management of renewable resources under an adaptive management paradigm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irwin, Brian J.; Conroy, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The success of natural resource management depends on monitoring, assessment and enforcement. In support of these efforts, reference points (RPs) are often viewed as critical values of management-relevant indicators. This paper considers RPs from the standpoint of objective-driven decision making in dynamic resource systems, guided by principles of structured decision making (SDM) and adaptive resource management (AM). During the development of natural resource policy, RPs have been variously treated as either ‘targets’ or ‘triggers’. Under a SDM/AM paradigm, target RPs correspond approximately to value-based objectives, which may in turn be either of fundamental interest to stakeholders or intermediaries to other central objectives. By contrast, trigger RPs correspond to decision rules that are presumed to lead to desirable outcomes (such as the programme targets). Casting RPs as triggers or targets within a SDM framework is helpful towards clarifying why (or whether) a particular metric is appropriate. Further, the benefits of a SDM/AM process include elucidation of underlying untested assumptions that may reveal alternative metrics for use as RPs. Likewise, a structured decision-analytic framework may also reveal that failure to achieve management goals is not because the metrics are wrong, but because the decision-making process in which they are embedded is insufficiently robust to uncertainty, is not efficiently directed at producing a resource objective, or is incapable of adaptation to new knowledge.

  1. Game Theory in water resources management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsanevaki, Styliani Maria; Varouchakis, Emmanouil; Karatzas, George

    2015-04-01

    Rural water management is a basic requirement for the development of the primary sector and involves the exploitation of surface/ground-water resources. Rational management requires the study of parameters that determine their exploitation mainly environmental, economic and social. These parameters reflect the influence of irrigation on the aquifer behaviour and on the level-streamflow of nearby rivers as well as on the profit from the farming activity for the farmers' welfare. The question of rural water management belongs to the socio-political problems, since the factors involved are closely related to user behaviour and state position. By applying Game Theory one seeks to simulate the behaviour of the system 'surface/ground-water resources to water-users' with a model based on a well-known game, "The Prisoner's Dilemma" for economic development of the farmers without overexploitation of the water resources. This is a game of two players that have been extensively studied in Game Theory, economy and politics because it can describe real-world cases. The present proposal aims to investigate the rural water management issue that is referred to two competitive small partnerships organised to manage their agricultural production and to achieve a better profit. For the farmers' activities water is required and ground-water is generally preferable because consists a more stable recourse than river-water which in most of the cases in Greece are of intermittent flow. If the two farmer groups cooperate and exploit the agreed water quantities they will gain equal profits and benefit from the sustainable availability of the water recourses (p). If both groups overexploitate the resource to maximize profit, then in the medium-term they will incur a loss (g), due to the water resources reduction and the increase of the pumping costs. If one overexploit the resource while the other use the necessary required, then the first will gain great benefit (P), and the second will

  2. Knowledge and information management for integrated water resource management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watershed information systems that integrate data and analytical tools are critical enabling technologies to support Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) by converting data into information, and information into knowledge. Many factors bring people to the table to participate in an IWRM fra...

  3. Guiding Climate Change Adaptation Within Vulnerable Natural Resource Management Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardsley, Douglas K.; Sweeney, Susan M.

    2010-05-01

    Climate change has the potential to compromise the sustainability of natural resources in Mediterranean climatic systems, such that short-term reactive responses will increasingly be insufficient to ensure effective management. There is a simultaneous need for both the clear articulation of the vulnerabilities of specific management systems to climate risk, and the development of appropriate short- and long-term strategic planning responses that anticipate environmental change or allow for sustainable adaptive management in response to trends in resource condition. Governments are developing climate change adaptation policy frameworks, but without the recognition of the importance of responding strategically, regional stakeholders will struggle to manage future climate risk. In a partnership between the South Australian Government, the Adelaide and Mt Lofty Ranges Natural Resource Management Board and the regional community, a range of available research approaches to support regional climate change adaptation decision-making, were applied and critically examined, including: scenario modelling; applied and participatory Geographical Information Systems modelling; environmental risk analysis; and participatory action learning. As managers apply ideas for adaptation within their own biophysical and socio-cultural contexts, there would be both successes and failures, but a learning orientation to societal change will enable improvements over time. A base-line target for regional responses to climate change is the ownership of the issue by stakeholders, which leads to an acceptance that effective actions to adapt are now both possible and vitally important. Beyond such baseline knowledge, the research suggests that there is a range of tools from the social and physical sciences available to guide adaptation decision-making.

  4. Understanding human resource management practices in Botswana's public health sector.

    PubMed

    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna Stannie; Gauld, Robin; Hill, Philip C; Barnett, Pauline

    2016-11-21

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the management of the public sector health workforce in Botswana. Using institutional frameworks it aims to document and analyse human resource management (HRM) practices, and make recommendations to improve employee and health system outcomes. Design/methodology/approach The paper draws from a large study that used a mixed methods approach to assess performance of Botswana's Ministry of Health (MOH). It uses data collected through document analysis and in-depth interviews of 54 key informants comprising policy makers, senior staff of the MOH and its stakeholder organizations. Findings Public health sector HRM in Botswana has experienced inadequate planning, poor deployment and underutilization of staff. Lack of comprehensive retention strategies and poor working conditions contributed to the failure to attract and retain skilled personnel. Relationships with both formal and informal environments affected HRM performance. Research limitations/implications While document review was a major source of data for this paper, the weaknesses in the human resource information system limited availability of data. Practical implications This paper presents an argument for the need for consideration of formal and informal environments in developing effective HRM strategies. Originality/value This research provides a rare system-wide approach to health HRM in a Sub-Saharan African country. It contributes to the literature and evidence needed to guide HRM policy decisions and practices.

  5. Chemical-management policy: prioritizing children's health.

    PubMed

    2011-05-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that chemical-management policy in the United States be revised to protect children and pregnant women and to better protect other populations. The Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) was passed in 1976. It is widely recognized to have been ineffective in protecting children, pregnant women, and the general population from hazardous chemicals in the marketplace. It does not take into account the special vulnerabilities of children in attempting to protect the population from chemical hazards. Its processes are so cumbersome that in its more than 30 years of existence, the TSCA has been used to regulate only 5 chemicals or chemical classes of the tens of thousands of chemicals that are in commerce. Under the TSCA, chemical companies have no responsibility to perform premarket testing or postmarket follow-up of the products that they produce; in fact, the TSCA contains disincentives for the companies to produce such data. Voluntary programs have been inadequate in resolving problems. Therefore, chemical-management policy needs to be rewritten in the United States. Manufacturers must be responsible for developing information about chemicals before marketing. The US Environmental Protection Agency must have the authority to demand additional safety data about a chemical and to limit or stop the marketing of a chemical when there is a high degree of suspicion that the chemical might be harmful to children, pregnant women, or other populations.

  6. 41 CFR 105-53.143 - Information Resources Management Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and records management activities; managing and operating the Information Technology Fund; managing... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Information Resources... FUNCTIONS Central Offices § 105-53.143 Information Resources Management Service. (a) Creation and...

  7. 41 CFR 105-53.143 - Information Resources Management Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and records management activities; managing and operating the Information Technology Fund; managing... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Information Resources... FUNCTIONS Central Offices § 105-53.143 Information Resources Management Service. (a) Creation and...

  8. 41 CFR 105-53.143 - Information Resources Management Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and records management activities; managing and operating the Information Technology Fund; managing... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Information Resources... FUNCTIONS Central Offices § 105-53.143 Information Resources Management Service. (a) Creation and...

  9. Report: EPA Needs Policies and Procedures to Manage Public Pesticide Petitions in a Transparent and Efficient Manner

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #16-P-0019, October 27, 2015. OPP’s lack of policies and procedures to manage public pesticide petitions in a transparent and efficient manner can result in unreasonable delay lawsuits costing the agency time and resources.

  10. Managing water resources for sustainable development: the case of integrated river basin management in China.

    PubMed

    Song, X; Ravesteijn, W; Frostell, B; Wennersten, R

    2010-01-01

    The emerging water crisis in China shows that the current institutional frameworks and policies with regard to water resources management are incapable of achieving an effective and satisfactory situation that includes Integrated River Basin Management (IRBM). This paper analyses this framework and related policies, examines their deficiencies in relation to all water stress problems and explores alternatives focusing on river basins. Water resources management reforms in modern China are reviewed and the main problems involved in transforming the current river management system into an IRBM-based system are analysed. The Huai River basin is used as an example of current river basin management, with quantitative data serving to show the scale and scope of the problems in the country as a whole. The institutional reforms required are discussed and a conceptual institutional framework is proposed to facilitate the implementation of IRBM in China. In particular, the roles, power and responsibilities of River Basin Commissions (RBCs) should be legally strengthened; the functions of supervising, decision-making and execution should be separated; and cross-sectoral legislation, institutional coordination and public participation at all levels should be promoted.

  11. 43 CFR 1610.4 - Resource management planning process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Resource management planning process. 1610.4 Section 1610.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF... Resource Management Planning § 1610.4 Resource management planning process....

  12. 43 CFR 1610.4 - Resource management planning process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Resource management planning process. 1610.4 Section 1610.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF... Resource Management Planning § 1610.4 Resource management planning process....

  13. 41 CFR 105-53.143 - Information Resources Management Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Resources... FUNCTIONS Central Offices § 105-53.143 Information Resources Management Service. (a) Creation and authority. The Information Resources Management Service (IRMS), headed by the Commissioner, Information...

  14. 14 CFR 135.330 - Crew resource management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Crew resource management training. 135.330... § 135.330 Crew resource management training. (a) Each certificate holder must have an approved crew resource management training program that includes initial and recurrent training. The training...

  15. 14 CFR 135.330 - Crew resource management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Crew resource management training. 135.330... § 135.330 Crew resource management training. (a) Each certificate holder must have an approved crew resource management training program that includes initial and recurrent training. The training...

  16. 41 CFR 105-53.143 - Information Resources Management Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Information Resources... FUNCTIONS Central Offices § 105-53.143 Information Resources Management Service. (a) Creation and authority. The Information Resources Management Service (IRMS), headed by the Commissioner, Information...

  17. 14 CFR 135.330 - Crew resource management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Crew resource management training. 135.330... § 135.330 Crew resource management training. (a) Each certificate holder must have an approved crew resource management training program that includes initial and recurrent training. The training...

  18. 43 CFR 1610.4 - Resource management planning process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Resource management planning process. 1610.4 Section 1610.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF... Resource Management Planning § 1610.4 Resource management planning process....

  19. The community resource management area mechanism: a strategy to manage African forest resources for REDD+.

    PubMed

    Asare, Rebecca A; Kyei, Andrew; Mason, John J

    2013-01-01

    Climate change poses a significant threat to Africa, and deforestation rates have increased in recent years. Mitigation initiatives such as REDD+ are widely considered as potentially efficient ways to generate emission reductions (or removals), conserve or sustainably manage forests, and bring benefits to communities, but effective implementation models are lacking. This paper presents the case of Ghana's Community Resource Management Area (CREMA) mechanism, an innovative natural resource governance and landscape-level planning tool that authorizes communities to manage their natural resources for economic and livelihood benefits. This paper argues that while the CREMA was originally developed to facilitate community-based wildlife management and habitat protection, it offers a promising community-based structure and process for managing African forest resources for REDD+. At a theoretical level, it conforms to the ecological, socio-cultural and economic factors that drive resource-users' decision process and practices. And from a practical mitigation standpoint, the CREMA has the potential to help solve many of the key challenges for REDD+ in Africa, including definition of boundaries, smallholder aggregation, free prior and informed consent, ensuring permanence, preventing leakage, clarifying land tenure and carbon rights, as well as enabling equitable benefit-sharing arrangements. Ultimately, CREMA's potential as a forest management and climate change mitigation strategy that generates livelihood benefits for smallholder farmers and forest users will depend upon the willingness of African governments to support the mechanism and give it full legislative backing, and the motivation of communities to adopt the CREMA and integrate democratic decision-making and planning with their traditional values and natural resource management systems.

  20. The community resource management area mechanism: a strategy to manage African forest resources for REDD+

    PubMed Central

    Asare, Rebecca A.; Kyei, Andrew; Mason, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change poses a significant threat to Africa, and deforestation rates have increased in recent years. Mitigation initiatives such as REDD+ are widely considered as potentially efficient ways to generate emission reductions (or removals), conserve or sustainably manage forests, and bring benefits to communities, but effective implementation models are lacking. This paper presents the case of Ghana's Community Resource Management Area (CREMA) mechanism, an innovative natural resource governance and landscape-level planning tool that authorizes communities to manage their natural resources for economic and livelihood benefits. This paper argues that while the CREMA was originally developed to facilitate community-based wildlife management and habitat protection, it offers a promising community-based structure and process for managing African forest resources for REDD+. At a theoretical level, it conforms to the ecological, socio-cultural and economic factors that drive resource-users’ decision process and practices. And from a practical mitigation standpoint, the CREMA has the potential to help solve many of the key challenges for REDD+ in Africa, including definition of boundaries, smallholder aggregation, free prior and informed consent, ensuring permanence, preventing leakage, clarifying land tenure and carbon rights, as well as enabling equitable benefit-sharing arrangements. Ultimately, CREMA's potential as a forest management and climate change mitigation strategy that generates livelihood benefits for smallholder farmers and forest users will depend upon the willingness of African governments to support the mechanism and give it full legislative backing, and the motivation of communities to adopt the CREMA and integrate democratic decision-making and planning with their traditional values and natural resource management systems. PMID:23878338

  1. Managing water resources for crop production

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, J. S.; Batchelor, C. H.

    1997-01-01

    Increasing crop production to meet the food requirements of the world's growing population will put great pressure on global water resources. Given that the vast freshwater resources that are available in the world are far from fully exploited, globally there should be sufficient water for future agricultural requirements. However, there are large areas where low water supply and high human demand may lead to regional shortages of water for future food production. In these arid and semi-arid areas, where water is a major constraint on production, improving water resource management is crucial if Malthusian disasters are to be avoided. There is considerable scope for improvement, since in both dryland and irrigated agriculture only about one-third of the available water (as rainfall, surface, or groundwater) is used to grow useful plants. This paper illustrates a range of techniques that could lead to increased crop production by improving agricultural water use efficiency. This may be achieved by increasing the total amount of water available to plants or by increasing the efficiency with which that water is used to produce biomass. Although the crash from the Malthusian precipice may ultimately be inevitable if population growth is not addressed, the time taken to reach the edge of the precipice could be lengthened by more efficient use of existing water resources.

  2. Cooperative Solutions for Sustainable Resource Management.

    PubMed

    Lejano; Davos

    1999-09-01

    / Many environmental management issues can be defined as allocation problems, e.g., the allocation of rights to use common-pool resources or the allocation of the cost of regional resource development projects. The allocation methods developed in the area of cooperative n-person game theory are most appropriate for these problems because they focus on the conditions for engendering and sustaining the necessary cooperation among the involved stakeholders. These solution concepts seek to ensure that the allocation is based on some norm of equity and, most often, also to minimize the incentive for any player to defect from the cooperative venture. We illustrate these solution concepts with an application to a water resource project in Southern California. We argue how the rigorous mathematical nature of these solution concepts should not hinder their application to actual situations and how, with the use of heuristic rules and inexact notions of comparable worths, we can employ these concepts even in approximate fashion. We remind ourselves that the goal of such an endeavor is to convince stakeholders of the equity of a proposed solution and, in so doing, maximize the prospect of sustained cooperation. The alternative to cooperation, on the other hand, may be endless stalemate.KEY WORDS: Core; Game theory; Equity; Common-pool resources; Sustainabilityhttp://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00267/bibs/24n2p167.html

  3. A new view for resource managers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, Robert H.

    1986-01-01

    In decades past, the rancher depended upon reports from cowboys to gather information he needed to make management decisions. Today, the vast open ranges of the cowboy era are mostly gone in the United States-fenced into pastures, paddocks, or fields that are now discrete management units. But fencing in the rangeland, while it has replaced much of the need for cowboys, has not replaced the need for information about the health and vigor of the forage on each parcel of land. Can a satellite, orbiting at more than 400 miles in space, serve this purpose? As ranchers and resource specialists are asked to make more and more complex management decisions, with less manpower for conducting inventories, they are wise to seek help in today's rapidly developing technologies. For the past few decades the range technician has accomplished most of his range assessment from a pickup truck, traveling periodically to each unit to determine its status. Now, satellite images of the Earth's resources might be able to help the modern range person do an even more efficient job of monitoring the availability of feed for livestock and wildlife. Yet some important questions need to be answered first. Can this new information source be used to evaluate the ecological condition of these lands? Or are satellite images of our Earth and its variety of landscapes just "pretty pictures," with little practical utility?

  4. Space Flight Resource Management for ISS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Lacey L.; Slack, Kelley; Holland, Albert; Huning, Therese; O'Keefe, William; Sipes, Walter E.

    2010-01-01

    Although the astronaut training flow for the International Space Station (ISS) spans 2 years, each astronaut or cosmonaut often spends most of their training alone. Rarely is it operationally feasible for all six ISS crewmembers to train together, even more unlikely that crewmembers can practice living together before launch. Likewise, ISS Flight Controller training spans 18 months of learning to manage incredibly complex systems remotely in plug-and-play ground teams that have little to no exposure to crewmembers before a mission. How then do all of these people quickly become a team - a team that must respond flexibly yet decisively to a variety of situations? The answer implemented at NASA is Space Flight Resource Management (SFRM), the so-called "soft skills" or team performance skills. Based on Crew Resource Management, SFRM was developed first for shuttle astronauts and focused on managing human errors during time-critical events (Rogers, et al. 2002). Given the nature of life on ISS, the scope of SFRM for ISS broadened to include teamwork during prolonged and routine operations (O'Keefe, 2008). The ISS SFRM model resembles a star with one competency for each point: Communication, Cross-Culture, Teamwork, Decision Making, Team Care, Leadership/Followership, Conflict Management, and Situation Awareness. These eight competencies were developed with international participation by the Human Behavior and Performance Training Working Group. Over the last two years, these competencies have been used to build a multi-modal SFRM training flow for astronaut candidates and flight controllers that integrates team performance skills into the practice of technical skills. Preliminary results show trainee skill increases as the flow progresses; and participants find the training invaluable to performing well and staying healthy during ISS operations. Future development of SFRM training will aim to help support indirect handovers as ISS operations evolve further with the

  5. Social Network Resources and Management of Hypertension*

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, Erin York; Waite, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases among older adults, but rates of blood pressure control are low. In this paper, we explore the role of social network ties and network-based resources (e.g., information and support) in hypertension diagnosis and management. We use data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) to identify older adults with undiagnosed or uncontrolled hypertension. We find that network characteristics and emotional support are associated with hypertension diagnosis and control. Importantly, the risks of undiagnosed and uncontrolled hypertension are lower among those with larger social networks -- if they discuss health issues with their network members. When these lines of communication are closed, network size is associated with greater risk of undiagnosed and uncontrolled hypertension. Health care utilization partially mediates associations with diagnosis, but the benefits of network resources for hypertension control do not seem to stem from health-related behaviors. PMID:22660826

  6. Managing Information Resources: New Directions in State Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caudle, Sharon L.; Marchand, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    Describes a national survey of management policies and practices applied to information and information technology in state government. Management approaches and trends are discussed in the areas of data processing, telecommunications, office automation, records management, state library services, policy formation, budgeting and accounting,…

  7. Integrated dynamic policy management methodology and system for strategic environmental assessment of golf course installation policy in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ching-Ho; Liu, Wei-Lin; Liaw, Shu-Liang

    2011-01-15

    Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) focuses primarily on assessing how policies, plans, and programs (PPPs) influence the sustainability of the involved regions. However, the processes of assessing policies and developing management strategies for pollution load and resource use are usually separate in the current SEA system. This study developed a policy management methodology to overcome the defects generated during the above processes. This work first devised a dynamic management framework using the methods of systems thinking, system dynamics, and Managing for Results (MFRs). Furthermore, a driving force-pressure-state-impact-response (DPSIR) indicator system was developed. The golf course installation policy was applied as a case study. Taiwan, counties of Taiwan, and the golf courses within those individual counties were identified as a system, subsystems, and objects, respectively. This study identified an object-linked double-layer framework with multi-stage-option to simultaneously to quantify golf courses in each subsystem and determine ratios of abatement and allocation for pollution load and resource use of each golf course. The DPSIR indicator values for each item of each golf course in each subsystem are calculated based on the options taken in the two decision layers. The summation of indicator values for all items of all golf courses in all subsystems according to various options is defined as the sustainability value of the policy. An optimization model and a system (IDPMS) were developed to obtain the greatest sustainability value of the policy, while golf course quantity, human activity intensity, total quantities of pollution load and resource use are simultaneously obtained. The solution method based on enumeration of multiple bounds for objectives and constraints (EMBOC) was developed for the problem with 1.95 x 10{sup 128} combinations of possible options to solve the optimal solution in ten minutes using a personal computer with 3.0 GHz

  8. NORMATIVE SCIENCE: A CORRUPTING INFLUENCE IN ECOLOGICAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE POLICY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effectively resolving the typical ecological or natural resource policy issue requires providing an array of scientific information to decision-makers. The ability of scientists (and scientific information) to constructively inform ecological policy deliberations has been dimi...

  9. Governance in managing public health resources in Brazilian municipalities.

    PubMed

    Avelino, George; Barberia, Lorena G; Biderman, Ciro

    2014-09-01

    This study contributes to the health governance discussion by presenting a new data set that allows for comparisons of the management of health resources among Brazilian municipalities. Research on Brazil is particularly important as the provision of health services was decentralized in 1988 and since then municipalities have been given greater responsibilities for the management of fiscal resources for public health service provision. Based on detailed information on corruption practices (such as over-invoicing, illegal procurement and fake receipts) from audit reports of health programmes in 980 randomly selected Brazilian municipalities, this study deepens understanding of the relationship between health governance institutions and the incidence of corruption at the local level by exploring the extent to which horizontal and vertical accountabilities contribute to reducing the propensity of municipal government officials to divert public health resources for private gain. The results of our multiple regression analysis suggest that the experience of health municipal councils is correlated with reductions in the incidence of corruption in public health programmes. This impact is significant over time, with each additional year of health council experience reducing corruption incidence levels by 2.1% from baseline values. The findings reported in this study do not rely on the subjectivity of corruption measures which usually conflate the actual incidence of corruption with its perception by informants. Based on our results, we provide recommendations that can assist policy makers to reduce corruption.

  10. Selecting pilots with crew resource management skills.

    PubMed

    Hedge, J W; Bruskiewicz, K T; Borman, W C; Hanson, M A; Logan, K K; Siem, F M

    2000-10-01

    For years, pilot selection has focused primarily on the identification of individuals with superior flying skills and abilities. More recently, the aviation community has become increasingly aware that successful completion of a flight or mission requires not only flying skills but the ability to work well in a crew situation. This project involved development and validation of a crew resource management (CRM) skills test for Air Force transport pilots. A significant relation was found between the CRM skills test and behavior-based ratings of aircraft commander CRM performance, and the implications of these findings for CRM-based selection and training are discussed.

  11. AOIPS water resources data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanwie, P.

    1977-01-01

    The text and computer-generated displays used to demonstrate the AOIPS (Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System) water resources data management system are investigated. The system was developed to assist hydrologists in analyzing the physical processes occurring in watersheds. It was designed to alleviate some of the problems encountered while investigating the complex interrelationships of variables such as land-cover type, topography, precipitation, snow melt, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, and streamflow rates. The system has an interactive image processing capability and a color video display to display results as they are obtained.

