Science.gov

Sample records for respirable suspended particles

  1. Real-time monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and respirable suspended particles from environmental tobacco smoke in a home

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, W.; Wilson, N.K.; Klepeis, N.; Switzer, P.

    1994-01-01

    Real-time measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on fine particles was evaluated in a home with environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) as a source. Respirable suspended particles (RSP) were also monitored. Comparison of PAH and RSP concentrations from these experiments suggests: (1) the PAH concentrations for the two types of cigarettes--a regular Marlboro filter cigarette and a University of Kentucky reference cigarette No. 2R1--were similar, but the RSP concentrations were different; (2) concentrations from the real-time PAH monitor were linearly related to RSP concentrations; (3) the slopes of the regression lines between PAH and RSP differed for the two types of cigarettes. The real-time PAH monitor appears to be a useful tool for evaluating mathematical models to predict the concentration time series in indoor microenvironments.

  2. The genotoxic contribution of wood smoke to indoor respirable suspended particles

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, P.M. ); Rossman, T.G. ); Daisey, J.M. )

    1989-01-01

    The effect of wood burning stoves on the genotoxicity of indoor respirable organic matter was investigated for four homes during the winter and spring of 1986. Paired samples, one collected when the stove was not used and one when wood was burned, were extracted with dichloromethane and acetone. Aliquots of the dichloromethane extracts were analyzed with and without metabolic activation using the Microscreen bioassay. The Microscreen is a rapid, sensitive bioassay which measures a broad genotoxic endpoint, {lambda}-prophage induction. Per nanogram of organic material, wood smoke proved to be a major source of indirect (observed with metabolic activation) but not direct genotoxins in homes. The increase in indirect genotoxicity for extracts from aerosol containing wood smoke is probably due to higher concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the wood smoke aerosol as well as other unidentified classes. The direct genotoxicity observed for extracts of aerosol not containing wood smoke decreased with metabolic activation. This direct genotoxicity may be related to cooking activities in the homes. The trends in genotoxicity observed per nanogram of organic material are more pronounced when expressed per m{sup 3} of air due to the higher percentage of extractable material in aerosol containing wood smoke.

  3. Identifying dominant sources of respirable suspended particulates in Guangzhou, China

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Y.; Dai, W.; Wang, X.S.; Cui, M.M.; Su, H.; Xie, S.D.; Zhang, Y.H.

    2008-09-15

    Respirable suspended particulates (RSP, i.e., particles with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 {mu} m or less) were measured in 2004 and 2005 at seven sites in the rapidly developing Guangzhou area of China. The average RSP concentration was 126 {mu} g m{sup -3}, a high level that could be very harmful to human health. The chemical species composition of the RSP, including organic and elemental carbon, water-soluble ions, and elemental compositions, was also analyzed. The organics and sulfate may be the major components of RSP mass concentrations. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was used to identify the sources of RSP as secondary sulfates (32%), secondary nitrates (6%), biomass burning (15%), coal fly ash/cement (18%), sea salt (3%), crustal dust (5%), vehicle exhaust (6%), and coal-fired power plants (3%). Reducing coal combustion and controlling vehicle emissions would alleviate RSP pollution, as most of the precursors were components of coal burning emissions and vehicular exhaust.

  4. Macromodel for assessing residential concentrations of combustion-generated pollutants: Model development and preliminary predictions for CO, NO/sub 2/, and respirable suspended particles

    SciTech Connect

    Traynor, G.W.; Aceti, J.C.; Apte, M.G.; Smith, B.V.; Green, L.L.; Smith-Reiser, A.; Novak, K.M.; Moses, D.O.

    1989-01-01

    A simulation model (also called a ''macromodel'') has been developed to predict residential air pollutant concentration distributions for specified populations. The model inputs include the market penetration of pollution sources, pollution source characteristics (e.g., emission rates, source usage rates), building characteristics (e.g., house volume, air exchange rates), and meteorological parameters (e.g., outside temperature). Four geographically distinct regions of the US have been modeled using Monte Carlo and deterministic simulation techniques. Single-source simulations were also conducted. The highest predicted CO and NO/sub 2/ residential concentrations were associated with the winter-time use of unvented gas and kerosene space heaters. The highest predicted respirable suspended particulate concentrations were associated with indoor cigarette smoking and the winter-time use of non-airtight wood stoves, radiant kerosene heaters, convective unvented gas space heaters, and oil forced-air furnaces. Future field studies in this area should (1) fill information gaps identified in this report, and (2) collect information on the macromodel input parameters to properly interpret the results. It is almost more important to measure the parameters that affect indoor concentration than it is to measure the concentrations themselves.

  5. Impact assessment of respirable suspended particulate matter from diesel generator sets used for pumping station.

    PubMed

    Talwar, B; Pipalatkar, P; Gajghate, D G; Nema, P

    2010-10-01

    Prediction of respirable suspended particulate matter impacts of diesel generator sets used for pumping station has been made using meteorological data, information on stack characteristics and emission rate, baseline ambient particulate matter and Industrial Source Complex Short Term (ISCST-3) model. It is observed that particulate matter emission from pumping station-S workplace diesel generator sets ranged from 2.4 to 436.5 mg Nm⁻³ and while at pumping station-C, it ranged from 23.2 to 186.5 mg Nm⁻³. The predicted and ambient respirable suspended particulate matter concentrations are below the national air quality standard for respirable suspended particulate matter in a mixed industrial area. Metals contents in respirable suspended particulate matter indicate the origin of crustal and mobile sources. Therefore, the impact of diesel generator sets used for pumping of crude oil on local air quality would be acceptable.

  6. Characterization of suspended particles in Everglades wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noe, G.B.; Harvey, J.W.; Saiers, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    We report the concentration, phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) content, and size and chemical fractionation of fine suspended particles (0.2-100 ??m) and colloids (3 kilodalton [kDa]-0.1 ??m) in the surface water of Everglades wetlands along regional and P-enrichment gradients. Total suspended sediment concentrations ranged from 0.7 to 2.7 mg L-1. Total particulate P concentrations increased from 0.05 ??mol L-1 to 0.31 ??mol L -1 along the P-enrichment gradient. Particles contained from 20% to 43% of total P but <12% of total N in surface water. Dissolved (<0.2 ??m) organic N contained about 90% of total N, with the 3-100-kDa colloidal size class containing the most N of any size class. The 0.45-2.7-??m size fraction held the most particulate P at all sites, whereas particulate N was most abundant in the 2.7-10-??m size class at most sites. Standard chemical fractionation of particles identified acid-hydrolyzable P as the most abundant species of particulate P, with little reactive or refractory organic P. Sequential chemical extraction revealed that about 65% of total particulate P was microbial, while about 25% was associated with humic and fulvic organic matter. The size and chemical fractionation information suggested that P-rich particles mostly consisted of suspended bacteria. Suspended particles in Everglades wetlands were small in size and had low concentrations, yet they stored a large proportion of surface-water P in intermediately reactive forms, but they held little N. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  7. Sampling of respirable isocyanate particles.

