Science.gov

Sample records for respirable suspended particles

  1. Real-time monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and respirable suspended particles from environmental tobacco smoke in a home

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, W.; Wilson, N.K.; Klepeis, N.; Switzer, P.

    1994-01-01

    Real-time measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on fine particles was evaluated in a home with environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) as a source. Respirable suspended particles (RSP) were also monitored. Comparison of PAH and RSP concentrations from these experiments suggests: (1) the PAH concentrations for the two types of cigarettes--a regular Marlboro filter cigarette and a University of Kentucky reference cigarette No. 2R1--were similar, but the RSP concentrations were different; (2) concentrations from the real-time PAH monitor were linearly related to RSP concentrations; (3) the slopes of the regression lines between PAH and RSP differed for the two types of cigarettes. The real-time PAH monitor appears to be a useful tool for evaluating mathematical models to predict the concentration time series in indoor microenvironments.

  2. The genotoxic contribution of wood smoke to indoor respirable suspended particles

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, P.M. ); Rossman, T.G. ); Daisey, J.M. )

    1989-01-01

    The effect of wood burning stoves on the genotoxicity of indoor respirable organic matter was investigated for four homes during the winter and spring of 1986. Paired samples, one collected when the stove was not used and one when wood was burned, were extracted with dichloromethane and acetone. Aliquots of the dichloromethane extracts were analyzed with and without metabolic activation using the Microscreen bioassay. The Microscreen is a rapid, sensitive bioassay which measures a broad genotoxic endpoint, {lambda}-prophage induction. Per nanogram of organic material, wood smoke proved to be a major source of indirect (observed with metabolic activation) but not direct genotoxins in homes. The increase in indirect genotoxicity for extracts from aerosol containing wood smoke is probably due to higher concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the wood smoke aerosol as well as other unidentified classes. The direct genotoxicity observed for extracts of aerosol not containing wood smoke decreased with metabolic activation. This direct genotoxicity may be related to cooking activities in the homes. The trends in genotoxicity observed per nanogram of organic material are more pronounced when expressed per m{sup 3} of air due to the higher percentage of extractable material in aerosol containing wood smoke.

  3. Identifying dominant sources of respirable suspended particulates in Guangzhou, China

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Y.; Dai, W.; Wang, X.S.; Cui, M.M.; Su, H.; Xie, S.D.; Zhang, Y.H.

    2008-09-15

    Respirable suspended particulates (RSP, i.e., particles with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 {mu} m or less) were measured in 2004 and 2005 at seven sites in the rapidly developing Guangzhou area of China. The average RSP concentration was 126 {mu} g m{sup -3}, a high level that could be very harmful to human health. The chemical species composition of the RSP, including organic and elemental carbon, water-soluble ions, and elemental compositions, was also analyzed. The organics and sulfate may be the major components of RSP mass concentrations. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was used to identify the sources of RSP as secondary sulfates (32%), secondary nitrates (6%), biomass burning (15%), coal fly ash/cement (18%), sea salt (3%), crustal dust (5%), vehicle exhaust (6%), and coal-fired power plants (3%). Reducing coal combustion and controlling vehicle emissions would alleviate RSP pollution, as most of the precursors were components of coal burning emissions and vehicular exhaust.

  4. Macromodel for assessing residential concentrations of combustion-generated pollutants: Model development and preliminary predictions for CO, NO/sub 2/, and respirable suspended particles

    SciTech Connect

    Traynor, G.W.; Aceti, J.C.; Apte, M.G.; Smith, B.V.; Green, L.L.; Smith-Reiser, A.; Novak, K.M.; Moses, D.O.

    1989-01-01

    A simulation model (also called a ''macromodel'') has been developed to predict residential air pollutant concentration distributions for specified populations. The model inputs include the market penetration of pollution sources, pollution source characteristics (e.g., emission rates, source usage rates), building characteristics (e.g., house volume, air exchange rates), and meteorological parameters (e.g., outside temperature). Four geographically distinct regions of the US have been modeled using Monte Carlo and deterministic simulation techniques. Single-source simulations were also conducted. The highest predicted CO and NO/sub 2/ residential concentrations were associated with the winter-time use of unvented gas and kerosene space heaters. The highest predicted respirable suspended particulate concentrations were associated with indoor cigarette smoking and the winter-time use of non-airtight wood stoves, radiant kerosene heaters, convective unvented gas space heaters, and oil forced-air furnaces. Future field studies in this area should (1) fill information gaps identified in this report, and (2) collect information on the macromodel input parameters to properly interpret the results. It is almost more important to measure the parameters that affect indoor concentration than it is to measure the concentrations themselves.

  5. Impact assessment of respirable suspended particulate matter from diesel generator sets used for pumping station.

    PubMed

    Talwar, B; Pipalatkar, P; Gajghate, D G; Nema, P

    2010-10-01

    Prediction of respirable suspended particulate matter impacts of diesel generator sets used for pumping station has been made using meteorological data, information on stack characteristics and emission rate, baseline ambient particulate matter and Industrial Source Complex Short Term (ISCST-3) model. It is observed that particulate matter emission from pumping station-S workplace diesel generator sets ranged from 2.4 to 436.5 mg Nm⁻³ and while at pumping station-C, it ranged from 23.2 to 186.5 mg Nm⁻³. The predicted and ambient respirable suspended particulate matter concentrations are below the national air quality standard for respirable suspended particulate matter in a mixed industrial area. Metals contents in respirable suspended particulate matter indicate the origin of crustal and mobile sources. Therefore, the impact of diesel generator sets used for pumping of crude oil on local air quality would be acceptable.

  6. Sampling of respirable isocyanate particles.

    PubMed

    Gylestam, Daniel; Gustavsson, Marcus; Karlsson, Daniel; Dalene, Marianne; Skarping, Gunnar

    2014-04-01

    An advanced design of a denuder impactor (DI) sampler has been developed for characterization of possible airborne isocyanate exposure in different particle size fractions. The sampler is equipped with 12 different parallel denuder tubes, 4 impaction stages with the cut-off values (d50) of: 9.5, 4, 2.5 and 1 µm, and an end filter that collects particles < 1 µm. All collecting parts were impregnated with di-n-butylamine DBA as the reagent in a mixture with acetic acid. The performance of the DI sampler was studied on a standard atmosphere containing gas and particulate isocyanates. The isocyanate atmosphere was generated by liquid permeation of 2,4-, 2,6-Toluene Diisocyanate (TDI), 1,6-Hexamethylene Diisocyanate (HDI) and Isophorone Diisocyanate (IPDI). 4,4'-Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (MDI) particles were generated by heating of technical MDI and condensing the mixture of gas and particle-borne MDI in an atmosphere containing mixed salt particles. The study was performed in a 0.85 m3 environmental chamber with stainless steel walls. With the advancement of the DI sampler it is now possible to collect isocyanate particle samples for up to 320 min. The performance of the DI sampler is essentially unaffected by the humidity. The DI sampler and the ASSET EZ4-NCO sampler (Sigma-Aldrich/Supelco, Bellefonte, PA, USA) gave similar results. Sample losses within the DI sampler are low. In the environmental chamber it was observed that the particle distribution may be affected by the humidity and ageing. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to separate a flow of selected fractions containing MDI particles from mixed MDI and salt particles. The particle-size distribution had a maximum at about 300 nm, but later in the environmental chamber 1 µm dominated. The distribution was very different as compared to with only NaCl or MDI present. The biological relevance for studying isocyanate nano particles is significant as these have the possibility to reach the

  7. Characterization of suspended particles in Everglades wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noe, G.B.; Harvey, J.W.; Saiers, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    We report the concentration, phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) content, and size and chemical fractionation of fine suspended particles (0.2-100 ??m) and colloids (3 kilodalton [kDa]-0.1 ??m) in the surface water of Everglades wetlands along regional and P-enrichment gradients. Total suspended sediment concentrations ranged from 0.7 to 2.7 mg L-1. Total particulate P concentrations increased from 0.05 ??mol L-1 to 0.31 ??mol L -1 along the P-enrichment gradient. Particles contained from 20% to 43% of total P but <12% of total N in surface water. Dissolved (<0.2 ??m) organic N contained about 90% of total N, with the 3-100-kDa colloidal size class containing the most N of any size class. The 0.45-2.7-??m size fraction held the most particulate P at all sites, whereas particulate N was most abundant in the 2.7-10-??m size class at most sites. Standard chemical fractionation of particles identified acid-hydrolyzable P as the most abundant species of particulate P, with little reactive or refractory organic P. Sequential chemical extraction revealed that about 65% of total particulate P was microbial, while about 25% was associated with humic and fulvic organic matter. The size and chemical fractionation information suggested that P-rich particles mostly consisted of suspended bacteria. Suspended particles in Everglades wetlands were small in size and had low concentrations, yet they stored a large proportion of surface-water P in intermediately reactive forms, but they held little N. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  8. Pyrogenic effect of respirable road dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardena, Umesh; Tollemark, Linda; Tagesson, Christer; Leanderson, Per

    2009-02-01

    Because pyrogenic (fever-inducing) compounds on ambient particles may play an important role for particle toxicity, simple methods to measure pyrogens on particles are needed. Here we have used a modified in vitro pyrogen test (IPT) to study the release of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in whole human blood exposed to respirable road-dust particles (RRDP). Road dusts were collected from the roadside at six different streets in three Swedish cities and particles with a diameter less than 10 μm (RRDP) were prepared by a water sedimentation procedure followed by lyophilisation. RRDP (200 μl of 1 - 106 ng/ml) were mixed with 50 μl whole blood and incubated at 37 °C overnight before IL-1β was analysed with chemiluminescence ELISA in 384-well plates. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella minnesota), zymosan B and Curdlan (P-1,3-glucan) were used as positive controls. All RRDP samples had a pyrogenic effect and the most active sample produced 1.6 times more IL-1β than the least active. This formation was of the same magnitude as in samples with 10 ng LPS/ml and was larger than that evoked by zymosan B and Curdlan (by mass basis). The method was sensitive enough to determine formation of IL-1β in mixtures with 10 ng RRDP/ml or 0.01 ng LPS/ml. The endotoxin inhibitor, polymyxin B (10 μg/ml), strongly reduced the RRDP-induced formation of IL-1β at 1μg RRDP/ml (around 80 % inhibition), but had only marginal or no effects at higher RRDP-concentrations (10 and 100 μg /ml). In summary, all RRDP tested had a clear pyrogen effect in this in vitro model. Endotoxin on the particles but also other factors contributed to the pyrogenic effect. As opposed to the limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay (which measures endotoxin alone), IPT measures a broad range of pyrogens that may be present on particulate matter. The IPT method thus affords a simple, sensitive and quantitative determination of the total pyrogenic potential of ambient particles.

  9. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Möhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging.

  10. Depth-resolved particle-associated microbial respiration in the northeast Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, Anna; Iversen, Morten; Giering, Sarah; Riou, Virginie; Henson, Stephanie A.; Berline, Leo; Guilloux, Loic; Sanders, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide are tightly linked to the depth at which sinking particulate organic carbon (POC) is remineralised in the ocean. Rapid attenuation of downward POC flux typically occurs in the upper mesopelagic (top few hundred metres of the water column), with much slower loss rates deeper in the ocean. Currently, we lack understanding of the processes that drive POC attenuation, resulting in large uncertainties in the mesopelagic carbon budget. Attempts to balance the POC supply to the mesopelagic with respiration by zooplankton and microbes rarely succeed. Where a balance has been found, depth-resolved estimates reveal large compensating imbalances in the upper and lower mesopelagic. In particular, it has been suggested that respiration by free-living microbes and zooplankton in the upper mesopelagic are too low to explain the observed flux attenuation of POC within this layer. We test the hypothesis that particle-associated microbes contribute significantly to community respiration in the mesopelagic, measuring particle-associated microbial respiration of POC in the northeast Atlantic through shipboard measurements on individual marine snow aggregates collected at depth (36-500 m). We find very low rates of both absolute and carbon-specific particle-associated microbial respiration (< 3 % d-1), suggesting that this term cannot solve imbalances in the upper mesopelagic POC budget. The relative importance of particle-associated microbial respiration increases with depth, accounting for up to 33 % of POC loss in the mid-mesopelagic (128-500 m). We suggest that POC attenuation in the upper mesopelagic (36-128 m) is driven by the transformation of large, fast-sinking particles to smaller, slow-sinking and suspended particles via processes such as zooplankton fragmentation and solubilisation, and that this shift to non-sinking POC may help to explain imbalances in the mesopelagic carbon budget.

  11. System for concentrating and analyzing particles suspended in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Cummings, Eric B.; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-04-26

    Disclosed is a device for separating and concentrating particles suspended in a fluid stream by using dielectrophoresis (DEP) to trap and/or deflect those particles as they migrate through a fluid channel. The method uses fluid channels designed to constrain a liquid flowing through it to uniform electrokinetic flow velocities. This behavior is achieved by connecting deep and shallow sections of channels, with the channel depth varying abruptly along an interface. By careful design of abrupt changes in specific permeability at the interface, an abrupt and spatially uniform change in electrokinetic force can be selected. Because these abrupt interfaces also cause a sharp gradient in applied electric fields, a DEP force also can be established along the interface. Depending on the complex conductivity of the suspended particles and the immersion liquid, the DEP force can controllably complement or oppose the local electrokinetic force transporting the fluid through the channel allowing for manipulation of particles suspended in the transporting liquid.

  12. Identifying anthropogenic and natural influences on extreme pollution of respirable suspended particulates in Beijing using backward trajectory analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Miao, Weijie; Liu, Bing; Dai, Wei; Cai, Xuhui

    2008-06-15

    In China, daily respirable suspended particulate (RSP, particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 10 microm) concentrations exceeding 420 microg m(-3) are considered "hazardous" to health. These can lead to the premature onset of certain diseases and premature death of sick and elderly people; even healthy people are warned to avoid outdoor activity when RSP concentrations are high. Such high pollution levels are defined as extreme RSP pollution events. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that a distinct difference exists between the health effects caused by natural sources and anthropogenic sources, mandating knowledge of the source of extreme RSP pollution. Twenty-six extreme RSP pollution events were recorded in Beijing from January 2003 to December 2006. The HYSPLIT4 (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model (Version 4) was used to discriminate the sources of these extreme RSP pollution events. The model found that twelve events were caused from natural sources (dust storms), nine events from anthropogenic sources (e.g., vehicles and industrial activities, etc.) under quasi-quiescent weather, and five events were from mixed causes. Identifying such events will be valuable in epidemiological studies on air pollution in Beijing.

  13. IUTAM symposium on hydrodynamic diffusion of suspended particles

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrodynamic diffusion refers to the fluctuating motion of nonBrownian particles (or droplets or bubbles) which occurs in a dispersion due to multiparticle interactions. For example, in a concentrated sheared suspension, particles do not move along streamlines but instead exhibit fluctuating motions as they tumble around each other. This leads to a net migration of particles down gradients in particle concentration and in shear rate, due to the higher frequency of encounters of a test particle with other particles on the side of the test particle which has higher concentration or shear rate. As another example, suspended particles subject to sedimentation, centrifugation, or fluidization, do not generally move relative to the fluid with a constant velocity, but instead experience diffusion-like fluctuations in velocity due to interactions with neighboring particles and the resulting variation in the microstructure or configuration of the suspended particles. In flowing granular materials, the particles interact through direct collisions or contacts (rather than through the surrounding fluid); these collisions also cause the particles to undergo fluctuating motions characteristic of diffusion processes. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. IUTAM symposium on hydrodynamic diffusion of suspended particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. H. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    Hydrodynamic diffusion refers to the fluctuating motion of nonBrownian particles (or droplets or bubbles) which occurs in a dispersion due to multiparticle interactions. For example, in a concentrated sheared suspension, particles do not move along streamlines but instead exhibit fluctuating motions as they tumble around each other. This leads to a net migration of particles down gradients in particle concentration and in shear rate, due to the higher frequency of encounters of a test particle with other particles on the side of the test particle which has higher concentration or shear rate. As another example, suspended particles subject to sedimentation, centrifugation, or fluidization, do not generally move relative to the fluid with a constant velocity, but instead experience diffusion-like fluctuations in velocity due to interactions with neighboring particles and the resulting variation in the microstructure or configuration of the suspended particles. In flowing granular materials, the particles interact through direct collisions or contacts (rather than through the surrounding fluid); these collisions also cause the particles to undergo fluctuating motions characteristic of diffusion processes. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  15. Suspended onion particles and potential corneal injury in onion harvesters.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yaw-Huei; Chou, En-Ju; Chang, Ching-Wen; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Ho, Chi-Kung; Chou, Chih-Liang; Lee, Zhih-Young; Tseng, Chi-Ting

    2002-01-01

    The authors suspected that suspended onion particles contributed to corneal ulcers in onion harvesters in southern Taiwan. In the present study, the authors used manikins to study suspended onion particles in fields in an effort to simulate typical conditions experienced by onion harvesters. An animal eye-exposure simulation study was also performed by the authors, who impacted suspended soil grains or onion particles onto the corneas of guinea pigs via aerosol generated from the Palas dispersion nozzle. The average size of 25.9 pm for suspended particles collected during the digging of onions was the largest one of those for various harvesting activities. Some onion skin flakes were found in samples obtained from gathering and packing activities; the typical flake size was approximately 3.5 x 2.5 mm2. The results of the animal study indicated that the size of soil grains has a demonstrable effect on the severity of corneal injury (p = .009). With respect to onion skin flakes, wind velocity was also associated significantly with the occurrence of corneal injury (p = .0004). A wind velocity threshold of 7 m/sec is recommended for the maintenance of safety, and if the wind speed exceeds this threshold level, workers should not engage in harvesting activities. Furthermore, use of appropriately designed goggles is necessary for the protection of onion harvesters who work in high-wind conditions.

  16. Ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression.

    PubMed

    Evans, Douglas E; Fent, Kenneth W

    2015-10-01

    Vehicle fires are a common occurrence, yet few studies have reported exposures associated with burning vehicles. This article presents an assessment of firefighters' potential for ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression training. Fires were initiated within the engine compartment and passenger cabins of three salvaged vehicles, with subsequent water suppression by fire crews. Firefighter exposures were monitored with an array of direct reading particle and air quality instruments. A flexible metallic duct and blower drew contaminants to the instrument array, positioned at a safe distance from the burning vehicles, with the duct inlet positioned at the nozzle operator's shoulder. The instruments measured the particle number, active surface area, respirable particle mass, photoelectric response, aerodynamic particle size distributions, and air quality parameters. Although vehicle fires were suppressed quickly (<10 minutes), firefighters may be exposed to short duration, high particle concentration episodes during fire suppression, which are orders of magnitude greater than the ambient background concentration. A maximum transient particle concentration of 1.21 × 10(7) particles per cm(3), 170 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 4700 μm(2) cm(-3) active surface area and 1400 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response were attained throughout the series of six fires. Expressed as fifteen minute time-weighted averages, engine compartment fires averaged 5.4 × 10(4) particles per cm(3), 0.36 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 92 μm(2) cm(-3) active particle surface area and 29 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Similarly, passenger cabin fires averaged 2.04 × 10(5) particles per cm(3), 2.7 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 320 μm(2) cm(-3) active particle surface area, and 34 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Passenger cabin fires were a greater potential source of exposure than engine compartment fires. The

  17. Ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression

    PubMed Central

    Fent, Kenneth W.

    2015-01-01

    Vehicle fires are a common occurrence, yet few studies have reported exposures associated with burning vehicles. This article presents an assessment of firefighters’ potential for ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression training. Fires were initiated within the engine compartment and passenger cabins of three salvaged vehicles, with subsequent water suppression by fire crews. Firefighter exposures were monitored with an array of direct reading particle and air quality instruments. A flexible metallic duct and blower drew contaminants to the instrument array, positioned at a safe distance from the burning vehicles, with the duct inlet positioned at the nozzle operator’s shoulder. The instruments measured the particle number, active surface area, respirable particle mass, photoelectric response, aerodynamic particle size distributions, and air quality parameters. Although vehicle fires were suppressed quickly (<10 minutes), firefighters may be exposed to short duration, high particle concentration episodes during fire suppression, which are orders of magnitude greater than the ambient background concentration. A maximum transient particle concentration of 1.21 × 107 particles per cm3, 170 mg m−3 respirable particle mass, 4700 μm2 cm−3 active surface area and 1400 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response were attained throughout the series of six fires. Expressed as fifteen minute time-weighted averages, engine compartment fires averaged 5.4 × 104 particles per cm3, 0.36 mg m−3 respirable particle mass, 92 μm2 cm−3 active particle surface area and 29 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Similarly, passenger cabin fires averaged 2.04 × 105 particles per cm3, 2.7 mg m−3 respirable particle mass, 320 μm2 cm−3 active particle surface area, and 34 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Passenger cabin fires were a greater potential source of exposure than engine compartment fires. The wind direction

  18. Planktivorous Fish Recognize Temporal Motion Patterns of Suspended Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickler, J. R.; Tsonis, A.

    2004-12-01

    Small planktivorous fish feed by selective captures of individual zooplankters. We realize that: 1) the predator, as well as the prey is suspended in the water column, which does not provide either with stable reference points; 2) the ambient flow field acts differently on the larger predators than on the much smaller prey; and 3) within the water column there are many suspended particles of lower nutritional value than the zooplankters represent. We investigated in the laboratory whether or not fish can distinguish between small targets moving with different swimming patterns, e.g. particles entrained passively in the ambient water flow versus entrained but actively swimming particles. We created in an aquarium computer-animated stimuli with motion patterns ranging from random to actual swimming motions of live animals. The results show that planktivorous fish can recognize temporal patterns in a visually homogeneous environment. Therefore, blue-water fish must process visual information similar to terrestrial animals processing auditory information.

  19. Sub-10-Micron and Respirable Particles in Lunar Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Bonnie L.; McKay, D. S.; Riofrio, L. M.; Taylor, L. A.; Gonzalez, C. P.

    2010-01-01

    Based on published lunar soil grain size distribution data, we estimate that 1-3% of the mass of typical mature lunar soils is comprised of grains less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter. These particles are in the respirable range (small enough to be inhaled). Estimates are used because the early methods of obtaining grain size distributions did not give reliable results below about 10 micrometers. Grain size analyses of Apollo 11 soil 10084 by a laser diffraction technique shows that this soil contains roughly 2% by volume in the respirable grain size, in agreement with our prior estimate.

  20. Ratios of total suspended solids to suspended sediment concentrations by particle size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selbig, W.R.; Bannerman, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    Wet-sieving sand-sized particles from a whole storm-water sample before splitting the sample into laboratory-prepared containers can reduce bias and improve the precision of suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC). Wet-sieving, however, may alter concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) because the analytical method used to determine TSS may not have included the sediment retained on the sieves. Measuring TSS is still commonly used by environmental managers as a regulatory metric for solids in storm water. For this reason, a new method of correlating concentrations of TSS and SSC by particle size was used to develop a series of correction factors for SSC as a means to estimate TSS. In general, differences between TSS and SSC increased with greater particle size and higher sand content. Median correction factors to SSC ranged from 0.29 for particles larger than 500m to 0.85 for particles measuring from 32 to 63m. Great variability was observed in each fraction-a result of varying amounts of organic matter in the samples. Wide variability in organic content could reduce the transferability of the correction factors. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  1. Comparative damage to alveolar macrophages after phagocytosis of respirable particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.O.; Gray, R.H.; DeNee, P.B.; Newton, G.J.

    1982-02-01

    Backscatter electron and secondary electron imaging were used in a scanning electron microscope study of the in vitro toxic effects of particles ingested by alveolar macrophages. Relatively nontoxic aluminosilicate fly ash particles from the Mount St. Helens eruption and from a coal-fired power plant as well as toxic quartz particles from the Westphalia (Germany) mine deposits were readily taken up by macrophages. The presence of fly ash particles inside the cells was not associated with any changes in surface morphology. The presence of intracellular quartz particles, on the other hand, was correlated with damage to the cell membrane as determined by alterations in surface morphology, uptake of trypan blue, and release of the cytoplasmic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase. The use of backscatter electron imaging is useful in scanning electron microscope studies which attempt to establish cause and effect relationships between exposure to respirable particles and the morphological and cytotoxic response.

  2. Drift of suspended ferromagnetic particles due to the Magnus effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, S. I.; Pedchenko, B. O.

    2017-01-01

    A minimal system of equations is introduced and applied to study the drift motion of ferromagnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid and subjected to a time-periodic driving force and a nonuniformly rotating magnetic field. It is demonstrated that the synchronized translational and rotational oscillations of these particles are accompanied by their drift in a preferred direction, which occurs under the action of the Magnus force. We calculate both analytically and numerically the drift velocity of particles characterized by single-domain cores and nonmagnetic shells and show that there are two types of drift, unidirectional and bidirectional, which can be realized in suspensions composed of particles with different core-shell ratios. The possibility of using the phenomenon of bidirectional drift for the separation of core-shell particles in suspensions is also discussed.

  3. Confidence in climate models including those with suspended particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reck, Ruth A.

    1982-05-01

    Confidence in the predictions of atmospheric models is limited, (1) by the uncertainty in our knowledge of the existing atmospheric system as it is defined by input data, and (2) by the ability of the model to describe all pertinent atmospheric processes. This paper describes a thermal sensitivity study of the global parameters in one version of the Manabe-Wetherald radiative-convective model which inclkudes Mie scattering particles. The relative importance of the usual global model parameters is identified in addition to other atmospheric constituents not commonly included in climate models. In particular this work emphasizes the role of Mie scattering suspended aerosol particles, a component which is seldom included in climate models. Here we discuss the major sources of particles, how the optical properties of individual particles determine the radiative effects of a particle layer, and also illustrate the separate role of absorption and backscatter in determining the sign of the surface temperature change. In addition, the coupling of the particle effects to surface albedo is indicated. Finally, the sign of the surface temperature change from anthropogenic particles is estimated using (1) global maps of particle abundance developed by Kellogg, (2) previous calculations for the Northern Hemisphere published by the author and (3) the surface albedo maps of Hummel and Reck.

  4. Electrooptical behaviour and control of a suspended particle device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergaz, R.; Pena, J. M. S.; Barrios, D.; Pérez, I.; Torres, J. C.

    2007-09-01

    A suspended particle device is made by electrophoretic rod-shape particles suspended in an organic gel. These particles can twist and order with an applied voltage. The light crossing the material suffers more or less scattering according to that voltage. A commercial device is analyzed in this work. Several electrical models are tested, being the best one a series configuration including a shunt double layer capacitance and a Warburg element. Main parameter errors are below 2%, showing the quality of this new electrical model for this kind of devices. A quick method to improve the manufacturing process on-line is also proposed. Impedance measurements will be fitted to the selected electrical model, in order to check physical aspects such as charge diffusion lengths and response times. An electronic driver to obtain several levels of device transmission has been also developed, being its linearity demonstrated too. Colour changes are negligible for the main part of the bleaching process. All these features allow the use of this set in domotics application.

  5. Photoacoustic study on the possible components of total suspended particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidong; Huang, Zuohua; Tang, Zhilie

    2006-02-01

    Total suspended particles (TSP) are one of the main atmospheric pollutants. The ingredients are very complex, mainly including black carbon (C),organic compound, inorganic compound and biologic component, which will do great harm to human's health. During environmental monitoring, the airborne suspended particle always is an index for evaluating the quality of atmosphere. In this article, possible mixture of TSP is proposed to determine its ingredients and content by photoacoustic spectroscopy. The normalized photoacoustic (PA) signal of the sulfur powder, mixtures of sulfur and black carbon in different proportions are obtained respectively. Simulation with linear equation says that the PA signal has a certain relationship with the content of sample. The normalized PA spectroscopy of various materials is acquired via examining the sample of the powder of cupric sulfate mixed with nitro compound (2, 5 -methoxybenzoic-4nitro-dehyde), Portland cement, residual particles of automobile exhaust pipe, ash of power plant's stocks. The experimental results have important reference value to the practical analysis of TSP, it also provides new possible methodology to the environmental monitoring.

  6. Rheology of cubic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid.

    PubMed

    Cwalina, Colin D; Harrison, Kelsey J; Wagner, Norman J

    2016-05-18

    Many real-world industrial processes involve non-spherical particles suspended in a fluid medium. Knowledge of the flow behavior of these suspensions is essential for optimizing their transport properties and designing processing equipment. In the present work, we explore and report on the rheology of concentrated suspensions of cubic-shaped colloidal particles under steady and dynamic shear flow. These suspensions exhibit a rich non-Newtonian rheology that includes shear thickening and normal stress differences at high shear stresses. Scalings are proposed to connect the material properties of these suspensions of cubic particle to those measured for suspensions of spherical particles. Negative first normal stress differences indicate that lubrication hydrodynamic forces dominate the stress in the shear-thickened state. Accounting for the increased lubrication hydrodynamic interactions between the flat surfaces of the cubic particles allows for a quantitative comparison of the deviatoric stress in the shear-thickened state to that of spherical particles. New semi-empirical models for the viscosity and normal stress difference coefficients are presented for the shear-thickened state. The results of this study indicate that cubic particles offer new and unique opportunities to formulate colloidal dispersions for field-responsive materials.

  7. Characterizing the kinetics of suspended cylindrical particles by polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ran; Ou, Xueheng; Ma, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Polarization has promising potential to retrieve the information of the steady samples, such as tissues. However, for the fast changing sample such as the suspended algae in the water, the kinetics of the particles also influence the scattered polarization. The present paper will show our recent results to extract the information about the kinetics of the suspended cylindrical particles by polarization measurements. The sample is the aqueous suspension of the glass fibers stirred by a magnetic stirrer. We measure the scattered polarization of the fibers by use of a simultaneous polarization measurement system and obtain the time series of two orthogonal polarization components. By use of correlation analysis, we obtain the time parameters from the auto-correlation functions of the polarization components, and observe the changes with the stirring speeds. Results show that these time parameters indicate the immigration of the fibers. After discussion, we find that they may further characterize the kinetics, including the translation and rotation, of the glass fibers in the fluid field.

  8. Relative Mesothelioma Potencies for Unregulated Respirable Elongated Mineral and Synthetic Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    For decades uncertainties and contradictions have surrounded the issue of whether exposures to respirable elongated mineral and synthetic particles (REMPs and RESPs) present health risks such as those recognized for exposures to elongated asbestiform mineral particles from the fi...

  9. Event-based total suspended sediment particle size distribution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jennifer; Sattar, Ahmed M. A.; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Warner, Richard C.

    2016-05-01

    One of the most challenging modelling tasks in hydrology is prediction of the total suspended sediment particle size distribution (TSS-PSD) in stormwater runoff generated from exposed soil surfaces at active construction sites and surface mining operations. The main objective of this study is to employ gene expression programming (GEP) and artificial neural networks (ANN) to develop a new model with the ability to more accurately predict the TSS-PSD by taking advantage of both event-specific and site-specific factors in the model. To compile the data for this study, laboratory scale experiments using rainfall simulators were conducted on fourteen different soils to obtain TSS-PSD. This data is supplemented with field data from three construction sites in Ontario over a period of two years to capture the effect of transport and deposition within the site. The combined data sets provide a wide range of key overlooked site-specific and storm event-specific factors. Both parent soil and TSS-PSD in runoff are quantified by fitting each to a lognormal distribution. Compared to existing regression models, the developed model more accurately predicted the TSS-PSD using a more comprehensive list of key model input parameters. Employment of the new model will increase the efficiency of deployment of required best management practices, designed based on TSS-PSD, to minimize potential adverse effects of construction site runoff on aquatic life in the receiving watercourses.

  10. Restoring number of suspended particles in ocean using satellite optical images and forecasting particle fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haltrin, Vladimir I.; Arnone, Robert A.; Flynn, Peter; Casey, Brandon; Weidemann, Alan D.; Ko, Dong-Shang

    2007-04-01

    A method to retrieve concentrations of suspended large and small particles in seawater from satellite images is proposed. The method uses as input images of scattering and backscattering coefficients in several satellite channels as well as an image of concentration of chlorophyll. All these three properties are derived using an atmospheric correction algorithm and algorithms to derive inherent optical properties from remote sensing reflectance. The proposed method is based on several approaches developed previously by Twardowski et al, van de Huist, and Evans and Fournier and is based on Mie theory. The proposed method was applied to restore a number of suspended particles and their dynamics in ocean using SeaWIFs satellite optical images.

  11. Dynamics of Single Chains of Suspended Ferrofluid Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutillas, S.; Liu, J.

    1999-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the dynamics of isolated chains made of super-paramagnetic particles under the influence of a magnetic field. The motivation of this work is to understand if the chain fluctuations exist and, if it does, how does the fluctuation affect chain aggregation. We find that single chains strongly fluctuate and that the characteristic frequency of their fluctuations is inversely proportional to the magnetic field strength. The higher the field the lower the characteristic frequency of the chain fluctuations. In the high magnetic field limit, chains behave like rigid rods without any internal motions. In this work, we used ferrofluid particles suspended in water. These particles do not have any intrinsic magnetization. Once a magnetic field is applied, a dipole moment is induced in each particle, proportional to the magnetic field. A dipolar magnetic interaction then occurs between particles. If dipole-dipole magnetic energy is higher than the thermal energy, the result is a structure change inside the dipolar fluid. The ratio of these two energies is expressed by a coupling constant lambda as: lambda = (pi(a(exp 3))(chi(exp 2))(mu(sub 0))(H(sub 0))(exp 2))/18kT Where a is the particle radius, mu(sub 0) is the vacuum magnetic permeability, H(sub 0) the applied magnetic field, k the Boltzmann constant and T the absolute temperature. If lambda > 1, magnetic particles form chains along the field direction. The lateral coalescence of several chains may form bigger aggregates especially if the particle volume fraction is high. While many studies and applications deal with the rheological properties and the structural changes of these dipolar fluids, this work focuses on the understanding of the chain dynamics. In order to probe the chain dynamics, we used dynamic light scattering (DLS) in self-beating mode as our experimental technique. The experimental geometry is such that the scattering plane is perpendicular to the magnetic field

  12. Particle Size and Structural Arrangement of Suspended Cohesive Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, X.; Zhang, G.; Reed, A. H.; Furukawa, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal environments are often characterized by high concentrations of cohesive sediments influenced by the loaded organic matter (particularly extracellular polymeric substances (EPS)), salt, and hydrodynamic disturbance. The size and structural variation of suspended cohesive sediments due to flocculation and/or disaggregation is of key importance for understanding a variety of sediment transport processes (e.g., settling, breakage, survivability) in littoral environments and the geotechnical/geophysical properties of the bottom bed. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of sediment floc behavior and correlate the clay-EPS-ion interaction mechanisms with their structures, a series of sediment samples were synthesized in laboratory using four pure clays (i.e., kaolinite, illite, Ca-montmorillonite, and Na-montmorillonite), three EPS (cationic, neutral, and anionic) at different concentrations, and saltwater of different salinity under different hydrodynamic conditions. Particle size analysis of the pure clays, clay-EPS, and clay-salt flocs under three hydrodynamic conditions demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory that pure clays and clay-EPS mixtures exhibit lognormal, multimodal (i.e., 2-4 levels consisting of primary particle, flocculi, microfloc, and macrofloc) particle size distributions (PSDs) within the size range of ~0.1 to ~500 μm. The presence of EPS causes the formation of macroflocs (>200 μm) and can significantly increase the mean particle size by several orders of magnitude through flocculation, assisted by electrostatic forces, ion-dipole, van der Waals forces, and other mechanisms. The change in size of the pure clay flocs in saltwater showed different trends: Due to the clays' different properties and interaction mechanisms with EPS, their PSDs and size changes are also different in different flow conditions: the hydrodynamic turbulence may promote the flocculation of Ca-montmorillonite, but break kaolinite and Na

  13. Thoracic and respirable particle definitions for human health risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Provides estimates of the thoracic and respirable fractions, for adults and children during typical activities during both nasal and oral inhalation, that may be used in the design of experimental studies and interpretation of evidence of health effects.

  14. Effectiveness of dust control methods for crystalline silica and respirable suspended particulate matter exposure during manual concrete surface grinding.

    PubMed

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Milz, Sheryl A; Wagner, Cynthia D; Bisesi, Michael S; Ames, April L; Khuder, Sadik; Susi, Pam; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2010-12-01

    Concrete grinding exposes workers to unacceptable levels of crystalline silica dust, known to cause diseases such as silicosis and possibly lung cancer. This study examined the influence of major factors of exposure and effectiveness of existing dust control methods by simulating field concrete grinding in an enclosed workplace laboratory. Air was monitored during 201 concrete grinding sessions while using a variety of grinders, accessories, and existing dust control methods, including general ventilation (GV), local exhaust ventilation (LEV), and wet grinding. Task-specific geometric mean (GM) of respirable crystalline silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled-grinding, while GV was off/on, were 0.17/0.09, 0.57/0.13, 1.11/0.44, and 23.1/6.80, respectively. Silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ using 100-125 mm (4-5 inch) and 180 mm (7 inch) grinding cups were 0.53/0.22 and 2.43/0.56, respectively. GM concentrations of silica dust were significantly lower for (1) GV on (66.0%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (99.0%), LEV:Shop-vac- (98.1%) or wet- (94.4%) vs. uncontrolled-grinding. Task-specific GM of respirable suspended particulate matter (RSP) concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled grinding, while GV was off/on, were 1.58/0.63, 7.20/1.15, 9.52/4.13, and 152/47.8, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP using 100-125 mm and 180 mm grinding cups were 4.78/1.62 and 22.2/5.06, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP were significantly lower for (1) GV on (70.2%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (98.9%), LEV:Shop-vac- (96.9%) or wet- (92.6%) vs. uncontrolled grinding. Silica dust and RSP were not significantly affected by (1) orientation of grinding surfaces (vertical vs. inclined); (2) water flow rates for wet grinding; (3) length of task-specific sampling time; or, (4) among cup sizes of 100, 115 or 125 mm. No combination of factors or control methods reduced an 8-hr exposure level to below the

  15. Suspended micro-sized PVC particles impair the performance and decrease survival in the Asian green mussel Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Rist, Sinja Elena; Assidqi, Khoirunnisa; Zamani, Neviaty Putri; Appel, Daniel; Perschke, Myriam; Huhn, Mareike; Lenz, Mark

    2016-10-15

    Marine bivalves are known to ingest microplastics, but information on the consequences for their physiological performance is limited. To investigate a potential exposure pathway that has not yet been addressed, we mimicked the resuspension of microplastics from the sediment in a laboratory exposure experiment. For this, we exposed the Asian green mussel Perna viridis to 4 concentrations (0mg/l, 21.6mg/l, 216mg/l, 2160mg/l) of suspended polyvinylchloride (PVC) particles (1-50μm) for two 2-hour-time-periods per day. After 44days, mussel filtration and respiration rates as well as byssus production were found to be a negative function of particle concentration. Furthermore, within 91days of exposure, mussel survival declined with increasing PVC abundance. These negative effects presumably go back to prolonged periods of valve closure as a reaction to particle presence. We suggest that microplastics constitute a new seston component that exerts a stress comparable to natural suspended solids.

  16. Experimental investigation of suspended particles transport through porous media: particle and grain size effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quansheng; Cui, Xianze; Zhang, Chengyuan; Huang, Shibing

    2016-01-01

    Particle and grain size may influence the transportation and deposition characteristics of particles within pollutant transport and within granular filters that are typically used in wastewater treatment. We conducted two-dimensional sandbox experiments using quartz powder as the particles and quartz sand as the porous medium to study the response of transportation and deposition formation to changes in particle diameter (ds, with median diameter 18, 41, and 82 μm) and grain diameter (dp, with median diameter 0.36, 1.25, and 2.82 mm) considering a wide range of diameter ratios (ds/dp) from 0.0064 to 0.228. Particles were suspended in deionized water, and quartz sand was used as the porous medium, which was meticulously cleaned to minimize any physicochemical and impurities effects that could result in indeterminate results. After the experiments, the particle concentration of the effluent and particle mass per gram of dry sands were measured to explore changes in transportation and deposition characteristics under different conditions. In addition, a micro-analysis was conducted to better analyse the results on a mesoscopic scale. The experimental observation analyses indicate that different diameter ratios (ds/dp) may lead to different deposit formations. As ds/dp increased, the deposit formation changed from 'Random Deposition Type' to 'Gradient Deposition Type', and eventually became 'Inlet Deposition Type'.

  17. Assessment of a New Method for Estimating Density of Suspended Particles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    and a custom-built Digital Floc Camera ( DFC ). The LISST estimates particle volumes for particles with diameters from ~1.25-250 µm, and the DFC ...estimates volumes of particles with diameters larger than ~50 µm. Although the DFC is not commercially available, there are new commercial sensors that...light from a collimated laser beam. The DFC estimates particle volume by analysis of silhouette, backlit images of particles suspended in a 4 x 4 x 2.5

  18. Indoor-outdoor relationships of respirable sulfates and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dockery, Douglas W.; Spengler, John D.

    Indoor and outdoor concentrations of respirable particulates and sulfates have been measured in 68 homes in six cities for at least 1 yr. A conservation of mass model was derived describing indoor concentrations in terms of outdoor concentrations, infiltration and indoor sources. The measured data were analysed to identify important building characteristics and to quantify their effect. The mean infiltration rate of outdoor fine particulates was found to be approximately 70%. Cigarette smoking was found to be the dominant indoor source of respirable particulates. Increased indoor concentrations of sulfates were found to be associated with smoking and also with gas stoves. The effect of full air conditioning of the building was to reduce infiltration of outdoor fine particulates by about one half, while preventing dilution and purging of internally generated pollutants. The model for indoor respirable particulate and sulfate levels was found to compare well with measurements.

  19. Particle size distribution of suspended solids in the Chesapeake Bay entrance and adjacent shelf waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrnes, M. R.; Oertel, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics of suspended solids, including total suspended matter, total suspended inorganics, total suspended organics, particle size distribution, and the presence of the ten most prominent particle types were determined. Four research vessels simultaneously collected samples along four transects. Samples were collected within a 2-hour period that coincided with the maximum ebb penetration of Chesapeake Bay outwelling. The distribution of primary and secondary particle size modes indicate the presence of a surface or near-surface plume, possibly associated with three sources: (1) runoff, (2) resuspension of material within the Bay, and/or (3) resuspension of material in the area of shoals at the Bay mouth. Additional supportive evidence for this conclusion is illustrated with ocean color scanner data.

  20. Sub-10-Micron and Respirable Particles in Lunar Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, B. L.; McKay, D. S.; Riofrio, L. M.; Taylor, L. A.; Gonzalez, C. P.

    2010-03-01

    Grain size analyses of Apollo 11 soil 10084 by a laser diffraction technique shows that this soil contains roughly 2% by volume in the respirable (2.5 µm and below) grain size, in agreement with our prior estimates based on extrapolation of sieve data.

  1. An experimental and theoretical study of the seepage migration of suspended particles with different sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Bing; Xu, Tao; Guo, Zhiguang

    2016-12-01

    This study experimentally investigates the effect of particle size, particle concentration and flow velocity on the migration of suspended particles of size 1.02-47 μm in porous media. The results show that at the same flow velocity, the peak values of the breakthrough curves decrease and corresponding pore volumes increase slightly with increasing particles size. The migration velocity of smaller suspended particles is even greater than water flow velocity, which is attributed to the size exclusion effect. With increase of the injected particle concentration, the deposition coefficients of small single particles increase at first and then tend to a steady state or even decrease slightly, explained by the maximum retention concentration. The dispersivity of small particles decreases with increasing velocity. However, at a high flow velocity, the hydrodynamic dispersivity becomes increasingly dominant with the increase of particle size. The deposition coefficients for large-sized particles are higher than those for small-sized particles, which is attributed to considerable mass removal due to straining. An analytical solution, considering the release effect of sorbed particles, is developed to account for the one-dimensional flow and dispersive effect using a source function method, and then three transport parameters—dispersivity, deposition coefficient and release coefficient—are fitted using the experimental results. Finally, suspended-particle migration is predicted by the proposed model for short-time constant-concentration injection and repeated three-pulse injection. Overall, particle size has a significant effect on the seepage migration parameters of suspended particles in porous media such as the particle velocity, dispersivity and deposition coefficient.

  2. Ocean particle chemistry: The fractionation of rare earth elements between suspended particles and seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Sholkovitz, E.R. ); Landing, W.M.; Lewis, B.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Sargasso Sea suspended particles were sequentially digested with three chemical treatments (acetic acid, mild HCl/HNO[sub 3], and HF/HNO[sub 3]/HCl in a bomb). The latter two treatments dissolve detrital minerals, while the acetic acid removes surface coatings (organic matter and Mn oxides). The rare earth element (REE) composition of the surface coatings, in marked contrast to the crust-like REE composition of the two detrital phases, is extensively fractionated with respect to both filtered seawater and the crust. Surface coatings are responsible for the removal and fractionation of REEs from seawater and, as such, play a key role in the marine geochemical cycles of trace elements. Relative to seawater, the surface coatings are systematically enriched tenfold across the trivalent REEs from Lu to La and develop large positive Ce-anomalies. The Ce-anomalies of the coatings switch from being negative (seawater-like) in the upper 100 m to being strongly positive at greater depths. The ingrowth of Ce and LREEs on particle surfaces reflects the in situ oxidation of dissolved Ce(III) to particulate Ce(IV), and the preferential removal of LREE(III)s over HREE(III)s. REEs(III) fractionation of this type is consistent with particle/solution models. Both processes appear to be related to the in situ formation of Mn oxide particles from the oxidation of dissolved Mn(II) in the upper 200 m of the water column. Preferential removal of LREEs in the upper waters is countered by their preferential release at depth due to remineralization of surface coatings on particles. A new method is explored for estimating the residence time of suspended particles by combining Ce concentration data of dissolved and surface-bound phases with the Ce(III) oxidation rate measurements of MOFFETT (1990). A Ce-based residence time of thirteen days is similar in magnitude to the value calculated from U-[sup 234]Th disequilibria in the Sargasso Sea.

  3. Apparatus and method for concentrating and filtering particles suspended in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Cummings, Eric B.; Singh, Anup K.

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed is a device for separating and concentrating particles suspended in a fluid stream by using dielectrophoresis (DEP) to trap and/or deflect those particles as they migrate through a fluid channel. The method uses fluid channels designed to constrain a liquid flowing through it to uniform electrokinetic flow velocities. This behavior is achieved by connecting deep and shallow sections of channels, with the channel depth varying abruptly along an interface. By careful design of abrupt changes in specific permeability at the interface, an abrupt and spatially uniform change in electrokinetic force can be selected. Because these abrupt interfaces also cause a sharp gradient in applied electric fields, a DEP force also can be established along the interface. Depending on the complex conductivity of the suspended particles and the immersion liquid, the DEP force can controllably complement or oppose the local electrokinetic force transporting the fluid through the channel allowing for manipulation of particles suspended in the transporting liquid.

  4. Effect of suspended particles upon drying process of volatile droplet sitting on solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, I.; Kochiya, K.

    Particle motion in volatile droplet on the solid surface especially the behavior of particles depositing in the vicinity of solid-liquid-gas boundary line contact line is focused This phenomenon is called as coffee stain problem Particle motion in the droplet is analyzed by reconstruction of spatio-temporal particle motion by applying three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry 3-D PTV We discuss the effect of the suspended particles upon the drying process of the droplet Morphological discussion on the particles stuck on the solid surface after the dryout the droplet is also conducted

  5. Development of Automated Image Analysis Software for Suspended Marine Particle Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    Development of Automated Image Analysis Software for Suspended Marine Particle Classification Scott Samson Center for Ocean Technology...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of Automated Image Analysis Software for Suspended...objective is to develop automated image analysis software to reduce the effort and time required for manual identification of plankton images. Automated

  6. Long-term measurements of respirable sulfates and particles inside and outside homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spengler, J. D.; Dockery, D. W.; Turner, W. A.; Wolfson, J. M.; Ferris, B. G.

    The results of extensive indoor and outdoor monitoring for respirable size particles and the sulfate fraction of these particles are reported. These air pollution measurements were obtained in conjunction with an epidemiologic study in six U.S. cities: Portage, Wisconsin; Topeka, Kansas; Kingston/Harriman, Tennessee; Watertown, Massachusetts; St. Louis, Missouri: and Steubenville, Ohio. The major source of indoor particulate matter is cigarette smoke, which contributes approximately 20 μm -3 to the indoor concentrations for each smoker. Even in homes without smokers, indoor particle concentrations equal or exceed outdoor levels. The indoor respirable sulfate concentrations are consistently lower than outdoor concentrations.

  7. Filter performance of n99 and n95 facepiece respirators against viruses and ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Eninger, Robert M; Honda, Takeshi; Adhikari, Atin; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi; Reponen, Tiina; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2008-07-01

    The performance of three filtering facepiece respirators (two models of N99 and one N95) challenged with an inert aerosol (NaCl) and three virus aerosols (enterobacteriophages MS2 and T4 and Bacillus subtilis phage)-all with significant ultrafine components-was examined using a manikin-based protocol with respirators sealed on manikins. Three inhalation flow rates, 30, 85, and 150 l min(-1), were tested. The filter penetration and the quality factor were determined. Between-respirator and within-respirator comparisons of penetration values were performed. At the most penetrating particle size (MPPS), >3% of MS2 virions penetrated through filters of both N99 models at an inhalation flow rate of 85 l min(-1). Inhalation airflow had a significant effect upon particle penetration through the tested respirator filters. The filter quality factor was found suitable for making relative performance comparisons. The MPPS for challenge aerosols was <0.1 mum in electrical mobility diameter for all tested respirators. Mean particle penetration (by count) was significantly increased when the size fraction of <0.1 mum was included as compared to particles >0.1 mum. The filtration performance of the N95 respirator approached that of the two models of N99 over the range of particle sizes tested ( approximately 0.02 to 0.5 mum). Filter penetration of the tested biological aerosols did not exceed that of inert NaCl aerosol. The results suggest that inert NaCl aerosols may generally be appropriate for modeling filter penetration of similarly sized virions.

  8. Measuring the mass, density, and size of particles and cells using a suspended microchannel resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Michel; Bryan, Andrea K.; Burg, Thomas P.; Babcock, Ken; Manalis, Scott R.

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of mass, density, and size of cells and nanoparticles using suspended microchannel resonators. The masses of individual particles are quantified as transient frequency shifts, while the particles transit a microfluidic channel embedded in the resonating cantilever. Mass histograms resulting from these data reveal the distribution of a population of heterogeneously sized particles. Particle density is inferred from measurements made in different carrier fluids since the frequency shift for a particle is proportional to the mass difference relative to the displaced solution. We have characterized the density of polystyrene particles, Escherichia coli, and human red blood cells with a resolution down to 10-4g/cm3.

  9. Apparatus and method for collection and concentration of respirable particles into a small fluid volume

    DOEpatents

    Simon, Jonathan N.; Brown, Steve B.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the collection of respirable particles and concentration of such particles into a small fluid volume. The apparatus captures and concentrates small (1-10 .mu.m) respirable particles into a sub-millileter volume of fluid. The method involves a two step operation, collection and concentration: wherein collection of particles is by a wetted surface having small vertical slits that act as capillary channels; and concentration is carried out by transfer of the collected particles to a small volume (sub-milliliter) container by centrifugal force whereby the particles are forced through the vertical slits and contact a non-wetted wall surface, and are deflected to the bottom where they are contained for analysis, such as a portable flow cytometer or a portable PCR DNA analysis system.

  10. Suspended particle and pathogen peak discharge buffering by a surface-flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Mulling, Bram T M; van den Boomen, Rob M; van der Geest, Harm G; Kappelhof, Joost W N M; Admiraal, Wim

    2013-03-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) have been shown to improve the water quality of treated wastewater. The capacity of CWs to reduce nutrients, pathogens and organic matter and restore oxygen regime under normal operating conditions cannot be extrapolated to periods of incidental peak discharges. The buffering capacity of CWs during peak discharges is potentially a key factor for water quality in the receiving waters. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the behaviour of peak discharges of suspended particles, (associated) physiochemical parameters and pathogenic organisms from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in a full scale constructed wetland (CW). By mixing clarified water and sludge rich water from the settlement tank of the WWTP, the suspended particle concentration was increased for 8 h from ± 3.5 to ± 230 mg L(-1), and discharged into a full scale horizontal surface flow constructed wetland. An increase of suspended particle concentration following the peak discharge concurred with increases in turbidity and oxygen demand, total nutrient load (nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon) and pathogens (Escherichia coli and Enterococci). Temperature, pH, conductivity and dissolved nutrient concentrations (nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon) were however unaffected by the initial peak discharge. After retention in the unvegetated ponds (the first CW compartment) the applied suspended particle peak with a total load of 86.2 kg was reduced by >99%. Similar peak buffering was observed for the turbidity, oxygen demand and settable volume. Simultaneously dissolved nutrient concentrations increased, indicating partial mineralization of the suspended particles during retention in the unvegetated ponds. The peak buffering of pathogens was lower (40-84%), indicating differences in removal processes between other suspended particles and pathogens. The results indicated that the suspended particles were probably mostly removed by sedimentation and mineralization

  11. Relationships among particle number, surface area, and respirable mass concentrations in automotive engine manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, William A; Evans, Douglas E; Ku, Bon Ki; Maynard, Andrew D; Slavin, Thomas J; Peters, Thomas M

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between particle number, surface area, and respirable mass concentration measured simultaneously in a foundry and an automotive engine machining and assembly center. Aerosol concentrations were measured throughout each plant with a condensation particle counter for number concentration, a diffusion charger for active surface area concentration, and an optical particle counter for respirable mass concentration. At selected locations, particle size distributions were characterized with the optical particle counter and an electrical low pressure impactor. Statistical analyses showed that active surface area concentration was correlated with ultrafine particle number concentration and weakly correlated with respirable mass concentration. Correlation between number and active surface area concentration was stronger during winter (R2 = 0.6 for both plants) than in the summer (R2 = 0.38 and 0.36 for the foundry and engine plant respectively). The stronger correlation in winter was attributed to use of direct-fire gas fired heaters that produced substantial numbers of ultrafine particles with a modal diameter between 0.007 and 0.023 mu m. These correlations support findings obtained through theoretical analysis. Such analysis predicts that active surface area increasingly underestimates geometric surface area with increasing particle size, particularly for particles larger than 100 nm. Thus, a stronger correlation between particle number concentration and active surface area concentration is expected in the presence of high concentrations of ultrafine particles. In general, active surface area concentration may be a concentration metric that is distinct from particle number concentration and respirable mass concentration. For future health effects or toxicological studies involving nano-materials or ultrafine aerosols, this finding needs to be considered, as exposure metrics may influence data interpretation.

  12. Elemental Spatiotemporal Variations of Total Suspended Particles in Jeddah City

    PubMed Central

    Kadi, Mohammad W.

    2014-01-01

    Elements associated with total suspended particulate matter (TSP) in Jeddah city were determined. Using high-volume samplers, TSP samples were simultaneously collected over a one-year period from seven sampling sites. Samples were analyzed for Al, Ba, Ca, Cu, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Ti, V, Cr, Co, Ni, As, and Sr. Results revealed great dependence of element contents on spatial and temporal variations. Two sites characterized by busy roads, workshops, heavy population, and heavy trucking have high levels of all measured elements. Concentrations of most elements at the two sites exhibit strong spatial gradients and concentrations of elements at these sites are higher than other locations. The highest concentrations of elements were observed during June–August because of dust storms, significant increase in energy consumption, and active surface winds. Enrichment factors of elements at the high-level sites have values in the range >10~60 while for Cu and Zn the enrichment factors are much higher (~0–>700) indicating that greater percentage of TSP composition for these three elements in air comes from anthropogenic activities. PMID:24701161

  13. Thermal performance of heat pipe with suspended nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, K. N.; Solomon, A. Brusly; Pillai, B. C.; Ruba Singh, B. Jacob; Saravana Kumar, S.

    2012-11-01

    Nanofluids are employed as the working medium for a conventional cylindrical heat pipe. A cylindrical copper heat pipe of 19.5 mm outer diameter and 400 mm length was fabricated and tested with two different working fluids. The working fluids used in this study are DI-water and Nano-particles suspension (mixture of copper nano particle and DI-water). The overall heat transfer coefficient of the heat pipe was calculated based on the lumped thermal resistance network and compared with the heat transfer coefficient of base fluid filled heat pipe. There is a quantitative improvement in the heat transfer coefficient using nano-particles suspension as the working medium. A heat transfer correlation was also developed based on multiple regression least square method and the results were compared with that obtained by the experiment.

  14. Suspended sediment measurements and calculation of the particle load at HPP Fieschertal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, D.; Albayrak, I.; Abgottspon, A.; Boes, R. M.

    2016-11-01

    In the scope of a research project on hydro-abrasive erosion of Pelton turbines, a field study was conducted at the high-head HPP Fieschertal in Valais, Switzerland. The suspended sediment mass concentration (SSC) and particle size distribution (PSD) in the penstock have been continuously measured since 2012 using a combination of six measuring techniques. The SSC was on average 0.52 g/l and rose to 50 g/l in a major flood event in July 2012. The median particle size d 50 was usually 15 pm, rising up to 100 μm when particles previously having settled in the headwater storage tunnel were re-suspended at low water levels. The annual suspended sediment loads (SSL) varied considerably depending on flood events. Moreover, so-called particle loads (PLs) according to the relevant guideline of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62364) were calculated using four relations between particle size and the relative abrasion potential. For the investigated HPP, the time series of the SSL and the PLs had generally similar shapes over the three years. The largest differences among the PLs were observed during re-suspension events when the particles were considerably coarser than usual. Further investigations on the effects of particle sizes on hydroabrasive erosion of splitters and cut-outs of coated Pelton turbines are recommended.

  15. IUTAM Symposium on Hydrodynamic Diffusion of Suspended Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. H.

    1995-01-01

    The focus of the symposium was on multiparticle hydrodynamic interactions which lead to fluctuating motion of the particles and resulting particle migration and dispersion or diffusion. Implications of these phenomena were described for sedimentation, fluidization, suspension flows, granular flows, and fiber suspensions. Computer simulation techniques as well as experimental techniques were described. Each session had an invited leadoff talk which overviewed the session topic as well as described the speaker's own related research. Ample time for discussion was included after each talk as well as at the end of each session. The symposium started with a keynote talk on the first evening on What is so puzzling about hydrodynamic diffusion?, which set the tone for the rest of the meeting by emphasizing both recent advances and unanswered issues.

  16. Precipitation of suspended particles in wet-film cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Val'dberg, A.Y.; Kirsanova, N.S.

    1986-07-01

    The fact that wet and dry mechanical centrifugal dust collectors operate on the same principle allowed the authors to make the calculations for wet cyclones with an equation similar to one used previously. A figure shows that the efficiency of wet cyclones is much higher (20% higher on the average) than that of dry cyclones under the same operating conditions. This improvement is due to a decrease in the secondary discharge of dust particles from the wet wall of the device.

  17. Development of Automated Image Analysis Software for Suspended Marine Particle Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    Development of Automated Image Analysis Software for Suspended Marine Particle Classification Scott Samson Center for Ocean Technology...and global water column. 1 OBJECTIVES The project’s objective is to develop automated image analysis software to reduce the effort and time

  18. Single Particle Analysis of Oceanic Suspended Matters During the SEEDS II Iron Fertilization Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Y.; Narita, Y.; Uematsu, M.