  12. The importance of human resources management in health care: a global context

    PubMed Central

    Kabene, Stefane M; Orchard, Carole; Howard, John M; Soriano, Mark A; Leduc, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    Background This paper addresses the health care system from a global perspective and the importance of human resources management (HRM) in improving overall patient health outcomes and delivery of health care services. Methods We explored the published literature and collected data through secondary sources. Results Various key success factors emerge that clearly affect health care practices and human resources management. This paper will reveal how human resources management is essential to any health care system and how it can improve health care models. Challenges in the health care systems in Canada, the United States of America and various developing countries are examined, with suggestions for ways to overcome these problems through the proper implementation of human resources management practices. Comparing and contrasting selected countries allowed a deeper understanding of the practical and crucial role of human resources management in health care. Conclusion Proper management of human resources is critical in providing a high quality of health care. A refocus on human resources management in health care and more research are needed to develop new policies. Effective human resources management strategies are greatly needed to achieve better outcomes from and access to health care around the world. PMID:16872531

  13. 41 CFR 109-28.5103 - Management policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Management policy. 109-28.5103 Section 109-28.5103 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT...

  14. 41 CFR 109-28.5103 - Management policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Management policy. 109-28.5103 Section 109-28.5103 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT...

  15. Human resources for health and decentralization policy in the Brazilian health system

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Brazilian health reform process, following the establishment of the Unified Health System (SUS), has had a strong emphasis on decentralization, with a special focus on financing, management and inter-managerial agreements. Brazil is a federal country and the Ministry of Health (MoH), through the Secretary of Labour Management and Health Education, is responsible for establishing national policy guidelines for health labour management, and also for implementing strategies for the decentralization of management of labour and education in the federal states. This paper assesses whether the process of decentralizing human resources for health (HRH) management and organization to the level of the state and municipal health departments has involved investments in technical, political and financial resources at the national level. Methods The research methods used comprise a survey of HRH managers of states and major municipalities (including capitals) and focus groups with these HRH managers - all by geographic region. The results were obtained by combining survey and focus group data, and also through triangulation with the results of previous research. Results The results of this evaluation showed the evolution policy, previously restricted to the field of 'personnel administration', now expanded to a conceptual model for health labour management and education-- identifying progress, setbacks, critical issues and challenges for the consolidation of the decentralized model for HRH management. The results showed that 76.3% of the health departments have an HRH unit. It was observed that 63.2% have an HRH information system. However, in most health departments, the HRH unit uses only the payroll and administrative records as data sources. Concerning education in health, 67.6% of the HRH managers mentioned existing cooperation with educational and teaching institutions for training and/or specialization of health workers. Among them, specialization courses

  16. Knowledge Assessment on Sustainable Water Resources Management for Irrigation - KASWARMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardowicks, K.; Billib, M.; Holzapfel, E.; Lorite, I.; Farkas, I.; Fernández Cirelli, A.; Del Callejo, I.; Paz, V.; Montaña, E.; Gheyi, H.

    2009-04-01

    The EU funded KASWARMI project was performed from March 2007 until August 2008 by focusing on society key issues to contribute to a better use and management of the water resources in arid and semi-arid ecosystems. In that way, the project has aimed to deliver fundamentals for future research activities to improve the sustainability of irrigated agriculture in Latin America. The world's food production depends on the availability of water, a precious but limited resource. Irrigated agriculture is responsible for approximately 70 percent of all the freshwater withdrawn in the world and more water will be used for irrigation in the future, as world food production continuously increases in order to meet rising demand. The challenge for irrigated agriculture today is to contribute to the world's food production and improvement of food security through a more efficient, cleaner and integrated use of water (FAO). The main objective of KASWARMI was to build up a comprehensive knowledge base, including the evaluation of current state of the art, assembling international experience in an interdisciplinary scientific network on sustainable water resources management for irrigation. In six selected irrigated areas in Latin America a basic analysis of the major socio-economical, environmental, institutional and agrotechnical aspects was carried out. The approach of KASWARMI was to learn from the past and ongoing research activities to identify gaps and the scope for the collaboration of potential stakeholders (farmers, researchers, other water users, policy makers). The direct communication between the researchers and the stakeholders in the field study areas was used to identify their main needs, finding strategies for future activities to solve open questions of sustainable water resources management for irrigation in Latin America. More information is available at site www.kaswarmi.eu.

  17. Impact of human resource management practices on nursing home performance.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, K V; Wagar, T H

    2001-08-01

    Management scholars and practitioners alike have become increasingly interested in learning more about the ability of certain 'progressive' or 'high-performance' human resource management (HRM) practices to enhance organizational effectiveness. There is growing evidence to suggest that the contribution of various HRM practices to impact firm performance may be synergistic in effect yet contingent on a number of contextual factors, including workplace climate. A contingency theory perspective suggests that in order to be effective, HMR policies and practices must be consistent with other aspects of the organization, including its environment. This paper reports on empirical findings from research that examines the relationship between HRM practices, workplace climate and perceptions of organizational performance, in a large sample of Canadian nursing homes. Data from 283 nursing homes were collected by means of a mail survey that included questions on HRM practices, programmes, and policies, on human resource aspects of workplace climate, as well as a variety of indicators that include employee, customer/resident and facility measures of organizational performance. Results derived from ordered probit analysis suggest that nursing homes in our sample which had implemented more 'progressive' HRM practices and which reported a workplace climate that strongly values employee participation, empowerment and accountability tended to be perceived to generally perform better on a number of valued organizational outcomes. Nursing homes in our sample that performed best overall were found to be more likely to not only have implemented more of these HRM practices, but also to report having a workplace climate that reflects the seminal value that it places on its human resources. This finding is consistent with the conclusion that simply introducing HRM practices or programmes, in the absence of an appropriately supportive workplace climate, will be insufficient to attain

  18. [HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT BASED ON COMPETENCIES].

    PubMed

    Larumbe Andueza, Ma Carmen; De Mendoza Cánton, Juana Hermoso

    2016-05-01

    We are living in a time with a lot of changes in which health organizations have more challenges to face. One of them is to recognize, strengthen, develop and retain the talent they have. Competency-based human resources management is emerging as a tool that contributes to achieve that aim. Competencies from the generic or characteristic perspective: personality traits, values and motivations, which are deeply rooted in the person. Through elaborating a competencies map for the organization, and identifying the job competencies profile, above all in key jobs, the employees know what it is going to expect from them. After, detect and cover the learning needs, it is possible to achieve better adjust between worker-job. The nursing unit manager is a key job because it is a link between management team and nursing team. The way that it is performed, it will have impact on the quality of care and its team motivation. So, the most adequate person who covers this job would have a part of knowledge, skills, attitudes and compatible interests with her job. Competency-based management helps identify both the potential and learning needs to performing this job.

  19. Policy, Procedures and Standards for Enterprise Information Management

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This policy establishes a standard approach for managing information produced by, funded by, or received per regulated reporting and/or federal-wide requirements and subsequently held or cataloged in information management systems by EPA.

  20. Overview of the Environmental and Water Resources Institute's "Guidelines For Integrated Water Resources Management" Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Sehlke

    2005-03-01

    Integrated Water Resources Management is a systematic approach to optimizing our understanding, control and management of water resources within a basin to meet multiple objectives. Recognition of the need for integrating water resources within basins is not unique to the Environmental and Water Resources Institute’s Integrated Water Resources Management Task Committee. Many individuals, governments and other organizations have attempted to develop holistic water resources management programs. In some cases, the results have been very effective and in other cases, valiant attempts have fallen far short of their initial goals. The intent of this Task Committee is to provide a set of guidelines that discusses the concepts, methods and tools necessary for integrating and optimizing the management of the physical resources and to optimize and integrate programs, organizations, infrastructure, and socioeconomic institutions into comprehensive water resources management programs.

  1. Merging Two Futures Concepts: Issues Management and Policy Impact Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renfro, William L.; Morrison, James L.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a workshop held during the 1982 World Future Society's Fourth General Assembly on the combined application of issues management and policy impact analysis. The workshop participants applied futures research, forecasting, goal-setting, and policy development techniques to future problems in educational policy. (AM)

  2. Policy and Procedures for Managing Dual Use Research of Concern

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The DURC and iDURC Policies require all federal departments and agencies that conduct life sciences research to implement their provisions. EPA Order 1000.19, Policy and Procedures for Managing Dual Use Research of Concern, implements both policies at EPA.

  3. HCV management in resource-constrained countries.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seng Gee

    2017-02-21

    With the arrival of all-oral directly acting antiviral (DAA) therapy with high cure rates, the promise of hepatitis C virus (HCV) eradication is within closer reach. The availability of generic DAAs has improved access to countries with constrained resources. However, therapy is only one component of the HCV care continuum, which is the framework for HCV management from identifying patients to cure. The large number of undiagnosed HCV cases is the biggest concern, and strategies to address this are needed, as risk factor screening is suboptimal, detecting <20% of known cases. Improvements in HCV confirmation through either reflex HCV RNA screening or ideally a sensitive point of care test are needed. HCV notification (e.g., Australia) may improve diagnosis (proportion of HCV diagnosed is 75%) and may lead to benefits by increasing linkage to care, therapy and cure. Evaluations for cirrhosis using non-invasive markers are best done with a biological panel, but they are only moderately accurate. In resource-constrained settings, only generic HCV medications are available, and a combination of sofosbuvir, ribavirin, ledipasvir or daclatasvir provides sufficient efficacy for all genotypes, but this is likely to be replaced with pangenetypic regimens such as sofosbuvir/velpatasvir and glecaprevir/pibrentaasvir. In conclusion, HCV management in resource-constrained settings is challenging on multiple fronts because of the lack of infrastructure, facilities, trained manpower and equipment. However, it is still possible to make a significant impact towards HCV eradication through a concerted effort by individuals and national organisations with domain expertise in this area.

  4. Scalable resource management in high performance computers.

    SciTech Connect

    Frachtenberg, E.; Petrini, F.; Fernandez Peinador, J.; Coll, S.

    2002-01-01

    Clusters of workstations have emerged as an important platform for building cost-effective, scalable and highly-available computers. Although many hardware solutions are available today, the largest challenge in making large-scale clusters usable lies in the system software. In this paper we present STORM, a resource management tool designed to provide scalability, low overhead and the flexibility necessary to efficiently support and analyze a wide range of job scheduling algorithms. STORM achieves these feats by closely integrating the management daemons with the low-level features that are common in state-of-the-art high-performance system area networks. The architecture of STORM is based on three main technical innovations. First, a sizable part of the scheduler runs in the thread processor located on the network interface. Second, we use hardware collectives that are highly scalable both for implementing control heartbeats and to distribute the binary of a parallel job in near-constant time, irrespective of job and machine sizes. Third, we use an I/O bypass protocol that allows fast data movements from the file system to the communication buffers in the network interface and vice versa. The experimental results show that STORM can launch a job with a binary of 12MB on a 64 processor/32 node cluster in less than 0.25 sec on an empty network, in less than 0.45 sec when all the processors are busy computing other jobs, and in less than 0.65 sec when the network is flooded with a background traffic. This paper provides experimental and analytical evidence that these results scale to a much larger number of nodes. To the best of our knowledge, STORM is at least two orders of magnitude faster than existing production schedulers in launching jobs, performing resource management tasks and gang scheduling.

  5. E-Resources Management: How We Positioned Our Organization to Implement an Electronic Resources Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marilyn; Sanders, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The Information Services Division (ISD) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) positioned itself to successfully implement an electronic resources management system. This article highlights the ISD's unique ability to "team" across the organization to realize a common goal, develop leadership qualities in support of…

  6. Resource allocation strategies in Southeastern European health policy.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Mihajlo B

    2013-04-01

    The past 23 years of post-socialist restructuring of health system funding and management patterns has brought many changes to small Balkan markets, putting them under increasing pressure to keep pace with advancing globalization. Socioeconomic inequalities in healthcare access are still growing across the region. This uneven development is marked by the substantial difficulties encountered by local governments in delivering medical services to broad sectors of the population. This paper presents the results of a systematic review of the following evidence: published reports on health system reforms in the region commissioned by WHO, IMF, World Bank, OECD, European Commission; all available published evidence on health economics, funding, reimbursement in world/local languages since 1989 indexed at Medline, Excerpta Medica and Google Scholar; in depth analysis of official website data on medical care financing related legislation among key public institutions such as national Ministries of health, Health Insurance Funds, Professional Associations were applicable, in local languages; correspondence with key opinion leaders in the field in their respective communities. Contributors were asked to answer a particular set of questions related to the issue, thus enlightening fresh legislative developments and hidden patterns of policy maker's behavior. Cost awareness is slowly expanding in regional management, academic and industrial establishment. The study provides an exact and comprehensive description of its current extent and legislative framework. Western Balkans policy makers would profit substantially from health-economics-based decision-making to cope with increasing difficulties in funding and delivering medical care in emerging markets with a rapidly growing demand for health services.

  7. The Role of Schools' Perceived Human Resource Policies in Teachers' Professional Development Activities: A Comparative Study of Innovations toward Competence-Based Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seezink, Audrey; Poell, Rob

    2011-01-01

    The change toward competence-based education has implications for teachers as well as school management. This study investigates which professional development activities teachers undertake related to this change and how these activities differ among schools with various human resource (HR) policies. Two types of HR policy were involved: (1) a…

  8. Houston Cole Library Collection Management and Development Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, William Abbot, Ed.; McAbee, Sonja L., Ed.

    This report describes the collection management and development policy of, and the diverse collections housed at, Jacksonville State University's Houston Cole Library. The first part of the report consists of a detailed collection management and development policy statement, beginning with the history of the library, the physical disposition of…

  9. 76 FR 9870 - Financial Management Policies-Interest Rate Risk

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Financial Management Policies--Interest Rate Risk AGENCY: Office of Thrift... of Proposal: Financial Management Policies--Interest Rate Risk OMB Number: 1550-0094 Form Number:...

  10. 76 FR 23646 - Financial Management Policies-Interest Rate Risk

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Financial Management Policies--Interest Rate Risk AGENCY: Office of Thrift... following information collection. Title of Proposal: Financial Management Policies--Interest Rate Risk....

  11. Water resources management in a homogenizing world: Averting the Growth and Underinvestment trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirchi, Ali; Watkins, David W.; Huckins, Casey J.; Madani, Kaveh; Hjorth, Peder

    2014-09-01

    Biotic homogenization, a de facto symptom of a global biodiversity crisis, underscores the urgency of reforming water resources management to focus on the health and viability of ecosystems. Global population and economic growth, coupled with inadequate investment in maintenance of ecological systems, threaten to degrade environmental integrity and ecosystem services that support the global socioeconomic system, indicative of a system governed by the Growth and Underinvestment (G&U) archetype. Water resources management is linked to biotic homogenization and degradation of system integrity through alteration of water systems, ecosystem dynamics, and composition of the biota. Consistent with the G&U archetype, water resources planning primarily treats ecological considerations as exogenous constraints rather than integral, dynamic, and responsive parts of the system. It is essential that the ecological considerations be made objectives of water resources development plans to facilitate the analysis of feedbacks and potential trade-offs between socioeconomic gains and ecological losses. We call for expediting a shift to ecosystem-based management of water resources, which requires a better understanding of the dynamics and links between water resources management actions, ecological side-effects, and associated long-term ramifications for sustainability. To address existing knowledge gaps, models that include dynamics and estimated thresholds for regime shifts or ecosystem degradation need to be developed. Policy levers for implementation of ecosystem-based water resources management include shifting away from growth-oriented supply management, better demand management, increased public awareness, and institutional reform that promotes adaptive and transdisciplinary management approaches.

  12. Quality Management in Hungarian Higher Education: Organisational Responses to Governmental Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csizmadia, Tibor; Enders, Jurgen; Westerheijden, Don F.

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on responses of higher education institutions to governmental policy. We investigate the influence of organisational characteristics on the implementation of quality management in Hungarian higher education institutions. Our theoretical framework is based on organisational theories (resource dependency and…

  13. A Dynamic Management Method for Fast Manufacturing Resource Reconfiguration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhiye

    To fast and optimally reconfigure manufacturing resource, a dynamic management method for fast manufacturing resource reconfiguration based on holon was proposed. In this method, a dynamic management structure for fast manufacturing resource reconfiguration was established based on holon. Moreover, the cooperation relationship among holons for fast manufacturing resource reconfiguration and the manufacturing information cooperation mechanism based on holonic were constructed. Finally, the simulation system of a dynamic management method for fast manufacturing resource reconfiguration was demonstrated and validated by Flexsim software. It has shown the proposed method can dynamically and optimally reconfigure manufacturing resource, and it can effectively improve the efficiency of manufacturing processes.

  14. Toward Strategic Human Resource Management in the Central Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosley Linhardt, Heather LeAnn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and explore how human resources are managed, what human resource management can look like, and what organizational issues, tensions, and ambiguities are likely to surface as a district central office moves toward being more strategic with their human resources. The research design was an exploratory case…

  15. The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program: An experiment in science-based resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kaplinski, m

    2001-12-01

    In 1996, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management (GCDAMP) program was established to provide input on Glen Canyon Dam operations and their affect on the Colorado Ecosystem in Grand Canyon. The GCDAMP is a bold experiment in federal resource management that features a governing partnership with all relevant stakeholders sitting at the same table. It is a complicated, difficult process where stakeholder-derived management actions must balance resource protection with water and power delivery compacts, the Endangered Species Act, the National Historical Preservation Act, the Grand Canyon Protection Act, National Park Service Policy, and other stakeholder concerns. The program consists of four entities: the Adaptive Management Workgroup (AMWG), the Technical Workgroup (TWG), the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC), and independent review panels. The AMWG and TWG are federal advisory committees that consists of federal and state resource managers, Native American tribes, power, environmental and recreation interests. The AMWG is develops, evaluates and recommends alternative dam operations to the Secretary. The TWG translates AMWG policy and goals into management objectives and information needs, provides questions that serve as the basis for long-term monitoring and research activities, interprets research results from the GCMRC, and prepares reports as required for the AMWG. The GCMRC is an independent science center that is responsible for all GCDAMP monitoring and research activities. The GCMRC utilizes proposal requests with external peer review and an in-house staff that directs and synthesizes monitoring and research results. The GCMRC meets regularly with the TWG and AMWG and provides scientific information on the consequences of GCDAMP actions. Independent review panels consist of external peer review panels that provide reviews of scientific activities and the program in general, technical advice to the GCMRC, TWG and AMWG, and play a critical

  16. Research-Informed Policy Options for Infant and Toddler Early Care and Education: Research-to-Policy Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    This Research-to-Policy Resource List compiles research-based policy documents published in 2010 and later on the following topics: Early learning guidelines for infants and toddlers; Program standards for settings serving infants and toddlers; Core competencies and credentials for caregivers of infants and toddlers; Use of infant/toddler…

  17. Efficient management of marine resources in conflict: an empirical study of marine sand mining, Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Goun

    2009-10-01

    This article develops a dynamic model of efficient use of exhaustible marine sand resources in the context of marine mining externalities. The classical Hotelling extraction model is applied to sand mining in Ongjin, Korea and extended to include the estimated marginal external costs that mining imposes on marine fisheries. The socially efficient sand extraction plan is compared with the extraction paths suggested by scientific research. If marginal environmental costs are correctly estimated, the developed efficient extraction plan considering the resource rent may increase the social welfare and reduce the conflicts among the marine sand resource users. The empirical results are interpreted with an emphasis on guidelines for coastal resource management policy.

  18. Water Resources Management In The Eastern Himalayan Urban Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomjan, S.

    The Himalayan ecosystem is one of the most important and threatened ecosystems on the earth. In this region, the scarcity of water in general, and drinking water in par- ticular is affecting common people and drawing the attention of researchers. Given the present situation and governance, in the near future it is most likely to deteriorate further. With expanding population and urbanization, accelerating human activities, and increasing per capita water consumption, problem of water supply in the moun- tain households will be certainly acute in the coming years. This crisis of decreasing availability of water is not only going to hamper the economic development of the region, but is also likely to threaten the very survival of the already marginalised and deprived people who are also on the brink of poverty and are incapable of coping with such crisis. Sustainable water harvesting and management of water resources offers the best hope for meeting the challenges of the growing water crisis. For this appropriate policy intervention, use of latest technology, application of tools like GIS and information from the satellite imageries, community participation and use of tra- ditional knowledge and traditional water management practices will be essential to overcome the challenge of looming water crisis. Darjiling Himalaya, located in the eastern Himalayas has a fragile environment and it is witnessing serious problems both in quality and quantity of water supply. Weak institutional arrangements, lack of awareness among citizens and a gap in the effective arrangements are huge stumbling blocks. This region is endowed with abundance of water resources and rich ecosystem. Therefore, this calls for an effective and participatory water management system with due attention given to the upgradation and expansion of the existing infrastructure. This paper takes a stock of the existing water resources in the Darjiling Himalaya, especially around the town of Darjiling, discusses

  19. Water footprint as a tool for integrated water resources management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaya, Maite; Hoekstra, Arjen

    2010-05-01

    together with the water footprint concept could thus provide an appropriate framework to support more optimal water management practices by informing production and trade decisions and the development and adoption of water efficient technology. In order to move towards better water governance however a further integration of water-related concerns into water-related sectoral policies is paramount. This will require a concerted effort by all stakeholders, the willingness to adopt a total resource view where water is seen as a key, cross-sectoral input for development and growth, a mix of technical approaches, and the courage to undertake and fund water sector reforms. We are convinced that the water footprint analysis can provide a sufficiently robust fact base for meaningful stakeholder dialogue and action towards solutions.

  20. Adaptation for river basins: connecting policy goals to the water resources system.

    PubMed

    Aerts, J

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on a methodology called 'generic adaptation methodology for river basins' (AMR) that provides guidance to water managers seeking: (1) potential adaptation measures to climate change and climate variability, (2) measuring impacts, and (3) evaluating adaptations. The methodology uses basic elements addressed in existing adaptation research and is designed for a participatory setting involving various stakeholders. In AMR, the water resources system is seen as an economic asset that provides 'goods and services' for both humans and ecosystems. The innovative aspect of AMR is that it distinguishes impacts to water management objectives and impacts to the physical state of water resources in a river basin in a relatively simple iterative approach. Both impact types are quantified using indicators. The framework and results are demonstrated for a case study in the Walawe basin (Sri Lanka). It is explained that actually implementing adaptations in policy making can be difficult in trans-boundary river basins as each riparian country has its own policy objectives and hence ways of dealing with adaptation.

  1. Beyond the Paycheck: A Human Resources Management Guide for Leaders of Small Youth-Serving Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Thomas P.

    2009-01-01

    This guide aims to help organization leaders develop the tools and knowledge they need to create and use sound human resources management (HRM) systems and practices that support program success and sustainability. It identifies key components of HRM systems and discusses important considerations in designing HRM policies, procedures, and…

  2. Environmental resource management of the Munduruku savanna

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffler, E.M.; Southwick, E.E.

    1984-05-01

    For 13 years, the Munduruku were observed living in the savanna region located in South America in the Brazilian state of Para. The area is near the point where the states of Para, Amazonas, and Mato Grosso join their borders, and is utilized by about 200-300 Munduruku Amerindians. Their subsistence staple is manioc (a cassava), with fruits and meat included in the diet. Gold mining by Brazilians is a disruptive element in the resource management of the savanna habitat on the rim of the Amazon Basin. Direct and indirect results of mining interference are described. A study of the manner in which the Munduruku on the Cururu River (a tributary of the Tapajos) have handled the potentially disruptive rubber tapping suggests possible ways of reversing the interference. Several courses of action are discussed. 14 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Water resource management in Japan: Forest management or dam reservoirs?

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Hikaru; Kume, Tomonori; Otsuki, Kyoichi

    2010-01-01

    Researchers and journalists in Japan recently proposed forest management as an alternative to dam reservoir development for water resource management. To examine the validity of the proposal, we compared the potential low-flow increase due to forest clearcutting with the increase due to dam reservoir development. Here, we focused on forest clearcutting as an end member among various types of forest management. We first analyzed runoff data for five catchments and found a positive correlation between annual precipitation and the low-flow increase due to deforestation. We then examined the increase in low-flow rates due to dam reservoir development (dQ(d)) using inflow and outflow data for 45 dam reservoirs across Japan. Using the relationship between annual precipitation and the low-flow increase due to deforestation, we estimated the potential increase in the low-flow rate for each dam reservoir watershed if forests in the watershed were clearcut (dQ(f)). Only 6 of the 45 samples satisfied dQ(f)>dQ(d), indicating that the potential increase in the low-flow rate due to forest clearcutting was less than the increase due to dam reservoir development in most cases. Twenty-five of the 45 samples satisfied dQ(f)<0.2 dQ(d), indicating the potential increase in the low-flow rate due to forest clearcutting was less than 20% of the increase due to dam reservoir development in more than half the cases. Therefore, forest management is far less effective for water resource management than dam reservoir development is in Japan.