    PubMed

    Gylestam, Daniel; Gustavsson, Marcus; Karlsson, Daniel; Dalene, Marianne; Skarping, Gunnar

    2014-04-01

    An advanced design of a denuder impactor (DI) sampler has been developed for characterization of possible airborne isocyanate exposure in different particle size fractions. The sampler is equipped with 12 different parallel denuder tubes, 4 impaction stages with the cut-off values (d50) of: 9.5, 4, 2.5 and 1 µm, and an end filter that collects particles < 1 µm. All collecting parts were impregnated with di-n-butylamine DBA as the reagent in a mixture with acetic acid. The performance of the DI sampler was studied on a standard atmosphere containing gas and particulate isocyanates. The isocyanate atmosphere was generated by liquid permeation of 2,4-, 2,6-Toluene Diisocyanate (TDI), 1,6-Hexamethylene Diisocyanate (HDI) and Isophorone Diisocyanate (IPDI). 4,4'-Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (MDI) particles were generated by heating of technical MDI and condensing the mixture of gas and particle-borne MDI in an atmosphere containing mixed salt particles. The study was performed in a 0.85 m3 environmental chamber with stainless steel walls. With the advancement of the DI sampler it is now possible to collect isocyanate particle samples for up to 320 min. The performance of the DI sampler is essentially unaffected by the humidity. The DI sampler and the ASSET EZ4-NCO sampler (Sigma-Aldrich/Supelco, Bellefonte, PA, USA) gave similar results. Sample losses within the DI sampler are low. In the environmental chamber it was observed that the particle distribution may be affected by the humidity and ageing. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to separate a flow of selected fractions containing MDI particles from mixed MDI and salt particles. The particle-size distribution had a maximum at about 300 nm, but later in the environmental chamber 1 µm dominated. The distribution was very different as compared to with only NaCl or MDI present. The biological relevance for studying isocyanate nano particles is significant as these have the possibility to reach the

  8. Settling classes for fine suspended particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brach-Papa, Christophe; Boyer, Patrick; Ternat, Fabien; Amielh, Muriel; Anselmet, Fabien

    2006-08-01

    The modelling of pollutant transfer in freshwater systems can be refined by considering the heterogeneities of the sedimentary dynamics and of the chemical reactivities of fine suspended particles. One of the first steps is the fractionation of these fine particles into effective settling classes. Although several methods exist, most of them are based on either granulometric considerations and/or arbitrary threshold criteria. This article presents the bases of an experimental method focusing on the direct measurement of the settling velocities without considering the granulometry and/nor any threshold criteria. The experimental work consists in recording the temporal evolution of the vertical distribution of the suspended solid concentration in a settling tank. A mathematical analysis provides the number of particle groups, and the mass contribution and the settling velocity for each This procedure is described and applied for validation, as a first step, to calibrated suspensions. Additional work is needed for a further analysis of the physical constraints involved in the model, as well as for more extensive experimental validation. To cite this article: C. Brach-Papa et al., C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  9. Exposure to carbon monoxide, respirable suspended particulates, and volatile organic compounds while commuting by bicycle

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, M.A.J.; Proctor, C.J.; Baker-Rogers, J.; Warren, N.D. )

    1991-04-01

    A portable air sampling system has been used to assess exposures to various substances while commuting by bicycle in an urban area. The major source of pollutants in this situation is motor vehicle exhaust emissions. Carbon monoxide, measured by electrochemical detection, was found at peak concentrations in excess of 62 ppm, with mean values over 16 individual 35-mm journeys being 10.5 ppm. Respirable suspended particulates, averaged over each journey period, were found at higher concentrations (mean 130 {mu}g m{sup {minus}3}) than would be expected in indoor situations. Mean exposure to benzene (at 56 {mu}g m{sup {minus}3}) and other aromatic volatile organic compounds was also relatively high. The influence of wind conditions on exposure was found to be significant. Commuting exposures to carbon monoxide, respirable suspended particulates, and aromatic VOCs were found to be higher than exposures in a busy high street and on common parkland.

  10. Pyrogenic effect of respirable road dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardena, Umesh; Tollemark, Linda; Tagesson, Christer; Leanderson, Per

    2009-02-01

    Because pyrogenic (fever-inducing) compounds on ambient particles may play an important role for particle toxicity, simple methods to measure pyrogens on particles are needed. Here we have used a modified in vitro pyrogen test (IPT) to study the release of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in whole human blood exposed to respirable road-dust particles (RRDP). Road dusts were collected from the roadside at six different streets in three Swedish cities and particles with a diameter less than 10 μm (RRDP) were prepared by a water sedimentation procedure followed by lyophilisation. RRDP (200 μl of 1 - 106 ng/ml) were mixed with 50 μl whole blood and incubated at 37 °C overnight before IL-1β was analysed with chemiluminescence ELISA in 384-well plates. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella minnesota), zymosan B and Curdlan (P-1,3-glucan) were used as positive controls. All RRDP samples had a pyrogenic effect and the most active sample produced 1.6 times more IL-1β than the least active. This formation was of the same magnitude as in samples with 10 ng LPS/ml and was larger than that evoked by zymosan B and Curdlan (by mass basis). The method was sensitive enough to determine formation of IL-1β in mixtures with 10 ng RRDP/ml or 0.01 ng LPS/ml. The endotoxin inhibitor, polymyxin B (10 μg/ml), strongly reduced the RRDP-induced formation of IL-1β at 1μg RRDP/ml (around 80 % inhibition), but had only marginal or no effects at higher RRDP-concentrations (10 and 100 μg /ml). In summary, all RRDP tested had a clear pyrogen effect in this in vitro model. Endotoxin on the particles but also other factors contributed to the pyrogenic effect. As opposed to the limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay (which measures endotoxin alone), IPT measures a broad range of pyrogens that may be present on particulate matter. The IPT method thus affords a simple, sensitive and quantitative determination of the total pyrogenic potential of ambient particles.

  11. System for concentrating and analyzing particles suspended in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Fiechtner, Gregory J [Bethesda, MD; Cummings, Eric B [Livermore, CA; Singh, Anup K [Danville, CA

    2011-04-26

    Disclosed is a device for separating and concentrating particles suspended in a fluid stream by using dielectrophoresis (DEP) to trap and/or deflect those particles as they migrate through a fluid channel. The method uses fluid channels designed to constrain a liquid flowing through it to uniform electrokinetic flow velocities. This behavior is achieved by connecting deep and shallow sections of channels, with the channel depth varying abruptly along an interface. By careful design of abrupt changes in specific permeability at the interface, an abrupt and spatially uniform change in electrokinetic force can be selected. Because these abrupt interfaces also cause a sharp gradient in applied electric fields, a DEP force also can be established along the interface. Depending on the complex conductivity of the suspended particles and the immersion liquid, the DEP force can controllably complement or oppose the local electrokinetic force transporting the fluid through the channel allowing for manipulation of particles suspended in the transporting liquid.