    2006-12-01

    Oceanic suspended particles play an important role regulating the chemical composition of seawater through the removal of trace elements from surface water to deep water and their lateral transport. Therefore, physical and chemical properties of these particles reflect the characteristics of water mass and marine ecosystem under the perturbation of marine environment such as iron fertilization. To consider the physical and/or chemical variation of these particles in the water column, it is necessary to analyze size, number and chemical composition of individual particles. Suspended particles in the surface seawater were collected during the SEEDS II (Subarctic Iron Experiment for Ecosystem and Dynamics Study II) iron fertilization experiment in the summer of 2004. The particulate samples were analyzed by Electron probe X-ray micro analyzer (EPMA) and characterized by size and major and minor elements ranged from 0.4 to 10 μ m in diameter. These particles were classified into five groups based on their chemical compositions: Al-Si, Si-rich, Ca-rich, Organic and Others. Most of particles were Si-rich, Ca-rich and Organic. Si-rich and Ca-rich particles were mainly consist of detritus of phytoplankton.In the iron-fertilized patch area, Chl-a concentration covaried with dry weight, number and volume concentrations of the suspended particles. At 20 m depth, the number concentration of Organic particles having two peaks at 1.1 and 0.65 μ m in diameter increased within 2 days after the iron fertilization, and then gradually increased. It is suggested that the increase in suspended particles, mostly detritus of planktonic shells, corresponded to that in primary production. The contents by weight of Si in Si-rich particle and the content by weight of Ca in Ca-rich particle tended to decrease in size. In fine mode particle, Si-rich and Ca-rich particles contained more P and S as biolimiting elements and less Al, Ti, Mn, and Fe as crustal elements. The smaller Organic

  19. What does respirator certification tell us about filtration of ultrafine particles?

    PubMed

    Eninger, Robert M; Honda, Takeshi; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2008-05-01

    Recent interest in exposures to ultrafine particles (less than 100 nm) in both environmental and occupational settings led the authors to question whether the protocols used to certify respirator filters provide adequate attention to ultrafine aerosols. The authors reviewed the particle size distribution of challenge aerosols and evaluated the aerosol measurement method currently employed in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) particulate respirator certification protocol for its ability to measure the contribution of ultrafine particles to filter penetration. Also considered were the differences between mechanical and electrically charged (electret) filters in light of the most penetrating particle size. It was found that the sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctylphthalate (DOP) aerosols currently used in respirator certification tests contain a significant fraction of particles in the ultrafine region. However, the photometric method deployed in the certification test is not capable of adequately measuring light scatter of particles below approximately 100 nm in diameter. Specifically, 68% (by count) and 8% (by mass) of the challenge NaCl aerosol particles and 10% (by count) and 0.3% (by mass) of the DOP particles below 100 nm do not significantly contribute to the filter penetration measurement. In addition, the most penetrating particle size for electret filters likely occurs at 100 nm or less under test conditions similar to those used in filter certification. The authors conclude, therefore, that the existing NIOSH certification protocol may not represent a worst-case assessment for electret filters because it has limited ability to determine the contribution of ultrafine aerosols, which include the most penetrating particle size for electret filters. Possible strategies to assess ultrafine particle penetration in the certification protocol are discussed.

  20. Different sources of suspended sediment according to particle size determined by natural radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizugaki, S.; Ohtsuka, J.; Maruyama, M.; Hamamoto, S.; Murakami, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Extensive human activity and climate change have given great impacts on the sediment balance and connectivity between fluvial and coastal systems, causing sediment-related problems such as sedimentation in reservoir, coastal erosion and water pollution by prolonged turbid water. The dynamics of suspended sediment is one of the most important issues in watershed and coastal management. Suspended sediment load transported to ocean by a river commonly represents a mixture of sediments delivered from different locations and source types within the contributing catchment. In our previous study, we have found that the three natural radionuclides are available to discriminate the source areas of suspended sediment represented by six different bed rock type (sedimentary rock, accretionary sedimentary rock, accretionary basalt block, accretionary volcanic rock, plutonic rock and metamorphic rock), and that the contribution of each source areas to suspended sediment can be estimated (Mizugaki et al., 2012). To elucidate the sources of suspended sediment from mountain to coastal area, the fingerprinting was conducted using natural radionuclide tracers across a couple of adjacent watersheds, the Saru River and Mu River watersheds in central Hokkaido, northern Japan. We collected suspended sediments at outlets of the 13 sub-catchments (0.7-27.2 km2) and 12 stream channels with mid- to large-scaled watershed areas (17-1,333 km2), deposited sediments across a dam reservoir and coastal sediments, in total 389 samples. For collected sediment samples, grain size distributions were measured by laser-diffraction particle size analyzer. The specific surface areas of the samples were estimated using their grain size distribution and the spherical approximation of the particles in each class. For fingerprint the source of suspended sediment, three natural radionuclide activities, 212Pb, 228Ac and 40K, were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Specific surface area of the sediment showed

  1. Inhalation of Respirable Crystalline Rifapentine Particles Induces Pulmonary Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Ashhurst, Anneliese S; Nagalingam, Gayathri; Britton, Warwick J; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2017-01-03

    Rifapentine is an anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB) drug with a prolonged half-life, but oral delivery results in low concentrations in the lungs because of its high binding (98%) to plasma proteins. We have shown that inhalation of crystalline rifapentine overcomes the limitations of oral delivery by significantly enhancing and prolonging the drug concentration in the lungs. The delivery of crystalline particles to the lungs may promote inflammation. This in vivo study characterizes the inflammatory response caused by pulmonary deposition of the rifapentine particles. The rifapentine powder was delivered to BALB/c mice by intratracheal insufflation at a dose of 20 mg/kg. The inflammatory response in the lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was examined at 12 h, 24 h, and 7 days post-treatment by flow cytometry and histopathology. At 12 and 24 h post-treatment, there was a significant influx of neutrophils into the lungs, and this returned to normal by day 7. A significant recruitment of macrophages occurred in the BAL at 24 h. Consistent with these findings, histopathological analysis demonstrated pulmonary vascular congestion and significant macrophage recruitment at 12 and 24 h post-treatment. In conclusion, the pulmonary delivery of crystalline rifapentine caused a transient neutrophil-associated inflammatory response in the lungs that resolved over 7 days. This observation may limit pulmonary delivery of rifapentine to once a week at a dose of 20 mg/kg or less. The effectiveness of weekly dosing with inhalable rifapentine will be assessed in murine Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

  2. Photocurrent spectroscopy of exciton and free particle optical transitions in suspended carbon nanotube pn-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shun-Wen; Theiss, Jesse; Hazra, Jubin; Aykol, Mehmet; Kapadia, Rehan; Cronin, Stephen B.

    2015-08-03

    We study photocurrent generation in individual, suspended carbon nanotube pn-junction diodes formed by electrostatic doping using two gate electrodes. Photocurrent spectra collected under various electrostatic doping concentrations reveal distinctive behaviors for free particle optical transitions and excitonic transitions. In particular, the photocurrent generated by excitonic transitions exhibits a strong gate doping dependence, while that of the free particle transitions is gate independent. Here, the built-in potential of the pn-junction is required to separate the strongly bound electron-hole pairs of the excitons, while free particle excitations do not require this field-assisted charge separation. We observe a sharp, well defined E{sub 11} free particle interband transition in contrast with previous photocurrent studies. Several steps are taken to ensure that the active charge separating region of these pn-junctions is suspended off the substrate in a suspended region that is substantially longer than the exciton diffusion length and, therefore, the photocurrent does not originate from a Schottky junction. We present a detailed model of the built-in fields in these pn-junctions, which, together with phonon-assistant exciton dissociation, predicts photocurrents on the same order of those observed experimentally.

  3. Laboratory and field evaluations of the LISST-100 instrument for suspended particle size determinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Cheng, R.T.; Wang, P.-F.; Richter, K.

    2001-01-01

    Advances in technology have resulted in a new instrument that is designed for in-situ determination of particle size spectra. Such an instrument that can measure undisturbed particle size distributions is much needed for sediment transport studies. The LISST-100 (Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry) uses the principle of laser diffraction to obtain the size distribution and volume concentration of suspended material in 32 size classes logarithmically spaced between 1.25 and 250 ??m. This paper describes a laboratory evaluation of the ability of LISST-100 to determine particle sizes using suspensions of single size, artificial particles. Findings show the instrument is able to determine particle size to within about 10% with increasing error as particle size increases. The instrument determines volume (or mass) concentration using a volume conversion factor Cv. This volume conversion factor is theoretically a constant. In the laboratory evaluation Cv is found to vary by a factor of about three over the particle size range between 5 and 200 ??m. Results from field studies in South San Francisco Bay show that values of mass concentration of suspended marine sediments estimated by LISST-100 agree favorably with estimates from optical backscatterance sensors if an appropriate value of Cv, according to mean size, is used and the assumed average particle (aggregate) density is carefully chosen. Analyses of size distribution of suspended materials in South San Francisco Bay over multiple tide cycles suggest the likelihood of different sources of sediment because of different size characteristics during flood and ebb cycles. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. IMPACT OF SIPHONING ACTIVITY AND NATURALLY SUSPENDED PARTICLE LOAD ON MUSSEL KILL by PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Molloy

    2003-08-04

    Under this USDOE-NETL contract, the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens is being developed as a biocontrol agent for zebra mussels. The specific purpose of the contract is to identify biotic and abiotic factors that affect mussel kill. Ingestion of these bacteria by zebra mussels is required to achieve kill, and tests evaluating factors that relate to mussel feeding are contained in this report. Specifically the impact of the following two factors were investigated: (1) Mussel siphoning behavior--In nature, zebra mussels typically have their two shells spread apart and their inhalant siphon tube extended from between their shells for taking food particles into their mantle cavities (Fig. 1). Our tests indicated that there is a direct correlation between mussel siphoning activity and mussel mortality achieved by a bacterial treatment. Therefore, to encourage mussel feeding on bacteria, future pipe treatments within power plants should be carried out using procedures which minimize disturbance to mussel siphoning. 2. Naturally suspended particle loads--Since bacterial cells are lethal only if ingested by mussels, waters containing very high levels of naturally suspended particles might reduce the mortality that can be achieved by a bacterial treatment. If true, this inhibition might occur as a result of particle exclusion, i.e., there could be reduced ingestion of bacterial cells since they represent a reduced percentage of all particles ingested. Our tests indicated that a range of particle concentrations that might naturally exist in a turbid river did not inhibit mussel kill by the bacterial cells, but that an artificially high load of natural particles was capable of causing a reduction in kill. To be conservative, therefore, future pipe treatments should be timed to occur when intake waters have relatively low quantities of naturally suspended particulate matter.

  5. Vanadium Inhalation in a Mouse Model for the Understanding of Air-Suspended Particle Systemic Repercussion

    PubMed Central

    Fortoul, T. I.; Rodriguez-Lara, V.; Gonzalez-Villalva, A.; Rojas-Lemus, M.; Cano-Gutierrez, G.; Ustarroz-Cano, M.; Colin-Barenque, L.; Montaño, L. F.; García-Pelez, I.; Bizarro-Nevares, P.; Lopez-Valdez, N.; Falcon-Rodriguez, C. I.; Jimenez-Martínez, R. S.; Ruiz-Guerrero, M. L.; López-Zepeda, L. S.; Morales-Rivero, A.; Muñiz-Rivera-Cambas, A.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increased concern about the health effects that air-suspended particles have on human health which have been dissected in animal models. Using CD-1 mouse, we explore the effects that vanadium inhalation produce in different tissues and organs. Our findings support the systemic effects of air pollution. In this paper, we describe our findings in different organs in our conditions and contrast our results with the literature. PMID:21716674

  6. Tracking suspended particle transport via radium isotopes ((226)Ra and (228)Ra) through the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River system.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Richard N; Burnett, William C; Opsahl, Stephen P; Santos, Isaac R; Misra, Sambuddha; Froelich, Philip N

    2013-02-01

    Suspended particles in rivers can carry metals, nutrients, and pollutants downstream which can become bioactive in estuaries and coastal marine waters. In river systems with multiple sources of both suspended particles and contamination sources, it is important to assess the hydrologic conditions under which contaminated particles can be delivered to downstream ecosystems. The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River system in the southeastern United States represents an ideal system to study these hydrologic impacts on particle transport through a heavily-impacted river (the Chattahoochee River) and one much less impacted by anthropogenic activities (the Flint River). We demonstrate here the utility of natural radioisotopes as tracers of suspended particles through the ACF system, where particles contaminated with arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) have been shown to be contributed from coal-fired power plants along the Chattahoochee River, and have elevated concentrations in the surficial sediments of the Apalachicola Bay Delta. Radium isotopes ((228)Ra and (226)Ra) on suspended particles should vary throughout the different geologic provinces of this river system, allowing differentiation of the relative contributions of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers to the suspended load delivered to Lake Seminole, the Apalachicola River, and ultimately to Apalachicola Bay. We also use various geochemical proxies ((40)K, organic carbon, and calcium) to assess the relative composition of suspended particles (lithogenic, organic, and carbonate fractions, respectively) under a range of hydrologic conditions. During low (base) flow conditions, the Flint River contributed 70% of the suspended particle load to both the Apalachicola River and the bay, whereas the Chattahoochee River became the dominant source during higher discharge, contributing 80% of the suspended load to the Apalachicola River and 62% of the particles entering the estuary. Neither of these hydrologic

  7. 3-D Lagrangian Measurements of Suspended Particles in San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. M.; Tse, I.; Variano, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    San Francisco Bay often appears brown. Its high suspended sediment concentrations give it the potential to move and mix large amounts of sediments from one environment, such as an urban stormwater outflow, to another, such as a wetland undergoing restoration. These sediments can carry with them persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals such as PCBs, mercury, or emerging contaminants. To predict sediment fate, almost all physical models describe the transport of suspended sediment with the advection-diffusion equation, which requires knowledge of the water currents and the diffusivity of sediment. Methods for estimating diffusivity to use in the model are not typically satisfying, and there remain fundamental questions about the accuracy and applicability of the typical approximation methods. We have developed a new tool that measures 3D tracks of suspended sediment in-situ, from which we compute diffusivity directly. We present here the results of the first deployment, in San Francisco Bay near the Berkeley shore. This site has highly active sediment and is important for transfer of sediment-associated contaminants, and sediment diffusivity is sensitive to wind, waves, tides and turbulence. We investigate these relationships using our preliminary, proof-of-concept, data. It also provides the foundation for future investigations of the behavior of sediment diffusivity and particle trajectories in different environments and the underlying theory of solute diffusivity in real-world conditions. In addition, these data enable the analysis of whether sediment particles in San Francisco Bay exhibit the 'preferential clustering' observed for some inertial particles in turbulent flow.

  8. A suspended-particle rosette multi-sampler for discrete biogeochemical sampling in low-particle-density waters

    SciTech Connect

    Breier, J. A.; Rauch, C. G.; McCartney, K.; Toner, B. M.; Fakra, S. C.; White, S. N.; German, C. R.

    2010-06-22

    To enable detailed investigations of early stage hydrothermal plume formation and abiotic and biotic plume processes we developed a new oceanographic tool. The Suspended Particulate Rosette sampling system has been designed to collect geochemical and microbial samples from the rising portion of deep-sea hydrothermal plumes. It can be deployed on a remotely operated vehicle for sampling rising plumes, on a wire-deployed water rosette for spatially discrete sampling of non-buoyant hydrothermal plumes, or on a fixed mooring in a hydrothermal vent field for time series sampling. It has performed successfully during both its first mooring deployment at the East Pacific Rise and its first remotely-operated vehicle deployments along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It is currently capable of rapidly filtering 24 discrete large-water-volume samples (30-100 L per sample) for suspended particles during a single deployment (e.g. >90 L per sample at 4-7 L per minute through 1 {mu}m pore diameter polycarbonate filters). The Suspended Particulate Rosette sampler has been designed with a long-term goal of seafloor observatory deployments, where it can be used to collect samples in response to tectonic or other events. It is compatible with in situ optical sensors, such as laser Raman or visible reflectance spectroscopy systems, enabling in situ particle analysis immediately after sample collection and before the particles alter or degrade.

  9. ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF RESPIRABLE TIRE PARTICLES AND ASSESSMENT OF CARDIO-PULMONARY TOXICITY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elemental Analysis of Respirable Tire Particles and Assessment of Cardio-pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    R.R. Gottipolu, PhD1, E. Landa, PhD2, J.K. McGee, MS1, M.C. Schladweiler, BS1, J.G. Wallenborn, MS3, A.D. Ledbetter, BS1, J.E. Richards, MS1 and U.P. Kodavanti, PhD1. 1NHEER...

  10. Particle Size-Selective Assessment of Protection of European Standard FFP Respirators and Surgical Masks against Particles-Tested with Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Dong-Chir; Li, He-Yi; Tsai, Chieh-Fu; Chen, Chun-Wan; Chen, Jen-Kun

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the protection of disposable filtering half-facepiece respirators of different grades against particles between 0.093 and 1.61 μm. A personal sampling system was used to particle size-selectively assess the protection of respirators. The results show that about 10.9% of FFP2 respirators and 28.2% of FFP3 respirators demonstrate assigned protection factors (APFs) below 10 and 20, which are the levels assigned for these respirators by the British Standard. On average, the protection factors of FFP respirators were 11.5 to 15.9 times greater than those of surgical masks. The minimum protection factors (PFs) were observed for particles between 0.263 and 0.384 μm. No significant difference in PF results was found among FFP respirator categories and particle size. A strong association between fit factors and protection factors was found. The study indicates that FFP respirators may not achieve the expected protection level and the APFs may need to be revised for these classes of respirators. PMID:27195721

  11. A review of the effects of particle types on oil-suspended particulate matter aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Andrew; Yim, Un Hyuk

    2016-12-01

    Oil-suspended particulate matter aggregate (OSA) can form naturally when oil and particles interact. The interaction between oil and suspended particulate matter makes oil less sticky, and facilitates its dispersion in the water column. The high oil-water surface contact enhances the biodegradation of oil and thus increases the efficiency of remediation processes. There are many factors that affect OSA formation, but, particle type is one of the most important. Because different particle types have different physical, chemical, and biological properties, their interactions with oil differ greatly. Particle properties such as interlayer spaces, hydrophobicity, surface charges, polarity, organic content, and size affect the interactions between materials and oil. These different interactions determine the type, buoyancy, size, and stability of OSA that forms, thus determining its fate in the environment. This review provides a current understanding of (1) OSA formation mechanisms, (2) sources and classes of marine materials, (3) oil-particle interactions, (4) material properties and their effects on oil interaction, and (5) future research needs.

  12. Flow regime and deposition pattern of evaporating binary mixture droplet suspended with particles.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2016-02-01

    The flow regimes and the deposition pattern have been investigated by changing the ethanol concentration in a water-based binary mixture droplet suspended with alumina nanoparticles. To visualize the flow patterns, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been applied in the binary liquid droplet containing the fluorescent microspheres. Three distinct flow regimes have been revealed in the evaporation. In Regime I, the vortices and chaotic flows are found to carry the particles to the liquid-vapor interface and to promote the formation of particle aggregation. The aggregates move inwards in Regime II as induced by the Marangoni flow along the droplet free surface. Regime III is dominated by the drying of the left water and the capillary flow driving particles radially outward is observed. The relative weightings of Regimes I and II, which are enhanced with an increasing load of ethanol, determine the motion of the nanoparticles and the formation of the final drying pattern.

  13. Challenge of N95 and P100 Filtering Facepiece Respirators with Particles Containing Viable H1N1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    Zhao B, Zhang Z, and Li X. 2005. Numerical study of the transport of droplets or particles generated by respiratory system indoors. Bldg. Environment... respiratory U U U SAR 35 Joseph D. Wander 850 283 6240 Reset Challenge of N95 and P100 Filtering Facepiece Respirators with Particles Containing...transmission include the use of respiratory protection devices in some situations. Furthermore, in the past decade, respirators have become commonplace

  14. Individual particle analysis of suspended materials in Onondaga Lake, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.L.; Jiao, Jianfu; DosSantos, S.G. ); Effler, S.W. )

    1991-04-01

    The chemical and physical characteristics of the particles of the near-surface waters of polluted, hypereutrophic, Onondaga Lake, NY, were observed by individual particle analysis techniques for the spring to fall interval of 1987. Strong temporal variations were documented for the projected particle area per unit volume (PAV), and the relative contribution that six chemical groupings of particles made to the overall assemblage of particles. These dynamics were regulated largely by (1) the composition and level of phytoplankton growth, (2) tributary loading of particles, particularly after runoff events, and (3) the precipitation of calcium carbonate. Approximately 85% of the PAV was associated with in-lake processes and {approximately} 15% was derived from tributary transport. Approximately 25% of the internally produced PAV was related to calcium carbonate precipitation; the remainder was associated with biological production. A once in 7-year runoff event caused a 5-fold increase in the concentration of suspended particles. Much of the increase was due to calcium carbonate precipitation that coated various nuclei particles.

  15. Glider monitoring of shelf suspended particle dynamics and transport during storm and flooding conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrin, François; Many, Gaël; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Martín, Jacobo; Puig, Pere; Houpert, Loic; Testor, Pierre; Kunesch, Stéphane; Mahiouz, Karim; Béguery, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    Transfers of particulate matter on continental margins primarily occur during energetic events. As part of the CASCADE (CAscading, Storm, Convection, Advection and Downwelling Events) experiment, a glider equipped with optical sensors was deployed in the coastal area of the Gulf of Lions, NW Mediterranean in March 2011 to assess the spatio-temporal variability of hydrology, suspended particles properties and fluxes during energetic conditions. This deployment complemented a larger observational effort, a part of the MOOSE (Mediterranean Ocean Observing System of the Environment) network, composed of a coastal benthic station, a surface buoy and moorings on the continental slope. This set of observations permitted to measure the impact of three consecutive storms and a flood event across the entire continental shelf. Glider data showed that the sediment resuspension and transport observed at the coastal station during the largest storm (Hs>4 m) was effective down to a water depth of 80 m. The mid-shelf mud belt, located between 40 and 90 m depth, appears as the zone where the along-shelf flux of suspended sediment is maximum. Besides, the across-shelf flux of suspended sediment converges towards the outer limit of the mid-shelf mud belt, where deposition of suspended particles probably occurs and contributes to the nourishment of this area. Hydrological structures, suspended particles transport and properties changed drastically during stormy periods and the following flood event. Prior to the storms, the shelf waters were weakly stratified due in particular to the presence of cold dense water on the inner- and mid-shelf. The storms rapidly swept away this dense water, as well as the resuspended sediments, along the shelf and towards a downstream submarine canyon. The buoyant river plumes that spread along the shelf after the flooding period provoked a restratification of the water column on the inner- and mid-shelf. The analysis of glider's optical data at

  16. Evaluation of the surface roughness effect on suspended particle deposition near unpaved roads

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Dongzi; Gillies, J. A.; Etyemezian, V.; Nikolich, G.; Shaw, William J.

    2015-11-11

    The downwind transport and deposition of suspended dust raised by a vehicle driving on unpaved roads was studied for four differently vegetated surfaces in the USA states of Kansas and Washington, and one barren surface in Nevada. A 10 m high tower adjacent to the source (z10 m downwind) and an array of multi-channel optical particle counters at three positions downwind of the source measured the flux of particles and the particle size distribution in the advecting dust plumes in the horizontal and vertical directions. Aerodynamic parameters such as friction velocity (u*) and surface roughness length (z0) were calculated from wind speed measurements made on the tower. Particle number concentration, PM10 mass exhibited an exponential decay along the direction of transport. Coarse particles accounted for z95% of the PM10 mass, at least to a downwind distance of 200 m from the source. PM10 removed by deposition was found to increase with increasing particle size and increasing surface roughness under similar moderate wind speed conditions. The surface of dense, long grass (1.2 m high and complete surface cover) had the greatest reduction of PM10 among the five surfaces tested due to deposition induced by turbulence effects created by the rougher surface and by enhanced particle impaction/ interception effects to the grass blades.

  17. Effective Interactions between Colloidal Particles Suspended in a Bath of Swimming Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, L.; Maggi, C.; Bernardini, M. L.; Rizzo, A.; di Leonardo, R.

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics of passive colloidal tracers in a bath of self-propelled particles is receiving a lot of attention in the context of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. Here we demonstrate that active baths are also capable of mediating effective interactions between suspended bodies. In particular we observe that a bath of swimming bacteria gives rise to a short range attraction similar to depletion forces in equilibrium colloidal suspensions. Using numerical simulations and experiments we show how the features of this interaction arise from the combination of nonequilibrium dynamics (peculiar of bacterial baths) and excluded volume effects.

  18. Biological flocculation of suspended particles in nutrient-rich aqueous ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Federico

    2009-09-01

    SummaryWe describe the development and testing of a mechanistic model (BFLOC) to predict the average size of sediment aggregates in nutrient-rich aqueous ecosystems. The original capability of BFLOC is to couple turbulence-induced flocculation of suspended minerals and micro-organisms with the nutrient-related dynamics of aggregate-attached micro-organisms. The model, calibrated and validated against the average floc size recorded at two stations in the Belgian North Sea [Fettweis, M., Francken, F., Pison V., Ven den Eynde, D., 2006. Suspended particulate matter dynamics and aggregate sizes in a high turbidity area. Marine Geology 235, 63-74], closely captured site conditions and significantly clarified interpretation of field measurements. Modeling results indicated that an accurate prediction of time-varying floc sizes was possible only by taking into account the organic fraction of the suspended particle matter and the micro-organism colonization of the floc micro-environment. BFLOC showed that the floc excess density strongly correlated with the floc biomass volume, while the settling velocity strongly correlated with the floc mineral volume. We noticed that the settling velocity was poorly correlated with the total floc volume (and floc size), suggesting a revision of current methods that assess suspended matter deposition uniquely on the basis of the floc size. Additionally, various hypotheses tested with BFLOC suggested that the effect of aggregate-attached biomass on aggregation and breakup rates was very small when it was accounted for with a first-order description. More generally, the sediment and biomass parameters found here were nearly site independent suggesting that the mechanistic approach of BFLOC was relatively robust.

  19. Spatial and temporal dynamics of suspended particle characteristics and composition in Navigation Pool 19 of the Upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milde, Amanda S.; Richardson, William B.; Strauss, Eric A.; Larson, James H.; Vallazza, Jon; Knights, Brent C.

    2017-01-01

    Suspended particles are an essential component of large rivers influencing channel geomorphology, biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, and food web resources. The Upper Mississippi River is a large floodplain river that exhibits pronounced spatiotemporal variation in environmental conditions and biota, providing an ideal environment for investigating dynamics of suspended particles in large river ecosystems. Here we investigated two questions: (i) How do suspended particle characteristics (e.g. size and morphology) vary temporally and spatially? and (ii) What environmental variables have the strongest association with particle characteristics? Water sampling was conducted in June, August, and September of 2013 and 2014 in Navigation Pool 19 of the Upper Mississippi River. A FlowCAM® (Flow Cytometer and Microscope) particle imaging system was used to enumerate and measure particles 53–300 μm in diameter for size and shape characteristics (e.g. volume, elongation, and symmetry). Suspended particle characteristics varied considerably over space and time and were strongly associated with discharge and concentrations of nitrate + nitrite (NO3−) and soluble reactive phosphorus. Particle characteristics in backwaters were distinct from those in other habitats for most of the study period, likely due to reduced hydrologic connectivity and higher biotic production in backwaters. During low discharge, phytoplankton and zooplankton made up relatively greater proportions of the observed particles. Concurrently during low discharge, concentrations of chlorophyll, volatile suspended solids, and total phosphorus were higher. Our results suggest that there are complex interactions among space, time, discharge, and other environmental variables (e.g. water nutrients), which drive suspended particle dynamics in large rivers.

  20. The fluctuation energy balance in non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Pähtz, Thomas; Durán, Orencio; Ho, Tuan-Duc; Valance, Alexandre; Kok, Jasper F.

    2015-01-15

    Here, we compare two extreme regimes of non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport, transport in light and heavy fluids (“saltation” and “bedload,” respectively), regarding their particle fluctuation energy balance. From direct numerical simulations, we surprisingly find that the ratio between collisional and fluid drag dissipation of fluctuation energy is significantly larger in saltation than in bedload, even though the contribution of interparticle collisions to transport of momentum and energy is much smaller in saltation due to the low concentration of particles in the transport layer. We conclude that the much higher frequency of high-energy particle-bed impacts (“splash”) in saltation is the cause for this counter-intuitive behavior. Moreover, from a comparison of these simulations to particle tracking velocimetry measurements which we performed in a wind tunnel under steady transport of fine and coarse sand, we find that turbulent fluctuations of the flow produce particle fluctuation energy at an unexpectedly high rate in saltation even under conditions for which the effects of turbulence are usually believed to be small.

  1. Control of respirable particles in indoor air with portable air cleaners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offermann, F. J.; Sextro, R. G.; Fisk, W. J.; Grimsrud, D. T.; Nazaroff, W. W.; Nero, A. V.; Revzan, K. L.; Yater, J.

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles using in situ chamber decay tests. Following injection of cigarette smoke in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size with and without air cleaner operation. The size distribution of the tobacco smoke particles was log normal with a count median diameter of 0.15 μm and a geometric standard deviation of 2.0. Without air cleaner operation, the natural mass-averaged surface deposition rate of particles was observed to be 0.1 h -1. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filter devices, a residential-sized ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. Electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters removed particles at substantial rates, and a HEPA-type filter was most efficient air cleaner studied.

  2. Control of Respirable Particles in Indoor Air with Portable AirCleaners

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, F.J.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Grimsrud, D.T.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-10-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles using in situ chamber decay tests. Following injection of cigarette smoke in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size with and without air cleaner operation. The size distribution of the tobacco smoke particles was log normal with a count median diameter of 0.15 {micro}m and a geometric standard deviation of 2.0. Without air cleaner operation, the natural mass-averaged surface deposition rate of particles was observed to be 0.1 h{sup -1}. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filter devices, a residential-sized ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. Electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters removed particles at substantial rates, and a HEPA-type filter was the most efficient air cleaner studied.

  3. Influence of neighboring particles on the drag of a particle suspended in laminar flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Adam Vincent

    Understanding particle-fluid flows is very important for the areas of sedimentation in river beds, fluidized bed reactors, and other fields of multiphase flow. The effect of one particle on another in a fluid flow is not very well understood nor does a correlation exist to describe the behavior of the drag coefficient between particles. The use of Proteus was validated by comparison to previous studies to the result obtained through simulations in Proteus, including analysis of the wake structure of a single sphere. Two particles were then analyzed for various Reynolds numbers less than 250 but greater than 5 and for the dimensionless gap of L/D ≥ 2, where L is the distance between the two particle centers and D is the diameter of the particles. Two arrangements were used for simulation, with the particles spaced horizontally or vertically within the fluid flow. Both orientations were evaluated for the effects of the dimensionless gap on the drag coefficient. The wake structure at higher Reynolds numbers were also evaluated for effects due to neighboring particles. A correlation was developed for the case of the horizontal particles at a dimensionless gap, L/D ≥ 2 for the range of Reynolds numbers described. The orientation effect is then studied at a fixed distance for offsets of thirty, forty-five and sixty degrees from the horizontal. Results are also presented to evaluate the effect of the diameter of a neighboring particle. The current results are restricted to the case described in the work. Future studies may build on the current work to extend the work to other effects of neighboring particles and multiple particle influence.

  4. Polychromatic transmissometer for in situ measurements of suspended particles and gelbstoff in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Hans; Grisard, Klaus; Holtsch, Kurt; Reuter, Rainer; Stute, Uwe

    1997-10-01

    The beam attenuation coefficient is an optical parameter that sensitively depends on suspended and dissolved substances in water. Its measurement is not only of interest for an understanding of the radiative transfer in a water column. With appropriate algorithms for data interpretation, it also allows a fast determination of absorbing and scattering matter as time-series measurements or depth profiles that cannot easily be obtained with other methods. An instrument has been developed for measuring spectral attenuation coefficients over a wavelength range from 340 to 785 nm. The optical path length can be set between 0 and 400 mm. This allows application in a wide range of turbidity in coastal and inland (case 2 and case 3) waters and a calibration of the instrument during in-situ measurements. This makes the instrument suitable for long-term applications in which signals from conventional instruments would degrade owing to the biofouling of optical windows. From the data, the amount and the size distribution of suspended particles and the specific absorption of dissolved organic matter are derived in real time. Algorithms based on Monte Carlo methods are available for a classification of transparent particles and phytoplankton.

  5. Polychromatic in-situ transmissometer for measurements of suspended particles and yellow substance in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Hans; Reuter, Rainer; Stute, Uwe

    1997-02-01

    Hydrographic conditions are often characterized by large amounts of dissolved and particulate matter. These substances influence the optical properties of seawater, and the radiative transfer in the water column. The attenuation coefficient is an optical parameter which depends sensitively on suspended and dissolved substances. An instrument has been developed for measuring spectral attenuation coefficients over a wavelength range form 370 to 730 nm. The optical path length can be set between zero and 400 nm, which allows an application in a wide range of turbidity. The variable path length enables a calibration of the instrument during in situ measurements, which makes it suitable for long-term applications where signals from conventional instruments would degrade due to biofouling of optical windows. From the data, the concentration and size distribution of suspended particles, and the concentration of dissolved organic matter are derived in real time. Algorithms based on Monte Carlo methods are available for a specific evaluation of non-chlorophylleous particles and phytoplankton. Results of field applications are reported.

  6. X-ray fluorescence mapping of mercury on suspended mineral particles and diatoms in a contaminated freshwater system

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Baohua; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Miller, Carrie L; Wang, Wei; Lai, Barry; Brooks, Scott C; Kemner, Kenneth M; Liang, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) bioavailability and geochemical cycling is affected by its partitioning between the aqueous and particulate phases. We applied X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobes to directly visualize and quantify the spatial localization of Hg and its correlations with other elements of interest on suspended particles from a Hg contaminated freshwater system. Up to 175 g/g Hg is found on suspended particles. Mercury is heterogeneously distributed among phytoplankton (e.g., diatoms) and mineral particles that are rich in iron oxides and natural organic matter (NOM), possibly as Hg-NOM-iron oxide ternary complexes. The diatom-bound Hg is mostly found on outer surfaces of the cells, suggesting passive sorption of inorganic Hg on diatoms. Our results indicate that localized sorption of Hg onto suspended particles, including diatoms and NOM-coated oxide minerals, is an important sink for Hg in natural aquatic environments.

  7. Ultrasonic device for real-time sewage velocity and suspended particles concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Abda, F; Azbaid, A; Ensminger, D; Fischer, S; François, P; Schmitt, P; Pallarès, A

    2009-01-01

    In the frame of a technological research and innovation network in water and environment technologies (RITEAU, Réseau de Recherche et d'Innovation Technologique Eau et Environnement), our research group, in collaboration with industrial partners and other research institutions, has been in charge of the development of a suitable flowmeter: an ultrasonic device measuring simultaneously the water flow and the concentration of size classes of suspended particles. Working on the pulsed ultrasound principle, our multi-frequency device (1 to 14 MHz) allows flow velocity and water height measurement and estimation of suspended solids concentration. Velocity measurements rely on the coherent Doppler principle. A self developed frequency estimator, so called Spectral Identification method, was used and compared to the classical Pulse-Pair method. Several measurements campaigns on one wastewater collector of the French city of Strasbourg gave very satisfactory results and showed smaller standard deviation values for the Doppler frequency extracted by the Spectral Identification method. A specific algorithm was also developed for the water height measurements. It relies on the water surface acoustic impedance rupture and its peak localisation and behaviour in the collected backscattering data. This algorithm was positively tested on long time measurements on the same wastewater collector. A large part of the article is devoted to the measurements of the suspended solids concentrations. Our data analysis consists in the adaptation of the well described acoustic behaviour of sand to the behaviour of wastewater particles. Both acoustic attenuation and acoustic backscattering data over multiple frequencies are analyzed for the extrapolation of size classes and respective concentrations. Under dry weather conditions, the massic backscattering coefficient and the overall size distribution showed similar evolution whatever the measurement site was and were suggesting a global

  8. Control of respirable particles and radon progeny with portable air cleaners

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, F.J.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-02-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles and radon progeny. Following injection of cigarette smoke and radon in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particles and radon progeny concentrations were measured with and without air cleaner operation. Particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size. In tests with no air cleaner the natural decay rate for cigarette smoke was observed to be 0.2 hr/sup -1/. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filters, a residential ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. The electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters tested had significant particle removal rates, and a HEPA-type filter was the most efficient air cleaner. The evaluation of radon progeny control produced similar results; the air cleaners which were effective in removing particles were also effective in removing radon progeny. At low particle concentrations plateout of the unattached radon progeny is an important removal mechanism. Based on data from these tests, the plateout rate for unattached progeny was found to be 15 hr/sup -1/. The unattached fraction and the overall removal rate due to deposition of attached and unattached nuclides have been estimated for each radon decay product as a function of particle concentration. While air cleaning can be effective in reducing total radon progeny, concentrations of unattached radon progeny can increase with increasing air cleaning. 39 references, 26 figures, 9 tables.

  9. Hysteresis in suspended sediment to turbidity relations due to changing particle size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landers, Mark N.; Sturm, Terry W.

    2013-01-01

    Turbidity (T) is the most ubiquitous of surrogate technologies used to estimate suspended-sediment concentration (SSC). The effects of sediment size on turbidity are well documented; however, effects from changes in particle size distributions (PSD) are rarely evaluated. Hysteresis in relations of SSC-to-turbidity (SSC~T) for single stormflow events was observed and quantified for a data set of 195 concurrent measurements of SSC, turbidity, discharge, velocity, and volumetric PSD collected during five stormflows in 2009–2010 on Yellow River at Gees Mill Road in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. Regressions of SSC-normalized turbidity (T/SSC) on concurrently measured PSD percentiles show an inverse, exponential influence of particle size on turbidity that is not constant across the size range of the PSD. The majority of the influence of PSD on T/SSC is from particles of fine-silt and smaller sizes (finer than 16 microns). This study shows that small changes in the often assumed stability of the PSD are significant to SSC~T relations. Changes of only 5 microns in the fine silt and smaller size fractions of suspended sediment PSD can produce hysteresis in the SSC~T rating that can increase error and produce bias. Observed SSC~T hysteresis may be an indicator of changes in sediment properties during stormflows and of potential changes in sediment sources. Trends in the PSD time series indicate that sediment transport is capacity-limited for sand-sized sediment in the channel and supply-limited for fine silt and smaller sediment from the hillslope.

  10. Hysteresis in suspended sediment to turbidity relations due to changing particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, Mark N.; Sturm, Terry W.

    2013-09-01

    Turbidity (T) is the most ubiquitous of surrogate technologies used to estimate suspended-sediment concentration (SSC). The effects of sediment size on turbidity are well documented; however, effects from changes in particle size distributions (PSD) are rarely evaluated. Hysteresis in relations of SSC-to-turbidity (SSC˜T) for single stormflow events was observed and quantified for a dataset of 195 concurrent measurements of SSC, turbidity, discharge, velocity, and volumetric PSD collected during five stormflows in 2009-2010 on Yellow River at Gees Mill Road in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. Regressions of SSC-normalized turbidity (T/SSC) on concurrently measured PSD percentiles show an inverse, exponential influence of particle size on turbidity that is not constant across the size range of the PSD. The majority of the influence of PSD on T/SSC is from particles of fine silt and smaller sizes (finer than 16 µm). This study shows that small changes in the often assumed stability of the PSD are significant to SSC˜T relations. Changes of only 5 µm in the fine silt and smaller size fractions of suspended sediment PSD can produce hysteresis in the SSC˜T rating that can increase error and produce bias. Observed SSC˜T hysteresis may be an indicator of changes in sediment properties during stormflows and of potential changes in sediment sources. Trends in the PSD time series indicate that sediment transport is capacity limited for sand-sized sediment in the channel and supply limited for fine silt and smaller sediment from the hillslope.

  11. Hydrolytic ectoenzyme activity associated with suspended and sinking organic particles within the anoxic Cariaco Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Gordon T.; Thunell, Robert; Varela, Ramon; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Scranton, Mary I.

    2009-08-01

    Ectohydrolase activities of suspended microbiota were compared to those associated with sinking particles (sed-POM) retrieved from sediment traps deployed in the permanently anoxic Cariaco Basin. In shore-based assays, activities of aminopeptidase, β-glucosidase, chitinase and alkaline phosphatase were measured in samples obtained from oxic and anoxic depths using MUF- and MCA-labeled fluorogenic substrate analogs. Hydrolysis potentials for these enzymes in the seston varied widely over the nine cruises sampled (8 Nov 1996-3 May 2000) and among depths (15-1265 m); from <10 to over 1600 nM d -1 hydrolysate released, generally co-varying with one another and with suspended particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate nitrogen (PN). Hydrolytic potentials, prokaryotic abundances and POC/PN concentrations in sinking debris were 400-1.3×10 7 times higher than in comparable volumes of seawater. However when normalized to PN, hydrolytic potentials in sediment trap samples were not demonstrably higher than in Niskin bottle samples. We estimate that PN pools in sediment trap samples were turned over 2-1400 times (medians=7-26 x) slower by hydrolysis than were suspended PN pools. Median prokaryotic growth rates (divisions d -1) in sinking debris were also ˜150 times slower than for bacterioplankton. Hydrolytic potentials in surface oxic waters were generally faster than in underlying anoxic waters on a volumetric basis (nM hydrolysate d -1), but were not significantly ( p>0.05) different when normalized to PN or prokaryote abundances. Alkaline phosphatase was consistently the most active ectohydrolase in both sample types, suggesting that Cariaco Basin assemblages were adapted to decomposing phosphate esters in organic polymers. However, phosphorus limitation was not evident from nutrient inventories in the water column. Results support the hypothesis that efficiencies of polymer hydrolysis in anoxic waters are not inherently lower than in oxic waters.

  12. Particle size distributions and organic-inorganic compositions of suspended particulate matters around the Bohai Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Bian, Changwei; Bi, Rong; Jiang, Wensheng; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Xueqing

    2017-02-01

    Laser in situ scattering and transmissometry (LISST) significantly improves our ability to assess particle size distribution (PSD) in seawater, while wide-ranging measurements of the organic-inorganic compositions of suspended particulate matters (SPM) are still difficult by using traditional methods such as microscopy. In this study, PSD properties and SPM compositions around the Bohai Strait (China) were investigated based on the measurements by LISST in combination with hydro-biological parameters collected from a field survey in summer 2014. Four typical PSD shapes were found in the region, namely right-peak, left-peak, double-peak and negative-skew shapes. The double-peak and negative-skew shapes may interconvert into each other along with strong hydrodynamic variation. In the upper layer of the Bohai Sea, organic particles were in the majority, with inorganic particles rarely observed. In the bottom layer, SPM were the mixture of organic and inorganic matters. LISST provided valuable baseline information on size-resolved organic-inorganic compositions of SPM: the size of organic particles mainly ranged from 4 to 20 μm and 40 to 100 μm, while most SPM ranging from 20 to 40 μm were composed of inorganic sediment.

  13. Experimental investigation on removal of suspended particles from water using flax fibre geotextiles.

    PubMed

    Abbar, Bouamama; Alem, Abdellah; Pantet, Anne; Marcotte, Stéphane; Ahfir, Nasre-Dine; Duriatti, Davy

    2017-02-05

    Natural geotextiles are increasingly used in geotechnical applications such as bank protection and short-term soil reinforcement. This study aimed to highlight the behaviour of natural flax fibre geotextiles towards the retention of suspended particles (SP) present in urban runoff and often polluted. Indeed, it is well known that a large fraction of the heavy metals are often associated with the SP. Long-term filtration tests were performed on four laboratory filter designs. The objective was to study the influence of a nonwoven flax fibre geotextiles on SP transfer through a sandy porous media under saturated conditions. The experiments consisted of injecting SP in a column filled with sand with and without flax fibre geotextiles at a constant flow rate. The results showed that nonwoven flax fibre geotextiles can increase flow homogeneity. Retention efficiency of SP at column scale as well as spatial deposition profile was modified by the presence of geotextile. The use of flax fibre geotextiles increases considerably the durability of the filtration system. Particle size analysis of the particles retained in the sand medium and in geotextiles shows that the coarser particles are mainly deposited at the entrance of the column, and in the geotextiles.

  14. Formation of nitrifying biofilms on small suspended particles in airlift reactors.

    PubMed

    Tijhuis, L; Huisman, J L; Hekkelman, H D; van Loosdrecht, M C; Heijnen, J J

    1995-09-05

    For a stable and reliable operation of a BAS-reactor a high, active biomass concentration is required with mainly biofilm-covered carriers. The effect of reactor conditions on the formation of nitrifying biofilms in BAS-reactors was investigated in this article. A start-up strategy to obtain predominantly biofilm-covered carriers, based on the balancing of detachment and a biomass production per carrier surface area, proved tp be very successful. The amount of biomass and the fraction of covered carrier were high and development of nitrification activity was fast, leading to a volumetric conversion of 5 kg(N) . m(-3) . d(-1) at a hydraulic retention time of 1h. A 1-week, continuous inoculation with suspended purely nitrifying microorganisms resulted in a swift start-up compared with batch addition of a small number of biofilms with some nitrification activity. The development of nitrifying biofilms was very similar to the formation of heterotrophic biofilms. In contrast to heterotrophic bio-films, the diameter of nitrifying biofilms increased during start-up. The detachment rate from nitrifying biofilms decreased with lower concentrations of bare carrier, in a fashion comparable with heterotrophic biofilms, but the nitrifying biofilms were much more robust and resistant. Standard diffusion theory combined with reaction kinetics are capable of predicting the activity and conversion of biofilms on small suspended particles. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons Inc.

  15. Effects of hydrodynamic retardation and interparticle interactions on the self-assembly in a drying droplet containing suspended solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebovka, N. I.; Khrapatiy, S.; Melnyk, R.; Vygornitskii, M.

    2014-05-01

    Self-assembly of particles, suspended in a drying droplet, were studied by the Monte Carlo method. The Brownian diffusion of particles was simulated accounting for the effect of hydrodynamic retardation and interparticle interactions. The model allowed for explaining formation of the "coffee ring" patterns even without accounting for the radial flows towards the three-phase contact line. Morphologies of the drying patterns and their dependence on interparticle interactions and concentration of particles are discussed.

  16. Comparison between Lagrangian and mesoscopic Eulerian modelling approaches for inertial particles suspended in decaying isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, A.; Moreau, M.; Simonin, O.; Helie, J.

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the accuracy of the mesoscopic approach proposed by Février et al. [P. Février, O. Simonin, K.D. Squires, Partitioning of particle velocities in gas-solid turbulent flows into a continuous field and a spatially uncorrelated random distribution: theoretical formalism and numerical study, J. Fluid Mech. 533 (2005) 1-46] by comparison against the Lagrangian approach for the simulation of an ensemble of non-colliding particles suspended in a decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence given by DNS. The mesoscopic Eulerian approach involves to solve equations for a few particle PDF moments: number density, mesoscopic velocity, and random uncorrelated kinetic energy (RUE), derived from particle flow ensemble averaging conditioned by the turbulent fluid flow realization. In addition, viscosity and diffusivity closure assumptions are used to compute the unknown higher order moments which represent the mesoscopic velocity and RUE transport by the uncorrelated velocity component. A detailed comparison between the two approaches is carried out for two different values of the Stokes number based on the initial fluid Kolmogorov time scale, St=0.17 and 2.2. In order to perform reliable comparisons for the RUE local instantaneous distribution and for the mesoscopic kinetic energy spectrum, the error due to the computation method of mesoscopic quantities from Lagrangian simulation results is evaluated and minimized. A very good agreement is found between the mesoscopic Eulerian and Lagrangian predictions for the small particle Stokes number case corresponding to the smallest particle inertia. For larger particle inertia, a bulk viscous term is included in the mesoscopic velocity governing equation to avoid spurious spatial oscillation that may arise due to the inability of the numerical scheme to resolve sharp number density gradients. As a consequence, for St=2.2, particle number density and RUE spatial distribution predicted by the

  17. Optimized goniometer for determination of the scattering phase function of suspended particles: simulations and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foschum, Florian; Kienle, Alwin

    2013-08-01

    We present simulations and measurements with an optimized goniometer for determination of the scattering phase function of suspended particles. We applied the Monte Carlo method, using a radially layered cylindrical geometry and mismatched boundary conditions, in order to investigate the influence of reflections caused by the interfaces of the glass cuvette and the scatterer concentration on the accurate determination of the scattering phase function. Based on these simulations we built an apparatus which allows direct measurement of the phase function from ϑ=7 deg to ϑ=172 deg without any need for correction algorithms. Goniometric measurements on polystyrene and SiO2 spheres proved this concept. Using the validated goniometer, we measured the phase function of yeast cells, demonstrating the improvement of the new system compared to standard goniometers. Furthermore, the scattering phase function of different fat emulsions, like Intralipid, was determined precisely.

  18. Particle Migration due to Viscoelasticity of the Suspending Liquid and Its Relevance in Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avino, Gaetano; Greco, Francesco; Maffettone, Pier Luca

    2017-01-01

    The fast growth of microfluidic applications based on complex fluids is a result of the unique fluid dynamics of these systems, enabling the creation of devices for health care or biological and chemical analysis. Microchannels designed to focus, concentrate, or separate particles suspended in viscoelastic liquids are becoming common. The key fluid dynamical issue on which such devices work is viscoelasticity-induced lateral migration. This phenomenon was discovered in the 1960s in macroscopic channels and has received great attention within the microfluidic community in the past decade. This review presents the current understanding, both from experiments and theoretical analysis, of viscoelasticity-driven cross-flow migration. Examples of promising microfluidic applications show the unprecedented capabilities offered by such technology based on geometrically simple microchannels and rheologically complex liquids.

  19. A radiotracer study of cerium and manganese uptake onto suspended particles in Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Moffett, J.W. )

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of Ce(III) and Mn(II) were studied in Chesapeake Bay in March and July 1990 to establish the role of water column redox processes in contributing to Ce anomalies observed in this estuary (SHOLKOVITZ and ELDERFIELD, 1988; SHOLKOVITZ et al., 1992). Oxidation was measured by adding Mn(II) and Ce(III) to freshly collected water samples as radiotracers and measuring their uptake onto the ambient suspended particle assemblage. Mn(II) oxidation was measured by following the uptake of [sup 54]Mn(II) onto suspended particles and utilizing protocols established by other workers to distinguish oxidation from Mn(II) adsorption. The same protocols were applicable to Ce(III), using [sup 139]Ce(III), and were supported by the use of [sup 152]Eu(III) as a nonredox reactive control. Specific rates of Ce(III) and MN(II) oxidation measured at a station in the North Bay (depth = 4 m) in July were 2016% per day and 4032% per day, respectively. In March, at the same station, the specific rate of Mn(II) of oxidation was only 1-% per day, and Ce(III) oxidation was undetectable. Both Ce(III) and Mn(II) oxidation processes were inhibited by azide, indicating that they were microbially mediated. The seasonal differences probably reflect strong seasonal variation in the abundance of Mn oxidizing bacteria. No Ce(III) oxidation occured in samples collected below the oxic/anoxic interface in July. The specific rates of oxidation for both elements were over 1000 times higher than those measured in the Sargasso Sea. However, the specific rates for Ce(III) and Mn(II) were very similar to each other. This fact, coupled with similar spatial and temporal trends for specific oxidation rates, suggests a common mechanism of oxidation of both elements which may be significant in a wide range of marine environments.

  20. Attenuation of an ultrasonic beam by suspended particles and range of acoustic flow meters in sewer networks.

    PubMed

    Larrarte, Frédérique; François, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic flow meters are commonly used in wastewater management. Under certain circumstances, a reduction in the flow meter range may occur and cause significant error in the flow rate measurement. Attenuation due to suspended particles is one of the phenomena capable of reducing the flow meter range. The present paper examines attenuation resulting from re-suspended pond sediment over a wide range of concentration values. It appears that a formula established for sand suspensions provides a good estimate of ultrasound attenuation for these types of particles as well. Experiments conducted for wastewater under particle concentrations commonly encountered in sewer networks demonstrate that the attenuation by particles only contributes to a negligible extent towards intensity decay, in accordance with theoretical predictions. We also theoretically determine herein the operating conditions under which the range of an ultrasonic flow meter would be significantly reduced due to particle attenuation.

  1. Assessing controls on cross-shelf phytoplankton and suspended particle distributions using repeated bio-optical glider surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderikx Freitas, Fernanda; Siegel, David A.; Washburn, Libe; Halewood, Stuart; Stassinos, Erik

    2016-10-01

    Characterizing the space/time variability of bio-optical properties is essential to understand the mechanisms that control cross-shelf phytoplankton and suspended particle distributions in coastal waters. Approximately 400 high-resolution cross-shelf sections of bio-optical properties collected with an oceanographic glider in the coastal Santa Barbara Channel, California, revealed complex relationships among optical properties and environmental conditions. Surface waves were found as a proximate control on suspended sediment variability for both inner and midshelves. Increases in phytoplankton abundances attributed to horizontal advection and upwelling events were observed only on episodic time scales. The lack of all-encompassing linear relationships between environmental forcings and changes in cross-shelf phytoplankton highlights the challenge of decoupling bio-optical signals from their controlling processes in coastal zones where phytoplankton distributions are patchy, and where nearshore and offshore phytoplankton populations and suspended sediments often occupy the same portion of the water column. Clear relationships between runoff and productivity were not observed. Temporal variability of suspended particles and phytoplankton distributions were roughly independent from each other during stratified conditions. Synchronous increases in phytoplankton and suspended sediments were observed when associated with strong upwelling events that may induce mixing and promote productivity. The repeated glider sections illustrated many processes regulating phytoplankton and particle transport in the innershelf and showed the difficulty in establishing general connections between high-frequency changes in optical properties and potential environmental forcings in a complex coastal environment.

  2. Characterization of the Particle Size Fraction associated with Heavy Metals in Suspended Sediments of the Yellow River

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qingzhen; Wang, Xiaojing; Jian, Huimin; Chen, Hongtao; Yu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the concentrations of particulate heavy metals and fluxes into the sea in the Yellow River were examined based on observational and measured data from January 2009 to December 2010. A custom-built water elutriation apparatus was used to separate suspended sediments into five size fractions. Clay and very fine silt is the dominant fraction in most of the suspended sediments, accounting for >40% of the samples. Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Fe and Mn are slightly affected by anthropogenic activities, while Cd is moderate affected. The concentrations of heavy metals increased with decrease in particle size. For suspended sediments in the Yellow River, on average 78%–82% of the total heavy metal loading accumulated in the <16 μm fraction. About 43% and 53% of heavy metal in 2009 and 2010 respectively, were readily transported to the Bohai Sea with “truly suspended” particles, which have potentially harmful effects on marine organisms. PMID:26083999

  3. Real-time measurements of suspended sediment concentration and particle size using five techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, D.; Albayrak, I.; Abgottspon, A.; Boes, R. M.

    2016-11-01

    Fine sediments are important in the design and operation of hydropower plants (HPPs), in particular with respect to sediment management and hydro-abrasive erosion in hydraulic machines. Therefore, there is a need for reliable real-time measurements of suspended sediment mass concentration (SSC) and particle size distribution (PSD). The following instruments for SSC measurements were investigated in a field study during several years at the HPP Fieschertal in the Swiss Alps: (1) turbidimeters, (2) a Laser In-Situ Scattering and Trans- missometry instrument (LISST), (3) a Coriolis Flow and Density Meter (CFDM), (4) acoustic transducers, and (5) pressure sensors. LISST provided PSDs in addition to concentrations. Reference SSCs were obtained by gravimetrical analysis of automatically taken water samples. In contrast to widely used turbidimeters and the single-frequency acoustic method, SSCs obtained from LISST, the CFDM or the pressure sensors were less or not affected by particle size variations. The CFDM and the pressure sensors allowed measuring higher SSC than the optical or the acoustic techniques (without dilution). The CFDM and the pressure sensors were found to be suitable to measure SSC ≥ 2 g/l. In this paper, the measuring techniques, instruments, setup, methods for data treatment, and selected results are presented and discussed.

  4. Mean distance of two Brownian particles trapped in a suspended droplet and its dependence on the Debye length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Kosuke; Sakata, Shinya; Moritani, Kousuke; Inui, Norio

    2017-01-01

    The Brownian motion of two particles confined near the bottom of a suspended droplet was considered in order to examine the electrical double-layer interaction between them. The mean distance between the particles was expressed as a function of the Debye screening length. We report the application of Brownian particle trajectories for the experimental determination of the Debye screening length between gold particles trapped within a water droplet. This was computed through a comparison of the mean distance measured by observing the Brownian motion with its theoretical value.

  5. Interaction of rising frazil with suspended particles: tank experiments with applications to nature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimnitz, E.; Clayton, J.R.; Kempema, E.W.; Payne, J.R.; Weber, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    Widespread occurrence of sediment-laden (turbid) sea ice and high concentrations of diatoms and foraminifers in ice have recently been reported from both polar regions. Many possible mechanisms of particle entrainment into ice have been postulated, among which scavenging by rising frazil ice and nucleation or adhesion of ice onto suspended particles appear to be the most likely ones. No reliable experimental data on the mechanisms, however, are available. Because of the importance of turbid ice for sediment transport, tanks for laboratory-scale experiments were constructed, in which frazil crystals produced at the base were monitored rising through water column laden with various types of particulate matter, including plankton. Observations made in salt water are reported here. Over a distance of 1.5 m, frazil < 1 mm in diameter grew to crystals or flocs several cm in diameter, rising at average velocities of 2 to 3 cm/s. Rise velocities were a function of frazil size, but varied greatly due to interactions of ice particles of different size and velocity and the resulting turbulence. Sand-size particles could be either trapped permanently by rising frazil, or were temporarily supported and again released. With live plankton, a several-fold enrichment of ice occurred, suggesting that their irregular shapes or appendages were caught by ice flocs. Diatom- and foram tests were also relatively effectively trapped. The concentration of silt- and clay-size terrigenous detritus in frazil tended to increase relative to the water. We found no preferential sorting by ice in this size range. Various kinds of evidence showed that ice does not nucleate onto foreign particles, and has no adhesive properties. Foreign material resided in the interstices of crystal aggregates, and particles denser than water could be released by agitation, suggesting that scavenging is a mechanical process. With rising frazil, the settling of particulate matter therefore is either retarded or

  6. Protection of firefighters against combustion aerosol particles: simulated workplace protection factor of a half-mask respirator (pilot study).

    PubMed

    Dietrich, James; Yermakov, Michael; Reponen, Tiina; Kulkarni, Pramod; Qi, Chaolong; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2015-01-01

    The present pilot study investigated the penetration of ultrafine particles originated by combustion of different materials into elastomeric half-mask respirators equipped with two P100 filters. We determined the Simulated Workplace Protection Factor (SWPF) for 11 firefighters wearing elastomeric half-mask respirators and performing activities simulating those conducted during fire overhaul operations. The tests were performed in a controlled laboratory setting. A newly-developed battery-operated Portable Aerosol Mobility Spectrometer (PAMS) was used to measure size-resolved aerosol particle concentrations outside (C(out)) and inside (Cin) of an air-purifying respirator donned on a firefighter, and the SWPF was calculated as C(out)/C(in). Based on the total aerosol concentration, the "total" SWPF ranged from 4,222 (minimum) to 35,534 (maximum) with values falling primarily in a range from 11,171 (25 percentile) to 26,604 (75 percentile) and a median value being ≈15,000. This is consistent with the recently reported fit factor (FF) data base.((1)) The size-resolved SWPF data revealed a dependency on the particle size. It was concluded that a portable device such as PAMS can be used on firefighters during overhaul operations (as well as on other workers wearing elastomeric half-mask respirators) to monitor the aerosol concentrations in real time and ultimately help prevent overexposure.

  7. Possible approach to cleaning 'problematic' LRW with large contents of suspended particles, oils and other organic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Ilin, V.; Karlin, Yu.; Laurson, A.; Volkov, Eu.; Dmitriev, S.