  4. Resource Trends and Population Policy: A Time for Reassessment. Worldwatch Paper 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lester R.

    Population growth and resource depletion are discussed. The need is stressed for policy makers to understand how population projections relate to the carrying capacity of the earth's basic biological systems. Because the earth's resources are limited, it is essential that policy makers in developed and developing nations be able to analyze the…

  5. Government Policy Resources for Science and Technology Topics: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescod, Janette; Leach, Sandra; Mack, Thura

    2011-01-01

    Research librarians should be literate in locating government resources at both federal and state levels. Although assistance with policy research may not be as frequently requested as other subjects, librarians need to be knowledgeable in this subject area. Policy resources produced by federal and state legislative and executive agencies can be…

  6. 43 CFR 1610.5-1 - Resource management plan approval and administrative review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) PLANNING, PROGRAMMING, BUDGETING Resource Management Planning § 1610.5-1 Resource management plan approval...

  7. 43 CFR 1610.5 - Resource management plan approval, use and modification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) PLANNING, PROGRAMMING, BUDGETING Resource Management Planning § 1610.5 Resource management plan approval, use and modification....

  8. Policy Recommendations for the Argentinean Water Resources National Plan Related to Extreme Events in Forested Mountain Basins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urciuolo, A. B.; Iturraspe, R. J.; Lofiego, R.

    2007-05-01

    In the framework of activities developed by COHIFE (Federal Water Resource Council), Argentina is preparing the Water Resources National Plan. To achieve an integrating project and considering that Argentina is a federal country, each province is working on the basis of its own Water Resources Provincial Plan. The first step of the plan consists in the identification of problems, with the purpose of further defining solutions based on structural and non structural actions. The general perception of the stakeholders involved in the plan development is the necessity of the analysis of strategies for the integrated water resource management Although a first document for water policy, named "Principios Rectores de Política Hídrica" is available, there are not specific strategies for integrated management of water and land use oriented to extreme events. In other way, there are a lack of policies oriented to Mountain basin with forest coverage, may be because of most of the population and the economical structure of the country is located on plain regions. This article proposes recommendations for policy to be integrated to the Water Resources National Plan, based on studies developed in a pilot basin representative of the Andean-Patagonia eco-region, in the framework of the EPIC FORCE proyect, financed by the European Union. Project methodology includes basin instrumentation, reconstruction and analysis of extreme events and land-water management practices revision. Climate, flow and sediment Data are available for simulation using the Shetran model on different land use scenarios, including changes in the basin forest coverage. On the basis of the first results of the project, policy guides oriented to fill mentioned policy lacks were defined.

  9. Western water resources: coming problems and the policy alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.; Laing, A.

    1980-02-01

    Water resources in the western United States are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. One of the more-serious conflicts over water use involves Indian water rights claims, but those disputes will be settled by the courts. Water shortages and water-quality problems will have to be solved to meet the growing demand. While impoundment and interbasin transfers could alleviate some regional water shortages these are unlikely for political and economic reasons. The most practical and economically viable solution is to reduce demand by full-cost pricing and to increase the supply by re-use and recycling. In the past, Federal financing of water encouraged development in the West. A water-market institution to cope with changing supply and demand conditions is needed now that development in the West no longer needs encouragement. This article outlines the sometimes contradictory state and Federal policy positions on water, along with areas of potential agreement and cooperation. A number of methods to improve the water-allocation process are examined. (SAC)

  10. Assessment of human resources management practices in Lebanese hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Sound human resources (HR) management practices are essential for retaining effective professionals in hospitals. Given the recruitment and retention reality of health workers in the twenty-first century, the role of HR managers in hospitals and those who combine the role of HR managers with other responsibilities should not be underestimated. The objective of this study is to assess the perception of HR managers about the challenges they face and the current strategies being adopted. The study also aims at assessing enabling factors including role, education, experience and HR training. Methods A cross-sectional survey design of HR managers (and those who combine their role as HR manager with other duties) in Lebanese hospitals was utilized. The survey included a combination of open- and close-ended questions. Questions included educational background, work experience, and demographics, in addition to questions about perceived challenges and key strategies being used. Quantitative data analysis included uni-variate analysis, whereas thematic analysis was used for open-ended questions. Results A total of 96 respondents from 61 hospitals responded. Respondents had varying levels of expertise in the realm of HR management. Thematic analysis revealed that challenges varied across respondents and participating hospitals. The most frequently reported challenge was poor employee retention (56.7%), lack of qualified personnel (35.1%), and lack of a system for performance evaluation (28.9%). Some of the strategies used to mitigate the above challenges included offering continuing education and training for employees (19.6%), improving salaries (14.4%), and developing retention strategies (10.3%). Mismatch between reported challenges and strategies were observed. Conclusion To enable hospitals to deliver good quality, safe healthcare, improving HR management is critical. There is a need for a cadre of competent HR managers who can fully assume these

  11. Resource Management: Futuristic Concept a Reality at Hood College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speers, Mary Louise; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Resource Management Center at Hood College (Maryland) provides home economics students with facilities to study and practice resource conservation, nutrition and preventive health maintenance, and community outreach. (SK)

  12. Water Resources Management for Shale Energy Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoxtheimer, D.

    2015-12-01

    The increase in the exploration and extraction of hydrocarbons, especially natural gas, from shale formations has been facilitated by advents in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies. Shale energy resources are very promising as an abundant energy source, though environmental challenges exist with their development, including potential adverse impacts to water quality. The well drilling and construction process itself has the potential to impact groundwater quality, however if proper protocols are followed and well integrity is established then impacts such as methane migration or drilling fluids releases can be minimized. Once a shale well has been drilled and hydraulically fractured, approximately 10-50% of the volume of injected fluids (flowback fluids) may flow out of the well initially with continued generation of fluids (produced fluids) throughout the well's productive life. Produced fluid TDS concentrations often exceed 200,000 mg/L, with elevated levels of strontium (Sr), bromide (Br), sodium (Na), calcium (Ca), barium (Ba), chloride (Cl), radionuclides originating from the shale formation as well as fracturing additives. Storing, managing and properly disposisng of these fluids is critical to ensure water resources are not impacted by unintended releases. The most recent data in Pennsylvania suggests an estimated 85% of the produced fluids were being recycled for hydraulic fracturing operations, while many other states reuse less than 50% of these fluids and rely moreso on underground injection wells for disposal. Over the last few years there has been a shift to reuse more produced fluids during well fracturing operations in shale plays around the U.S., which has a combination of economic, regulatory, environmental, and technological drivers. The reuse of water is cost-competitive with sourcing of fresh water and disposal of flowback, especially when considering the costs of advanced treatment to or disposal well injection and lessens

  13. The nexus between integrated natural resources management and integrated water resources management in southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twomlow, Stephen; Love, David; Walker, Sue

    The low productivity of smallholder farming systems and enterprises in the drier areas of the developing world can be attributed mainly to the limited resources of farming households and the application of inappropriate skills and practices that can lead to the degradation of the natural resource base. This lack of development, particularly in southern Africa, is of growing concern from both an agricultural and environmental perspective. To address this lack of progress, two development paradigms that improve land and water productivity have evolved, somewhat independently, from different scientific constituencies. One championed by the International Agricultural Research constituency is Integrated Natural Resource Management (INRM), whilst the second championed predominantly by Environmental and Civil Engineering constituencies is Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM). As a result of similar objectives of working towards the millennium development goals of improved food security and environmental sustainability, there exists a nexus between the constituencies of the two paradigms, particularly in terms of appreciating the lessons learned. In this paper lessons are drawn from past INRM research that may have particular relevance to IWRM scientists as they re-direct their focus from blue water issues to green water issues, and vice-versa. Case studies are drawn from the management of water quality for irrigation, green water productivity and a convergence of INRM and IWRM in the management of gold panning in southern Zimbabwe. One point that is abundantly clear from both constituencies is that ‘one-size-fits-all’ or silver bullet solutions that are generally applicable for the enhancement of blue water management/formal irrigation simply do not exist for the smallholder rainfed systems.

  14. Coupling Agent-Based and Groundwater Modeling to Explore Demand Management Strategies for Shared Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Amin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Municipal water demands in growing population centers in the arid southwest US are typically met through increased groundwater withdrawals. Hydro-climatic uncertainties attributed to climate change and land use conversions may also alter demands and impact the replenishment of groundwater supply. Groundwater aquifers are not necessarily confined within municipal and management boundaries, and multiple diverse agencies may manage a shared resource in a decentralized approach, based on individual concerns and resources. The interactions among water managers, consumers, and the environment influence the performance of local management strategies and regional groundwater resources. This research couples an agent-based modeling (ABM) framework and a groundwater model to analyze the effects of different management approaches on shared groundwater resources. The ABM captures the dynamic interactions between household-level consumers and policy makers to simulate water demands under climate change and population growth uncertainties. The groundwater model is used to analyze the relative effects of management approaches on reducing demands and replenishing groundwater resources. The framework is applied for municipalities located in the Verde River Basin, Arizona that withdraw groundwater from the Verde Formation-Basin Fill-Carbonate aquifer system. Insights gained through this simulation study can be used to guide groundwater policy-making under changing hydro-climatic scenarios for a long-term planning horizon.

  15. The Human Resource Management in Dry-Bulk Shipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantopoulos, Nikolaos; Alexopoulos, Aristotelis B.

    2007-12-01

    This article investigates some positions and human resource management practices in dry-bulk shipping. The particularity of the human resource management field, as well as the crews' nationality change that has occurred over the last years, underpin the configuration of the hypothesis of this present research. The results demonstrate that the Greek dry-bulk shipping is going through a transition phase regarding the sector of the ships' human resource management by the captains.

  16. Teaching Social Policy: Integration of Current Legislation and Media Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRigne, LeaAnne

    2011-01-01

    Social work students enter the field of social work for many reasons--from wanting to become clinicians to wanting to advocate for a more socially just world. Social policy classes can be the ideal courses to provide instruction on conducting research on current policy issues. Teaching students about policy advocacy can lead to a class rich with…

  17. Water resource management planning guide for Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, J.E.; Stephenson, D.E.; Steele, J.L. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Lab.); Gordon, D.E. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Plant)

    1988-10-01

    The Water Resource Management Planning Guide provides an outline for the development of a Savannah River Plant Water Resource Management Plan (WRMP) to protect, manage, and monitor the site's water resources. The management plan is based on three principle elements: (1) protection of the water quality, (2) management of the water quantity, and (3) monitoring of the water quality and quantity. The plan will assure that changes in water quality and quantity are identified and that corrective action is implemented as needed. In addition, water management activities within and between Savannah River Plant (SRP) organizations and departments will be coordinated to ensure the proper management of water resources. This document is intended as a guide to suggest goals and objectives that will provide a basis for the development of a water resource plan for SRP. Planning should be flexible rather than rigid, and the plan outlines in this document was prepared to be modified or updated as conditions necessitate. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Evaluation of Four Water Management Policies for Ogallala Aquifer Sustainability in the Texas High Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, J. E.; Gowda, P. H.; Howell, T. A.; Marek, T. H.; Ha, W.; Almas, L. K.

    2010-12-01

    Diminishing groundwater supply in the Ogallala Aquifer will severely reduce regional crop and animal production in the absence of a sustainable water management policy. It is essential to mitigate adverse impacts on the regional economy due to future withdrawals of the limited groundwater resource. Currently, approximately ten alternative water management policies are being debated by policy makers in the Central and Southern High Plains of the Ogallala Aquifer region. Before implementing any new policy or modifying current policies, newer alternative policies should be evaluated for their impact on groundwater levels with eventual extension to regional economic impacts. The main objective of this study was to evaluate four water management policies, from the debated ones, on future groundwater levels in the Ogallala Aquifer beneath four heavily irrigated counties (Dallam, Sherman, Hartley, and Moore) located in the northwest corner of the Texas High Plains using a calibrated ModFlow model. The four water management policies were (1) voluntary permanent conversion to dry land production up to 10% of the total irrigated area, (2) adoption of advances in biotechnology that allow water use reductions at a rate of 1% per year up to 10% of current use, (3) mandatory water use reduction to decrease the total water pumped by 10% (volume per unit land area per year), and (4) voluntary temporary conversion to dry land production during 15 years for a maximum area of 10% of the total irrigated area. The water management policies were converted into water demand rates for ModFlow model inputs. Simulations were conducted for a 50-year (2010-2060) period. Preliminary results indicate that a combination of more than one policy will be required to produce a significant reduction in the current groundwater depletion rates.

  19. Continuity and change in human resources policies for health: lessons from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This paper reports on progress in implementing human resources for health (HRH) policies in Brazil, in the context of the implementation and expansion of the Unified Health System (Sistema Unico de Saúde - SUS). The three main objectives were: i) to reconstruct the chronology of long term HRH change in Brazil, and to identify and discuss the precursors, drivers, and enablers for these changes over a long time period; (ii) to examine how change was achieved by describing facilitators and constraints, and how policies were adapted to deal with the latter; and (iii) to report on the current situation and draw policy implications. Methods A mixed methods approach was used. A literature review was conducted using pre-defined keywords; and stakeholders were contacted and asked to provide relevant information, data and policy reports. Results There are two key features of HRH change which are related to the implementation of SUS which merit attention: the achievement of staffing growth, and the improvement in HRH policy making and management. Staff growth rates across the period have been high enough to exceed population growth rates. As a consequence, the ratio of staff to population has improved. In 1990 the physician ratio per 1000 inhabitants was 1.12. In 2007, it was 1.74. Another critical factor in achieving staffing growth has been HRH policy making capacity and influence within the political establishment. Conclusions Policies have had to adapt to changing circumstances, whilst focusing on sequential improvements aimed at achieving long term goals. The end objectives, of improving care and access to care, have been kept in view. No one Ministry could secure all the resources and impetus for change that has been required, hence the need for inter-ministry, inter-governmental and inter-agency collaboration, and the development of alliances of shared interest. Across the period of thirty years or more, not all initiatives have been equally successful, but

  20. Using policy management for optical VPN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkaoui, Omar; Chen, Ken; Serhouchni, Ahmed

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents a Policy-based Control Plane, which allows Carrier Optical Network to dynamically configure and deploy Optical Virtual Private Networks (Optical VPNs) over multiple administration domains. A configurable policy-based control mechanism is required to regulate and control the information propagation across both UNI and NNI interfaces and the actions allowed on behalf of the users. The proposed framework extend the ITU Control Plane by adding based IP-centric policy mechanisms like admission control protocol COPS (Common Open Policy Service).

  1. Human resources management for a hospital pharmacy department.

    PubMed

    Chase, P A

    1989-06-01

    The concepts of human resources management (HRM) are presented, and the application of HRM concepts to a hospital pharmacy department is described. Low salaries and poor working conditions had precipitated a mass exodus of pharmacists from a 650-bed, tertiary-care medical center. The newly hired director of pharmacy sought to rebuild the department by developing a three-stage HRM model consisting of needs forecasting, performance management, and advanced management systems. In the needs-forecasting stage, the strengths and weaknesses of departmental programs were determined through analysis of existing standards of practice, situational analysis, and financial analyses; the strengths and weaknesses of departmental employees were determined through the use of talent inventories, turnover analysis, analysis of time and leave records, reevaluation of the department's job classifications, performance and productivity evaluations, and productivity evaluations, and development of a philosophy of practice and mission statement. Needs and problems were addressed by examining each existing program and developing new policies and procedures, performance standards, quality assurance mechanisms, and productivity expectations. Personnel needs and problems were addressed by designing a system of differentiated career ladders, contracting with pharmacists for career moves, developing the skills of currently employed pharmacists, and implementing a succession planning model. The model has been in place for approximately three years and is beginning to yield the desired results. Application of HRM concepts to a hospital pharmacy department appears to have been successful in improving employee morale and in helping the department to meet goals of expanded and improved services.

  2. Health services reform and human resource management in Hong Kong public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D; Snape, E; Stokes, C

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses the empirical study of reform in the human resource management function in the Hong Kong Hospital Authority. It describes the prior management of the hospitals based on the civil service administration model before looking at management reform in general. From this research, the creative tensions between the centrifugal and centripetal forces in the pursuit of 'effectiveness', 'efficiency' and 'economy' are explored in terms of decentralization. A survey of line managers, in eleven Hospital Authority hospitals, revealed the progress of decentralization: a majority of respondents felt that, over the previous five years, managers at their level had been given greater responsibility for human resource management issues. In spite of the widespread perception of increased decentralization, however, it was recognized that there are limits to decentralization. It was the routine administration rather than the policy formulation and interpretation which had been decentralized, and hospitals continued to rely on the Hospital Authority Head of Office for guidance on policy interpretation. Several barriers to the effective decentralization of responsibility for human resource management were identified, including a lack of management skill, knowledge and time, the attitudes of some managers and the tight control of budget.

  3. Multi-agent Water Resources Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletti, A.; Giuliani, M.

    2011-12-01

    Increasing environmental awareness and emerging trends such as water trading, energy market, deregulation and democratization of water-related services are challenging integrated water resources planning and management worldwide. The traditional approach to water management design based on sector-by-sector optimization has to be reshaped to account for multiple interrelated decision-makers and many stakeholders with increasing decision power. Centralized management, though interesting from a conceptual point of view, is unfeasible in most of the modern social and institutional contexts, and often economically inefficient. Coordinated management, where different actors interact within a full open trust exchange paradigm under some institutional supervision is a promising alternative to the ideal centralized solution and the actual uncoordinated practices. This is a significant issue in most of the Southern Alps regulated lakes, where upstream hydropower reservoirs maximize their benefit independently form downstream users; it becomes even more relevant in the case of transboundary systems, where water management upstream affects water availability downstream (e.g. the River Zambesi flowing through Zambia, Zimbabwe and Mozambique or the Red River flowing from South-Western China through Northern Vietnam. In this study we apply Multi-Agent Systems (MAS) theory to design an optimal management in a decentralized way, considering a set of multiple autonomous agents acting in the same environment and taking into account the pay-off of individual water users, which are inherently distributed along the river and need to coordinate to jointly reach their objectives. In this way each real-world actor, representing the decision-making entity (e.g. the operator of a reservoir or a diversion dam) can be represented one-to-one by a computer agent, defined as a computer system that is situated in some environment and that is capable of autonomous action in this environment in

  4. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Sustainable Management of Watershed Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lack of integration in the study and management of water resource problems suggests the need for a multidisciplinary approach. As practiced in the Shepherd Creek stormwater management study (Cincinnati OH), we envision a multidisciplinary approach involving economic incentive...

  5. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING (from Cultural Resources Management Program for the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING (from Cultural Resources Management Program for the Environment Management Division, Directorate of Public Works, Fort Benning, Georgia) Delineator unknown. GARAGES - Fort Benning, Building No. 864, 7325 Miller Loop, Main Post, Fort Benning Military Reservation, Chattahoochee County, GA

  6. Human Resource Management in Library and Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Line, Maurice B.; Kinnell, Margaret

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of human resource management focuses on academic libraries. Topics addressed include the influence of information technology; strategic planning; equal opportunities; recruitment; staff appraisal; quality of working life; motivation; job satisfaction; participative management; leadership; burnout; conflict; organizational structures;…

  7. Resource Management and Contingencies in Aerospace Concurrent Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpati, Gabe; Hyde, Tupper; Peabody, Hume; Garrison, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    significant concern in designing complex systems implementing new technologies is that while knowledge about the system is acquired incrementally, substantial financial commitments, even make-or-break decisions, must be made upfront, essentially in the unknown. One practice that helps in dealing with this dichotomy is the smart embedding of contingencies and margins in the design to serve as buffers against surprises. This issue presents itself in full force in the aerospace industry, where unprecedented systems are formulated and committed to as a matter of routine. As more and more aerospace mission concepts are generated by concurrent design laboratories, it is imperative that such laboratories apply well thought-out contingency and margin structures to their designs. The first part of this publication provides an overview of resource management techniques and standards used in the aerospace industry. That is followed by a thought provoking treatise on margin policies. The expose presents the actual flight telemetry data recorded by the thermal discipline during several recent NASA Goddard Space Flight Center missions. The margins actually achieved in flight are compared against pre-flight predictions, and the appropriateness and the ramifications of having designed with rigid margins to bounding stacked worst case conditions are assessed. The second half of the paper examines the particular issues associated with the application of contingencies and margins in the concurrent engineering environment. In closure, a discipline-by-discipline disclosure of the contingency and margin policies in use at the Integrated Design Center at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center is made.

  8. Remote sensing in Michigan for land resource management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, D. S.; Istvan, L. B.; Roller, N. E.; Sattinger, I. J.; Sellman, A. N.; Wagner, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    The application of NASA earth resource survey technology to resource management and environmental protection in Michigan was investigated. Remote sensing techniques to aid Michigan government agencies were applied in the following activities: (1) land use inventory and management, (2) great lakes shorelands protection and management, (3) wetlands protection and management, and (4) soil survey. In addition, information was disseminated on remote sensing technology, and advice and assistance was provided to a number of users.

  9. The partnership between park wild life management policy and landscape wild life management policy. How shall we then manage?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halvorson, William L.; Eastin, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Resources management practices are changing in North America, not only based on greater understanding of the resources that are being managed, but also on some critical sociological relationship changes between human beings and between humans and nature. The entire way that humans look at the natural world and our own society is changing dramatically as we come to the end of the twentieth century. Managers are changing from making belief-based decisions to making informed knowledge-based decisions through better science programs. Society appears to increasingly be making a shift to a community mind-set, a mind-set of connectedness and interdependence, and away from strict individualism. Managers appear to be ready to embrace the concept of unity and wholeness; to understand that humans and nature are inextricably tied to each other’s wellbeing

  10. ``Virtual water'': An unfolding concept in integrated water resources management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong; Zehnder, Alexander

    2007-12-01

    In its broadest sense, virtual water refers to the water required for the production of food commodities. Issues relating to virtual water have drawn much attention in scientific communities and the political sphere since the mid 1990s. This paper provides a critical review of major research issues and results in the virtual water literature and pinpoints the remaining questions and the direction of research in future virtual water studies. We conclude that virtual water studies have helped to raise the awareness of water scarcity and its impact on food security and to improve the understanding of the role of food trade in compensating for water deficit. However, the studies so far have been overwhelmingly concerned with the international food trade, and many solely quantified virtual water flows associated with food trade. There is a general lack of direct policy relevance to the solutions to water scarcity and food insecurity, which are often local, regional, and river basin issues. The obscurity in the conceptual basis of virtual water also entails some confusion. The methodologies and databases of the studies are often crude, affecting the robustness and reliability of the results. Looking ahead, future virtual water studies need to enhance the policy relevance by strengthening their linkages with national and regional water resources management. Meanwhile, integrated approaches taking into consideration the spatial and temporal variations of blue and green water resources availability and the complexity of natural, socioeconomic, and political conditions are necessary in assessing the trade-offs of the virtual water strategy in dealing with water scarcity. To this end, interdisciplinary efforts and quantitative methods supported by improved data availability are greatly important.

  11. Trends and issues in land and water resources management: Setting the agenda for change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortner, Hanna J.; Moote, Margaret A.

    1994-03-01

    The classical model of a paradigm shift is used to explore changes that are occurring in public lands and water resources management. Recent policy developments suggest that the traditional paradigm, which is characterized by sustained yield, is in the process of being invalidated. While no new paradigm has been fully accepted, the emerging paradigm does appear to be based on two principles: ecosystem management and collaborative decision making. Implementation of these two principles is likely to require extensive revision of traditional management practices and institutions. Failure to address these issues could result in adoption of the rhetoric of change without any lasting shift in management practices or professional attitudes.