  12. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Möhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging.

  13. Exposure to Inhalable, Respirable, and Ultrafine Particles in Welding Fume

    PubMed Central

    Pesch, Beate

    2012-01-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m−3 for inhalable and 1.29 mg m−3 for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m−3). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging. PMID:22539559

  14. Depth-resolved particle-associated microbial respiration in the northeast Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, Anna; Iversen, Morten; Giering, Sarah; Riou, Virginie; Henson, Stephanie A.; Berline, Leo; Guilloux, Loic; Sanders, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide are tightly linked to the depth at which sinking particulate organic carbon (POC) is remineralised in the ocean. Rapid attenuation of downward POC flux typically occurs in the upper mesopelagic (top few hundred metres of the water column), with much slower loss rates deeper in the ocean. Currently, we lack understanding of the processes that drive POC attenuation, resulting in large uncertainties in the mesopelagic carbon budget. Attempts to balance the POC supply to the mesopelagic with respiration by zooplankton and microbes rarely succeed. Where a balance has been found, depth-resolved estimates reveal large compensating imbalances in the upper and lower mesopelagic. In particular, it has been suggested that respiration by free-living microbes and zooplankton in the upper mesopelagic are too low to explain the observed flux attenuation of POC within this layer. We test the hypothesis that particle-associated microbes contribute significantly to community respiration in the mesopelagic, measuring particle-associated microbial respiration of POC in the northeast Atlantic through shipboard measurements on individual marine snow aggregates collected at depth (36-500 m). We find very low rates of both absolute and carbon-specific particle-associated microbial respiration (< 3 % d-1), suggesting that this term cannot solve imbalances in the upper mesopelagic POC budget. The relative importance of particle-associated microbial respiration increases with depth, accounting for up to 33 % of POC loss in the mid-mesopelagic (128-500 m). We suggest that POC attenuation in the upper mesopelagic (36-128 m) is driven by the transformation of large, fast-sinking particles to smaller, slow-sinking and suspended particles via processes such as zooplankton fragmentation and solubilisation, and that this shift to non-sinking POC may help to explain imbalances in the mesopelagic carbon budget.

  15. IUTAM symposium on hydrodynamic diffusion of suspended particles

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrodynamic diffusion refers to the fluctuating motion of nonBrownian particles (or droplets or bubbles) which occurs in a dispersion due to multiparticle interactions. For example, in a concentrated sheared suspension, particles do not move along streamlines but instead exhibit fluctuating motions as they tumble around each other. This leads to a net migration of particles down gradients in particle concentration and in shear rate, due to the higher frequency of encounters of a test particle with other particles on the side of the test particle which has higher concentration or shear rate. As another example, suspended particles subject to sedimentation, centrifugation, or fluidization, do not generally move relative to the fluid with a constant velocity, but instead experience diffusion-like fluctuations in velocity due to interactions with neighboring particles and the resulting variation in the microstructure or configuration of the suspended particles. In flowing granular materials, the particles interact through direct collisions or contacts (rather than through the surrounding fluid); these collisions also cause the particles to undergo fluctuating motions characteristic of diffusion processes. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. IUTAM symposium on hydrodynamic diffusion of suspended particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. H. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    Hydrodynamic diffusion refers to the fluctuating motion of nonBrownian particles (or droplets or bubbles) which occurs in a dispersion due to multiparticle interactions. For example, in a concentrated sheared suspension, particles do not move along streamlines but instead exhibit fluctuating motions as they tumble around each other. This leads to a net migration of particles down gradients in particle concentration and in shear rate, due to the higher frequency of encounters of a test particle with other particles on the side of the test particle which has higher concentration or shear rate. As another example, suspended particles subject to sedimentation, centrifugation, or fluidization, do not generally move relative to the fluid with a constant velocity, but instead experience diffusion-like fluctuations in velocity due to interactions with neighboring particles and the resulting variation in the microstructure or configuration of the suspended particles. In flowing granular materials, the particles interact through direct collisions or contacts (rather than through the surrounding fluid); these collisions also cause the particles to undergo fluctuating motions characteristic of diffusion processes. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. Suspended Particles: Their Role in Estuarine Biogeochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A.; Millward, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    Suspended particles are instrumental in controlling the reactivity, transport and biological impacts of substances in aquatic environments, and provide a crucial link for chemical constituents between the water column, bed sediment and food chain. This article reviews the role of suspended particles in the chemical and biological cycling of trace constituents (trace metals, organo-metallic compounds and hydrophobic organic micropollutants; HOMs) in estuaries, with particular emphasis on the effects of and changes to particle reactivity and composition. The partitioning (or distribution coefficient, KD ) and bioavailability of chemical constituents, and assimilation efficiency (AE) of such by bivalve suspension feeders, are identified as key parameters requiring definition for accurate biogeochemical modelling, and the discussion centres around the determination of and controls on these parameters. Particle-water interactions encompass a variety of physical, biological, electrostatic and hydrophobic effects, and are largely dependent on the character and concentration of suspended particles and salinity. The salinity-dependence results from the competing and complexing effects of seawater ions for trace metals, and the compression of water in the presence of dissolved seawater ions and consequent salting out of neutral solute (HOMs, organo-metallic compounds and some trace metal complexes). The extent of biological solubilization of chemical constituents from suspended particles is dependent on the nature of chemical components of the gastro-intestinal environment and their interactions with ingested particles, and the physiological (e.g. gut passage time) and chemical (e.g. redox conditions and pH) constraints imposed on these interactions. Generally, chemicals that associate with fine, organic-rich particles (or, for some HOMs, fine inorganic particles), and desorb at pH 5-6 and/or complex with digestive enzymes or surfactants are most readily solubilized in the

  18. Suspended onion particles and potential corneal injury in onion harvesters.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yaw-Huei; Chou, En-Ju; Chang, Ching-Wen; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Ho, Chi-Kung; Chou, Chih-Liang; Lee, Zhih-Young; Tseng, Chi-Ting

    2002-01-01

    The authors suspected that suspended onion particles contributed to corneal ulcers in onion harvesters in southern Taiwan. In the present study, the authors used manikins to study suspended onion particles in fields in an effort to simulate typical conditions experienced by onion harvesters. An animal eye-exposure simulation study was also performed by the authors, who impacted suspended soil grains or onion particles onto the corneas of guinea pigs via aerosol generated from the Palas dispersion nozzle. The average size of 25.9 pm for suspended particles collected during the digging of onions was the largest one of those for various harvesting activities. Some onion skin flakes were found in samples obtained from gathering and packing activities; the typical flake size was approximately 3.5 x 2.5 mm2. The results of the animal study indicated that the size of soil grains has a demonstrable effect on the severity of corneal injury (p = .009). With respect to onion skin flakes, wind velocity was also associated significantly with the occurrence of corneal injury (p = .0004). A wind velocity threshold of 7 m/sec is recommended for the maintenance of safety, and if the wind speed exceeds this threshold level, workers should not engage in harvesting activities. Furthermore, use of appropriately designed goggles is necessary for the protection of onion harvesters who work in high-wind conditions.