    2007-07-01

    A general structural scheme for cleaning 'problematic' liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) containing a large amount of suspended particles, oils and other organic substances has been proposed. The technological scheme includes two main stages: 1) separation of suspended particles, oil product emulsions and the larger part of colloidal particles from LRW by filtration, 2) purification of radioactive waters from radionuclides by membrane-sorption to the levels of radiation safety norms applied. The filtration stage is considered as a three-step process of 'problematic' LRW treatment including: 1) 'problematic' LRW extraction from storage tanks with a robot type device intended for washing out the bottom sediment (slurry), 2) separation of suspended particles, oil product emulsions and larger part of colloidal particles from LRW by filtration through porous or gauze diaphragms of 0.1 to 10 {mu}m pores (cells) in size, 3) concentration of separated slurry up to 100-200 g/l. Two main options of the membrane-sorption technologies, AQUA-EXPRESS and Reverse Osmosis, for LRW purification have been considered. Two possible options of porous or gauze diaphragms productivity and lifetime increase between their surface regenerations have been shown: 1) possibility of an oxidizer introduction into initial LRW, 2) possibility to rotate a filtering element (disk or cylinder type). (authors)

  8. Biologically Induced Deposition of Fine Suspended Particles by Filter-Feeding Bivalves in Land-Based Industrial Marine Aquaculture Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Shaojun; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Industrial aquaculture wastewater contains large quantities of suspended particles that can be easily broken down physically. Introduction of macro-bio-filters, such as bivalve filter feeders, may offer the potential for treatment of fine suspended matter in industrial aquaculture wastewater. In this study, we employed two kinds of bivalve filter feeders, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, to deposit suspended solids from marine fish aquaculture wastewater in flow-through systems. Results showed that the biodeposition rate of suspended particles by C. gigas (shell height: 8.67±0.99 cm) and M. galloprovincialis (shell height: 4.43±0.98 cm) was 77.84±7.77 and 6.37±0.67 mg ind−1•d−1, respectively. The total solid suspension (TSS) deposition rates of oyster and mussel treatments were 3.73±0.27 and 2.76±0.20 times higher than that of the control treatment without bivalves, respectively. The TSS deposition rates of bivalve treatments were significantly higher than the natural sedimentation rate of the control treatment (P<0.001). Furthermore, organic matter and C, N in the sediments of bivalve treatments were significantly lower than those in the sediments of the control (P<0.05). It was suggested that the filter feeders C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis had considerable potential to filter and accelerate the deposition of suspended particles from industrial aquaculture wastewater, and simultaneously yield value-added biological products. PMID:25250730

  9. Biologically induced deposition of fine suspended particles by filter-feeding bivalves in land-based industrial marine aquaculture wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Shaojun; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Industrial aquaculture wastewater contains large quantities of suspended particles that can be easily broken down physically. Introduction of macro-bio-filters, such as bivalve filter feeders, may offer the potential for treatment of fine suspended matter in industrial aquaculture wastewater. In this study, we employed two kinds of bivalve filter feeders, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, to deposit suspended solids from marine fish aquaculture wastewater in flow-through systems. Results showed that the biodeposition rate of suspended particles by C. gigas (shell height: 8.67 ± 0.99 cm) and M. galloprovincialis (shell height: 4.43 ± 0.98 cm) was 77.84 ± 7.77 and 6.37 ± 0.67 mg ind(-1) • d(-1), respectively. The total solid suspension (TSS) deposition rates of oyster and mussel treatments were 3.73 ± 0.27 and 2.76 ± 0.20 times higher than that of the control treatment without bivalves, respectively. The TSS deposition rates of bivalve treatments were significantly higher than the natural sedimentation rate of the control treatment (P < 0.001). Furthermore, organic matter and C, N in the sediments of bivalve treatments were significantly lower than those in the sediments of the control (P < 0.05). It was suggested that the filter feeders C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis had considerable potential to filter and accelerate the deposition of suspended particles from industrial aquaculture wastewater, and simultaneously yield value-added biological products.

  10. X-ray fluorescence mapping of mercury on suspended mineral particles and diatoms in a contaminated freshwater system

    DOE PAGES

    Gu, B.; Mishra, B.; Miller, C.; ...

    2014-09-30

    Mercury (Hg) bioavailability and geochemical cycling is affected by its partitioning between the aqueous and particulate phases. We applied a synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe to visualize and quantify directly the spatial localization of Hg and its correlations with other elements of interest on suspended particles from a Hg-contaminated freshwater system. Up to 175 μg g−1 Hg is found on suspended particles, but less than 0.01% is in the form of methylmercury. Mercury is heterogeneously distributed among phytoplankton (e.g., diatoms) and mineral particles that are rich in iron oxides and natural organic matter (NOM). The diatom-bound Hg is mostly foundmore » on outer surfaces of the cells, suggesting passive sorption of Hg on diatoms. Our results indicate that localized sorption of Hg onto suspended particles, including diatoms and NOM-coated oxide minerals, may play an important role in affecting the partitioning, reactivity, and biogeochemical cycling of Hg in natural aquatic environments.« less

  11. Spatial-temporal variations of phosphorus fractions in surface water and suspended particles in the Daliao River Estuary, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Qin, Yanwen; Han, Chaonan; Cao, Wei; Ma, Yingqun; Shi, Yao; Liu, Zhichao; Yang, Chenchen

    2016-08-01

    The transport and storage of phosphorus in estuary is a complex biogeochemical process as the result of the convergence of fresh and saline water. The objective of the current study is to investigate the spatial-temporal variations of phosphorus fractions in surface water and suspended particles of Daliao River Estuary, China. Samples were collected in August (wet season) and November (dry season), 2013. The results showed that total particulate phosphorus (TPP) in water accounted for more than 50 % of the total phosphorus (TP). Meanwhile, in suspended particles, more than 62 % of particulate phosphorus was in the form of bioavailable phosphorus, including exchangeable phosphorus (Exc-P), extractable organic phosphorus (Exo-P), and iron-bound phosphorus (Fe-P), which meant that the potential impacts of bioavailable phosphorus in suspended particles on estuarine water environment cannot be ignored. There were significantly seasonal variations of phosphorus fractions in the Daliao River Estuary. The concentrations of phosphorus fractions in water in wet season were much lower than that in dry season because of the dilution effect of larger rainfall in wet season. In addition, spatial distribution characteristics of phosphorus fractions were also obvious. Due to terrigenous phosphorus input from the upstream of tidal reach and seawater dilution effect in coastal estuary, total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentrations in water gradually decreased from tidal reach to coastal estuary. However, the concentrations of TPP and TP in water and Exo-P in suspended particles presented spatial fluctuation, and these were greatly attributed to sediment re-suspension in coastal estuary.

  12. Inhibition of rainbow trout acetylcholinesterase by aqueous and suspended particle-associated organophosphorous insecticides.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Armin; Radau, Tanja S; Hahn, Torsten; Schulz, Ralf

    2007-06-01

    Spraydrift and edge-of-field runoff are important routes of pesticide entry into streams. Pesticide contamination originating from spraydrift usually resides in the water phase, while pesticides in contaminated runoff are to a large extent associated with suspended particles (SPs). The effects of two organophosphorous insecticides (OPs), chloropyrifos (CPF) and azinphos-methyl (AZP), on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in rainbow trout were compared between two exposure scenarios, simulating spraydrift- and runoff-borne contamination events in the Lourens River (LR), Western Cape, South Africa. NOECs of brain AChE inhibition, determined after 1h of exposure followed by 24h of recovery, were 0.33microgl(-1) for aqueous CPF, 200mgkg(-1) for SP-associated CPF and 20mgkg(-1) for SP-associated AZP (at 0.5gl(-1) SP). The highest aqueous AZP concentration tested (3.3microgl(-1)) was without significant effects. Previously reported peak levels of aqueous CPF in the LR ( approximately 0.2microgl(-1)) are close to its NOEC (this study), suggesting a significant toxicological risk to fish in the LR. By contrast, reported levels of SP-associated OPs in the LR are 20-200-fold lower than their NOECs (this study). In a comparative in situ study, trout were exposed for seven days at agricultural (LR2, LR3) and upstream reference (LR1) sites. No runoff occurred during the study. Brain AChE was significantly inhibited at LR3. However, OP levels at LR3 (CPF 0.01microgl(-1); AZP 0.14microgl(-1)) were minor compared to concentrations having effects in the laboratory (see above). Additionally, muscle AChE activity was significantly higher in caged trout from LR1 than in animals maintained in laboratory tanks.

  13. Trace metal concentrations in suspended particles, sediments and clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) from Jiaozhou Bay of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian; Mu, Qinglin

    2006-10-01

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM), sediments and clams were collected at three sites in Jiaozhou Bay to assess the magnitude of trace metal pollution in the area. Metal concentrations in SPM (Cu: 40.11-203; Zn: 118-447; Pb: 50.1-132; Cd: 0.55-4.39; Cr: 147.6-288; Mn: 762-1670 microg/g), sediments (Cu: 17.64-34.26; Zn: 80.79-110; Pb: 24.57-49.59; Cd: 0.099-0.324; Cr: 41.6-88.1; Mn: 343-520 microg/g) and bivalves (Cu: 6.41-19.76; Zn: 35.5-85.5; Pb: 0.31-1.01; Cd: 0.51-0.67; Mn: 27.45-67.6 microg/g) are comparable to those reported for other moderately polluted world environments. SPM showed a less clear pattern. Metal concentrations in sediments displayed a clear geographical trend with values increasing with proximity to major urban centers. The clams (on dry weight) showed a complex pattern due to the variability introduced by age-related factors. Cd showed an apparent reverse industrial trend with higher concentrations in clams collected at distant stations. Zn, Pb and Mn showed no clear geographical pattern, whereas Cu increased in the clams collected in the most industrialized area. In addition, the bioaccumulation factors (BAF) were calculated. The result indicated that the studied Ruditapes philippinarum in Jiaozhou Bay possessed different bioaccumulation capacities for Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb and Mn, and Cd, Zn had a relatively high assimilation of those metals from sediment particles. A significant relationship with clam age was observed for Zn (positive) and Cu (negative) suggesting different physiological requirements for both metals with age. Trace metal concentrations measured in the tissue of the investigated clam were in the range considered safe by the WHO for human use.

  14. The active surface of suspended particles as a predictor of lung function and pulmonary symptoms in Austrian school children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshammer, Hanns; Neuberger, Manfred

    At a central elementary school in the capital of Upper Austria children aged 7-10 years underwent repeated respiratory health checkups (questionnaires, diaries, spirometry). Between March and May 2001 the daily means of the signals of a diffusion charging sensor, measuring the "active surface" of suspended particles, and a photoelectric aerosol sensor, measuring the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were related to spirometric results of the total 164 children examined and to the daily symptom scores of a susceptible subgroup. Significant reductions of forced vital capacity ( p=0.006) and forced expiratory volume in the first second ( p=0.001) and significant increases of wheezing ( p=0.001), shortness of breath ( p=0.041), cough in the evening ( p=0.031) and at night ( p=0.018) were found with increase of "active surface" of suspended particles measured at the adjacent outdoor monitoring station, but not with the increase of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Monitoring "active surface" of particles with diameters of about 10 nm-1 μm by means of a diffusion charging sensor might provide additional information in surveillance of particulate matter for prevention of acute effects on respiratory health.

  15. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of organic acids in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Zhao, Jinping; He, Lulu; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-10-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions of individual organic acids were determined in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou. The δ 13C values of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 20-C 28) varied from -34.1‰ to -32.4‰ and tended to be heavier in summer and lighter in winter. These δ 13C values indicate that high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids were derived mainly from emission by C 3 plants. Reduced biological synthesis of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids in winter may be the reason for the light carbon isotopic composition. The δ 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 10-C 18) changed from -31.7‰ to -30.3‰ and exhibited a reverse seasonal trend, i.e., heavier in winter and lighter in summer. Slightly heavier δ 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids than those of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids suggested that they may be emitted from blended sources, e.g., anthropogenic sources and vegetation waxes. Lighter δ 13C values in summer may be attributed to relatively low anthropogenic sources and high botanic sources in summer. Dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids have been proposed as secondary products from photochemical degradation. The average δ 13C values of dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids were heavier, and ranged from -25.2‰ to -22.9‰ and from -30.0‰ to -27.6‰, respectively. Both dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids displayed the same temporal variations in the δ 13C values, i.e., negative δ 13C in the summer samples and positive in the winter samples, which may be controlled by photochemical reactions; they are generally severe in winter in Guangzhou under the monsoon weather system. The heaviest δ 13C values were observed in dicarboxylic acids, indicating that dicarboxylic acids were formed by fast and more complete oxidation reactions. These results indicate that the stable carbon isotopic composition of organic acids may provide important information about sources and

  16. A hybrid method to estimate suspended particle sizes from satellite measurements over Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Deyong; Qiu, Zhongfeng; Hu, Chuanmin; Wang, Shengqiang; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Lufei; Peng, Tian; He, Yijun

    2016-09-01

    Particle-size distribution (PSD), a measure of particle concentrations at different sizes, is of great importance to the understanding of many biogeochemical processes in coastal marine ecosystems. Here, a hybrid method, including analytical, semianalytical, and empirical steps, is developed to estimate PSD through the median diameter of suspended particles (Dv50). Four cruise surveys were conducted to measure optical scattering properties, particle concentrations, spectral reflectance, and particle-size distributions (obtained with a LISST instrument covering a size range of 2.5-500 μm) in coastal waters of Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea, and Jiangsu coastal region. Based on the Mie scattering theory, Dv50 is closely related to mass-specific backscattering coefficient of suspended particles (bbp*), and their relationship is calibrated through a power model (R2 = 0.796, n = 67, p < 0.001) for the Dv50 range of 23.5-379.8 μm. The model is shown to perform better than the previously used inverse-proportion model. The retrieval of bbp* is through a bio-optical model that links remote sensing reflectance just beneath the surface to inherent optical properties, where a close empirical relationship is established between particulate backscattering and particle concentration. The hybrid method shows high degree of fitting (R2 = 0.875, n = 46, p < 0.001) between the measured and estimated Dv50 for the size range of 17.2-325.2 μm used in the model calibration, while validation using two independent data sets shows mean absolute percentage errors of 46.0% and 64.7%, respectively. Application of the hybrid method to MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data results in spatial distributions of Dv50 that are generally consistent with those from in situ observations, suggesting potential use of the method in studying particle dynamics through time series of remote sensing observations. However, its general applicability to other regions still requires further research.

  17. Particle size distribution of river-suspended sediments determined by in situ measured remote-sensing reflectance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanzhi; Huang, Zhaojun; Chen, Chuqun; He, Yijun; Jiang, Tingchen

    2015-07-10

    Suspended sediments in water bodies are classified into organic and inorganic matter and have been investigated by remote-sensing technology for years. Focusing on inorganic matter, however, detailed information such as the grain size of this matter has not been provided yet. In this study, we present a new solution for estimating inorganic suspended sediments' size distribution in highly complex Case 2 waters by using a simple spectrometer sensor rather than a backscattering sensor. An experiment was carried out in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) in the dry season to collect the remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs) and particle size distribution (PSD) of inorganic suspended sediments. Based on Mie theory, PSDs in the PRE waters were retrieved by Rrs, colored dissolved organic matter, and phytoplankton. The retrieved median diameters in 12 stations show good agreement with those of laboratory analysis at root mean square error of 2.604 μm (27.63%), bias of 1.924 μm (20.42%), and mean absolute error of 2.298 μm (24.37%). The retrieved PSDs and previous PSDs were compared, and the features of PSDs in the PRE waters were concluded.

  18. A New Miniature Respirable Sampler for In-mask Sampling: Part 1— Particle Size Selection Performance

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Peter; Thorpe, Andrew; Mogridge, Rhiannon; Lee, Taekhee; Harper, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The Health and Safety Laboratory has developed a miniature respirable sampler to gain a better understanding of the exposure of workers to hazardous substances when they are wearing respiratory protective equipment (RPE) or helmets with visors in the workplace. The study was in two parts and the first part, described herein, was to develop the sampler and test its collection characteristics. Assessment of the impact of the sampler on RPE safety and its comparability with traditional laboratory-based approaches to measure protection factors was discussed in a second article. The miniature sampler (weight—5.4 g, length—13 mm) was designed to ft into the space available between the nose and chin of an individual inside a filtering facepiece type mask and has a radially omnidirectional inlet with a porous foam particle selector that allows the collection of the respirable fraction on a downstream filter. The sampling efficiency was compared with the respirable convention. A close match with the respirable convention was obtained at a flow rate of 1 l min−1 and the 50% penetration cut off value (d50) was 4.08 μm. After 3 hours sampling in high humidity (95%), the penetration curve had shifted towards smaller particle sizes (d50 = 3.81 μm) with 88% of the calculated bias values within 10%. The miniature sampler measured respirable dust and crystalline silica mass concentrations comparable with performance of the Safety In Mines Personal Dust Sampler (SIMPEDS), commonly used in Great Britain, at a flow rate of 0.8 l min−1. The d50 for the miniature sampler at 0.8 l min−1 (4.4 μm) is within 5% of the d50 of the SIMPEDS at its prescribed flow rate of 2.2 l min−1 (4.2 μm). These results indicated that the miniature sampler was a good candidate to proceed with tests with RPE described in the second part of this series of two papers. PMID:27630151

  19. Performance of High Flow Rate Personal Respirable Samplers When Challenged with Mineral Aerosols of Different Particle Size Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Peter; Thorpe, Andrew; Echt, Alan

    2016-01-01

    It is thought that the performance of respirable samplers may vary when exposed to dust aerosols with different particle sizes and wind speeds. This study investigated the performance of the GK 4.16 (RASCAL), GK 2.69, PPI 8, and FSP 10, high flow rate personal samplers when exposed to aerosols of mineral dust in a wind tunnel at two different wind speeds (1 and 2 m s−1) and orientations (towards and side-on to the source of emission). The mass median aerodynamic diameter of four aerosolized test dusts ranged from 8 to 25 µm with geometric standard deviations from 1.6 to 2 µm. The performance of each sampler type was compared with that of the SIMPEDS (Higgins–Dewell design) sampler. There was slight evidence to suggest that the performance of the FSP 10 is affected by the direction of the inlet relative to the air flow, although this was not significant when most respirable dust concentrations were compared, possibly due to the variability of paired dust concentration results. The GK 2.69, RASCAL, and PPI 8 samplers had similar performances, although the results when side-on to the emission source were generally slightly lower than the SIMPEDS. Despite slight differences between respirable dust concentrations the respirable crystalline silica values were not significantly different from the SIMPEDS. The GK family of cyclones obtained most precise results and more closely matched the SIMPEDS. A comparison with dust concentration results from previous calm air chamber studies (where wind speeds were < 0.4 m s−1) found that the relative performance between samplers was similar to those observed in this work indicating consistent performance relative to the SIMPEDS in both calm and moving air. PMID:26865560

  20. Influence of microorganism content in suspended particles on the particle-water partitioning of mercury in semi-enclosed coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jiyi; Kim, Hyunji; Han, Seunghee

    2014-02-01

    It is known that particle scavenging of mercury (Hg) can be affected by the abundance of particulate organic matter in coastal waters. However, the role of living organic particles in Hg scavenging is not yet completely understood. In this study, we hypothesized that an abundance of living organic particles (i.e., phytoplankton and bacteria) would influence the particle-water partitioning of Hg in coastal waters. Surface seawater samples were collected from eight stations in Gwangyang Bay, Korea, in three seasons (November 2009, April 2010, and October 2010) for the determination of concentrations of suspended particulate matter (including chlorophyll-a and bacteria), and Hg in unfiltered and filtered waters. We found that more Hg partitioned toward particulate matter when phytoplankton biomass, indicated from the chlorophyll-a concentration in a particle, was higher. In the low algal season, when [chlorophyll-a]<0.6 μg L(-1), the bacterial number, instead of chlorophyll-a concentration in particle, showed a positive correlation with the particle-water partition coefficient of Hg. Overall, microbial abundance seems to play a critical role in particle scavenging of Hg in coastal water. Taking this result in light of Hg in pristine coastal zones, we predict that increases in algal biomass amplify the potential for algae to transfer Hg to marine food chains.

  1. Dynamics of magnetic particles suspended in Newtonian fluids under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Mingyang; Walker, Travis

    2016-11-01

    Anisotropic structures are commonly found in natural materials. Researchers are committed to developing meta-materials that mimic natural materials by introducing anisotropic filler particles. These materials can exhibit enhanced magnetic, mechanical, optical, and diffusive properties. In this study, a magnetic field is used to align magnetic oblate spheroids. We present an analytic solution based on a single-particle Stokes-flow model that describes the planar alignment of the particle in a rotating magnetic field. The analytic solution covers the full range of the magnetic field frequency agreeing well with our experimental results. Asymptotic solutions are also developed at both the high-frequency and the low-frequency limits of the field. The induced dipole of each particle can create its own magnetic field that can interact with neighboring particles, causing particles to aggregate. Different structures of particles are formed depending on the characteristics of the field, i.e., one-dimensional columns of particles in a constant field and two-dimensional sheets of particles in a rotating field. To simulate the realistic dynamics of the phenomena, we include hydrodynamic interactions between the particles via Stokesian dynamics.

  2. Effect of fluid and particle inertia on the rotation of an oblate spheroidal particle suspended in linear shear flow.

    PubMed

    Rosén, T; Do-Quang, M; Aidun, C K; Lundell, F

    2015-05-01

    This work describes the inertial effects on the rotational behavior of an oblate spheroidal particle confined between two parallel opposite moving walls, which generate a linear shear flow. Numerical results are obtained using the lattice Boltzmann method with an external boundary force. The rotation of the particle depends on the particle Reynolds number, Re(p)=Gd(2)ν(-1) (G is the shear rate, d is the particle diameter, ν is the kinematic viscosity), and the Stokes number, St=αRe(p) (α is the solid-to-fluid density ratio), which are dimensionless quantities connected to fluid and particle inertia, respectively. The results show that two inertial effects give rise to different stable rotational states. For a neutrally buoyant particle (St=Re(p)) at low Re(p), particle inertia was found to dominate, eventually leading to a rotation about the particle's symmetry axis. The symmetry axis is in this case parallel to the vorticity direction; a rotational state called log-rolling. At high Re(p), fluid inertia will dominate and the particle will remain in a steady state, where the particle symmetry axis is perpendicular to the vorticity direction and has a constant angle ϕ(c) to the flow direction. The sequence of transitions between these dynamical states were found to be dependent on density ratio α, particle aspect ratio r(p), and domain size. More specifically, the present study reveals that an inclined rolling state (particle rotates around its symmetry axis, which is not aligned in the vorticity direction) appears through a pitchfork bifurcation due to the influence of periodic boundary conditions when simulated in a small domain. Furthermore, it is also found that a tumbling motion, where the particle symmetry axis rotates in the flow-gradient plane, can be a stable motion for particles with high r(p) and low α.

  3. Evaluating unsupervised methods to size and classify suspended particles using digital in-line holography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, Emlyn J.; Buscombe, Daniel D.; Graham, George W.; Nimmo-Smith, W. Alex M.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial information can be gained from digital in-line holography of marine particles, eliminating depth-of-field and focusing errors associated with standard lens-based imaging methods. However, for the technique to reach its full potential in oceanographic research, fully unsupervised (automated) methods are required for focusing, segmentation, sizing and classification of particles. These computational challenges are the subject of this paper, in which we draw upon data collected using a variety of holographic systems developed at Plymouth University, UK, from a significant range of particle types, sizes and shapes. A new method for noise reduction in reconstructed planes is found to be successful in aiding particle segmentation and sizing. The performance of an automated routine for deriving particle characteristics (and subsequent size distributions) is evaluated against equivalent size metrics obtained by a trained operative measuring grain axes on screen. The unsupervised method is found to be reliable, despite some errors resulting from over-segmentation of particles. A simple unsupervised particle classification system is developed, and is capable of successfully differentiating sand grains, bubbles and diatoms from within the surf-zone. Avoiding miscounting bubbles and biological particles as sand grains enables more accurate estimates of sand concentrations, and is especially important in deployments of particle monitoring instrumentation in aerated water. Perhaps the greatest potential for further development in the computational aspects of particle holography is in the area of unsupervised particle classification. The simple method proposed here provides a foundation upon which further development could lead to reliable identification of more complex particle populations, such as those containing phytoplankton, zooplankton, flocculated cohesive sediments and oil droplets.

  4. DNS-DEM of Suspended Sediment Particles in an Open Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakseresht, Pedram; Apte, Sourabh; Finn, Justin

    2016-11-01

    DNS with point-particle based discrete element model (DEM) is used to study particle-turbulence interactions in an open channel flow at Reτ of 710, corresponding to the experimental observations of Righetti & Romano. Large particles of diameter 200 microns (10 in wall units) with volume loading on the order of 10-3 are simulated using four-way coupling with closure models for drag, added mass, lift, pressure, and inter-particle collision forces. The point-particle model is able to accurately capture the effect of particles on the fluid flow in the outer layer. However, the particle is significantly larger than the wall-normal grid in the near-wall region, but slightly smaller than the axial and longitudinal grid resolutions. The point-particle model fails to capture the interactions in the near-wall region. In order to improve the near-wall predictions, particles are represented by Lagrangian material points which are used to perform interpolations from the grid to the Lagrangian points and to distribute the two-way coupling force to the Eulerian grid. Predictions using this approach is compared with the experimental data to evaluate its effectiveness. NSF project #1133363, Sediment-Bed-Turbulence Coupling in Oscillatory Flows.

  5. Mineralogical and chemical characterization of suspended atmospheric particles over the east Mediterranean based on synoptic-scale circulation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalderon-Asael, Boriana; Erel, Yigal; Sandler, Amir; Dayan, Uri

    Suspended atmospheric particles were collected in Israel in order to identify their nature and relationships with the major synoptic-scale circulation patterns. The particles were analyzed for their major and trace element concentrations and mineralogical composition. Samples were collected during three synoptic systems associated with desert dust storms: Red Sea trough, Sharav cyclone and cold depression, and during deep and shallow modes of Persian Gulf trough, which prevails in the summer months and is not associated with dust storms. All samples mostly contain particles smaller than 2 μm. The suspended desert dust is composed primarily of illite-smectite and calcite. Some indicative secondary minerals were found for each of the dust transporting synoptic systems (e.g., palygorskite for Red Sea trough). The bulk chemistry data support the mineralogical observations and reveal additional chemical signatures of each dust transporting system. For instance, Red Sea trough samples have significantly higher Ca/Al and Ca/Mg in the carbonate and Mg/Al in Al-silicate fraction than cold depression samples. Nevertheless, Sharav cyclone samples have intermediate values in spite of the fact that the source of the dust during these conditions is similar to cold depression (i.e., North Africa). Even though differences in the chemical and the mineralogical composition of desert dust do exist, this study reveals their overall chemical and mineralogical similarities. In contrast to the synoptic systems that carry desert dust, the inorganic fraction of the Persian Gulf trough samples contains significant amount (up to 50%) of non-mineral material that has a pronounced chemical signature in terms of major element concentrations (e.g., Al, Ca, Mg, Na, S) implying their anthropogenic nature, probably from countries around the Black Sea. This striking finding is indicative for atmospheric pollution in the Eastern Mediterranean region during the summer.

  6. Nanoparticle filtration performance of NIOSH-certified particulate air-purifying filtering facepiece respirators: evaluation by light scattering photometric and particle number-based test methods.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Samy; Eimer, Benjamin C

    2012-01-01

    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification test methods employ charge neutralized NaCl or dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols to measure filter penetration levels of air-purifying particulate respirators photometrically using a TSI 8130 automated filter tester at 85 L/min. A previous study in our laboratory found that widely different filter penetration levels were measured for nanoparticles depending on whether a particle number (count)-based detector or a photometric detector was used. The purpose of this study was to better understand the influence of key test parameters, including filter media type, challenge aerosol size range, and detector system. Initial penetration levels for 17 models of NIOSH-approved N-, R-, and P-series filtering facepiece respirators were measured using the TSI 8130 photometric method and compared with the particle number-based penetration (obtained using two ultrafine condensation particle counters) for the same challenge aerosols generated by the TSI 8130. In general, the penetration obtained by the photometric method was less than the penetration obtained with the number-based method. Filter penetration was also measured for ambient room aerosols. Penetration measured by the TSI 8130 photometric method was lower than the number-based ambient aerosol penetration values. Number-based monodisperse NaCl aerosol penetration measurements showed that the most penetrating particle size was in the 50 nm range for all respirator models tested, with the exception of one model at ~200 nm size. Respirator models containing electrostatic filter media also showed lower penetration values with the TSI 8130 photometric method than the number-based penetration obtained for the most penetrating monodisperse particles. Results suggest that to provide a more challenging respirator filter test method than what is currently used for respirators containing electrostatic media, the test method should utilize a sufficient number

  7. Hydro-meteorological influences and multimodal suspended particle size distributions in the Belgian nearshore area (southern North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fettweis, Michael; Baeye, Matthias; Lee, Byung Joon; Chen, Peihung; Yu, Jason C. S.

    2012-04-01

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) were assessed in a coastal turbidity maximum area (southern North Sea) during a composite period of 37 days in January-April 2008. PSDs were measured with a LISST 100X and classified using entropy analysis in terms of subtidal alongshore flow. The PSDs during tide-dominated conditions showed distinct multimodal behaviour due to flocculation, revealing that the building blocks of flocs consist of primary particles (<3 μm) and flocculi (15 μm). Flocculi comprise clusters of clay minerals, whereas primary particles have various compositions (calcite, clays). The PSDs during storms with a NE-directed alongshore subtidal current (NE storms) are typically unimodal and characterised by mainly granular material (silt, sand) resuspended from the seabed. During storms with a SW-directed alongshore subtidal current (SW storms), by contrast, mainly flocculated material can be identified in the PSDs. The findings emphasise the importance of wind-induced advection, alongshore subtidal flow and highly concentrated mud suspensions (HCMSs) as regulating mechanisms of SPM concentration, as well as other SPM characteristics (cohesiveness or composition of mixed sediment particles) and size distribution in a high-turbidity area. The direction of subtidal alongshore flow during SW storm events results in an increase in cohesive SPM concentration, HCMS formation, and the armouring of sand; by contrast, there is a decrease in cohesive SPM concentration, no HCMS formation, and an increase in sand and silt in suspension during NE storms.

  8. Determination of the Density of Protein Particles Using a Suspended Microchannel Resonator.

    PubMed

    Folzer, Emilien; Khan, Tarik A; Schmidt, Roland; Finkler, Christof; Huwyler, Jörg; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Koulov, Atanas V

    2015-12-01

    One of the analytical tools for characterization of subvisible particles, which gained popularity over the last years because of its unique capabilities, is the resonance mass measurement technique. However, a challenge that this technique presents is the need to know the exact density of the measured particles in order to obtain accurate size calculations. The density of proteinaceous subvisible particles has not been measured experimentally yet and to date researchers have been using estimated density values. In this paper, we report for a first-time experimental measurements of the density of protein particles (0.2-5 μm in size) using particles created by stressing three different proteins using four different types of stress conditions. Interestingly, the particle density values that were measured varied between 1.28 and 1.33 g/cm(3) and were lower than previous estimates. Furthermore, it was found that although the density of proteinaceous particles was affected to a very low degree by the stress conditions used to generate them, there is relatively larger difference between particles originating from different classes of proteins (e.g., monoclonal antibody vs. bovine serum albumin).

  9. Analysis of suspended solids by single-particle scattering. [for Lake Superior pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, S. R.; Smith, D. T.; Sydor, M.

    1979-01-01

    Light scattering by individual particulates is used in a multiple-detector system to categorize the composition of suspended solids in terms of broad particulate categories. The scattering signatures of red clay and taconite tailings, the two primary particulate contaminants in western Lake Superior, along with two types of asbestiform fibers, amphibole and chrysolite, were studied in detail. A method was developed to predict the concentration of asbestiform fibers in filtration plant samples for which electron microscope analysis was done concurrently. Fiber levels as low as 50,000 fibers/liter were optically detectable. The method has application in optical categorization of samples for remote sensing purposes and offers a fast, inexpensive means for analyzing water samples from filtration plants for specific particulate contaminants.

  10. Effect of evaporation and solutocapillary-driven flow upon motion and resultant deposition of suspended particles in volatile droplet on solid substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, I.; Kochiya, K.

    Particle motion in a volatile droplet on a solid surface, especially the behavior of particles depositing in the vicinity of a solid liquid gas boundary line (contact line) is focused. This phenomenon is called the ‘coffee stain problem’. Motion and deposition of the particles suspended in distilled water droplets and distilled water ethanol mixture droplets are discussed. The spatio-temporal particle motion is analyzed by the three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D PTV). A discussion of the morphology of the particles stuck to the solid surface after the dryout of the droplet is also given.

  11. Particle size distributions and the vertical distribution of suspended matter in the upwelling region off Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchen, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Various methods of presenting and mathematically describing particle size distribution are explained and evaluated. The hyperbolic distribution is found to be the most practical but the more complex characteristic vector analysis is the most sensitive to changes in the shape of the particle size distributions. A method for determining onshore-offshore flow patterns from the distribution of particulates was presented. A numerical model of the vertical structure of two size classes of particles was developed. The results show a close similarity to the observed distributions but overestimate the particle concentration by forty percent. This was attributed to ignoring grazing by zooplankton. Sensivity analyses showed the size preference was most responsive to the maximum specific growth rates and nutrient half saturation constants. The verical structure was highly dependent on the eddy diffusivity followed closely by the growth terms.

  12. Multiphysics modelling of the separation of suspended particles via frequency ramping of ultrasonic standing waves.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Francisco J; Eberhardt, Sebastian; Möller, Dirk; Dual, Jurg; Knoerzer, Kai

    2013-03-01

    A model was developed to determine the local changes of concentration of particles and the formations of bands induced by a standing acoustic wave field subjected to a sawtooth frequency ramping pattern. The mass transport equation was modified to incorporate the effect of acoustic forces on the concentration of particles. This was achieved by balancing the forces acting on particles. The frequency ramping was implemented as a parametric sweep for the time harmonic frequency response in time steps of 0.1s. The physics phenomena of piezoelectricity, acoustic fields and diffusion of particles were coupled and solved in COMSOL Multiphysics™ (COMSOL AB, Stockholm, Sweden) following a three step approach. The first step solves the governing partial differential equations describing the acoustic field by assuming that the pressure field achieves a pseudo steady state. In the second step, the acoustic radiation force is calculated from the pressure field. The final step allows calculating the locally changing concentration of particles as a function of time by solving the modified equation of particle transport. The diffusivity was calculated as function of concentration following the Garg and Ruthven equation which describes the steep increase of diffusivity when the concentration approaches saturation. However, it was found that this steep increase creates numerical instabilities at high voltages (in the piezoelectricity equations) and high initial particle concentration. The model was simplified to a pseudo one-dimensional case due to computation power limitations. The predicted particle distribution calculated with the model is in good agreement with the experimental data as it follows accurately the movement of the bands in the centre of the chamber.

  13. Suspended-sediment concentrations, yields, total suspended solids, turbidity, and particle-size fractions for selected rivers in Minnesota, 2007 through 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellison, Christopher A.; Savage, Brett E.; Johnson, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive sediment transport in rivers causes problems for flood control, soil conservation, irrigation, aquatic health, and navigation, as well as transporting harmful contaminants like organic chemicals and eutrophication-causing nutrients. In Minnesota, more than 5,800 miles of streams are identified as impaired by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) due to elevated levels of suspended sediment. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the MPCA, established a sediment monitoring network in 2007 and began systematic sampling of suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), total suspended solids (TSS), and turbidity in rivers across Minnesota to improve the understanding of fluvial sediment transport relations. Suspended-sediment samples were collected from 14 sites from 2007 through 2011. Analyses of these data indicated that the Zumbro River at Kellogg in southeast Minnesota had the highest mean SSC of 226 milligrams per liter (mg/L) followed by the Minnesota River at Mankato with a mean SSC of 193 mg/L. The single highest SSC of 1,250 mg/L was measured at the Zumbro River during the 2011 spring runoff. The lowest mean SSC of 21 mg/L was measured at Rice Creek in the northern Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area. Total suspended solids (TSS) have been used as a measure of fluvial sediment by the MPCA since the early 1970s; however, TSS concentrations have been known to underrepresent the amount of suspended sediment. For this study, comparisons between concurrently sampled SSC and TSS indicated significant differences at every site, with SSC on average two times larger than TSS concentrations. Regression analysis indicated that 7 out of 14 sites had poor or no relation between SSC and streamflow. Only two sites, the Knife River and the Wild Rice River at Twin Valley, had strong correlations between SSC and streamflow, with coefficient of determination (R2) values of 0.82 and 0.80, respectively. In contrast, turbidity had moderate to strong

  14. Measurements of Plutonium and Americium in Soil Samples from Project 57 using the Suspended Soil Particle Sizing System (SSPSS)

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Bowen; Rowena Gonzalez; David S. Shafer

    2001-05-01

    As part of the preliminary site characterization conducted for Project 57, soils samples were collected for separation into several size-fractions using the Suspended Soil Particle Sizing System (SSPSS). Soil samples were collected specifically for separation by the SSPSS at three general locations in the deposited Project 57 plume, the projected radioactivity of which ranged from 100 to 600 pCi/g. The primary purpose in focusing on samples with this level of activity is that it would represent anticipated residual soil contamination levels at the site after corrective actions are completed. Consequently, the results of the SSPSS analysis can contribute to dose calculation and corrective action-level determinations for future land-use scenarios at the site.

  15. Suspended-sediment concentrations, loads, total suspended solids, turbidity, and particle-size fractions for selected rivers in Minnesota, 2007 through 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellison, Christopher A.; Savage, Brett E.; Johnson, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Sediment-laden rivers and streams pose substantial environmental and economic challenges. Excessive sediment transport in rivers causes problems for flood control, soil conservation, irrigation, aquatic health, and navigation, and transports harmful contaminants like organic chemicals and eutrophication-causing nutrients. In Minnesota, more than 5,800 miles of streams are identified as impaired by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) due to elevated levels of suspended sediment. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the MPCA, established a sediment monitoring network in 2007 and began systematic sampling of suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC), total suspended solids (TSS), and turbidity in rivers across Minnesota to improve the understanding of fluvial sediment transport relations. Suspended-sediment samples collected from 14 sites from 2007 through 2011 indicated that the Zumbro River at Kellogg in the driftless region of southeast Minnesota had the highest mean SSC of 226 milligrams per liter (mg/L) followed by the Minnesota River at Mankato with a mean SSC of 193 mg/L. During the 2011 spring runoff, the single highest SSC of 1,250 mg/L was measured at the Zumbro River. The lowest mean SSC of 21 mg/L was measured at Rice Creek in the northern Minneapolis- St. Paul metropolitan area. Total suspended solids (TSS) have been used as a measure of fluvial sediment by the MPCA since the early 1970s; however, TSS concentrations have been determined to underrepresent the amount of suspended sediment. Because of this, the MPCA was interested in quantifying the differences between SSC and TSS in different parts of the State. Comparisons between concurrently sampled SSC and TSS indicated significant differences at every site, with SSC on average two times larger than TSS concentrations. The largest percent difference between SSC and TSS was measured at the South Branch Buffalo River at Sabin, and the smallest difference was observed at the Des Moines

  16. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array.

    PubMed

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-08-16

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams.

  17. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-08-01

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams.

  18. Evaluations of the Method to Measure Black Carbon Particles Suspended in Rainwater and Snow Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohata, S.; Moteki, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Kondo, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The mass concentrations and size distributions of black carbon (BC) particles in rainwater and snow are important parameters for improved understanding of the wet deposition of BC, is a key process in quantifying the impacts of BC on climate. In this study, we have evaluated a new method to measure these parameters. The approach consists of an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) used in conjunction with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The USN converts sample water into micron-size droplets at a constant rate and then extracts airborne BC particles by dehydrating the water droplets. The mass of individual BC particles is measured by the SP2, based on the laser-induced incandescence technique. The combination of the USN and SP2 enabled the measurement of BC particles using only small amount of sample water, typically 10 ml (Ohata et al., 2011). However, the loss of BC during the extraction process depends on their size. We determined the size-dependent extraction efficiency using polystyrene latex spheres (PSLs) with twelve different diameters between 100-1050 nm. The PSL concentrations in water were determined by the light extinction of at 532nm. The extraction efficiency of the USN showed broad maximum in the diameter range of 200-500nm, and decreased substantially at larger sizes. The extraction efficiency determined using the PSL standards agreed to within ±40% with that determined using laboratory-generated BC concentration standards. We applied this method to the analysis of rainwater collected in Tokyo and Okinawa over the East China Sea. Measured BC size distributions in all rainwater samples showed negligible contribution of the BC particles larger than 600nm to the total BC amounts. However, for BC particles in surface snow collected in Greenland and Antarctica, size distributions were sometimes shifted to much larger size ranges.

  19. Arsenic speciation in water, suspended particles, and coastal organisms from the Taehwa River Estuary of South Korea.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seongjin; Kwon, Hye-Ok; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Lee, Jung-Suk; Khim, Jong Seong

    2016-07-15

    Water, suspended particulate matter (SPM), and biota samples were collected from the Taehwa River Estuary to determine the distributions, partitioning, and bioaccumulation of arsenicals. Six forms of As were quantitated by the use of HPLC-ICP/MS. As was found mainly near urban and industrial areas, and inorganic As(V) was the predominant As form in both water and SPM. Particulate arsenicals were found at the greatest concentrations in coarse particles (>180μm), followed by medium (30-180μm) and fine (0.45-30μm) particles, in freshwater. Arsenical concentrations were similar across the three particle fractions in saltwater. Field-based distribution coefficient (Kd) values for As depended strongly on SPM, with a less robust dependence on salinity. Concentrations of As were greater in macroalgae than in marine animals, such as fishes, bivalves, crabs, shrimps, and gastropods. Overall, the results of the present study provide useful information on the behaviors and fate of arsenicals in an estuarine environment.

  20. Rotational diffusion measurements of suspended colloidal particles using two-dimensional exchange nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Barrall, G.A.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Lee, Y.K.; Landfester, K.; Zimmermann, H.; Chingas, G.C.; Pines, A. |

    1996-01-01

    We present here an experimental and theoretical study of the application of two-dimensional exchange nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) to the investigation of the rotational diffusion of colloidal particles. The theoretical discussion includes the nature of the NMR frequency time-correlation function where the NMR interaction is represented by the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA). Time-correlation functions for the isotropic rotational diffusion of a suspension of colloidal particles containing single and multiple sites are derived in addition to time-correlation functions for the rotational diffusion of a suspension of symmetric top particles containing an isotropic distribution of a single CSA interaction. Simulations of two-dimensional exchange spectra for particles undergoing isotropic rotational diffusion are presented. We performed two-dimensional exchange NMR experiments on a colloidal suspension of spherical poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles which were synthesized with a 20{percent} enrichment in {sup 13}C at the carbonyl site. Rotational diffusion time-correlation functions determined from the experimental exchange spectra are consistent with the composition of the colloidal suspension. Detailed explanations of the syntheses of the enriched methyl {sup 13}C-(carbonyl)-methacrylate monomer and the small quantities of 20{percent} enriched {sup 13}C-(carbonyl)-poly(methyl methacrylate) microspheres used for this study are presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Measurements of the cross-sectional distributions of spherical particles suspended in rectangular channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, Takahiro; Yabu, Takuya; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Itano, Tomoaki; Sugihara-Seki, Masako

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the inertial migration of neutrally buoyant spherical particles using millimeter-sized rectangular channels of various aspect ratios (AR = 1 - 4.2), in the range of Reynolds numbers (Re) from 100 to 2000. The Reynolds number was defined as UH/ ν, where U is the maximum flow velocity, H is the length of the shorter face of the channel cross-section, and ν is the kinematic viscosity. Dilute suspensions of polystyrene particles of diameter d = 300 - 650 μm were used. For the size ratio d / H = 0 . 1 - 0.25, the observation of particle positions at downstream cross-sections revealed that the particles were aligned in a straight or curved line nearly parallel to the longer face of the channel cross-section and their probability density function showed a sharp peak at a certain distance from the channel centerline. These focusing positions of particles were found to depend on Re, d / H and AR. They approached the channel centerline with increasing Re. As AR increased for constant Re and constant d / H , focusing positions moved closer to the channel centerline, and reached asymptotic positions for AR>2.

  2. Respirable particles and carcinogens in the air of delaware hospitality venues before and after a smoking ban.

    PubMed

    Repace, James

    2004-09-01

    How do the concentrations of indoor air pollutants known to increase risk of respiratory disease, cancer, heart disease, and stroke change after a smoke-free workplace law? Real-time measurements were made of respirable particle (RSP) air pollution and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPAH), in a casino, six bars, and a pool hall before and after a smoking ban. Secondhand smoke contributed 90% to 95% of the RSP air pollution during smoking, and 85% to 95% of the carcinogenic PPAH, greatly exceeding levels of these contaminants encountered on major truck highways and polluted city streets. This air-quality survey demonstrates conclusively that the health of hospitality workers and patrons is endangered by tobacco smoke pollution. Smoke-free workplace laws eliminate that hazard and provide health protection impossible to achieve through ventilation or air cleaning.

  3. Sampling submicrometer particles suspended in near sonic and supersonic free jets. [from GTE exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martone, J. A.; Daley, P. S.; Boubel, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Aerosols containing solid, spherical stearic acid particles with a mean diameter of 0.8 micron and a geometric standard deviation of 1.28 were sampled with small bore front-facing aspirating probes in near-sonic and supersonic unheated free jets. The results are compared to compute the sampling error associated with a high-speed jet sample.

  4. Comparison of methods for developing contaminant-particle size distributions for suspended sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.D.; Burgoa, B.B.; Fontaine, T.A.

    1994-10-01

    Relationships between contaminant concentration and particle size distribution are required for modeling the transport of contaminated sediment. Standard methods, including the pipette and bottom withdrawal techniques, are unsatisfactory because of the lack of homogeneous separations of each size fraction, which results in uncertainty in the contaminant-particle size relation. In addition, the size fractions produced with these techniques do not contain enough mass for accurate contaminant analyses. To avoid these problems, an alternative method using a settling column and withdrawal times based on Stokes Law has been developed. Tests have been conducted using sediment samples contaminated with Cs-137 from a waste area at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The samples were separated into sand, coarse and fine silt, and clay-sized particles. The results for particle size distribution and associated contaminant concentrations were evaluated for the settling column, pipette, and bottom withdrawal methods. The settling column method provides homogeneous size fractions, larger aliquots of sediment for contaminant analysis, and is quicker in some cases and less complicated to perform than the other two methods.

  5. Atmospheric trace element concentrations in total suspended particles near Paris, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayrault, Sophie; Senhou, Abderrahmane; Moskura, Mélanie; Gaudry, André

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate today's trace element atmospheric concentrations in large urban areas, an atmospheric survey was carried out for 18 months, from March 2002 to September 2003, in Saclay, nearby Paris. The total suspended particulate matter (TSP) was collected continuously on quartz fibre filters. The TSP contents were determined for 36 elements (including Ag, Bi, Mo and Sb) using two analytical methods: Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The measured concentrations were in agreement within the uncertainties with the certified values for the polycarbonate reference material filter SRM-2783 (National Institute for Standard Technology NIST, USA). The measured concentrations were significantly lower than the recommended atmospheric concentrations. In 2003, the Pb atmospheric level at Saclay was 15 ng/m 3, compared to the 500 ng/m 3 guideline level and to the 200 ng/m 3 observed value in 1994. The typical urban background TSP values of 1-2, 0.2-1, 4-6, 10-30 and 3-5 ng/m 3 for As, Co, Cr, Cu and Sb, respectively, were inferred from this study and were compared with the literature data. The typical urban background TSP concentrations could not be realised for Cd, Pb and Zn, since these air concentrations are highly influenced by local features. The Zn concentrations and Zn/Pb ratio observed in Saclay represented a characteristic fingerprint of the exceptionally large extent of zinc-made roofs in Paris and its suburbs. The traffic-related origin of Ba, Cr, Cu, Pb and Sb was demonstrated, while the atmospheric source(s) of Ag was not identified.

  6. Scanning electron microscope and statistical analysis of suspended heavy metal particles in San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, A. Aragón; Villaseñor, G. Torres; Fernández, M. Monroy; Luszczewski Kudra, A.; Leyva Ramos, R.

    Three hundred samples of urban aerosol were collected in high-volume samplers from five urban locations situated near an important metallurgical plant in the city of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Whole samples were analyzed by atomic absorption (AA) for Pb, Cd, As, Cu, Ni, Fe and Cr. One hundred eighty of these samples were subjected to X-ray microanalysis (EDS) coupled with a scanning electron microscope to classify individual particles according to their chemical or mineralogical composition. The principal component analysis (PCA) obtained from the bulk sample analysis, and X-ray microanalysis from individual particles, confirmed chemical associations among elements directly and indirectly. PCA from bulk assays made the most effective use of X-ray microanalysis to characterize major particle types. Some chemical associations would be difficult to detect using microanalysis, alone, for example, in anthropogenic complex phases. In this work, the combined use of microanalysis and statistical methods permitted identification of associations among elements. We observed an association of Pb-As-Cd and Fe-Mn among the samples. In a second order, Pb-Fe, Pb-Mn, Fe-As, Fe-Cd, Cd-Mn and As-Mn showed a lower association. Only Ni and Cu appeared unassociated with any other element analyzed by AA. We characterized the mineral phases by size range, morphology and chemical composition using SEM-EDS to obtain a compositional approach of anthropogenic phases and peculiar morphology and size. A high percentage of heavy metal particles smaller than 2 μm were detected.

  7. Particle-size dependence of immersion freezing: Investigation of INUIT test aerosol particles with freely suspended water drops.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Karoline; Debertshäuser, Michael; Eppers, Oliver; Jantsch, Evelyn; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    One goal of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT) is to investigate the efficiencies of several test ice nuclei under comparable conditions but with different experimental techniques. In the present studies, two methods are used: the Mainz vertical wind tunnel and an acoustic levitator placed inside a cold chamber. In both cases drops are freely levitated, either at their terminal velocity in the wind tunnel updraft or around the nodes of a standing ultrasonic wave in the acoustic levitator. Thus, heat transfer conditions are well approximated, and wall contact effects on freezing as well as electrical charges of the drops are avoided. Drop radii are 370 μm and 1 mm, respectively. In the wind tunnel, drops are investigated at constant temperatures within a certain time period and the onset of freezing is observed directly. In the acoustic levitator, the drop temperature decreases during the experiments and is measured by an in-situ calibrated Infrared thermometer. The onset of freezing is indicated by a rapid rise of the drop surface temperature because of the release of latent heat. Investigated test ice nuclei are Snomax® as a proxy of biological particles and illite NX as well as K-feldspar as represents of mineral dust. The particle concentrations are 1 × 10-12 to 3 × 10-6 g Snomax® per drop and 5 × 10-9 to 5 × 10-5 g mineral dust per drop. Freezing temperatures are between -2 and -18° C in case of Snomax® and between -14 and -26° C in case of mineral dust. The lower the particle masses per drop the lower are the freezing temperatures. For similar particle concentrations in the drops, the median freezing temperatures determined by the two techniques agree well within the measurement errors. With the knowledge of the specific particle surface area of the mineral dusts, the results are interpreted also in terms of particle surface area per drop. Results from the wind tunnel experiments which are performed at constant temperatures indicate

  8. Near-bottom suspended matter concentration on the Continental Shelf during storms: estimates based on in situ observations of light transmission and a particle size dependent transmissometer calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Butman, B.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory calibration of Sea Tech and Montedoro-Whitney beam transmissometers shows a linear relation between light attenuation coefficient (cp) and suspended matter concentration (SMC) for natural sediments and for glass beads. However the proportionality constant between cp and SMC depends on the particle diameter and particle type. Thus, to measure SMC, observations of light attenuation must be used with a time-variable calibration when suspended particle characteristics change with time. Because of this variable calibration, time series of light attenuation alone may not directly reflect SMC and must be interpreted with care. The near-bottom concentration of suspended matter during winter storms on the U.S. East Coast Continental Shelf is estimated from light transmission measurements made 2 m above the bottom and from the size distribution of suspended material collected simultaneously in sediment traps 3 m above the bottom. The average concentrations during six storms between December 1979 and February 1980 in the Middle Atlantic Bight ranged from 2 to 4 mg l1 (maximum concentration of 7 mg l1) and 8 to 12 mg l1 (maximum concentration of 22 mg l1) on the south flank of Georges Bank. ?? 1987.

  9. Performance of an N95 filtering facepiece particulate respirator and a surgical mask during human breathing: two pathways for particle penetration.

    PubMed

    Grinshpun, Sergey A; Haruta, Hiroki; Eninger, Robert M; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy T; Lee, Shu-An

    2009-10-01

    The protection level offered by filtering facepiece particulate respirators and face masks is defined by the percentage of ambient particles penetrating inside the protection device. There are two penetration pathways: (1) through the faceseal leakage, and the (2) filter medium. This study aimed at differentiating the contributions of these two pathways for particles in the size range of 0.03-1 microm under actual breathing conditions. One N95 filtering facepiece respirator and one surgical mask commonly used in health care environments were tested on 25 subjects (matching the latest National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health fit testing panel) as the subjects performed conventional fit test exercises. The respirator and the mask were also tested with breathing manikins that precisely mimicked the prerecorded breathing patterns of the tested subjects. The penetration data obtained in the human subject- and manikin-based tests were compared for different particle sizes and breathing patterns. Overall, 5250 particle size- and exercise-specific penetration values were determined. For each value, the faceseal leakage-to-filter ratio was calculated to quantify the relative contributions of the two penetration pathways. The number of particles penetrating through the faceseal leakage of the tested respirator/mask far exceeded the number of those penetrating through the filter medium. For the N95 respirator, the excess was (on average) by an order of magnitude and significantly increased with an increase in particle size (p < 0.001): approximately 7-fold greater for 0.04 microm, approximately 10-fold for 0.1 microm, and approximately 20-fold for 1 microm. For the surgical mask, the faceseal leakage-to-filter ratio ranged from 4.8 to 5.8 and was not significantly affected by the particle size for the tested submicrometer fraction. Facial/body movement had a pronounced effect on the relative contribution of the two penetration pathways. Breathing intensity and

  10. Meteorological phenomena affecting the presence of solid particles suspended in the air during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñanos, P.; Galán, C.; Alcázar, P.; Dominguez, E.

    Winter is not traditionally considered to be a risky season for people who suffer from pollen allergies. However, increasing numbers of people are showing symptoms in winter. This prompted our investigation into the levels of solid material in the air, and some of the meteorological phenomena that allow their accumulation. This study showed a possible relationship between the phenomenon of thermal inversion, which occurs when very low temperatures, cloudless skies and atmospheric calms coincide, and an increase in the concentration of solid material in the atmosphere. Frequently, this situation is associated with other predictable phenomena such as fog, dew and frost. This may allow a warning system to be derived for urban pollution episodes. The effect caused by parameters such as wind and rainfall was also analysed. Solid material was differentiated into non-biological material from natural and non-natural sources (e.g. soot, dust, sand, diesel exhaust particles, partially burnt residues) and biological material. The latter mainly comprises pollen grains and fungal spores. Owing to its abundance and importance as a causal agent of winter allergies, Cupressaceae pollen was considered separately.

  11. [Distributions and pollution status of heavy metals in the suspended particles of the estuaries and coastal area of eastern Hainan].

    PubMed

    Xin, Cheng-Lin; Ren, Jing-Ling; Zhang, Gui-Ling; Shao, Ya-Ping; Zhang, Guo-Ling; Liu, Su-Mei

    2013-04-01

    The distributions and pollution status of heavy metals in the suspended particles were investigated in the Wanquan and Wenchang/Wenjiao estuaries and the coastal area of eastern Hainan in July 2008. The concentrations of metal elements (Al, Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu, Ni, V, Zn) were determined by ICP-AES after microwave digestion. Multivariate statistical methods (e. g. correlation analysis and principal factor analysis) were used to discuss the major factors controlling the variability of heavy metal concentrations and the pollution status in those areas. There was an obvious variability in particulate metal concentrations from upstream to estuary of both rivers. The concentrations first increased with increasing salinity and then decreased with further increase of the salinity; the concentrations were slightly higher at the coastal area in the east. The variability of particulate metal concentrations reduced significantly after the normalization by Al, indicating the effects of grain size. Enrichment factor calculation results showed that there was heavy metal pollution (especially Cu, Ni) in the Wenchang/Wenjiao River and estuary, while the situation in Wanquan River remained at pristine level. Concentrations of particulate metals in the study area were mainly controlled by source geology and provenance, as well as contamination from the discharge of waste water and biological activity.

  12. Current-use pesticides in stream water and suspended particles following runoff: exposure, effects, and mitigation requirements.

    PubMed

    Bereswill, Renja; Streloke, Martin; Schulz, Ralf

    2013-06-01

    The European Union's directive for sustainable use of pesticides requires implementing risk mitigation measures at streams threatened by pesticide entries. The need for mitigation measures was investigated at 10 stream sites within an intensively used arable region in central Germany by characterizing pesticide exposure following edge-of-field runoff and effects on the aquatic macroinvertebrates. Moreover, the influence of riparian buffer strip width (as a mitigation measure) at the sampling sites was considered. Generally, invertebrate fauna was dominated by pesticide-tolerant species, suggesting a high pesticide exposure at almost all sites. This result is also reflected by the elevated levels of suspended particle contamination in terms of toxic units (logTUMax  > -2), corresponding to one-hundredth of the median lethal concentration (LC50) to Daphnia magna. At two sites that received high aqueous-phase entries of the pyrethroid lambda-cyhalothrin (logTUMax  > -0.6), the abundance and number of sensitive species in terms of the species at risk index decreased during the pesticide application period. In contrast, no acute significant negative effects on macroinvertebrates were observed at sites characterised by low water-phase toxicity (logTUMax  < -3.5). An influence of riparian buffer strip width on pesticide exposure was not observed, supposedly because of the presence of erosion rills and ephemeral ditches. In conclusion, results show that mitigation measures (such as the improvement of currently present riparian buffer strips) are needed in the study area.

  13. Seasonal and spatial changes of free and bound organic acids in total suspended particles in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Bi, Xinhui; Zhao, Jinping; He, Lulu; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-12-01

    The concentrations and compositions of free and bound organic acids in total suspended particles from typical urban, suburban and forest park sites of Guangzhou were determined in this study. The free form of organic acids (solvent extractable) in aerosols in Guangzhou varied with site and season. The suburban samples contained the highest contents of alkanoic, alkenoic and dicarboxylic acids. These findings were consistent with a higher supply of hydrocarbons and NOx in the suburban area. However, concentrations of aromatic acids were similar in the urban, suburban and forest park sites. Generally, winter season samples of the acids from anthropogenic sources contained more organic acids than summer season samples due to stronger removal by wet deposition in the summer. For the acids from botanic sources, the summer season samples were higher. In addition to the free acids, bound acids (solvent non-extractable) mainly formed by esterification of free acids were also found in the samples. In general, bound acids were higher than free acids. Esterification is mainly controlled by the pKa of organic acids and the atmospheric pH value. This explains why aromatic and dicarboxylic acids occur mainly as bound forms and why the samples from urban sites contained high levels of bound acids as the pH of rain water can reach 4.53. Concentrations of alkanoic and alkenoic acids in the aerosols of Guangzhou were much higher than those in the other areas studied.

  14. Determination of buffering capacity of total suspended particle and its source apportionment using the chemical mass balance approach.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiao-Hui; Feng, Yin-Chang; Zhu, Tan; Zhang, Yu-Fen; Wu, Jian-Hui; Li, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    The samples of total suspended particle (TSP) from sources and TSP in the ambient atmosphere were collected in 2006 at Tianjin, People's Republic of China and analyzed for 16 chemical elements, two water-soluble ions, total carbon, and organic carbon. On the basis of the chemical mass balance (CMB) model, the contributions of different TSP sources to the ambient TSP were identified. The results showed that resuspended dust has the biggest contributions to the concentration of ambient TSP. The buffering capacity of each TSP source was also determined by an analytical chemistry method, and the result showed that the constructive dust (the dust emitted from construction work) had the strongest buffering capacity among the measured sources, whereas the coal combustion dust had the weakest buffering capacity. A calculation formula of the source of buffering capacity of ambient TSP was developed based on the result of TSP source apportionment and the identification of the buffering capacity of each TSP source in this study. The results of the source apportionment of the buffering capacity of ambient TSP indicated that open sources (including soil dust, resuspended dust, and constructive dust) were the dominant sources of the buffering capacity of the ambient TSP. Acid rain pollution in cities in Northern China might become serious with a decrease of open source pollution without reducing acidic sources. More efforts must be made to evaluate this potential risk, and countermeasures should be proposed as early as possible.