  12. Federal Information Policy and Management for Electronic Services Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Charles R.; And Others

    To assist the Office of Technology Assessment of the U.S. Congress in identifying and resolving policy issues related to the electronic delivery of government services, this study examined selected innovative information technology applications, management practices, and policies that promote experimentation and integration with new electronic…

  13. Starting the Conversation: University-Wide Research Data Management Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erway, Ricky

    2013-01-01

    This call for action addresses the high-level benefits of adopting a university-wide policy regarding research data management. It identifies the various university stakeholders and suggests that the library initiate a conversation among them in order to get buy-in for a proactive, rather than reactive, high-level policy for responsible data…

  14. Public participation in integrated water resources management: the case of Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungumaro, Esther W.; Madulu, Ndalahwa F.

    Effective and sustainable management of water resources is vital for ensuring sustainable development. However, efforts of water resource management seem to demonstrate inappropriate practices, especially when compared to water consumption trends in developing countries in general, and sub-Saharan Africa in particular. Being a major and vital ingredient to human kind, water resources influence all sectors. However, there have been increased problems over time that subject water resources to a number of crisis and pressures. Poor water resources management have stimulated and sustained a number of problems related to health, socio-economic and environment, which need to be solved. These problems are accelerated and magnified by the countries’, communities’ and individuals’ struggles for economic and social development as many development initiatives are affected by water availability and vice versa. Integrated water resources management (IWRM), is a process, a change, and an approach that mainstream water resource use and management into the national economic in an equitable manner without compromising the sustainability of vital ecosystems. This paper analyses the importance of community participation in the process of IWRM. The paper describes reasons that justify the need for an IWRM approach and explains the rationale for community participation. Successful cases in community involvement have been cited from different areas to demonstrate the importance of IWRM. The paper concludes that the public/community involvement is crucial for a successful and sustainable water resource management. It has been emphasized that natural resources management related policies including water requires the use of knowledge, experience and opinions of local communities who are the key stakeholders in resource conservation. This could be ensured through public/community participation.

  15. Philippines: Environment and natural resource management study. World Bank country study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This study addresses the most significant issues of natural-resource management in the Philippines. These include the disappearence or degradation of forests; erosion and changes in hydrological regimes; the conversion of mangrove swamps to fishponds; degradation of coral reefs; and depletion of nearshore fisheries through overfishing and destructive techniques. The issues addressed concern the extent and rate of degradation of these resource stocks, the impact thereof on the national economy, and the scope for ameliorative measures through policy responses, management changes, and investments. The Government is responsible for management of public resources, which include over half of the land area of the Philippines as well as the coastal waters. Historically, public management has been less than optimal, as evidenced by an unsustainable rate of deforestation and the recent stagnation or decline in extractive fisheries.

  16. Scenario analysis for integrated water resources planning and management under uncertainty in the Zayandehrud river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safavi, Hamid R.; Golmohammadi, Mohammad H.; Sandoval-Solis, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study is to develop and analyze three scenarios in the Zayandehrud river basin in Iran using a model already built and calibrated by Safavi et al. (2015) that has results for the baseline scenario. Results from the baseline scenario show that water demands will be supplied at the cost of depletion of surface and ground water resources, making this scenario undesirable and unsustainable. Supply Management, Demand Management, and Meta (supply and demand management) scenarios are the selected scenarios in this study. They are to be developed and declared into the Zayandehrud model to assess and evaluate the imminent status of the basin. Certain strategies will be employed for this purpose to improve and rectify the current management policies. The five performance criteria of time-based and volumetric reliability, resilience, vulnerability, and maximum deficit will be employed in the process of scenario analysis and evaluation. The results obtained from the performance criteria will be summed up into a so-called 'Water Resources Sustainability Index' to facilitate comparison among the likely trade-offs. Uncertainties arising from historical data, management policies, rainfall-runoff model, demand priorities, and performance criteria are considered in the proposed conceptual framework and modeled by appropriate approaches. Results show that the Supply Management scenario can be used to improve upon the demand supply but that it has no tangible effects on the improvement of the resources in the study region. In this regard, the Demand Management scenario is found to be more effective than the water supply one although it still remains unacceptable. Results of the Meta scenario indicate that both the supply and demand management scenarios must be applied if the water resources are to be safeguarded against degradation and depletion. In other words, the supply management scenario is necessary but not adequate; rather, it must be coupled to the demand

  17. You Have "How Many" Spreadsheets? Rethinking Electronic Resource Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rux, Erika; Borchert, Theresa

    2010-01-01

    As libraries face a veritable explosion of electronic resources and as the interconnectedness of print and online resources becomes increasingly complicated, many librarians are challenged to find efficient and cost-friendly ways to manage these resources. In this article, the authors describe how a team of people from various library departments…

  18. Information Resource Management Strategic Plan, FY 2007-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Chief Information Officer (CIO) at the U.S. Department of Education (ED) has primary responsibility to ensure that Information Technology (IT) is acquired and information resources are managed in a manner consistent with statutory, regulatory, and Departmental requirements and priorities. This Department Information Resource Management (IRM)…

  19. 43 CFR 9268.4 - Visual resource management. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Visual resource management. 9268.4 Section 9268.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9268.4 Visual resource management....

  20. 43 CFR 9268.1 - Cultural resource management. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cultural resource management. 9268.1 Section 9268.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9268.1 Cultural resource management....

  1. 43 CFR 9268.4 - Visual resource management. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Visual resource management. 9268.4 Section 9268.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9268.4 Visual resource management....

  2. 43 CFR 9268.4 - Visual resource management. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Visual resource management. 9268.4 Section 9268.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9268.4 Visual resource management....

  3. 43 CFR 9268.1 - Cultural resource management. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cultural resource management. 9268.1 Section 9268.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9268.1 Cultural resource management....

  4. 43 CFR 9268.1 - Cultural resource management. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cultural resource management. 9268.1 Section 9268.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9268.1 Cultural resource management....

  5. 43 CFR 9269.3-2 - Land resource management. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Land resource management. 9269.3-2 Section 9269.3-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9269.3-2 Land resource management....

  6. 43 CFR 9268.4 - Visual resource management. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Visual resource management. 9268.4 Section 9268.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9268.4 Visual resource management....

  7. 43 CFR 9269.3-2 - Land resource management. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Land resource management. 9269.3-2 Section 9269.3-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9269.3-2 Land resource management....

  8. 43 CFR 9268.1 - Cultural resource management. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cultural resource management. 9268.1 Section 9268.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9268.1 Cultural resource management....

  9. 43 CFR 9269.3-2 - Land resource management. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Land resource management. 9269.3-2 Section 9269.3-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9269.3-2 Land resource management....

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory compliance with cultural resource management legislation

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, C.E.; Rea, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    Cultural resources management is one aspect of NEPA-induced legislation increasingly affecting federal land managers. A number of regulations, some of them recent, outline management criteria for protecting cultural resources on federal land. Nearly all construction projects at the 11,135 hectare Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico are affected by cultural resource management requirements. A substantial prehistoric Puebloan population occupied the Laboratory area from the 13th to the early 16th centuries. Grazing, timbering, and homesteading followed Indian occupation. Therefore, archaeological and historical ruins and artifacts are abundant. The Laboratory has developed a cultural resources management program which meets both legal and project planning requirements. The program operates in coordination with the New Mexico State Historical Preservation Office. Major elements of the Laboratory program are illustrated by a current project involving relocation of a homesteader's cabin located on land required for a major new facility. The Laboratory cultural resource management program couples routine oversight of all engineering design projects with onsite resource surveys and necessary mitigation prior to construction. The Laboratory has successfully protected major archaeological and historical ruins, although some problems remain. The cultural resource program is intended to be adjustable to new needs. A cultural resource management plan will provide long-term management guidance.

  11. 43 CFR 9269.3-2 - Land resource management. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Land resource management. 9269.3-2 Section 9269.3-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... § 9269.3-2 Land resource management....

  12. Current Issues for Higher Education Information Resources Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Current issues that are important for the future of information resources management in higher education are presented. They include: integrating planning for information resources within institution-wide strategic planning; reengineering fundamental services; change management; distributed computing support; networking; the changing communication…

  13. Strategies for sustainable management of renewable resources during environmental change.

    PubMed

    Lindkvist, Emilie; Ekeberg, Örjan; Norberg, Jon

    2017-03-15

    As a consequence of global environmental change, management strategies that can deal with unexpected change in resource dynamics are becoming increasingly important. In this paper we undertake a novel approach to studying resource growth problems using a computational form of adaptive management to find optimal strategies for prevalent natural resource management dilemmas. We scrutinize adaptive management, or learning-by-doing, to better understand how to simultaneously manage and learn about a system when its dynamics are unknown. We study important trade-offs in decision-making with respect to choosing optimal actions (harvest efforts) for sustainable management during change. This is operationalized through an artificially intelligent model where we analyze how different trends and fluctuations in growth rates of a renewable resource affect the performance of different management strategies. Our results show that the optimal strategy for managing resources with declining growth is capable of managing resources with fluctuating or increasing growth at a negligible cost, creating in a management strategy that is both efficient and robust towards future unknown changes. To obtain this strategy, adaptive management should strive for: high learning rates to new knowledge, high valuation of future outcomes and modest exploration around what is perceived as the optimal action.

  14. An appraisal of policies and institutional frameworks impacting on smallholder agricultural water management in Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyagumbo, I.; Rurinda, J.

    Policies and institutional frameworks associated with and / or impacting on agricultural water management (AWM) in smallholder farming systems in Zimbabwe were analyzed through literature reviews, feedback from stakeholder workshops, key informant interviews and evaluation of policy impacts on implemented case study projects/programmes. The study showed that Zimbabwe has gone a long way towards developing a water management policy addressing both equity and access, through the Water and ZINWA of 1998. However, lack of incentives for improving efficient management and utilization of water resources once water has reached the farm gate was apparent, apart from punitive economic instruments levied on usage of increased volumes of water. For example, the new water reforms of 1998 penalized water savers through loss of any unused water in their permits to other users. In addition, the ability of smallholder farmers to access water for irrigation or other purposes was influenced by macro and micro-economic policies such as Economic Structural and Adjustment Programme (ESAP), Zimbabwe Programme for Economic and Social Transformation (ZIMPREST), prevailing monetary and fiscal policies, as well as the Land and Agrarian Reform policies. For instance, the implementation of ESAP from 1991 to 95 resulted in a decline in government support to management of communal irrigation schemes, and as a result only gravity-fed schemes survived. Also AWM projects/programmes that were in progress were prematurely terminated. While considerable emphasis was placed on rehabilitation of irrigation infrastructure since the fast track land reform in 1998, the policies remained rather silent on strategies for water management in rainfed systems. The piecemeal nature and fragmentation of policies and institutional frameworks scattered across government ministries and sectors were complex and created difficulties for smallholder farmers to access water resources. Poor policy implementation

  15. Facilitating job retention for chronically ill employees: perspectives of line managers and human resource managers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases are a leading contributor to work disability and job loss in Europe. Recent EU policies aim to improve job retention among chronically ill employees. Disability and occupational health researchers argue that this requires a coordinated and pro-active approach at the workplace by occupational health professionals, line managers (LMs) and human resource managers (HRM). Little is known about the perspectives of LMs an HRM on what is needed to facilitate job retention among chronically ill employees. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore and compare the perspectives of Dutch LMs and HRM on this issue. Methods Concept mapping methodology was used to elicit and map statements (ideas) from 10 LMs and 17 HRM about what is needed to ensure continued employment for chronically ill employees. Study participants were recruited through a higher education and an occupational health services organization. Results Participants generated 35 statements. Each group (LMs and HRM) sorted these statements into six thematic clusters. LMs and HRM identified four similar clusters: LMs and HRM must be knowledgeable about the impact of chronic disease on the employee; employees must accept responsibility for work retention; work adaptations must be implemented; and clear company policy. Thematic clusters identified only by LMs were: good manager/employee cooperation and knowledge transfer within the company. Unique clusters identified by HRM were: company culture and organizational support. Conclusions There were both similarities and differences between the views of LMs and HRM on what may facilitate job retention for chronically ill employees. LMs perceived manager/employee cooperation as the most important mechanism for enabling continued employment for these employees. HRM perceived organizational policy and culture as the most important mechanism. The findings provide information about topics that occupational health researchers and planners should

  16. Curriculum on Ecology and Natural Resource Management for Indian Natural Resource Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Richard R.; Cox, Randi

    1997-01-01

    A curriculum developed by the University of California for American Indian natural resource workers blends traditional knowledge of ecology and management with Euro-American scientific principles. The trophic pyramid provides an example for teaching the underlying principles of natural resource management, including reciprocity and interdependence…

  17. The state of human dimensions capacity for natural resource management: needs, knowledge, and resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Leong, Kirsten M.; Milley, Brad J.; Clarke, Melinda M.; Teel, Tara L.; Chase, Mark A.; Dietsch, Alia M.

    2013-01-01

    The social sciences have become increasingly important in understanding natural resource management contexts and audiences, and are essential in design and delivery of effective and durable management strategies. Yet many agencies and organizations do not have the necessary resource management. We draw on the textbook definition of HD: how and why people value natural resources, what benefits people seek and derive from those resources, and how people affect and are affected by those resources and their management (Decker, Brown, and Seimer 2001). Clearly articulating how HD information can be used and integrated into natural resource management planning and decision-making is an important challenge faced by the HD field. To address this challenge, we formed a collaborative team to explore the issue of HD capacity-building for natural resource organizations and to advance the HD field. We define HD capacity as activities, efforts, and resources that enhance the ability of HD researchers and practitioners and natural managers and decision-makers to understand and address the social aspects of conservation. Specifically, we sought to examine current barriers to integration of HD into natural resource management, knowledge needed to improve HD capacity, and existing HD tools, resources, and training opportunities. We conducted a needs assessment of HD experts and practitioners, developed a framework for considering HD activities that can contribute both directly and indirectly throughout any phase of an adaptive management cycle, and held a workshop to review preliminary findings and gather additional input through breakout group discussions. This paper provides highlights from our collaborative initiative to help frame and inform future HD capacity-building efforts and natural resource organizations and also provides a list of existing human dimensions tools and resources.

  18. Evaluating participation in water resource management: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, G.; BlöSchl, G.; Loucks, D. P.

    2012-11-01

    Key documents such as the European Water Framework Directive and the U.S. Clean Water Act state that public and stakeholder participation in water resource management is required. Participation aims to enhance resource management and involve individuals and groups in a democratic way. Evaluation of participatory programs and projects is necessary to assess whether these objectives are being achieved and to identify how participatory programs and projects can be improved. The different methods of evaluation can be classified into three groups: (i) process evaluation assesses the quality of participation process, for example, whether it is legitimate and promotes equal power between participants, (ii) intermediary outcome evaluation assesses the achievement of mainly nontangible outcomes, such as trust and communication, as well as short- to medium-term tangible outcomes, such as agreements and institutional change, and (iii) resource management outcome evaluation assesses the achievement of changes in resource management, such as water quality improvements. Process evaluation forms a major component of the literature but can rarely indicate whether a participation program improves water resource management. Resource management outcome evaluation is challenging because resource changes often emerge beyond the typical period covered by the evaluation and because changes cannot always be clearly related to participation activities. Intermediary outcome evaluation has been given less attention than process evaluation but can identify some real achievements and side benefits that emerge through participation. This review suggests that intermediary outcome evaluation should play a more important role in evaluating participation in water resource management.

  19. The "internet +" quality resource management system based on process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Tong, Weichao; Yin, Hong; Liu, Zhilong; Shen, Jun; Zhong, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Based on the relative theories of quality resource management system and "Internet +", this paper combines the "Internet +"and quality resource management system. By using quality management process approach and taking computers and databases technology as tools, the system collects, archives and manages the quality data in process network, to supervise and control the process of the quality resource management system more effectively. Based on the quality control process in production site and the characteristics of the process, the paper constructs the frame of the resource management system. By taking the STM32F103 series microcontroller as core controller, the system achieves a network system and collects data automatically. The results show that the system can be positioning problem accurately timely and improves the productivity and quality of products.

  20. Review of dynamic optimization methods in renewable natural resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, the applications of dynamic optimization procedures in natural resource management have proliferated. A systematic review of these applications is given in terms of a number of optimization methodologies and natural resource systems. The applicability of the methods to renewable natural resource systems are compared in terms of system complexity, system size, and precision of the optimal solutions. Recommendations are made concerning the appropriate methods for certain kinds of biological resource problems.

  1. Developing an integrated ecological resource management and monitoring plan as part of an environmental management system

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, D.; Hooten, M.; Kelly, E.; Roy-Harrison, W.

    1997-04-01

    Recent interest in defining the appropriate content of an Environmental Management System (EMS) as specified by ISO 14001 prompted a study to determine how ecological concerns should be integrated into an EMS and subsequently implemented. This paper describes an approach for developing objectives, targets, and processes for ecological resource management at those Department of Energy (DOE) facilities where an ecological resource management approach that goes beyond simple regulatory compliance is warranted. A major goal of this approach is to position DOE facilities so that they can proactively address ecological concerns, rather than being forced to respond retroactively to damage claims, restoration requirements, and/or bad publicity. Although DOE is not requiring ISO 14001 implementation at its facilities, it is recommending ISO 14001 as a voluntary approach to encourage good environmental practices, such as pollution prevention and sustainable development, by adopting an integrated systems approach. The DOE position is that existing DOE orders and policy statements are consistent with, and have elements of, the ISO 14001 EMS approach.

  2. Systematic regional planning for multiple objective natural resource management.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Brett A; Crossman, Neville D

    2008-09-01

    On-ground natural resource management actions such as revegetation and remnant vegetation management can simultaneously affect multiple objectives including land, water and biodiversity resources. Hence, planning for the sustainable management of natural resources requires consideration of these multiple objectives. However, planning the location of management actions in the landscape often treats these objectives individually to reduce the process and spatial complexity inherent in human-modified and natural landscapes. This can be inefficient and potentially counterproductive given the linkages and trade-offs involved. We develop and apply a systematic regional planning approach to identify geographic priorities for on-ground natural resource management actions that most cost-effectively meet multiple natural resource management objectives. Our systematic regional planning approach utilises integer programming within a structured multi-criteria decision analysis framework. Intelligent siting can capitalise on the multiple benefits of on-ground actions and achieve natural resource management objectives more efficiently. The focus of this study is the human-modified landscape of the River Murray, South Australia. However, the methodology and analyses presented here can be adapted to other regions requiring more efficient and integrated planning for the management of natural resources.

  3. Identifying Cost-Effective Water Resources Management Strategies: Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) is a public-domain software application designed to aid decision makers with integrated water resources management. The tool allows water resource managers and planners to screen a wide-range of management practices for c...

  4. Harvesting and replenishment policies for renewable natural resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglas, Aaron J.; Johnson, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    The current paper links the optimal intertemporal use of renewable natural resources to the harvesting activities of various economic agents. Previous contributions cite market forces as a causative factor inducing the extirpation of renewable natural resources. The analysis given here discusses investment in the stock of renewable resources and cites important examples of this activity. By introducing joint harvesting and replenishment strategies into a model of renewable resource use, the analysis adds descriptive reality and relevance to positive and normative discussions of renewable natural resource use. A high price for the yield or a high discount rate tend to diminish the size of the optimum stationary stock of the resource with a non-replenishment harvesting strategy. Optimal non-replenishment harvesting strategies for renewable natural resources will exhaustion or extirpation of the resource if the price of the yield or the discount rate are sufficiently large. However, the availability of a replenishment technology and the use of replenishment activities tends to buffer the resource against exhaustion or extirpation.

  5. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan: Annual summary, January 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan published in December of 1998 (DOE/NV--518) describes the Nevada Test Site stewardship mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. As part of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, DOE Nevada Operations Office has committed to perform and publish an annual summary review of DOE Nevada Operations' stewardship of the Nevada Test Site. This annual summary includes a description of progress made toward the goals of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, pertinent monitoring data, actions that were taken to adapt to changing conditions, and any other changes to the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan.

  6. Adaptive management of natural resources-framework and issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive management, an approach for simultaneously managing and learning about natural resources, has been around for several decades. Interest in adaptive decision making has grown steadily over that time, and by now many in natural resources conservation claim that adaptive management is the approach they use in meeting their resource management responsibilities. Yet there remains considerable ambiguity about what adaptive management actually is, and how it is to be implemented by practitioners. The objective of this paper is to present a framework and conditions for adaptive decision making, and discuss some important challenges in its application. Adaptive management is described as a two-phase process of deliberative and iterative phases, which are implemented sequentially over the timeframe of an application. Key elements, processes, and issues in adaptive decision making are highlighted in terms of this framework. Special emphasis is given to the question of geographic scale, the difficulties presented by non-stationarity, and organizational challenges in implementing adaptive management. ?? 2010.

  7. In the Arid Zone: Drying out Educational Resources for English Language Learners through Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DaSilva Iddings, Ana Christina; Combs, Mary Carol; Moll, Luis

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a variety of issues related to the effects of restrictive language and educational policies that ultimately limits important resources for English language learners (i.e., services, funding, time, and information). The authors spotlight the state of Arizona as an unfortunate case of language control through policies, which…

  8. Community Choices Public Policy Education Program: Exploring the Human Resources/Economic Development Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaulieu, Lionel J.; Bolton, Kenneth, Jr.

    The Community Choices program is designed to engage communities in a systematic assessment of the linkages between their human resource attributes and their economic development opportunities. This document contains seven modules. Modules 1-3 lay the foundation for doing public policy education work by (1) defining public policy education and…

  9. Human Resources & Demographics: Characteristics of People and Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joint Economic Committee, Washington, DC.

    The Human Resources and Demographics staff study for the Joint Economic Committee's Special Study on Economic Change presents demographic data to support the position that it will take a strong economy to enable the United States to utilize its human resources. Data are presented, in narrative format, on fertility, population, characteristics of…

  10. Incorporating indigenous rights and environmental justice into fishery management: comparing policy challenges and potentials from Alaska and Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Laurie

    2013-11-01

    Colonial processes including the dispossession of indigenous lands and resources and the development of Western management institutions to govern the use of culturally important fish resources have served in many ways to marginalize indigenous interests within the United States fisheries. In recent years, several US fishery institutions have begun to develop policies that can confront this colonial legacy by better accommodating indigenous perspectives and rights in fishery management practices. This paper analyzes two such policies: the 2005 community quota entity program in Alaska which permits rural communities (predominantly Alaska Native villages) to purchase and lease commercial halibut fishing privileges and the 1994 State of Hawai'i community-based subsistence fishing area (CBSFA) legislation through which Native Hawaiian communities can designate marine space near their community as CBSFAs and collaborate with the state of Hawai'i to manage those areas according to traditional Hawaiian practices. The analysis reveals a striking similarity between the trajectories of these two policies. While they both offered significant potential for incorporating indigenous rights and environmental justice into state or federal fishery management, they have so far largely failed to do so. Environmental managers can gain insights from the challenges and potentials of these two policies. In order to introduce meaningful change, environmental policies that incorporate indigenous rights and environmental justice require a commitment of financial and institutional support from natural resource agencies, a commitment from indigenous groups and communities to organize and develop capacity, and careful consideration of contextual and cultural factors in the design of the policy framework.

  11. Optimal Index Policies for Anomaly Localization in Resource-Constrained Cyber Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    1 Optimal Index Policies for Anomaly Localization in Resource-Constrained Cyber Systems Kobi Cohen1, Qing Zhao1, Ananthram Swami2 Abstract— The...component is abnormal. We develop optimal simple index policies under both models. The proposed index policies apply to a more general case where a subset...more than one) of the components can be probed simultaneously and have strong performance as demonstrated by simulation examples. Index Terms—Anomaly

  12. Development and implementation of a PACS network and resource manager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Brent K.; Taira, Ricky K.; Dwyer, Samuel J., III; Huang, H. K.