  19. Identifying anthropogenic and natural influences on extreme pollution of respirable suspended particulates in Beijing using backward trajectory analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Miao, Weijie; Liu, Bing; Dai, Wei; Cai, Xuhui

    2008-06-15

    In China, daily respirable suspended particulate (RSP, particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 10 microm) concentrations exceeding 420 microg m(-3) are considered "hazardous" to health. These can lead to the premature onset of certain diseases and premature death of sick and elderly people; even healthy people are warned to avoid outdoor activity when RSP concentrations are high. Such high pollution levels are defined as extreme RSP pollution events. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that a distinct difference exists between the health effects caused by natural sources and anthropogenic sources, mandating knowledge of the source of extreme RSP pollution. Twenty-six extreme RSP pollution events were recorded in Beijing from January 2003 to December 2006. The HYSPLIT4 (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model (Version 4) was used to discriminate the sources of these extreme RSP pollution events. The model found that twelve events were caused from natural sources (dust storms), nine events from anthropogenic sources (e.g., vehicles and industrial activities, etc.) under quasi-quiescent weather, and five events were from mixed causes. Identifying such events will be valuable in epidemiological studies on air pollution in Beijing.

  20. Planktivorous Fish Recognize Temporal Motion Patterns of Suspended Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickler, J. R.; Tsonis, A.

    2004-12-01

    Small planktivorous fish feed by selective captures of individual zooplankters. We realize that: 1) the predator, as well as the prey is suspended in the water column, which does not provide either with stable reference points; 2) the ambient flow field acts differently on the larger predators than on the much smaller prey; and 3) within the water column there are many suspended particles of lower nutritional value than the zooplankters represent. We investigated in the laboratory whether or not fish can distinguish between small targets moving with different swimming patterns, e.g. particles entrained passively in the ambient water flow versus entrained but actively swimming particles. We created in an aquarium computer-animated stimuli with motion patterns ranging from random to actual swimming motions of live animals. The results show that planktivorous fish can recognize temporal patterns in a visually homogeneous environment. Therefore, blue-water fish must process visual information similar to terrestrial animals processing auditory information.

  1. Ultrafine and respirable particles in an automotive grey iron foundry.

    PubMed

    Evans, Douglas E; Heitbrink, William A; Slavin, Thomas J; Peters, Thomas M

    2008-01-01

    Ultrafine particle number and respirable particle mass concentrations were measured throughout an automotive grey iron foundry during winter, spring and summer using a particle concentration mapping procedure. Substantial temporal and spatial variability was observed in all seasons and attributed, in part, to the batch nature of operations, process emission variability and frequent work interruptions. The need for fine mapping grids was demonstrated, where elevations in particle concentrations were highly localized. Ultrafine particle concentrations were generally greatest during winter when incoming make-up air was heated with direct fire, natural gas burners. Make-up air drawn from roof level had elevated respirable mass and ultrafine number concentrations above ambient outdoor levels, suggesting inadvertent recirculation of foundry process emissions. Elevated respirable mass concentrations were highly localized on occasions (e.g. abrasive blasting and grinding), depended on the area within the facility where measurements were obtained, but were largely unaffected by season. Particle sources were further characterized by measuring their respective number and mass concentrations by particle size. Sources that contributed to ultrafine particles included process-specific sources (e.g. melting and pouring operations), and non-process sources (e.g. direct fire natural gas heating units, a liquid propane-fuelled sweeper and cigarette smoking) were additionally identified.

  2. Ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression

    PubMed Central

    Fent, Kenneth W.

    2015-01-01

    Vehicle fires are a common occurrence, yet few studies have reported exposures associated with burning vehicles. This article presents an assessment of firefighters’ potential for ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression training. Fires were initiated within the engine compartment and passenger cabins of three salvaged vehicles, with subsequent water suppression by fire crews. Firefighter exposures were monitored with an array of direct reading particle and air quality instruments. A flexible metallic duct and blower drew contaminants to the instrument array, positioned at a safe distance from the burning vehicles, with the duct inlet positioned at the nozzle operator’s shoulder. The instruments measured the particle number, active surface area, respirable particle mass, photoelectric response, aerodynamic particle size distributions, and air quality parameters. Although vehicle fires were suppressed quickly (<10 minutes), firefighters may be exposed to short duration, high particle concentration episodes during fire suppression, which are orders of magnitude greater than the ambient background concentration. A maximum transient particle concentration of 1.21 × 107 particles per cm3, 170 mg m−3 respirable particle mass, 4700 μm2 cm−3 active surface area and 1400 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response were attained throughout the series of six fires. Expressed as fifteen minute time-weighted averages, engine compartment fires averaged 5.4 × 104 particles per cm3, 0.36 mg m−3 respirable particle mass, 92 μm2 cm−3 active particle surface area and 29 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Similarly, passenger cabin fires averaged 2.04 × 105 particles per cm3, 2.7 mg m−3 respirable particle mass, 320 μm2 cm−3 active particle surface area, and 34 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Passenger cabin fires were a greater potential source of exposure than engine compartment fires. The wind direction

  3. Ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression.

    PubMed

    Evans, Douglas E; Fent, Kenneth W

    2015-10-01

    Vehicle fires are a common occurrence, yet few studies have reported exposures associated with burning vehicles. This article presents an assessment of firefighters' potential for ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression training. Fires were initiated within the engine compartment and passenger cabins of three salvaged vehicles, with subsequent water suppression by fire crews. Firefighter exposures were monitored with an array of direct reading particle and air quality instruments. A flexible metallic duct and blower drew contaminants to the instrument array, positioned at a safe distance from the burning vehicles, with the duct inlet positioned at the nozzle operator's shoulder. The instruments measured the particle number, active surface area, respirable particle mass, photoelectric response, aerodynamic particle size distributions, and air quality parameters. Although vehicle fires were suppressed quickly (<10 minutes), firefighters may be exposed to short duration, high particle concentration episodes during fire suppression, which are orders of magnitude greater than the ambient background concentration. A maximum transient particle concentration of 1.21 × 10(7) particles per cm(3), 170 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 4700 μm(2) cm(-3) active surface area and 1400 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response were attained throughout the series of six fires. Expressed as fifteen minute time-weighted averages, engine compartment fires averaged 5.4 × 10(4) particles per cm(3), 0.36 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 92 μm(2) cm(-3) active particle surface area and 29 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Similarly, passenger cabin fires averaged 2.04 × 10(5) particles per cm(3), 2.7 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 320 μm(2) cm(-3) active particle surface area, and 34 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Passenger cabin fires were a greater potential source of exposure than engine compartment fires. The

  4. Ratios of total suspended solids to suspended sediment concentrations by particle size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selbig, W.R.; Bannerman, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    Wet-sieving sand-sized particles from a whole storm-water sample before splitting the sample into laboratory-prepared containers can reduce bias and improve the precision of suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC). Wet-sieving, however, may alter concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) because the analytical method used to determine TSS may not have included the sediment retained on the sieves. Measuring TSS is still commonly used by environmental managers as a regulatory metric for solids in storm water. For this reason, a new method of correlating concentrations of TSS and SSC by particle size was used to develop a series of correction factors for SSC as a means to estimate TSS. In general, differences between TSS and SSC increased with greater particle size and higher sand content. Median correction factors to SSC ranged from 0.29 for particles larger than 500m to 0.85 for particles measuring from 32 to 63m. Great variability was observed in each fraction-a result of varying amounts of organic matter in the samples. Wide variability in organic content could reduce the transferability of the correction factors. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  5. Drift of suspended ferromagnetic particles due to the Magnus effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, S. I.; Pedchenko, B. O.