  15. Hydroclimatic influence on particle size distribution of suspended sediments evacuated from debris-covered Chorabari Glacier, upper Mandakini catchment, central Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Gokhale, Anupam Anand; Shukla, Tanuj; Dobhal, Dwarika Prasad

    2016-07-01

    Sediments released from high altitude glaciers exhibit varying evacuation patterns and transport characteristics owing to the presence of thick debris cover over the glacier. Despite the recent needs for integrated hydrometeorological studies in the Himalaya, little is known about the impacts of suspended sediment on hydropower generation, reservoir sedimentation, and abrasion of turbine components. Present study involves analysis of particle size distribution of suspended sediments to understand sediment evacuation patterns and transport characteristics in variable energy conditions during the ablation season. Peak suspended sediments were evacuated during extreme rainfall events. The estimated seasonal modern sediment erosion rate varies from 0.6 to 2.3 mm y- 1 for the study period (2009-2012). The analysis shows dominance of medium silt-sized to fine sand-sized particles having sediment size of 0.0156-0.25 mm corresponding to 70-80% without any significant seasonal variation. These transported sediments show that they are poorly sorted, coarser in nature with a nearly symmetrical to coarse skewed texture and kurtosis analysis suggesting mesokurtic distribution of sediments. The particle size fraction ranges between 4.65 and 5.23 ϕ, which is dominantly medium to coarse silty in texture. Results indicate that suspended sediments are evacuated in highly variable energy conditions through subglacial transport pathways because of increase in availability of meltwater with the progressive ablation season. Bulk geochemical characterization has been carried out to differentiate the source of suspended sediments and intensity of weathering. Chemical Index of Alterations (CIA) values of sediment flux range from 54.68 to 55.18 compared to the Upper Continental Crust (UCC) ~ 50, indicating moderate intensity of weathering. Mean seasonal (2009-2012) elemental fluxes and their contribution to the suspended sediment flux reflect that Si and Al are responsible for about 85% of

  16. Source apportionment of PAHs and n-alkanes in respirable particles in Tehran, Iran by wind sector and vertical profile.

    PubMed

    Moeinaddini, Mazaher; Esmaili Sari, Abbas; Riyahi bakhtiari, Alireza; Chan, Andrew Yiu-Chung; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Hawker, Darryl; Connell, Des

    2014-06-01

    The vertical concentration profiles and source contributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-alkanes in respirable particle samples (PM4) collected at 10, 100, 200 and 300-m altitude from the Milad Tower of Tehran, Iran during fall and winter were investigated. The average concentrations of total PAHs and total n-alkanes were 16.7 and 591 ng/m(3), respectively. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was applied to the chemical composition and wind data to apportion the contributing sources. The five PAH source factors identified were: 'diesel' (56.3% of total PAHs on average), 'gasoline' (15.5%), 'wood combustion, and incineration' (13%), 'industry' (9.2%), and 'road soil particle' (6.0%). The four n-alkane source factors identified were: 'petrogenic' (65% of total n-alkanes on average), 'mixture of petrogenic and biomass burning' (15%), 'mixture of biogenic and fossil fuel' (11.5%), and 'biogenic' (8.5%). Source contributions by wind sector were also estimated based on the wind sector factor loadings from PMF analysis. Directional dependence of sources was investigated using the conditional probability function (CPF) and directional relative strength (DRS) methods. The calm wind period was found to contribute to 4.4% of total PAHs and 5.0% of total n-alkanes on average. Highest average concentrations of PAHs and n-alkanes were found in the 10 and 100 m samples, reflecting the importance of contributions from local sources. Higher average concentrations in the 300 m samples compared to those in the 200 m samples may indicate contributions from long-range transport. The vertical profiles of source factors indicate the gasoline and road soil particle-associated PAHs, and the mixture from biogenic and fossil fuel source-associated n-alkanes were mostly from local emissions. The smaller average contribution of diesel-associated PAHs in the lower altitude samples also indicates that the restriction of diesel-fueled vehicle use in the central area

  17. Particles and enzymes: Combining nanoscale zero valent iron and organochlorine respiring bacteria for the detoxification of chloroethane mixtures.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Joanna C; Boparai, Hardiljeet K; Lee, Matthew J; O'Carroll, Denis M; Barnes, Robert J; Manefield, Michael J

    2016-05-05

    Nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) and organochlorine respiring bacteria (ORB) are two technologies used to detoxify chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). nZVI can rapidly detoxify high CAH concentrations, but is quickly oxidised and unable to degrade certain CAHs (e.g., 1,2-dichlorothane). In contrast, ORB can dechlorinate CAHs resistant to nZVI (e.g., 1,2-dichlorothane) but are inhibited by other CAHs of concern degradable by nZVI (e.g., chloroform and carbon tetrachloride). Combining the two was proposed as a unique treatment train to overcome each technology's shortcomings. In this study, this combined remedy was investigated using a mixture of 1,2-dichloroethane, degradable by ORB but not nZVI, and 1,1,2-trichloroethane, susceptible to both. Results indicated that nZVI rapidly dechlorinated 1,1,2-trichloroethane when supplied above 0.5 g/L, however ORB were inhibited and unable to dechlorinate 1,2-dichloroethane. pH increase and ionic species associated with nZVI did not significantly impact ORB, pinpointing Fe(0) particles as responsible for ORB inhibition. Below 0.05 g/L nZVI, ORB activity was stimulated. Results suggest that combining ORB and nZVI at appropriate doses can potentially treat a wider range of CAHs than each individual remedy. At field sites where nZVI was applied, it is likely that in situ nZVI concentrations were below the threshold of negative consequences.

  18. Selective exposure and analysis of the sheep tracheal lobe as a model for toxicological studies of respirable particles

    SciTech Connect

    Begin, R.; Masse, S.; Rola-Pleszczynski, M.; Drapeau, G.; Dalle, D.

    1985-04-01

    A conscious sheep model, recently developed to study sequentially the bronchoalveolar milieu, was further refined to use in the rapid in vivo assessment of the biological effects of respirable particles. In this model, the anatomically isolated tracheal lobe was selectively exposed to either 100 ml phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (control group of 12 sheep), 100 mg of 0.1-..mu..m latex beads in 100 ml PBS (latex group of 12 sheep), or 100 mg of UICC Canadian chrysotile fibers in 100 ml PBS (asbestos group of 12 sheep). Bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) of the tracheal lobe were obtained prior to exposure and at Days 1, 8, 15, 21, 29, 45, and 60 after exposure. Whole-lung detailed pulmonary function tests (PFT) were performed at the same times and the histopathology of the lobe was examined in six sheep in each group at Days 29 and 60. In the latex group, there was no significant change in PFT, the BAL analyses documented early transient increase in cellularity (macrophages and neutrophils at Day 1) and only macrophages after; lung histology documented an early macrophagic alveolitis which decreased to less than 10% of the initial inflammatory reaction at Day 60, without other distortion of the lung and airway architecture. In the asbestos sheep, the only change in whole-lung PFT was a 10-torr fall in arterial O/sub 2/ pressure. BAL analyses documented persistent increases in macrophages, neutrophils, and lactate dehydrogenase as well as increasing ..gamma..-globulins. Lung histology revealed a macrophagic and neutrophilic peribronchiolar alveolitis, early fibrosis, and severe distortion of the small airways, lesions comparable to those of early asbestosis in sheep or humans.

  19. A new device to measure the settling properties of suspended particles : instrumental development and first applications during runoff events in small watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legoût, Cédric; Wendling, Valentin; Gratiot, Nicolas; Mercier, Bernard; Coulaud, Catherine; Nord, Guillaume; Droppo, Ian; Ribolzi, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Most equations describing suspended particle transport balances the settling flux of particles against the turbulent flux of the flow. Although in-situ techniques have been developed to measure settling velocities of suspended particles in coastal areas, floodplain rivers and estuaries, they are not easily transferable to small and meso-scale watersheds. The main limitation lies in the range of concentrations frequently reaching several tens of grams per liter during runoff events. To overcome this instrumental limitation we developed an original System for the Characterization of Aggregates and Flocs (SCAF). An optical settling column, equipped with a vertical array of 16 optical sensors, was used to provide light transmission through a suspension during quiescent settling. It was specifically designed to be inserted in plastic bottles contained in classical sequential samplers, in order to obtain automatic measurements of the suspension immediately after its collection in the river. From the SCAF measurements, we calculate both the particle settling velocity distributions and the propensity of particles to flocculate. The prototypes were tested in laboratory conditions for a wide range of concentrations and material types, leading to consistent measurements with flocculation indices comprised between 0 and 80, respectively for non-cohesive and cohesive materials. First measurements in the field were achieved during runoff events at the outlet of small nested catchments in Lao PDR (MSEC network of environmental observatories) in order to explore the non-conservative behavior of the settling properties of eroded soil aggregates during their transfer.

  20. Residence time of suspended particles in the Garonne River (SW France): indications derived from Th-234, Be-7 and Pb-210

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sabine; Saari, Hanna-Kaïsa

    2013-04-01

    Particulates that enter the ocean from rivers are the products of integrated basin-wide processes (soil erosion, sediment transport and deposition in watersheds). The fate of sediments in river is therefore challenging and generally analysed using hydrodynamics models. An alternative method relies on the use of fallout radioactive tracers to identify sediment source regions and/or to estimate suspended sediment age or the fraction of the suspended sediment recently eroded from the landscape. This work presents the application of naturally occurring radionuclides: Pb-210 (T1/2 = 22.3 years) and Be-7 (T1/2 = 53 days), both delivered by atmospheric fallout, and Th-234 (T1/2 = 24.1 days), to investigate residence times of particles in the lower Garonne River (South-West France). Th-234, produced continuously by decay of U-238, is widely used in marine sciences for studying particle dynamic on time-scales of days to weeks, but a major limitation to extend its application from the ocean to river is the activity (level, variability) of its parent, U-238, in contrast with the high and rather constant levels of oceanic uranium. The Garonne River has a watershed of 55 000 km2 with a mean discharge of 650 m3 s-1 (range: 12500 m3 s-1). It flows westward about 647 km from the Spanish Pyrenees, ending into the Gironde, its common estuary with the Dordogne River. To investigate suspended particle dynamic of the lower Garonne River, monthly samplings were performed from January 2006 to December 2007 at selected sites along this river system, including a site in its estuarine section. Dissolved and particulate activities of radionuclides were determined using a low-background, well-shaped gamma spectrometer. Additional data (river discharge, rain rate, suspended particulate concentrations) were also collected to better interpret radionuclide data. Whereas dissolved fractions are always negligible, particulate Th-234, Be-7 and Pb-210 activities present marked spatio

  1. Assessing and accounting for the impact of respiratory motion on FDG uptake and viable volume for liver lesions in free-breathing PET using respiration-suspended PET images as reference

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guang Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Humm, John L.; Burger, Irene A.; Ridge, Carole A.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To assess and account for the impact of respiratory motion on the variability of activity and volume determination of liver tumor in positron emission tomography (PET) through a comparison between free-breathing (FB) and respiration-suspended (RS) PET images. Methods: As part of a PET/computed tomography (CT) guided percutaneous liver ablation procedure performed on a PET/CT scanner, a patient's breathing is suspended on a ventilator, allowing the acquisition of a near-motionless PET and CT reference images of the liver. In this study, baseline RS and FB PET/CT images of 20 patients undergoing thermal ablation were acquired. The RS PET provides near-motionless reference in a human study, and thereby allows a quantitative evaluation of the effect of respiratory motion on PET images obtained under FB conditions. Two methods were applied to calculate tumor activity and volume: (1) threshold-based segmentation (TBS), estimating the total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and the segmented volume and (2) histogram-based estimation (HBE), yielding the background-subtracted lesion (BSL) activity and associated volume. The TBS method employs 50% of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) as the threshold for tumors with SUV{sub max} ≥ 2× SUV{sub liver-bkg}, and tumor activity above this threshold yields TLG{sub 50%}. The HBE method determines local PET background based on a Gaussian fit of the low SUV peak in a SUV-volume histogram, which is generated within a user-defined and optimized volume of interest containing both local background and lesion uptakes. Voxels with PET intensity above the fitted background were considered to have originated from the tumor and used to calculate the BSL activity and its associated lesion volume. Results: Respiratory motion caused SUV{sub max} to decrease from RS to FB by −15% ± 11% (p = 0.01). Using TBS method, there was also a decrease in SUV{sub mean} (−18% ± 9%, p = 0.01), but an increase in TLG{sub 50%} (18%

  2. The trajectories of particles suspended in electrolytes under the influence of crossed electric and magnetic fields. Possible explanation of the sensitivity of organism to magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Gunter, R C; Bamberger, S; Valet, G; Crossin, M; Ruhenstroth-Bauer, G

    1977-12-27

    We observed that particles, suspended in an electrolyte and brought into crossed magnetic and electric fields of low intensities, will deviate in the central part of the electrophoresis chamber of a standard Zeiss Cytopherometer with a component vertical to both fields. The direction and magnitude, however, were sharply at variance with what would be expected by the action of the Lorentz force (EMF) on the surface of the particles. The magnitude of the deviation depends upon the magnetic and electric field strength, the ion concentration of the suspension medium and the geometry of the chamber. The movement of the particles is due to streaming of the electrolyte which is mainly caused by inhomogeneities of the electric field in the electrophoresis chamber. The magnitude of the effect is high enough to occur physiological conditions. Magneto-electrophoretic streaming might eventually act as a transducer mechanism which could explain the ability of some animals to orientate themselves in the geomagnetic field.

  3. Suspended-sediment concentrations, bedload, particle sizes, surrogate measurements, and annual sediment loads for selected sites in the lower Minnesota River Basin, water years 2011 through 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groten, Joel T.; Ellison, Christopher A.; Hendrickson, Jon S.

    2016-12-20

    Accurate measurements of fluvial sediment are important for assessing stream ecological health, calculating flood levels, computing sediment budgets, and managing and protecting water resources. Sediment-enriched rivers in Minnesota are a concern among Federal, State, and local governments because turbidity and sediment-laden waters are the leading impairments and affect more than 6,000 miles of rivers in Minnesota. The suspended sediment in the lower Minnesota River is deleterious, contributing about 75 to 90 percent of the suspended sediment being deposited into Lake Pepin. The Saint Paul District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Lower Minnesota River Watershed District collaborate to maintain a navigation channel on the lower 14.7 miles of the Minnesota River through scheduled dredging operations. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency has adopted a sediment-reduction strategy to reduce sediment in the Minnesota River by 90 percent by 2040.The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, and the Lower Minnesota River Watershed District, collected suspended-sediment, bedload, and particle-size samples at five sites in the lower Minnesota River Basin during water years 2011 through 2014 and surrogate measurements of acoustic backscatter at one of these sites on the lower Minnesota River during water years 2012 through 2016 to quantify sediment loads and improve understanding of sediment-transport relations. Annual sediment loads were computed for calendar years 2011 through 2014.Data collected from water years 2011 through 2014 indicated that two tributaries, Le Sueur River and High Island Creek, had the highest sediment yield and concentrations of suspended sediment. These tributaries also had greater stream gradients than the sites on the Minnesota River. Suspended fines were greater than suspended sand at all sites in the study area. The range of median particle sizes matched

  4. Comparison of fluvial suspended-sediment concentrations and particle-size distributions measured with in-stream laser diffraction and in physical samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Straub, Timothy D.; Curran, Christopher A.; Landers, Mark N.; Domanski, Marian M.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-diffraction technology, recently adapted for in-stream measurement of fluvial suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs) and particle-size distributions (PSDs), was tested with a streamlined (SL), isokinetic version of the Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry (LISST) for measuring volumetric SSCs and PSDs ranging from 1.8-415 µm in 32 log-spaced size classes. Measured SSCs and PSDs from the LISST-SL were compared to a suite of 22 datasets (262 samples in all) of concurrent suspended-sediment and streamflow measurements using a physical sampler and acoustic Doppler current profiler collected during 2010-12 at 16 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Illinois and Washington (basin areas: 38 – 69,264 km2). An unrealistically low computed effective density (mass SSC / volumetric SSC) of 1.24 g/ml (95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.45 g/ml) provided the best-fit value (R2 = 0.95; RMSE = 143 mg/L) for converting volumetric SSC to mass SSC for over 2 orders of magnitude of SSC (12-2,170 mg/L; covering a substantial range of SSC that can be measured by the LISST-SL) despite being substantially lower than the sediment particle density of 2.67 g/ml (range: 2.56-2.87 g/ml, 23 samples). The PSDs measured by the LISST-SL were in good agreement with those derived from physical samples over the LISST-SL's measureable size range. Technical and operational limitations of the LISST-SL are provided to facilitate the collection of more accurate data in the future. Additionally, the spatial and temporal variability of SSC and PSD measured by the LISST-SL is briefly described to motivate its potential for advancing our understanding of suspended-sediment transport by rivers.

  5. Role of microbial Fe(III) reduction and solution chemistry in aggregation and settling of suspended particles in the Mississippi River Delta plain, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaisi, D.P.; Ji, S.; Dong, H.; Blake, R.E.; Eberl, D.D.; Kim, J.

    2008-01-01

    River-dominated delta areas are primary sites of active biogeochemical cycling, with productivity enhanced by terrestrial inputs of nutrients. Particle aggregation in these areas primarily controls the deposition of suspended particles, yet factors that control particle aggregation and resulting sedimentation in these environments are poorly understood. This study was designed to investigate the role of microbial Fe(III) reduction and solution chemistry in aggregation of suspended particles in the Mississippi Delta. Three representative sites along the salinity gradient were selected and sediments were collected from the sediment-water interface. Based on quantitative mineralogical analyses 88-89 wt.% of all minerals in the sediments are clays, mainly smectite and illite. Consumption of SO421 and the formation of H2S and pyrite during microbial Fe(III) reduction of the non-sterile sediments by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 in artificial pore water (APW) media suggest simultaneous sulfate and Fe(III) reduction activity. The pHPZNPC of the sediments was ??? 3.5 and their zeta potentials at the sediment-water interface pH (6.9-7.3) varied from -35 to -45 mV, suggesting that both edges and faces of clay particles have negative surface charge. Therefore, high concentrations of cations in pore water are expected to be a predominant factor in particle aggregation consistent with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Experiments on aggregation of different types of sediments in the same APW composition revealed that the sediment with low zeta potential had a high rate of aggregation. Similarly, addition of external Fe(II) (i.e. not derived from sediments) was normally found to enhance particle aggregation and deposition in all sediments, probably resulting from a decrease in surface potential of particles due to specific Fe(II) sorption. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) images showed predominant face-to-face clay aggregation in native

  6. How does breathing frequency affect the performance of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator and a surgical mask against surrogates of viral particles?

    PubMed

    He, Xinjian; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2014-01-01

    Breathing frequency (breaths/min) differs among individuals and levels of physical activity. Particles enter respirators through two principle penetration pathways: faceseal leakage and filter penetration. However, it is unknown how breathing frequency affects the overall performance of N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) and surgical masks (SMs) against viral particles, as well as other health-relevant submicrometer particles. A FFR and SM were tested on a breathing manikin at four mean inspiratory flows (MIFs) (15, 30, 55, and 85 L/min) and five breathing frequencies (10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 breaths/min). Filter penetration (Pfilter) and total inward leakage (TIL) were determined for the tested respiratory protection devices against sodium chloride (NaCl) aerosol particles in the size range of 20 to 500 nm. "Faceseal leakage-to-filter" (FLTF) penetration ratios were calculated. Both MIF and breathing frequency showed significant effects (p < 0.05) on Pfilter and TIL. Increasing breathing frequency increased TIL for the N95 FFR whereas no clear trends were observed for the SM. Increasing MIF increased Pfilter and decreased TIL resulting in decreasing FLTF ratio. Most of FLTF ratios were >1, suggesting that the faceseal leakage was the primary particle penetration pathway at various breathing frequencies. Breathing frequency is another factor (besides MIF) that can significantly affect the performance of N95 FFRs, with higher breathing frequencies increasing TIL. No consistent trend of increase or decrease of TIL with either MIF or breathing frequency was observed for the tested SM. To potentially extend these findings beyond the manikin/breathing system used, future studies are needed to fully understand the mechanism causing the breathing frequency effect on the performance of respiratory protection devices on human subjects.

  7. Concentration of lead, cadmium, and iron in sediment dust and total suspended particles before and after initialisation of integral production in iron and steel work plant Zenica.

    PubMed

    Prcanović, Halim; Duraković, Mirnes; Beganović, Sanela

    2012-06-01

    Poor air quality is a common fact for all areas with base industry. The city of Zenica was once the metallurgical centre of Ex-Yugoslavia and is therefore highly polluted at present. Air pollution peaked in 1987 when average concentration of pollutants was extremely high (daily average concentration of SO(2) was 1800 μg m(-3)). With the beginning of the war in 1992, integral production in the steel work plant was shut down, to be re-launched in 2008. Limit values for iron do not exist, but iron has been monitored in Zenica for the past 28 years because of the presence of steel works. Concentrations of cadmium and lead have also been measured because they are very much present in polluted areas with steel works. The concentration of mentioned elements in air deposit and total suspended particles before and after integral production in the steel work plant was re-launched is the subject of this paper. Total suspended particles were measured in two locations using German standard VDI 2463 Blatt 4. Sediment dust was measured in nine locations using Bergerhoff method. The concentration of iron, lead, and cadmium was performed in the chemical laboratory of the Metallurgical Institute "Kemal Kapetanović" Zenica using standard methods. Higher concentrations of these parameters during the period of integral production clearly point to the impact of steel works on Zenica valley.

  8. Precise determination of the refractive index of suspended particles: light transmission as a function of refractive index mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClymer, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    Many fluids appear white because refractive index differences lead to multiple scattering. In this paper, we use safe, low-cost commercial index matching fluids to quantitatively study light transmission as a function of index mismatch, reduce multiple scattering to allow single scattering probes, and to precisely determine the index of refraction of suspended material. The transmission profile is compared with Rayleigh-Gans and Mie theory predictions. The procedure is accessible as a student laboratory project, while providing advantages over other standard methods of measuring the refractive index of an unknown nanoparticle, making it valuable to researchers.

  9. Apparatus for preparing mimics of suspended particles in the troposphere and their controlled deposition onto individual lung cells in culture with measurement of downstream biological response.

    PubMed

    Haddrell, Allen E; Ishii, Hiroshi; van Eeden, Stephan F; Agnes, George R

    2005-06-01

    Inhalation exposure to particles <10 microm in size that are suspended in the troposphere (PM10) is a factor in respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. The extent of the injury, local to systemic inflammation, is dependent on the number, size, and composition of the particles to which an individual is exposed. The physical properties of and compounds on PM10 that are responsible for these adverse effects on human health are the subject of intense investigation. Here, we report a laboratory method that involved the creation of 1-120 particles per trial that were of known size and composition, followed by deposition of them directly onto individual human lung cells within a cell culture, and after an incubation period, a downstream biological response was measured. To illustrate this methodology, particles that each contained 50 pg of lipopolysaccharide were created and deposited onto individual cells over a region <0.36 mm2 within a genetically modified A549 cell culture. The biological readout was the relative expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 after 24 h of incubation using an immunocytochemistry assay. The apparatus and methodology introduced here enables studies at the interface between the relevant but diverse areas of atmospheric particle chemistry and lung cell biology to identify the chemical and physical factors of PM10 that cause/exacerbate respiratory and cardiovascular diseases by triggering various biological pathways.

  10. Scanning and transmission electron microscope of suspended lead-rich particles in the air of San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, A. Aragón; Villaseñor, G. Torres; Jacinto, P. Santiago; Fernández, M. Monroy

    In the city of San Luis Potosi exists an important metallurgical plant and is known that in the adjacent urban zone, there is a high concentration of lead in the air, it is also supposed that most of the particles with lead have an anthropogenic origin because these particles show morphological characteristics and chemical composition very different in comparison with common lead minerals. In this work it was proved that most of the airborne particles with lead present in this urban zone, effectively came from the copper smelter. The airborne particles with lead were compared with particles with lead obtained starting from samples of slag and lead calcine of the copper smelter. To perform the comparative study, these particles were studied with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS) in conjunction with scanning electron microscope to obtain chemical composition and associated morphological characteristics. Results suggest that these particles, composed of only one phase, are chemically distinct from any crustal lead mineral. Because of the complexity of the chemical composition of these particles (Pb, S, Cu, As, Fe, Zn, Cd, Sb, O), some of the airborne particles were analyzed by transmission microscopy in order to associate crystalline structure with any particular chemical phase.

  11. Suspended microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Casavant, Benjamin P; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Berthier, Jean; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I; Bischel, Lauren L; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P; Beebe, David J

    2013-06-18

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale structures devoid of a ceiling and floor. We developed a simple and ubiquitous model predicting fluid flow in suspended microfluidic systems and show that it encompasses many known capillary phenomena. Suspended microfluidics was used to create arrays of collagen membranes, mico Dots (μDots), in a horizontal plane separating two fluidic chambers, demonstrating a transwell platform able to discern collective or individual cellular invasion. Further, we demonstrated that μDots can also be used as a simple multiplexed 3D cellular growth platform. Using the μDot array, we probed the combined effects of soluble factors and matrix components, finding that laminin mitigates the growth suppression properties of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Based on the same fluidic principles, we created a suspended microfluidic metabolite extraction platform using a multilayer biphasic system that leverages the accessibility of open microchannels to retrieve steroids and other metabolites readily from cell culture. Suspended microfluidics brings the high degree of fluidic control and unique functionality of closed microfluidics into the highly accessible and robust platform of open microfluidics.

  12. Experimental and Theoretical Study on Circular Disk Particles Suspended in Centrifugal and Non-Centrifugal Force Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Torii, Shuichi; Watanabe, Yoshimi; Tanaka, Satoyuki; Yano, Toshiaki; Iino, Naoko

    2008-02-15

    Theoretical and experimental studies are performed on suspension particle motion in Centrifugal and Non-Centrifugal Force Environment, i.e., in both an axially rotating drum and a stable liquid tank. The particle velocity of circular disks is measured by PTV (Particle Tracking Velocimetry) method and is predicted by BBO (Basset-Boussinesq-Ossen) equation. It is found that (1) as time progresses, one side of the disk in the axially rotating drum is attracted toward the drum wall and its velocity is affected by the rotating speed, (2) when the particle moves in the Stokes' regime, its velocity is linearly increased with the distance from the center of the drum, (3) in contrast, the autorotation of the disk occurs in the non-centrifugal force field, and (4) the corresponding drag coefficient in the low Reynolds number region is in good agreement with the theoretical value of the sphere.

  13. Sorption of lindane to river biofilms, suspended particles and sediments in the presence and absence of Cr(VI) and As(V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z.; Dong, D.; Hua, X.; Lan, X.; Liang, D.

    2013-12-01

    Few study has focused on the effects of Cr(VI) and As(V) which are often in the form of anionic groups in natural aquatic environment on the sorption of dissolved hydrophobic organic pollutants (HOPs) onto natural solid materials from water. In this study, we compared the sorption thermodynamics of lindene as a model dissolved HOP on biofilms, suspended particles and surface sediments collected from the same river in the presence and absence of Cr(VI) and As(V). Visual MINTEQ (version 3.0) was applied to calculate Cr(VI) and As(V) species in the sorption system. CrO42- (89%) was the main Cr(VI) species and HAsO42- (78%) and H2AsO4- (22%) were the As(V) species. Compared with Freundlich and the dual reactive domain model, linear model gave a better fit for the lindane sorption isotherms on the biofilms, particles and sediments (Fig.1). For the lindane sorption on the biofilms, the linear model distribution coefficient (KL) were reduced by 48.0% and 47.6% in the presence of Cr(VI) and As(V), respectively; For that on the suspended particles, KL were reduced by 6.2% and 10.8%, respectively; For the sediments, KL were reduced by 30.2% and 34.5%, respectively. In general, the presence of Cr(VI) and As(V) inhibited lindane sorption onto the three solids and inhibition level decreased in the order biofilms > sediments > particles. In contrast to the promotion of metal cations on the dissolved HOPs sorption onto natural solid materials, anionic Cr(VI) and As(V) groups suppressed the sorption. This indicated that anionic Cr(VI) and As(V) groups might occupy some sorption sites on solids and then occurred competitive sorption with lindane. Taking account of the errors in experiment, effects on the sorption between Cr(VI) and As(V) has no significant difference. This shown that the type of metal has little effect on the HOPs sorption onto natural solids. This result was consistent with that in other related studis. In addition, we inferred that the differences of component

  14. Cd isotopic composition in the suspended and sinking particles of the surface water of the South China Sea: The effects of biotic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shun-Chung; Lee, Der-Chuen; Ho, Tung-Yuan

    2015-10-01

    We determined the Cd isotopic composition of size-fractionated phytoplankton, zooplankton and sinking particles collected in the top 160 m of a deep water time series station in the South China Sea (SCS) to investigate the fractionation effects of major biotic activities. The isotopic composition (ε114/110Cd = [(114Cd /110Cd)sample / (114Cd /110Cd)NIST 3108 - 1 ] ×104) ranged from -2.5 to +7.0, from -9.3 to +6.7, from -1.2 to +4.5, and from -0.2 to + 3.2 ε in the plankton of size fractions 10-60, 60-150, >150, and >100 μm, respectively. The composition in the two smallest fractions, dominated by phytoplankton, was lower than the ambient seawater value (+8 to + 9 ε), indicating that the phytoplankton preferentially take up relatively light Cd isotopes. The insignificant difference between the composition of phytoplankton and zooplankton suggests that the fractionation effect through zooplankton grazing may be relatively small. The composition in the sinking particles at 30 m, ranging from +8.1 to + 12.8 ε, was significantly heavier than the composition in the suspended particles and the composition increased with depth, ranging from +11.5 to + 20.8 ε at 100 m, and from +16.0 to + 18.0 ε at 160 m. The increasing isotopic value with depth indicates that the processes of microbial degradation and/or zooplankton repackaging preferentially decomposed relatively light Cd in the sinking particles. The comparable isotopic composition between sinking particles and dissolved Cd indicates that the fractionation effects of major biotic activities, including phytoplankton uptake, microbial degradation and zooplankton repackaging, take place at similar magnitudes and result in insignificant net biological fractionation effects of Cd in the mixed layer.

  15. Effects of suspended particles on the rate of mass transfer to a rotating disk electrode. [Ferric cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Roha, D.J.

    1981-06-01

    Limiting currents for the reduction of ferric cyanide at a rotating disk were determined in the presence of 0 to 40 percent by volume of spherical glass beads. Experiments were conducted with six different particle diameters, and with rotation speeds in the range of 387 to 270 rpm, usong both a 0.56 cm and a 1.41 cm radius disk electrode. It was established that at a given rpm upon addition of glass beads in the limiting current, i/sub L/, may increase to more than three times its value without solids. This increase in limiting current density is greater at high rotation speeds and with the larger disk electrode. i/sub L/ as a function of particle diameter yields at maximum at approx. 10 ..mu..m. Two mass transfer models are offered to explain this behavior, both of which assume that the beads are in contact with the disk electrode and moving parallel to its surface. In the surface renewal model it is assumed that complete mixing takes place with the passage of each bead and the boundary layer is replaced with fresh bulk solution. While with the particle film model it is assumed the bead and a clinging film of fluid rotate together. The film promotes mass transfer by alternately absorbing and desorbing the diffusing species. The particle film model best explains the observed behavior of the limiting current density. Calculations of stirring power required verses i/sub L/ observed, show that adding beads to increase i/sub L/ consumes less additional power than simply increasing the rotation speed alone and even permits a decrease in the amount of stirring energy required per unit reactant consumed, at limiting current conditions.

  16. Suspended-sediment transport measurement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Of the two operationally defined phases of fluvial-sediment transport – suspended load and bedload – collection of suspended-load data is the more common. This is a reflection of a number of factors including the general predominance of suspended load over bedload in mass transport and the greater difficulty and costs associated with collecting bedload data. Acquisition of suspended-sediment data for sediment-transport computations requires collection of water-sediment samples that represent, or can be reliably adjusted to represent, the mean discharge-weighted concentration and particle-size distribution in a cross section at the time of sample collection. Analytical results from a sufficient number of representative samples obtained with concurrent water-discharge values are needed to compute suspended-sediment discharge for the period of interest.

  17. Properties of poly(styrene/alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzyl-polyglycidol) microspheres suspended in water. Effect of sodium chloride and temperature on particle diameters and electrophoretic mobility.

    PubMed

    Basinska, Teresa; Slomkowski, Stanislaw; Kazmierski, Slawomir; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2008-08-19

    Hydrodynamic and electrophoretic properties of core-shell poly(styrene/alpha- tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzyl-polyglycidol) (P(S/PGL)) microspheres suspended in water are described. The microspheres were obtained by surfactant-free emulsion copolymerization of styrene and alpha- tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzyl-polyglycidol macromonomer ( M n = 2800, M w/ M n = 1.05). The process yielded microspheres with number average diameter D n = 270 nm and with low diameter dispersity index D w/ D n = 1.01. Shells of P(S/PGL) microspheres were enriched in polyglycidol. Molar fraction of polyglycidol monomeric units in the shells (determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) was equal to 0.34, which is much higher than the average molar fraction of polyglycidol monomeric units in whole particles of 0.048. Influences of NaCl concentration and temperature on P(S/PGL) microsphere diameters and on their electrophoretic mobility were investigated. It was found that hydrodynamic diameter of P(S/PGL) microspheres, determined by photon correlation spectroscopy, decreased significantly when temperature did exceed a certain value (transition temperature, T t). It has been found that the decrease is more pronounced for higher concentrations of NaCl in the medium. For microspheres suspended in 10 (-1) M NaCl, the hydrodynamic diameter decreased by 8% whereas for the same particles in pure water the diameter decreased by 5.2%. The process of shrinkage was fully reversible. Values of T t for P(S/PGL) microspheres were lower for higher concentrations of NaCl. Adjustment of salt concentration allowed controlling T t in a range from 44.4 to 49.9 degrees C. 13C NMR relaxation time measurements (T 1) for carbon atoms in polyglycidol macromonomer revealed that T 1 did increase with increasing temperature (in temperature range from 25 to 75 degrees C) indicating higher motion of chains at higher temperature. Addition of NaCl did not induce a substantial change of T 1 in the mentioned temperature

  18. Determination of physical and dynamic properties of suspended particles in water column with ultrasonic scanning in between the water surface and stable sediment layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, Dursun; Alpar, Bedri; Ozeren, Sinan; Cagatay, Namık; Sari, Erol; Vardar, Denizhan; Eris, Kadir

    2015-04-01

    The behavior of seafloor sediment with its water column should be known against any occurrences of anoxic or oxic conditions. The most important ones of these conditions are possible leakage of natural gas or escape of liquids from sediment. On the basis of combined solid/liquid flow dynamics in sedimentation, such kind of events can change, even in an effective manner, the dynamic movements of molecules and their cumulative mass of particules, i.e. the suspended materials. The deployment of suitable sediment traps or ultrasonic transducers somewhere in the water column are not easy attempts in order to obtain useful information about the state of suspended materials during sedimentation. These are usually bulky instruments; therefore they may behave like an anti-move suppresser on the particles moving in the float direction, in oxic and anoxic manner. These instruments, on the other hand, may cover the effects of diffusive flow or bubble formed gas and fluid escape from the sediment surface into the water column. Ultrasonic scanners, however, are able to make observations in a remote manner, without affecting such artificial events. Our field trials were successfully completed at the historical estuary called Halic of Marmara sea . The physical properties; such as the velocity of particles, their travel directions, their dimensions and the ability to observe anti-compositor crushes of shock waves of the bubbles are only a few of these observations in natural ambience. The most important problem solved about water pressure during 3 atmosphere . The sensor has been tested successfully few times. We used the ''High voltage electric isolator oil filling'' to the inside of the scanner for pressure equalization between outer side and inner body of probe at a depth of (20 meters) beneath the sea surface . The transmitted signals by the planar crystal of the transducer become weaker under the pressure of overlying water column in depths. Our efforts are now focused on the

  19. Optical Characterisation of Suspended Particles in the Mackenzie River Plume (Canadian Arctic Ocean) and Implications for Ocean Colour Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doxaran, D.; Ehn, J.; Belanger, S.; Matsuoka, A.; Hooker, S.; Babin, M.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change significantly impacts Arctic shelf regions in terms of air temperature, ultraviolet radiation, melting of sea ice, precipitation, thawing of permafrost and coastal erosion. Direct consequences have been observed on the increasing Arctic river flow and a large amount of organic carbon sequestered in soils at high latitudes since the last glacial maximum can be expected to be delivered to the Arctic Ocean during the coming decade. Monitoring the fluxes and fate of this terrigenous organic carbon is problematic in such sparsely populated regions unless remote sensing techniques can be developed and proved to be operational. The main objective of this study is to develop an ocean colour algorithm to operationally monitor dynamics of suspended particulate matter (SPM) on the Mackenzie River continental shelf (Canadian Arctic Ocean) using satellite imagery. The water optical properties are documented across the study area and related to concentrations of SPM and particulate organic carbon (POC). Robust SPM and POC : SPM proxies are identified, such as the light backscattering and attenuation coefficients, and relationships are established between these optical and biogeochemical parameters. Following a semi-analytical approach, a regional SPM quantification relationship is obtained for the inversion of the water reflectance signal into SPM concentration. This relationship is reproduced based on independent field optical measurements. It is successfully applied to a selection of MODIS satellite data which allow estimating fluxes at the river mouth and monitoring the extension and dynamics of the Mackenzie River surface plume in 2009, 2010 and 2011. Good agreement is obtained with field observations representative of the whole water column in the river delta zone where terrigenous SPM is mainly constrained (out of short periods of maximum river outflow). Most of the seaward export of SPM is observed to occur within the west side of the river mouth. Future

  20. Seasonal variations in the cycling of aluminium, cadmium and manganese in a Scottish sea loch: biogeochemical processes involving suspended particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, I. R.; Hydes, D. J.; Statham, P. J.; Overnell, J.

    1999-11-01

    Concentrations of Al, Cd and Mn were determined in water and particles collected from water bottles over one year during 19 surveys of a silled fjord. Nutrient and hydrographic data were also collected. Particle fluxes were determined at one site using a sediment trap array. Concentrations of dissolved Al showed the strongest (negative) relationship to salinity ( r=0.91). This correlation decreased with the onset of the diatom bloom and was insignificant immediately post bloom. Removal of dissolved Al was coincident with an increase in particulate Al concentrations. The degree of removal could be predicted from previously reported Al/Si uptake ratios. Concentrations of leachable P in particulate material from the sediment traps increase at the onset of the bloom and decrease coincident with rapid regeneration as the bloom crashed. Particulate leachable Cd showed a lag in apparent uptake and regeneration relative to particulate leachable P. A substantial amount (ca. 53%) of the annual particle flux of Mn to the deepest trap is material recycled at the sediment surface and is not accumulated in the bottom sediment. Dissolved and particulate Mn levels in the loch have a strong seasonal pattern with low values prior to the spring phytoplankton bloom and increased values after the bloom crash. Maximum concentrations were observed in late autumn. Levels decreased to near pre-bloom values early the following year. This suggests bacterial decay of deposited organic carbon associated with the spring bloom-maintained suboxic conditions at or near the seawater-sediment interface throughout the majority of the year. After exhaustion of this organic matter pool recycling ceased for a brief (2-3 months) winter period.

  1. Identification of compounds bound to suspended solids causing sub-lethal toxic effects in Daphnia magna. A field study on re-suspended particles during river floods in Ebro River.

    PubMed

    Rivetti, Claudia; Gómez-Canela, Cristian; Lacorte, Silvia; Díez, Sergi; Lázaro, Wilkinson L; Barata, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Identifying chemicals causing adverse effects in organisms present in water remains a challenge in environmental risk assessment. This study aimed to assess and identify toxic compounds bound to suspended solids re-suspended during a prolonged period of flushing flows in the lower part of Ebro River (NE, Spain). This area is contaminated with high amounts of organochlorine and mercury sediment wastes. Chemical characterization of suspended material was performed by solid phase extraction using a battery of non-polar and polar solvents and analyzed by GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS. Mercury content was also determined for all sites. Post-exposure feeding rates of Daphnia magna were used to assess toxic effects of whole and filtered water samples and of re-constituted laboratory water with re-suspended solid fractions. Organochlorine and mercury residues in the water samples increased from upstream to downstream locations. Conversely, toxic effects were greater at the upstream site than downstream of the superfund Flix reservoir. A further analysis of the suspended solid fraction identified a toxic component eluted within the 80:20 methanol:water fraction. Characterization of that toxic component fraction by LC-MS/MS identified the phytotoxin anatoxin-a, whose residue levels were correlated with observed feeding inhibition responses. Further feeding inhibition assays conducted in the lab using anatoxin-a produced from Planktothrix agardhii, a filamentous cyanobacteria, confirmed field results. This study provides evidence that in real field situation measured contaminant residues do not always agree with toxic effects.

  2. Size of Suspended Bacterial Cells and Association of Heterotrophic Activity with Size Fractions of Particles in Estuarine and Coastal Waters †

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Ferguson, Randolph L.; Rublee, Parke A.

    1984-01-01

    The size of bacteria and the size distribution of heterotrophic activity were examined in estuarine, neritic, and coastal waters. The data indicated the small size of suspended marine bacteria and the predominance of free-living cells in numerical abundance and in the incorporation of dissolved amino acids. The average per-cell volume of suspended marine bacteria in all environments was less than 0.1 μm3. Cell volume ranged from 0.072 to 0.096 μm3 at salinities of 0 to 34.3‰ in the Newport River estuary, N.C., and from 0.078 to 0.096 μm3 in diverse areas of the Gulf of Mexico. Thus, the free-living bacteria were too small to be susceptible to predation by copepods. In the Newport River estuary, ca. 93 to 99% of the total number of cells and 75 to 97% of incorporated tritium (from 3H-labeled mixed amino acids) retained by a 0.2-μm-pore-size filter passed through a 3.0-μm-pore-size filter. Although the amino acid turnover rate per cell was higher for the bacteria in the >3.0-μm size fraction than in the <3.0-μm size fraction, the small number of bacteria associated with the >3.0-μm size particles resulted in the low relative contribution of attached bacteria to total heterotrophic activity in the estuary. For coastal and neritic samples, collected off the coast of Georgia and northeast Florida and in the plume of the Mississippi River, 56 to 98% of incorporated label passed through a 3.0-μm-pore-size filter. The greatest activity in the >3.0-μm fraction in the Georgia Bight was at nearshore stations and in the bottom samples. Our data were consistent with the hypothesis that resuspension of bottom material is an important factor in influencing the proportion of heterotrophic activity attributable to particle-associated bacteria. PMID:16346582

  3. Suspended particulate matter in the Chesapeake Bay entrance and adjacent shelf waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingerich, K. J.; Oertel, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    Approximately 400 samples were collected from the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay for various analyses, including 138 for suspended solids. Characteristics of suspended solids that were analyzed included: total suspended matter; total suspended inorganics, total suspended organics; percent organics; particle size distribution; and presence or absence of 11 of the most prominent particle types.

  4. Reversible electrically-driven magnetic domain wall rotation in multiferroic heterostructures to manipulate suspended on-chip magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Mark; Sohn, Hyunmin; Liang, Cheng-Yen; Hockel, Joshua; Wetzlar, Kyle; Keller, Scott; McLellan, Brenda; Marcus, Matthew; Doran, Andrew; Young, Anthony; Kläui, Mathias; Carman, Gregory; Bokor, Jeffrey; Candler, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate reversible electrically-driven, strain-mediated domain wall (DW) rotation in Ni rings fabricated on piezoelectric [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) O3]0.66-[PbTiO3]0.34 (PMN-PT) substrates. An electric field applied across the PMN-PT substrate induces a strain in the Ni rings producing DW rotation around the ring toward the dominant PMN-PT strain axis by inverse magnetostriction. We observe DWs reversibly cycled between their initial and rotated state as a function of the applied electric field with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photo-emission electron microscopy. The DW rotation is analytically predicted using a fully coupled micromagnetic/elastodyanmic multi-physics simulation to verify that the experimental behavior is caused by the electrically-generated strain in this multiferroic system. Finally, this DW rotation is used to capture and manipulate magnetic particles in a fluidic environment to demonstrate a proof-of-concept energy-efficient pathway for multiferroic-based lab-on-a-chip applications. Supported by TANMS (NSF 11-537), E3S, US Dept of Energy (DE-AC02-05CH11231), EU, and DFG.

  5. Removal of antibiotics from water in the coexistence of suspended particles and natural organic matters using amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants: A combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuying; Yang, Zhen; Ren, Kexin; Tian, Ziqi; Dong, Chang; Ma, Ruixue; Yu, Ge; Yang, Weiben

    2016-11-05

    Contamination of trace antibiotics is widely found in surface water sources. This work delineates removal of trace antibiotics (norfloxacin (NOR), sulfadiazine (SDZ) or tylosin (TYL)) from synthetic surface water by flocculation, in the coexistence of inorganic suspended particles (kaolin) and natural organic matter (humic acid, HA). To avoid extra pollution caused by petrochemical products-based modification reagents, environmental-friendly amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants, Ctrp and Ctyr, with different functional aromatic-rings structures were employed. Jar tests at various pHs exhibited that, Ctyr, owning phenol groups as electron donors, was favored for elimination of cationic NOR (∼50% removal; optimal pH: 6; optimal dosage: 4mg/L) and TYL (∼60% removal; optimal pH: 7; optimal dosage: 7.5mg/L), due to π-π electron donator-acceptor (EDA) effect and unconventional H-bonds. Differently, Ctrp with indole groups as electron acceptor had better removal rate (∼50%) of SDZ anions (electron donator). According to correlation analysis, the coexisted kaolin and HA played positive roles in antibiotics' removal. Detailed pairwise interactions in molecular level among different components were clarified by spectral analysis and theoretical calculations (density functional theory), which are important for both the structural design of new flocculants aiming at targeted contaminants and understanding the environmental behaviors of antibiotics in water.

  6. Tomographic particle-image velocimetry and thermography in Rayleigh-Bénard convection using suspended thermochromic liquid crystals and digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciofalo, M.; Signorino, M.; Simiano, M.

    2003-02-01

    Steady-state flow and temperature fields in shallow rectangular enclosures heated from below were visualized and quantitatively characterized by using glycerol as the working fluid and suspended thermochromic liquid crystals as tracers. Couples of photographs taken on 120 transparency film for two orthogonal sets of vertical plane sections were digitized by a 1,200-dpi flatbed scanner and split into HSL (hue-saturation-lightness) components by using commercial general-purpose image processing software. Two-dimensional velocity fields were obtained from the lightness component by a two-frame cross-correlation technique using a commercial particle-image velocimetry (PIV) package. Temperature fields were obtained from the hue component on the basis of an in situ calibration procedure, conducted under conditions of stable thermal stratification. Finally, 2D flow and temperature distributions were interpolated by a purpose-written Fortran program to give 3D flow and thermal fields in the enclosure. Results are presented here for the case of a 1:2:4 aspect ratio cavity at a Rayleigh number of ˜ 14,500, for which a complex 3D flow and temperature distribution was observed.

  7. Assessment of the relationship between total suspended particles and the response of two biological indicators transplanted to an urban area in central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreras, H. A.; Rodriguez, J. H.; González, C. M.; Wannaz, E. D.; Garcia Ferreyra, F.; Perez, C. A.; Pignata, M. L.

    Samples of the vascular plant Tradescantia pallida and the lichen Usnea amblyoclada were exposed from October 2004 to April 2005 in three sites with different local sources of air pollution in Córdoba city, Argentina. Simultaneous determinations of the ambient levels of total suspended particles were made for each site. Young inflorescenses of T. pallida were collected in November, February and April and the frequency of micronuclei was determined on early tetrads of pollen mother cells. Physiological parameters and the elemental composition of lichen thalli were measured from samples exposed and replaced every month. Significant differences among sampling sites were observed in the frequency of micronuclei measured in T. pallida as well as in many physiological parameters and elements accumulated in lichen thalli. The mass of particulate material as well as the concentration of Ca, Mn, Cu, Zn and Sr was significantly different in different sampling sites, too. These results suggest that in situ biomonitoring using both higher plants and lichens may be of use to characterize air pollution in areas devoid of instrumental monitoring techniques or where it is necessary to explore the distribution of air contaminants at a microscale.

  8. Simultaneous determination of radiocesium ((135)Cs, (137)Cs) and plutonium ((239)Pu, (240)Pu) isotopes in river suspended particles by ICP-MS/MS and SF-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liguo; Zheng, Jian; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Pan, Shaoming; Wang, Zhongtang; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2016-10-01

    Due to radioisotope releases in the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, long-term monitoring of radiocesium ((135)Cs and (137)Cs) and Pu isotopes ((239)Pu and (240)Pu) in river suspended particles is necessary to study the transport and fate of these long-lived radioisotopes in the land-ocean system. However, it is expensive and technically difficult to collect samples of suspended particles from river and ocean. Thus, simultaneous determination of multi-radionuclides remains as a challenging topic. In this study, for the first time, we report an analytical method for simultaneous determination of radiocesium and Pu isotopes in suspended particles with small sample size (1-2g). Radiocesium and Pu were sequentially pre-concentrated using ammonium molybdophosphate and ferric hydroxide co-precipitation, respectively. After the two-stage ion-exchange chromatography separation from the matrix elements, radiocesium and Pu isotopes were finally determined by ICP-MS/MS and SF-ICP-MS, respectively. The interfering elements of U ((238)U(1)H(+) and (238)U(2)H(+) for (239)Pu and (240)Pu, respectively) and Ba ((135)Ba(+) and (137)Ba(+) for (135)Cs and (137)Cs, respectively) were sufficiently removed with the decontamination factors of 1-8×10(6) and 1×10(4), respectively, with the developed method. Soil reference materials were utilized for method validation, and the obtained (135)Cs/(137)Cs and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios, and (239+240)Pu activities showed a good agreement with the certified/information values. In addition, the developed method was applied to analyze radiocesium and Pu in the suspended particles of land water samples collected from Fukushima Prefecture after the FDNPP accident. The (135)Cs/(137)Cs atom ratios (0.329-0.391) and (137)Cs activities (23.4-152Bq/g) suggested radiocesium contamination of the suspended particles mainly originated from the accident-released radioactive contaminates, while similar Pu contamination of suspended

  9. Global gene expression changes in human embryonic lung fibroblasts induced by organic extracts from respirable air particles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, we used cell-free assays to demonstrate the toxic effects of complex mixtures of organic extracts from urban air particles (PM2.5) collected in four localities of the Czech Republic (Ostrava-Bartovice, Ostrava-Poruba, Karvina and Trebon) which differed in the extent and sources of air pollution. To obtain further insight into the biological mechanisms of action of the extractable organic matter (EOM) from ambient air particles, human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL12469) were treated with the same four EOMs to assess changes in the genome-wide expression profiles compared to DMSO treated controls. Method For this purpose, HEL cells were incubated with subtoxic EOM concentrations of 10, 30, and 60 μg EOM/ml for 24 hours and global gene expression changes were analyzed using human whole genome microarrays (Illumina). The expression of selected genes was verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Results Dose-dependent increases in the number of significantly deregulated transcripts as well as dose-response relationships in the levels of individual transcripts were observed. The transcriptomic data did not differ substantially between the localities, suggesting that the air pollution originating mainly from various sources may have similar biological effects. This was further confirmed by the analysis of deregulated pathways and by identification of the most contributing gene modulations. The number of significantly deregulated KEGG pathways, as identified by Goeman's global test, varied, depending on the locality, between 12 to 29. The Metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 exhibited the strongest upregulation in all 4 localities and CYP1B1 had a major contribution to the upregulation of this pathway. Other important deregulated pathways in all 4 localities were ABC transporters (involved in the translocation of exogenous and endogenous metabolites across membranes and DNA repair), the Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways (associated

  10. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles inhibit cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhimin; Morrow, Matthew P; Asefa, Tewodros; Sharma, Krishna K; Duncan, Cole; Anan, Abhishek; Penefsky, Harvey S; Goodisman, Jerry; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2008-05-01

    We studied the effect of two types of mesoporous silica nanoparticles, MCM-41 and SBA-15, on mitochondrial O 2 consumption (respiration) in HL-60 (myeloid) cells, Jurkat (lymphoid) cells, and isolated mitochondria. SBA-15 inhibited cellular respiration at 25-500 microg/mL; the inhibition was concentration-dependent and time-dependent. The cellular ATP profile paralleled that of respiration. MCM-41 had no noticeable effect on respiration rate. In cells depleted of metabolic fuels, 50 microg/mL SBA-15 delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration by 12 min and 200 microg/mL SBA-15 by 34 min; MCM-41 also delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration. Neither SBA-15 nor MCM-41 affected cellular glutathione. Both nanoparticles inhibited respiration of isolated mitochondria and submitochondrial particles.

  11. Modeling Total Suspended Solids (TSS) Concentrations in Narragansett Bay.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work covers mechanistic modeling of suspended particulates in estuarine systems with an application to Narragansett Bay, RI. Suspended particles directly affect water clarity and attenuate light in the water column. Water clarity affects both phytoplankton and submerged aqua...

  12. Long-term observation of water-soluble chemical components and acid-digested metals in the total suspended particles collected at Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, D.; Okada, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Nakama, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Somada, Y.; Ijyu, M.; Azechi, S.; Oshiro, Y.; Nakaema, F.; Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.

    2011-12-01

    The economic growth and population increase in recent Asia have been increasing air pollution. Emission rate of air pollutants from Asia, in particular oxides of nitrogen, surpassed those from North America and Europe and should continue to exceed them for decades. Okinawa Island is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km south of South Korea. Its location is ideal in observing East Asia's air quality because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background clean air and can be compared with continental air masses which have been affected by anthropogenic activities. We collected total suspended particles (TSP) on quartz filters by using a high volume air sampler at the Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS), Okinawa, Japan during August 2005 and August 2010. Sampling duration was one week for each sample. We determined the concentrations of water-soluble anions, cations, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and acid-digested metals in TSP samples using ion chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry, total organic carbon analyzer and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), respectively. Seasonal variation of water-soluble chemical components and acid-digested metals showed that the concentrations were the lowest in summer, higher in fall and winter, and the highest in spring. When air mass came from Asian continent, the concentrations of water-soluble chemical components and acid-digested metals were much higher compared to the other directions, suggesting long-range transport of air pollutants from Asian continent. Also, when the air mass came from Asian continent (75-100% dominant), the mean concentrations of non-sea salt sulfate and nitrate increased ca. 1.8 times and ca. 3.7 times, respectively between 2005 and 2010, and the ratio of nitrate to

  13. LABORATORY REPORT ON IODINE ({sup 129}I AND {sup 127}I) SPECIATION, TRANSFORMATION AND MOBILITY IN HANFORD GROUNDWATER, SUSPENDED PARTICLES AND SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.; Santschi, P.; Xu, C.; Zhang, S.; Ho, Y.; Li, H.; Schwehr, K.

    2012-09-30

    than iodide K{sub d} values, and the K{sub d} values for both species tended to increase with the amount of organic carbon (OC) present in the sediment. It is especially noteworthy that this trend existed at the very low OC concentrations that naturally exist in the Hanford sediments. Iodine and OC can form essentially irreversible covalent bonds, thereby providing a yet unstudied {sup 129}I retardation reaction at the Hanford Site. In addition to the transformation of iodine species, the sediment collected from the vadose zone also released stable iodide into the aqueous phase. It was found that the three sediments all took up the ambient iodate from the groundwater and slowly transformed it into iodide under the laboratory conditions, likely dependent on the abundance of reducing agents such as organic matter and Fe{sup 2+}. Therefore two competitive iodine processes were identified, the tendency for the sediment to reduce iodate to iodide, and the groundwater chemistry to maintain the iodine as iodate, presumably it is largely the result of natural pH and dissolved O{sub 2}/Eh levels. Suspended carbonate (and silica) particles collected from Hanford groundwater contained elevated amounts of iodine (142 ± 8 μg/g iodine), consisting mainly of iodate (>99%). Iodate was likely incorporated into the carbonate structure during calcite precipitation upon degasing of CO{sub 2} as the groundwater samples were removed from the subsurface. This concentration of groundwater iodate in precipitated carbonate has implication to long-term fate and transport of 129I and on active in-situ {sup 129}I groundwater remediation. This study provides some of the first groundwater radioiodine speciation studies conducted in arid environments and provides much needed mechanistic descriptions to permit making informed decisions about low-cost/high intellectual input remediation options, such as monitored natural attenuation, or long-term stewardship of nuclear waste disposal sites.

  14. Combined exposure of diesel exhaust particles and respirable Soufrière Hills volcanic ash causes a (pro-)inflammatory response in an in vitro multicellular epithelial tissue barrier model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomašek, Ines; Horwell, Claire J.; Damby, David; Barošová, Hana; Geers, Christoph; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J. D.

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundThere are justifiable health concerns regarding the potential adverse effects associated with human exposure to volcanic ash (VA) particles, especially when considering communities living in urban areas already exposed to heightened air pollution. The aim of this study was, therefore, to gain an imperative, first understanding of the biological impacts of respirable VA when exposed concomitantly with diesel particles.MethodsA sophisticated in vitro 3D triple cell co-culture model of the human alveolar epithelial tissue barrier was exposed to either a single or repeated dose of dry respirable VA (deposited dose of 0.26 ± 0.09 or 0.89 ± 0.29 μg/cm2, respectively) from Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat for a period of 24 h at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Subsequently, co-cultures were exposed to co-exposures of single or repeated VA and diesel exhaust particles (DEP; NIST SRM 2975; 0.02 mg/mL), a model urban pollutant, at the pseudo-ALI. The biological impact of each individual particle type was also analysed under these precise scenarios. The cytotoxic (LDH release), oxidative stress (depletion of intracellular GSH) and (pro-)inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-1β) responses were assessed after the particulate exposures. The impact of VA exposure upon cell morphology, as well as its interaction with the multicellular model, was visualised via confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively.ResultsThe combination of respirable VA and DEP, in all scenarios, incited an heightened release of TNF-α and IL-8 as well as significant increases in IL-1β, when applied at sub-lethal doses to the co-culture compared to VA exposure alone. Notably, the augmented (pro-)inflammatory responses observed were not mediated by oxidative stress. LSM supported the quantitative assessment of cytotoxicity, with no changes in cell morphology within the barrier model evident. A direct interaction of the VA with all

  15. Nosepiece respiration monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, A. L.; Long, L. E.; Rice, N. E.

    1968-01-01

    Comfortable, inexpensive nosepiece respiration monitor produces rapid response signals to most conventional high impedance medical signal conditioners. The monitor measures respiration in a manner that produces a large signal with minimum delay.

  16. Respirator Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... it last? That depends on how much filtering capacity the respirator has and the amount of hazard ... and it will vary by each respirator model's capacities. That's why your emergency plan must include some ...

  17. Source tracing of fluvial suspended sediments by magnetic and geochemical particle characterization: example of the Canche watershed (Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patault, Edouard; Alary, Claire; Franke, Christine; Gauthier, Arnaud; Abriak, Nor-Edine

    2016-04-01

    In France, erosion by water run-off is estimated to 1.5 t ha-1yr-1 and can exceed 10 t ha-1yr-1 in large growing areas, such as the North of France (Nord-Pas-de-Calais). In this region, the Canche watershed (1294 km2) sustains heavy loss of fertile soils. The land use is mainly dominated by arable lands (80%) and in 2013, 104 kt of suspended sediment transited to the estuary. As demonstrated in literature, agricultural soil erosion leads to the gradual disappearance and depletion of fertile soil, which constitute a non-renewable resource at human time scale. Additionally, water erosion can significantly damage the aquatic habitat and can be responsible for the input of nutrients, bacteria, pesticides, heavy metals and radionuclides into surface waters. Conscious of these effects, many programs have emerged in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais to reduce erosion. This study presents a combination of environmental magnetic proxy parameters and geochemical analyses on sediments and suspended particulate matter. The aim is to develop effective tools to trace erosion by water run-off and quantify this process. In order to identify the respective sediment sources in the Canche watershed, sediment trap samples of suspended particulate matter were recovered at key positions along the Canche watershed. The preliminary results show that magnetic concentration (Mrs) shows typical values for the agricultural soils in the region, but these variations in magnetic concentrations and total irons concentrations are not always correlated, which may be explained by the iron speciation. In calculating the so-called S-ratio for each sample we can distinguish changes in magneto-mineralogy (and thus iron speciation) from magnetite-dominated assemblages in the mainstream Canche (naturel background signal) to high-coercivity-dominated assemblages in the tributaries, typical for soil erosion material rich in hematite/goethite. In combination with the element concentrations from ICP analyses, this proxy

  18. Spatial variability of concentrations of chlorophyll a, dissolved organic matter and suspended particles in the surface layer of the Kara Sea in September 2011 from lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelevin, V. V.; Zavjalov, P. O.; Belyaev, N. A.; Konovalov, B. V.; Kravchishina, M. D.; Mosharov, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents results of underway remote laser sensing of the surface water layer in continuous automatic mode using the UFL-9 fluorescent lidar onboard the R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh during cruise 59 in the Kara Sea in 2011. The description of the lidar, the approach to interpreting seawater fluorescence data, and certain methodical aspects of instrument calibration and measurement are presented. Calibration of the lidar is based on laboratory analysis of water samples taken from the sea surface during the cruise. Spatial distribution of chlorophyll a, total organic carbon and suspended matter concentrations in the upper quasi-homogeneous layer are mapped and the characteristic scales of the variability are estimated. Some dependencies between the patchiness of the upper water layer and the atmospheric forcing and freshwater runoff are shown.