    1992-07-01

    Clinical acceptance of PACS is predicated upon maximum uptime. Upon component failure, detection, diagnosis, reconfiguration and repair must occur immediately. Our current PACS network is large, heterogeneous, complex and wide-spread geographically. The overwhelming number of network devices, computers and software processes involved in a departmental or inter-institutional PACS makes development of tools for network and resource management critical. The authors have developed and implemented a comprehensive solution (PACS Network-Resource Manager) using the OSI Network Management Framework with network element agents that respond to queries and commands for network management stations. Managed resources include: communication protocol layers for Ethernet, FDDI and UltraNet; network devices; computer and operating system resources; and application, database and network services. The Network-Resource Manager is currently being used for warning, fault, security violation and configuration modification event notification. Analysis, automation and control applications have been added so that PACS resources can be dynamically reconfigured and so that users are notified when active involvement is required. Custom data and error logging have been implemented that allow statistics for each PACS subsystem to be charted for performance data. The Network-Resource Manager allows our departmental PACS system to be monitored continuously and thoroughly, with a minimal amount of personal involvement and time.

  13. Information Resources Management (IRM): A Revolution in Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Louise Giovane

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the emergence of information resources management (IRM) as a focus for managing information activities, particularly those related to federal administration. The IRM office and its manager are described within the context of an organization. Impact of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 on IRM is discussed. (SW)

  14. 43 CFR 1610.1 - Resource management planning guidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Resource management planning guidance. 1610.1 Section 1610.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) PLANNING, PROGRAMMING,...

  15. 43 CFR 1610.1 - Resource management planning guidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Resource management planning guidance. 1610.1 Section 1610.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) PLANNING, PROGRAMMING,...

  16. 43 CFR 1610.4 - Resource management planning process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Resource management planning process. 1610.4 Section 1610.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) PLANNING, PROGRAMMING,...

  17. Personnel Management: Stewardship of Human Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Douglas G.

    1976-01-01

    The personnel function of top management is examined by first studying the environment in which top management functions. The basic skills required to perform the function are discussed. Against this background, six elements of personnel management in colleges and universities are considered: goals and objectives, organization for personnel…

  18. Top 40 priorities for science to inform conservation and management policy in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleishman, Erica; Blockstein, David E.; Hall, John A.; Mascia, Michael B.; Rudd, Murray A.; Scott, J. Michael; Sutherland, William J.; Bartuska, Ann M.; Brown, A. Gordon; Christen, Catherine A.; Clement, Joel P.; DellaSala, Dominick; Duke, Clifford D.; Fiske, Shirley J.; Gosnell, Hannah; Haney, J. Chris; Hutchins, Michael; Klein, Mary L.; Marqusee, Jeffrey; Noon, Barry R.; Nordgren, John R.; Orbuch, Paul M.; Powell, Jimmie; Quarles, Steven P.; Saterson, Kathryn A.; Stein, Bruce A.; Webster, Michael S.; Vedder, Amy

    2011-01-01

    To maximize the utility of research to decisionmaking, especially given limited financial resources, scientists must set priorities for their efforts. We present a list of the top 40 high-priority, multidisciplinary research questions directed toward informing some of the most important current and future decisions about management of species, communities, and ecological processes in the United States. The questions were generated by an open, inclusive process that included personal interviews with decisionmakers, broad solicitation of research needs from scientists and policymakers, and an intensive workshop that included scientifically oriented individuals responsible for managing and developing policy related to natural resources. The process differed from previous efforts to set priorities for conservation research in its focus on the engagement of decisionmakers in addition to researchers. The research priorities emphasized the importance of addressing societal context and exploration of trade-offs among alternative policies and actions, as well as more traditional questions related to ecological processes and functions.

  19. Remote sensing in Michigan for land resource management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sattinger, I. J.; Sellman, A. N.; Istvan, L. B.; Cook, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    During the period from June 1972 to June 1973, remote sensing techniques were applied to the following tasks: (1) mapping Michigan's land resources, (2) waterfowl habitat management at Point Mouillee, (3) mapping of Lake Erie shoreline flooding, (4) highway impact assessment, (5) applications of the Earth Resources Technology Satellite, ERTS-1, (6) investigation of natural gas eruptions near Williamsburg, and (7) commercial site selection. The goal of the program was the large scale adaption, by both public agencies and private interests in Michigan, of earth-resource survey technology as an important aid in the solution of current problems in resources management and environmental protection.

  20. Public policy, private landholders: perspectives on policy mechanisms for sustainable land management.

    PubMed

    Cocklin, Chris; Mautner, Naomi; Dibden, Jacqui

    2007-12-01

    A variety of tools can be employed in support of environmental policy objectives, but achieving preferred outcomes also requires the cooperation of private landholders and others with vested interests in the land. The Land Stewardship project in the state of Victoria, Australia, is an initiative devoted to exploring the ways in which private landholders could be encouraged towards more sustainable land management. Following the view that the success of policy initiatives is contingent on effective stakeholder engagement, a component of the Land Stewardship project involved a dialogue with landholders about policy tools (e.g., regulation, economic instruments) that might be deployed to encourage improved land management practices. This paper provides an account of the views and attitudes of landholders, as revealed in a series of three workshops, which consisted of discussions about the factors influencing agriculture, participants' interpretations of sustainability, and policy methods. The focus of the paper is on what landholders believe to be the strengths and limitations of standard policy tools, and the essential requirements for these tools to deliver the best land management outcomes. One of the main findings of the project was a 'preference hierarchy' in respect of policy methods, according to which the strongest support was expressed for voluntary and education-based tools, followed by market-based instruments, with command-and-control regulation identified as a measure of 'last resort'. In the paper we reflect also on how the views and outlook of landholders should be positioned relative to other inputs in the design of policy interventions.

  1. Resource control in ATLAS distributed data management: Rucio Accounting and Quotas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisits, M.; Serfon, C.; Garonne, V.; Lassnig, M.; Beermann, T.; Vigne, R.

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Data Management system manages more than 160PB of physics data across more than 130 sites globally. Rucio, the next generation Distributed Data Management system of the ATLAS experiment, replaced DQ2 in December 2014 and will manage the experiment's data throughout Run 2 of the LHC and beyond. The previous data management system pursued a rather simplistic approach for resource management, but with the increased data volume and more dynamic handling of data workflows required by the experiment, a more elaborate approach is needed. Rucio was delivered with an initial quota system, but during the first months of operation it turned out to not fully satisfy the collaboration's resource management needs. We consequently introduce a new concept of declaring quota policies (limits) for accounts in Rucio. This new quota concept is based on accounts and RSE (Rucio storage element) expressions, which allows the definition of hierarchical quotas in a dynamic way. This concept enables the operators of the data management system to implement very specific policies for users, physics groups and production systems while, at the same time, lowering the operational burden. This contribution describes the concept, architecture and workflow of the system and includes an evaluation measuring the performance of the system.

  2. Public health human resources: a comparative analysis of policy documents in two Canadian provinces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Amidst concerns regarding the capacity of the public health system to respond rapidly and appropriately to threats such as pandemics and terrorism, along with changing population health needs, governments have focused on strengthening public health systems. A key factor in a robust public health system is its workforce. As part of a nationally funded study of public health renewal in Canada, a policy analysis was conducted to compare public health human resources-relevant documents in two Canadian provinces, British Columbia (BC) and Ontario (ON), as they each implement public health renewal activities. Methods A content analysis of policy and planning documents from government and public health-related organizations was conducted by a research team comprised of academics and government decision-makers. Documents published between 2003 and 2011 were accessed (BC = 27; ON = 20); documents were either publicly available or internal to government and excerpted with permission. Documentary texts were deductively coded using a coding template developed by the researchers based on key health human resources concepts derived from two national policy documents. Results Documents in both provinces highlighted the importance of public health human resources planning and policies; this was particularly evident in early post-SARS documents. Key thematic areas of public health human resources identified were: education, training, and competencies; capacity; supply; intersectoral collaboration; leadership; public health planning context; and priority populations. Policy documents in both provinces discussed the importance of an educated, competent public health workforce with the appropriate skills and competencies for the effective and efficient delivery of public health services. Conclusion This policy analysis identified progressive work on public health human resources policy and planning with early documents providing an inventory of issues to be

  3. Integrating Science, Management, and Policy for the Future of Water in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Society faces complex, multifaceted problems that call for research that transcends disciplinary boundaries and informs public policy. Water resources management in the face of climate change in California is one such challenge. Understanding responses to future conditions requires integration of climatic, hydrologic, ecological, and social dynamics. To catalyze the development and application of this science, the graduate students of the U.S. National Science Foundation-funded Climate Change, Water, and Society Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (CCWAS IGERT) at the University of California, Davis organized a "State of the Science" workshop to identify knowledge gaps; promote cross-disciplinary communication, fertilization, and collaboration; and better connect science and policy.

  4. Achieving competitive advantage through strategic human resource management.

    PubMed

    Fottler, M D; Phillips, R L; Blair, J D; Duran, C A

    1990-01-01

    The framework presented here challenges health care executives to manage human resources strategically as an integral part of the strategic planning process. Health care executives should consciously formulate human resource strategies and practices that are linked to and reinforce the broader strategic posture of the organization. This article provides a framework for (1) determining and focusing on desired strategic outcomes, (2) identifying and implementing essential human resource management actions, and (3) maintaining or enhancing competitive advantage. The strategic approach to human resource management includes assessing the organization's environment and mission; formulating the organization's business strategy; assessing the human resources requirements based on the intended strategy; comparing the current inventory of human resources in terms of numbers, characteristics, and human resource management practices with respect to the strategic requirements of the organization and its services or product lines; formulating the human resource strategy based on the differences between the assessed requirements and the current inventory; and implementing the appropriate human resource practices to reinforce the strategy and attain competitive advantage.

  5. Performance Evaluation of Resource Management in Cloud Computing Environments.

    PubMed

    Batista, Bruno Guazzelli; Estrella, Julio Cezar; Ferreira, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Filho, Dionisio Machado Leite; Nakamura, Luis Hideo Vasconcelos; Reiff-Marganiec, Stephan; Santana, Marcos José; Santana, Regina Helena Carlucci

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is a computational model in which resource providers can offer on-demand services to clients in a transparent way. However, to be able to guarantee quality of service without limiting the number of accepted requests, providers must be able to dynamically manage the available resources so that they can be optimized. This dynamic resource management is not a trivial task, since it involves meeting several challenges related to workload modeling, virtualization, performance modeling, deployment and monitoring of applications on virtualized resources. This paper carries out a performance evaluation of a module for resource management in a cloud environment that includes handling available resources during execution time and ensuring the quality of service defined in the service level agreement. An analysis was conducted of different resource configurations to define which dimension of resource scaling has a real influence on client requests. The results were used to model and implement a simulated cloud system, in which the allocated resource can be changed on-the-fly, with a corresponding change in price. In this way, the proposed module seeks to satisfy both the client by ensuring quality of service, and the provider by ensuring the best use of resources at a fair price.

  6. Technologies for water resources management: an integrated approach to manage global and regional water resources

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W. C., LLNL

    1998-03-23

    Recent droughts in California have highlighted and refocused attention on the problem of providing reliable sources of water to sustain the State`s future economic development. Specific elements of concern include not only the stability and availability of future water supplies in the State, but also how current surface and groundwater storage and distribution systems may be more effectively managed and upgraded, how treated wastewater may be more widely recycled, and how legislative and regulatory processes may be used or modified to address conflicts between advocates of urban growth, industrial, agricultural, and environmental concerns. California is not alone with respect to these issues. They are clearly relevant throughout the West, and are becoming more so in other parts of the US. They have become increasingly important in developing and highly populated nations such as China, India, and Mexico. They are critically important in the Middle East and Southeast Asia, especially as they relate to regional stability and security issues. Indeed, in almost all cases, there are underlying themes of `reliability` and `sustainability` that pertain to the assurance of current and future water supplies, as well as a broader set of `stability` and `security` issues that relate to these assurances--or lack thereof--to the political and economic future of various countries and regions. In this latter sense, and with respect to regions such as China, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia, water resource issues may take on a very serious strategic nature, one that is most illustrative and central to the emerging notion of `environmental security.` In this report, we have identified a suite of technical tools that, when developed and integrated together, may prove effective in providing regional governments the ability to manage their water resources. Our goal is to formulate a framework for an Integrated Systems Analysis (ISA): As a strategic planning tool for managing

  7. Determining operating policies for a water resource system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagli, C. H.; Miles, J. F.

    1980-07-01

    The object of the study described in this paper was to find a method of determining operating policies for a set of four dams which are to be constructed on the Firat (Euphrates) River in Turkey. Each of the dams has an associated hydro-electric power plant, and there are requirements to supply water for irrigation, as well as maintaining river flows downstream of the dams into Syria and Iraq. The problem is thus complex and conventional stochastic models would entail an excessive amount of computation. Moreover, the set of feasible operating policies is so large that simulation cannot be considered a viable alternative. The method adopted might be described as adaptive planning (AP). At time l a forecast is made of the inflow values expected during the planning period and using these forecast values a deterministic model of the system is solved to obtain an operating policy for time l + 1. The forecast is updated and the model re-run at each successive time period to yield revised policies based on the latest available data. The solution obtained by this method for a five-year test period, using historical data, was within 0.4% of the optimal solution.

  8. Biomass for biorefining: Resources, allocation, utilization, and policies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of biomass in the development of renewable energy, the availability and allocation of biomass, its preparation for use in biorefineries, and the policies affecting biomass are discussed in this chapter. Bioenergy development will depend on maximizing the amount of biomass obtained fro...

  9. 33 CFR 209.345 - Water resource policies and authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Document No. 10, 90th Congress, 1st Session, “Study of Federal Reimbursement Policy for Work by States and.... Reimbursement for Advance Non-Federal Participation in Civil Works Projects (a) Purpose. This regulation gives... regulation applies to all field operating agencies having Civil Works responsibilities. (c) References....

  10. NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect

    GREEN,T.ET AL.

    2003-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is located near the geographic center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated on 5,265 acres of land composed of Pine Barrens habitat with a central area developed for Laboratory work. In the mid-1990s BNL began developing a wildlife management program. This program was guided by the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP), which was reviewed and approved by various state and federal agencies in September 1999. The WMP primarily addressed concerns with the protection of New York State threatened, endangered, or species of concern, as well as deer populations, invasive species management, and the revegetation of the area surrounding the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The WMP provided a strong and sound basis for wildlife management and established a basis for forward motion and the development of this document, the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP), which will guide the natural resource management program for BNL. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B respectively), lists of actions in tabular format (Appendix C), and regulatory drivers for the Natural Resource Program (Appendix D). The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and incorporation of community involvement, where applicable.

  11. The evolution of Crew Resource Management training in commercial aviation.

    PubMed

    Helmreich, R L; Merritt, A C; Wilhelm, J A

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we describe changes in the nature of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training in commercial aviation, including its shift from cockpit to crew resource management. Validation of the impact of CRM is discussed. Limitations of CRM, including lack of cross-cultural generality are considered. An overarching framework that stresses error management to increase acceptance of CRM concepts is presented. The error management approach defines behavioral strategies taught in CRM as error countermeasures that are employed to avoid error, to trap errors committed, and to mitigate the consequences of error.

  12. The evolution of Crew Resource Management training in commercial aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, R. L.; Merritt, A. C.; Wilhelm, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we describe changes in the nature of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training in commercial aviation, including its shift from cockpit to crew resource management. Validation of the impact of CRM is discussed. Limitations of CRM, including lack of cross-cultural generality are considered. An overarching framework that stresses error management to increase acceptance of CRM concepts is presented. The error management approach defines behavioral strategies taught in CRM as error countermeasures that are employed to avoid error, to trap errors committed, and to mitigate the consequences of error.

  13. Group decision-making techniques for natural resource management applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coughlan, Beth A.K.; Armour, Carl L.

    1992-01-01

    This report is an introduction to decision analysis and problem-solving techniques for professionals in natural resource management. Although these managers are often called upon to make complex decisions, their training in the natural sciences seldom provides exposure to the decision-making tools developed in management science. Our purpose is to being to fill this gap. We present a general analysis of the pitfalls of group problem solving, and suggestions for improved interactions followed by the specific techniques. Selected techniques are illustrated. The material is easy to understand and apply without previous training or excessive study and is applicable to natural resource management issues.

  14. The Oregon health insurance experiment: when limited policy resources provide research opportunities.

    PubMed

    Allen, Heidi; Baicker, Katherine; Taubman, Sarah; Wright, Bill; Finkelstein, Amy

    2013-12-01

    In 2008 Oregon allocated access to its Medicaid expansion program, Oregon Health Plan Standard, by drawing names from a waiting list by lottery. The lottery was chosen by policy makers and stakeholders as the preferred way to allocate limited resources. At the same time, it also gave rise to the Oregon Health Insurance Experiment: an unprecedented opportunity to do a randomized evaluation - the gold standard in medical and scientific research - of the impact of expanding Medicaid. In this article we provide historical context for Oregon's decision to conduct a lottery, discuss the importance of randomized controlled designs for policy evaluation, and describe some of the practical challenges in successfully capitalizing on the research opportunity presented by the Oregon lottery through public-academic partnerships. Since policy makers will always face tough choices about how to distribute scarce resources, we urge thoughtful consideration of the opportunities to incorporate randomization that can substantially improve the evidence available to inform policy decisions without compromising policy goals.

  15. WasteWise Resource Management: Innovative Solid Waste Contracting Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Resource management is an innovative contractual partnership between a waste-generating organization and a qualified contractor that changes the nature of current disposal services to support waste minimization and recycling.

  16. Fragmented local governance and water resource management outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hong; Keane, Timothy D; Bernard, Eric A

    2015-03-01

    Fragmented jurisdictions and decision making structures can result in destructive competition and/or a lack of systematic cooperation that can hamper effective resource management and environmental planning, although the value of local autonomy and stakeholder participations should not be underestimated. This study empirically examines if political fragmentation in local governance is a significant barrier to successful resource management. To test this hypothesis, the authors quantify the degree of political fragmentation at two different geographical scales - 1) site-level: 12-digit watersheds and 2) regional: metropolitan statistical areas or equivalent regions - and analyze how water resource management outcomes vary with the level of political fragmentation using nationwide land cover and stream gauge information in the U.S. Regression analysis shows water quality declines (or slower quality improvements), measured in terms of total suspended solids, are associated with both site-level and regional political fragmentation indicators, suggesting that political fragmentation can make resource management more challenging.

  17. Implementing AIM-based monitoring for natural resource management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful monitoring programs are built on clearly-defined objectives, thorough planning, and organized implementation. However, natural resource management decisions need to be made at many different organizational levels and scales – from local to national. Developing separate monitoring programs...

  18. Hard-real-time resource management for autonomous spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes tickets, a computational mechanism for hard-real-time autonomous resource management. Autonomous spacecraftcontrol can be considered abstractly as a computational process whose outputs are spacecraft commands.

  19. What shapes research impact on policy? Understanding research uptake in sexual and reproductive health policy processes in resource poor contexts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Assessing the impact that research evidence has on policy is complex. It involves consideration of conceptual issues of what determines research impact and policy change. There are also a range of methodological issues relating to the question of attribution and the counter-factual. The dynamics of SRH, HIV and AIDS, like many policy arenas, are partly generic and partly issue- and context-specific. Against this background, this article reviews some of the main conceptualisations of research impact on policy, including generic determinants of research impact identified across a range of settings, as well as the specificities of SRH in particular. We find that there is scope for greater cross-fertilisation of concepts, models and experiences between public health researchers and political scientists working in international development and research impact evaluation. We identify aspects of the policy landscape and drivers of policy change commonly occurring across multiple sectors and studies to create a framework that researchers can use to examine the influences on research uptake in specific settings, in order to guide attempts to ensure uptake of their findings. This framework has the advantage that distinguishes between pre-existing factors influencing uptake and the ways in which researchers can actively influence the policy landscape and promote research uptake through their policy engagement actions and strategies. We apply this framework to examples from the case study papers in this supplement, with specific discussion about the dynamics of SRH policy processes in resource poor contexts. We conclude by highlighting the need for continued multi-sectoral work on understanding and measuring research uptake and for prospective approaches to receive greater attention from policy analysts. PMID:21679384

  20. Natural resources management in an era of global change

    SciTech Connect

    Sommers, W.T.

    1993-12-31

    The international science community has issued a series of predictions of global atmospheric change that, if they verify, will have heretofore unexperienced impact on our forests. Convincing the public and their natural resource managers to respond to these effects must be high on the agenda of the science community. Mitigative and adapative responses we examine and propose, however, should stem from an understanding of the evolving role of the natural resource manager and how that role might be affected by global change.

  1. Halfway House Management: A Curriculum Planning Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas-Gordon, Sandy L.; Spetz, Sally H.

    This curriculum resource guide, one of seven developed by the State of Illinois to present information on new and emerging curricula existing in the nation, can be used as a basis for local educators to determine the resources needed to offer halfway house management curricula and to initiate curriculum development at the local level. Chapters 1…

  2. Human Resource Management Issues. Symposium 22. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on human resource management issues consists of three presentations. "Work and Family Conflict: A Review of the Theory and Literature" (Susan R. Madsen) explores the literature related to work and family conflict and its possible implications to human resource development (HRD) theory and practice. It presents four existing…

  3. Swine Confinement Management: A Curriculum Planning and Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Walter D.; Spetz, Sally H.

    This curriculum resource guide, one of seven developed by the State of Illinois to present information on new and emerging curricula existing in the nation, can be used as a basis for local educators to determine the resources needed to offer swine confinement management curricula and to initiate curriculum development at the local level. Chapters…

  4. On the matter of sustainable water resources management

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter attempts to develop the concept of sustainability and make it operational in the realm of water resources management. Water is unique in its primacy among natural resources as an essential component of life itself. Due to its equally unique chemical and physical prop...

  5. Remote sensing in Michigan for land resource management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sattinger, I. J.; Istvan, L. B.; Roller, N. E. G.; Lowe, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    An extensive program was conducted to establish practical uses of NASA earth resource survey technology in meeting resource management problems throughout Michigan. As a result, a broad interest in and understanding of the usefulness of remote sensing methods was developed and a wide variety of applications was undertaken to provide information needed for informed decision making and effective action.

  6. HRIS: Introduction to Tomorrow's System for Managing Human Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Albert C.; Shafritz, Jay M.

    1977-01-01

    Reports on the U.S. State Department's experiment with a new concept in management information systems for personnel resources--the Human Resources Information Systems (HRIS). Suggests that the HRIS approach may meet public executives' demands for accurate, rapid, responsive, and flexible information systems. (Author/JG)

  7. Human Resources Administration in Education: A Management Approach. Sixth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebore, Ronald W.

    This book reflects the changing aspects of school human-resources management. Current concerns include the impact of new laws related to disabilities, civil rights, family and medical leave, and the testing of school bus drivers for alcohol and controlled substances. Also examined are human resources' responsibilities to military reservists and…

  8. Big Hat, No Cattle: Managing Human Resources, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Wickham

    1982-01-01

    The author discusses why business has difficulty in motivating its employees and proposes a new approach to developing human resources. Discusses mistaken premises, personnel and supervision, setting a long-term goal, changing management's philosophy, and selling human resource development as a company priority. (CT)

  9. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Annual Report FY 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton F. Marler; Julie Braun; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Brenda Ringe Pace

    2007-04-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500-year span of human occupation in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has legal responsibility for the management and protection of those resources and has delegated these responsibilities to its primary contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The INL Cultural Resource Management Office, staffed by BEA professionals, is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting the resources’ importance in local, regional, and national history. This annual report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office staff during Fiscal Year 2006. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be both informative to internal and external stakeholders, and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the INL.

  10. Managing nut genetic resources under disease threat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA ARS, National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) Corvallis, Oregon, is assigned to preserve genetic resources of hazelnuts (Corylus L.) and butternuts (Juglans cinerea L.). Both crops are threatened by fungal diseases. Hazelnuts are challenged by Eastern filbert blight (EFB) [caused by Anis...