    2017-01-01

    A minimal system of equations is introduced and applied to study the drift motion of ferromagnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid and subjected to a time-periodic driving force and a nonuniformly rotating magnetic field. It is demonstrated that the synchronized translational and rotational oscillations of these particles are accompanied by their drift in a preferred direction, which occurs under the action of the Magnus force. We calculate both analytically and numerically the drift velocity of particles characterized by single-domain cores and nonmagnetic shells and show that there are two types of drift, unidirectional and bidirectional, which can be realized in suspensions composed of particles with different core-shell ratios. The possibility of using the phenomenon of bidirectional drift for the separation of core-shell particles in suspensions is also discussed.

  6. Sub-10-Micron and Respirable Particles in Lunar Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Bonnie L.; McKay, D. S.; Riofrio, L. M.; Taylor, L. A.; Gonzalez, C. P.

    2010-01-01

    Based on published lunar soil grain size distribution data, we estimate that 1-3% of the mass of typical mature lunar soils is comprised of grains less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter. These particles are in the respirable range (small enough to be inhaled). Estimates are used because the early methods of obtaining grain size distributions did not give reliable results below about 10 micrometers. Grain size analyses of Apollo 11 soil 10084 by a laser diffraction technique shows that this soil contains roughly 2% by volume in the respirable grain size, in agreement with our prior estimate.

  7. Statistical models for the prediction of respirable suspended particulate matter in urban cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, P.; Chan, Andy T.; Jaiswal, Neeru

    Particulate matters (PM) constitute a major concern for air quality of metropolitan cities. In this paper, the problem of air quality forecasting of respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM) based on some meteorological factors has been discussed. The present work deals with the application of three statistical models to forecast daily averaged concentration of RSPM in urban Delhi and Hong Kong. Model 1 is based on multiple linear regression of meteorological parameters, model 2 is based on Box-Jenkins time series auto regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model and model 3 is a combination of the two. A detailed analysis of results of above models shows that the combination of ARIMA and multiple regression (model 3) gives better results in comparison to the other two models with respect to observed data. Thus the model 3 has been used, in the present study, to forecast the air quality of Delhi and Hong Kong with respect to RSPM. It has been concluded that the same model may be used as a practical prognostic model for prediction of RSPM in urban cities.

  8. Comparative damage to alveolar macrophages after phagocytosis of respirable particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.O.; Gray, R.H.; DeNee, P.B.; Newton, G.J.

    1982-02-01

    Backscatter electron and secondary electron imaging were used in a scanning electron microscope study of the in vitro toxic effects of particles ingested by alveolar macrophages. Relatively nontoxic aluminosilicate fly ash particles from the Mount St. Helens eruption and from a coal-fired power plant as well as toxic quartz particles from the Westphalia (Germany) mine deposits were readily taken up by macrophages. The presence of fly ash particles inside the cells was not associated with any changes in surface morphology. The presence of intracellular quartz particles, on the other hand, was correlated with damage to the cell membrane as determined by alterations in surface morphology, uptake of trypan blue, and release of the cytoplasmic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase. The use of backscatter electron imaging is useful in scanning electron microscope studies which attempt to establish cause and effect relationships between exposure to respirable particles and the morphological and cytotoxic response.

  9. Confidence in climate models including those with suspended particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reck, Ruth A.

    1982-05-01

    Confidence in the predictions of atmospheric models is limited, (1) by the uncertainty in our knowledge of the existing atmospheric system as it is defined by input data, and (2) by the ability of the model to describe all pertinent atmospheric processes. This paper describes a thermal sensitivity study of the global parameters in one version of the Manabe-Wetherald radiative-convective model which inclkudes Mie scattering particles. The relative importance of the usual global model parameters is identified in addition to other atmospheric constituents not commonly included in climate models. In particular this work emphasizes the role of Mie scattering suspended aerosol particles, a component which is seldom included in climate models. Here we discuss the major sources of particles, how the optical properties of individual particles determine the radiative effects of a particle layer, and also illustrate the separate role of absorption and backscatter in determining the sign of the surface temperature change. In addition, the coupling of the particle effects to surface albedo is indicated. Finally, the sign of the surface temperature change from anthropogenic particles is estimated using (1) global maps of particle abundance developed by Kellogg, (2) previous calculations for the Northern Hemisphere published by the author and (3) the surface albedo maps of Hummel and Reck.

  10. A direct simulation method for flows with suspended paramagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Tae Gon; Hulsen, Martien A. Toonder, Jaap M.J. den; Anderson, Patrick D.; Meijer, Han E.H.

    2008-04-20

    A direct numerical simulation method based on the Maxwell stress tensor and a fictitious domain method has been developed to solve flows with suspended paramagnetic particles. The numerical scheme enables us to take into account both hydrodynamic and magnetic interactions between particles in a fully coupled manner. Particles are assumed to be non-Brownian with negligible inertia. Rigid body motions of particles in 2D are described by a rigid-ring description implemented by Lagrange multipliers. The magnetic force, acting on the particles due to magnetic fields, is represented by the divergence of the Maxwell stress tensor, which acts as a body force added to the momentum balance equation. Focusing on two-dimensional problems, we solve a single-particle problem for verification. With the magnetic force working on the particle, the proper number of collocation points is found to be two points per element. The convergence with mesh refinement is verified by comparing results from regular mesh problems with those from a boundary-fitted mesh problem as references. We apply the developed method to two application problems: two-particle interaction in a uniform magnetic field and the motion of a magnetic chain in a rotating field, demonstrating the capability of the method to tackle general problems. In the motion of a magnetic chain, especially, the deformation pattern at break-up is similar to the experimentally observed one. The present formulation can be extended to three-dimensional and viscoelastic flow problems.