  19. [Research on the Content Characteristics and Pollution Evaluation of Heavy Metals in Filtered Water and Suspended Particles from Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia Sections of the Yellow River in Wet Season Using HR-ICP-MS].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-ling; Liu, Jing-jun; Deng, Feng-yu; Zuo, Hang; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Li-yang; Liu, Ying

    2015-10-01

    The content characteristics, pollution evaluation and source identification of 6 heavy Metals (Cd, Pb, Cr, As, Cu and Zn) in filtered water and 9 heavy Metals (Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, V, Co, Zn and Mn) in suspended particles from 10 sampling sites such as Zhaojunfuqiao (S1) and Baotoufuqiao (S2), etc. from Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia sections of the Yellow River in 2012 Wet Season were studied to understand the condition of the heavy metal pollution in Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia Sections of the Yellow River by using high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS). Multivariate geochemical approaches and statistical analysis were also exploited for assessing the level of heavy metals in filtered water and suspended particles from studied area. The results showed that in filtering water, only the concentrations of Cr exceeded the standard value of Environmental Quality Standard for Surface Water (GB3838-2002) and were the highest (74.8-94.7 μg x L(-1)) among all elements in 10 sampling sites; Single factor pollution index (I(i)) results suggested that the water quality in all sampling sites were contaminated by both Cr and total nitrogen (TN), with the exception of TN in Baotoufuqiao (S2); Integrated Nemerow pollution index (I) indicated that the I values in all sampling sites were between 1-2 (light pollution), which implied that the water quality in Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia sections, especially downstream sections (S1-S6) of the Yellow River wasn't an ideal source for drinking and using in aquaculture any more. In suspended particles, concentrations of heavy metals were relatively higher than their soil background values in 10 sampling sites, except Ni in S10 (34.7 μg x L(-1)). Index of geo-accumulation (I(geo)) indicated that the I(geo) values of Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, V, Co, Zn and Mn in all sampling sites were less than 1 (unpolluted or unpolluted-moderately polluted), respectively, while I(geo)Cd were the highest in 10

  20. Particle-associated contaminants in street dust, parking lot dust, soil, lake-bottom sediment, and suspended and streambed sediment, Lake Como and Fosdic Lake watersheds, Fort Worth, Texas, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Jennifer T.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Werth, Charles J.; Yang, Yanning

    2006-01-01

    A previous study by the U.S. Geological Survey of impaired water bodies in Fort Worth, Texas, reported elevated but variable concentrations of particle-associated contaminants (PACs) comprising chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and trace elements in suspended and bed sediment of lakes and streams affected by urban land use. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Fort Worth, collected additional samples during October 2004 to investigate sources of PACs in the watersheds of two impaired lakes: Lake Como and Fosdic Lake. Source materials and aquatic sediment were sampled and analyzed for PACs. Source materials sampled consisted of street dust and soil from areas with residential and commercial land use and parking lot dust from sealed and unsealed parking lots. Aquatic sediment sampled consisted of bottom-sediment cores from the two lakes and suspended and streambed sediment from the influent stream of each lake. Samples were analyzed for chlorinated hydrocarbons (organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, major and trace elements, organic carbon, grain size, and radionuclides.

  1. Speech and respiration.

    PubMed

    Conrad, B; Schönle, P

    1979-04-12

    This investigation deals with the temporal aspects of air volume changes during speech. Speech respiration differs fundamentally from resting respiration. In resting respiration the duration and velocity of inspiration (air flow or lung volume change) are in a range similar to that of expiration. In speech respiration the duration of inspiration decreases and its velocity increases; conversely, the duration of expiration increases and the volume of air flow decreases dramatically. The following questions arise: are these two respiration types different entities, or do they represent the end points of a continuum from resting to speech respiration? How does articulation without the generation of speech sound affect breathing? Does (verbalized?) thinking without articulation or speech modify the breathing pattern? The main test battery included four tasks (spontaneous speech, reading, serial speech, arithmetic) performed under three conditions (speaking aloud, articulating subvocally, quiet performance by tryping to exclusively 'think' the tasks). Respiratory movements were measured with a chest pneumograph and evaluated in comparison with a phonogram and the identified spoken text. For quiet performance the resulting respiratory time ratio (relation of duration of inspiration versus expiration) showed a gradual shift in the direction of speech respiration--the least for reading, the most for arithmetic. This change was even more apparent for the subvocal tasks. It is concluded that (a) there is a gradual automatic change from resting to speech respiration and (b) the degree of internal verbalization (activation of motor speech areas) defines the degree of activation of the speech respiratory pattern.

  2. Voluntary use of respirators.

    PubMed

    Feiner, Lynn

    2009-11-01

    Allowing voluntary use of respirators can provide workers with an added level of comfort and relief from nuisance levels of particulates, gases, or vapors. But misuse can result in illness or injury to the worker. Understanding and following OSHA's guidelines on voluntary use of respirators is one of the many ways you help provide a safe workplace and ensure your employees stay healthy.

  3. 40 CFR 230.21 - Suspended particulates/turbidity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., usually smaller than silt, and organic particles. Suspended particulates may enter water bodies as a..., and man's activities including dredging and filling. Particulates may remain suspended in the water column for variable periods of time as a result of such factors as agitation of the water...

  4. Optimizing the deposition of hydrogen evolution sites on suspended semiconductor particles using on-line photocatalytic reforming of aqueous methanol solutions.

    PubMed

    Busser, G Wilma; Mei, Bastian; Muhler, Martin

    2012-11-01

    The deposition of hydrogen evolution sites on photocatalysts is a crucial step in the multistep process of synthesizing a catalyst that is active for overall photocatalytic water splitting. An alternative approach to conventional photodeposition was developed, applying the photocatalytic reforming of aqueous methanol solutions to deposit metal particles on semiconductor materials such as Ga₂O₃ and (Ga₀.₆ Zn₀.₄)(N₀.₆O₀.₄). The method allows optimizing the loading of the co-catalysts based on the stepwise addition of their precursors and the continuous online monitoring of the evolved hydrogen. Moreover, a synergetic effect between different co-catalysts can be directly established.

  5. Respiration in Aquatic Insects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, John

    1985-01-01

    This article: (1) explains the respiratory patterns of several freshwater insects; (2) describes the differences and mechanisms of spiracular cutaneous, and gill respiration; and (3) discusses behavioral aspects of selected aquatic insects. (ML)

  6. Aerosol penetration through filtering facepieces and respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Lehtimäki, M; Willeke, K

    1992-09-01

    Air-purifying respirators must be certified following the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) filter test criteria (30 CFR 11). The criteria specify a range for the mean particle size and the measure of spread permissible for the test aerosol. The authors' experiments have shown that aerosol penetration as a function of particle size differs considerably among certified respirators of the same type. Filtering facepieces (disposable respirators) and cartridges of the dust-mist, dust-mist-fume, and high-efficiency particulate air type were tested. The respirators were sealed to mannequins in a test chamber. The aerosol concentrations inside and outside the respirator were measured by an aerodynamic particle sizer and a laser aerosol spectrometer over a particle size range of 0.1 to 15 microns. Five flow rates ranging from 5 to 100 L/min were used to study flow dependency. The aerosol penetration through the filters is presented as a function of particle size. Aerosol penetration and pressure drop are combined to express the performance of each filter in terms of "quality factor." Under the same test conditions, the quality factor of one respirator may be as much as 6.6 times more than that of another respirator of the same type. The filter quality factor has a greater aerosol size dependency as airflow and aerosol size increase. In general, cartridges have a larger surface area than filtering facepieces but not necessarily lower filter penetration or higher filter quality.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Composition, size distribution, optical properties and radiative effects of re-suspended local mineral dust of Rome area by individual-particle microanalysis and radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrodangelo, A.; Salzano, R.; Bassani, C.; Pareti, S.; Perrino, C.

    2015-05-01

    New information on the PM10 mineral dust from site-specific (Rome area, Latium) outcropped rocks, and on the microphysics, optical properties and radiative effects of mineral dust at local level were gained in this work. A multi-disciplinary approach was used, based on individual-particle scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy-dispersive microanalysis (SEM XEDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of dust, size distribution of mineral particles, and radiative transfer modelling (RTM).The mineral composition of Rome lithogenic PM10 varies between an end-member dominated by silicate minerals and one exclusively composed of calcite. The first is obtained from volcanic lithotypes, the second from travertine or limestones; lithogenic PM10 with intermediate composition derives mainly from siliciclastic rocks or marlstones of Rome area. Size and mineral species of PM10 particles of silicate-dominated dust types are tuned mainly by weathering and, to lesser extent, by debris formation or crystallization; chemical precipitation of CaCO3 plays a major role in calcite-dominated types. These differences are evidenced by the diversity of volume distributions, within either dust types, or mineral species. Further differences are observed between volume distributions of calcite from travertine (natural source) and from road dust (anthropic source), specifically on the width, shape and enrichment of the fine fraction (unimodal at 5 μm a.d. for travertine, bimodal at 3.8 and 1.8 μm a.d. for road dust). Log-normal probability density functions of volcanics and travertine dusts affect differently the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the asymmetry parameter (g) in the VISible and Near Infrared (NIR) regions, depending also on the absorbing/non-absorbing character of volcanics and travertine, respectively. The downward component of the BOA solar irradiance simulated by RTM for a volcanics-rich or travertine-rich atmosphere shows that volcanics contribution to the solar

  8. Long-term trends in suspended chlorophyll a and vertical particle flux with respect to changing physical conditions in eastern Fram Strait, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nöthig, Eva-Maria; Bauerfeind, Eduard; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka; Kraft, Angelina; Bracher, Astrid; Cherkasheva, Alexandra; Fahl, Kirsten; Hardge, Kristin; Kaleschke, Lars; Lalande, Catherine; Metfies, Katja; Peeken, Ilka; Klages, Michael; Soltwedel, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The Fram Strait is the main gateway for water, heat, sea ice and plankton exchanges between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic. The abundance and composition of phyto- and zooplankton communities is governed to a large extent by key physical factors such as water temperature, salinity, currents, stratification of the water column and the presence or absence of sea ice. With our study we aim at tracing effects of environmental changes in pelagic system structure and impacts on the fate of organic matter produced in the upper water column in a region that is anticipated to react rapidly to climate change. Chlorophyll a, an indicator of biomass standing stock of phytoplankton, has been measured in the upper 100 m of the water column since 1991 during several summer cruises (with RV 'Polarstern') across Fram Strait. Chlorophyll a measurements are used to validate productivity estimates by remote sensing from space. The quantity and composition of export fluxes of organic matter including biomarker have been measured since 2000 by annually moored sediment traps deployed at 200-300m at the AWI long-term observatory HAUSGARTEN in eastern Fram Strait (79°/4°E). Along with sinking particles, zooplankton (so-called 'swimmers') was also caught in the traps. Analyses of the material collected by the sediment traps allowed us to track seasonal and inter-annual changes in the surface waters at HAUSGARTEN. We present temporal trends in the chlorophyll a distribution (1991-2012), in swimmer composition in the traps (2000-2009), and in the export of biomarker (2000-2008), particulate organic carbon, particulate biogenic silica, calcium carbonate, and the protist composition (2000-2012), in relation to the changing sea ice cover and water temperature. Whereas chlorophyll a (integrated values 0-100m) showed only a slight increase, the swimmer composition and the composition of the annual particle flux changed after a warm water event occurring from 2005-2007. The warm anomaly

  9. Seasonal Control of Surface-Water Dissolved Iron Concentrations by Suspended Particle Concentrations on the Northern Gulf of Alaska Continental Shelf and Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crusius, J.; Schroth, A. W.; Campbell, R.; Cullen, J. T.; Dillman, D.; Resing, J.

    2012-12-01

    The continental shelf region of the northern Gulf of Alaska (GoA) supports a productive ecosystem including an important commercial fishery. Downwelling winds during most of the year imply that some mechanism other than upwelling must be supplying the essential nutrients iron and nitrate. Although it is well known that iron limits productivity offshore in the GoA, we have a poor understanding of the controls on Fe supply. Data from cruises from 2010 provide some new insight into the mechanisms of Fe supply. Cruises were carried out along a transect extending from the mouth of the Copper River to ~40 km beyond the shelf break three times per year including early April, early May, and late July. High-resolution surface-water sampling was carried out, as well as bottle casts at 5 stations. High, fairly uniform concentrations of "total dissolvable iron" (TDFe; unfiltered sample acidified to pH=1.7) as well as "dissolved" Fe (dFe) were observed spanning the shelf in April, suggesting sediment resuspension is an important source of dFe to surface waters at that time. By contrast, high dFe and TDFe concentrations in late July coincide with low-salinity surface water, which in this location indicates a glacial meltwater source. Throughout spring and summer high particle concentrations across much of the shelf appear to "buffer" dFe concentrations to ~3 nmol/kg, which are close to those observed by Lippiatt et al (2010) in the region. This is consistent with dFe concentrations being determined by the organic ligand concentrations that, in turn, are fairly constant. In late July, surface water dFe concentrations are ~0.5 nmol/kg on the outer shelf and up to ~50 km further offshore. These dFe concentrations on the outer shelf are much lower in July than earlier in the year, owing to Fe removal by phytoplankton uptake and by scavenging, as well as by the lack of particulate Fe sources to surface waters in July. However, the high surface-water dFe observed ~50 km beyond the

  10. Diffusiophoretic Focusing of Suspended Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Nan; Nery-Azevedo, Rodrigo; Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.; Squires, Todd M.

    2016-12-01

    Using a microfluidic system to impose and maintain controlled, steady-state multicomponent p H and electrolyte gradients, we present systems where the diffusiophoretic migration of suspended colloids leads them to focus at a particular position, even in steady-state gradients. We show that naively superpositing effects of each gradient may seem conceptually and qualitatively reasonable, yet is invalid due to the coupled transport of these multicomponent electrolytes. In fact, reformulating the classic theories in terms of the flux of each species (rather than local gradients) reveals rather stringent conditions that are necessary for diffusiophoretic focusing in steady gradients. Either particle surface properties must change as a function of local composition in solution (akin to isoelectric focusing in electrophoresis), or chemical reactions must occur between electrolyte species, for such focusing to be possible. The generality of these findings provides a conceptual picture for understanding, predicting, or designing diffusiophoretic systems.

  11. The transport of 'suspended' sediment by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Anthony; Cooper, James; Wainwright, John; Sekiguichi, Tomohiro

    2013-04-01

    Coherent turbulent flow structures, such as eddy-like, macro-turbulent structures and smaller scale bursting events, cause a two-way vertical exchange of momentum between the sediment bed and the water surface. Thus movement of suspended particles in open channel flows has a strong correlation with the advection and propagation of these turbulent flow structures, controlling entrainment , travel and deposition. Consequently, there is an argument in favour of the view that suspended sediment merely travels in suspension, but that its distance of travel is finite, and that between periods of travel it is at rest on the bed of the river. To test his hypothesis we added 25 kg of fluorescent sand, fine enough to be transported in suspension, into a steady flow discharge of 0.95 cumecs in the 160-m-long flume at Tsukuba University. After the flow event, a few grains of the sand were identified less than 5 m from the point of introduction and progressively (but irregularly) more downflume. Although our results are both limited and preliminary due to the nature of the existing flume, they clearly show that suspended sediment has a virtual velocity that is less than that of the flow in which the sediment is suspended. For the sediment-size range and flow velocity used in our experiment this virtual velocity is of the order of 50% of the water velocity.

  12. Suspended sediment in Trail Creek at Michigan City, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crawford, Charles G.; Jacques, David V.

    1992-01-01

    Trail Creek is a small (54.1-square-mile drainage area) tributary of Lake Michigan located in northwestern Indiana. A harbor at the mouth of the stream has experienced excessive sediment deposition. A study was done to investigate the suspended-sediment characteristics of Trail Creek. The study included analysis of suspended-sediment concentration and particle-size data, and estimates of annual suspended-sediment load. Suspended-sediment concentrations ranged from only a few milligrams per liter at low flows to about 300 milligrams per liter at high flows. At low flows, the suspended sediment was mostly silt- and clay-sized material (less than 0.062 millimeter). The percentage of silt- and clay-sized material gradually decreased to about 50 percent of the suspended sediment at high flows. Estimates of the annual suspended-sediment load for the 1981-90 water years were calculated by the flow-duration, rating-curve method. Annual loads ranged from 3,690 to 8,250 tons. The average annual load for the 10-year period was 6,180 tons. Annual suspended-sediment yield (load per unit drainage area) averaged 114 tons per square mile; this value is within the range of values from 14 other previously investigated streams in northern Indiana. Average annual yields of these 14 streams ranged from 11 to 152 tons per square mile; the median annual yield was 56 tons per square mile.

  13. Pulmonary toxicology of respirable particles. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Cross, F.T.; Dagle, G.E.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1980-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 44 papers presented in these proceedings. The last paper (Stannard) in the proceedings is an historical review of the field of inhalation toxicology and is not included in the analytics. (DS)

  14. Suspended sediment transport under estuarine tidal channel conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sternberg, R.W.; Kranck, K.; Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A modified version of the GEOPROBE tripod has been used to monitor flow conditions and suspended sediment distribution in the bottom boundary layer of a tidal channel within San Francisco Bay, California. Measurements were made every 15 minutes over three successive tidal cycles. They included mean velocity profiles from four electromagnetic current meters within 1 m of the seabed; mean suspended sediment concentration profiles from seven miniature nephelometers operated within 1 m of the seabed; near-bottom pressure fluctuations; vertical temperature gradient; and bottom photographs. Additionally, suspended sediment was sampled from four levels within 1 m of the seabed three times during each successive flood and ebb cycle. While the instrument was deployed, STD-nephelometer measurements were made throughout the water column, water samples were collected each 1-2 hours, and bottom sediment was sampled at the deployment site. From these measurements, estimates were made of particle settling velocity (ws) from size distributions of the suspended sediment, friction velocity (U*) from the velocity profiles, and reference concentration (Ca) was measured at z = 20 cm. These parameters were used in the suspended sediment distribution equations to evaluate their ability to predict the observed suspended sediment profiles. Three suspended sediment particle conditions were evaluated: (1) individual particle size in the 4-11 ?? (62.5-0.5 ??m) range with the reference concentration Ca at z = 20 cm (C??), (2) individual particle size in the 4-6 ?? size range, flocs representing the 7-11 ?? size range with the reference concentration Ca at z = 20 cm (Cf), and (3) individual particle size in the 4-6 ?? size range, flocs representing the 7-11 ?? size range with the reference concentration predicted as a function of the bed sediment size distribution and the square of the excess shear stress. In addition, computations of particle flux were made in order to show vertical variations

  15. Efficiency of Respirator Filter Media against Diesel Particulate Matter: A Comparison Study Using Two Diesel Particulate Sources.

    PubMed

    Burton, Kerrie A; Whitelaw, Jane L; Jones, Alison L; Davies, Brian

    2016-07-01

    Diesel engines have been a mainstay within many industries since the early 1900s. Exposure to diesel particulate matter (DPM) is a major issue in many industrial workplaces given the potential for serious health impacts to exposed workers; including the potential for lung cancer and adverse irritant and cardiovascular effects. Personal respiratory protective devices are an accepted safety measure to mitigate worker exposure against the potentially damaging health impacts of DPM. To be protective, they need to act as effective filters against carbon and other particulates. In Australia, the filtering efficiency of respiratory protective devices is determined by challenging test filter media with aerosolised sodium chloride to determine penetration at designated flow rates. The methodology outlined in AS/NZS1716 (Standards Australia International Ltd and Standards New Zealand 2012. Respiratory protective devices. Sydney/Wellington: SAI Global Limited/Standards New Zealand) does not account for the differences between characteristics of workplace contaminants like DPM and sodium chloride such as structure, composition, and particle size. This study examined filtering efficiency for three commonly used AS/NZS certified respirator filter models, challenging them with two types of diesel emissions; those from a diesel generator and a diesel engine. Penetration through the filter media of elemental carbon (EC), total carbon (TC), and total suspended particulate (TSP) was calculated. Results indicate that filtering efficiency assumed by P2 certification in Australia was achieved for two of the three respirator models for DPM generated using the small diesel generator, whilst when the larger diesel engine was used, filtering efficiency requirements were met for all three filter models. These results suggest that the testing methodology specified for certification of personal respiratory protective devices by Standards Australia may not ensure adequate protection for

  16. Inclusions in freely suspended smectic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stannarius, Ralf; Harth, Kirsten

    Smectic liquid crystal phases have a unique property: Like soap solutions, they can form stable freely suspended films. Their aspect ratios can be larger than one million to one. Such films can serve as models for two-dimensional (2D) uids, with or without in-plane anisotropy. Solid or liquid inclusions trapped in these films by capillary forces can move in the film plane and interact with other inclusions, with film thickness gradients or the film boundaries, and even with the local orientation field. We describe preparation techniques to incorporate particles or droplets in thin smectic films, and optical observation methods. Several aspects make inclusions in freely suspended films interesting research objects: They provide rich information on capillary forces as well as surface and interfacial tensions, they can serve as platforms for hydrodynamic studies in 2D, and they may help to understand coalescence dynamics at the transition from 2D to 3D...

  17. [Suspended particulates and lung health].

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Manfred; Moshammer, Hanns

    2004-01-01

    Based on several severe air pollution episodes, a temporal correlation between high concentrations of particulate matter (PM) and SO2 pollution and acute increases in respiratory and cardiopulmonary mortality had been established in Vienna for the 1970's. After air pollution had decreased in Austria in the 1980's--as documented by data on SO2, and total suspended particles (TSP)--no such associations between day-to-day changes of SO2 and TSP and mortality have been documented any more, however, traffic related pollutants like fine particles and NO2 remained a problem. Therefore, short term effects of PM on lung function, morbidity and mortality were investigated in Vienna, Linz, Graz and a rural control area. Long-term exposure and chronic disease--even more important for public health--were studied in repeated cross-sectional, a mixed longitudinal and a birth cohort study on school children in the city of Linz. Lung function growth was found impaired from long-term exposure to air pollutants and improved in districts where ambient air pollution had decreased. Where only TSP and SO2 had decreased, no continuous improvement of small airway function was found and end-expiratory flow rates stayed impaired where NO2-reduction from technical improvements of cars and industry was counterbalanced by increase of motorized (diesel) traffic. Remaining acute effects of ambient air pollution in 2001 from PM, NO2 and co-pollutants found in a time series study also show that continuing efforts are necessary. Active surface of particles inhaled several hours to days before spirometry was found related to short-term reductions in forced vital capacity-FVC (p<0.01), forced expiratory volume in one second-FEV1 (p<0.01) and maximal expiratory flow rate at 50% of vital capacity-MEF50 (p<0.05). In pupils with asthma or previous airway obstruction 4-week-diaries proved that the following symptoms increased with acute exposure to higher active surface of particles: wheezing (p<0

  18. Dispersive suspended microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Yu; Lu, Yue-Le; Wu, Tong; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Dong-Hui

    2011-11-14

    A novel sample pre-treatment technique termed dispersive suspended microextraction (DSME) coupled with gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) has been developed for the determination of eight organophosphorus pesticides (ethoprophos, malathion, chlorpyrifos, isocarbophos, methidathion, fenamiphos, profenofos, triazophos) in aqueous samples. In this method, both extraction and two phases' separation process were performed by the assistance of magnetic stirring. After separating the two phases, 1 μL of the suspended phase was injected into GC for further instrument analysis. Varieties of experiment factors which could affect the experiment results were optimized and the following were selected: 12.0 μL p-xylene was selected as extraction solvent, extraction speed was 1200 rpm, extraction time was 30 s, the restoration speed was 800 rpm, the restoration time was 8 min, and no salt was added. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detections (LODs) varied between 0.01 and 0.05 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSDs, n=6) ranged from 4.6% to 12.1%. The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 0.1-100.0 μg L(-1). Correlation coefficients (r) varied from 0.9964 to 0.9995. The enrichment factors (EFs) were between 206 and 243. In the final experiment, the developed method has been successfully applied to the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in wine and tap water samples and the obtained recoveries were between 83.8% and 101.3%. Compared with other pre-treatment methods, DSME has its own features and could achieve satisfied results for the analysis of trace components in complicated matrices.

  19. Hybrid respiration-signal conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinard, G. A.; Steffen, D. A.; Sturm, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Hybrid impedance-pneumograph and respiration-rate signal conditioner element of hand-held vital signs monitor measures changes in impedance of chest during breathing cycle and generates analog respiration signal as output along with synchronous square wave that can be monitored by breath-rate processor.

  20. Suspended graphene variable capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AbdelGhany, M.; Mahvash, F.; Mukhopadhyay, M.; Favron, A.; Martel, R.; Siaj, M.; Szkopek, T.

    2016-12-01

    Electromechanical variable capacitors, or varactors, find a wide range of applications including sensing applications and the tuning of electrical circuit resonance. We demonstrate a nano-electromechanical graphene varactor, a variable capacitor wherein the capacitance is tuned by voltage controlled deflection of a dense array of suspended graphene membranes. The low flexural rigidity of graphene monolayers is exploited to achieve low actuation voltage and high tunable capacitance density in an ultra-thin structure. Large arrays comprising thousands of suspensions were fabricated to give a tunable capacitance of over 10 pF mm-2. This capacitance density suggests that graphene offers a potential solution to the challenge of reducing the size of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). A capacitance tuning of 55% was achieved with a 10 V actuating voltage, exceeding the 50% tuning limit of Hookean parallel plate pull-in without the use of complex mechanical schemes that occupy substrate area. Capacitor behavior was investigated experimentally, and described by a simple theoretical model. Mechanical properties of the graphene membranes were measured independently using atomic force microscopy. We present a comparison of state-of-the-art MEMS and graphene varactors. The quality factor of graphene varactors is limited by graphene sheet resistance, pull-in voltage can be improved with more aggressive scaling, while the power handling and cycling stability of graphene varactors remains unknown.

  1. Evaluating turbidity and suspended-sediment concentration relations from the North Fork Toutle River basin near Mount St. Helens, Washington; annual, seasonal, event, and particle size variations - a preliminary analysis.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uhrich, Mark A.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Mosbrucker, Adam; Christianson, Tami

    2015-01-01

    Regression of in-stream turbidity with concurrent sample-based suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) has become an accepted method for producing unit-value time series of inferred SSC (Rasmussen et al., 2009). Turbidity-SSC regression models are increasingly used to generate suspended-sediment records for Pacific Northwest rivers (e.g., Curran et al., 2014; Schenk and Bragg, 2014; Uhrich and Bragg, 2003). Recent work developing turbidity-SSC models for the North Fork Toutle River in Southwest Washington (Uhrich et al., 2014), as well as other studies (Landers and Sturm, 2013, Merten et al., 2014), suggests that models derived from annual or greater datasets may not adequately reflect shorter term changes in turbidity-SSC relations, warranting closer inspection of such relations. In-stream turbidity measurements and suspended-sediment samples have been collected from the North Fork Toutle River since 2010. The study site, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgage 14240525 near Kid Valley, Washington, is 13 river km downstream of the debris avalanche emplaced by the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (Lipman and Mullineaux, 1981), and 2 river km downstream of the large sediment retention structure (SRS) built from 1987–1989 to mitigate the associated sediment hazard. The debris avalanche extends roughly 25 km down valley from the edifice of the volcano and is the primary source of suspended sediment moving past the streamgage (NF Toutle-SRS). Other significant sources are debris flow events and sand deposits upstream of the SRS, which are periodically remobilized and transported downstream. Also, finer material often is derived from the clay-rich original debris avalanche deposit, while coarser material can derive from areas such as fluvially reworked terraces.

  2. 7 CFR 1206.21 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.21 Suspend. Suspend means...

  3. 7 CFR 1206.21 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.21 Suspend. Suspend means...

  4. 7 CFR 1206.21 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.21 Suspend. Suspend means...

  5. 7 CFR 1206.21 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.21 Suspend. Suspend means...

  6. 7 CFR 1206.21 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.21 Suspend. Suspend means...

  7. Respirators, internal dose, and Oyster Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Michal, R.

    1996-06-01

    This article looks at the experience of Oyster Creek in relaxing the requirements for the use of respirators in all facets of plant maintenance, on the overall dose received by plant maintenance personnel. For Roger Shaw, director of radiological controls for three years at GPU Nuclear Corporation`s Oyster Creek nuclear plant the correct dose balance is determined on a job-by-job basis: Does the job require a respirator, which is an effective means of decreasing worker inhalation of airborne radioactive particles? Will wearing a respirator slow down a worker, consequently increasing whole body radiation exposure by prolonging the time spent in fields of high external radiation? How does respiratory protection affect worker safety and to what degree? While changes to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s 10CFR20 have updated the radiation protection requirements for the nuclear industry, certain of the revisions have been directed specifically at reducing worker dose, Shaw said. {open_quotes}It basically delineates that dose is dose,{close_quotes} Shaw said, {open_quotes}regardless of whether it is acquired externally or internally.{close_quotes} The revision of Part 20 changed the industry`s attitude toward internal dose, which had always been viewed negatively. {open_quotes}Internal dose was always seen as preventable by wearing respirators and by using engineering techniques such as ventilation control and decontamination,{close_quotes} Shaw said, {open_quotes}whereas external dose, although reduced where practical, was seen as a fact of the job.{close_quotes}

  8. Pulmonary epithelial response in the rat lung to instilled Montserrat respirable dusts and their major mineral components

    PubMed Central

    Housley, D; Berube, K; Jones, T; Anderson, S; Pooley, F; Richards, R

    2002-01-01

    Background: The Soufriere Hills, a stratovolcano on Montserrat, started erupting in July 1995, producing volcanic ash, both from dome collapse pyroclastic flows and phreatic explosions. The eruptions/ash resuspension result in high concentrations of suspended particulate matter in the atmosphere, which includes cristobalite, a mineral implicated in respiratory disorders. Aims: To conduct toxicological studies on characterised samples of ash, together with major components of the dust mixture (anorthite, cristobalite), and a bioreactive mineral control (DQ12 quartz). Methods: Rats were challenged with a single mass (1 mg) dose of particles via intratracheal instillation and groups sacrificed at one, three, and nine weeks. Acute bioreactivity of the particles was assessed by increases in lung permeability and inflammation, changes in epithelial cell markers, and increase in the size of bronchothoracic lymph nodes. Results: Data indicated that respirable ash derived from pyroclastic flows (20.1% cristobalite) or phreatic explosion (8.6% cristobalite) had minimal bioreactivity in the lung. Anorthite showed low bioreactivity, in contrast to pure cristobalite, which showed progressive increases in lung damage. Conclusion: Results suggests that either the percentage mass of cristobalite particles present in Montserrat ash was not sufficient as a catalyst in the lung environment, or its surface reactivity was masked by the non-reactive volcanic glass components during the process of ash formation. PMID:12107295

  9. Respiration in the open ocean.

    PubMed

    del Giorgio, Paul A; Duarte, Carlos M

    2002-11-28

    A key question when trying to understand the global carbon cycle is whether the oceans are net sources or sinks of carbon. This will depend on the production of organic matter relative to the decomposition due to biological respiration. Estimates of respiration are available for the top layers, the mesopelagic layer, and the abyssal waters and sediments of various ocean regions. Although the total open ocean respiration is uncertain, it is probably substantially greater than most current estimates of particulate organic matter production. Nevertheless, whether the biota act as a net source or sink of carbon remains an open question.

  10. Suspended sediment fluxes in the Humber catchment, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wass, Paul D.; Leeks, Graham J. L.

    1999-05-01

    An extensive sediment monitoring network was established within the LOIS programme, involving 10 of the main tributaries of the River Humber (UK). Its primary purpose was to measure the flux of suspended sediment to the estuary. A turbidity monitoring system was developed to provide a continuous record of suspended sediment concentration in the rivers, from which the fluxes were calculated. Linear relationships were established between suspended sediment concentration and turbidity (with slopes varying from 0·89 to 1·69) to enable the conversion of nephelometric turbidity [NTU] to suspended sediment concentration [mg l-1]. Potential uncertainties were identified and quantified. The suspended sediment flux to the Humber (November 1994-October 1997) was calculated to be 699 861 t, equivalent to a yield of 15 t km-2 yr-1. Large temporal and spatial variations in the flux were measured during the monitoring period, in response to factors such as climate, land use, catchment scale, deposition and reservoir trapment. The particle size composition of the suspended sediment was measured and found to vary little, except at very high discharges, when it coarsened. The organic content of the sediment was found to be directly related to the discharge of sewage effluent to the rivers.

  11. From breathing to respiration.

    PubMed

    Fitting, Jean-William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of breathing remained an enigma for a long time. The Hippocratic school described breathing patterns but did not associate breathing with the lungs. Empedocles and Plato postulated that breathing was linked to the passage of air through pores of the skin. This was refuted by Aristotle who believed that the role of breathing was to cool the heart. In Alexandria, breakthroughs were accomplished in the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Later, Galen proposed an accurate description of the respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing. However, his heart-lung model was hampered by the traditional view of two non-communicating vascular systems - veins and arteries. After a period of stagnation in the Middle Ages, knowledge progressed with the discovery of pulmonary circulation. The comprehension of the purpose of breathing progressed by steps thanks to Boyle and Mayow among others, and culminated with the contribution of Priestley and the discovery of oxygen by Lavoisier. Only then was breathing recognized as fulfilling the purpose of respiration, or gas exchange. A century later, a controversy emerged concerning the active or passive transfer of oxygen from alveoli to the blood. August and Marie Krogh settled the dispute, showing that passive diffusion was sufficient to meet the oxygen needs.

  12. Acoustic measuring techniques for suspended sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, P.; Felix, D.; Storti, G.; Lattuada, M.; Fleckenstein, P.; Deschwanden, F.

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic signals can be used in various ways for suspended sediment monitoring. One possibility which lends itself particularly well in the context of hydropower plants (HPPs), is to use installations for acoustic discharge measurement (ADM). Such installations already exist at waterways of many HPPs. Similar to certain turbidimeters, the attenuation of the forward scattered signal travelling through the water-sediment mixture is correlated with suspended sediment concentration (SSC). This correlation can be based on reference SSCs, e.g. from gravimetric analyses of bottle samples. Without the need of additional sensors and practically maintenance-free, this method is used successfully in the HPP Fieschertal to warn the HPP operator of high SSC to prevent excessive turbine abrasion. Acoustic methods and systems that allow for estimating both SSC and particle size distribution (PSD) are under development. The simultaneous determination of SSC and PSD is not possible using a single frequency. Therefore, multi-frequency approaches are investigated for generally scattered signals. When backscattered signals are used, a stronger frequency dependency can be exploited. However, the reliable simultaneous determination of particle size (and distribution) and concentration is still a major challenge due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and an ill- posed problem of estimating concentration and size from recorded signals. The optimal setup configuration (angles, frequencies) for such a system is not unique and further investigations are recommended.

  13. Workplace performance of a loose-fitting powered air purifying respirator during nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivisto, Antti J.; Aromaa, Mikko; Koponen, Ismo K.; Fransman, Wouter; Jensen, Keld A.; Mäkelä, Jyrki M.; Hämeri, Kaarle J.

    2015-04-01

    Nanoparticle (particles with diameter ≤100 nm) exposure is recognized as a potentially harmful size fraction for pulmonary particle exposure. During nanoparticle synthesis, the number concentrations in the process room may exceed 10 × 106 cm-3. During such conditions, it is essential that the occupants in the room wear highly reliable high-performance respirators to prevent inhalation exposure. Here we have studied the in-use program protection factor (PPF) of loose-fitting powered air purifying respirators, while workers were coating components with TiO2 or Cu x O y nanoparticles under a hood using a liquid flame spray process. The PPF was measured using condensation particle counters, an electrical low pressure impactor, and diffusion chargers. The room particle concentrations varied from 4 × 106 to 40 × 106 cm-3, and the count median aerodynamic diameter ranged from 32 to 180 nm. Concentrations inside the respirator varied from 0.7 to 7.2 cm-3. However, on average, tidal breathing was assumed to increase the respirator concentration by 2.3 cm-3. The derived PPF exceeded 1.1 × 106, which is more than 40 × 103 times the respirator assigned protection factor. We were unable to measure clear differences in the PPF of respirators with old and new filters, among two male and one female user, or assess most penetrating particle size. This study shows that the loose-fitting powered air purifying respirator provides very efficient protection against nanoparticle inhalation exposure if used properly.

  14. 78 FR 18601 - Respirator Certification Fees; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Respirator Certification Fees; Public Meeting... stakeholders to present information the impact of an increase on respirator fees on individual respirator... in respirator certification and approval fees on individual respirator manufacturers, the...

  15. Manikin-based performance evaluation of N95 filtering-facepiece respirators challenged with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Balazy, Anna; Toivola, Mika; Reponen, Tiina; Podgórski, Albert; Zimmer, Anthony; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2006-04-01

    Protection of the human respiratory system from exposure to nanoparticles is becoming an emerging issue in occupational hygiene. The potential adverse health effects associated with particles of approximately 1-100 nm are probably greater than submicron or micron-sized particles. The performance of two models of N95 half-facepiece-filtering respirators against nano-sized particles was evaluated at two inhalation flow rates, 30 and 85 l min(-1), following a manikin-based protocol. The aerosol concentration was measured outside and inside the facepiece using the Wide-Range Particle Spectrometer. Sodium chloride particles, conventionally used to certify N-series respirators under NIOSH 42 CFR 84 regulations, were utilized as the challenge aerosol. The targeted particle sizes ranged from 10 to 600 nm, although the standard certification tests are performed with particles of approximately 300 nm, which is assumed to be the most penetrating size. The results indicate that the nanoparticle penetration through a face-sealed N95 respirator may be in excess of the 5% threshold, particularly at high respiratory flow rates. Thus, N95 respirators may not always provide the expected respiratory protection for workers. The highest penetration values representing the poorest respirator protection conditions were observed in the particle diameter range of approximately 30-70 nm. Based on the theoretical simulation, we have concluded that for respirators utilizing mechanical filters, the peak penetration indeed occurs at the particle diameter of approximately 300 nm; however, for pre-charged fiber filters, which are commonly used for N95 respirators, the peak shifts toward nano-sizes. This study has confirmed that the neutralization of particles is a crucial element in evaluating the efficiency of a respirator. The variability of the respirator's performance was determined for both models and both flow rates. The analysis revealed that the coefficient of variation of the penetration

  16. Effects of uniformities of deposition of respirable particles on filters on determining their quartz contents by using the direct on-filter X-ray diffraction (DOF XRD) method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Hwa; Tsaia, Perng-Jy; Lai, Chane-Yu; Peng, Ya-Lian; Soo, Jhy-Charm; Chen, Cheng-Yao; Shih, Tung-Sheng

    2010-04-15

    In this study, field samplings were conducted in three workplaces of a foundry plant, including the molding, demolding, and bead blasting, respectively. Three respirable aerosol samplers (including a 25-mm aluminum cyclone, nylon cyclone, and IOSH cyclone) were used side-by-side to collect samples from each selected workplace. For each collected sample, the uniformity of the deposition of respirable dusts on the filter was measured and its free silica content was determined by both the DOF XRD method and NIOSH 7500 XRD method (i.e., the reference method). A same trend in measured uniformities can be found in all selected workplaces: 25-mm aluminum cyclone>nylon cyclone>IOSH cyclone. Even for samples collected by the sampler with the highest uniformity (i.e., 25-mm aluminum cyclone), the use of the DOF XRD method would lead to the measured free silica concentrations 1.15-2.89 times in magnitude higher than that of the reference method. A new filter holder should be developed with the minimum uniformity comparable to that of NIOSH 7500 XRD method (=0.78) in the future. The use of conversion factors for correcting quartz concentrations obtained from the DOF XRD method based on the measured uniformities could be suitable for the foundry industry at this stage.

  17. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    PubMed Central

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; Dujardin, Erik; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Checco, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. Here, we systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Further, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquid interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle. PMID:27072195

  18. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; ...

    2016-04-13

    Dependence on the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. We systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Moreover, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquidmore » interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle.« less

  19. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; Dujardin, Erik; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Checco, Antonio

    2016-04-13

    Dependence on the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. We systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Moreover, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquid interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle.

  20. Suspended animation for delayed resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, R; Safar, P; Tisherman, S A; Basford, R; Bruttig, S P; Capone, A; Dubick, M A; Ernster, L; Hattler, B G; Hochachka, P; Klain, M; Kochanek, P M; Kofke, W A; Lancaster, J R; McGowan, F X; Oeltgen, P R; Severinghaus, J W; Taylor, M J; Zar, H

    1996-02-01

    Suspended animation is defined as the therapeutic induction of a state of tolerance to temporary complete systemic ischemia, i.w., protection-preservation of the whole organism during prolonged circulatory arrest ( > or = 1 hr), followed by resuscitation to survival without brain damage. The objectives of suspended animation include: a) helping to save victims of temporarily uncontrollable (internal) traumatic (e.g., combat casualties) or nontraumatic (e.g., ruptured aortic aneurysm) exsanguination, without severe brain trauma, by enabling evacuation and resuscitative surgery during circulatory arrest, followed by delayed resuscitation; b) helping to save some nontraumatic cases of sudden death, seemingly unresuscitable before definite repair; and c) enabling selected (elective) surgical procedures to be performed which are only feasible during a state of no blood flow. In the discussion session, investigators with suspended animation-relevant research interests brainstorm on present knowledge, future research potentials, and the advisability of a major research effort concerning this subject. The following topics are addressed: the epidemiologic facts of sudden death in combat casualties, which require a totally new resuscitative approach; the limits and potentials of reanimation research; complete reversibility of circulatory arrest of 1 hr in dogs under profound hypothermia ( < 10 degrees C), induced and reversed by portable cardiopulmonary bypass; the need for a still elusive pharmacologic or chemical induction of suspended animation in the field; asanguinous profound hypothermic low-flow with cardiopulmonary bypass; electric anesthesia; opiate therapy; lessons learned by hypoxia tolerant vertebrate animals, hibernators, and freeze-tolerant animals (cryobiology); myocardial preservation during open-heart surgery; organ preservation for transplantation; and reperfusion-reoxygenation injury in vital organs, including the roles of nitric oxide and free radicals

  1. Magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocking, G.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly (MSRWA) is the product of a development effort funded by the Air Force Materials Laboratory (AFML) at Wright Patterson AFB. The specific objective of the project was to establish the manufacturing processes for samarium cobalt magnets and demonstrate their use in a space application. The development was successful on both counts. The application portion of the program, which involves the magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly, is emphasized. The requirements for the reaction wheel were based on the bias wheel requirements of the DSP satellite. The tasks included the design, fabrication, and test of the unit to the DSP program qualification requirements.

  2. Relationships between microbial extracellular enzymatic activity and suspended and sinking particulate organic matter: seasonal transformations in the North Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, A. L.; Deming, J. W.

    Despite the importance of hydrolytic activities by bacterial extracellular enzymes (EE) in the temperate ocean, little is known about the role of extracellular enzymatic activity (EEA) in determining the fate of particulate organic matter (POM) in polar seas. To explore the issue further, we measured various chemical and bacterial parameters in the near-0°C waters of the North Water during the months of May and July of 1998. Seawater (SW) samples were collected by Niskin bottle at the depth of the chlorophyll fluorescence maximum (8-90 m), while samples of sinking particles and aggregates were collected in short-term (0.5-1.2 d), unpoisoned, floating sediment traps deployed at depths typically below the mixed layer (50-136 m). Samples were analyzed for POC, PON, and abundance of total and actively respiring bacteria. They were also incubated with fluorescently tagged substrate analogs to measure potential maximal rates of three classes of EE (leucine-aminopeptidase, chitobiase, and β-glucosidase) at -1°C. The percentage of actively respiring bacteria was always higher in sediment trap samples than in SW (medians of 38% and 24% versus 10% and 12% in May and July, respectively). Cell-specific rates of EEA were also higher in the trap samples and, for both sample types, similar to published rates from temperate waters. Rates of EEA when scaled to the abundance of actively respiring bacteria, however, did not differ between sample types, suggesting that the elevated EEA associated with sinking material is due to the greater abundance of metabolically active cells supported by such material and not due to enhanced enzyme expression in general, as suggested by previous studies. In this study, leucine-aminopeptidase activity was always much higher than the other classes of EEA, becoming even more dominant later in the season; it always correlated positively with the abundance of both total and actively respiring bacteria. Enzyme ratios indicating protease dominance

  3. Electrical stimulation to restore respiration.

    PubMed

    Creasey, G; Elefteriades, J; DiMarco, A; Talonen, P; Bijak, M; Girsch, W; Kantor, C

    1996-04-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used for over 25 years to restore breathing to patients with high quadriplegia causing respiratory paralysis and patients with central alveolar hypoventilation. Three groups have developed electrical pacing systems for long-term support of respiration in humans. These systems consist of electrodes implanted on the phrenic nerves, connected by leads to a stimulator implanted under the skin, and powered and controlled from a battery-powered transmitter outside the body. The systems differ principally in the electrode design and stimulation waveform. Approximately 1,000 people worldwide have received one of the three phrenic pacing devices, most with strongly positive results: reduced risk of tracheal problems and chronic infection, the ability to speak and smell more normally, reduced risk of accidental interruption of respiration, greater independence, and reduced costs and time for ventilatory care. For patients with partial lesions of the phrenic nerves, intercostal muscle stimulation may supplement respiration.

  4. Toward clean suspended CVD graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Yulaev, Alexander; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela R.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Myers, Alline; Leite, Marina S.; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2016-08-26

    The application of suspended graphene as electron transparent supporting media in electron microscopy, vacuum electronics, and micromechanical devices requires the least destructive and maximally clean transfer from their original growth substrate to the target of interest. Here, we use thermally evaporated anthracene films as the sacrificial layer for graphene transfer onto an arbitrary substrate. We show that clean suspended graphene can be achieved via desorbing the anthracene layer at temperatures in the 100 °C to 150 °C range, followed by two sequential annealing steps for the final cleaning, using a Pt catalyst and activated carbon. The cleanliness of the suspended graphene membranes was analyzed employing the high surface sensitivity of low energy scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A quantitative comparison with two other commonly used transfer methods revealed the superiority of the anthracene approach to obtain a larger area of clean, suspended CVD graphene. Lastly, our graphene transfer method based on anthracene paves the way for integrating cleaner graphene in various types of complex devices, including the ones that are heat and humidity sensitive.

  5. Toward Clean Suspended CVD Graphene.

    PubMed

    Yulaev, Alexander; Cheng, Guangjun; Walker, Angela R Hight; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Myers, Alline; Leite, Marina S; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    The application of suspended graphene as electron transparent supporting media in electron microscopy, vacuum electronics, and micromechanical devices requires the least destructive and maximally clean transfer from their original growth substrate to the target of interest. Here, we use thermally evaporated anthracene films as the sacrificial layer for graphene transfer onto an arbitrary substrate. We show that clean suspended graphene can be achieved via desorbing the anthracene layer at temperatures in the 100 °C to 150 °C range, followed by two sequential annealing steps for the final cleaning, using Pt catalyst and activated carbon. The cleanliness of the suspended graphene membranes was analyzed employing the high surface sensitivity of low energy scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A quantitative comparison with two other commonly used transfer methods revealed the superiority of the anthracene approach to obtain larger area of clean, suspended CVD graphene. Our graphene transfer method based on anthracene paves the way for integrating cleaner graphene in various types of complex devices, including the ones that are heat and humidity sensitive.

  6. Insights into particle cycling from thorium and particle data.

    PubMed

    Lam, Phoebe J; Marchal, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Marine particles are a main vector by which the biological carbon pump in the ocean transfers carbon from the atmosphere to the deep ocean. Marine particles exist in a continuous spectrum of sizes, but they can be functionally grouped into a small, suspended class (which constitutes most of the total particle mass) and a large, sinking class (which contributes most of the particle flux). These two classes are connected by aggregation and disaggregation processes. The interplay of processes that create, aggregate, and destroy marine particles determines the strength and transfer efficiency of the biological pump. Measurements of radiocarbon, barium, and organic biomarkers on suspended and sinking particles have provided qualitative insights into particle dynamics, and measurements of thorium isotopes have provided quantitative estimates of rates. Here, we review what has been learned so far about particle dynamics in the ocean from chemical measurements on suspended and sinking particles. We then discuss future directions for this approach.

  7. [Dark respiration of terrestrial vegetations: a review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin-Wei; Yuan, Feng-Hui; Guan, De-Xin; Wu, Jia-Bing

    2013-06-01

    The source and sink effect of terrestrial plants is one of the hotspots in terrestrial ecosystem research under the background of global change. Dark respiration of terrestrial plants accounts for a large fraction of total net carbon balance, playing an important role in the research of carbon cycle under global climate change. However, there is little study on plant dark respiration. This paper summarized the physiological processes of plant dark respiration, measurement methods of the dark respiration, and the effects of plant biology and environmental factors on the dark respiration. The uncertainty of the dark respiration estimation was analyzed, and the future hotspots of related researches were pointed out.

  8. Soil Respiration - A Geochemist's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cappellen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Soil biogeochemistry is largely driven by the decomposition of plant-derived organic matter by soil microorganisms. In addition to its effects on water quality and soil fertility, the decomposition of organic matter couples soil processes to climate, via the production and emission of greenhouse gases. In this presentation, I will review a number of key factors controlling the rate of decomposition of soil organic matter. In particular, I will discuss the importance of the spatial and temporal variations in redox conditions as drivers of soil respiration. The discussion will highlight the limitations of current soil respiration models based on partitioning soil organic matter in a finite number of pools of different degradability. In order to predict the sensitivity of soil respiration to anthropogenic pressures - including climate warming - it is crucial to relate the apparent degradability of soil organic matter to the geochemical and hydrological dynamics of the soil environment. Overall, there remains much scope for geochemists to help develop more robust, process-based, representations of soil respiration in global carbon models and climate predictions.

  9. High concentration suspended sediment measurments using acontinuous fiber optic in-stream transmissometer

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Chris G.; Laycak, Danny T.; Hoppes, William; Tran,Nguyen T.; Shi, Frank G.

    2004-05-26

    Suspended sediment loads mobilized during high flow periods in rivers and streams are largely uncharacterized. In smaller and intermittent streams, a large storm may transport a majority of the annual sediment budget. Therefore monitoring techniques that can measure high suspended sediment concentrations at semi-continuous time intervals are needed. A Fiber optic In-stream Transmissometer (FIT) is presented for continuous measurement of high concentration suspended sediment in storm runoff. FIT performance and precision were demonstrated to be reasonably good for suspended sediment concentrations up to 10g/L. The FIT was compared to two commercially available turbidity devices and provided better precision and accuracy at both high and low concentrations. Both turbidity devices were unable to collect measurements at concentrations greater than 4 g/L. The FIT and turbidity measurements were sensitive to sediment particle size. Particle size dependence of transmittance and turbidity measurement poses the greatest problem for calibration to suspended sediment concentration. While the FIT was demonstrated to provide acceptable measurements of high suspended sediment concentrations, approaches to real-time suspended sediment detection need to address the particle size dependence in concentration measurements.

  10. Suspended Solids Profiler Shop Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2000-01-19

    The Suspended Solids Profiler (SSP) Instrument is planned to be installed in the AZ-101 tank to measure suspended solids concentrations during mixer pump testing. The SSP sensor uses a reflectance measurement principle to determine the suspended solids concentrations. The purpose of this test is to provide a documented means of verifying that the functional components of the SSP operate properly.

  11. 21 CFR 1404.1010 - Suspending official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspending official. 1404.1010 Section 1404.1010 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.1010 Suspending official. (a) Suspending official means an agency official...

  12. 30 CFR 57.16009 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Suspended loads. 57.16009 Section 57.16009 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Handling § 57.16009 Suspended loads. Persons shall stay clear of suspended loads....

  13. 30 CFR 56.16009 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Suspended loads. 56.16009 Section 56.16009 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Handling § 56.16009 Suspended loads. Persons shall stay clear of suspended loads....

  14. 30 CFR 57.16009 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Suspended loads. 57.16009 Section 57.16009 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Handling § 57.16009 Suspended loads. Persons shall stay clear of suspended loads....

  15. 30 CFR 57.16009 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Suspended loads. 57.16009 Section 57.16009 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Handling § 57.16009 Suspended loads. Persons shall stay clear of suspended loads....

  16. 30 CFR 56.16009 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspended loads. 56.16009 Section 56.16009 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Handling § 56.16009 Suspended loads. Persons shall stay clear of suspended loads....

  17. 30 CFR 56.16009 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Suspended loads. 56.16009 Section 56.16009 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Handling § 56.16009 Suspended loads. Persons shall stay clear of suspended loads....

  18. 30 CFR 56.16009 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Suspended loads. 56.16009 Section 56.16009 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Handling § 56.16009 Suspended loads. Persons shall stay clear of suspended loads....

  19. 30 CFR 57.16009 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspended loads. 57.16009 Section 57.16009 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Handling § 57.16009 Suspended loads. Persons shall stay clear of suspended loads....

  20. 30 CFR 57.16009 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspended loads. 57.16009 Section 57.16009 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Handling § 57.16009 Suspended loads. Persons shall stay clear of suspended loads....

  1. 30 CFR 56.16009 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspended loads. 56.16009 Section 56.16009 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Handling § 56.16009 Suspended loads. Persons shall stay clear of suspended loads....

  2. Toward clean suspended CVD graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Yulaev, Alexander; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela R.; ...

    2016-08-26

    The application of suspended graphene as electron transparent supporting media in electron microscopy, vacuum electronics, and micromechanical devices requires the least destructive and maximally clean transfer from their original growth substrate to the target of interest. Here, we use thermally evaporated anthracene films as the sacrificial layer for graphene transfer onto an arbitrary substrate. We show that clean suspended graphene can be achieved via desorbing the anthracene layer at temperatures in the 100 °C to 150 °C range, followed by two sequential annealing steps for the final cleaning, using a Pt catalyst and activated carbon. The cleanliness of the suspendedmore » graphene membranes was analyzed employing the high surface sensitivity of low energy scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A quantitative comparison with two other commonly used transfer methods revealed the superiority of the anthracene approach to obtain a larger area of clean, suspended CVD graphene. Lastly, our graphene transfer method based on anthracene paves the way for integrating cleaner graphene in various types of complex devices, including the ones that are heat and humidity sensitive.« less

  3. Quantitative suspended sediment mapping using aircraft remotely sensed multispectral data. [in Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Suspended sediment is an important environmental parameter for monitoring water quality, water movement, and land use. Quantitative suspended sediment determinations were made from analysis of aircraft remotely sensed multispectral digital data. A statistical analysis and derived regression equation were used to determine and plot quantitative suspended sediment concentration contours in the tidal James River, Virginia, on May 28, 1974. From the analysis, a single band, Band 8 (0.70-0.74 microns), was adequate for determining suspended sediment concentrations. A correlation coefficient of 0.89 was obtained with a mean inaccuracy of 23.5 percent for suspended sediment concentrations up to about 50 mg/l. Other water quality parameters - secchi disc depth and chlorophyll - also had high correlations with the remotely sensed data. Particle size distribution had only a fair correlation with the remotely sensed data.

  4. Physicochemical properties of respirable-size lunar dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, D. S.; Cooper, B. L.; Taylor, L. A.; James, J. T.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Pieters, C. M.; Wentworth, S. J.; Wallace, W. T.; Lee, T. S.

    2015-02-01

    We separated the respirable dust and other size fractions from Apollo 14 bulk sample 14003,96 in a dry nitrogen environment. While our toxicology team performed in vivo and in vitro experiments with the respirable fraction, we studied the size distribution and shape, chemistry, mineralogy, spectroscopy, iron content and magnetic resonance of various size fractions. These represent the finest-grained lunar samples ever measured for either FMR np-Fe0 index or precise bulk chemistry, and are the first instance we know of in which SEM/TEM samples have been obtained without using liquids. The concentration of single-domain, nanophase metallic iron (np-Fe0) increases as particle size diminishes to 2 μm, confirming previous extrapolations. Size-distribution studies disclosed that the most frequent particle size was in the 0.1-0.2 μm range suggesting a relatively high surface area and therefore higher potential toxicity. Lunar dust particles are insoluble in isopropanol but slightly soluble in distilled water (~0.2 wt%/3 days). The interaction between water and lunar fines, which results in both agglomeration and partial dissolution, is observable on a macro scale over time periods of less than an hour. Most of the respirable grains were smooth amorphous glass. This suggests less toxicity than if the grains were irregular, porous, or jagged, and may account for the fact that lunar dust is less toxic than ground quartz.

  5. Ambient Tropospheric Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is a complex mixture of solid and liquid particles suspended in ambient air (also known as the atmospheric aerosol). Ambient PM arises from a wide-range of sources and/or processes, and consists of particles of different shapes, sizes, and com...

  6. [Research advances in forest soil respiration].

    PubMed

    Luan, Junwei; Xiang, Chenghua; Luo, Zongshi; Gong, Yuanbo

    2006-12-01

    Among the methods of measuring forest soil respiration, infrared CO2 analysis is the optimal one so far. Comparing with empirical model, the process-based model in simulating the production and transportation of soil CO2 has the advantage of considering the biological and physical processes of soil respiration. Generally, soil respiration is positively correlated with soil temperature and moisture, but there are still many uncertainties about the relationships between soil respiration and forest management activities such as firing, cutting, and fertilization. The relationships of soil respiration with vegetation type and soil microbial biomass, as well as the spatial heterogeneity of soil respiration, are the hotspots in recent researches. Some issues and future development in forest soil respiration research were discussed in this paper.

  7. Direction-dependent freezing of diamagnetic colloidal tracers suspended in paramagnetic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Passow, Christopher; Fischer, Birgit; Sprung, Michael; Köckerling, Martin; Wagner, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    The dynamic behavior of an inverse ferrofluid consisting of diamagnetic, spherical silica particles suspended in the paramagnetic ionic liquid (EMIm)2[Co(NCS)4] is investigated by means of x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy in the presence of an external magnetic field. Dipole-dipole interactions between the diamagnetic holes in the paramagnetic continuum of the suspending medium induce a direction-dependence of the diffusive motion of the colloidal particles: due to a magnetic repulsion perpendicular to the direction of an external field the diffusive motion of the colloidal particles is selectively frozen in this direction.

  8. Modeling Hydrodynamics, Water Temperature, and Suspended Sediment in Detroit Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Sobieszczyk, Steven; Bragg, Heather M.

    2007-01-01

    Detroit Lake is a large reservoir on the North Santiam River in west-central Oregon. Water temperature and suspended sediment are issues of concern in the river downstream of the reservoir. A CE-QUAL-W2 model was constructed to simulate hydrodynamics, water temperature, total dissolved solids, and suspended sediment in Detroit Lake. The model was calibrated for calendar years 2002 and 2003, and for a period of storm runoff from December 1, 2005, to February 1, 2006. Input data included lake bathymetry, meteorology, reservoir outflows, and tributary inflows, water temperatures, total dissolved solids, and suspended sediment concentrations. Two suspended sediment size groups were modeled: one for suspended sand and silt with particle diameters larger than 2 micrometers, and another for suspended clay with particle diameters less than or equal to 2 micrometers. The model was calibrated using lake stage data, lake profile data, and data from a continuous water-quality monitor on the North Santiam River near Niagara, about 6 kilometers downstream of Detroit Dam. The calibrated model was used to estimate sediment deposition in the reservoir, examine the sources of suspended sediment exiting the reservoir, and examine the effect of the reservoir on downstream water temperatures.