  11. Outdoor Recreation and Wildlife Management Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    These instructional materials were developed as a supplement to the "Alaska State Model Curriculum in Renewable Natural Resources/Agriculture." The topics covered focus on competencies from the curriculum for which materials were not readily available to Alaskan teachers and provide information that may not be sufficiently covered by…

  12. A Management Tool for Reallocating College Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dellow, Donald; Losinger, Regina

    2004-01-01

    Community college administrators frequently need to deal with program enrollment shifts resulting from economic and demographic shifts. Reallocating resources between areas of the college to adjust to those enrollment shifts can become a difficult process if there isn't a careful monitoring of enrollment patterns and program costs. The authors…

  13. The Human Resources Management System: Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceriello, Vincent R.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a systematic and disciplined approach to planning for the development and implementation of an information system which will collect, store, maintain, and report human resources data. Discusses guidelines, priorities, training requirements, security, auditing, interface with payroll, and personnel reporting. (CT)

  14. Threshold concepts: implications for the management of natural resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Gross, John

    2014-01-01

    Threshold concepts can have broad relevance in natural resource management. However, the concept of ecological thresholds has not been widely incorporated or adopted in management goals. This largely stems from the uncertainty revolving around threshold levels and the post hoc analyses that have generally been used to identify them. Natural resource managers have a need for new tools and approaches that will help them assess the existence and detection of conditions that demand management actions. Recognition of additional threshold concepts include: utility thresholds (which are based on human values about ecological systems) and decision thresholds (which reflect management objectives and values and include ecological knowledge about a system) as well as ecological thresholds. All of these concepts provide a framework for considering the use of threshold concepts in natural resource decision making.

  15. Investing in citizen science can improve natural resource management and environmental protection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKinley, Duncan C.; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.; Ballard, Heidi L.; Bonney, Rick; Brown, Hutch; Evans, Daniel M.; French, Rebecca A.; Parrish, Julia K.; Phillips, Tina B.; Ryan, Sean F.; Shanley, Lea A.; Shirk, Jennifer L.; Stepenuck, Kristine F.; Weltzin, Jake F.; Wiggins, Andrea; Boyle, Owen D.; Briggs, Russell D.; Chapin, Stuart F.; Hewitt, David A.; Preuss, Peter W.; Soukup, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Citizen science has made substantive contributions to science for hundreds of years. More recently, it has contributed to many articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals and has influenced natural resource management and environmental protection decisions and policies across the nation. Over the last 10 years, citizen science—participation by the public in a scientific project—has seen explosive growth in the United States, particularly in ecology, the environmental sciences, and related fields of inquiry. In this report, we explore the current use of citizen science in natural resource and environmental science and decision making in the United States and describe the investments organizations might make to benefit from citizen science.

  16. Government Support for Open Educational Resources: Policy, Funding, and Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacey, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Foundations like Hewlett, Mellon, and Gates provided start-up funding and support that nurtured the field of open educational resources (OER) from infancy to a robust early adolescence characterized by energy and idealism (Casserly & Smith, 2008). However, foundation grants typically focus on establishing exemplars and cannot be relied on for…

  17. Natural Resource Management at Four Social Scales: Psychological Type Matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Helen; Hobbs, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Understanding organisation at different social scales is crucial to learning how social processes play a role in sustainable natural resource management. Research has neglected the potential role that individual personality plays in decision making in natural resource management. In the past two decades natural resource management across rural Australia has increasingly come under the direct influence of voluntary participatory groups, such as Catchment Management Authorities. The greater complexity of relationships among all stakeholders is a serious management challenge when attempting to align their differing aspirations and values at four social institutional scales—local, regional, state and national. This is an exploratory study on the psychological composition of groups of stakeholders at the four social scales in natural resource management in Australia. This article uses the theory of temperaments and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI®) to investigate the distribution of personality types. The distribution of personality types in decision-making roles in natural resource management was markedly different from the Australian Archive sample. Trends in personality were found across social scales with Stabilizer temperament more common at the local scale and Theorist temperament more common at the national scale. Greater similarity was found at the state and national scales. Two temperaments comprised between 76 and 90% of participants at the local and regional scales, the common temperament type was Stabilizer. The dissimilarity was Improviser (40%) at the local scale and Theorist (29%) at the regional scale. Implications for increasing participation and bridging the gap between community and government are discussed.

  18. Natural resource management at four social scales: psychological type matters.

    PubMed

    Allison, Helen; Hobbs, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Understanding organisation at different social scales is crucial to learning how social processes play a role in sustainable natural resource management. Research has neglected the potential role that individual personality plays in decision making in natural resource management. In the past two decades natural resource management across rural Australia has increasingly come under the direct influence of voluntary participatory groups, such as Catchment Management Authorities. The greater complexity of relationships among all stakeholders is a serious management challenge when attempting to align their differing aspirations and values at four social institutional scales-local, regional, state and national. This is an exploratory study on the psychological composition of groups of stakeholders at the four social scales in natural resource management in Australia. This article uses the theory of temperaments and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) to investigate the distribution of personality types. The distribution of personality types in decision-making roles in natural resource management was markedly different from the Australian Archive sample. Trends in personality were found across social scales with Stabilizer temperament more common at the local scale and Theorist temperament more common at the national scale. Greater similarity was found at the state and national scales. Two temperaments comprised between 76 and 90% of participants at the local and regional scales, the common temperament type was Stabilizer. The dissimilarity was Improviser (40%) at the local scale and Theorist (29%) at the regional scale. Implications for increasing participation and bridging the gap between community and government are discussed.

  19. 77 FR 64393 - Delegation of Authority for the Office of Field Policy and Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... Office of Field Policy and Management; Redelegation of Authority for the Office of Field Policy and... Office of Field Policy and Management AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Delegation... Development delegates to the Assistant Deputy Secretary for Field Policy and Management authority for...

  20. Markov decision processes in natural resources management: observability and uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Byron K.

    2015-01-01

    The breadth and complexity of stochastic decision processes in natural resources presents a challenge to analysts who need to understand and use these approaches. The objective of this paper is to describe a class of decision processes that are germane to natural resources conservation and management, namely Markov decision processes, and to discuss applications and computing algorithms under different conditions of observability and uncertainty. A number of important similarities are developed in the framing and evaluation of different decision processes, which can be useful in their applications in natural resources management. The challenges attendant to partial observability are highlighted, and possible approaches for dealing with it are discussed.

  1. Markov decision processes in natural resources management: Observability and uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    The breadth and complexity of stochastic decision processes in natural resources presents a challenge to analysts who need to understand and use these approaches. The objective of this paper is to describe a class of decision processes that are germane to natural resources conservation and management, namely Markov decision processes, and to discuss applications and computing algorithms under different conditions of observability and uncertainty. A number of important similarities are developed in the framing and evaluation of different decision processes, which can be useful in their applications in natural resources management. The challenges attendant to partial observability are highlighted, and possible approaches for dealing with it are discussed.

  2. Realizing the Potential of Information Resources: Information, Technology, and Services. Track 2: Policies and Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Seven papers and one abstract of a paper are presented from the 1995 CAUSE conference track on policies and standards issues faced by managers of information technology at colleges and universities. The papers include: (1) "University/College Information System Structures and Policies: Do They Make a Difference? An Initial Assessment"…

  3. Meeting the challenge of policy-relevant science: lessons from a water resource project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, Berton L.

    1986-01-01

    Water resource scientists face complex tasks in evaluating aspects of water projects, but relatively few assessment procedures have been applied and accepted as standard applications. Decision-makers often rely on environmental assessments to evaluate the value and operation of projects. There is often confusion about scientists' role in policy decisions. The scientist can affect policy-making as an expert withess, an advocate or a surrogate. By understanding the policy process, scientists can make their work more “policy relevant.” Using the Terror Lake hydro project in Alaska as a guide, three lessons are discussed: (1) not all problems are able to be solved with technology; (2) policy-relevant technology is rarely imposed on a problem; and (3) the scientist need not just react to the policy process, but can have an impact on how that process unfolds.

  4. Ecological resource management: a call to arms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emlen, J.M.; Kapustka, L.; Barnthouse, L.; Beyer, N.; Biddinger, G.; Kedwards, T.; Landis, W.; Menzie, C.; Munns, W.; Sorenson, M.; Wentsel, R.

    2002-01-01

    As the human population enlarges, it becomes increasingly difficult to sustain valued ecological resources. Human use of resources, whether it is the harvest of ocean fisheries, logging of forests, or farming of arable lands, has resulted in significant population declines in many wildlife species. The growth of urban areas and the expansion of impermeable surfaces alter landscape diversity and modify hydrologic patterns in ways that decrease habitat quality for many desired plant, fish, and wildlife species. Impaired water, air, and soil quality related to industrial, municipal, and agricultural activities have altered the composition of aquatic and terrestrial communities.

  5. Aeronautical Decision Making - Cockpit Resource Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    of this effort to establish a universal CRM evaluation methodology useful throughout the 7 Codes icd/or AA industry. The author’s participation in the...on communication) to the decision training and evaluation being offered to the single-person cockpit elsewhere described as ADM. From a historical...risk assessment skills. 5) Learning to consider all resources available. 6) Learning to how evaluate your flight and decision making skills. Recent

  6. Discussion: Comparison of slope instability screening tools following a large storm event and application to forest management and policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingley, Leslie; Slaughter, Stephen L.; Sarikhan, Isabelle Y.; Norman, David K.

    2013-02-01

    This discussion is in response to the article entitled "Comparison of slope stability screening tools following a large storm event and application to forest management and policy" by Kara Whittaker and Dan McShane (Geomorphology 145-146 (2012) 115-122). The discussion is coauthored by several geologists at the Washington Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) including those from the research and policy sections of the state agency.

  7. Food security and sustainable resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Dennis; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2015-07-01

    The projected growth in global food demand until mid-century will challenge our ability to continue recent increases in crop yield and will have a significant impact on natural resources. The water and land requirements of current agriculture are significantly less than global reserves but local shortages are common and have serious impacts on food security. Recent increases in global trade have mitigated some of the effects of spatial and temporal variability. However, trade has a limited impact on low-income populations who remain dependent on subsistence agriculture and local resources. Potential adverse environmental impacts of increased agricultural production include unsustainable depletion of water and soil resources, major changes in the global nitrogen and phosphorous cycles, human health problems related to excessive nutrient and pesticide use, and loss of habitats that contribute to agricultural productivity. Some typical case studies from China illustrate the connections between the need for increased food production and environmental stress. Sustainable options for decreasing food demand and for increasing production include reduction of food losses on both the producer and consumer ends, elimination of unsustainable practices such as prolonged groundwater overdraft, closing of yield gaps with controlled expansions of fertilizer application, increases in crop yield and pest resistance through advances in biotechnology, and moderate expansion of rain fed and irrigated cropland. Calculations based on reasonable assumptions suggest that such measures could meet the food needs of an increasing global population while protecting the environment.

  8. Design an optimum safety policy for personnel safety management - A system dynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, P.

    2014-10-01

    Personnel safety management (PSM) ensures that employee's work conditions are healthy and safe by various proactive and reactive approaches. Nowadays it is a complex phenomenon because of increasing dynamic nature of organisations which results in an increase of accidents. An important part of accident prevention is to understand the existing system properly and make safety strategies for that system. System dynamics modelling appears to be an appropriate methodology to explore and make strategy for PSM. Many system dynamics models of industrial systems have been built entirely for specific host firms. This thesis illustrates an alternative approach. The generic system dynamics model of Personnel safety management was developed and tested in a host firm. The model was undergone various structural, behavioural and policy tests. The utility and effectiveness of model was further explored through modelling a safety scenario. In order to create effective safety policy under resource constraint, DOE (Design of experiment) was used. DOE uses classic designs, namely, fractional factorials and central composite designs. It used to make second order regression equation which serve as an objective function. That function was optimized under budget constraint and optimum value used for safety policy which shown greatest improvement in overall PSM. The outcome of this research indicates that personnel safety management model has the capability for acting as instruction tool to improve understanding of safety management and also as an aid to policy making.

  9. Design an optimum safety policy for personnel safety management - A system dynamic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Balaji, P.

    2014-10-06

    Personnel safety management (PSM) ensures that employee's work conditions are healthy and safe by various proactive and reactive approaches. Nowadays it is a complex phenomenon because of increasing dynamic nature of organisations which results in an increase of accidents. An important part of accident prevention is to understand the existing system properly and make safety strategies for that system. System dynamics modelling appears to be an appropriate methodology to explore and make strategy for PSM. Many system dynamics models of industrial systems have been built entirely for specific host firms. This thesis illustrates an alternative approach. The generic system dynamics model of Personnel safety management was developed and tested in a host firm. The model was undergone various structural, behavioural and policy tests. The utility and effectiveness of model was further explored through modelling a safety scenario. In order to create effective safety policy under resource constraint, DOE (Design of experiment) was used. DOE uses classic designs, namely, fractional factorials and central composite designs. It used to make second order regression equation which serve as an objective function. That function was optimized under budget constraint and optimum value used for safety policy which shown greatest improvement in overall PSM. The outcome of this research indicates that personnel safety management model has the capability for acting as instruction tool to improve understanding of safety management and also as an aid to policy making.

  10. Incorporating evolutionary principles into environmental management and policy

    PubMed Central

    Lankau, Richard; Jørgensen, Peter Søgaard; Harris, David J; Sih, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    As policymakers and managers work to mitigate the effects of rapid anthropogenic environmental changes, they need to consider organisms’ responses. In light of recent evidence that evolution can be quite rapid, this now includes evolutionary responses. Evolutionary principles have a long history in conservation biology, and the necessary next step for the field is to consider ways in which conservation policy makers and managers can proactively manipulate evolutionary processes to achieve their goals. In this review, we aim to illustrate the potential conservation benefits of an increased understanding of evolutionary history and prescriptive manipulation of three basic evolutionary factors: selection, variation, and gene flow. For each, we review and propose ways that policy makers and managers can use evolutionary thinking to preserve threatened species, combat pest species, or reduce undesirable evolutionary changes. Such evolution-based management has potential to be a highly efficient and consistent way to create greater ecological resilience to widespread, rapid, and multifaceted environmental change. PMID:25567975

  11. Medicare disease management in policy context.

    PubMed

    Linden, Ariel; Adler-Milstein, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Interim results of the Medicare health support (MHS) demonstration projects suggest that commercial disease management (DM) is unable to deliver short-term medical cost savings. This is not surprising given the current DM program focus on compliance with process measures that may only lead to cost savings in the long-term. A program focused on reducing near-term hospitalizations is more likely to deliver savings during the initial 3-year phase of MHS. If the early trends in MHS are indicative of the final results, CMS will face the decision of whether to abandon commercial DM in favor of other chronic care management strategies. This article supports the upcoming assessment by describing the characteristics of the current commercial DM model that limit its ability to deliver short-term medical cost savings and the changes required to overcome these limitations.

  12. Developing Student Global Perspectives through Undergraduate Family Resource Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Glinda

    1993-01-01

    An undergraduate home economics program at the University of North Dakota infuses global concepts in courses on consumer issues, personal and family finances, and family management. Substantive themes center around values, family resource management patterns, interdependence, global issues/problems, critical thinking, and global actors. (SK)

  13. Non-Procedural Languages for Information Resource Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearley, William L.

    The future of information resources management requires new approaches to implementing systems which will include a type of data base management that frees users to solve data processing problems logically by telling the system what they want, together with powerful non-procedural languages that will permit communication in simple, concise…

  14. Coordinating the Design and Management of Heterogeneous Datacenter Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guevara, Marisabel

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous design presents an opportunity to improve energy efficiency but raises a challenge in management. Whereas prior work separates the two, we coordinate heterogeneous design and management. We present a market-based resource allocation mechanism that navigates the performance and power trade-offs of heterogeneous architectures. Given…

  15. Automatic Management of Parallel and Distributed System Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jerry; Ngai, Tin Fook; Lundstrom, Stephen F.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on automatic management of parallel and distributed system resources are presented. Topics covered include: parallel applications; intelligent management of multiprocessing systems; performance evaluation of parallel architecture; dynamic concurrent programs; compiler-directed system approach; lattice gaseous cellular automata; and sparse matrix Cholesky factorization.

  16. The Process Approach to Management of Enterprise Human Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlenko, O.; Mozhayeva, T.

    2016-04-01

    The paper describes the approach to human resources management in the quality management system of an enterprise on the basis of their dual nature. The expediency of this approach application is analysed to ensure harmony between the interests of the company and its personnel and to improve the quality of labour.

  17. Promoting Instructional Improvement: A Strategic Human Resource Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smylie, Mark A.; Wenzel, Stacy A.

    2006-01-01

    This report argues that instructional improvement, which goes hand-in-hand with efforts at education reform, can be promoted through the strategic use of human resource management (HRM) practices at the school, district, and state levels. The authors present information from the organizational and management literatures on how firms in several…

  18. Competitive Funding Models, Resource Management and Quality Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sizer, John

    1994-01-01

    Reviews, from a management accountant and funding council chief executive's perspective, relationship among (British) funding council models for competitive funding of higher education institutions, resource management, and quality assessments of teaching and learning. Posits a constrained funding environment for the rest of the 1990s. Concludes…

  19. Practical Materials for Teaching. Resource File: Edition I. Energy Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    This directory lists energy education programs directed at increasing the energy conservation awareness of scientists, engineers, managers, and technicians working in fields where they are responsible for managing energy consumption. The resource is prepared to help with the process of identifying, selecting, and obtaining materials for promoting…

  20. Evaluating stakeholder participation in water management: intermediary outcomes as potential indicators for future resource management outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Gemma; Bloeschl, Guenter; Loucks, Daniel Pete

    2013-04-01

    Evaluation of participation programmes, projects and activities is essential to identify whether stakeholder involvement has been successful in achieving its aims. Aims may include an improvement in water resource management such as enhanced ecological functioning, an improvement in human wellbeing and economic conditions, or overcoming a conflict between interest groups. Evaluating against "interest-based" resource management criteria requires that a desirable outcome can be identified, agreed upon and be measured at the time of evaluation. In many water management situations where collaborative approaches are applied, multiple interests and objectives are present, or stakeholders have not yet identified their own positions and priorities. Even if a resource management objective has been identified and strategy agreed upon, resource management changes tend to emerge over longer timescales and evaluation frequently takes place before they can be recognised. Evaluating against resource management criteria may lead evaluators to conclude that a programme has failed because it has not achieved a resource management objective at the time of evaluation. This presents a critical challenge to researchers assessing the effectiveness of stakeholder participation programmes. One strategy to overcome this is to conduct "goal-free" evaluation to identify what the programme is actually achieving. An evaluation framework that includes intermediary outcomes that are both tangible achievements such as innovation, creation of new organisations, and shared information and knowledge, as well as intangible achievements such as trust and network development can be applied to more broadly assess a programme's success. Analysis of case-studies in the published literature for which a resource management outcome has been achieved shows that intermediary outcomes frequently precede resource management outcomes. They seem to emerge over shorter timescales than resource management outcomes

  1. Managing aquatic ecosystems and water resources under multiple stress--an introduction to the MARS project.

    PubMed

    Hering, Daniel; Carvalho, Laurence; Argillier, Christine; Beklioglu, Meryem; Borja, Angel; Cardoso, Ana Cristina; Duel, Harm; Ferreira, Teresa; Globevnik, Lidija; Hanganu, Jenica; Hellsten, Seppo; Jeppesen, Erik; Kodeš, Vit; Solheim, Anne Lyche; Nõges, Tiina; Ormerod, Steve; Panagopoulos, Yiannis; Schmutz, Stefan; Venohr, Markus; Birk, Sebastian

    2015-01-15

    Water resources globally are affected by a complex mixture of stressors resulting from a range of drivers, including urban and agricultural land use, hydropower generation and climate change. Understanding how stressors interfere and impact upon ecological status and ecosystem services is essential for developing effective River Basin Management Plans and shaping future environmental policy. This paper details the nature of these problems for Europe's water resources and the need to find solutions at a range of spatial scales. In terms of the latter, we describe the aims and approaches of the EU-funded project MARS (Managing Aquatic ecosystems and water Resources under multiple Stress) and the conceptual and analytical framework that it is adopting to provide this knowledge, understanding and tools needed to address multiple stressors. MARS is operating at three scales: At the water body scale, the mechanistic understanding of stressor interactions and their impact upon water resources, ecological status and ecosystem services will be examined through multi-factorial experiments and the analysis of long time-series. At the river basin scale, modelling and empirical approaches will be adopted to characterise relationships between multiple stressors and ecological responses, functions, services and water resources. The effects of future land use and mitigation scenarios in 16 European river basins will be assessed. At the European scale, large-scale spatial analysis will be carried out to identify the relationships amongst stress intensity, ecological status and service provision, with a special focus on large transboundary rivers, lakes and fish. The project will support managers and policy makers in the practical implementation of the Water Framework Directive (WFD), of related legislation and of the Blueprint to Safeguard Europe's Water Resources by advising the 3rd River Basin Management Planning cycle, the revision of the WFD and by developing new tools for

  2. Human Resource Management Systems and Their Role in the Development of Strategic Resources: Empirical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez de Pablos, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is double. First, it provides a conceptual framework linking human resource management, organisational learning and knowledge management. Second, the paper builds a causal model and tests it with a sample of firms from the Spanish manufacturing industry, using a structural equation modelling technique. In particular, after…

  3. Integrating water resources management in eco-hydrological modelling.

    PubMed

    Koch, H; Liersch, S; Hattermann, F F

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the integration of water resources management with regard to reservoir management in an eco-hydrological model is described. The model was designed to simulate different reservoir management options, such as optimized hydropower production, irrigation intake from the reservoir or optimized provisioning downstream. The integrated model can be used to investigate the impacts of climate variability/change on discharge or to study possible adaptation strategies in terms of reservoir management. The study area, the Upper Niger Basin located in the West African Sahel, is characterized by a monsoon-type climate. Rainfall and discharge regime are subject to strong seasonality. Measured data from a reservoir are used to show that the reservoir model and the integrated management options can be used to simulate the regulation of this reservoir. The inflow into the reservoir and the discharge downstream of the reservoir are quite distinctive, which points out the importance of the inclusion of water resources management.

  4. Adaptive resource management and the value of information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Byron K.; Eaton, Mitchell J.; Breininger, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The value of information is a general and broadly applicable concept that has been used for several decades to aid in making decisions in the face of uncertainty. Yet there are relatively few examples of its use in ecology and natural resources management, and almost none that are framed in terms of the future impacts of management decisions. In this paper we discuss the value of information in a context of adaptive management, in which actions are taken sequentially over a timeframe and both future resource conditions and residual uncertainties about resource responses are taken into account. Our objective is to derive the value of reducing or eliminating uncertainty in adaptive decision making. We describe several measures of the value of information, with each based on management objectives that are appropriate for adaptive management. We highlight some mathematical properties of these measures, discuss their geometries, and illustrate them with an example in natural resources management. Accounting for the value of information can help to inform decisions about whether and how much to monitor resource conditions through time.

  5. Adaptive resource management and the value of information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.; Eaton, M.J.; Breininger, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    The value of information is a general and broadly applicable concept that has been used for several decades to aid in making decisions in the face of uncertainty. Yet there are relatively few examples of its use in ecology and natural resources management, and almost none that are framed in terms of the future impacts of management decisions. In this paper we discuss the value of information in a context of adaptive management, in which actions are taken sequentially over a timeframe and both future resource conditions and residual uncertainties about resource responses are taken into account. Our objective is to derive the value of reducing or eliminating uncertainty in adaptive decision making. We describe several measures of the value of information, with each based on management objectives that are appropriate for adaptive management. We highlight some mathematical properties of these measures, discuss their geometries, and illustrate them with an example in natural resources management. Accounting for the value of information can help to inform decisions about whether and how much to monitor resource conditions through time. ?? 2011.

  6. Improving nursing students' communication skills using crew resource management strategies.

    PubMed

    Aebersold, Michelle; Tschannen, Dana; Sculli, Gary

    2013-03-01

    To provide optimal patient care, all members of the health care team must effectively communicate patient status and the current plan of care. The Crew Resource Management (CRM) training system has been successfully used in the aviation industry to manage human error and reduce risk in the operational environment. CRM focuses on behaviors that support communication and teamwork and is modifiable to be used in nursing education. A version of CRM-nursing crew resource management-was implemented in a group of senior undergraduate nursing students. Students were satisfied with the program, and in a subsequent simulation they demonstrated the ability to use the communication techniques learned.