  11. Photoacoustic study on the possible components of total suspended particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidong; Huang, Zuohua; Tang, Zhilie

    2006-02-01

    Total suspended particles (TSP) are one of the main atmospheric pollutants. The ingredients are very complex, mainly including black carbon (C),organic compound, inorganic compound and biologic component, which will do great harm to human's health. During environmental monitoring, the airborne suspended particle always is an index for evaluating the quality of atmosphere. In this article, possible mixture of TSP is proposed to determine its ingredients and content by photoacoustic spectroscopy. The normalized photoacoustic (PA) signal of the sulfur powder, mixtures of sulfur and black carbon in different proportions are obtained respectively. Simulation with linear equation says that the PA signal has a certain relationship with the content of sample. The normalized PA spectroscopy of various materials is acquired via examining the sample of the powder of cupric sulfate mixed with nitro compound (2, 5 -methoxybenzoic-4nitro-dehyde), Portland cement, residual particles of automobile exhaust pipe, ash of power plant's stocks. The experimental results have important reference value to the practical analysis of TSP, it also provides new possible methodology to the environmental monitoring.

  12. Electrooptical behaviour and control of a suspended particle device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergaz, R.; Pena, J. M. S.; Barrios, D.; Pérez, I.; Torres, J. C.

    2007-09-01

    A suspended particle device is made by electrophoretic rod-shape particles suspended in an organic gel. These particles can twist and order with an applied voltage. The light crossing the material suffers more or less scattering according to that voltage. A commercial device is analyzed in this work. Several electrical models are tested, being the best one a series configuration including a shunt double layer capacitance and a Warburg element. Main parameter errors are below 2%, showing the quality of this new electrical model for this kind of devices. A quick method to improve the manufacturing process on-line is also proposed. Impedance measurements will be fitted to the selected electrical model, in order to check physical aspects such as charge diffusion lengths and response times. An electronic driver to obtain several levels of device transmission has been also developed, being its linearity demonstrated too. Colour changes are negligible for the main part of the bleaching process. All these features allow the use of this set in domotics application.

  13. Rheology of cubic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid.

    PubMed

    Cwalina, Colin D; Harrison, Kelsey J; Wagner, Norman J

    2016-05-18

    Many real-world industrial processes involve non-spherical particles suspended in a fluid medium. Knowledge of the flow behavior of these suspensions is essential for optimizing their transport properties and designing processing equipment. In the present work, we explore and report on the rheology of concentrated suspensions of cubic-shaped colloidal particles under steady and dynamic shear flow. These suspensions exhibit a rich non-Newtonian rheology that includes shear thickening and normal stress differences at high shear stresses. Scalings are proposed to connect the material properties of these suspensions of cubic particle to those measured for suspensions of spherical particles. Negative first normal stress differences indicate that lubrication hydrodynamic forces dominate the stress in the shear-thickened state. Accounting for the increased lubrication hydrodynamic interactions between the flat surfaces of the cubic particles allows for a quantitative comparison of the deviatoric stress in the shear-thickened state to that of spherical particles. New semi-empirical models for the viscosity and normal stress difference coefficients are presented for the shear-thickened state. The results of this study indicate that cubic particles offer new and unique opportunities to formulate colloidal dispersions for field-responsive materials.

  14. Partitioning of copper to suspended particles in surface water

    SciTech Connect

    Grassi, M.T.; Shi, B.; Allen, H.E.

    1995-12-31

    The recent recommendation that Water Quality Criteria for metals be implemented based on dissolved, rather than total recoverable metal, requires significant new understanding of the role of particulate matter in surface waters. Principal factors controlling the distribution of metal between the particles and the water include suspended solids concentration, the solution pH, and the concentrations of dissolved and particulate organic carbon. The authors have investigated these variables in the laboratory to develop predictions of partitioning in natural waters. Particulate water was concentrated from the Delaware River. The binding of copper was studied as a function of solution pH. Both inorganic copper and copper contained in sewage effluent was added.

  15. Characterizing the kinetics of suspended cylindrical particles by polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ran; Ou, Xueheng; Ma, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Polarization has promising potential to retrieve the information of the steady samples, such as tissues. However, for the fast changing sample such as the suspended algae in the water, the kinetics of the particles also influence the scattered polarization. The present paper will show our recent results to extract the information about the kinetics of the suspended cylindrical particles by polarization measurements. The sample is the aqueous suspension of the glass fibers stirred by a magnetic stirrer. We measure the scattered polarization of the fibers by use of a simultaneous polarization measurement system and obtain the time series of two orthogonal polarization components. By use of correlation analysis, we obtain the time parameters from the auto-correlation functions of the polarization components, and observe the changes with the stirring speeds. Results show that these time parameters indicate the immigration of the fibers. After discussion, we find that they may further characterize the kinetics, including the translation and rotation, of the glass fibers in the fluid field.

  16. Performance of high flow rate samplers for respirable particle collection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taekhee; Kim, Seung Won; Chisholm, William P; Slaven, James; Harper, Martin

    2010-08-01

    The American Conference of Governmental Industrial hygienists (ACGIH) lowered the threshold limit value (TLV) for respirable crystalline silica (RCS) exposure from 0.05 to 0.025 mg m(-3) in 2006. For a working environment with an airborne dust concentration near this lowered TLV, the sample collected with current standard respirable aerosol samplers might not provide enough RCS for quantitative analysis. Adopting high flow rate sampling devices for respirable dust containing silica may provide a sufficient amount of RCS to be above the limit of quantification even for samples collected for less than full shift. The performances of three high flow rate respirable samplers (CIP10-R, GK2.69, and FSP10) have been evaluated in this study. Eleven different sizes of monodisperse aerosols of ammonium fluorescein were generated with a vibrating orifice aerosol generator in a calm air chamber in order to determine the sampling efficiency of each sampler. Aluminum oxide particles generated by a fluidized bed aerosol generator were used to test (i) the uniformity of a modified calm air chamber, (ii) the effect of loading on the sampling efficiency, and (iii) the performance of dust collection compared to lower flow rate cyclones in common use in the USA (10-mm nylon and Higgins-Dewell cyclones). The coefficient of variation for eight simultaneous samples in the modified calm air chamber ranged from 1.9 to 6.1% for triplicate measures of three different aerosols. The 50% cutoff size ((50)d(ae)) of the high flow rate samplers operated at the flow rates recommended by manufacturers were determined as 4.7, 4.1, and 4.8 microm for CIP10-R, GK2.69, and FSP10, respectively. The mass concentration ratio of the high flow rate samplers to the low flow rate cyclones decreased with decreasing mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and high flow rate samplers collected more dust than low flow rate samplers by a range of 2-11 times based on gravimetric analysis. Dust loading inside the

  17. Restoring number of suspended particles in ocean using satellite optical images and forecasting particle fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haltrin, Vladimir I.; Arnone, Robert A.; Flynn, Peter; Casey, Brandon; Weidemann, Alan D.; Ko, Dong-Shang

    2007-04-01

    A method to retrieve concentrations of suspended large and small particles in seawater from satellite images is proposed. The method uses as input images of scattering and backscattering coefficients in several satellite channels as well as an image of concentration of chlorophyll. All these three properties are derived using an atmospheric correction algorithm and algorithms to derive inherent optical properties from remote sensing reflectance. The proposed method is based on several approaches developed previously by Twardowski et al, van de Huist, and Evans and Fournier and is based on Mie theory. The proposed method was applied to restore a number of suspended particles and their dynamics in ocean using SeaWIFs satellite optical images.