  9. Turbidity - a Semi-Continuous Monitoring Option for Suspended Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendvay, J. M.; Rosasco, M. V.; David, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    Redwood Creek, a third order coastal stream flowing through Muir Woods National Monument and Golden Gate National Recreation Area in Marin County, California, was once the spawning grounds for a relatively large population of Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). In recent years less than 1% of historic populations have been returning to the stream. Redwood creek is currently undergoing extensive ecological restoration in an attempt to improve the spawning habitat for the salmon. The original stream path has been altered in the past to make way for development and the National Park Service has been working towards restoring much of the stream's natural functionality with the hope that the salmon population will increase. The restoration process has altered the surrounding riparian landscape in the Redwood Creek watershed. Riparian disturbance caused by vegetation and levee removal as a part of the restoration process followed by installation of seedlings raises concern about the concentration of sediments in the water. Throughout 2011-2012 three parameters for water quality were monitored at Redwood Creek. Suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and total suspended solids (TSS) measurements to determine the concentration of suspended particles in the water column at a given point in time. Turbidity, measured in Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) is a measure of the water's cloudiness caused by suspended particles. Turbidity measurements are favored as they provide a semi-automated monitoring option. Therefore, development of a relationship between turbidity and SSC and TSS is desired. Water samples were analyzed for TSS and SSC using the EPA standard methods, and Turbidity was measured using a Hach 2100Q portable turbidimeter. Additional semi-continuous monitoring of turbidity was completed in situ using Hydrolab DS5X datasondes (with self-cleaning turbidity sensor). The relationship between TSS, SSC and turbidity was determined using a linear regression model for

  10. Suspended sediment transport in an estuarine tidal channel within San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sternberg, R.W.; Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.; Kranck, K.

    1986-01-01

    Size distributions of the suspended sediment samples, estimates of particle settling velocity (??s), friction velocity (U*), and reference concentration (Ca) at z = 20 cm were used in the suspended sediment distribution equations to evaluate their ability to predict the observed suspended sediment profiles. Three suspended sediment particle conditions were evaluated: (1) individual particle sizes in the 4-11 ?? (62.5-0.5 ??m) size range with the reference concentration Ca at z = 20 cm (C??); (2) individual particle sizes in the 4-6 ?? size range, flocs representing the 7-11 ?? size range with the reference concentration Ca at z = 20 cm (Cf); and (3) individual particle sizes in the 4-6 ?? size range, flocs representing the 7-11 ?? size range with the reference concentration predicted as a function of the bed sediment size distribution and the square of the excess shear stress. An analysis was also carried out on the sensitivity of the suspended sediment distribution equation to deviations in the primary variables ??s, U*, and Ca. In addition, computations of mass flux were made in order to show vertical variations in mass flux for varying flow conditions. ?? 1986.

  11. Measuring suspended sediment: Chapter 10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, J.R.; Landers, M.N.

    2013-01-01

    Suspended sediment in streams and rivers can be measured using traditional instruments and techniques and (or) surrogate technologies. The former, as described herein, consists primarily of both manually deployed isokinetic samplers and their deployment protocols developed by the Federal Interagency Sedimentation Project. They are used on all continents other than Antarctica. The reliability of the typically spatially rich but temporally sparse data produced by traditional means is supported by a broad base of scientific literature since 1940. However, the suspended sediment surrogate technologies described herein – based on hydroacoustic, nephelometric, laser, and pressure difference principles – tend to produce temporally rich but in some cases spatially sparse datasets. The value of temporally rich data in the accuracy of continuous sediment-discharge records is hard to overstate, in part because such data can often overcome the shortcomings of poor spatial coverage. Coupled with calibration data produced by traditional means, surrogate technologies show considerable promise toward providing the fluvial sediment data needed to increase and bring more consistency to sediment-discharge measurements worldwide.

  12. Thixotropic particles suspensions and method for their formation

    DOEpatents

    Garino, T.J.

    1997-06-17

    Thixotropic particle suspensions are prepared by controlling the quantity of dispersant composition used for particle coating to an amount which is less than that quantity that would provide a full coating of dispersant on all particles suspended. 5 figs.

  13. Dynamics and yielding of binary self-suspended nanoparticle fluids.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Akanksha; Yu, Hsiu-Yu; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Choudhury, Snehashis; Narayanan, Suresh; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-07-14

    Yielding and flow transitions in bi-disperse suspensions of particles are studied using a model system comprised of self-suspended spherical nanoparticles. An important feature of the materials is that the nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in the absence of a solvent. Addition of larger particles to a suspension of smaller ones is found to soften the suspensions, and in the limit of large size disparities, completely fluidizes the material. We show that these behaviors coincide with a speeding-up of de-correlation dynamics of all particles in the suspensions and are accompanied by a reduction in the energy dissipated at the yielding transition. We discuss our findings in terms of ligand-mediated jamming and un-jamming of hairy particle suspensions.

  14. Respirable concrete dust--silicosis hazard in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Linch, Kenneth D

    2002-03-01

    Concrete is an extremely important part of the infrastructure of modern life and must be replaced as it ages. Many of the methods of removing, repairing, or altering existing concrete structures have the potential for producing vast quantities of respirable dust. Since crystalline silica in the form of quartz is a major component of concrete, airborne respirable quartz dust may be produced during construction work involving the disturbance of concrete, thereby producing a silicosis hazard for exposed workers. Silicosis is a debilitating and sometimes fatal lung disease resulting from breathing microscopic particles of crystalline silica. Between 1992 and 1998, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) made visits to construction projects where concrete was being mechanically disturbed in order to obtain data concerning respirable crystalline silica dust exposures. The construction activities studied included: abrasive blasting, concrete pavement sawing and drilling, and asphalt/concrete milling. Air samples of respirable dust were obtained using 10-mm nylon cyclone pre-separators, 37-mm polyvinyl chloride (PVC) filters, and constant-flow pumps calibrated at 1.7 L/min. In addition, high-volume respirable dust samples were obtained on 37-mm PVC filters using 1/2" metal cyclones (Sensidyne model 18) and constant-flow pumps calibrated at 9.0 L/min. Air sample analysis included total weight gain by gravimetric analysis according to NIOSH Analytical Method 600 and respirable crystalline silica (quartz and cristobalite) using x-ray diffraction, as per NIOSH Analytical Method 7500. For abrasive blasting of concrete structures, the respirable crystalline silica (quartz) concentration ranged up to 14.0 mg/m3 for a 96-minute sample resulting in an eight-hour time-weighted average (TWA) of 2.8 mg/m3. For drilling concrete highway pavement the respirable quartz concentrations ranged up to 4.4 mg/m3 for a 358-minute sample, resulting in an eight-hour TWA

  15. Respirable dust control in grinding gray iron castings.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, D; Baron, P; Willeke, K

    1987-02-01

    High speed grinding of gray iron castings long has been associated with excessive exposure to crystalline silica. Not all workers engaged in these operations are protected by conventional ventilation techniques. Dust in the air that has been entrained by the spinning grinding wheel and not captured in the grinder hood has been postulated to be a major exposure source. A pilot grinding operation was constructed, and the size distribution and concentration of airborne particles were measured with the aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). Various control measures proved effective in reducing the respirable dust concentration: increased exhaust ventilation, and installation of baffles and/or the use of an air jet to deflect the entrained air stream. The concentration of respirable dust is the breathing zone was reduced approximately 20-fold through the combined use of increased ventilation, interior baffles, and an air jet. The air jet and baffle utilized at the base ventilation rate reduced the respirable dust concentration by a factor of three to four, whereas the baffle alone halved the concentration.

  16. Validation of Respirator Filter Efficacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    A 1980’ s unpublished ECBC report presented calculations of the required degree of filtration needed to protect a respirator wearer from a given...tested against three bioaerosols ranging in size from 0.69 – 0.88 µm aerodynamic diameter (Mycobacterium abscessus , staphylococcus epidermidis , and 10...and penetration beginning with 99.97% @ 0.3 µm for 10 cm/ s face velocity, a fiber diameter of 0.9 µm, a 0.07 solidity, a 0.3 mm media thickness, and

  17. 7 CFR 1221.30 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.30 Suspend....

  18. 7 CFR 1221.30 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.30 Suspend....

  19. 7 CFR 1221.30 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.30 Suspend....

  20. 7 CFR 1221.30 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.30 Suspend....

  1. 7 CFR 1221.30 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.30 Suspend....

  2. 7 CFR 1218.20 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.20 Suspend....

  3. 7 CFR 1218.20 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.20 Suspend....

  4. 7 CFR 1218.20 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.20 Suspend....

  5. 7 CFR 1218.20 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.20 Suspend....

  6. 7 CFR 1218.20 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.20 Suspend....

  7. 7 CFR 1216.27 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.27 Suspend....

  8. 7 CFR 1216.27 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.27 Suspend....

  9. 7 CFR 1216.27 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.27 Suspend....

  10. 7 CFR 1216.27 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.27 Suspend....

  11. 7 CFR 1216.27 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.27 Suspend....

  12. 7 CFR 1280.124 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAMB PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Lamb Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1280.124 Suspend....

  13. Soil respiration under climate warming: differential response of heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Lingli; Piao, Shilong; Janssens, Ivan A; Tang, Jianwu; Liu, Weixing; Chi, Yonggang; Wang, Jing; Xu, Shan

    2014-10-01

    Despite decades of research, how climate warming alters the global flux of soil respiration is still poorly characterized. Here, we use meta-analysis to synthesize 202 soil respiration datasets from 50 ecosystem warming experiments across multiple terrestrial ecosystems. We found that, on average, warming by 2 °C increased soil respiration by 12% during the early warming years, but warming-induced drought partially offset this effect. More significantly, the two components of soil respiration, heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration showed distinct responses. The warming effect on autotrophic respiration was not statistically detectable during the early warming years, but nonetheless decreased with treatment duration. In contrast, warming by 2 °C increased heterotrophic respiration by an average of 21%, and this stimulation remained stable over the warming duration. This result challenged the assumption that microbial activity would acclimate to the rising temperature. Together, our findings demonstrate that distinguishing heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration would allow us better understand and predict the long-term response of soil respiration to warming. The dependence of soil respiration on soil moisture condition also underscores the importance of incorporating warming-induced soil hydrological changes when modeling soil respiration under climate change.

  14. Suspended matter in surface waters of the Atlantic continental margin from Cape Cod to the Florida keys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.; Meade, R.H.; Bond, G.C.

    1970-01-01

    Appreciable amounts of suspended matter (> 1.0 milligram per liter) in surface waters are restricted to within a few kilometers of the Atlantic coast. Particles that escape estuaries or are discharged by rivers into the shelf region tend to travel longshoreward rather than seaward. Suspended matter farther offshore, chiefly amorphous organic particles, totals 0.1 milligram per liter or less. Soot, fly ash, processed cellulose, and other pollutants are widespread.

  15. Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study #43442

    SciTech Connect

    Chochoms, Michael

    2016-04-20

    This course, Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study (#43442), addresses training requirements for supervisors of respirator wearers as specified by the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) Standard for Respiratory Protection, ANSI Z88.2, and as incorporated by reference in the Department of Energy (DOE) Worker Health and Safety Rule, 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 851. This course also presents the responsibilities of supervisors of respirator wearers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  16. An evaluation of respirator maintenance requirements.

    PubMed

    Brosseau, L M; Traubel, K

    1997-03-01

    A telephone survey was developed as part of a pilot study to evaluate the inspection, cleaning, maintenance, and storage aspects of respirator protection programs (RPP). Regulations and consensus standards such as those published by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) or the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) require or recommend that RPP contain elements that ensure that the respirators provide proper protection. A great deal of research has been done to evaluate the effectiveness of new respirators; however, little research has been conducted to evaluate how respirators behave over time in real industrial settings Respirator inspection, cleaning, maintenance, and storage are significant factors in determining how well a respirator continues to perform. The telephone survey was developed by reviewing the requirements and recommendations of CFR 1910.134 and ANSI Z88.2-1980. Approximately 30 companies were selected based on their use of negative air-purifying respirators. Most of the companies represented the hardgoods manufacturing or service industries. Although the majority of companies were meeting requirements, responses indicated that the following improvements in RPP were necessary: (1) inspection of all respirator parts should be carried out before and after each use, (2) replacement parts should be made readily available on site, (3) regular cleaning should be performed, and (4) more hands-on practice with respirators and their maintenance should be incorporated into training sessions.

  17. Respirator selection for clandestine methamphetamine laboratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gary O; Bronder, Gregory D; Larson, Scott A; Parker, Jay A; Metzler, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    First responders to illicit drug labs may not always have SCBA protection available. Air-purifying respirators using organic vapor cartridges with P-100 filters may not be sufficient. It would be better to use a NIOSH-approved CBRN respirator with its required multi-purpose cartridge system, which includes a P-100 filter. This would remove all the primary drug lab contaminants—organic vapors, acid gases, ammonia, phosphine, iodine, and airborne meth particulates. To assure the proper selection and use of a respirator, it is recommended that the contaminants present be identified and quantified and the OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134 respirator protection program requirements followed.

  18. Droplet Suspended on a Wire Begins Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion Experiment completing a number of successful burns on STS-94, July 11, 1997, MET:9/17:40 (approximate). The photo shows a droplet of 95% heptane and 5% hexadecane, suspended and positioned by the fiber wire, just as it is being ignited by the glowing coil beneath. Study of the physical properties of burning fuel from this experiment is expected to contribute to more efficient use of fossil fuels and reduction of combustion by-products on Earth. The sequence is from a time-lapse movie (34 seconds condensed to 12 seconds), and clearly shows particles emanating from the droplet during the burn. The droplet shrank to nothing as it was consumed. FSDC-2 studied fundamental phenomena related to liquid fuel droplet combustion in air. Pure fuels and mixtures of fuels were burned as isolated single and dual droplets with and without forced air convection. The FSDC guest investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (1.2 MB, 11-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300180.html.

  19. Ignition of Droplet Suspended on a Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion Experiment completing a number of successful burns on STS-94, July 11, 1997, MET:9/17:40 (approximate). The photo shows a droplet of 95% heptane and 5% hexadecane, suspended and positioned by the fiber wire, just as it is being ignited by the glowing coil beneath. Study of the physical properties of burning fuel from this experiment is expected to contribute to more efficient use of fossil fuels and reduction of combustion by-products on Earth. The sequence is from a time-lapse movie (34 seconds condensed to 12 seconds), and clearly shows particles emanating from the droplet during the burn. The droplet shrank to nothing as it was consumed. FSDC-2 studied fundamental phenomena related to liquid fuel droplet combustion in air. Pure fuels and mixtures of fuels were burned as isolated single and dual droplets with and without forced air convection. The FSDC guest investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (133KB JPEG, 656 x 741 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300181.html.

  20. Defining an exposure-response relationship for suspended kaolin clay particulates and aquatic organisms: work toward defining a water quality guideline for suspended solids.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Andrew K; Palmer, Carolyn G

    2015-04-01

    Water quality guidelines for suspended solids generally rely on the percentage departure from reference condition, an approach that has been criticized. Attempts to develop a biological effects-base guideline have, however, been confounded by low data availability. Furthermore, the high biological response variability to suspended solids exposure suggests that organisms are responding not only to exposure concentration and duration but also to other mechanisms of effect associated with suspended particles (e.g., size, shape, and geochemical composition). An alternative option is to develop more situation and site specific guidelines by generating biological effects data to suspended particles of a particular geochemistry and restricted size range. With this in mind, aquatic organism responses to kaolin clay particle exposure were collated from the literature and incorporated into 2 exposure-response relationship approaches. The species sensitivity distribution approach produced a hazardous concentration affecting 5% of species estimate of 58 mg/L for mortality responses, and 36 mg/L for sublethal data. The severity-of-ill-effect approach produced similar estimates for lethal and sublethal data. These results suggest that aquatic organisms are slightly more tolerant of kaolin clay particles than particles from barite or bentonite clays, based on results from previous studies on these clay types. This type of information can enable better estimates of the risk faced by aquatic organisms exposed to suspended solids. For example, when the sediments of a particular water body are dominated by a particular type of clay particle, then the most appropriate exposure-response relationship can be applied.

  1. Surface tension of Nanofluid-type fuels containing suspended nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanvir, Saad; Qiao, Li

    2012-04-01

    The surface tension of ethanol and n-decane based nanofluid fuels containing suspended aluminum (Al), aluminum oxide (Al2O3), and boron (B) nanoparticles as well as dispersible multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were measured using the pendant drop method by solving the Young-Laplace equation. The effects of nanoparticle concentration, size and the presence of a dispersing agent (surfactant) on surface tension were determined. The results show that surface tension increases both with particle concentration (above a critical concentration) and particle size for all cases. This is because the Van der Waals force between particles at the liquid/gas interface increases surface free energy and thus increases surface tension. At low particle concentrations, however, addition of particles has little influence on surface tension because of the large distance between particles. An exception is when a surfactant was used or when (MWCNTs) was involved. For such cases, the surface tension decreases compared to the pure base fluid. The hypothesis is the polymer groups attached to (MWCNTs) and the surfactant layer between a particle and the surround fluid increases the electrostatic force between particles and thus reduce surface energy and surface tension.

  2. 5 CFR 919.1010 - Suspending official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspending official. 919.1010 Section 919.1010 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... official. (a) Suspending official means an agency official who is authorized to impose suspension....

  3. Suspending and Reinstating Joint Activities with Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevalley, Eric; Bangerter, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Interruptions are common in joint activities like conversations. Typically, interrupted participants suspend the activity, address the interruption, and then reinstate the activity. In conversation, people jointly commit to interact and to talk about a topic, establishing these commitments sequentially. When a commitment is suspended, face is…

  4. 30 CFR 56.9317 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Suspended loads. 56.9317 Section 56.9317 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... § 56.9317 Suspended loads. Persons shall not work or pass under the buckets or booms of loaders...

  5. 30 CFR 56.9317 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspended loads. 56.9317 Section 56.9317 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... § 56.9317 Suspended loads. Persons shall not work or pass under the buckets or booms of loaders...

  6. 30 CFR 56.9317 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Suspended loads. 56.9317 Section 56.9317 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... § 56.9317 Suspended loads. Persons shall not work or pass under the buckets or booms of loaders...

  7. 30 CFR 56.9317 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Suspended loads. 56.9317 Section 56.9317 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... § 56.9317 Suspended loads. Persons shall not work or pass under the buckets or booms of loaders...

  8. 30 CFR 56.9317 - Suspended loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspended loads. 56.9317 Section 56.9317 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... § 56.9317 Suspended loads. Persons shall not work or pass under the buckets or booms of loaders...

  9. A method for evaluating aerosol leakage through the interface between protective suits and full-face respirators.

    PubMed

    Arnoldsson, Kristina; Danielsson, Signar; Thunéll, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Military personnel and first responders use a range of personal equipment including protective suits, gloves, boots, and respirators to prevent exposure of their skin and airways to hazardous chemical, biological, radiological, and/or nuclear substances. Although each individual item of personal protective equipment is well tested against existing standards, it is also necessary to consider the performance of the interfaces between items in terms of prevention from exposure, and the protection system as a whole. This article presents an aerosol challenge method for assessing the performance of the interface between a respirator and the hood of a protective suit. The interface is formed between the sealing strip of the hood and the surface of the respirator's outer sealing area and is affected by how well the sealing strip can cover and adapt to the sealing area. The method evaluates the leakage of particles of different sizes into the hood via the interface by particle counting at sampling points around the respirator's perimeter. Three different respirators were tested together with a single hood having a tight-fitting seal. The method variation between measurements was low but increased appreciably when the protective ensemble was re-dressed between measurements. This demonstrates the difficulty of achieving a reliable and reproducible seal between respirator and hood under normal conditions. Different leakage patterns were observed for the three respirators and were linked to some specific design features, namely the respirator's sealing area at the chin and its width at cheek level. Induced leak experiments showed that to detect substantial particle leakage, channels at the hood-respirator interface must be quite large. The method outlined herein provides a straightforward way of evaluating hood-respirator interfaces and could be useful in the further development of personal protective equipment.

  10. Controls of suspended sediment concentration, nutrient content, and transport in a subtropical wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noe, G.B.; Harvey, J.W.; Schaffranek, R.W.; Larsen, L.G.

    2010-01-01

    Redistribution of largely organic sediment from low elevation sloughs to higher elevation ridges is a leading hypothesis for the formation and maintenance of the native ridge and slough landscape pattern found in peat wetlands of the Florida Everglades. We tested this redistribution hypothesis by measuring the concentration and characteristics of suspended sediment and its associated nutrients in the flowpaths of adjacent ridge and slough plant communities. Over two wet seasons we found no sustained differences in suspended sediment mass concentrations, particle-associated P and N concentrations, or sizes of suspended particles between ridge and slough sites. Discharge of suspended sediment, particulate nutrients, and solutes were nearly double in the slough flowpath compared to the ridge flowpath due solely to deeper and faster water flow in sloughs. Spatial and temporal variations in suspended sediment were not related to water velocity, consistent with a hypothesis that the critical sheer stress causing entrainment is not commonly exceeded in the present-day managed Everglades. The uniformity in the concentrations and characteristics of suspended sediment at our research site suggests that sediment and particulate nutrient redistribution between ridges and sloughs does not occur, or rarely occurs, in the modern Everglades.

  11. Correlation of ERTS multispectral imagery with suspended matter and chlorophyll in lower Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowker, D. E.; Fleischer, P.; Gosink, T. A.; Hanna, W. J.; Ludwick, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of using multispectral satellite imagery to monitor the characteristics of estuarine waters is being investigated. Preliminary comparisons of MSS imagery with suspended matter concentrations, particle counts, chlorophyll, transmittance and bathymetry have been made. Some visual correlation of radiance with particulates and chlorophyll has been established. Effects of bathymetry are present, and their relation to transmittance and radiance is being investigated. Greatest detail in suspended matter is revealed by MSS band 5. Near-surface suspended sediment load and chlorophyll can be observed in bands 6 and 7. Images received to date have partially defined extent and location of high suspensate concentrations. Net quantity of suspended matter in the lower Bay has been decreasing since the inception of the study, and represents the diminution of turbid flood waters carried into the Bay in late September, 1972. The results so far point to the utility of MSS imagery in monitoring estuarine water character for the assessment of siltation, productivity, and water types.

  12. Respirators: APR Issuer Self Study 33461

    SciTech Connect

    Chochoms, Michael

    2016-07-13

    Respirators: APR Issuer Self-Study (course 33461) is designed to introduce and familiarize employees selected as air-purifying respirator (APR) issuers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with the responsibilities, limitations, procedures, and resources for issuing APRs at LANL. The goal is to enable these issuers to consistently provide proper, functioning APRs to authorized users

  13. Mitochondrial respiration is sensitive to cytoarchitectural breakdown.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Judith; Angelin, Alessia A; Wallace, Douglas C; Eckmann, David M

    2016-11-07

    An abundance of research suggests that cellular mitochondrial and cytoskeletal disruption are related, but few studies have directly investigated causative connections between the two. We previously demonstrated that inhibiting microtubule and microfilament polymerization affects mitochondrial motility on the whole-cell level in fibroblasts. Since mitochondrial motility can be indicative of mitochondrial function, we now further characterize the effects of these cytoskeletal inhibitors on mitochondrial potential, morphology and respiration. We found that although they did not reduce mitochondrial inner membrane potential, cytoskeletal toxins induced significant decreases in basal mitochondrial respiration. In some cases, basal respiration was only affected after cells were pretreated with the calcium ionophore A23187 in order to stress mitochondrial function. In most cases, mitochondrial morphology remained unaffected, but extreme microfilament depolymerization or combined intermediate doses of microtubule and microfilament toxins resulted in decreased mitochondrial lengths. Interestingly, these two particular exposures did not affect mitochondrial respiration in cells not sensitized with A23187, indicating an interplay between mitochondrial morphology and respiration. In all cases, inducing maximal respiration diminished differences between control and experimental groups, suggesting that reduced basal respiration originates as a largely elective rather than pathological symptom of cytoskeletal impairment. However, viability experiments suggest that even this type of respiration decrease may be associated with cell death.

  14. Direct reading of electrocardiograms and respiration rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, J. P.

    1969-01-01

    Technique for reading heart and respiration rates is more accurate and direct than the previous method. Index of a plastic calibrated card is aligned with a point on the electrocardiogram. Complexes are counted as indicated on the card and heart or respiration rate is read directly from the appropriate scale.

  15. Photosynthesis and Respiration in a Jar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttner, Joseph K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity that reduces the biosphere to a water-filled jar to simulate the relationship between cellular respiration, photosynthesis, and energy. Allows students in high school biology and related courses to explore quantitatively cellular respiration and photosynthesis in almost any laboratory setting. (ASK)

  16. Exposure of taxi drivers and office workers to total and respirable manganese in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Zayed, J; Mikhaïl, M; Loranger, S; Kennedy, G; L'Espérance, G

    1996-04-01

    This research measured the exposure of two groups of workers to respirable and total manganese (Mn) and characterized the Mn particles emitted from an automobile tailpipe. The exposure of 20 office workers and 9 taxi drivers in Toronto to total airborne Mn and respirable Mn was measured over a 7-day period, 24 hours per day. Subjects were asked to wear two pumps (one included a size-selective cyclone that collected the respirable particles), and two battery chargers were supplied to each person so that the pump batteries could be recharged overnight while sampling continued. All filters were analyzed by neutron activation. In addition, Mn particles emitted from a car were collected directly at the exhaust. Particles were observed using secondary electron images in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and their elemental composition was determined by energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. The Mn concentrations obtained for the group of office workers ranged from 0.001 to 0.034 microgram/m3 for respirable Mn and from 0.002 to 0.044 microgram/m3 for total Mn. For the taxi drivers the Mn concentrations ranged from 0.007 to 0.032 microgram/m3 for respirable Mn and from 0.008 to 0.073 microgram/m3 for total Mn. There was a significant difference (p < 0.05) between the two groups for both respirable and total Mn. SEM analysis showed that the particles were mostly heterogeneous agglomerates varying from 1 to 100 microns. Even if the specific exposure to Mn from automobiles has not been directly established, these results suggest that the related increase of exposure may be limited.

  17. Sleep and Respiration in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, John B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Sleep is often reported to be of poor quality in microgravity, and studies on the ground have shown a strong relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption. During the 16-day Neurolab mission, we studied the influence of possible changes in respiratory function on sleep by performing comprehensive sleep recordings on the payload crew on four nights during the mission. In addition, we measured the changes in the ventilatory response to low oxygen and high carbon dioxide in the same subjects during the day, hypothesizing that changes in ventilatory control might affect respiration during sleep. Microgravity caused a large reduction in the ventilatory response to reduced oxygen. This is likely the result of an increase in blood pressure at the peripheral chemoreceptors in the neck that occurs when the normally present hydrostatic pressure gradient between the heart and upper body is abolished. This reduction was similar to that seen when the subjects were placed acutely in the supine position in one-G. In sharp contrast to low oxygen, the ventilatory response to elevated carbon dioxide was unaltered by microgravity or the supine position. Because of the similarities of the findings in microgravity and the supine position, it is unlikely that changes in ventilatory control alter respiration during sleep in microgravity. During sleep on the ground, there were a small number of apneas (cessation of breathing) and hypopneas (reduced breathing) in these normal subjects. During sleep in microgravity, there was a reduction in the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour compared to preflight. Obstructive apneas virtually disappeared in microgravity, suggesting that the removal of gravity prevents the collapse of upper airways during sleep. Arousals from sleep were reduced in microgravity compared to preflight, and virtually all of this reduction was as a result of a reduction in the number of arousals from apneas and hypopneas. We conclude that any sleep

  18. Improving respiration measurements with gas exchange analyzers.

    PubMed

    Montero, R; Ribas-Carbó, M; Del Saz, N F; El Aou-Ouad, H; Berry, J A; Flexas, J; Bota, J

    2016-12-01

    Dark respiration measurements with open-flow gas exchange analyzers are often questioned for their low accuracy as their low values often reach the precision limit of the instrument. Respiration was measured in five species, two hypostomatous (Vitis Vinifera L. and Acanthus mollis) and three amphistomatous, one with similar amount of stomata in both sides (Eucalyptus citriodora) and two with different stomata density (Brassica oleracea and Vicia faba). CO2 differential (ΔCO2) increased two-fold with no change in apparent Rd, when the two leaves with higher stomatal density faced outside. These results showed a clear effect of the position of stomata on ΔCO2. Therefore, it can be concluded that leaf position is important to guarantee the improvement of respiration measurements increasing ΔCO2 without affecting the respiration results by leaf or mass units. This method will help to increase the accuracy of leaf respiration measurements using gas exchange analyzers.

  19. Mucous Secretion and Cilia Beating Defend Developing Coral Larvae from Suspended Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ross J.; Clode, Peta L.; Negri, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Suspended sediments produced from dredging activities, or added to the sediment budget via river runoff, are a concern for marine resource managers. Understanding the impact of suspended sediments on critical life history stages of keystone species like corals is fundamental to effective management of coastlines and reefs. Coral embryos (Acropora tenuis and A. millepora) and larvae (A. tenuis, A. millepora and Pocillopora acuta) were subjected to a range of suspended sediment concentrations of different sediment types (siliciclastic and carbonate) to assess concentration-response relationships on ecologically relevant endpoints, including survivorship and ability to metamorphose. Embryos were subjected to short (12 h) suspended sediment exposures from ages of 3–12 hours old or a long (30 h) exposure at 6 hours old. Neither the survivorship nor metamorphosis function of embryos were significantly affected by realistic sediment exposures to ~1000 mg L-1. However, some embryos exhibited a previously undescribed response to dynamically suspended sediments, which saw 10% of the embryos form negatively buoyant cocoons at siliciclastic suspended sediment concentrations ≥35 mg L-1. Scanning electron and optical microscopy confirmed the presence of a coating on these embryos, possibly mucus with incorporated sediment particles. Cocoon formation was common in embryos but not in larvae, and occurred more often after exposure to siliciclastic rather than carbonate sediments. Once transferred into sediment-free seawater, functional ~36-h-old embryos began emerging from the cocoons, coinciding with cilia development. Ciliated (> 36-h-old) larvae exposed to suspended sediments for 60 h were also observed to secrete mucus and were similarly unaffected by suspended sediment concentrations to ~800 mg L-1. This study provides evidence that mucous secretion and cilia beating effectively protect coral embryos and larvae from suspended sediment and that these mechanisms may enhance

  20. Mucous Secretion and Cilia Beating Defend Developing Coral Larvae from Suspended Sediments.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Gerard F; Jones, Ross J; Clode, Peta L; Negri, Andrew P

    Suspended sediments produced from dredging activities, or added to the sediment budget via river runoff, are a concern for marine resource managers. Understanding the impact of suspended sediments on critical life history stages of keystone species like corals is fundamental to effective management of coastlines and reefs. Coral embryos (Acropora tenuis and A. millepora) and larvae (A. tenuis, A. millepora and Pocillopora acuta) were subjected to a range of suspended sediment concentrations of different sediment types (siliciclastic and carbonate) to assess concentration-response relationships on ecologically relevant endpoints, including survivorship and ability to metamorphose. Embryos were subjected to short (12 h) suspended sediment exposures from ages of 3-12 hours old or a long (30 h) exposure at 6 hours old. Neither the survivorship nor metamorphosis function of embryos were significantly affected by realistic sediment exposures to ~1000 mg L-1. However, some embryos exhibited a previously undescribed response to dynamically suspended sediments, which saw 10% of the embryos form negatively buoyant cocoons at siliciclastic suspended sediment concentrations ≥35 mg L-1. Scanning electron and optical microscopy confirmed the presence of a coating on these embryos, possibly mucus with incorporated sediment particles. Cocoon formation was common in embryos but not in larvae, and occurred more often after exposure to siliciclastic rather than carbonate sediments. Once transferred into sediment-free seawater, functional ~36-h-old embryos began emerging from the cocoons, coinciding with cilia development. Ciliated (> 36-h-old) larvae exposed to suspended sediments for 60 h were also observed to secrete mucus and were similarly unaffected by suspended sediment concentrations to ~800 mg L-1. This study provides evidence that mucous secretion and cilia beating effectively protect coral embryos and larvae from suspended sediment and that these mechanisms may enhance

  1. A Novel Device for Measuring Respirable Dustiness Using Low Mass Powder Samples

    PubMed Central

    O’Shaughnessy, Patrick T.; Kang, Mitchell; Ellickson, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Respirable dustiness represents the tendency of a powder to generate respirable airborne dust during handling and therefore indicates the propensity for a powder to become an inhalation hazard. The dustiness of fourteen powders, including ten different nanopowders, was evaluated with the use of a novel low mass dustiness tester (LMDT) designed to minimize the use of the test powder. The aerosol created from 15-mg powder samples falling down a tube were measured with an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). Particle counts integrated throughout the pulse of aerosol created by the falling powder were used to calculate a respirable dustiness mass fraction (D, mg/kg). An amorphous silicon dioxide nanopowder produced a respirable D of 121.4 mg/kg which was significantly higher than all other powders (p<0.001). Many nanopowders produced D values of that were not significantly different from large-particle powders such as Arizona Road Dust and Bentonite clay. In general, fibrous nanopowders and powders with primary particles > 100 nm are not as dusty as those containing granular, nano-sized primary particles. The method used here, incorporating an APS, represents a deviation from a standard method but resulted in dustiness values comparable to other standard methods. PMID:22335240

  2. Shenzhen: city of suspended possibility.

    PubMed

    Bach, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This essay on Shenzhen, China, presents three vignettes addressing the question of home in a city of migrants. The first section explores the ubiquitous narratives of success forming the city's foundational myth. The second follows this myth into the world of a Shenzhen filmmaker and his characters, as they navigate the tension between the idea of home and the urge to start anew, resulting in the suspended possibility of the title. The last section looks at young architects who hope to preserve the city's heterotopic sites of migrants and original villagers through architectural innovations. The cases show how an economy of desire supplements the political economy of this export-driven city. The city appears as an urban desiring machine that produces itself as an object of desire for the migrants of all classes who flock to its factories, "urban villages", white-collar jobs, luxury villas and underground economy. The essay is an encounter with the mythology of success and failure, the intertwining of home as an end and home as the beginning, and with the manipulation of space that allows residents to control their own subjectivity.

  3. Continuous measurement of suspended-sediment discharge in rivers by use of optical backscatterance sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, D.H.; Wright, S.A.; Bogen, J.; Fergus, T.; Walling, D.

    2003-01-01

    Optical sensors have been used to measure turbidity and suspended-sediment concentration by many marine and estuarine studies, and optical sensors can provide automated, continuous time series of suspended-sediment concentration and discharge in rivers. Three potential problems with using optical sensors are biological fouling, particle-size variability, and particle-reflectivity variability. Despite varying particle size, output from an optical backscatterance sensor in the Sacramento River at Freeport, California, USA, was calibrated successfully to discharge-weighted, cross-sectionally averaged suspended-sediment concentration, which was measured with the equal discharge-, or width-increment, methods and an isokinetic sampler. A correction for sensor drift was applied to the 3-year time series. However, the calibration of an optical backscatterance sensor used in the Colorado River at Cisco, Utah, USA, was affected by particle-size variability. The adjusted time series at Freeport was used to calculate hourly suspended-sediment discharge that compared well with daily values from a sediment station at Freeport. The appropriateness of using optical sensors in rivers should be evaluated on a site-specific basis and measurement objectives, potential particle size effects, and potential fouling should be considered.

  4. The effect of gender and respirator brand on the association of respirator fit with facial dimensions.

    PubMed

    Oestenstad, R Kent; Elliott, Leshan J; Beasley, T Mark

    2007-12-01

    This study examined the association of facial dimensions with respirator fit considering the effect of gender and respirator brand. Forty-one subjects (20 white females and 21 white males) participated in the study. Each subject was measured for 12 facial dimensions using anthropometric sliding and spreading calipers and a steel measuring tape. Three quantitative fit tests were conducted with the same subject wearing one size of three different brands of half-mask respirators resulting in a total of nine fit tests. Linear mixed model analysis was used to model respirator fit as a function of gender and respirator brand while controlling for facial dimensions. Results indicated that the gender by respirator brand interaction was not statistically significant (p = 0.794), and there was no significant difference in respirator fit between males and females (p = 0.356). There was a significant difference in respirator fit among respirator brands (p < 0.001). Because correlations between facial dimensions and respirator fit differed across gender and respirator brand, six separate linear mixed models were fit to assess which facial dimensions most strongly relate to respirator fit using a "one variable at a step" backward elimination procedure. None of the 12 facial dimensions were significantly associated with respirator fit in all six models. However, bigonial breadth and menton-nasion length were significantly associated with respirator fit in five of the six models, and biectoorbitale breadth, bizygomatic breadth, and lip width were significantly associated with respirator fit in four of the six models. Although this study resulted in significant findings related to the correlation of respirator fit with menton-nasion length and lip width (the dimensions currently used to define the half-mask respirator test panel), other facial dimensions were also shown to be significantly associated with respirator fit. Based on these findings and findings from previous studies

  5. Technological advances in suspended-sediment surrogate monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John R.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.

    2009-01-01

    Surrogate technologies to continuously monitor suspended sediment show promise toward supplanting traditional data collection methods requiring routine collection and analysis of water samples. Commercially available instruments operating on bulk optic (turbidity), laser optic, pressure difference, and acoustic backscatter principles are evaluated based on cost, reliability, robustness, accuracy, sample volume, susceptibility to biological fouling, and suitable range of mass concentration and particle size distribution. In situ turbidimeters are widely used. They provide reliable data where the point measurements can be reliably correlated to the river's mean cross section concentration value, effects of biological fouling can be minimized, and concentrations remain below the sensor's upper measurement limit. In situ laser diffraction instruments have similar limitations and can cost 6 times the approximate $5000 purchase price of a turbidimeter. However, laser diffraction instruments provide volumetric-concentration data in 32 size classes. Pressure differential instruments measure mass density in a water column, thus integrating substantially more streamflow than a point measurement. They are designed for monitoring medium-to-large concentrations, are generally unaffected by biological fouling, and cost about the same as a turbidimeter. However, their performance has been marginal in field applications. Acoustic Doppler profilers use acoustic backscatter to measure suspended sediment concentrations in orders of magnitude more streamflow than do instruments that rely on point measurements. The technology is relatively robust and generally immune to effects of biological fouling. Cost of a single-frequency device is about double that of a turbidimeter. Multifrequency arrays also provide the potential to resolve concentrations by clay silt versus sand size fractions. Multifrequency hydroacoustics shows the most promise for revolutionizing collection of continuous

  6. Clinical pulmonary function and industrial respirator wear

    SciTech Connect

    Raven, P.B.; Moss, R.F.; Page, K.; Garmon, R.; Skaggs, B.

    1981-12-01

    This investigation was the initial step in determining a clinical pulmonary test which could be used to evaluate workers as to their suitability to industrial respirator wear. Sixty subjects, 12 superior, 37 normal, and 11 moderately impaired with respect to lung function tests were evaluated with a battery of clinical pulmonary tests while wearing an industrial respirator. The respirator was a full-face mask (MSA-Ultravue) demand breathing type equipped with an inspiratory resistance of 85mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow and an expiratory resistance of 25mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow. Comparisons of these tests were made between the three groups of subjects both with and without a respirator. It appears that those lung tests which measure the flow characteristics of the lung especially those that are effort dependant are more susceptible to change as a result of respirator wear. Hence, the respirator affects the person with superior lung function to a greater degree than the moderately impaired person. It was suggested that the clinical test of 15 second maximum voluntary ventilations (MVV./sub 25/) may be the test of choice for determining worker capability in wearing an industrial respirator.

  7. Basic hydraulic experiment on the saturated concentration of suspended load due to tsunamis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Somekawa, Shiho

    2016-04-01

    When tsunamis arrive in the shallow sea, a huge amount of suspended load is generated by large velocity and strong turbulence. The suspended load causes the geomorphic processes of erosion and deposition. Because the suspended load cannot be increased endlessly, it should have the saturated concentration. Many numerical models of sediment transport due to tsunamis have assumed a constant value of 1% for the saturated concentration empirically. However, it is supposed as a function of velocity. In this study, a hydraulic experiment was carried out to investigate a relationship between velocity and the saturated concentration of suspended load when tsunamis attack. A water circulation pipe used in the experiment was 10 cm in a diameter, 260 cm in length and 50 cm in width. A velocity of water flow in the pipe had been controlled by two pumps and two valves. It was changed from 0.24 to 1.22 m/s. Various amounts of sand was spread on the bottom of pipe. The amount of sand was changed from 0.1 to 10% as converted in the concentration of suspended load if all sand suspended. A diameter and a density of the sand were 0.267 mm and 2.64 x 103 kg/m^3. A condition of sediment transport in the pipe was recorded by video camera from a transparent window at the side of pipe. The condition was judged as all sand particles were suspended or not. The former condition indicates that the concentration of suspended load is saturated and the latter does it is not saturated. When velocity was smaller than 0.47 m/s, there was no suspended load because of a weak tractive force. When velocity became larger, the suspended load was generated and the concentration also became higher. However, the concentration had the upper limit and surplus sand appeared on the bed of pipe when velocity became much larger. The condition gave the saturated concentration of suspended load. When velocity was 0.665 m/s, the saturated concentration was smaller than 1% which is used in many numerical simulations

  8. BOREAS TE-5 Soil Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected measurements in the NSA and SSA on gas exchange, gas composition, and tree growth. Soil respiration data were collected from 26-May-94 to 07-Sep-94 in the BOREAS NSA and SSA to compare the soil respiration rates in different forest sites using a LI-COR 6200 soil respiration chamber (model 6299). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distrobuted Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  9. Respiration in Neonate Sea Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Paladino, Frank V.; Strohl, Kingman P.; Pilar Santidrián, T.; Klann, Kenneth; Spotila, James R.

    2007-01-01

    The pattern and control of respiration is virtually unknown in hatchling sea turtles. Using incubator-raised turtles, we measured oxygen consumption, frequency, tidal volume, and minute volume for leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) and olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) turtle hatchlings for the first six days after pipping. In addition, we tested the hatchlings’ response to hypercapnic, hyperoxic, and hypoxic challenges over this time period. Hatchling sea turtles generally showed resting ventilation characteristics that are similar to those of adults: a single breath followed by a long respiratory pause, slow frequency, and high metabolic rate. With hypercapnic challenge, both species responded primarily by elevating respiratory frequency via a decrease in the non-ventilatory period. Leatherback resting tidal volume increased with age but otherwise, neither species’ resting respiratory pattern nor response to gas challenge changed significantly over the first few days after hatching. At the time of nest emergence, sea turtles have achieved a respiratory pattern that is similar to that of actively diving adults. PMID:17258487

  10. Respiration in a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Perry, Steven F; Spinelli Oliveira, Elisabeth

    2010-08-31

    Multidisciplinary respiratory research highlighted in the present symposium uses existing and new models from all Kingdoms in both basic and applied research and bears upon molecular signaling processes that have been present from the beginning of life and have been maintained as an integral part of it. Many of these old mechanisms are still recognizable as ROS and oxygen-dependent pathways that probably were in place even before photosynthesis evolved. These processes are not only recognizable through relatively small molecules such as nucleotides and their derivatives. Also some DNA sequences such as the hypoxia response elements and pas gene family are ancient and have been co-opted in various functions. The products of pas genes, in addition to their function in regulating nuclear response to hypoxia as part of the hypoxia-inducible factor HIF, play key roles in development, phototransduction, and control of circadian rhythmicity. Also RuBisCO, an enzyme best known for incorporating CO(2) into organic substrates in plants also has an ancient oxygenase function, which plays a key role in regulating peroxide balance in cells. As life forms became more complex and aerobic metabolism became dominant in multicellular organisms, the signaling processes also took on new levels of complexity but many ancient elements remained. The way in which they are integrated into remodeling processes involved in tradeoffs between respiration and nutrition or in control of aging in complex organisms is an exciting field for future research.

  11. Light respiration by subtropical seaweeds.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Matheus C; Eyre, Bradley D

    2017-03-20

    Here we report the first-ever measurements of light CO2 respiration rate (CRR) by seaweeds. We measured the influence of temperature (15 to 25°C) and light (irradiance from 60 to 670 μmol · m(-2) · s(-1) ) on the light CCR of two subtropical seaweed species, and measured the CRR of seven different seaweed species under the same light (150 μmol · m(-2) · s(-1) ) and temperature (25°C). There was little effect of irradiance on light CRR, but there was an effect of temperature. Across the seven species light CRR was similar to OCR (oxygen consumption rate in the dark), with the exception of a single species. The outlier species was a coralline alga, and the higher light CRR was probably driven by calcification. CRR could be estimated from OCR, as well as carbon photosynthetic rates from oxygen photosynthetic rates, which suggests that previous studies have probably provided good estimations of gross photosynthesis for seaweeds. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Respiration during sleep in kyphoscoliosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sawicka, E H; Branthwaite, M A

    1987-01-01

    Eleven subjects with non-paralytic and 10 with paralytic kyphoscoliosis and nine normal control subjects were studied during sleep. The Cobb angle of those with kyphoscoliosis varied from 60 degrees to 140 degrees (median 100 degrees) and the vital capacity varied from 17% to 56% (median 28%) of the value predicted on the basis of span. Recordings made during sleep included expired carbon dioxide tension at the nose, gas flow at the mouth, arterial oxygen saturation, chest wall movement, and the electroencephalogram, electro-oculogram, and electrocardiogram. In three subjects transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension was measured simultaneously. Patients with kyphoscoliosis hypoventilated during sleep, particularly in rapid eye movement sleep, resulting in a rise in end tidal and transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension, and a reduction in oxygen saturation to a degree not observed in normal subjects. Reduced chest wall movement was the major cause of these episodes, which were more frequent and occupied a greater proportion of sleep time in those with kyphoscoliosis than in normal subjects. Serious cardiac arrhythmias were rarely associated. It is concluded that disturbances of respiration during sleep occur in patients with kyphoscoliosis and that these may be important in the pathogenesis of cardiorespiratory failure. PMID:3424256

  13. Impact of Mining Waste on Airborne Respirable Particulates in Northeastern Oklahoma, United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric dispersion of particles from mine waste is potentially an important route of human exposure to metals in communities close to active and abandoned mining areas. In this study, we assessed sources of mass and metal concentrations in two size fractions of respirable pa...

  14. Satellite power using magnetically suspended flywheel stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, James A.; Anand, Davinder K.

    1987-01-01

    Research activities with magnetically suspended flywheels are reported. The purpose of the effort is to critically examine and further the development of all the key technologies which impact the inertial energy storage system. The results presented discuss the concept of a magnetically suspended flywheel as it applies to a 500 Watt-hour energy storage system. The proposed system is currently under hardware development and is based upon two pancake magnetic bearings arranged in a vertical stack.

  15. Stability of suspended graphene under Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovsky, E. M.; Zarzuela, R.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a graphene sheet suspended above a conducting surface. Treating graphene as an elastic membrane subjected to Casimir force, we study its stability against sagging towards the conductor. There exists a critical elevation at the edges below which the central part of the suspended graphene nucleates a trunk that sinks under the action of the Casimir force. The dependence of the critical elevation on temperature, dimensions, and the elastic stress applied to the graphene sheet is computed.

  16. Observations on the use of acoustic Doppler velocimeters over rough beds with suspended sediment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic Doppler velocimeters provide a means for measuring velocities and turbulence in challenging circumstances, such as in flows with suspended particles, which are difficult or impossible with laser-based techniques. The relatively non-intrusive measurement resulting from the offset sampling v...

  17. Settleable and Non-Settleable Suspended Sediments in the Ogeechee River Estuary, Georgia, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, M.

    2000-06-01

    Suspended particle dynamics were investigated in the Ogeechee River Estuary during neap tide in July 1996. Samples were operationally separated into ' truly suspended ' (settling velocity <0·006 cm s-1) and ' settleable ' (settling velocity >0·006 cm s-1) fractions over the course of a tidal cycle to determine whether these two fractions were comprised of particles with differing biological and chemical characteristics. Total suspended sediment, organic carbon and nitrogen, chlorophyll a and phaeopigment concentrations were measured in each fraction, as well as rates of bacterial hydrolytic enzyme activity [β-1,4-glucosidase (βGase) and β-xylosidase (βXase)]. The majority of the suspended sediment (by weight) was in the truly suspended fraction; all measured parameters were largely associated with this fraction as well. When compared to the settleable material, the truly suspended material was significantly higher in % POC (5·7±0·6 vs. 3·9±1·8), % chlorophyll (0·07±0·02 vs. 0·03±0·01), % phaeopigment (0·030±0·006 vs. 0·018±0·012), and weight-specific maximal uptake rates (Vmaxper mg suspended sediment) of both enzymes (1·8±0·4 vs. 0·7± 0·2 nmol mg-1 h-1βGase and 1·1±0·3vs . 0·3±0·2 nmol mg-1 h-1βXase), providing clear evidence for a qualitative distinction between the two fractions. These results are interpreted to mean that the more organic-rich, biologically active material associated with the suspended fraction is likely to have a different fate in this Estuary, as ' truly suspended ' sediments will be readily transported whereas ' settleable ' sediments will settle and be resuspended with each tide. These types of qualitative differences should be incorporated into models of particle dynamics in estuaries.

  18. Photosynthesis and Respiration in Leaf Slices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Simon

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates how leaf slices provide an inexpensive material for illustrating several fundamental points about the biochemistry of photosynthesis and respiration. Presents experiments that illustrate the effects of photon flux density and herbicides and carbon dioxide concentration. (DDR)

  19. Organohalide respiration: microbes breathing chlorinated molecules

    PubMed Central

    Leys, David; Adrian, Lorenz; Smidt, Hauke

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial respiration has taken advantage of almost every redox couple present in the environment. The reduction of organohalide compounds to release the reduced halide ion drives energy production in organohalide respiring bacteria. This process is centred around the reductive dehalogenases, an iron–sulfur and corrinoid containing family of enzymes. These enzymes, transcriptional regulators and the bacteria themselves have potential to contribute to future bioremediation solutions that address the pollution of the environment by halogenated organic compounds. PMID:23479746

  20. A comparison of facemask and respirator filtration test methods.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Samy; Shaffer, Ronald; Williams, Brandon; Smit, Sarah

    2017-02-01

    NIOSH published a Federal Register Notice to explore the possibility of incorporating FDA required filtration tests for surgical masks (SMs) in the 42 CFR Part 84 respirator certification process. There have been no published studies comparing the filtration efficiency test methods used for NIOSH certification of N95 filtering facepiece respirators (N95 FFRs) with those used by the FDA for clearance of SMs. To address this issue, filtration efficiencies of "N95 FFRs" including six N95 FFR models and three surgical N95 FFR models, and three SM models were measured using the NIOSH NaCl aerosol test method, and FDA required particulate filtration efficiency (PFE) and bacterial filtration efficiency (BFE) methods, and viral filtration efficiency (VFE) method. Five samples of each model were tested using each method. Both PFE and BFE tests were done using unneutralized particles as per FDA guidance document. PFE was measured using 0.1 µm size polystyrene latex particles and BFE with ∼3.0 µm size particles containing Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. VFE was obtained using ∼3.0 µm size particles containing phiX 174 as the challenge virus and Escherichia coli as the host. Results showed that the efficiencies measured by the NIOSH NaCl method for "N95 FFRs" were from 98.15-99.68% compared to 99.74-99.99% for PFE, 99.62-99.9% for BFE, and 99.8-99.9% for VFE methods. Efficiencies by the NIOSH NaCl method were significantly (p = <0.05) lower than the other methods. SMs showed lower efficiencies (54.72-88.40%) than "N95 FFRs" measured by the NIOSH NaCl method, while PFE, BFE, and VFE methods produced no significant difference. The above results show that the NIOSH NaCl method is relatively conservative and is able to identify poorly performing filtration devices. The higher efficiencies obtained using PFE, BFE and VFE methods show that adding these supplemental particle penetration methods will not improve respirator certification.

  1. Ordering of Fine Particles in a Planar Magnetron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Totsuji, H.; Ishihara, O.; Sato, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Adachi, S.

    2008-09-07

    Fine particles injected in a planar magnetron were pushed upward by diffusible plasma, leading to being suspended by the force balance with the gravity and forming three-dimensional structures on the two-dimensional structure formed by particle strings.

  2. Telephone communications with several commercial respirators.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A T; Scott, W H; Coyne, K M; Koh, F C; Rebar, J E

    2001-01-01

    Previous work showed that telephone communications while wearing military respirators degraded both word comprehension and recognition speed. In addition, electronic amplification of the speech diaphragm signal had shown no advantage to the extra hardware. This experiment was performed to test effects of different configurations of commercially available respirators on telephone communications accuracy and speed. Twelve pairs of subjects were separated into different rooms and communicated by telephone. Modified rhyme-test words were presented by computer to the speaker, who transmitted the word by telephone to the listener. During the first replication, subjects were given no instruction about telephone communications procedure. During the second replication subjects followed a communications protocol that instructed them when to move the telephone handset from their ears to their mouths. Results showed that the protocol uniformly improved communications accuracy without incurring any extra time penalty. Word comprehension was still twice as fast without a respirator as with a respirator. Accuracy with the protocol nearly equaled the no respirator control value for most respirators tested.

  3. Mitochondrial respiration without ubiquinone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ), a.k.a. coenzyme Q, is a redox-active lipid that participates in several cellular processes, in particular mitochondrial electron transport. Primary UQ deficiency is a rare but severely debilitating condition. Mclk1 (a.k.a. Coq7) encodes a conserved mitochondrial enzyme that is necessary for UQ biosynthesis. We engineered conditional Mclk1 knockout models to study pathogenic effects of UQ deficiency and to assess potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of UQ deficiencies. We found that Mclk1 knockout cells are viable in the total absence of UQ. The UQ biosynthetic precursor DMQ9 accumulates in these cells and can sustain mitochondrial respiration, albeit inefficiently. We demonstrated that efficient rescue of the respiratory deficiency in UQ-deficient cells by UQ analogues is side chain length dependent, and that classical UQ analogues with alkyl side chains such as idebenone and decylUQ are inefficient in comparison with analogues with isoprenoid side chains. Furthermore, Vitamin K2, which has an isoprenoid side chain, and has been proposed to be a mitochondrial electron carrier, had no efficacy on UQ-deficient mouse cells. In our model with liver-specific loss of Mclk1, a large depletion of UQ in hepatocytes caused only a mild impairment of respiratory chain function and no gross abnormalities. In conjunction with previous findings, this surprisingly small effect of UQ depletion indicates a nonlinear dependence of mitochondrial respiratory capacity on UQ content. With this model, we also showed that diet-derived UQ10 is able to functionally rescue the electron transport deficit due to severe endogenous UQ deficiency in the liver, an organ capable of absorbing exogenous UQ. PMID:23847050

  4. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  5. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  6. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  7. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  8. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  9. 42 CFR 84.197 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.197... Cartridge Respirators § 84.197 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type...

  10. 42 CFR 84.134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.134... Respirators § 84.134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Supplied-air respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type...

  11. 42 CFR 84.174 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.174... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.174 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except..., durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type of respirator it...

  12. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  13. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  14. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  15. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  16. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  17. Continuous-flow centrifugation to collect suspended sediment for chemical analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conn, Kathleen E.; Dinicola, Richard S.; Black, Robert W.; Cox, Stephen E.; Sheibley, Richard W.; Foreman, James R.; Senter, Craig A.; Peterson, Norman T.

    2016-12-22

    polychlorinated biphenyls. The particle-size distribution of the captured sediment changes to a more fine-grained sample during centrifugation, and the necessity to account for this change when extrapolating chemical concentrations on the centrifuged sediment sample to the environmental water system is discussed.The data produced using this method will help eliminate a data gap of suspended sediment-bound chemical concentrations, and will support management decisions, such as chemical source-control efforts or in-stream restoration activities. When coupled with streamflow and sediment flux data, it will improve estimates of riverine chemical fluxes, and will aid in assessing the importance and impacts of suspended sediment-bound chemicals to downstream freshwater and coastal marine ecosystems.

  18. A New Simple Suspended-Load Sampler: Continuous Particulate Matter Collection from Rivers with Low and High Suspended Matter Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralik, Martin; Miesbauer, Hermann; Humer, Franko; Oberndorfer, Hermann

    2010-05-01

    Please fill in your abstract text. Suspended particulate matter (SPM) or suspended load in waters is the part of the stream load that is carried for a considerable period of time in suspension. Long term suspended sediment monitoring is hampered by the limited sample size or enormous investments in equipment and/or working hours. In addition many samplers are limited to easily accessible sampling points equipped with electric power supply or to certain types of streams and cannot operate unattended in case of floods. The sorption characteristics of the suspended particulate matter (wash load) have been recognized as important transporters of natural and anthropogenic trace constituents. To allow repeated analyses sometimes several grams of dried SPM are needed. All parts of the sediment sampler are available as spare parts in hardware stores and made of polyvinylchloride (PVC). The inlet device is connected with the sampler by a tubing of several meter length. Without a pump the sampler can be positioned at a safe place lower than the inlet device to allow a continuous flow. Only a small portion (0.001-0.002 l/s) of the river water flows down through the central pipe by gravitational force to the bottom of the container. Due to the considerable larger diameter of the container the water rises very slowly (1-3 hours) and leaves the container at a small overflow-pipe allowing a nearly complete settling and/or flocculation (80-90%) of the suspended load in the container. The sampler was tested in an alpine torrent and two rivers in flat areas. The newly developed sampler offers following advantages. The sampler (1) is inexpensive and robust, (2) operates in case of small cascade or cataracts (>0.5 m) without power supply, (3) can be used singly or in lateral or vertical nests, (4) allows continuous settling and flocculation without perturbation by vibrating movements of the sampler (5) is resistant to plugging and clogging by coarser particles and plant debris, (6

  19. Suspended two-dimensional electron and hole gases

    SciTech Connect

    Kazazis, D.; Bourhis, E.; Gierak, J.; Gennser, U.; Bourgeois, O.; Antoni, T.

    2013-12-04

    We report on the fabrication of fully suspended two-dimensional electron and hole gases in III-V heterostructures. Low temperature transport measurements verify that the properties of the suspended gases are only slightly degraded with respect to the non-suspended gases. Focused ion beam technology is used to pattern suspended nanostructures with minimum damage from the ion beam, due to the small width of the suspended membrane.

  20. A study of metal ion adsorption at low suspended-solid concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, Cecily C.Y.; Davis, J.A.; Kuwabara, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure for conducting adsorption studies at low suspended solid concentrations in natural waters (<50 mg l-1) is described. Methodological complications previously associated with such experiments have been overcome. Adsorption of zinc ion onto synthetic colloidal titania (TiO2) was studied as a function of pH, supporting electrolyte (NaCl) concentration (0??1-0??002 m) and particle concentration (2-50 mg l-1). The lack of success of the Davis Leckie site bonding model in describing Zn(II) adsorption emphasizes the need for further studies of adsorption at low suspended-solid concentrations. ?? 1987.

  1. Nitrate respiration associated with detrital aggregates in aerobic bottom waters of the abyssal NE Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolgast, D. M.; Carlucci, A. F.; Bauer, J. E.

    Rates of nitrate utilization in tube core respirometers (TCR) placed over aggregates on the seafloor at an abyssal site (Station M) in the eastern North Pacific Ocean increased at times of high particle flux. In the presence of aggregates, both oxygen and nitrate were used in respiration. The ratio of O 2 : NO 3 concentrations in ambient waters was 3.9, while O 2 : NO 3 utilization rates in TCR overlying and TCR aggregate pore waters were 2.6 and 0.6, respectively. We postulated that denitrification was occurring in microzones of the particle-rich oxygenated (135 μM) waters. To test this, nitrate respiration was measured aboard a ship in oxygen-minimum (˜26 μM) water supplemented with particulate matter collected by a surface net tow. Dissolved oxygen consumption occurred immediately, followed by nitrate utilization while oxygen was still present. Calculations from cell densities indicated 0.6 μM of the original 42 μM of nitrate was assimilated into bacterial biomass during 36 h of incubation, suggesting the major portion of the utilized nitrate was used in respiration. Nitrate utilization rates in the in situ incubation study and those of the shipboard experiment were 3.1 and 2.7 μM d -1, respectively. The results of the present studies suggest nitrate respiration occurs in microzones of aggregates in oxygenated bottom waters at times of high particle flux and causes some loss of fixed nitrogen.

  2. Dispersal of suspended matter in Makasar Strait and the Flores Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisma, D.; Kalf, J.; Karmini, M.; Mook, W. G.; van Put, A.; Bernard, P.; van Grieken, R.