  7. Apparatus and method for managing digital resources by passing digital resource tokens between queues

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Henry J.; Lindenstruth, Volker

    1999-01-01

    A method of managing digital resources of a digital system includes the step of reserving token values for certain digital resources in the digital system. A selected token value in a free-buffer-queue is then matched to an incoming digital resource request. The selected token value is then moved to a valid-request-queue. The selected token is subsequently removed from the valid-request-queue to allow a digital agent in the digital system to process the incoming digital resource request associated with the selected token. Thereafter, the selected token is returned to the free-buffer-queue.

  8. Apparatus and method for managing digital resources by passing digital resource tokens between queues

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, H.J.; Lindenstruth, V.

    1999-06-29

    A method of managing digital resources of a digital system includes the step of reserving token values for certain digital resources in the digital system. A selected token value in a free-buffer-queue is then matched to an incoming digital resource request. The selected token value is then moved to a valid-request-queue. The selected token is subsequently removed from the valid-request-queue to allow a digital agent in the digital system to process the incoming digital resource request associated with the selected token. Thereafter, the selected token is returned to the free-buffer-queue. 6 figs.

  9. Appraisal of Scientific Resources for Emergency Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    scientific, technical, and management skills. These included entomology , toxicology, public health, environmental impact analysis, economic analysis...Legionnaire’s Disease, Microbiology, chemical analysis & epidem- 1976 iology studies essential. 7. Medfly Controversy, 1981 Entomology , toxicology...Analytical 2. Inorganic 3. Organic 4. Physical 5. Nuclear 6. Forensic 7. Ordnance 8. Drugs 9. Narcotics 10. Chemical Warfare Agents 11. Insecticides

  10. Information Resource Management for Industrial Information Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dosa, Marta

    This paper argues that the function of educational programs is to convey a sense of reality and an understanding of the open-endedness of information needs and situations; only such a reality orientation can instill the necessary flexibility in information professionals for effectively managing change. There is a growing consensus among…

  11. Climate Change and Water Resources Management: A Federal Perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brekke, Levi D.; Kiang, Julie E.; Olsen, J. Rolf; Pulwarty, Roger S.; Raff, David A.; Turnipseed, D. Phil; Webb, Robert S.; White, Kathleen D.

    2009-01-01

    Many challenges, including climate change, face the Nation's water managers. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has provided estimates of how climate may change, but more understanding of the processes driving the changes, the sequences of the changes, and the manifestation of these global changes at different scales could be beneficial. Since the changes will likely affect fundamental drivers of the hydrological cycle, climate change may have a large impact on water resources and water resources managers. The purpose of this interagency report prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is to explore strategies to improve water management by tracking, anticipating, and responding to climate change. This report describes the existing and still needed underpinning science crucial to addressing the many impacts of climate change on water resources management.

  12. Router Agent Technology for Policy-Based Network Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Edward T.; Sudhir, Gurusham; Chang, Hsin-Ping; James, Mark; Liu, Yih-Chiao J.; Chiang, Winston

    2011-01-01

    This innovation can be run as a standalone network application on any computer in a networked environment. This design can be configured to control one or more routers (one instance per router), and can also be configured to listen to a policy server over the network to receive new policies based on the policy- based network management technology. The Router Agent Technology transforms the received policies into suitable Access Control List syntax for the routers it is configured to control. It commits the newly generated access control lists to the routers and provides feedback regarding any errors that were faced. The innovation also automatically generates a time-stamped log file regarding all updates to the router it is configured to control. This technology, once installed on a local network computer and started, is autonomous because it has the capability to keep listening to new policies from the policy server, transforming those policies to router-compliant access lists, and committing those access lists to a specified interface on the specified router on the network with any error feedback regarding commitment process. The stand-alone application is named RouterAgent and is currently realized as a fully functional (version 1) implementation for the Windows operating system and for CISCO routers.

  13. A Semantic Based Policy Management Framework for Cloud Computing Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takabi, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing paradigm has gained tremendous momentum and generated intensive interest. Although security issues are delaying its fast adoption, cloud computing is an unstoppable force and we need to provide security mechanisms to ensure its secure adoption. In this dissertation, we mainly focus on issues related to policy management and access…

  14. Policy, Procedures and Guidance for System Life Cycle Management (SLCM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this policy is to establish a consistent framework across the Agency to ensure that EPA IT systems and applications are properly planned and managed, controllable, cost-effective and that they support the Agency’s mission and business goals.

  15. Houston Cole Library Collection Management and Development Policy. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAbee, Sonja L., Comp.; Bevis, Mary D., Ed.; Poe, Jodi W., Ed.; Whitesel, George, Ed.

    In 1991, the staff of the Houston Cole Library (Jacksonville State University, Alabama) published its first formal "Collection Management and Development Policy." This was used as a guide in conducting a complete assessment of the Library's collections. This second edition is a revision of the 1991 publication. The first section is an…

  16. [Displaying Education Data to Managers and Policy Makers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Michael P.

    Some approaches to displaying education data to managers and policy makers that may be pertinent to environmental data as well are discussed. The National Center for Education Statistics produces many publications each year, including "The Digest of Education Statistics,""The Condition of Education Statistics," and…

  17. School Leadership: Beyond Education Management. An Essay in Policy Scholarship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Gerald

    This book advances the new field of educational leadership--that of policy scholarship. It examines the ways in which concepts of educational leadership and management have evolved historically and culturally and reviews contemporary debates about the nature of school leadership. These debates involve cultural conservatives, New Right marketeers,…

  18. Survey-Based Measurement of Public Management and Policy Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Adam Douglas; Lubell, Mark; McCoy, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Networks have become a central concept in the policy and public management literature; however, theoretical development is hindered by a lack of attention to the empirical properties of network measurement methods. This paper compares three survey-based methods for measuring organizational networks: the roster, the free-recall name generator, and…

  19. [Laboral health in Penitentiary Center of Chile: a look from policies of human resources].

    PubMed

    Güilgüiruca R, M; Herrera-Bascur, J

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the influence of human resources policies on occupational health variables, such as engagement and job satisfaction, with regard to Chilean prison employees. 80 workers at the Women's Prison of Iquique were evaluated and results show that 77% and 88 % have a moderate to high score in terms of engagement and job satisfaction respectively. The 24% variation in engagement of the workers studied can be explained by policies aimed at promoting personal interests, while 32% of the variation in job satisfaction could be explained by policies of self-efficacy and personal interests. The above data permits the assertion to be made that human resources policies have a role that is relevant and necessary to modify and improve the occupational health conditions of these public sector workers.

  20. Advocacy coalitions involved in California's menu labeling policy debate: Exploring coalition structure, policy beliefs, resources, and strategies.

    PubMed

    Payán, Denise D; Lewis, LaVonna B; Cousineau, Michael R; Nichol, Michael B

    2017-03-01

    Advocacy coalitions often play an important role in the state health policymaking process, yet little is known about their structure, composition, and behavior. In 2008, California became the first state to enact a menu labeling law. Using the advocacy coalition framework, we examine different facets of the coalitions involved in California's menu labeling policy debate. We use a qualitative research approach to identify coalition members and explore their expressed beliefs and policy arguments, resources, and strategies by analyzing legislative documents (n = 87) and newspaper articles (n = 78) produced between 1999 and 2009. Between 2003 and 2008, six menu labeling bills were introduced in the state's legislature. We found the issue received increasing media attention during this period. We identified two advocacy coalitions involved in the debate-a public health (PH) coalition and an industry coalition. State organizations acted as coalition leaders and participated for a longer duration than elected officials. The structure and composition of each coalition varied. PH coalition leadership and membership notably increased compared to the industry coalition. The PH coalition, led by nonprofit PH and health organizations, promoted a clear and consistent message around informed decision making. The industry coalition, led by a state restaurant association, responded with cost and implementation arguments. Each coalition used various resources and strategies to advance desired outcomes. PH coalition leaders were particularly effective at using resources and employing advocacy strategies, which included engaging state legislators as coalition members, using public opinion polls and information, and leveraging media resources to garner support. Policy precedence and a local policy push emerged as important policymaking strategies. Areas for future research on the state health policymaking process are discussed.

  1. Environmental Policy Beliefs of Stakeholders in Protected Area Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovardas, Tasos; Poirazidis, Kostas

    2007-04-01

    Although the importance of understanding stakeholder beliefs regarding environmental policy has been noted by many authors, research focusing on the heterogeneity of stakeholder views is still very scarce and concentrated on a product-oriented definition of stakeholders. The aim of the present study is to address this gap by examining environmental policy beliefs of stakeholder groups engaged in protected area management. Questionnaires containing 73 five-point Likert scale items were administered to eight different stakeholder groups involved in the management of Greek protected areas. Items referred to core beliefs on environmental policy, namely, the value framework and sustainable development, and secondary beliefs, that is, beliefs on social consensus and ecotourism development. Our study used as a starting point respondent recruitment on the basis of a traditional product-centered approach. We investigated whether environmental policy beliefs can be used to effectively segregate stakeholders in well-defined segments, which override the product-oriented definition of stakeholders. Indeed, K-means clustering revealed an innovation-introduction and an implementation-charged sample segment. The instrument utilized in this research proved quite reliable and valid in measuring stakeholder environmental policy beliefs. Furthermore, the methodology implied that stakeholder groups differ in a significant number of belief-system elements. On the other hand, stakeholder groups were effectively distinguished on a small set of both core and secondary beliefs. Therefore, the instrument used can be an effective tool for determining and monitoring environmental policy beliefs of stakeholders in protected area management. This is of considerable importance in the Greek case, given the recent establishment of 27 administrative bodies of protected areas, all of which are required to incorporate public consultation into management practices.

  2. Generation of priority research questions to inform conservation policy and management at a national level.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Murray A; Beazley, Karen F; Cooke, Steven J; Fleishman, Erica; Lane, Daniel E; Mascia, Michael B; Roth, Robin; Tabor, Gary; Bakker, Jiselle A; Bellefontaine, Teresa; Berteaux, Dominique; Cantin, Bernard; Chaulk, Keith G; Cunningham, Kathryn; Dobell, Rod; Fast, Eleanor; Ferrara, Nadia; Findlay, C Scott; Hallstrom, Lars K; Hammond, Thomas; Hermanutz, Luise; Hutchings, Jeffrey A; Lindsay, Kathryn E; Marta, Tim J; Nguyen, Vivian M; Northey, Greg; Prior, Kent; Ramirez-Sanchez, Saudiel; Rice, Jake; Sleep, Darren J H; Szabo, Nora D; Trottier, Geneviève; Toussaint, Jean-Patrick; Veilleux, Jean-Philippe

    2011-06-01

    Integrating knowledge from across the natural and social sciences is necessary to effectively address societal tradeoffs between human use of biological diversity and its preservation. Collaborative processes can change the ways decision makers think about scientific evidence, enhance levels of mutual trust and credibility, and advance the conservation policy discourse. Canada has responsibility for a large fraction of some major ecosystems, such as boreal forests, Arctic tundra, wetlands, and temperate and Arctic oceans. Stressors to biological diversity within these ecosystems arise from activities of the country's resource-based economy, as well as external drivers of environmental change. Effective management is complicated by incongruence between ecological and political boundaries and conflicting perspectives on social and economic goals. Many knowledge gaps about stressors and their management might be reduced through targeted, timely research. We identify 40 questions that, if addressed or answered, would advance research that has a high probability of supporting development of effective policies and management strategies for species, ecosystems, and ecological processes in Canada. A total of 396 candidate questions drawn from natural and social science disciplines were contributed by individuals with diverse organizational affiliations. These were collaboratively winnowed to 40 by our team of collaborators. The questions emphasize understanding ecosystems, the effects and mitigation of climate change, coordinating governance and management efforts across multiple jurisdictions, and examining relations between conservation policy and the social and economic well-being of Aboriginal peoples. The questions we identified provide potential links between evidence from the conservation sciences and formulation of policies for conservation and resource management. Our collaborative process of communication and engagement between scientists and decision makers for

  3. Generation of Priority Research Questions to Inform Conservation Policy and Management at a National Level

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Murray A; Beazley, Karen F; Cooke, Steven J; Fleishman, Erica; Lane, Daniel E; Mascia, Michael B; Roth, Robin; Tabor, Gary; Bakker, Jiselle A; Bellefontaine, Teresa; Berteaux, Dominique; Cantin, Bernard; Chaulk, Keith G; Cunningham, Kathryn; Dobell, Rod; Fast, Eleanor; Ferrara, Nadia; Findlay, C Scott; Hallstrom, Lars K; Hammond, Thomas; Hermanutz, Luise; Hutchings, Jeffrey A; Lindsay, Kathryn E; Marta, Tim J; Nguyen, Vivian M; Northey, Greg; Prior, Kent; Ramirez-Sanchez, Saudiel; Rice, Jake; Sleep, Darren J H; Szabo, Nora D; Trottier, Geneviève; Toussaint, Jean-Patrick; Veilleux, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Integrating knowledge from across the natural and social sciences is necessary to effectively address societal tradeoffs between human use of biological diversity and its preservation. Collaborative processes can change the ways decision makers think about scientific evidence, enhance levels of mutual trust and credibility, and advance the conservation policy discourse. Canada has responsibility for a large fraction of some major ecosystems, such as boreal forests, Arctic tundra, wetlands, and temperate and Arctic oceans. Stressors to biological diversity within these ecosystems arise from activities of the country's resource-based economy, as well as external drivers of environmental change. Effective management is complicated by incongruence between ecological and political boundaries and conflicting perspectives on social and economic goals. Many knowledge gaps about stressors and their management might be reduced through targeted, timely research. We identify 40 questions that, if addressed or answered, would advance research that has a high probability of supporting development of effective policies and management strategies for species, ecosystems, and ecological processes in Canada. A total of 396 candidate questions drawn from natural and social science disciplines were contributed by individuals with diverse organizational affiliations. These were collaboratively winnowed to 40 by our team of collaborators. The questions emphasize understanding ecosystems, the effects and mitigation of climate change, coordinating governance and management efforts across multiple jurisdictions, and examining relations between conservation policy and the social and economic well-being of Aboriginal peoples. The questions we identified provide potential links between evidence from the conservation sciences and formulation of policies for conservation and resource management. Our collaborative process of communication and engagement between scientists and decision makers for

  4. Economic models for management of resources in peer-to-peer and grid computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyya, Rajkumar; Stockinger, Heinz; Giddy, Jonathan; Abramson, David

    2001-07-01

    The accelerated development in Peer-to-Peer (P2P) and Grid computing has positioned them as promising next generation computing platforms. They enable the creation of Virtual Enterprises (VE) for sharing resources distributed across the world. However, resource management, application development and usage models in these environments is a complex undertaking. This is due to the geographic distribution of resources that are owned by different organizations or peers. The resource owners of each of these resources have different usage or access policies and cost models, and varying loads and availability. In order to address complex resource management issues, we have proposed a computational economy framework for resource allocation and for regulating supply and demand in Grid computing environments. The framework provides mechanisms for optimizing resource provider and consumer objective functions through trading and brokering services. In a real world market, there exist various economic models for setting the price for goods based on supply-and-demand and their value to the user. They include commodity market, posted price, tenders and auctions. In this paper, we discuss the use of these models for interaction between Grid components in deciding resource value and the necessary infrastructure to realize them. In addition to normal services offered by Grid computing systems, we need an infrastructure to support interaction protocols, allocation mechanisms, currency, secure banking, and enforcement services. Furthermore, we demonstrate the usage of some of these economic models in resource brokering through Nimrod/G deadline and cost-based scheduling for two different optimization strategies on the World Wide Grid (WWG) testbed that contains peer-to-peer resources located on five continents: Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America.

  5. "Engendering" Agenda 21: gender equality and water resource management: five years after Rio.

    PubMed

    Hannan-andersson, C

    1997-01-01

    Agenda 21 acknowledges women's role in natural resources management at the local level and emphasizes the need for more women in senior positions to contribute positively to the implementation of environmental policy. This article assesses Agenda 21's approach to gender equality and its achievements. A few explicit references to women and water resource management (WRM) without consideration on the gender implications of the WRM policies and strategies were noted. The macro-oriented, technology-focused and supply-oriented approach of Agenda 21 on WRM hinders the inclusion of a gender perspective. There are two levels of implications of gender-blind intervention in relation to WRM: the issue of social justice and rights, and the negative impact of the neglect of gender inequality on overall planning and success of interventions. The inclusion of a gender perspective at policy and planning levels to facilitate the resolution of inconsistencies, as well as the importance of water sources and patterns of use knowledge for adequate policy development and planning was suggested. It is important that the WRM principle application utilize a sociocultural and gender perspective at both community and household levels before decisions are made on WRM interventions.

  6. Isotope tracers help manage water resources

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.; Hudson, B.; Davisson, L.

    1997-11-01

    Livermore isotope scientists are using stable and radioactive isotopes to learn about groundwater sources, ages, travel times, and flow paths and to determine the path and extent of contaminant movement in the water. These studies started at the Nevada Test Site because of concern about the transport in groundwater of contaminants from underground nuclear testing. When water managers can accurately predict where contaminated groundwater will be, they can avoid using it. Groundwater studies have also been performed for the Orange County Water District, Contra Costa County, and other public agencies, as well as at the Livermore site. Livermore scientists are some of the first to marry isotope tracing techniques and numerical groundwater models, using data from the former to verify and validate the predictions of the latter and thus provide a powerful forecasting tool for water managers.

  7. Managing Resource Teams in the Hellenic Navy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Safety and health 48 Improved union-management relations 47 Quality of products and services 70 Customer service 67 Worker...organizational processes and quality of products and services when compared to organizations where teams were infrequently used. Possessing the ability...e.g., new roles, change in cohesion); team performance (quantity and quality of products and services, as well as time, errors, cost and overall

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Annual Report FY 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Braun; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Clayton Marler; Brenda Pace

    2008-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500-year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has legal responsibility for the management and protection of those resources and has delegated these responsibilities to its primary contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting the resources’ importance in local, regional, and national history. This annual report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2007. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be both informative to internal and external stakeholders, and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the INL.

  9. Phenology research for natural resource management in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enquist, Carolyn A. F.; Kellermann, Jherime L.; Gerst, Katharine L.; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.

    2014-05-01

    Natural resource professionals in the United States recognize that climate-induced changes in phenology can substantially affect resource management. This is reflected in national climate change response plans recently released by major resource agencies. However, managers on-the-ground are often unclear about how to use phenological information to inform their management practices. Until recently, this was at least partially due to the lack of broad-based, standardized phenology data collection across taxa and geographic regions. Such efforts are now underway, albeit in very early stages. Nonetheless, a major hurdle still exists: phenology-linked climate change research has focused more on describing broad ecological changes rather than making direct connections to local to regional management concerns. To help researchers better design relevant research for use in conservation and management decision-making processes, we describe phenology-related research topics that facilitate "actionable" science. Examples include research on evolution and phenotypic plasticity related to vulnerability, the demographic consequences of trophic mismatch, the role of invasive species, and building robust ecological forecast models. Such efforts will increase phenology literacy among on-the-ground resource managers and provide information relevant for short- and long-term decision-making, particularly as related to climate response planning and implementing climate-informed monitoring in the context of adaptive management. In sum, we argue that phenological information is a crucial component of the resource management toolbox that facilitates identification and evaluation of strategies that will reduce the vulnerability of natural systems to climate change. Management-savvy researchers can play an important role in reaching this goal.

  10. Phenology research for natural resource management in the United States.

    PubMed

    Enquist, Carolyn A F; Kellermann, Jherime L; Gerst, Katharine L; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J

    2014-05-01

    Natural resource professionals in the United States recognize that climate-induced changes in phenology can substantially affect resource management. This is reflected in national climate change response plans recently released by major resource agencies. However, managers on-the-ground are often unclear about how to use phenological information to inform their management practices. Until recently, this was at least partially due to the lack of broad-based, standardized phenology data collection across taxa and geographic regions. Such efforts are now underway, albeit in very early stages. Nonetheless, a major hurdle still exists: phenology-linked climate change research has focused more on describing broad ecological changes rather than making direct connections to local to regional management concerns. To help researchers better design relevant research for use in conservation and management decision-making processes, we describe phenology-related research topics that facilitate "actionable" science. Examples include research on evolution and phenotypic plasticity related to vulnerability, the demographic consequences of trophic mismatch, the role of invasive species, and building robust ecological forecast models. Such efforts will increase phenology literacy among on-the-ground resource managers and provide information relevant for short- and long-term decision-making, particularly as related to climate response planning and implementing climate-informed monitoring in the context of adaptive management. In sum, we argue that phenological information is a crucial component of the resource management toolbox that facilitates identification and evaluation of strategies that will reduce the vulnerability of natural systems to climate change. Management-savvy researchers can play an important role in reaching this goal.

  11. New Federalism: the wave of the future for water resources policy

    SciTech Connect

    Bracken, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    Water resources policy is a significant public policy arena. There is a long history of concern causing debate among federal, state, and local levels of government on appropriate roles of each. This debate dates as early as the 1934 national conference on water pollution. Since the early 1950s, the policy arena has been replete with the issues of proper delineation of roles, authority, and responsibility. The New Federalism is the Reagan Administration's overarching response to intergovernmental affairs and is considered a major shift in policy. The impact on water policy planning is still not clear. Was acceptance or resistance the prevailing mood in the intergovernmental community. What precipitated or reinforced the reaction. Did basic institutional structure and function impede or facilitate desired shifts. Understanding the impact of the New Federalism will help define the current scenario in water resources policy/planning to set the stage for consideration of needed institutional adjustments to allow policymakers and planners to address critical water resources issues. Water is a definable and limited quantity with competing demands, each significant to the nation's prosperity. The impact of the New Federalism will be strongly influenced by the developing roles, responsibility, and authority at each level of government.

  12. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AMONG INTENSIVE CARE NURSES: AN ETHNOGRAPHIC STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Abbas; Najar, Ali Vafaee; Bakhshi, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nurses are the main users of supplies and equipment applied in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) which are high-priced and costly. Therefore, understanding ICU nurses’ experiences about resource management contributes to the better control of the costs. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the culture of nurses’ working environment regarding the resource management in the ICUs in Iran. Patients and Methods: In this study, a focused ethnographic method was used. Twenty-eight informants among ICU nurses and other professional individuals were purposively selected and interviewed. As well, 400 hours of ethnographic observations as a participant observer was used for data gathering. Data analysis was performed using the methods described by Miles and Huberman (1994). Results: Two main themes describing the culture of ICU nurses regarding resource management included (a) consumption monitoring and auditing, and (b) prudent use. The results revealed that the efforts for resource management are conducted in the conditions of scarcity and uncertainty in supply. ICU nurses had a sense of futurism in the supply and use of resources in the unit and do the planning through taking the rules and guidelines as well as the available resources and their values into account. Improper storage of some supplies and equipment was a reaction to this uncertain condition among nurses. Conclusions: To manage the resources effectively, improvement of supply chain management in hospital seems essential. It is also necessary to hold educational classes in order to enhance the nurses’ awareness on effective supply chain and storage of the items in the unit stock. PMID:26889097

  13. Patient centered integrated clinical resource management.

    PubMed

    Hofdijk, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The impact of funding systems on the IT systems of providers has been enormous and have prevented the implementation of designs to focused on the health issue of patients. The paradigm shift the Dutch Ministry of Health has taken in funding health care has a remarkable impact on the orientation of IT systems design. Since 2007 the next step is taken: the application of the funding concept on chronic diseases using clinical standards as the norm. The focus on prevention involves the patient as an active partner in the care plan. The impact of the new dimension in funding has initiated a process directed to the development of systems to support collaborative working and an active involvement of the patient and its informal carers. This national approach will be presented to assess its international potential, as all countries face the long term care crisis lacking resources to meet the health needs of the population.