  18. Event-based total suspended sediment particle size distribution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jennifer; Sattar, Ahmed M. A.; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Warner, Richard C.

    2016-05-01

    One of the most challenging modelling tasks in hydrology is prediction of the total suspended sediment particle size distribution (TSS-PSD) in stormwater runoff generated from exposed soil surfaces at active construction sites and surface mining operations. The main objective of this study is to employ gene expression programming (GEP) and artificial neural networks (ANN) to develop a new model with the ability to more accurately predict the TSS-PSD by taking advantage of both event-specific and site-specific factors in the model. To compile the data for this study, laboratory scale experiments using rainfall simulators were conducted on fourteen different soils to obtain TSS-PSD. This data is supplemented with field data from three construction sites in Ontario over a period of two years to capture the effect of transport and deposition within the site. The combined data sets provide a wide range of key overlooked site-specific and storm event-specific factors. Both parent soil and TSS-PSD in runoff are quantified by fitting each to a lognormal distribution. Compared to existing regression models, the developed model more accurately predicted the TSS-PSD using a more comprehensive list of key model input parameters. Employment of the new model will increase the efficiency of deployment of required best management practices, designed based on TSS-PSD, to minimize potential adverse effects of construction site runoff on aquatic life in the receiving watercourses.

  19. Hydrodynamic controls on respiration in the Amazon River and the importance of particle interactions on organic matter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, N. D.; Sawakuchi, H. O.; Bianchi, T. S.; Gagne-Maynard, W.; Neu, V.; da Silva, D. F.; Diniz, J. E. D. M.; de Matos Valerio, A.; Cunha, A. C.; Brito, D. C.; da Silva, R.; Krusche, A. V.; Richey, J. E.; Keil, R. G.

    2016-12-01

    Microbial decomposition of terrestrial and aquatic organic matter (OM) drives an evasive CO2gas flux from the world's inland waters comparable to the amount of anthropogenic carbon absorbed by the terrestrial biosphere. However, the physical factors regulating aquatic respiration rates are not well understood and traditional respiration experiments have not satisfactorily represented the turbulent conditions that microbes experience in large rivers. We hypothesize that interactions between the OM/microbes associated with particles and their free-living/dissolved counterparts such as exoenzyme activity, cometabolism, and priming effects are a critical factor controlling respiration rates. River velocity is directly linked to the abundance of particles that remain suspended, and as such, should regulate respiration accordingly. This study examines the influence of river velocity on aquatic respiration based on experiments performed in the lower Amazon River with stationary and rotating incubation chambers equipped with integrated O2 probes to monitor O2 drawdown in real-time. For all experiments performed there was a robust positive correlation between the rate at which chambers were spun and the measured respiration rate (r2 values ranged from 0.76 to 1.00). This relationship was then used to normalize respiration rates to instantaneous measurements of river velocity across each river channel. Whereas average respiration rates measured in traditional BOD bottles could only account for 12 ± 7% of the annual average CO2 outgassing rate measured along the lower Amazon River mainstem, respiration rates based on chambers spinning at 0.22 m s-1, 0.66 m s-1, and velocity-normalized calculations could account for 64 ± 22%, 104 ± 36%, and 130 ± 62% of the CO2 outgassing rate, respectively (average river velocity along the lower Amazon River was 0.98 ± 0.42 m s-1). During each sampling campaign there was a positive correlation with river velocity and in situ CO2

  20. The role of particle associated microbial respiration in mesopelagic particle flux attenuation in the NE Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, A.; Henson, S.; Sanders, R.; Lampitt, R. S.

    2016-02-01

    The oceanic uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) through the biological carbon pump is intrinsically linked to atmospheric levels of CO2 and hence global climate. Rapid changes in the flux of particulate organic carbon (POC) occur in the upper mesopelagic layer of the ocean, making it a key region for understanding both the current and future balance of oceanic and atmospheric CO2. However, the practical difficulties of making measurements in this dynamic upper region of the ocean mean that the mechanisms controlling both the magnitude and efficiency of the biologically driven carbon flux to the deep ocean are still poorly understood, in particular the relative contributions of zooplankton and microbes to POC remineralisation. Here we present the first vertical profile of particle associated microbial respiration calculated from direct measurements on individual marine snow aggregates collected in situ. Sinking particles were collected over the upper 500 m at a site in the NE Atlantic using Marine Snow Catchers, revealing a decline in POC flux of 76 %. To determine the role of particle associated microbial respiration in flux attenuation, we carried out micro-scale measurements of oxygen gradients through marine snow aggregates collected in situ. The calculated rates of microbial respiration cannot account for the observed steep declines in POC, explaining only 4 % of POC attenuation over the upper 130 m. However, 31 % of POC attenuation in the mesopelagic zone can be explained by particle associated microbial respiration, highlighting the increasing importance of microbial respiration deeper in the water column. Our results imply that zooplankton mediated processes, such as coprorhexy, coprophagy and coprochaly are therefore important drivers of POC flux attenuation in the upper mesopelagic.

  1. Dynamics of Single Chains of Suspended Ferrofluid Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutillas, S.; Liu, J.

    1999-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the dynamics of isolated chains made of super-paramagnetic particles under the influence of a magnetic field. The motivation of this work is to understand if the chain fluctuations exist and, if it does, how does the fluctuation affect chain aggregation. We find that single chains strongly fluctuate and that the characteristic frequency of their fluctuations is inversely proportional to the magnetic field strength. The higher the field the lower the characteristic frequency of the chain fluctuations. In the high magnetic field limit, chains behave like rigid rods without any internal motions. In this work, we used ferrofluid particles suspended in water. These particles do not have any intrinsic magnetization. Once a magnetic field is applied, a dipole moment is induced in each particle, proportional to the magnetic field. A dipolar magnetic interaction then occurs between particles. If dipole-dipole magnetic energy is higher than the thermal energy, the result is a structure change inside the dipolar fluid. The ratio of these two energies is expressed by a coupling constant lambda as: lambda = (pi(a(exp 3))(chi(exp 2))(mu(sub 0))(H(sub 0))(exp 2))/18kT Where a is the particle radius, mu(sub 0) is the vacuum magnetic permeability, H(sub 0) the applied magnetic field, k the Boltzmann constant and T the absolute temperature. If lambda > 1, magnetic particles form chains along the field direction. The lateral coalescence of several chains may form bigger aggregates especially if the particle volume fraction is high. While many studies and applications deal with the rheological properties and the structural changes of these dipolar fluids, this work focuses on the understanding of the chain dynamics. In order to probe the chain dynamics, we used dynamic light scattering (DLS) in self-beating mode as our experimental technique. The experimental geometry is such that the scattering plane is perpendicular to the magnetic field

  2. Relative Mesothelioma Potencies for Unregulated Respirable Elongated Mineral and Synthetic Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    For decades uncertainties and contradictions have surrounded the issue of whether exposures to respirable elongated mineral and synthetic particles (REMPs and RESPs) present health risks such as those recognized for exposures to elongated asbestiform mineral particles from the fi...