    In November 1984 in Makasar and the Flores Basin water samples were collected (T, S, dissolved O 2, total CO 2), bottom samples (sediment composition) and suspended matter (particle composition, particle size). A sediment trap was moored in the Flores Basin at 4600 m depth for nearly four months, covering the dry season. In the Flores Basin there are indications for bottom flow resuspending bottom material or preventing suspended material from settling; in Makasar Strait there is probably inflow of deep water both from the south and from the north, resulting in a very slow bottom water flor. Bottom deposits in Makasar Strait and the Flores Basin are predominantly terrigenous, with an admixture of organic carbonate and silica (mostly coccoliths). Volcanic material is primarily present near to the volcanoes in the south and reaches the deeper basins by slumping. In the suspended matter no volcanic particles and little planktonic material were found, although the latter form 10 to 15% of the top sediment and of the material deposited in the sediment trap. In suspension particles with a large concentration of tin (Sn) were found associated mainly with iron. They probably come from northern Kalimantan or northern Sulawesi. Suspended matter concentrations were mainly less than 0.5 mg·dm -3, only off the Mahakam river mouth were concentrations higher than 1 mg·dm -3. Particle size was erratic because of the variable composition of the coarser particles in suspension. Organic matter concentrations in suspension (in mg·dm -3) roughly follow the distribution of total suspended matter but organic content (in %) of the suspended matter does not show any trends. All organic matter in suspension is of marine origin except in the Mahakam river and estuary. Deposition rates, as estimated from the sediment trap results, are 150 mg·cm -2·a -1 for the total sediment, 26 mg·cm -2·a -1 for carbonate and 13 mg·cm -2·a -1 for organic matter. Flocs and fibres in suspension were

  3. Estimation of suspended sediment concentration in rivers using acoustic methods.

    PubMed

    Elçi, Sebnem; Aydin, Ramazan; Work, Paul A

    2009-12-01

    Acoustic Doppler current meters (ADV, ADCP, and ADP) are widely used in water systems to measure flow velocities and velocity profiles. Although these meters are designed for flow velocity measurements, they can also provide information defining the quantity of particulate matter in the water, after appropriate calibration. When an acoustic instrument is calibrated for a water system, no additional sensor is needed to measure suspended sediment concentration (SSC). This provides the simultaneous measurements of velocity and concentration required for most sediment transport studies. The performance of acoustic Doppler current meters for measuring SSC was investigated in different studies where signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and suspended sediment concentration were related using different formulations. However, these studies were each limited to a single study site where neither the effect of particle size nor the effect of temperature was investigated. In this study, different parameters that affect the performance of an ADV for the prediction of SSC are investigated. In order to investigate the reliability of an ADV for SSC measurements in different environments, flow and SSC measurements were made in different streams located in the Aegean region of Turkey having different soil types. Soil samples were collected from all measuring stations and particle size analysis was conducted by mechanical means. Multivariate analysis was utilized to investigate the effect of soil type and water temperature on the measurements. Statistical analysis indicates that SNR readings ob tained from the ADV are affected by water temperature and particle size distribution of the soil, as expected, and a prediction model is presented relating SNR readings to SSC mea surements where both water temperature and sediment characteristics type are incorporated into the model. The coefficients of the suggested model were obtained using the multivariate anal ysis. Effect of high turbidity

  4. Selective inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in human leukaemic leucocytes by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S; Ray, M; Misra, S; Dutta, D P; Ray, S

    1997-04-15

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of mitochondria of both normal and leukaemic leucocytes was tested by using different respiratory substrates and complex specific artificial electron donors and inhibitors. The results indicate that methylglyoxal strongly inhibits mitochondrial respiration in leukaemic leucocytes, whereas, at a much higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit mitochondrial respiration in normal leucocytes. Methylglyoxal strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxoglutarate and malate plus NAD+-dependent respiration, whereas, at a higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit succinate and alpha-glycerophosphate-dependent respiration. Methylglyoxal also fails to inhibit respiration which is initiated by duroquinone and cannot inhibit oxygen consumption when the N,N,N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by-pass is used. NADH oxidation by sub-mitochondrial particles of leukaemic leucocytes is also inhibited by methylglyoxal. Lactaldehyde, a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of leukaemic leucocyte mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal also inhibits l-lactic acid formation by intact leukaemic leucocytes and critically reduces the ATP level of these cells, whereas methylglyoxal has no effect on normal leucocytes. We conclude that methylglyoxal inhibits glycolysis and the electron flow through mitochondrial complex I of leukaemic leucocytes. This is strikingly similar to our previous studies on mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis and ATP levels in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells [Ray, Dutta, Halder and Ray (1994) Biochem. J. 303, 69-72; Halder, Ray and Ray (1993) Int. J. Cancer 54, 443-449], which strongly suggests that the inhibition of electron flow through complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and inhibition of glycolysis by methylglyoxal may be common characteristics of all malignant cells.

  5. Selective inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in human leukaemic leucocytes by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, S; Ray, M; Misra, S; Dutta, D P; Ray, S

    1997-01-01

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of mitochondria of both normal and leukaemic leucocytes was tested by using different respiratory substrates and complex specific artificial electron donors and inhibitors. The results indicate that methylglyoxal strongly inhibits mitochondrial respiration in leukaemic leucocytes, whereas, at a much higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit mitochondrial respiration in normal leucocytes. Methylglyoxal strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxoglutarate and malate plus NAD+-dependent respiration, whereas, at a higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit succinate and alpha-glycerophosphate-dependent respiration. Methylglyoxal also fails to inhibit respiration which is initiated by duroquinone and cannot inhibit oxygen consumption when the N,N,N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by-pass is used. NADH oxidation by sub-mitochondrial particles of leukaemic leucocytes is also inhibited by methylglyoxal. Lactaldehyde, a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of leukaemic leucocyte mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal also inhibits l-lactic acid formation by intact leukaemic leucocytes and critically reduces the ATP level of these cells, whereas methylglyoxal has no effect on normal leucocytes. We conclude that methylglyoxal inhibits glycolysis and the electron flow through mitochondrial complex I of leukaemic leucocytes. This is strikingly similar to our previous studies on mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis and ATP levels in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells [Ray, Dutta, Halder and Ray (1994) Biochem. J. 303, 69-72; Halder, Ray and Ray (1993) Int. J. Cancer 54, 443-449], which strongly suggests that the inhibition of electron flow through complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and inhibition of glycolysis by methylglyoxal may be common characteristics of all malignant cells. PMID:9163322

  6. Respiration and Reproductive Effort in Xanthium canadense

    PubMed Central

    KINUGASA, TOSHIHIKO; HIKOSAKA, KOUKI; HIROSE, TADAKI

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims The proportion of resources devoted to reproduction in the plant is called the reproductive effort (RE), which is most commonly expressed as the proportion of reproductive biomass to total plant biomass production (REW). Reproductive yield is the outcome of photosynthates allocated to reproductive structures minus subsequent respiratory consumption for construction and maintenance of reproductive structures. Thus, REW can differ from RE in terms of photosynthates allocated to reproductive structures (REP). • Methods Dry mass growth and respiration of vegetative and reproductive organs were measured in Xanthium canadense and the amount of photosynthates and its partitioning to dry mass growth and respiratory consumption were determined. Differences between REW and REP were analysed in terms of growth and maintenance respiration. • Key Results The fraction of allocated photosynthates that was consumed by respiration was smaller in the reproductive organ than in the vegetative organs. Consequently, REP was smaller than REW. The smaller respiratory consumption in the reproductive organ resulted from its shorter period of existence and a seasonal decline in temperature, as well as a slower rate of maintenance respiration, although the fraction of photosynthates consumed by growth respiration was larger than in the vegetative organs. • Conclusions Reproductive effort in terms of photosynthates (REP) was smaller than that in terms of biomass (REW). This difference resulted from respiratory consumption for maintenance, which was far smaller in the reproductive organ than in vegetative organs. PMID:15837721

  7. Suspending superconducting qubits by silicon micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Y.; Axline, C.; Wang, C.; Brecht, T.; Gao, Y. Y.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2016-09-01

    We present a method for relieving aluminum 3D transmon qubits from a silicon substrate using micromachining. Our technique is a high yield, one-step deep reactive ion etch that requires no additional fabrication processes and results in the suspension of the junction area and edges of the aluminum film. The drastic change in the device geometry affects both the dielectric and the flux noise environment experienced by the qubit. In particular, the participation ratios of various dielectric interfaces are significantly modified, and suspended qubits exhibited longer T1's than non-suspended ones. We also find that the suspension increases the flux noise experienced by tunable SQUID-based qubits.

  8. Polymer microlasers with a suspended cavity design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Nalla, Venkatram; Bettiol, Andrew A.

    2015-04-01

    We report on the fabrication of microlasers with suspended cavity design in a thin layer of Rhodamine B doped SU-8 polymer using proton beam writing. Optical characterization of the fabricated three-dimensional microlasers under ambient atmosphere results in low lasing threshold of 0.5 μJ/mm2, which is an improvement by factor of 2 when compared to planar microlasers. The directional behavior is also observed in whispering gallery mode microlasers with spiral cavity design. These microlasers with suspended cavity design are not only useful in reducing the lasing threshold but also have significance in 3D photonic integrated circuits.

  9. Performance of suspended and attached growth MBR systems in treating high strength synthetic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jamal Khan, S; Ilyas, Shazia; Javid, Sadaf; Visvanathan, C; Jegatheesan, V

    2011-05-01

    The performance of laboratory-scale attached growth (AG) and suspended growth (SG) membrane bioreactors (MBRs) was evaluated in treating synthetic wastewater simulating high strength domestic wastewater. This study investigated the influence of sponge suspended carriers in AG-MBR system, occupying 15% reactor volume, on the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP), and compared it to that of SG-MBR. Results showed that the removal efficiencies of COD, TN and TP in AG-MBR were 98%, 89% and 58%, respectively as compared to 98%, 74% and 38%, respectively in SG-MBR. Improved TN removal in AG-MBR systems was primarily based on simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) process. These results infer that the presence of small bio-particles having higher microbial activity and the growth of complex biomass captured within the suspended sponge carriers resulted in improved TN and TP removal in AG-MBR.

  10. Overview of selected surrogate technologies for continuous suspended-sediment monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, J.R.; Gartner, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Surrogate technologies for inferring selected characteristics of suspended sediments in surface waters are being tested by the U.S. Geological Survey and several partners with the ultimate goal of augmenting or replacing traditional monitoring methods. Optical properties of water such as turbidity and optical backscatter are the most commonly used surrogates for suspended-sediment concentration, but use of other techniques such as those based on acoustic backscatter, laser diffraction, digital photo-optic, and pressure-difference principles is increasing for concentration and, in some cases, particle-size distribution and flux determinations. The potential benefits of these technologies include acquisition of automated, continuous, quantifiably accurate data obtained with increased safety and at less expense. When suspended-sediment surrogate data meet consensus accuracy criteria and appropriate sediment-record computation techniques are applied, these technologies have the potential to revolutionize the way fluvial-sediment data are collected, analyzed, and disseminated.

  11. Suspended sediment control and water quality conservation through riparian vegetation:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanelli, D.; Cavazza, C.; Correggiari, S.

    2009-04-01

    Soil erosion and Suspended Sediment River are strongly related in the Apennines catchments which are generally characterised by a clayey lithology and impermeable soils and extensive and severe erosion and slope stability problems. In fact the suspended sediment yield represents one of the most reliable tools to assess real basin soil loss (Pavanelli and Pagliarani, 2002; Pavanelli and Rigotti, 2007) from the surface rain erosive features in a mountain watershed, as rills and interrills erosion, gullies, bad-lands (calanchi basins). Suspended sediment yield is known to imply several detrimental consequences: soil losses from agricultural land, worsening of the quality of the water, clogging of water supply filters and reservoir siltation. In addition, suspended sediment yield is also one of the main vector for pollutants and nutrients: various studies have already proved how nitrogen content has been constantly rising in aquifers and surface waters [Böhlke and Denver, 1995]. Finer particles and their aggregates have been proved to be the preferential vehicle for particulate nitrogen [Droppo et al., 1997; Ongley et al., 1992]. In one research [Pavanelli and al. 2006] four Apennines torrents (Gaiana, Sillaro, Savena and Lavino) with mountain basins ranging from 8.7 to 139 Km2 were monitored via automatic sampling devices, the samples of water collected were analysed to characterise suspended solids in terms of their grain size distribution and total nitrogen with respect to the source of eroded area in the catchment. Preliminary results [Pavanelli and al. 2007] seem to show the existence of a direct relationship between nitrogen concentration and finer particle concentration (<20 μm), with the maximum nitrogen loss values being related to factors like the presence of clayey formations, their position within the catchment and the availability of suspended particles. The results seem to indicate hillsides as main sources of suspended sediment to the torrents

  12. The use of wide-band transmittance imaging to size and classify suspended particulate matter in seawater.

    PubMed

    Davies, E J; Brandvik, P J; Leirvik, F; Nepstad, R

    2017-02-15

    An in situ particle imaging system for measurement of high concentrations of suspended particles ranging from 30μm to several mm in diameter, is presented. The system obtains quasi-silhouettes of particles suspended within an open-path sample volume of up to 5cm in length. Benchmarking against spherical standards and the LISST-100 show good agreement, providing confidence in measurements from the system when extending beyond the size, concentration and particle classification capabilities of the LISST-100. Particle-specific transmittance is used to classify particle type, independent of size and shape. This is applied to mixtures of oil droplets, gas bubbles and oil-coated gas bubbles, to provide independent measures of oil and gas size distributions, concentrations, and oil-gas ratios during simulated subsea releases. The system is also applied to in situ measurements of high concentrations of large mineral flocs surrounding a submarine mine tailings placement within a Norwegian Fjord.

  13. Numerical studies on the performance of an aerosol respirator with faceseal leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaripov, S. K.; Mukhametzanov, I. T.; Grinshpun, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    We studied the efficiency of a facepiece filtering respirator (FFR) in presence of a measurable faceseal leakage using the previously developed model of a spherical sampler with porous layer. In our earlier study, the model was validated for a specific filter permeability value. In this follow-up study, we investigated the effect of permeability on the overall respirator performance accounting for the faceseal leakage. The Total Inward Leakage (TIL) was calculated as a function of the leakage-to-filter surface ratio and the particle diameter. A good correlation was found between the theoretical and experimental TIL values. The TIL value was shown to increase and the effect of particle size on TIL to decrease as the leakage-to- filter surface ratio grows. The model confirmed that within the most penetrating particle size range (∼50 nm) and at relatively low leakage-to-filter surface ratios, an FFR performs better (TIL is lower) when the filter has a lower permeability which should be anticipated as long as the flow through the filter represents the dominant particle penetration pathway. An increase in leak size causes the TIL to rise; furthermore, under certain leakage-to-filter surface ratios, TIL for ultrafine particles becomes essentially independent on the filter properties due to a greater contribution of the aerosol flow through the faceseal leakage. In contrast to the ultrafine fraction, the larger particles (e.g., 800 nm) entering a typical high- or medium-quality respirator filter are almost fully collected by the filter medium regardless of its permeability; at the same time, the fraction penetrated through the leakage appears to be permeability- dependent: higher permeability generally results in a lower pressure drop through the filter which increases the air flow through the filter at the expense of the leakage flow. The latter reduces the leakage effect thus improving the overall respiratory protection level. The findings of this study provide

  14. Soil respiration partition and its components in the total agro-ecosystem respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delogu, Emilie; LeDantec, Valerie; Mordelet, Patrick; Buysse, Pauline; Aubinet, Marc; Pattey, Elizabeth; Mary, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Close to 15% of the Earth's terrestrial surface is used for cropland. In the context of global warming, and acknowledged by the Kyoto Protocol, agricultural soils could be a significant sink for atmospheric CO2. Understanding the factors influencing carbon fluxes of agricultural soils is essential for implementing efficient mitigation practices. Most of the soil respiration modeling studies was carried out in forest ecosystems, but only a few was carried out in agricultural ecosystems. In the study, we evaluated simple formalisms to model soil respiration using wheat data from four contrasting geographical mi-latitude regions. Soil respiration were measured in three winter wheat fields at Lamasquère (43°49'N, 01°23'E, 2007) and Auradé (43°54'N, 01°10'E, 2008), South-West France and Lonzée (50°33'N, 4°44'E, 2007), Belgium, and in a spring wheat field at Ottawa (45°22'N, 75°43'W, 2007, 2011), Ontario, Canada. Manual closed chambers were used in the French sites. The Belgium and Canadian sites were equipped with automated closed chamber systems, which continuously collected 30-min soil respiration exchanges. All the sites were also equipped with eddy flux towers. When eddy flux data were collected over bare soil, the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was equal to soil respiration exchange. These NEE data were used to validate the model. Different biotic and abiotic descriptors were used to model daily soil respiration and its heterotrophic and autotrophic components: soil temperature, soil relative humidity, Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), shoot biomass, crop height, with different formalisms. It was interesting to conclude that using biotic descriptors did not improve the performances of the model. In fact, a combination of abiotic descriptors (soil humidity and soil temperature) allowed significant model formalism to model soil respiration. The simple soil respiration model was used to calculate the heterotrophic and autotrophic source contributions to

  15. An evaluation of suspended sediments and turbidity in Cow Creek, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtiss, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    During a 6-month period from December 1980 through May 1981, samples were collected from Cow Creek near Azalea, Oreg., and analyzed for suspended sediment, particle-size distribution, and turbidity. Of the estimated suspended-sediment discharge of 4,270 tons for the 1981 water year, 95 percent (4,050 tons) was transported during a major storm event, December 2-4, 1980. The 1981 water year suspended-sediment discharge of 4,270 tons is well below the average annual suspended-sediment discharge of 22,000 tons reported earlier by Curtiss (1974). A clay-sediment transport curve was used in conjunction with the flow-duration curve to estimate average annual clay discharge of 3,700 tons for Cow Creek near Azalea. Turbidity in Cow Creek near Azalea is estimated to be equal to or less than 15 NTU (nephelometric turbidity units) 90 percent of the time. A method for predicting turbidity values in a hypothetical impoundment is presented in this report. This method utilizes a suspended-sediment transport curve of the fine (<0.002 mm) material and measures residual-turbidity values. This method probably could be used to assess the impact of proposed reservoirs on stream turbidities in basins similar to that of Cow Creek basin.

  16. The external respiration and gas exchange in space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. M.; Tikhonov, M. A.; Kotov, A. N.

    both and its individual systems including an external respiration function. In this case, it should be remembered that the external respiration system has some physiological and morphological properties due to which the body systems are particularly subjected to environmental effects. Thus, according to figurative comparison by Evald Veible a contact area of the lungs with an external environment i.e. an alveolar surface is large and equaled approximately to tennis-court size, as the alveolocapillary membrane thickness is negligible and amounts to one fiftieth of a writing-paper sheet [1]. From this it follows that such a fine and highly organized structure must be extremely dependent upon any external exposures including gravitational ones since from the physical viewpoint of physics the lungs represent a quasiconical three-dimensional elastic body suspended in the thoracic cavity and in which there occur the gravity-induced internal tensions incrementing in a base-to-apices direction. As a result of these tensions, in the lungs various physical gradients: hydrostatic, pleural and transpulmonary pressures, pulmonary time constant, vertical gradient of the volume and structure of alveoli, etc. are developed.

  17. BOREAS TE-2 Wood Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Michael G.; Lavigne, Michael; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-2 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the respiration of the foliage, roots, and wood of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of wood respiration conducted in the NSA during the growing season of 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  18. BOREAS TE-2 Continuous Wood Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Ryan, Michael G.; Lavigne, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-2 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the respiration of the foliage, roots, and wood of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of wood respiration measured continuously (about once per hour) in the NSA during the growing season of 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  19. BOREAS TE-2 Foliage Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Michael G.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Lavigne, Michael; Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-2 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the respiration of the foliage, roots, and wood of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of foliar respiration conducted in the NSA during the growing season of 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  20. BOREAS TE-2 Root Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Michael G.; Lavigne, Michael; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-2 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the respiration of the foliage, roots, and wood of boreal vegetation. This data set includes means of tree root respiration measurements on roots having diameters ranging from 0 to 2 mm conducted in the NSA during the growing season of 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  1. A Successful Retention Program for Suspended Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dill, Anna L.; Gilbert, Jerome A.; Hill, Jennifer P.; Minchew, Sue S.; Sempier, Tracie A.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally at Mississippi State University (MSU), students who are placed on academic suspension are required to stay out of school one regular semester. As an alternative, the university designed a program for early readmission for suspended students who agree to follow the requirements outlined in the "Learning Skills Support…

  2. Size of Suspended Sediment Over Dunes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Samples of suspended sediment were collected at four elevations simultaneously over two-dimensional mobile dunes in 0.5 mm sand in a laboratory flume channel. A constant sampling position relative to the dunes was maintained by adjusting the translation rate of the sampling carriage to be the same ...

  3. Size of Suspended Sediment over Dunes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Samples of suspended sediment were collected at four elevations simultaneously over two-dimensional mobile dunes in two mixtures of 0.5 mm sand in a laboratory flume channel. A constant sampling position relative to the dunes was maintained by adjusting the translation rate of the sampling carriage...

  4. 7 CFR 1212.28 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS..., PROMOTION, CONSUMER EDUCATION AND INDUSTRY INFORMATION ORDER Honey Packers and Importers Research, Promotion, Consumer Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1212.28 Suspend. “Suspend” means to...

  5. Changes in soil respiration components and their specific respiration along three successional forests in the subtropics

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Tianfeng; Liu, Juxiu; Wang, Gangsheng; ...

    2016-01-16

    1.Understanding how soil respiration components change with forest succession is critical for modelling and predicting soil carbon (C) processes and its sequestration below-ground. The specific respiration (a ratio of respiration to biomass) is increasingly being used as an indicator of forest succession conceptually based on Odum's theory of ecosystem development. However, the hypothesis that specific soil respiration declines with forest succession remains largely untested. 2.We used a trenching method to partition soil respiration into heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration (RH and RA) and then evaluated the specific RH and specific RA in three successional forests in subtropical China. 3.Our resultsmore » showed a clear seasonality in the influence of forest succession on RH, with no significant differences among the three forests in the dry season but a higher value in the old-growth forest than the other two forests in the wet season. RA in the old-growth forest tended to be the highest among the three forests. Both the specific RH and specific RA decreased with the progressive maturity of three forests. 4.Lastly, our results highlight the importance of forest succession in determining the variation of RH in different seasons. With forest succession, soil microbes and plant roots become more efficient to conserve C resources, which would result in a greater proportion of C retained in soils.« less

  6. Effects of Airflow and Changing Humidity on the Aerosolization of Respirable Fungal Fragments and Conidia of Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the aerosolization of particles (micro- and macroconidia and fragments) from Botrytis cinerea cultures in relation to potential human inhalation in indoor environments. The influence of the following factors on the aerosolization of B. cinerea particles was studied: exposure to airflow, relative humidity (rh), changing rh, and plant or building materials. The aerodynamic diameter (da) and the respirable fraction of the aerosolized particles were determined. Conidia and fragments of B. cinerea were not aerosolized as a response to a decrease in the rh. In contrast, both micro- and macroconidia and fungal fragments were aerosolized when exposed to an airflow of 1.5 m s−1 or 0.5 m s−1. Significantly more particles of microconidial size and fragment size were aerosolized at a low rh (18 to 40% rh) than at a higher rh (60 to 80% rh) when cultures were exposed to airflow. The size of the respirable fraction of the aerosolized particles was dependent on the rh but not on the growth material. At high rh, about 30% of the aerosolized particles were of respirable size, while at low rh, about 70% were of respirable size. During low rh, more fungal (1→3)-β-d-glucan and chitinase were aerosolized than during high rh. In conclusion, exposure to external physical forces such as airflow is necessary for the aerosolization of particles from B. cinerea. The amount and size distribution are highly affected by the rh, and more particles of respirable sizes were aerosolized at low rh than at high rh. PMID:22447608

  7. Two-dimensional microrheology of freely suspended liquid crystal films.

    PubMed

    Eremin, A; Baumgarten, S; Harth, K; Stannarius, R; Nguyen, Z H; Goldfain, A; Park, C S; Maclennan, J E; Glaser, M A; Clark, N A

    2011-12-23

    Smectic liquid crystals form freely-suspended, fluid films of highly uniform structure and thickness, making them ideal systems for studies of hydrodynamics in two dimensions. We have measured particle mobility and shear viscosity by direct observation of the gravitational drift of silica spheres and smectic islands included in these fluid membranes. In thick films, we observe a hydrodynamic regime dominated by lateral confinement effects, with the mobility of the inclusion determined predominantly by coupling of the fluid flow to the fixed boundaries of the film. In thin films, the mobility of inclusions is governed primarily by coupling of the fluid to the surrounding air, as predicted by Saffman-Delbrück theory.

  8. Acoustic backscatter by suspended cohesive sediments: Field observations, Seine Estuary, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Cihan; Verney, Romaric; Sheremet, Alexandru; Voulgaris, George

    2017-02-01

    Observations of suspended sediment size and concentration, flow and acoustic backscatter intensity collected on the Seine Estuary (France) are used to study the acoustic response in cohesive-sediment dominated environments. Estimates of suspended sediment concentration based on optical backscatter sensors and water samples are used to calibrate the acoustic backscatter intensity. The vertical structure of suspended sediment concentration is then estimated from acoustic backscatter information. To our knowledge, this is the first field application of the recently proposed model of acoustic scattering by flocculating suspensions based on the variation of particle density (floc-scattering model). The estimates of sediment concentration reproduce well the observations under different tidal (neap/spring) conditions, confirming the applicability of the new model in the field when detailed particle size measurements are available. When particle size measurements are not available, using estimated floc sizes based on the turbulence intensities may provide reasonable SSC profiles. During spring tide events (associated with strong currents, small flocs and large concentrations), the performances of the new floc-scattering model and the previous models given for solid particle-scattering are comparable. The floc-scattering model increases the quality of the SSC estimates especially during low-energy conditions characterized with larger flocs.

  9. Long-term continuous acoustical suspended-sediment measurements in rivers - Theory, application, bias, and error

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Topping, David J.; Wright, Scott A.

    2016-05-04

    It is commonly recognized that suspended-sediment concentrations in rivers can change rapidly in time and independently of water discharge during important sediment‑transporting events (for example, during floods); thus, suspended-sediment measurements at closely spaced time intervals are necessary to characterize suspended‑sediment loads. Because the manual collection of sufficient numbers of suspended-sediment samples required to characterize this variability is often time and cost prohibitive, several “surrogate” techniques have been developed for in situ measurements of properties related to suspended-sediment characteristics (for example, turbidity, laser-diffraction, acoustics). Herein, we present a new physically based method for the simultaneous measurement of suspended-silt-and-clay concentration, suspended-sand concentration, and suspended‑sand median grain size in rivers, using multi‑frequency arrays of single-frequency side‑looking acoustic-Doppler profilers. The method is strongly grounded in the extensive scientific literature on the incoherent scattering of sound by random suspensions of small particles. In particular, the method takes advantage of theory that relates acoustic frequency, acoustic attenuation, acoustic backscatter, suspended-sediment concentration, and suspended-sediment grain-size distribution. We develop the theory and methods, and demonstrate the application of the method at six study sites on the Colorado River and Rio Grande, where large numbers of suspended-sediment samples have been collected concurrently with acoustic attenuation and backscatter measurements over many years. The method produces acoustical measurements of suspended-silt-and-clay and suspended-sand concentration (in units of mg/L), and acoustical measurements of suspended-sand median grain size (in units of mm) that are generally in good to excellent agreement with concurrent physical measurements of these quantities in the river cross sections at

  10. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  11. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  12. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  13. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  14. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  15. Respiration patterns of resting wasps (Vespula sp.).

    PubMed

    Käfer, Helmut; Kovac, Helmut; Stabentheiner, Anton

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the respiration patterns of wasps (Vespula sp.) in their viable temperature range (2.9-42.4°C) by measuring CO2 production and locomotor and endothermic activity. Wasps showed cycles of an interburst-burst type at low ambient temperatures (Ta<5°C) or typical discontinuous gas exchange patterns with closed, flutter and open phases. At high Ta of >31°C, CO2 emission became cyclic. With rising Ta they enhanced CO2-emission primarily by an exponential increase in respiration frequency, from 2.6 mHz at 4.7°C to 74 mHz at 39.7°C. In the same range of Ta CO2 release per cycle decreased from 38.9 to 26.4 μl g(-1)cycle(-1). A comparison of wasps with other insects showed that they are among the insects with a low respiratory frequency at a given resting metabolic rate (RMR), and a relatively flat increase of respiratory frequency with RMR. CO2 emission was always accompanied by abdominal respiration movements in all open phases and in 71.4% of the flutter phases, often accompanied by body movements. Results suggest that resting wasps gain their highly efficient gas exchange to a considerable extent via the length and type of respiration movements.

  16. 78 FR 18535 - Respirator Certification Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 84 RIN 0920-AA42 Respirator Certification Fees AGENCY: Centers for Disease... and Human Services (HHS) proposes to revise the fee structure currently used by the National Institute... number). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This proposed rule is designed to establish fees for the...

  17. Development of conformal respirator monitoring technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shonka, J.J.; Weismann, J.J.; Logan, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a Small Business Innovative Research Phase II project to develop a modular, surface conforming respirator monitor to improve upon the manual survey techniques presently used by the nuclear industry. Research was performed with plastic scintillator and gas proportional modules in an effort to find the most conducive geometry for a surface conformal, position sensitive monitor. The respirator monitor prototype developed is a computer controlled, position-sensitive detection system employing 56 modular proportional counters mounted in molds conforming to the inner and outer surfaces of a commonly used respirator (Scott Model 801450-40). The molds are housed in separate enclosures and hinged to create a {open_quotes}waffle-iron{close_quotes} effect so that the closed monitor will simultaneously survey both surfaces of the respirator. The proportional counter prototype was also designed to incorporate Shonka Research Associates previously developed charge-division electronics. This research provided valuable experience into pixellated position sensitive detection systems. The technology developed can be adapted to other monitoring applications where there is a need for deployment of many traditional radiation detectors.

  18. Electrophrenic respiration in patients with high quadriplegia.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, P C; Halter, J A; Nakajima, K

    1989-04-01

    After determining that 15 patients with high spinal cord injuries who were permanently apneic had viable phrenic nerves, electrophrenic respiration units were implanted. Thirteen of the patients (86%) achieved full-time respiration and two more achieved half-time respiration. Despite the loss of 8 patients to unrelated problems, 7 now use electrophrenic respiration continuously, one having done so for 16 years. The patient selection criteria, neurophysiological evaluation method, surgical procedure, postoperative care, and methods for diagnosis of system failures are presented. A comparison of the cervical and thoracic procedures is made. The cervical approach is preferred. Complications consisted primarily of equipment failures. For the external components there were several cases of antenna connection and battery connection failures. The implanted receivers failed in 6 cases with an average lifetime of 48 months, ranging from 24 to 108 months. In one case fibrosis around the electrode resulted in failure to stimulate the phrenic nerve effectively. In another case, infection required removal of the system which was reimplanted later and has continued to provide successful ventilation.

  19. Effects of cadmium on heart mitochondrial respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Kisling, G.M.; Kopp, S.J.; Paulson, D.J.; Tow, J.P.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the direct effect of cadmium on isolated heart mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria were rapidly prepared by polytroning hearts from male Sprague-Dawley rats in a 0.25 M Sucrose, 4 mM Tris, 1 mM EGTA, 0.2% BSA buffer (pH 7.4), followed by a two-part differential centrifugation. Mitochondria were resuspended in this same Tris-sucrose-BSA buffer minus EGTA and mitochondrial respiration was assayed using a Clark oxygen electrode system at a concentration of 0.5 mg total mitochondrial protein/ml assay buffer. At 5 x 10/sup -6/ M cadmium, mitochondrial state 3 respiration (pyruvate plus malate) was reduced to a level 74.8% of the control value. A 50% reduction in state 3 respiratory rate was achieved at a cadmium concentration of 8.75 x 10/sup -6/ M. The respiratory control ratio did not change significantly but at higher cadmium concentrations (< greater than or equal to 1.25 x 10/sup -5/ M) the ADP/O ratio was increased. None of the cadmium concentrations tested, from 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -4/ M, demonstrated an uncoupling response. These data suggest that cadmium acts strictly as an inhibitor of heart mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. These results contrast those of earlier work involving liver mitochondria in which cadmium was reported to uncouple mitochondrial respiration.

  20. Estimating Canopy Dark Respiration for Crop Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje Mejia, Oscar Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Crop production is obtained from accurate estimates of daily carbon gain.Canopy gross photosynthesis (Pgross) can be estimated from biochemical models of photosynthesis using sun and shaded leaf portions and the amount of intercepted photosyntheticallyactive radiation (PAR).In turn, canopy daily net carbon gain can be estimated from canopy daily gross photosynthesis when canopy dark respiration (Rd) is known.

  1. Sulfide-inhibition of mitochondrial respiration at very low oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Matallo, J; Vogt, J; McCook, O; Wachter, U; Tillmans, F; Groeger, M; Szabo, C; Georgieff, M; Radermacher, P; Calzia, E

    2014-09-15

    Our aim was to study the ability of an immortalized cell line (AMJ2-C11) to sustain aerobic cell respiration at decreasing oxygen concentrations under continuous sulfide exposure. We assumed that the rate of elimination of sulfide through the pathway linked to the mitochondrial respiratory chain and therefore operating under aerobic conditions, should decrease with limiting oxygen concentrations. Thus, sulfide's inhibition of cellular respiration would occur faster under continuous sulfide exposure when the oxygen concentration is in the very low range. The experiments were performed with an O2K-oxygraph (Oroboros Instruments) by suspending 0.5-1×10(6) cells in 2 ml of continuously stirred respiration medium at 37 °C and calculating the oxygen flux (JO2) as the negative derivative of the oxygen concentration in the medium. The cells were studied in two different metabolic states, namely under normal physiologic respiration (1) and after uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration (2). Oxygen concentration was controlled by means of a titration-injection pump, resulting in average concentration values of 0.73±0.05 μM, 3.1±0.2 μM, and 6.2±0.2 μM. Simultaneously we injected a 2 mM Na2S solution at a continuous rate of 10 μl/s in order to quantify the titration-time required to reduce the JO2 to 50% of the initial respiratory activity. Under the lowest oxygen concentration this effect was achieved after 3.5 [0.3;3.5] and 11.7 [6.2;21.2]min in the uncoupled and coupled state, respectively. This time was statistically significantly shorter when compared to the intermediate and the highest O2 concentrations tested, which yielded values of 24.6 [15.5;28.1]min (coupled) and 35.9 [27.4;59.2]min (uncoupled), as well as 42.4 [27.5;42.4]min (coupled) and 51.5 [46.4;51.7]min (uncoupled). All data are medians [25%, and 75% percentiles]. Our results confirm that the onset of inhibition of cell respiration by sulfide occurs earlier under a continuous exposure when approaching

  2. Suspended monolayer graphene under true uniaxial deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyzos, Ioannis; Bianchi, Massimiliano; Rizzi, Laura; Koukaras, Emmanuel N.; Parthenios, John; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Sordan, Roman; Galiotis, Costas

    2015-07-01

    2D crystals, such as graphene, exhibit the higher strength and stiffness of any other known man-made or natural material. So far, this assertion has been primarily based on modelling predictions and on bending experiments in combination with pertinent modelling. True uniaxial loading of suspended graphene is not easy to accomplish; however such an experiment is of paramount importance in order to assess the intrinsic properties of graphene without the influence of an underlying substrate. In this work we report on uniaxial tension of graphene up to moderate strains of ~0.8%. This has been made possible by sandwiching the graphene flake between two polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) layers and by suspending its central part by the removal of a section of PMMA with e-beam lithography. True uniaxial deformation is confirmed by the measured large phonon shifts with strain by Raman spectroscopy and the indication of lateral buckling (similar to what is observed for thin macroscopic membranes under tension). Finally, we also report on how the stress is transferred to the suspended specimen through the adhesive grips and determine the value of interfacial shear stress that is required for efficient axial loading in such a system.2D crystals, such as graphene, exhibit the higher strength and stiffness of any other known man-made or natural material. So far, this assertion has been primarily based on modelling predictions and on bending experiments in combination with pertinent modelling. True uniaxial loading of suspended graphene is not easy to accomplish; however such an experiment is of paramount importance in order to assess the intrinsic properties of graphene without the influence of an underlying substrate. In this work we report on uniaxial tension of graphene up to moderate strains of ~0.8%. This has been made possible by sandwiching the graphene flake between two polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) layers and by suspending its central part by the removal of a section of

  3. [Endogenous respiration process analysis of heterotrophic biomass and autotrophic biomass based on respiration map ].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-hua; Bai, Xu-li; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Yi; He, Chun-bo

    2014-09-01

    The endogenous process is an important metabolic part of the activated sludge, and the understanding of this process is still unclear. Characteristics of endogenous respiration for heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic nitrifiers were analyzed using respirogram. Results showed that both heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria entered the stage of endogenous respiration at almost the same time, but heterotrophic bacteria first entered the stage of dormancy i. e. , they were easier to recover a higher proportion of biomass during the dormancy stage, indicating that heterotrophic bacteria exhibited strong environmental adaptability. Autotrophic bacteria were, however, quite different. This finding confirmed that autotrophic bacteria were more vulnerable from the viewpoint of endogenous respiration. In addition, the study also found that the increase of endogenous respiration rate ratio reflected the decreased sludge activity. And the proportion of endogenous respiration was an important parameter to characterize the activity of activated sludge, which can be used as a quantitative index for the health status of activated sludge. The findings further deepened the understanding of endogenous respiration process and provided a theoretical basis for the operation and management of wastewater treatment plants.

  4. 21 CFR 892.1970 - Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. 892.1970... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1970 Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. (a) Identification. A radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer is a device intended to be used...

  5. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  6. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  7. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  8. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  9. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  10. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84... Combination Gas Masks § 84.1134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section each respirator shall be equipped with a substantial, durable...

  11. 42 CFR 84.190 - Chemical cartridge respirators: description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators: description. 84.190... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.190 Chemical cartridge respirators: description. (a) Chemical...

  12. 42 CFR 84.190 - Chemical cartridge respirators: description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators: description. 84.190... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.190 Chemical cartridge respirators: description. (a) Chemical...

  13. 42 CFR 84.190 - Chemical cartridge respirators: description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators: description. 84.190... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.190 Chemical cartridge respirators: description. (a) Chemical...

  14. 42 CFR 84.190 - Chemical cartridge respirators: description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators: description. 84.190... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.190 Chemical cartridge respirators: description. (a) Chemical...

  15. 42 CFR 84.190 - Chemical cartridge respirators: description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators: description. 84.190... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.190 Chemical cartridge respirators: description. (a) Chemical...

  16. Analysis of Mineral-Rich Suspended Matter in Glacial Lakes Using Simulations and Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, E.; Dornhofer, K.; Gege, P.; Schenk, K.; Klinger, Ph.; Wenzel, J.; Oppelt, N.; Gruber, N.

    2016-08-01

    The contribution of mineral-rich suspended matter (MSM) to the optics of water bodies is still less treated by bio-optical modeling than that of other water constituents. However, with the increasing number of remote sensing studies on inland waters, optical properties of terrestrial particles gain importance for accurately estimating particle concentrations. We compared two current simulation tools, Hydrolight and WASI, for high MSM concentrations within the realistic context of catchments with glacial erosion. The study area is an extreme form of suspended sediment- dominated Case2 water. We simulated Rrs(0-) spectra with MSM concentrations varying from 5 to 200 g m-3. In a second step, WASI-2D was applied to invert Landsat8. In-situ measured concentrations and reflectance spectra served to assess model performance. Thus, we tested the suitability of the analytical model WASI for high MSM concentrations and point out necessities for future adaptations to (extremely) turbid environments.

  17. Oscillation Control of Suspended Load with Flywheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Toshiaki; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    This study is about an attitude control device applying flywheels. Reaction torque of a flywheel is applied for oscillation suppression of a suspended load. We suggest a sensorless estimation method of the attitude angular velocity. The band pass filter extracts the component of oscillation velocity from flywheel rotation velocity that contains various kinds of errors. A disturbance observer eliminates the steady state error on the wheel. Since the disturbance observer is for low frequency range, it does not interfere to angle velocity estimation. This attitude control device is convenient because it needs least calibrations when it is remounted on various suspended loads. The experimental result shows the validity of angle velocity estimation and the validity of oscillation suppression.

  18. Molybdenum-rhenium superconducting suspended nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Mohsin; Christopher Hudson, David; Russo, Saverio

    2014-06-09

    Suspended superconducting nanostructures of MoRe 50%/50% by weight are fabricated employing commonly used fabrication steps in micro- and nano-meter scale devices followed by wet-etching with Hydro-fluoric acid of a SiO{sub 2} sacrificial layer. Suspended superconducting channels as narrow as 50 nm and length 3 μm have a critical temperature of ≈6.5 K, which can increase by 0.5 K upon annealing at 400 °C. A detailed study of the dependence of the superconducting critical current and critical temperature upon annealing and in devices with different channel widths reveals that desorption of contaminants is responsible for the improved superconducting properties. These findings pave the way for the development of superconducting electromechanical devices using standard fabrication techniques.

  19. Central San Francisco Bay suspended-sediment transport processes and comparison of continuous and discrete measurements of suspended-solids concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    1996-01-01

    Sediments are an important component of the San Francisco Bay estuarine system. Potentially toxic substances, such as metals and pesticides, adsorb to sediment particles (Kuwabara and others, 1989; Domagalski and Kuivila, 1993). Sediments on the bottom of the bay provide the habitat for benthic communities that can ingest these substances and introduce them into the food web (Luoma and others, 1985). Nutrients, metals, and other substances are stored in bottom sediments and pore water in which chemical reactions occur and which provide an important source and/or sink to the water column (Hammond and others, 1985; Flegal and others, 1991). The transport and fate of suspended sediment is an important factor in determining the transport and fate of the constituents adsorbed on the sediment. Seasonal changes in sediment erosion and deposition patterns contribute to seasonal changes in the abundance of benthic macroinvertebrates (Nichols and Thompson, 1985). Tidal marshes are an ecologically important habitat that were created and are maintained by sedimentation processes (Atwater and others, 1979). In Suisun Bay, the maximum suspended-sediment concentration marks the position of the turbidity maximum, which is a crucial ecological region in which suspended sediment, nutrients, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larvae, and juvenile fish accumulate (Peterson and others, 1975; Arthur and Ball, 1979; Kimmerer, 1992; Jassby and Powell, 1994). Suspended sediments confine the photic zone to the upper part of the water column, and this limitation on light availability is a major control on phytoplankton production in San Francisco Bay (Cloern, 1987; Cole and Cloern, 1987). Suspended sediments also deposit in ports and shipping channels, which must be dredged to maintain navigation (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1992).

  20. Method for non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis

    DOEpatents

    Goddard, Gregory Russ; Kaduchak, Gregory; Jett, James Hubert; Graves, Steven Wayde

    2012-09-11

    Method and system for uniformly spacing particles in a flowing system comprising suspending particles in an elongated fluid filled cavity; exposing said cavity to an axial acoustic standing wave field, wherein said axial acoustic standing wave field drives said particles to nodal and anti-nodal positions along the center axis of said cavity to result in uniformly spaced particles; and focusing said particles to the center axis of said cavity.

  1. Method for non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis

    DOEpatents

    Goddard, Gregory R; Kaduchak, Gregory; Jett, James H; Graves, Steven W

    2015-01-13

    Method and system for uniformly spacing particles in a flowing system comprising suspending particles in an elongated fluid filled cavity; exposing said cavity to an axial acoustic standing wave field, wherein said axial acoustic standing wave field drives said particles to nodal and anti-nodal positions along the center axis of said cavity to result in uniformly spaced particles; and focusing said particles to the center axis of said cavity.

  2. Pointwise plucking of suspended carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Ouyang, Wengen; Li, Xiaopei; Jin, Zhong; Yang, Leijing; Chen, Changqing; Zhang, Jin; Li, Yan; Warner, Jamie H; Peng, Lian-Mao; Zheng, Quanshui; Zhu, Jing

    2012-07-11

    Vibration of nanotubes/wires is significant for fundamental and applied researches. However, it remains challenging to control the vibration with point-level precision. Herein, individual suspended carbon nanotubes are plucked point by point to vibrate in scanning electron microscope with the electron beam as a nanoscale pointer. The vibration is directly imaged, and its images fit well with simulations from the plucking mechanism. This demonstrates a new way to manipulate the nanotube vibration with unprecedented precision.

  3. Particle analyzing method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Griffin, C. E.; Norris, D. D.; Friedlander, S. K. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The rapid chemical analysis of particles in aerosols can be accomplished using an apparatus which produces a controlled stream of individual particles from an environment, and another apparatus which vaporizes and ionizes the particles moving in free flight, for analysis by a mass spectrometer. The device for producing the stream of particles includes a capillary tube through which the air with suspended particles moves, a skimmer with a small opening spaced from an end of the capillary tube to receive particles passing through the tube, and a vacuum pump which removes air from between the tube and skimmer and creates an inflow of air and particles through the tube. The particles passing through the skimmer opening can be simultaneously vaporized and ionized while in free flight, by a laser beam of sufficient intensity that is directed across the path of the free flying particles.

  4. Suspended sediments limit coral sperm availability

    PubMed Central

    Ricardo, Gerard F.; Jones, Ross J.; Clode, Peta L.; Humanes, Adriana; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Suspended sediment from dredging activities and natural resuspension events represent a risk to the reproductive processes of coral, and therefore the ongoing maintenance of reefal populations. To investigate the underlying mechanisms that could reduce the fertilisation success in turbid water, we conducted several experiments exposing gametes of the corals Acropora tenuis and A. millepora to two sediment types. Sperm limitation was identified in the presence of siliciclastic sediment (230 and ~700 mg L−1), with 2–37 fold more sperm required to achieve maximum fertilisation rates, when compared with sediment-free treatments. This effect was more pronounced at sub-optimum sperm concentrations. Considerable (>45%) decreases in sperm concentration at the water’s surface was recorded in the presence of siliciclastic sediment and a >20% decrease for carbonate sediment. Electron microscopy then confirmed sediment entangled sperm and we propose entrapment and sinking is the primary mechanism reducing sperm available to the egg. Longer exposure to suspended sediments and gamete aging further decreased fertilisation success when compared with a shorter exposure. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that high concentrations of suspended sediments effectively remove sperm from the water’s surface during coral spawning events, reducing the window for fertilisation with potential subsequent flow-on effects for recruitment. PMID:26659008

  5. Acoustic vibrations of single suspended gold nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Todd A.

    The acoustic vibrations for single gold nanowires and gold plates were studied using time-resolved ultrafast transient absorption. The objective of this work was to remove the contribution of the supporting substrate from the damping of the acoustic vibrations of the metal nano-objects. This was achieved by suspending the nano-objects across trenches created by photolithography and reactive ion etching. Transient absorption measurements for single suspended gold nanowires were initially completed in air and water environments. The acoustic vibrations for gold nanowires over the trench in air last typically for several nanoseconds, whereas gold nanowires in water are damped more quickly. Continuum mechanics models suggest that the acoustic impedance mismatch between air and water dominates the damping rate. Later transient absorption studies on single suspended gold nanowires were completed in glycerol and ethylene glycol environments. However, our continuum mechanical model suggests nearly complete damping in glycerol due to its high viscosity, but similar damping rates are seen between the two liquids. The continuum mechanics model thus incorrectly addresses high viscosity effects on the lifetimes of the acoustic vibrations, and more complicated viscoelastic interactions occur for the higher viscosity liquids. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  6. Suspended monolayer graphene under true uniaxial deformation.

    PubMed

    Polyzos, Ioannis; Bianchi, Massimiliano; Rizzi, Laura; Koukaras, Emmanuel N; Parthenios, John; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Sordan, Roman; Galiotis, Costas

    2015-08-14

    2D crystals, such as graphene, exhibit the higher strength and stiffness of any other known man-made or natural material. So far, this assertion has been primarily based on modelling predictions and on bending experiments in combination with pertinent modelling. True uniaxial loading of suspended graphene is not easy to accomplish; however such an experiment is of paramount importance in order to assess the intrinsic properties of graphene without the influence of an underlying substrate. In this work we report on uniaxial tension of graphene up to moderate strains of ∼0.8%. This has been made possible by sandwiching the graphene flake between two polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) layers and by suspending its central part by the removal of a section of PMMA with e-beam lithography. True uniaxial deformation is confirmed by the measured large phonon shifts with strain by Raman spectroscopy and the indication of lateral buckling (similar to what is observed for thin macroscopic membranes under tension). Finally, we also report on how the stress is transferred to the suspended specimen through the adhesive grips and determine the value of interfacial shear stress that is required for efficient axial loading in such a system.

  7. Imaging Mechanical Vibrations in Suspended Graphene Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sanchez, D.; van der Zande, A. M.; Paulo, A. San; Lassagne, B.; McEuen, P. L.; Bachtold, A.

    2008-05-01

    We carried out measurements on nanoelectromechanical systems based on multilayer graphene sheets suspended over trenches in silicon oxide. The motion of the suspended sheets was electrostatically driven at resonance using applied radio-frequency voltages. The mechanical vibrations were detected using a novel form of scanning probe microscopy, which allowed identification and spatial imaging of the shape of the mechanical eigenmodes. In as many as half the resonators measured, we observed a new class of exotic nanoscale vibration eigenmodes not predicted by the elastic beam theory, where the amplitude of vibration is maximum at the free edges. By modeling the suspended sheets with the finite element method, these edge eigenmodes are shown to be the result of non-uniform stress with remarkably large magnitudes (up to 1.5 GPa). This non-uniform stress, which arises from the way graphene is prepared by pressing or rubbing bulk graphite against another surface, should be taken into account in future studies on electronic and mechanical properties of graphene.

  8. Suspended sediments limit coral sperm availability.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Gerard F; Jones, Ross J; Clode, Peta L; Humanes, Adriana; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-12-14

    Suspended sediment from dredging activities and natural resuspension events represent a risk to the reproductive processes of coral, and therefore the ongoing maintenance of reefal populations. To investigate the underlying mechanisms that could reduce the fertilisation success in turbid water, we conducted several experiments exposing gametes of the corals Acropora tenuis and A. millepora to two sediment types. Sperm limitation was identified in the presence of siliciclastic sediment (230 and ~700 mg L(-1)), with 2-37 fold more sperm required to achieve maximum fertilisation rates, when compared with sediment-free treatments. This effect was more pronounced at sub-optimum sperm concentrations. Considerable (>45%) decreases in sperm concentration at the water's surface was recorded in the presence of siliciclastic sediment and a >20% decrease for carbonate sediment. Electron microscopy then confirmed sediment entangled sperm and we propose entrapment and sinking is the primary mechanism reducing sperm available to the egg. Longer exposure to suspended sediments and gamete aging further decreased fertilisation success when compared with a shorter exposure. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that high concentrations of suspended sediments effectively remove sperm from the water's surface during coral spawning events, reducing the window for fertilisation with potential subsequent flow-on effects for recruitment.

  9. In situ sensing to understand diel turbidity cycles, suspended solids, and nutrient transport in Clear Creek, Iowa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loperfido, J. V.; Just, Craig L.; Papanicolaou, Athanasios N.; Schnoor, Jerald L.

    2010-06-01

    Recent advances in sensor technology have made high-frequency environmental data readily available. In this study, high-frequency monitoring of turbidity revealed diel turbidity cycles with peak values during the nighttime and lower values occurring during daytime. Particles responsible for these cycles were fixed suspended solids consisting mostly of aluminosilicates (clay particles) emanating from bed sediments. High-frequency data were used to investigate the transport of total suspended solids (TSS) during base flow. A majority of the base flow TSS loading occurred during the nighttime in a small agricultural catchment in Iowa, United States. Elevated nighttime turbidity coincided with an increased total suspended phosphorus loading during nighttime. Bioturbation, as a result of nocturnal feeding of fishes, is the suspected cause of the diel turbidity cycles. High-frequency monitoring was also used to detect TSS loading during storm events. Results from this study highlight the importance of high-frequency environmental measurements to reveal and understand biogeochemical transport phenomena.

  10. Transient dehydration of lungs in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Steskal, J.; Morey-Holton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    The fluid balance in the lungs of rats exposed to head-down tilt is examined. Six Munich-Wister rats were suspended for 7 days and 10 Sprague-Dawley rats for 14 days using the technique of Morey (1979). The water contents of the lungs of the suspended and a control group are calculated and compared. The data reveal that the two-days suspended rats had dehydrated lungs; however, the lungs of the 14-day suspended and control group rats were similar. It is noted that the dehydration in the 2-day suspended rats is caused by general dehydration not the head-tilt position.

  11. Algorithm for Computing Particle/Surface Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, David W.

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm has been devised for predicting the behaviors of sparsely spatially distributed particles impinging on a solid surface in a rarefied atmosphere. Under the stated conditions, prior particle-transport models in which (1) dense distributions of particles are treated as continuum fluids; or (2) sparse distributions of particles are considered to be suspended in and to diffuse through fluid streams are not valid.

  12. A combined use of acoustic and optical devices to investigate suspended sediment in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Massimo; Rüther, Nils; Haun, Stefan; Baranya, Sandor

    2017-04-01

    The use of acoustic and optic devices has become more and more common for estimating suspended sediment loads in rivers. The echo intensity levels (EIL) recorded by means of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) have been applied in different methods, which provided relationships between scattering particles features derived from samples (i.e., concentration and grain size) and corresponding backscattering strength and sound attenuation. At the same time, the laser diffraction was applied by an in-stream sampler (LISST-SL) to measure suspended sediment concentration and the corresponding particle size distribution (PSD). These two techniques exhibited different limitations in terms of the measured range of concentration, sensitivity to a certain spectrum of particle sizes, and instruments deploy feasibility especially in large rivers, in a way that the use of sampled PSD by LISST-SL to validate ADCP methods may not be trivial. The aim of this study was to combine the vertical profiling of EIL by an ADCP with results from LISST-SL, eventually demonstrating the possibility of using moving ADCP measurements to detect different suspended matters along a Danube River section characterized by a small tributary junction. At the same time, this work elucidates optical to acoustic method deviations that hinders an actual validation of ADCP methods based on LISST-SL rather than with physical samplings.

  13. [Contribution of wheat rhizosphere respiration to soil respiration under elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen application].

    PubMed

    Kou, Tai-ji; Xu, Xiao-feng; Zhu, Jian-guo; Xie, Zu-bin; Guo, Da-yong; Miao, Yan-fang

    2011-10-01

    With the support of free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) system and by using isotope 13C technique, and through planting wheat (Triticum aestivum L., C3 crop) on a soil having been planted with maize (Zea mays L., C4 crop) for many years, this paper studied the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen application on the delta 13C value of soil emitted CO2 and the wheat rhizosphere respiration. With the growth of wheat, the delta 13C value of soil emitted CO2 had a gradual decrease. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (200 micromol mol(-1)) decreased the delta 13C value of emitted CO2 at booting and heading stages significantly when the nitrogen application rate was 250 kg hm(-2) (HN), and at jointing and booting stages significantly when the nitrogen application rate was 150 kg hm(-2) (LN). Nevertheless, the elevated atmospheric CO2 promoted the proportions of wheat rhizosphere respiration to soil respiration at booting and heading stages significantly. From jointing stage to maturing stage, the proportions of wheat rhizosphere respiration to soil respiration were 24%-48% (HN) and 21%-48% (LN) under elevated atmospheric CO2, and 20%-36% (HN) and 19%-32% (LN) under ambient atmospheric CO2. Under both elevated and ambient atmospheric CO2 concentrations, the delta 13C value of emitted CO2 and the rhizosphere respiration had different responses to the increased nitrogen application rate, and there was a significant interactive effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration and nitrogen application rate on the wheat rhizosphere respiration at jointing stage.

  14. Changes in soil respiration components and their specific respiration along three successional forests in the subtropics

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Tianfeng; Liu, Juxiu; Wang, Gangsheng; Huang, Wenjuan; Zhou, Guoyi

    2016-01-16

    1.Understanding how soil respiration components change with forest succession is critical for modelling and predicting soil carbon (C) processes and its sequestration below-ground. The specific respiration (a ratio of respiration to biomass) is increasingly being used as an indicator of forest succession conceptually based on Odum's theory of ecosystem development. However, the hypothesis that specific soil respiration declines with forest succession remains largely untested. 2.We used a trenching method to partition soil respiration into heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration (RH and RA) and then evaluated the specific RH and specific RA in three successional forests in subtropical China. 3.Our results showed a clear seasonality in the influence of forest succession on RH, with no significant differences among the three forests in the dry season but a higher value in the old-growth forest than the other two forests in the wet season. RA in the old-growth forest tended to be the highest among the three forests. Both the specific RH and specific RA decreased with the progressive maturity of three forests. 4.Lastly, our results highlight the importance of forest succession in determining the variation of RH in different seasons. With forest succession, soil microbes and plant roots become more efficient to conserve C resources, which would result in a greater proportion of C retained in soils.

  15. Morphological and Chemical Mechanisms of Elongated Mineral Particle Toxicities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Much of our understanding regarding the mechanisms for induction of disease following inhalation of respirable elongated mineral particles (REMPs) is based on studies involving the biological effects of asbestos fibers. The factors governing the disease potential of an exposure i...

  16. A MEMS turbine prototype for respiration harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goreke, U.; Habibiabad, S.; Azgin, K.; Beyaz, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    The design, manufacturing, and performance characterization of a MEMS-scale turbine prototype is reported. The turbine is designed for integration into a respiration harvester that can convert normal human breathing into electrical power through electromagnetic induction. The device measures 10 mm in radius, and employs 12 blades located around the turbine periphery along with ball bearings around the center. Finite element simulations showed that an average torque of 3.07 μNm is induced at 12 lpm airflow rate, which lies in normal breathing levels. The turbine and a test package were manufactured using CNC milling on PMMA. Tests were performed at respiration flow rates between 5-25 lpm. The highest rotational speed was measured to be 9.84 krpm at 25 lpm, resulting in 8.96 mbar pressure drop across the device and 370 mW actuation power.

  17. Respirable particulate monitoring with remote sensors. (Public health ecology: Air pollution)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severs, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring atmospheric aerosols in the respirable range from air or space platforms was studied. Secondary reflectance targets were located in the industrial area and near Galveston Bay. Multichannel remote sensor data were utilized to calculate the aerosol extinction coefficient and thus determine the aerosol size distribution. Houston Texas air sampling network high volume data were utilized to generate computer isopleth maps of suspended particulates and to establish the mass loading of the atmosphere. In addition, a five channel nephelometer and a multistage particulate air sampler were used to collect data. The extinction coefficient determined from remote sensor data proved more representative of wide areal phenomena than that calculated from on site measurements. It was also demonstrated that a significant reduction in the standard deviation of the extinction coefficient could be achieved by reducing the bandwidths used in remote sensor.

  18. Robust respiration detection from remote photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    van Gastel, Mark; Stuijk, Sander; de Haan, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of respiration is essential for early detection of critical illness. Current methods require sensors attached to the body and/or are not robust to subject motion. Alternative camera-based solutions have been presented using motion vectors and remote photoplethysmography. In this work, we present a non-contact camera-based method to detect respiration, which can operate in both visible and dark lighting conditions by detecting the respiratory-induced colour differences of the skin. We make use of the close similarity between skin colour variations caused by the beating of the heart and those caused by respiration, leading to a much improved signal quality compared to single-channel approaches. Essentially, we propose to find the linear combination of colour channels which suppresses the distortions best in a frequency band including pulse rate, and subsequently we use this same linear combination to extract the respiratory signal in a lower frequency band. Evaluation results obtained from recordings on healthy subjects which perform challenging scenarios, including motion, show that respiration can be accurately detected over the entire range of respiratory frequencies, with a correlation coefficient of 0.96 in visible light and 0.98 in infrared, compared to 0.86 with the best-performing non-contact benchmark algorithm. Furthermore, evaluation on a set of videos recorded in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) shows that this technique looks promising as a future alternative to current contact-sensors showing a correlation coefficient of 0.87. PMID:28018717

  19. Radar sensitivity to human heartbeats and respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aardal, Øyvind; Brovoll, Sverre; Paichard, Yoann; Berger, Tor; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2015-05-01

    Human heartbeats and respiration can be detected from a distance using radar. This can be used for medical applications and human being detection. It is useful to have a system independent measure of how detectable the vital signs are. In radar applications, the Radar Cross Section (RCS) is normally used to characterize the detectability of an object. Since the human vital signs are seen by the radar as movements of the torso, the modulations in the person RCS can be used as a system independent measure of the vital signs detectability. In this paper, measurements of persons seated in an anechoic chamber are presented. The measurements were calibrated using empty room and a metallic calibration sphere. A narrowband radar operating at frequencies from 500 MHz to 18 GHz in discrete steps was used. A turntable provided measurements at precise aspect angles all around the person under test. In an I & Q receiver, the heartbeat and respiration modulation is a combination of amplitude and phase mod- modulations. The measurements were filtered, leaving the modulations from the vital signs in the radar recordings. The procedure for RCS computation was applied to these filtered data, capturing the complex signatures. It was found that both the heartbeat and respiration detectability increase with increasing frequency. The heartbeat signatures are almost equal from the front and the back, while being almost undetectable from the sides of the person. The respiration signatures are slightly higher from the front than from the back, and smaller from the sides. The signature measurements presented in this paper provide an objective system independent measure of the detectability of human vital signs as a function of frequency and aspect angle. These measures are useful for example in system design and in assessing real measurement scenarios.