  14. Bringing ecosystem services into integrated water resources management.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Crossman, Neville D; Nolan, Martin; Ghirmay, Hiyoba

    2013-11-15

    In this paper we propose an ecosystem service framework to support integrated water resource management and apply it to the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia. Water resources in the Murray-Darling Basin have been over-allocated for irrigation use with the consequent degradation of freshwater ecosystems. In line with integrated water resource management principles, Australian Government reforms are reducing the amount of water diverted for irrigation to improve ecosystem health. However, limited understanding of the broader benefits and trade-offs associated with reducing irrigation diversions has hampered the planning process supporting this reform. Ecosystem services offer an integrative framework to identify the broader benefits associated with integrated water resource management in the Murray-Darling Basin, thereby providing support for the Government to reform decision-making. We conducted a multi-criteria decision analysis for ranking regional potentials to provide ecosystem services at river basin scale. We surveyed the wider public about their understanding of, and priorities for, managing ecosystem services and then integrated the results with spatially explicit indicators of ecosystem service provision. The preliminary results of this work identified the sub-catchments with the greatest potential synergies and trade-offs of ecosystem service provision under the integrated water resources management reform process. With future development, our framework could be used as a decision support tool by those grappling with the challenge of the sustainable allocation of water between irrigation and the environment.

  15. Managing water resources for biomass production in a biofuel economy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One goal of our national security policy is to become more energy independent using biofuels. The expanded production of agricultural crops for bioenergy production has introduced new challenges for management of water. Water availability has been widely presumed in the discussion of bioenergy crop ...

  16. Translating childhood tuberculosis case management research into operational policies.

    PubMed

    Safdar, N; Hinderaker, S G; Baloch, N A; Enarson, D A; Khan, M A; Morkve, O

    2011-08-01

    The control of childhood tuberculosis (TB) has been of low priority in TB programmes in high-burden settings. The objective of this paper was to describe the development and testing of tools for the management of childhood TB. The Pakistan National TB Control Programme embarked on a number of activities, including the establishment of policy guidelines for the management of childhood TB and later a guidance document, 'Case Management Desk Guide and Structured Monitoring', to demonstrate the implementation of childhood TB interventions in a programme context. Initial results showed improved case finding and treatment outcome in implementation sites compared with control districts. However, further programme attention is required to improve quality.

  17. Practice Policy Statement: Integrating Effective Weight Management Into Practice.

    PubMed

    Edshteyn, Ingrid; Uduhiri, Kelechi A; Morgan, Toyosi O; Rhodes, Katrina L; Sherin, Kevin M

    2016-10-01

    The American College of Preventive Medicine Prevention Practice Committee contributes to policy guidelines and recommendations on preventive health topics for clinicians and public health decision makers. As an update to a previously published statement on weight management counseling of overweight adults, the College is providing a consensus-based recommendation designed to more effectively integrate weight management strategies into clinical practice and to incorporate referrals to effective evidence-based community and commercial weight management programs. The goal is to empower providers to include lifestyle interventions as part of the foundation of clinical practice.

  18. Evaluation of the Waste Tire Resources Recovery Program and Environmental Health Policy in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Ching; Yamada, Tetsuji; Chiu, I-Ming; Liu, Yi-Kuen

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of Taiwanese environmental health policies, whose aim is to improve environmental quality by reducing tire waste via the Tire Resource Recovery Program. The results confirm that implemented environmental health policies improve the overall health of the population (i.e. a decrease in death caused by bronchitis and other respiratory diseases). Current policy expenditures are far below the optimal level, as it is estimated that a ten percent increase in the subsidy would decrease the number of deaths caused by bronchitis and other respiratory diseases by 0.58% per county/city per year on average. PMID:19440434

  19. Evaluation of the waste Tire Resources Recovery Program and environmental health policy in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Ching; Yamada, Tetsuji; Chiu, I-Ming; Liu, Yi-Kuen

    2009-03-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of Taiwanese environmental health policies, whose aim is to improve environmental quality by reducing tire waste via the Tire Resource Recovery Program. The results confirm that implemented environmental health policies improve the overall health of the population (i.e. a decrease in death caused by bronchitis and other respiratory diseases). Current policy expenditures are far below the optimal level, as it is estimated that a ten percent increase in the subsidy would decrease the number of deaths caused by bronchitis and other respiratory diseases by 0.58% per county/city per year on average.

  20. Piecing Together the Puzzle of Graduate Employment: Factors that Shape the Graduate Work Expectations of Human Resource Management Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parris, Melissa A.; Saville, Kerrie

    2011-01-01

    Providing graduates with a set of skills and attributes relevant to their future employment remains a key topic in both higher education policy and research. This paper reports findings from a pilot study of human resource management (HRM) students' perceptions of the graduate work experience. Specifically, it focuses on how these perceptions are…

  1. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Parr, P.D. ); Evans, J.W. )

    1992-06-01

    A plan for management of the wildlife resources on the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation is outlined in this document. Management includes wildlife population control (hunts, trapping, and removal), handling specific problems with wildlife, restoration of species, coordination with researchers on wildlife studies, preservation and management of habitats, and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into five categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for obtaining these objectives. These categories are (1) species-richness management to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species management to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) management of game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety, (4) endangered species management designed to preserve and protect both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (5) pest management. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Environmental Sciences Division.

  2. Citizen science for water resources management: toward polycentric monitoring and governance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buytaert, Wouter; Dewulf, Art; De Bièvre, Bert; Clark, Julian; Hannah, David

    2016-04-01

    Novel and more affordable technologies are allowing new actors to engage increasingly in the monitoring of hydrological systems and the assessment of water resources. This trend may shift data collection from a small number of mostly formal institutions (e.g., statutory monitoring authorities, water companies) toward a much more dynamic, decentralized, and diverse network of data collectors (including citizens and other non-specialists). Such a move towards a more diverse and polycentric type of monitoring may have important consequences for the generation of knowledge about water resources and the way that this knowledge is used to govern these resources. An increasingly polycentric approach to monitoring and data collection will change inevitably the relation between monitoring and decision-making for water resources. On a technical level, it may lead to improve availability of, and access to, data. The opportunity for actors to design and implement monitoring may also lead to data collection strategies that are tailored better to locally specific management questions. However, in a policy context the evolution may also shift balances of knowledge and power. For example, it will be easier to collect data and generate evidence to support specific agendas, or for non-specialists to challenge existing agreements, laws, and statutory authorities. Analysing a case study in the Peruvian Andes, we identify strong links with polycentric models of river basin management and governance. Polycentric models recognize the existence of multiple centres of decision-making within a catchment and provide a potential alternative to the top-down centralizing tendencies of integrated water resources management. Although polycentric systems are often associated with data scarcity, we argue that citizen science provides a framework for data collection in such systems and that it provides opportunities for knowledge generation, institutional capacity building and policy support, in

  3. Integrated water resources management for emergency situations: A case study of Macau.

    PubMed

    Huang, JianYong; Lou, Inchio; Li, YingXia

    2016-12-01

    Integrated urban water management (IUWM) is a useful tool that can be used to alleviate water resource shortages in developing regions like Macau, where 98% of the raw water comes from mainland China. In Macau, scarce water resources deteriorate rapidly in emergency situations, such as accidental chemical spills upstream of the supply reservoir or salty tides. During these times, only the water from the two freshwater reservoirs in Macau can be used. In this study, we developed urban water management optimization models that integrated the raw water supply from the two reservoirs with various proposed governmental policies (wastewater reuse, rainwater collection, and water saving). We then determined how various water resource strategies would influence the urban water supply in Macau in emergency situations. Our results showed that, without imported raw water, the water supply from only the two Macau reservoirs would last for 7.95days. However, when all the government policies were included in the model, the supply could be extended to 13.79days. Out of the three non-conventional water resources, wastewater reuse is the most beneficial for increasing the Macau water supply, and rainwater collection also has great potential.

  4. Social capital and the collective management of resources.

    PubMed

    Pretty, Jules

    2003-12-12

    The proposition that natural resources need protection from the destructive actions of people is widely accepted. Yet communities have shown in the past and increasingly today that they can collaborate for long-term resource management. The term social capital captures the idea that social bonds and norms are critical for sustainability. Where social capital is high in formalized groups, people have the confidence to invest in collective activities, knowing that others will do so too. Some 0.4 to 0.5 million groups have been established since the early 1990s for watershed, forest, irrigation, pest, wildlife, fishery, and microfinance management. These offer a route to sustainable management and governance of common resources.

  5. A Case for Customizable Resource Management in Networks,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    00C Ca~aegie ej=)n ’C= 4P -jý A Case for Customizable Resource Management in Networks Peter Steenkiste Allan Fisher Hui Zhang October 21, 1998 CMU-CS-98...167 School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract We envision the deployment of an electronic services market ...that will deliver a wide range of electronic ser- vices over networks. This market will allow applications to combine resources at endpoints with

  6. Citizen science can improve conservation science, natural resource management, and environmental protection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKinley, Duncan C.; Miller-Rushing, Abe J.; Ballard, Heidi L.; Bonney, Rick; Brown, Hutch; Cook-Patton, Susan; Evans, Daniel M.; French, Rebecca A.; Parrish, Julia; Phillips, Tina B.; Ryan, Sean F.; Shanley, Lea A.; Shirk, Jennifer L.; Stepenuck, Kristine F.; Weltzin, Jake; Wiggins, Andrea; Boyle, Owen D.; Briggs, Russell D.; Chapin, Stuart F.; Hewitt, David A.; Preuss, Peter W.; Soukup, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Citizen science has advanced science for hundreds of years, contributed to many peer-reviewed articles, and informed land management decisions and policies across the United States. Over the last 10 years, citizen science has grown immensely in the United States and many other countries. Here, we show how citizen science is a powerful tool for tackling many of the challenges faced in the field of conservation biology. We describe the two interwoven paths by which citizen science can improve conservation efforts, natural resource management, and environmental protection. The first path includes building scientific knowledge, while the other path involves informing policy and encouraging public action. We explore how citizen science is currently used and describe the investments needed to create a citizen science program. We find that:Citizen science already contributes substantially to many domains of science, including conservation, natural resource, and environmental science. Citizen science informs natural resource management, environmental protection, and policymaking and fosters public input and engagement.Many types of projects can benefit from citizen science, but one must be careful to match the needs for science and public involvement with the right type of citizen science project and the right method of public participation.Citizen science is a rigorous process of scientific discovery, indistinguishable from conventional science apart from the participation of volunteers. When properly designed, carried out, and evaluated, citizen science can provide sound science, efficiently generate high-quality data, and help solve problems.

  7. National forecast for geothermal resource exploration and development with techniques for policy analysis and resource assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, T.A.V.; Shimamoto, G.T.; Amundsen, C.B.; Blair, P.D.; Finan, W.F.; Smith, M.R.; Edeistein, R.H.

    1982-03-31

    The backgrund, structure and use of modern forecasting methods for estimating the future development of geothermal energy in the United States are documented. The forecasting instrument may be divided into two sequential submodels. The first predicts the timing and quality of future geothermal resource discoveries from an underlying resource base. This resource base represents an expansion of the widely-publicized USGS Circular 790. The second submodel forecasts the rate and extent of utilization of geothermal resource discoveries. It is based on the joint investment behavior of resource developers and potential users as statistically determined from extensive industry interviews. It is concluded that geothermal resource development, especially for electric power development, will play an increasingly significant role in meeting US energy demands over the next 2 decades. Depending on the extent of R and D achievements in related areas of geosciences and technology, expected geothermal power development will reach between 7700 and 17300 Mwe by the year 2000. This represents between 8 and 18% of the expected electric energy demand (GWh) in western and northwestern states.

  8. Regional growth management policies: Toward reducing global warming at state and local levels

    SciTech Connect

    Purdie, J.

    1995-09-01

    State and local governments in the United States are accepting mandates to coordinate legislated land use and growth management planning with vigorous environmental protection and resource conservation. These mandates, implemented or planned in states with populations totaling over 100 million, will directly impact growth patterns and ultimately affect the level of atmospheric gases and particulates generated within their borders. This paper addresses the issues of growth management and land use planning at the local, state and regional levels and identifies areas impacting global warming. A review of existing systems will be presented, and recommendations will be made to improve monitoring of growth management mechanisms and organizational structures with the goal of global atmospheric improvement. The issues discussed include urban sprawl, transportation, and growth patterns as managed by policies also designed to protect environments and provide for sustainable growth. Areas for improved coordination between jurisdictions to ease global warming will also be examined.

  9. Resolving structural uncertainty in natural resources management using POMDP approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing focus on the uncertainties of natural resources management, and the importance of accounting for uncertainty in assessing management effectiveness. This paper focuses on uncertainty in resource management in terms of discrete-state Markov decision processes (MDP) under structural uncertainty and partial observability. It describes the treatment of structural uncertainty with approaches developed for partially observable resource systems. In particular, I show how value iteration for partially observable MDPs (POMDP) can be extended to structurally uncertain MDPs. A key difference between these process classes is that structurally uncertain MDPs require the tracking of system state as well as a probability structure for the structure uncertainty, whereas with POMDPs require only a probability structure for the observation uncertainty. The added complexity of the optimization problem under structural uncertainty is compensated by reduced dimensionality in the search for optimal strategy. A solution algorithm for structurally uncertain processes is outlined for a simple example in conservation biology. By building on the conceptual framework developed for POMDPs, natural resource analysts and decision makers who confront structural uncertainties in natural resources can take advantage of the rapid growth in POMDP methods and approaches, and thereby produce better conservation strategies over a larger class of resource problems. ?? 2011.

  10. Adaptive Management of Computing and Network Resources for Spacecraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfarr, Barbara; Welch, Lonnie R.; Detter, Ryan; Tjaden, Brett; Huh, Eui-Nam; Szczur, Martha R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    It is likely that NASA's future spacecraft systems will consist of distributed processes which will handle dynamically varying workloads in response to perceived scientific events, the spacecraft environment, spacecraft anomalies and user commands. Since all situations and possible uses of sensors cannot be anticipated during pre-deployment phases, an approach for dynamically adapting the allocation of distributed computational and communication resources is needed. To address this, we are evolving the DeSiDeRaTa adaptive resource management approach to enable reconfigurable ground and space information systems. The DeSiDeRaTa approach embodies a set of middleware mechanisms for adapting resource allocations, and a framework for reasoning about the real-time performance of distributed application systems. The framework and middleware will be extended to accommodate (1) the dynamic aspects of intra-constellation network topologies, and (2) the complete real-time path from the instrument to the user. We are developing a ground-based testbed that will enable NASA to perform early evaluation of adaptive resource management techniques without the expense of first deploying them in space. The benefits of the proposed effort are numerous, including the ability to use sensors in new ways not anticipated at design time; the production of information technology that ties the sensor web together; the accommodation of greater numbers of missions with fewer resources; and the opportunity to leverage the DeSiDeRaTa project's expertise, infrastructure and models for adaptive resource management for distributed real-time systems.

  11. Health Policy and Management: in praise of political science. Comment on "On Health Policy and Management (HPAM): mind the theory-policy-practice gap".

    PubMed

    Hunter, David J

    2015-03-12

    Health systems have entered a third era embracing whole systems thinking and posing complex policy and management challenges. Understanding how such systems work and agreeing what needs to be put in place to enable them to undergo effective and sustainable change are more pressing issues than ever for policy-makers. The theory-policy-practice-gap and its four dimensions, as articulated by Chinitz and Rodwin, is acknowledged. It is suggested that insights derived from political science can both enrich our understanding of the gap and suggest what changes are needed to tackle the complex challenges facing health systems.

  12. Integrated Spatial Modeling using Geoinformatics: A Prerequisite for Natural Resources Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katpatal, Y. B.

    2014-12-01

    Every natural system calls for complete visualization for its holistic and sustainable development. Many a times, especially in developing countries, the approaches deviate from this basic paradigm and results in ineffective management of the natural resources. This becomes more relevant in these countries which are witnessing heavy exodus of the rural population to urban areas increasing the pressures on the basic commodities. Spatial technologies which provide the opportunity to enhance the knowledge visualization of the policy makers and administrators which facilitates technical and scientific management of the resources. Increasing population has created negative impacts on the per capita availability of several resources, which has been well accepted in the statistical records of several developing countries. For instance, the per capita availability of water in India has decreased substantially in last decade and groundwater depletion is on the rise. There is hence a need of tool which helps in restoring the resource through visualization and evaluation temporally. Geological parameters play an important role in operation of several natural systems and earth sciences parameters may not be ignored. Spatial technologies enables application of 2D as well as 3D modeling taking into account variety of natural parameters related to diverse areas. The paper presents case studies where spatial technology has helped in not only understanding the natural systems but also providing solutions, especially in Indian context. The case studies relate to Groundwater Management, Watershed and Basin Management, Groundwater recharge, Environment sustainability using spatial technology. Key Words: Spatial model, Groundwater, Hydrogeology, Geoinformatics, Sustainable Development.

  13. Environmental compliance considerations for the management of cultural resources

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.A.; Whitfield, S.; McGinnis, K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines three key considerations underlying the programmatic management of cultural resources that may be affected by a large federal project. These considerations are statutory background and the compliance process, cultural resource compliance tasks, and quality assurance. The first consideration addresses the legal requirements and steps that must be met and taken for federal agencies to fulfill their cultural resource compliance responsibilities. The second consideration focuses on the tasks that must be performed by technical specialists to facilitate related federal and state compliance actions. The third consideration ensures that compliance requirements are being properly fulfilled. In the technical literature and compliance planning, archaeological and historic sites and Native American cultural resources are grouped under the general heading of cultural resources. Also included under this heading are the traditions and resources of Folk societies. Cultural resources encompass both material and nonmaterial aspects of our cultural heritage and include buildings, structures, objects, sites, districts, archaeological resources, places of religious importance, and unique, distinctive, or unusual lifeways. For compliance purposes, it is useful to treat these resources within four roughly chronological culture-historical periods: prehistoric, ethnohistoric, historic, and contemporary. 6 refs., 6 tabs.

  14. Providing policy-relevant information for greenhouse gas management: Perspectives from science and technology policy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilling, L.

    2009-12-01

    In the 12 years since the Kyoto Protocol was signed setting forth targets for greenhouse gas emissions from several nations, the number of policies, voluntary programs and commercial enterprises that have developed to manage carbon has grown exponentially. Many of these programs have occurred in a voluntary context, such as carbon trading, carbon offset programs, and climate registries . To date, no single, common system for accrediting, verifying and recording carbon credits has developed. Moreover, as the international community continues to negotiate the dimensions of an international agreement for the post-Kyoto time period, discussions still center on targets for fossil fuel emissions, biospheric carbon protection, and appropriate distribution of the burden of compliance globally. If carbon still remains the currency for discussion in a climate agreement, some type of effective measurement and verification system will be needed to ensure that commitments are being met. While entire volumes over the past decade have been written on what it is possible to observe about the carbon cycle and how to do so-- these tend to describe observations from the perspective of studying the carbon cycle to discover fundamental new knowledge. I will argue, however, that for the application under consideration in this session, i.e. a global greenhouse gas information system, it is essential to bring in the perspective of the policy and regulatory community. The needs of the scientific community for measuring the uncertainties in the global carbon cycle are not necessarily the same as those for the policy community. To ensure that such a system can serve a policy-relevant function, the scientific community must engage with policy makers, entrepreneurs, those who must comply, and others involved in constructing the policy framework. This paper will examine some of the key fundamentals that the policy community may be considering in designing a greenhouse gas monitoring system. I

  15. Adaptive Management as an Effective Strategy: Interdisciplinary Perceptions for Natural Resources Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiss, Lindsay M.; Hessenauer, Jan-Michael; Nathan, Lucas R.; O'Connor, Kelly M.; Liberati, Marjorie R.; Kloster, Danielle P.; Barclay, Janet R.; Vokoun, Jason C.; Morzillo, Anita T.

    2017-02-01

    Adaptive management is a well-established approach to managing natural resources, but there is little evidence demonstrating effectiveness of adaptive management over traditional management techniques. Peer-reviewed literature attempts to draw conclusions about adaptive management effectiveness using social perceptions, but those studies are largely restricted to employees of US federal organizations. To gain a more comprehensive insight into perceived adaptive management effectiveness, this study aimed to broaden the suite of disciplines, professional affiliations, and geographic backgrounds represented by both practitioners and scholars. A questionnaire contained a series of questions concerning factors that lead to or inhibit effective management, followed by another set of questions focused on adaptive management. Using a continuum representing strategies of both adaptive management and traditional management, respondents selected those strategies that they perceived as being effective. Overall, characteristics (i.e., strategies, stakeholders, and barriers) identified by respondents as contributing to effective management closely aligned with adaptive management. Responses were correlated to the type of adaptive management experience rather than an individual's discipline, occupational, or regional affiliation. In particular, perceptions of characteristics contributing to adaptive management effectiveness varied between respondents who identified as adaptive management scholars (i.e., no implementation experience) and adaptive management practitioners. Together, these results supported two concepts that make adaptive management effective: practitioners emphasized adaptive management's value as a long-term approach and scholars noted the importance of stakeholder involvement. Even so, more communication between practitioners and scholars regarding adaptive management effectiveness could promote interdisciplinary learning and problem solving for improved

  16. Energy resource management for energy-intensive manufacturing industries

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, C.W.; Levangie, J.

    1981-10-01

    A program to introduce energy resource management into an energy-intensive manufacturing industry is presented. The food industry (SIC No. 20) was chosen and 20 companies were selected for interviews, but thirteen were actually visited. The methodology for this program is detailed. Reasons for choosing the food industry are described. The substance of the information gained and the principal conclusions drawn from the interviews are given. Results of the model Energy Resource Management Plan applied to three companies are compiled at length. Strategies for dissemination of the information gained are described. (MCW)

  17. 78 FR 53777 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Visual Resource Management and Areas of Critical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Draft Visual Resource Management and Areas of... prepared a Draft Visual Resources Management and Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) Resource....html . ADDRESSES: You may submit comments related to the Draft Visual Resource Management and Areas...

  18. 43 CFR 1610.4-8 - Selection of resource management plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Selection of resource management plan..., BUDGETING Resource Management Planning § 1610.4-8 Selection of resource management plan. After publication of the draft resource management plan and draft environmental impact statement, the Field...

  19. 43 CFR 1610.4-8 - Selection of resource management plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Selection of resource management plan..., BUDGETING Resource Management Planning § 1610.4-8 Selection of resource management plan. After publication of the draft resource management plan and draft environmental impact statement, the Field...

  20. An Integrated Systems Approach to Designing Climate Change Adaptation Policy in Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, D.; Malano, H. M.; Davidson, B.; George, B.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change projections are characterised by large uncertainties with rainfall variability being the key challenge in designing adaptation policies. Climate change adaptation in water resources shows all the typical characteristics of 'wicked' problems typified by cognitive uncertainty as new scientific knowledge becomes available, problem instability, knowledge imperfection and strategic uncertainty due to institutional changes that inevitably occur over time. Planning that is characterised by uncertainties and instability requires an approach that can accommodate flexibility and adaptive capacity for decision-making. An ability to take corrective measures in the event that scenarios and responses envisaged initially derive into forms at some future stage. We present an integrated-multidisciplinary and comprehensive framework designed to interface and inform science and decision making in the formulation of water resource management strategies to deal with climate change in the Musi Catchment of Andhra Pradesh, India. At the core of this framework is a dialogue between stakeholders, decision makers and scientists to define a set of plausible responses to an ensemble of climate change scenarios derived from global climate modelling. The modelling framework used to evaluate the resulting combination of climate scenarios and adaptation responses includes the surface and groundwater assessment models (SWAT & MODFLOW) and the water allocation modelling (REALM) to determine the water security of each adaptation strategy. Three climate scenarios extracted from downscaled climate models were selected for evaluation together with four agreed responses—changing cropping patterns, increasing watershed development, changing the volume of groundwater extraction and improving irrigation efficiency. Water security in this context is represented by the combination of level of water availability and its associated security of supply for three economic activities (agriculture