  20. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Or; Earles, J. Mason; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0°C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq.) cm-3 yr-1 on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics. PMID:26629819

  1. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Or; Earles, J Mason; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2015-01-01

    Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0 °C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq.) cm(-3) yr(-1) on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics.

  2. Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-15

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed for noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that (1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; (2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; (3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and (4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms.

  3. Natural Niche for Organohalide-Respiring Chloroflexi

    PubMed Central

    Krzmarzick, Mark J.; Crary, Benjamin B.; Harding, Jevon J.; Oyerinde, Oyenike O.; Leri, Alessandra C.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2012-01-01

    The phylum Chloroflexi contains several isolated bacteria that have been found to respire a diverse array of halogenated anthropogenic chemicals. The distribution and role of these Chloroflexi in uncontaminated terrestrial environments, where abundant natural organohalogens could function as potential electron acceptors, have not been studied. Soil samples (116 total, including 6 sectioned cores) from a range of uncontaminated sites were analyzed for the number of Dehalococcoides-like Chloroflexi 16S rRNA genes present. Dehalococcoides-like Chloroflexi populations were detected in all but 13 samples. The concentrations of organochlorine ([organochlorine]), inorganic chloride, and total organic carbon (TOC) were obtained for 67 soil core sections. The number of Dehalococcoides-like Chloroflexi 16S rRNA genes positively correlated with [organochlorine]/TOC while the number of Bacteria 16S rRNA genes did not. Dehalococcoides-like Chloroflexi were also observed to increase in number with a concomitant accumulation of chloride when cultured with an enzymatically produced mixture of organochlorines. This research provides evidence that organohalide-respiring Chloroflexi are widely distributed as part of uncontaminated terrestrial ecosystems, they are correlated with the fraction of TOC present as organochlorines, and they increase in abundance while dechlorinating organochlorines. These findings suggest that organohalide-respiring Chloroflexi may play an integral role in the biogeochemical chlorine cycle. PMID:22101035

  4. Respirable coal mine dust sample processing

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, L.D.; Tomb, T.F.; Parobeck, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969 established mandatory dust standards for coal mines. Regulatory requirements for complying with the provisions of the Act were prescribed in Title 30, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 70 and 71, which were published in the Federal Register on April 3, 1970, and March 28, 1972, respectively. These standard and sampling requirements of coal mine operators, along with a description of the laboratory which was established to process respirable coal mine dust samples collected in accordance with these requirements, were published in MESA Informational Report (MESA, the acronym for the Mining Enforcement and Safety Administration, was changed to MSHA, the acronym for the Mine Safety and Health Administration, in 1977). These standards and regulatory requirements continued under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 until November 1980, when major regulatory revisions were made in the operator's dust sampling program. This paper describes the changes in the respirable coal mine dust sampling program and the equipment and procedures used by MSHA to process respirable coal mine dust samples collected in accordance with regulatory requirements. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Continuous respirable mine dust monitor development

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, B.K.; Williams, K.L.; Stein, S.W.

    1996-12-31

    In June 1992, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) published the Report of the Coal Mine Respirable Dust Task Group, Review of the Program to Control Respirable Coal Mine Dust in the United States. As one of its recommendations, the report called for the accelerated development of two mine dust monitors: (1) a fixed-site monitor capable of providing continuous information on dust levels to the miner, mine operator, and to MSHA, if necessary, and (2) a personal sampling device capable of providing both a short-term personal exposure measurement as well as a full-shift measurement. In response to this recommendation, the U.S. Bureau of Mines initiated the development of a fixed-site machine-mounted continuous respirable dust monitor. The technology chosen for monitor development is the Rupprecht and Patashnick Co., Inc. tapered element oscillating microbalance. Laboratory and in-mine tests have indicated that, with modification, this sensor can meet the humidity and vibration requirements for underground coal mine use. The U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Research Center (DOE-PRC) is continuing that effort by developing prototypes of a continuous dust monitor based on this technology. These prototypes are being evaluated in underground coal mines as they become available. This effort, conducted as a joint venture with MSHA, is nearing completion with every promise of success.

  6. DIFFUSION IN BIOFILMS RESPIRING ON ELECTRODES

    PubMed Central

    Renslow, RS; Babauta, JT; Majors, PD; Beyenal, H

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that 1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; 2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; 3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and 4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms. PMID:23420623

  7. The LISST-SL streamlined isokinetic suspended-sediment profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John R.; Agrawal, Yogesh C.; Pottsmith, H. Charles

    2004-01-01

    The new manually deployed Laser In Situ Scattering Transmissometer-StreamLined profiler (LISST-SL) represents a major technological advance for suspended-sediment measurements in rivers. The LISST-SL is being designed to provide real-time data on sediment concentrations and particle-size distributions. A pressure sensor and current meter provide real-time depth and ambient velocity data, respectively. The velocity data are also used to control pumpage across an internal laser so that the intake velocity is constantly adjusted to match the ambient stream velocity. Such isokinetic withdrawal is necessary for obtaining representative sedimentary measurements in streamflow, and ensures compliance with established practices. The velocity and sediment-concentration data are used to compute fluxes for up to 32 particle-size classes at points, verticals, or in the entire stream cross section. All data are stored internally, as well as transmitted via a 2-wire conductor to the operator using a specially developed communication protocol. The LISST-SL's performance will be measured and compared to published sedimentological accuracy criteria, and a performance summary will be placed on-line.

  8. Tracing water and suspended matter in Raritan and Lower New York Bays using dissolved and particulate elemental concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The concentrations of 22 elements also were measured in the suspended matter of Raritan and Lower New York Bays and brackish water sources. The elemental composition of the suspended matter in surface and bottom waters was correlated with Fe concentrations, which ranged between 50 and 900 μmol g− 1. Statistical differences among the geographical regions were detected in the relationships of Ti, Ni, Co, As, and U with Fe, with particulate As being an especially strong geochemical indicator of Raritan River particles. The geochemical signatures of Lower New York Bay particles were similar to those of Upper New York Bay. The geochemical signatures of Raritan River particles were distinctly different than those of the Upper New York Bay, but the influence of Raritan River particles appeared to be limited to only inner Raritan Bay. This study illustrates the utility of trace elements for characterization of physical processes in complex estuaries.

  9. Determination of suspendable ice nuclei from various pollen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgitsch, Laura; Pummer, Bernhard; Grothe, Hinrich

    2014-05-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in cloud glaciation. On the one hand, ice clouds increase the albedo (Mishchenko et al. 1996), leading to a cooling effect, and on the other hand tend to a faster precipitation (Lohmann 2002) and therefore reduce the total cloud albedo, which has a direct influence on the climate and weather. However, many processes involved are still not entirely understood and only poorly described which makes it difficult to forecast these effects for climate modelling. Therefore detailed laboratory studies are inherently necessary. Only recently, Pummer et al. (2012) have shown that pollen emitted from trees originating from the Northern timberline carry active ice nuclei, which are suspendable macromolecules. So far little is known about the structures and functionalities of these molecules. Here we present several analytical strategies we use to separate the responsible species (via solid phase extraction with different columns like C18 and PH) and solve the structure including different forms of mass spectrometry (MS) like the intact cell MS and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS, which give access to the molecules in question. For identification, the surface molecules are compared with those washed out from pores and from pollen that burst due to osmotic pressure. Lohmann U.; 'A Glaciation Indirect Aerosol Effect Caused by Soot Aerosols; J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 24 No.4; pp 11-1 - 11-4; 2002 Mishchenko M.I., Rossow W.B., Macke A., Lacis A. A.; Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Albedo, Bidirectional Reflectance and Optical Thickness Retrieval Accuracy to Ice Particle Shape, J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 101, No D12; pp. 16,973 - 16,985; 1996 Pummer B., Bauer H., Bernardi J., Bleicher S., Grothe H.; Suspendable Macromolecules are Responsible for Ice Nucleation Activity of Birch and Conifer Pollen; Atmos. Chem. Phys.; 12; pp. 2541 - 2550;

  10. Microgravity Particle Research on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, Steven W. (Editor); Mckay, Christopher P. (Editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Science questions that could be addressed by a Space Station Microgravity Particle Research Facility for studying small suspended particles were discussed. Characteristics of such a facility were determined. Disciplines covered include astrophysics and the solar nebula, planetary science, atmospheric science, exobiology and life science, and physics and chemistry.

  11. Enormous yield of photoelectrons from small particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Ott, A.; Schurtenberger, P.; Siegmann, H. C.

    1980-10-01

    The paper reports a large enhancement of the yield of photoelectrons per incident photon if ultrafine particles with radii not greater than 50 A are chosen as photoemitters. The results are obtained with Ag and WO3 by the use of an ac bridge technique making it possible to study very small particles suspended in gases.

  12. Microgravity particle research on the Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Squyres, S.W.; Mckay, C.P.; Schwartz, D.E.

    1987-12-01

    Science questions that could be addressed by a Space Station Microgravity Particle Research Facility for studying small suspended particles were discussed. Characteristics of such a facility were determined. Disciplines covered include astrophysics and the solar nebula, planetary science, atmospheric science, exobiology and life science, and physics and chemistry.

  13. Hydrologic characteristics and suspended sediment dynamics in the Gradašica river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogoj, Mojca; Rusjan, Simon; Vidmar, Andrej; Mikoš, Matjaž

    2013-04-01

    and physical and biological processes. In order to define significance of each factor, monitoring of meteorological events, hydrological response, water chemistry and turbidity, suspended sediment concentration in studied water bodies and field catchment analysis need to be carried out at time scales that correspond to hydrological dynamics of a catchment. The research involves analyses of sediment sources, estimation of suspended sediment load, laboratory tests of suspended sediment samples for particle size classification and organic fraction determination. Turbidity and suspended sediment concentration measurements will be coupled with rainfall and streamflow records.

  14. Suspended-sediment concentrations during dam decommissioning in the Elwha River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Christopher A.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Duda, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    monitoring station. A relation between turbidity and suspended-sediment concentrations, consistent with established USGS protocols (Rasmussen and others, 2009), was established to enable reporting of suspended-sediment concentrations in the lower Elwha River. This document contains calculations of total suspended-sediment concentrations and concentrations of suspended-sediment fines (particle sizes less than 0.0625 mm) in the lower Elwha River downstream of the dam decommissioning project from September 2011 to February 2013. A time-series record of suspended-sediment concentrations is reported using continuous turbidity data as a surrogate for suspended-sediment concentrations.

  15. Plankton respiration in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Carol; Serret, Pablo; Tilstone, Gavin; Teira, Eva; Zubkov, Mikhail V.; Rees, Andrew P.; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.

    2002-05-01

    Concurrent measurements of dark community respiration (DCR), gross production (GP), size fractionated primary production ( 14C PP), nitrogen uptake, nutrients, chlorophyll a concentration, and heterotrophic and autotrophic bacterial abundance were collected from the upper 200 m of a latitudinal (32°S-48°N) transect in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean during May/June 1998. The mean mixed layer respiration rate was 2.5±2.1 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 ( n=119) for the whole transect, 2.2±1.1 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 ( n=32) in areas where chlorophyll a was <0.5 mg m -3 and 1.5±0.7 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 ( n=10) where chlorophyll a was <0.2 mg m -3. These values lie within the range of published data collected in comparable waters, they co-vary with indicators of heterotrophic and autotrophic biomass (heterotrophic bacterial abundance, chlorophyll a concentration, beam attenuation and particulate organic carbon concentration) and they can be reconciled with accepted estimates of total respiratory activity. The mean and median respiratory quotient (RQ), calculated as the ratio of dissolved inorganic carbon production to dissolved oxygen consumption, was 0.8 ( n=11). At the time of the study, plankton community respiration exceeded GP in the picoautotroph dominated oligotrophic regions (Eastern Tropical Atlantic [15.5°S-14.2°N] and North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre [21.5-42.5°N]), which amounted to 50% of the stations sampled along the 12,100 km transect. These regions also exhibited high heterotrophic: autotrophic biomass ratios, higher turnover rates of phytoplankton than of bacteria and low f ratios. However, the carbon supply mechanisms required to sustain the rates of respiration higher than GP could not be fully quantified. Future research should aim to determine the temporal balance of respiration and GP together with substrate supply mechanisms in these ocean regions.

  16. In vitro toxicology of respirable Montserrat volcanic ash

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M.; Stone, V.; Cullen, R.; Searl, A.; Maynard, R.; Donaldson, K.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—In July 1995 the Soufriere Hills volcano on the island of Montserrat began to erupt. Preliminary reports showed that the ash contained a substantial respirable component and a large percentage of the toxic silica polymorph, cristobalite. In this study the cytotoxicity of three respirable Montserrat volcanic ash (MVA) samples was investigated: M1 from a single explosive event, M2 accumulated ash predominantly derived from pyroclastic flows, and M3 from a single pyroclastic flow. These were compared with the relatively inert dust TiO2 and the known toxic quartz dust, DQ12.
METHODS—Surface area of the particles was measured with the Brunauer, Emmet, and Teller (BET) adsorption method and cristobalite content of MVA was determined by x ray diffraction (XRD). After exposure to particles, the metabolic competence of the epithelial cell line A549 was assessed to determine cytotoxic effects. The ability of the particles to induce sheep blood erythrocyte haemolysis was used to assess surface reactivity.
RESULTS—Treatment with either MVA, quartz, or titanium dioxide decreased A549 epithelial cell metabolic competence as measured by ability to reduce 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). On addition of mannitol, the cytotoxic effect was significantly less with M1, quartz, and TiO2. All MVA samples induced a dose dependent increase in haemolysis, which, although less than the haemolysis induced by quartz, was significantly greater than that induced by TiO2. Addition of mannitol and superoxide dismutase (SOD) significantly reduced the haemolytic activity only of M1, but not M2 or M3, the samples derived from predominantly pyroclastic flow events.
CONCLUSIONS—Neither the cristobalite content nor the surface area of the MVA samples correlated with observed in vitro reactivity. A role for reactive oxygen species could only be shown in the cytotoxicity of M1, which was the only sample derived from a purely explosive event

  17. Sulfide-Inhibition of Mitochondrial Respiration at Very Low Oxygen Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Matallo, J; Vogt, J; McCook, O; Wachter, U; Tillmans, F; Groeger, M; Szabo, C; Georgieff, M; Radermacher, P; Calzia, E

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to study the capacity of an immortalized cell line (AMJ2-C11) to sustain aerobic cell respiration at decreasing oxygen concentrations under continuous sulfide exposure. We assumed that the capacity of the pathway metabolizing and eliminating sulfide, which is linked to the mitochondrial respiratory chain and therefore operates under aerobic conditions, should decrease with limiting oxygen concentrations. Thus, sulfide’s inhibition of cellular respiration would be dependent of the oxygen concentration in the very low range. The experiments were performed with an O2K-oxygraph (Oroboros Instruments) by suspending 0.5 – 1 × 106 cells in 2 ml of continuously stirred respiration medium at 37°C and calculating the oxygen flux (JO2) as the negative derivative of the oxygen concentration in the medium. The cells were studied in two different metabolic states, namely under normal physiologic respiration (1) and after uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration (2). Oxygen concentration was controlled by means of a titration-injection pump, resulting in average concentration values of 0.73 ± 0.05 μM, 3.1 ± 0.2 μM, and 6.2 ± 0.2 μM. Simultaneously we injected a 2 mM Na2S solution at a continuous rate of 10 μl/s in order to quantify the titration-time required to reduce the JO2 to 50% of the initial respiratory activity. Under the lowest oxygen concentration this effect was achieved after 3.5 [0.3; 3.5] and 11.7 [6.2;21.2] min in the uncoupled and coupled state, respectively. This time was statistically significantly shorter when compared to the intermediate and the highest O2 concentrations tested, which yielded values of 24.6[15.5;28.1] min (coupled) and 35.9[27.4;59.2] min (uncoupled), as well as 42.4 [27.5;42.4] min (coupled) and 51.5 [46.4;51.7] min (uncoupled). All data are medians [25%, and 75% percentiles]. Our results suggest that elimination of sulfide in these cells is limited by oxygen availability when approaching the anoxic condition. This

  18. Monitoring of suspended sediment in South Tyrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadalet, Rudi; Dinale, Roberto; Pernter, Martin; Maraldo, Luca; Peterlin, Dieter; Richter, Arnold; Comiti, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    In the context of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD), which aims to achieve a good status of European water bodies, the Hydrographic Office of the Autonomous Province of Bolzano (Italy) extended in 2014 its institutional activities including the monitoring of suspended sediment in the river channel network. Currently, the only active monitoring station is on the Adige River at the gauging station of Ponte Adige near Bolzano (drainage area 2705 km2). The applied monitoring strategy and the data analysis concept are both based on the guidelines issued by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management (BMLFUW). The results indicates that the temporal variability strongly differs during the investigated period (2014-2015). In addition to the analysis of precipitation and water discharge, temperature and lightning activity were also included to better understand the sediment transport dynamics observed at the station. In summer 2015, the combination of constantly high daily temperature throughout the Adige basin (which drove intense glacier melting in the headwaters) with a high frequency of convective rainfall events (90% more than in 2014, obtained through lightning detection), led to an annual mass of transported suspended sediment of 260000 t. Interestingly, this value is similar to the one estimated for 2014 (300000 t), which was characterized by very different meteorological conditions (colder and wetter summer), but with the occurrence of an important flood in August, which transported half of the annual amount. Finally, we can conclude that the adopted monitoring strategy is applicable for institutional aims in terms of costs as well as in terms of time effort. During the next years, other stations for suspended sediment monitoring are planned to be installed in the Province to cover the most important river segments.

  19. DESORPTION OF PYRETHROIDS FROM SUSPENDED SOLIDS

    PubMed Central

    Fojut, Tessa L.; Young, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been widely detected in sediments at concentrations that can cause toxicity to aquatic organisms. Desorption rates play an important role in determining the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds, such as pyrethroids, because these compounds are more likely to be sorbed to solids in the environment and times to reach sorptive equilibrium can be long. In this study, sequential Tenax desorption experiments were performed with three sorbents, three aging times, and four pyrethroids. A biphasic rate model was fit to the desorption data with r2 > 0.99 and the rapid and slow compartment desorption rate constants and compartment fractions are reported. Suspended solids from irrigation runoff water collected from a field that had been sprayed with permethrin one day prior were used in the experiments to compare desorption rates for field-applied pyrethroids to those for laboratory-spiked materials. Suspended solids were used in desorption experiments because suspended solids can be a key source of hydrophobic compounds to surface waters. The rapid desorption rate parameters of field-applied permethrin were not statistically different than those of laboratory spiked permethrin, indicating that the desorption of the spiked pyrethroids is comparable to those added and aged in the field. Sorbent characteristics had the greatest effect on desorption rate parameters; as organic carbon content of the solids increased, the rapid desorption fractions and rapid desorption rate constants both decreased. The desorption rate constant of the slow compartment for sediment containing permethrin aged for 28 d was significantly different from those aged 1 d and 7 d, while desorption in the rapid and slow compartments did not differ between these treatments. PMID:21538493

  20. Hydrogenase Activity of Mineral-Associated and Suspended Populations of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Essex 6

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Reardon; T.S. Magnuson; E.S. Boyd; W.D. Leavitt; D.W. Reed; G.G. Geesey

    2014-02-01

    The interactions between sulfate-reducing microorganisms and iron oxides influence a number of important redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes including the formation of iron sulfides. Enzymes, such as hydrogenase which catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen, are known to mediate electron transfer to metals and may contribute to the formation and speciation of ferrous sulfides formed at the cell–mineral interface. In the present study, we compared the whole cell hydrogenase activity of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain Essex 6 growing as biofilms on hematite (hematite-associated) or as suspended populations using different metabolic pathways. Hematite-associated cells exhibited significantly greater hydrogenase activity than suspended populations during sulfate respiration but not during pyruvate fermentation. The enhanced activity of the hematite-associated, sulfate-grown cells appears to be dependent on iron availability rather than a general response to surface attachment since the activity of glass-associated cells did not differ from that of suspended populations. Hydrogenase activity of pyruvate-fermenting cells was stimulated by addition of iron as soluble Fe(II)Cl2 and, in the absence of added iron, both sulfate-reducing and pyruvate-fermenting cells displayed similar rates of hydrogenase activity. These data suggest that iron exerts a stronger influence on whole cell hydrogenase activity than either metabolic pathway or mode of growth. The location of hydrogenase to the cell envelope and the enhanced activity at the hematite surface in sulfate-reducing cells may influence the redox conditions that control the species of iron sulfides on the mineral surface.

  1. Analyzing the uncertainty of suspended sediment load prediction using sequential data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisenring, Marc; Moradkhani, Hamid

    2012-10-01

    SummaryA first step in understanding the impacts of sediment and controlling the sources of sediment is to quantify the mass loading. Since mass loading is the product of flow and concentration, the quantification of loads first requires the quantification of runoff volume. Using the National Weather Service's SNOW-17 and the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) models, this study employed particle filter based Bayesian data assimilation methods to predict seasonal snow water equivalent (SWE) and runoff within a small watershed in the Lake Tahoe Basin located in California, USA. A procedure was developed to scale the variance multipliers (a.k.a hyperparameters) for model parameters and predictions based on the accuracy of the mean predictions relative to the ensemble spread. In addition, an online bias correction algorithm based on the lagged average bias was implemented to detect and correct for systematic bias in model forecasts prior to updating with the particle filter. Both of these methods significantly improved the performance of the particle filter without requiring excessively wide prediction bounds. The flow ensemble was linked to a non-linear regression model that was used to predict suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) based on runoff rate and time of year. Runoff volumes and SSC were then combined to produce an ensemble of suspended sediment load estimates. Annual suspended sediment loads for the 5 years of simulation were finally computed along with 95% prediction intervals that account for uncertainty in both the SSC regression model and flow rate estimates. Understanding the uncertainty associated with annual suspended sediment load predictions is critical for making sound watershed management decisions aimed at maintaining the exceptional clarity of Lake Tahoe. The computational methods developed and applied in this research could assist with similar studies where it is important to quantify the predictive uncertainty of pollutant load

  2. Electronic thermal conductivity of suspended graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Begum, K. Rizwana Sankeshwar, N. S.

    2014-04-24

    Electronic thermal conductivity, κ{sub e}, of suspended graphene is studied for 20K 100K, becoming dominant for T > 250K. Good agreement with recent experimental data is obtained.

  3. Oscillation damped movement of suspended objects

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.F.; Petterson, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    Transportation of objects using overhead cranes or manipulators can induce pendulum motion of the object. Residual oscillation from transportation typically must be damped or allowed to decay before the next process can take place. By properly programming the acceleration of the transporting device (e.g., crane) an oscillation damped transport and swing free stop is obtainable. This paper reviews the theory associated with oscillation damped trajectories for simply suspended objects and describes a particular implementation using a CIMCORP XR 6100 gantry robot. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Elastic properties of suspended black phosphorus nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jia-Ying; Li, Yang; Zhen, Liang; Xu, Cheng-Yan; Zhan, Zhao-Yao; Li, Tie

    2016-01-04

    The mechanical properties of black phosphorus (BP) nanosheets suspended over circular holes were measured by an atomic force microscope nanoindentation method. The continuum mechanic model was introduced to calculate the elastic modulus and pretension of BP nanosheets with thicknesses ranging from 14.3 to 34 nm. Elastic modulus of BP nanosheets declines with thickness, and the maximum value is 276 ± 32.4 GPa. Besides, the effective strain of BP ranges from 8 to 17% with a breaking strength of 25 GPa. Our results show that BP nanosheets serve as a promising candidate for flexible electronic applications.

  5. Development of a magnetically suspended momentum wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, S. B.

    1973-01-01

    An engineering model of a magnetically suspended momentum wheel was designed, fabricated, and tested under laboratory conditions. The basic unit consisted of two magnet bearings, a sculptured aluminum rotor, brushless dc spin motor, and electronics. The magnet bearings, utilizing rare-earth cobltrat-samarium magnets were active radially and passive axially. The results of the program showed that momentum wheels with magnetic bearings are feasible and operable, and that magnetic bearings of this type are capable of being used for applications where high capacity, high stiffness, and low power consumption are required. The tests performed developed criteria for improved performance for future designs.

  6. Safety Harness For Work Under Suspended Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunoo, Su Young

    1994-01-01

    Safety device protects worker under suspended engine or other heavy load. Mechanically linked with load so if load should fall, worker yanked safely away. Worker wears chest-plate vest with straps crossing eye on back. Lower safety cable connected to eye extends horizontally away from worker to nearby wall, wrapped on pulley and extends upward to motion amplifier or reducer. Safety cables transform any sudden downward motion of overhanging load into rapid sideways motion of worker. Net catches worker, preventing worker from bumping against wall.

  7. Suspended-sediment inflows to Watts Bar Reservoir. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, L.K.

    1993-09-01

    Suspended-sediment inflows to Watts Bar Reservoir are important data that are required in numerical modeling of transport and deposition of sediment in the reservoir. Acceptable numerical modeling requires sediment inflow rates and locations in order to be able to compute the location and quantity of sediment deposited within the reservoir. Therefore, the representativeness of modeling results is highly dependent on the characteristics of sediment input to the model. The following recommendations, that account for suspended-sediment inflows to be used in the numerical modeling of sediment transport and deposition in Watts Bar Reservoir, were developed through an evaluation of available watershed and sediment deposition data. (1) Use the suspended-sediment rating regression equations of Gaydos et al., for Emory River at Oakdale, TN, and for Poplar Creek near Oak Ridge, TN, to represent the suspended-sediment inflows into Watts Bar Reservoir from its tributaries; (2) Use a suspended-sediment rating regression equation that was derived from suspended-sediment and streamflow data of the Little Tennessee River at McGhee, TN, to represent sediment inflow from the Little Tennessee River for simulation of any historical year before the completion of Tellico Dam; (3) Check the appropriateness of any assumption for suspended-sediment inflows from upstream reservoirs by using its long-term relationship to local suspended-sediment inflows and to the suspended-sediment outflow through Watts Bar Dam; and (4) Focus refinements to suspended-sediment inflow rates on the Clinch arm of Watts Bar Reservoir.

  8. Measurement and Interpretation of Light Scattering by Suspended Particulates in an Oligotrophic Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Stephen Wayne

    The accurate characterization of fine suspended particles is central to a wide range of limno-logical research areas, including microbial ecosystem function and dynamics, underwater light propagation, nutrient cycling, and drinking water quality. The goal of this work was to develop methods to measure and characterize suspended particles in the oligotrophic Lake Tahoe, California--Nevada, where light scattering by particulates is the dominant process controlling lake clarity. Suspended particle populations were characterized using an in situ laser diffraction particle size analyzer---the LISST 100X. A set of laboratory tests was first performed to assess the accuracy of the LISST over a wide variety of environmental particle shapes and compositions. Processing techniques based on Mie theory were developed which enabled the LISST to produce accurate size distributions on the majority of the samples tested. Analysis of field data showed the LISST to be highly sensitive to ambient sunlight, causing erroneous spikes in small particle concentrations at high light levels. Techniques were developed to post-process the data and remove light contamination based on independently measured or modeled light intensities. These data processing techniques were employed to examine the composition of particulates in Lake Tahoe. Measured ratios of backscatter by particles to total particle scattering were used to estimate the bulk index of refraction, a proxy for particle composition. Sampling was performed during four periods relevant to the seasonal clarity cycle. Scattering ratios on all sampling days were found to be consistent with dominance by particles of predominantly organic composition. Consequently, the late spring minimum in Lake Tahoe clarity was shown to be likely due to phytoplankton growth stimulated by streamborne nutrients. Phytoplankton communities in the summer period of intense lake stratification were found to exhibit photoacclimation, the process by which algal

  9. Effects of photodynamic action on respiration in nonphosphorylating mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Salet, C; Moreno, G; Ricchelli, F

    1998-10-15

    We have studied the effects of singlet oxygen produced by photodynamic action on respiration in nonphosphorylating mitochondria (state 4). Isolated rat liver mitochondria were incubated with 3 microM hematoporphyrin and irradiated at 365 nm with a fluence rate of 25 W/m2. After short durations of irradiation, state 4 respiration with beta-hydroxybutyrate as substrate increases while respiration with succinate is negligibly affected. When mitochondria have been uncoupled with carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone before irradiation, no change occurs in beta-hydroxybutyrate-driven respiration, while succinate-driven respiration strongly decreases. Stimulation of state 4 NADH respiration cannot be explained by slippage of the NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase because the stoichiometry of the redox pump was found insensitive to photodynamic action. In the light of the metabolite theory for linear enzymatic chains applied to state 4 respiration (Brand et al., Biochem. J. 255, 535-539, 1988), these results suggest that stimulation of NADH respiration is simply due to an increase of membrane leaks which occurs after irradiation. In the case of succinate-driven respiration, a strong inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase activity has been demonstrated after irradiation. It can be suggested that this inhibition introduces a negative control coefficient over state 4 respiration, counterbalancing the effects due to leakage.

  10. Particle Dynamics in the Sea: Processes of Production and Loss Governing the Abundance of Marine Snow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-05

    of the suspended particulate matter in the ocean exists as aggregates of smaller particles of algae , bacteria, organic detritus and inorganic...3997; Omnet - A.Alidredge ABSTRACT Much of the suspended particulate matter in the ocean exists as aggregates of smaller particles of algae , bacteria...the ocean exists as a,4regat::. of smaller particles of algae , bacteria, organic detritus, and inorganic particles. These aggregates range from tens of

  11. A comparison of load estimates using total suspended solids and suspended-sediment concentration data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glysson, G.D.; Gray, J.R.; Schwarz, G.E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the results to-date from a continuing investigation into the differences between total suspended solids (TSS) and suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) data and the ramifications of using each type of data to estimate sediment loads. It compares estimates of annual suspended-sediment loads that were made using regression equations developed from paired TSS and SSC data, to annual loads computed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) using traditional techniques and SSC data. Load estimates were compared for 10 stations where sufficient TSS and SSC paired data were available to develop sediment-transport curves for the same time period that daily suspended-sediment records were available. Results of these analyses indicate that as the time frame over which the estimates were made increases, the overall errors associated with the estimates decreases with respect to loads computed using traditional USGS techniques. Using SSC data to compute loads tends to produce estimates closer to those computed by traditional techniques than those computed from TSS data. Loads computed from TSS data tend to be negatively biased with respect to those computed by traditional USGS techniques.

  12. Blood Pump Having a Magnetically Suspended Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaki, James F. (Inventor); Paden, Bradley (Inventor); Burgreen, Gregory (Inventor); Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.

  13. Blood Pump Having a Magnetically Suspended Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaki, James F. (Inventor); Paden, Bradley (Inventor); Burgreen, Gregory (Inventor); Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.

  14. Electrodialytic remediation of suspended mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik K; Rojo, Adrian; Pino, Denisse; Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2008-07-01

    This work shows the laboratory results of nine electrodialytic remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. A newly designed remediation cell, where the solids were kept in suspension by airflow, was tested. The results show that electric current could remove copper from suspended tailings applying 40 mA during 7 days. The liquid-to-solid ratios used were 3, 6 and 9 mL g(- 1). With addition of sulfuric acid, the process was enhanced because the pH decreased to either 2 or 4, and copper was therefore dissolved. The maximum copper removal was 80% with addition of sulfuric acid in 7-day experiment at 40 mA, with approximately 137.5 g mine tailings on dry basis. The removal for a static (baseline) experiment only amounted 15% when passing approximately the same amount of charge through 130 g of mine tailings. The use of air bubbling to keep the tailings suspended increased the removal efficiency from 1% to 80% compared to experiments with no stirring but with the same operational conditions. This showed the crucial importance of having the solids in suspension and not settled during the remediation.

  15. Method for forming suspended micromechanical structures

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.

    2000-01-01

    A micromachining method is disclosed for forming a suspended micromechanical structure from {111} crystalline silicon. The micromachining method is based on the use of anisotropic dry etching to define lateral features of the structure which are etched down into a {111}-silicon substrate to a first etch depth, thereby forming sidewalls of the structure. The sidewalls are then coated with a protection layer, and the substrate is dry etched to a second etch depth to define a spacing of the structure from the substrate. A selective anisotropic wet etchant (e.g. KOH, EDP, TMAH, NaOH or CsOH) is used to laterally undercut the structure between the first and second etch depths, thereby forming a substantially planar lower surface of the structure along a {111} crystal plane that is parallel to an upper surface of the structure. The lateral extent of undercutting by the wet etchant is controlled and effectively terminated by either timing the etching, by the location of angled {111}-silicon planes or by the locations of preformed etch-stops. This present method allows the formation of suspended micromechanical structures having large vertical dimensions and large masses while allowing for detailed lateral features which can be provided by dry etch definition. Additionally, the method of the present invention is compatible with the formation of electronic circuitry on the substrate.

  16. Elastic properties of suspended multilayer WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Koutsos, Vasileios; Cheung, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental determination of the elastic properties of suspended multilayer WSe2, a promising two-dimensional (2D) semiconducting material combined with high optical quality. The suspended WSe2 membranes have been fabricated by mechanical exfoliation of bulk WSe2 and transfer of the exfoliated multilayer WSe2 flakes onto SiO2/Si substrates pre-patterned with hole arrays. Then, indentation experiments have been performed on these membranes with an atomic force microscope. The results show that the 2D elastic modulus of the multilayer WSe2 membranes increases linearly while the prestress decreases linearly as the number of layers increases. The interlayer interaction in WSe2 has been observed to be strong enough to prevent the interlayer sliding during the indentation experiments. The Young's modulus of multilayer WSe2 (167.3 ± 6.7 GPa) is statistically independent of the thickness of the membranes, whose value is about two thirds of other most investigated 2D semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, namely, MoS2 and WS2. Moreover, the multilayer WSe2 can endure ˜12.4 GPa stress and ˜7.3% strain without fracture or mechanical degradation. The 2D WSe2 can be an attractive semiconducting material for application in flexible optoelectronic devices and nano-electromechanical systems.

  17. Prediction of suspended-sediment concentrations at selected sites in the Fountain Creek watershed, Colorado, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stogner, Robert W.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; McDonald, Richard R.; Kinzel, Paul J.; Mau, David P.

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Pikes Peak Area Council of Governments, Colorado Water Conservation Board, Colorado Springs City Engineering, and the Lower Arkansas Valley Water Conservancy District, began a small-scale pilot study to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of a computational model of streamflow and suspended-sediment transport for predicting suspended-sediment concentrations and loads in the Fountain Creek watershed in Colorado. Increased erosion and sedimentation damage have been identified by the Fountain Creek Watershed Plan as key problems within the watershed. A recommendation in the Fountain Creek Watershed plan for management of the basin is to establish measurable criteria to determine if progress in reducing erosion and sedimentation damage is being made. The major objective of this study was to test a computational method to predict local suspended-sediment loads at two sites with different geomorphic characteristics in order to evaluate the feasibility of using such an approach to predict local suspended-sediment loads throughout the entire watershed. Detailed topographic surveys, particle-size data, and suspended-sediment samples were collected at two gaged sites: Monument Creek above Woodmen Road at Colorado Springs, Colorado (USGS gage 07103970), and Sand Creek above mouth at Colorado Springs, Colorado (USGS gage 07105600). These data were used to construct three-dimensional computational models of relatively short channel reaches at each site. The streamflow component of these models predicted a spatially distributed field of water-surface elevation, water velocity, and bed shear stress for a range of stream discharges. Using the model predictions, along with measured particle sizes, the sediment-transport component of the model predicted the suspended-sediment concentration throughout the reach of interest. These computed concentrations were used with predicted flow patterns and channel morphology to

  18. Aerodynamic size distribution of suspended particulate matter in the ambient air in the city of Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.; King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    The City of Cleveland Division of Air Pollution Control and NASA jointly investigated the chemical and physical characteristics of the suspended particulate matter in Cleveland, and as part of the program, measurements of the particle size distribution of ambient air samples at five urban locations during August and September 1972 were made using high-volume cascade impactions. The distributions were evaluated for lognormality, and the mass median diameters were compared between locations and as a function of resultant wind direction. Junge-type distributions were consistent with dirty continental aerosols. About two-thirds of the suspended particulate matter observed in Cleveland is less than 7 microns in diameter.

  19. Microbial respiration and root respiration follow divergent seasonal and diel temporal patterns in a temperate forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, E. A.; Savage, K. E.; Tang, J.

    2010-12-01

    Soil respiration is often related to empirical measurements of soil temperature and water content, as if it were a single process that responds uniformly to these environmental drivers. However, we know that root and microbial processes both contribute to CO2 production within the soil, and the roots are connected to aboveground plant tissues, which may, in turn, be responding to other environmental cues. Trenched plots provide a method to separate these two processes, where only microbial respiration (Rm) occurs in the trenched plots that have had roots excluded, total soil respiration (Rt) occurs in untrenched reference plots, and root respiration (Rr) is inferred by the difference between the two treatments. Like all methods, this one has potential artifacts that may render the quantification of Rr uncertain, but the method is likely to demonstrate the phenology of Rr and its impact on diel and seasonal temporal patterns of Rt. We deployed three automated soil respiration chambers in both control and trenched plots at the Harvard Forest in central Massachusetts. Soil CO2 efflux was measured every half hour for each chamber from day-of-year 112 to 304, 2009 (with some data gaps in the intervening period due to equipment failure). For the combined measurement period, mean daily soil respiration and mean daily flux amplitude were significantly higher in the reference plots compared to the trenched plots. The peak flux also occurred about 2 hours later in the evening in the reference plots compared to the trenched plots. Breaking this period down into four seasonal windows (spring, early summer, late summer, and autumn), the mean daily flux was significantly higher in the reference plot for all seasons, the higher daily amplitude was significant only during the early summer, and the delay in peak emissions was significant during early and late summer. While roots were contributing to soil respiration in all measurement periods, their largest effect on daily mean

  20. Forest Soil Respiration: Identifying Sources and Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Högberg, P.

    2008-12-01

    Most of the respiration in forests comes from the soil. This flux is composed of two components, autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration. In a strict sense the former should be plant belowground respiration only, but the term is used here to denote respiration by roots, their mycorrhizal fungal symbionts and other closely associated organisms dependent on recent photosynthate. Heterotrophs are organisms using organic matter, chiefly above- and belowground litters, as substrate (i.e. substrates of in general much higher ecosystem age). Because of the complexity of the plant-soil system, the component fluxes are difficult to study. I will discuss results of different approaches to partition soil respiratory components and to study their controls. The focus will be on northern boreal forests. In these generally strongly nitrogen-limited forests, the autotrophic respiration equals or exceeds the heterotrophic component. The large autotrophic component reflects high plant allocation of C to roots and mycorrhizal fungi in response to the low N supply. A physiological manipulation, girdling, which stops the flow of photosynthates to roots, showed that autotrophic respiration could account for as much as 70% in N-limited forests, but only 40% in fertilized forests. Also using girdling, we could show that a shift to lower summertime temperature leads to a decrease in heterotrophic but not in autotrophic activity, suggesting substrate (photosynthate) limitation of the latter. Physiological manipulations like girdling and trenching cannot be used to reveal the finer details of soil C dynamics. Natural abundance stable isotope (13C) and 14C approaches also have their limitations if a high resolution in terms of time, space and organism is required. A very high resolution can, of course, be obtained in studies of laboratory micro- or mesocosms, but the possibility to extend the interpretation of their results to the field may be questioned. In the CANIFLEX (CArbon NItrogen

  1. Light attenuation - a more effective basis for the management of fine suspended sediment than mass concentration?

    PubMed

    Davies-Colley, Robert J; Ballantine, Deborah J; Elliott, Sandy H; Swales, Andrew; Hughes, Andrew O; Gall, Mark P

    2014-01-01

    Fine sediment continues to be a major diffuse pollution concern with its multiple effects on aquatic ecosystems. Mass concentrations (and loads) of fine sediment are usually measured and modelled, apparently with the assumption that environmental effects of sediment are predictable from mass concentrations. However, some severe impacts of fine sediment may not correlate well with mass concentration, notably those related to light attenuation by suspended particles. Light attenuation per unit mass concentration of suspended particulate matter in waters varies widely with particle size, shape and composition. Data for suspended sediment concentration, turbidity and visual clarity (which is inversely proportional to light beam attenuation) from 77 diverse New Zealand rivers provide valuable insights into the mutual relationships of these quantities. Our analysis of these relationships, both across multiple rivers and within individual rivers, supports the proposition that light attenuation by fine sediment is a more generally meaningful basis for environmental management than sediment mass. Furthermore, optical measurements are considerably more practical, being much cheaper (by about four-fold) to measure than mass concentrations, and amenable to continuous measurement. Mass concentration can be estimated with sufficient precision for many purposes from optical surrogates locally calibrated for particular rivers.

  2. Suspended sediment deposition and trapping efficiency in a Delaware salt marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalski, Susanne M.; Sommerfield, Christopher K.

    2012-02-01

    This study examined sediment deposition and retention in a section of salt marsh in the St. Jones River estuary in Delaware. Sediment traps, siphon samplers, a LISST particle sizer, and four water level sensors were deployed in a 100 m by 200 m grid over the course of a spring tide in June 2007. The objective was to determine the relative influences of suspended sediment concentration, settling velocity, tidal hydroperiod, and vegetation density on sediment deposition and trapping efficiency within a small section of marsh. Hydroperiod is not a major contributor to sediment deposition in the study plot. Spatial patterns in depositional processes on tidal timescales are instead primarily controlled by overmarsh SSC, settling velocity, and distance from the tidal channel. Trapping efficiency, or the ratio of measured deposition and the amount of sediment available for deposition, decreased with distance away from the tidal channel, indicating that less of the available suspended sediment was deposited in the marsh interior. The suspended particles were flocculated, but floc sizes decreased with distance away from the tidal channel.

  3. Recent developments in the use of hydroacoustics for monitoring suspended-sediment transport in rivers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. A.; Topping, D. J.; Williams, C. A.; Wood, M. S.; Landers, M. N.; Straub, T. D.

    2010-12-01

    Hydroacoustic techniques, particularly acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP), have gained wide usage in rivers for measuring velocity, depth, and discharge. Velocity measurements with ADCPs are derived from frequency shifts in the energy returned from particles in suspension(i.e. Doppler shifts). It has long been recognized that the amount of energy returned, or “backscattered” by the suspended particles, is indicative of the number of particles in suspension as well as their size. The relations between backscatter, suspended-sediment concentration, and particle size were the subject of a series of theoretical developments, laboratory experiments, and field applications in the late 1980s and 1990s. This research was focused primarily on coastal applications for sand-sized particles with narrow particle-size distributions. Rivers provide a challenge to any monitoring technique because of the wide ranges in concentration and particle size. Concentrations can range from only a few milligrams per liter to over 10,000, and particle sizes range from fine clay to medium sand, depending on the particular hydrologic and geologic setting. Recent applications of hydroacoustics on the Colorado River in Arizona led to novel processing techniques that overcome some of the difficulties in monitoring these wide ranges. In this reach of river, the transport of silts and clays tends to be decoupled from sand transport due to the supply limitation imposed by an upstream dam. Applications of side-looking ADCPs to this reach indicated that backscatter was correlated with sand concentration, as expected based on previous studies. However, further data analyses suggested that fine sediment concentrations were highly correlated with energy losses along the profiling path (acoustic attenuation). That is, the sand particles tended to dominate the backscatter response while the silt and clay particles tended to dominate the attenuation response. Thus, it was shown that a profiling

  4. Tillage Effects on Soil Properties & Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Teodor; Bogdan, Ileana; Moraru, Paula; Pop, Adrian; Duda, Bogdan; Cacovean, Horea; Coste, Camelia

    2015-04-01

    Soil tillage systems can be able to influence soil compaction, water dynamics, soil temperature and soil structural condition. These processes can be expressed as changes of soil microbiological activity, soil respiration and sustainability of agriculture. Objectives of this study were: 1) to assess the effects of tillage systems (Conventional System-CS, Minimum Tillage-MT, No-Tillage-NT) on soil compaction, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration and 2) to establish the relationship that exists in changing soil properties. Three treatments were installed: CS-plough + disc; MT-paraplow + rotary grape; NT-direct sowing. The study was conducted on an Argic-Stagnic Faeoziom. The MT and NT applications reduce or completely eliminate the soil mobilization, due to this, soil is compacted in the first year of application. The degree of compaction is directly related to soil type and its state of degradation. The state of soil compaction diminished over time, tending toward a specific type of soil density. Soil moisture was higher in NT and MT at the time of sowing and in the early stages of vegetation and differences diminished over time. Moisture determinations showed statistically significant differences. The MT and NT applications reduced the thermal amplitude in the first 15 cm of soil depth and increased the soil temperature by 0.5-2.20C. The determinations confirm the effect of soil tillage system on soil respiration; the daily average was lower at NT (315-1914 mmoli m-2s-1) and followed by MT (318-2395 mmoli m-2s-1) and is higher in the CS (321-2480 mmol m-2s-1). Comparing with CS, all the two conservation tillage measures decreased soil respiration, with the best effects of no-tillage. An exceeding amount of CO2 produced in the soil and released into the atmosphere, resulting from aerobic processes of mineralization of organic matter (excessive loosening) is considered to be not only a way of increasing the CO2 in the atmosphere, but also a loss of

  5. ESTIMATING ROOT RESPIRATION IN SPRUCE AND BEECH: DECREASES IN SOIL RESPIRATION FOLLOWING GIRDLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was undertaken to follow seasonal fluxes of CO2 from soil and to estimate the contribution of autotrophic (root + mycorrhizal) to total soil respiration (SR) in a mixed stand of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) near Freising, Germany. Matu...

  6. Soil respiration under different land uses in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Chao; Yang, Ming-Zhen; Han, Wen-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Land-use change has a crucial influence on soil respiration, which further affects soil nutrient availability and carbon stock. We monitored soil respiration rates under different land-use types (tea gardens with three production levels, adjacent woodland, and a vegetable field) in Eastern China at weekly intervals over a year using the dynamic closed chamber method. The relationship between soil respiration and environmental factors was also evaluated. The soil respiration rate exhibited a remarkable single peak that was highest in July/August and lowest in January. The annual cumulative respiration flux increased by 25.6% and 20.9% in the tea garden with high production (HP) and the vegetable field (VF), respectively, relative to woodland (WL). However, no significant differences were observed between tea gardens with medium production (MP), low production (LP), WL, and VF. Soil respiration rates were significantly and positively correlated with organic carbon, total nitrogen, and available phosphorous content. Each site displayed a significant exponential relationship between soil respiration and soil temperature measured at 5 cm depth, which explained 84-98% of the variation in soil respiration. The model with a combination of soil temperature and moisture was better at predicting the temporal variation of soil respiration rate than the single temperature model for all sites. Q10 was 2.40, 2.00, and 1.86-1.98 for VF, WL, and tea gardens, respectively, indicating that converting WL to VF increased and converting to tea gardens decreased the sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature. The equation of the multiple linear regression showed that identical factors, including soil organic carbon (SOC), soil water content (SWC), pH, and water soluble aluminum (WSAl), drove the changes in soil respiration and Q10 after conversion of land use. Temporal variations of soil respiration were mainly controlled by soil temperature, whereas spatial variations were

  7. Performance of the Volumetric Diffusive Respirator at Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-18

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2014-0020 Performance of the Volumetric Diffusive Respirator at Altitude Dario Rodriquez, MSc1; Tyler Britton, RRT2...the Volumetric Diffusive Respirator at Altitude 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-12-2-6B012 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...volumetric diffusive respirator is a pneumatic ventilator used by the U.S. Army Burn Team and the U.S. Air Force Lung Team for patients with hypoxemic

  8. Reconviction rates after suspended sentences: comparison of the effects of different types of suspended sentences on reconviction in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Aarten, Pauline G M; Denkers, Adriaan; Borgers, Matthias J; van der Laan, Peter H

    2015-02-01

    Previous research has focused mainly on determining the effectiveness of suspended sentences compared with other sentences, and seldom on understanding to what extent the different types of suspended sentences reduce recidivism rates. This study examined reconviction rates of offenders (N = 1,258) who received fully or partly suspended prison sentences, with or without special conditions, in 2006 in two of the largest court districts in the Netherlands. Cox proportional hazard models revealed no difference in reconviction rates between fully and partly suspended prison sentences, with and without special conditions. However, suspended sentences without special conditions had significantly lower reconviction rates compared with special conditions that were solely control-orientated. Although there are indications that certain types of suspended sentences reduced reconviction rates more than other types, more rigorous research is still required.

  9. Suspended sediment yield in Texas watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coonrod, Julia Ellen Allred

    The Texas Water Development Board collected suspended sediment samples across the state of Texas for approximately 60 years. Until this research, no comprehensive analysis of the data had been conducted. This study compiles the suspended sediment data along with corresponding streamflow and rainfall. GIS programs are developed which characterize watersheds corresponding to the sediment gauging stations. The watersheds are characterized according to topography, climate, soils, and land use. All of the data is combined to form several SAS data sets which can subsequently be analyzed using regression. Annual data for all of the stations across the state are classified temporally and spatially to determine trends in the sediment yield. In general, the suspended sediment load increases with increasing runoff but no correlation exists with rainfall. However, the annual average rainfall can be used to classify the watersheds according to climate, which improves the correlation between sediment load and runoff. The watersheds with no dams have higher sediment loads than watersheds with dams. Dams in the drier parts of Texas reduce the sediment load more than dams in the wetter part of the state. Sediment rating curves are developed separately for each basin in Texas. All but one of the curves fall into a band which varies by about two orders of magnitude. The study analyzes daily time series data for the Lavaca River near Edna station. USGS data are used to improve the sediment rating curve by the addition of physically related variables and interaction terms. The model can explain an additional 41% of the variability in sediment concentration compared to a simple bivariate regression of sediment load and flow. The TWDB daily data for the Lavaca River near Edna station are used to quantify temporal trends. There is a high correlation between sediment load and flowrate for the Lavaca River. The correlation can be improved by considering a flow-squared term and by

  10. Apparatus for Suspension of Charged Particles and Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, T. G. Owe

    1969-01-01

    Describes an apparatus designed to study the properties of charged particles suspended in an electric field. The apparatus consists of a suspension chamber, an optical system and power supplies and controls. Experiments conducted include determination of particle size, charge-to-mass ratio and particle collisions and exchange. (LC)

  11. Optical teledetection of the suspended sediment in reservoirs during typhoon events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Liu, C.

    2009-12-01

    Problems attributed to the high sediment contents in reservoirs, such as the rapid reduction in storage capacity and high cost for drinking water treatment, had been the most important challenge for water resources management in Taiwan. This is especially crucial during typhoon events, when the concentration of suspended sediment varies significantly both in time and space, and decisions related to the drinking water supply and reservoir operations for mitigating floods must been made in a short time. An idea platform for frequently monitoring the level of suspended sediment during typhoon events is thus of importance. A recently developed platform (MS700) that is originally designed to provide ground truth for the atmospheric correction of a satellite sensor and is able to continuously measure the above-water downward and upwelling irradiance with a grating spectroradiometer and a rotation arm, was deployed in Tsengwen and Shimen Reservoir. The MS700 device gave reliable measurements of the water surface irradiances during the 135 days of operation, including 5 passing typhoons and a total of 3000 mm of precipitation. Furthermore, the measured spectral irradiance reflectance, R(λ), is significantly correlated to the concentration of suspended sediment. This study attempts to develop a semi-empirical method to optically teledetect the concentration of suspended sediment from the MS700 measured R(λ). Firstly, a series of numerical experiments under a range of conditions (water constituents, cloud cover and sun angle) using Radiative Transfer Model (Hydrolight) were conducted to develop algorithms for converting the R spectra into remote sensing reflectance, Rrs(λ). Secondly, an ocean color retrieval algorithm, GA-SA, was employed to derive the particle backscattering coefficients (bbp) from the Rrs. Thirdly, the relationships between GA-SA derived bbp and the suspended sediment contents was developed based on the in-situ data. Finally, the hourly and daily

  12. Pulmonary toxicity screening studies in male rats with M5 respirable fibers and particulates.

    PubMed

    Warheit, David B; Webb, Thomas R; Reed, Kenneth L

    2007-09-01

    M5 fiber is a high-strength, high-performance organic fiber type that is a rigid rod material and composed of heterocyclic polymer fibers of type PIPD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute lung toxicity of intratracheally instilled M5 respirable fibers and particulates in rats. Using a pulmonary bioassay and bridging methodology, the acute lung toxicity of intratracheally instilled M5 particulates and that of its fibers were compared with a positive control particle type, quartz, as well as a negative control particle type, carbonyl iron particles. Moreover, the results of these instillation studies were bridged with data previously generated from inhalation studies with quartz and carbonyl iron particles, using the quartz and iron particles as the inhalation/instillation bridge material. For the bioassay experimental design, in the bronchoalveolar lavage studies, the lungs of rats were intratracheally instilled with 0.5 or 0.75 mg/kg of M5 particulate or 1 or 5 mg/kg of the following control or particle types: (1) M5 long fiber preparation, (2) silica-quartz particles, and (3) carbonyl iron particles. Phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-instilled rats served as additional controls. Following exposures, the lungs of PBS and particle-exposed rats were assessed using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid biomarkers, cell proliferation methods, and histopathological evaluation of lung tissue at 24 h, 1 wk, 1 mo and 3 mo post instillation exposure. The bronchoalveolar lavage results demonstrated that lung exposures to quartz particles, at both concentrations but particularly at the higher dose, produced significant increases vs. controls in pulmonary inflammation and cytotoxicity indices. Exposures to M5 particulate and M5 long fiber preparation produced transient inflammatory and cell injury effects at 24 h postexposure (pe) as well as at 24 h and 1 wk pe, respectively, but these effects were not sustained when compared to quartz-silica effects. Exposures to

  13. Ecosystem-level controls on root-rhizosphere respiration.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Francesca; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A; Flower, Charles E; Lynch, Douglas J; Czimczik, Claudia; Tang, Jianwu; Subke, Jens-Arne

    2013-07-01

    Recent advances in the partitioning of autotrophic from heterotrophic respiration processes in soils in conjunction with new high temporal resolution soil respiration data sets offer insights into biotic and environmental controls of respiration. Besides temperature, many emerging controlling factors have not yet been incorporated into ecosystem-scale models. We synthesize recent research that has partitioned soil respiration into its process components to evaluate effects of nitrogen, temperature and photosynthesis on autotrophic flux from soils at the ecosystem level. Despite the widely used temperature dependence of root respiration, gross primary productivity (GPP) can explain most patterns of ecosystem root respiration (and to some extent heterotrophic respiration) at within-season time-scales. Specifically, heterotrophi crespiration is influenced by a seasonally variable supply of recent photosynthetic products in the rhizosphere. The contribution of stored root carbon (C) to root respiratory fluxes also varied seasonally, partially decoupling the proportion of photosynthetic C driving root respiration. In order to reflect recent insights, new hierarchical models, which incorporate root respiration as a primary function of GPP and which respond to environmental variables by modifying Callocation belowground, are needed for better prediction of future ecosystem C sequestration.

  14. Autotrophic and heterotrophic components of soil respiration in permafrost zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udovenko, Maria; Goncharova, Olga

    2016-04-01

    Soil carbon dioxide emissions production is an important integral indicator of soil biological activity and it includes several components: the root respiration and microbial decomposition of organic matter. Separate determination of the components of soil respiration is necessary for studying the balance of carbon in the soil and to assessment its potential as a sink or source of carbon dioxide. The aim of this study was testing field methods of separate determination of root and microbial respiration in soils of north of West Siberia. The research took place near the town Nadym, Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous District (north of West Siberia).The study area was located in the northern taiga with sporadic permafrost. Investigations were carried out at two sites: in forest and in frozen peatland. 3 methods were tested for the separation of microbial and root respiration. 1) "Shading"; 2) "Clipping"(removing the above-ground green plant parts); 3)a modified method of roots exclusion (It is to compare the emission of soils of "peat spots", devoid of vegetation and roots, and soils located in close proximity to the spots on which there is herbaceous vegetation and moss). For the experiments on methods of "Shading" and "Clipping" in the forest and on the frozen peatland ware established 12 plots, 1 x 1 m (3 plots in the forest and at 9 plots on frozen peatland; 4 of them - control).The criterions for choosing location sites were the similarity of meso- and microrelief, the same depth of permafrost, the same vegetation. Measurement of carbon dioxide emissions (chamber method) was carried out once a day, in the evening, for a week. Separation the root and microbial respiration by "Shading" showed that in the forest the root respiration contribution is 5%, and microbial - 95%. On peatlands root respiration is 41%, 59% of the microbial. In the experiment "Clipping" in peatlands root respiration is 56%, the microbial respiration - 44%, in forest- root respiration is 17%, and

  15. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators...

  16. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators...

  17. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators...

  18. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators...

  19. Deposition and fate of reactive Fe, Mn, P, and C in suspended particulate matter in the Bay of Biscay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anschutz, Pierre; Chaillou, Gwénaëlle

    2009-05-01

    Hydrographic structure of the water column, dissolved nutrient concentrations and the distribution of suspended particulate matter were recorded from CDT measurements and Niskin bottles sampling on the continental slope of the Bay of Biscay and on the axis of Capbreton canyon. Ascorbate extraction was applied here for the first time on marine suspended particles to determine the content of reactive Fe- and Mn-oxides, and P associated with Fe-oxides. Hydrographic structure of the south-eastern part of the Bay of Biscay did not change during the last three decades. Particulate organic carbon (POC) contents dropped strongly with depth, showing that organic matter mineralization was efficient in the water column. Organic matter mineralized in the water column had a Redfield N:P ratio. POC percent of particles collected at depth were higher during a bloom period, suggesting that some new organic matter reached the bottom. Contents of Fe and Mn extracted with the ascorbate leaching solution showed that suspended particles originated from the Gironde estuary, one of the major sources of particles in the Bay of Biscay. Intermediate and deeper nepheloid layers occurred in the Capbreton canyon. Particles of nepheloid layers were enriched in Mn- and Fe-oxides because they originated from resuspension of surface sediment.

  20. Influences of environmental noise level and respiration rate on the accuracy of acoustic respiration rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Shizuha; Toyama, Hiroaki; Takei, Yusuke; Wagatsuma, Toshihiro; Yabuki, Hiroshi; Yamauchi, Masanori

    2017-02-07

    We tested the hypothesis that the environmental noise generated by a forced-air warming system reduces the monitoring accuracy of acoustic respiration rate (RRa). Noise levels were adjusted to 45-55, 56-65, 66-75, and 76-85 dB. Healthy participants breathed at set respiration rates (RRset) of 6, 12, and 30/min. Under each noise level at each RRset, the respiration rates by manual counting (RRm) and RRa were recorded. Any appearance of the alarm display on the RRa monitor was also recorded. Each RRm of all participants agreed with each RRset at each noise level. At 45-55 dB noise, the RRa of 13, 17, and 17 participants agreed with RRset of 6, 12, and 30/min, respectively. The RRa of 14, 17, and 16 participants at 56-65 dB noise, agreed with RRset of 6, 12, and 30/min, respectively. At 66-75 dB noise, the RRa of 9, 15, and 16 participants agreed with RRset of 6, 12, and 30/min, respectively. The RRa of one, nine, and nine participants at 76-85 dB noise agreed with RRset of 6, 12, and 30/min, respectively, which was significantly less than the other noise levels (P < 0.05). Overall, 72.9% of alarm displays highlighted incorrect values of RRa. In a noisy situation involving the operation of a forced-air warming system, the acoustic respiration monitoring should be used carefully especially in patients with a low respiration rate.