  3. Relative Mesothelioma Potencies for Unregulated Respirable Elongated Mineral and Synthetic Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    For decades uncertainties and contradictions have surrounded the issue of whether exposures to respirable elongated mineral and synthetic particles (REMPs and RESPs) present health risks such as those recognized for exposures to elongated asbestiform mineral particles from the fi...

  4. Particle Size and Structural Arrangement of Suspended Cohesive Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, X.; Zhang, G.; Reed, A. H.; Furukawa, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal environments are often characterized by high concentrations of cohesive sediments influenced by the loaded organic matter (particularly extracellular polymeric substances (EPS)), salt, and hydrodynamic disturbance. The size and structural variation of suspended cohesive sediments due to flocculation and/or disaggregation is of key importance for understanding a variety of sediment transport processes (e.g., settling, breakage, survivability) in littoral environments and the geotechnical/geophysical properties of the bottom bed. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of sediment floc behavior and correlate the clay-EPS-ion interaction mechanisms with their structures, a series of sediment samples were synthesized in laboratory using four pure clays (i.e., kaolinite, illite, Ca-montmorillonite, and Na-montmorillonite), three EPS (cationic, neutral, and anionic) at different concentrations, and saltwater of different salinity under different hydrodynamic conditions. Particle size analysis of the pure clays, clay-EPS, and clay-salt flocs under three hydrodynamic conditions demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory that pure clays and clay-EPS mixtures exhibit lognormal, multimodal (i.e., 2-4 levels consisting of primary particle, flocculi, microfloc, and macrofloc) particle size distributions (PSDs) within the size range of ~0.1 to ~500 μm. The presence of EPS causes the formation of macroflocs (>200 μm) and can significantly increase the mean particle size by several orders of magnitude through flocculation, assisted by electrostatic forces, ion-dipole, van der Waals forces, and other mechanisms. The change in size of the pure clay flocs in saltwater showed different trends: Due to the clays' different properties and interaction mechanisms with EPS, their PSDs and size changes are also different in different flow conditions: the hydrodynamic turbulence may promote the flocculation of Ca-montmorillonite, but break kaolinite and Na

  5. STABLE ISOTOPE VARIATIONS IN SUSPENDED PARTICLES IN A TEMPERATE NORTH PACIFIC ESTUARY, OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatial distributions of 13C and 15N in suspended particles were examined monthly over an annual cycle in the euphotic zone (0.5m) of the Yaquina River and Estuary, Oregon. Suspended organic matter in estuaries is a mixture of land-derived and oceanic carbon and nitrogen. In a...

  6. Suspended particle organic composition and cycling in surface and midwaters of the equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, C. C.; Lee, C.; Wakeham, S. G.; Bishop, J. K. B.

    2002-11-01

    In this study we relate spatial and temporal variation in the organic composition of suspended particles to current conceptual models of open-ocean particle cycling. Suspended particles in surface (0-200 m) and midwaters (200-1000 m) of the equatorial Pacific Ocean were collected during the 1992 US JGOFS Equatorial Pacific (EqPac) program. Samples collected during El Niño (Survey I) and normal conditions (Survey II) were analyzed for pigment, amino acid, fatty acid, and neutral lipid concentrations and compositions. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and other statistical methods were used to assess changes in particulate organic composition between Surveys I and II, over 24° of latitude, from 15 to 850 m depth, and to compare our compositional data with previously published data from EqPac sinking particles. These analyses indicated that surface suspended particles (0-200 m) were similar in composition to surface ocean phytoplankton and were less degraded than particles sinking out of the euphotic zone (105 m). The organic composition of suspended particles in surface waters varied with latitudinal and El-Niño-induced changes in phytoplankton assemblages. Midwater suspended particles (200-1000 m) contained labile phytodetrital material derived from particles exiting the euphotic zone (105 m). However, labile organic constituents of midwater suspended particles were increasingly degraded by microbes or consumed by midwater metazoans with depth. The increase in degradation state observed for midwater suspended particles may also have been caused by dilution of deeper (450-850 m) suspended particle pools with more refractory material originating from fast-sinking particles, e.g., fecal pellets. However, the mechanism controlling midwater particle degradation state varied with flux regime; dilution of midwater suspended particles dominated only in the higher flux regime found at equatorial latitudes (5°N-5°S) during Survey II (normal conditions). In summary, it

  7. Experimental investigation of suspended particles transport through porous media: particle and grain size effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quansheng; Cui, Xianze; Zhang, Chengyuan; Huang, Shibing

    2016-01-01

    Particle and grain size may influence the transportation and deposition characteristics of particles within pollutant transport and within granular filters that are typically used in wastewater treatment. We conducted two-dimensional sandbox experiments using quartz powder as the particles and quartz sand as the porous medium to study the response of transportation and deposition formation to changes in particle diameter (ds, with median diameter 18, 41, and 82 μm) and grain diameter (dp, with median diameter 0.36, 1.25, and 2.82 mm) considering a wide range of diameter ratios (ds/dp) from 0.0064 to 0.228. Particles were suspended in deionized water, and quartz sand was used as the porous medium, which was meticulously cleaned to minimize any physicochemical and impurities effects that could result in indeterminate results. After the experiments, the particle concentration of the effluent and particle mass per gram of dry sands were measured to explore changes in transportation and deposition characteristics under different conditions. In addition, a micro-analysis was conducted to better analyse the results on a mesoscopic scale. The experimental observation analyses indicate that different diameter ratios (ds/dp) may lead to different deposit formations. As ds/dp increased, the deposit formation changed from 'Random Deposition Type' to 'Gradient Deposition Type', and eventually became 'Inlet Deposition Type'.

  8. Suspended micro-sized PVC particles impair the performance and decrease survival in the Asian green mussel Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Rist, Sinja Elena; Assidqi, Khoirunnisa; Zamani, Neviaty Putri; Appel, Daniel; Perschke, Myriam; Huhn, Mareike; Lenz, Mark

    2016-10-15

    Marine bivalves are known to ingest microplastics, but information on the consequences for their physiological performance is limited. To investigate a potential exposure pathway that has not yet been addressed, we mimicked the resuspension of microplastics from the sediment in a laboratory exposure experiment. For this, we exposed the Asian green mussel Perna viridis to 4 concentrations (0mg/l, 21.6mg/l, 216mg/l, 2160mg/l) of suspended polyvinylchloride (PVC) particles (1-50μm) for two 2-hour-time-periods per day. After 44days, mussel filtration and respiration rates as well as byssus production were found to be a negative function of particle concentration. Furthermore, within 91days of exposure, mussel survival declined with increasing PVC abundance. These negative effects presumably go back to prolonged periods of valve closure as a reaction to particle presence. We suggest that microplastics constitute a new seston component that exerts a stress comparable to natural suspended solids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Particle size distribution of suspended solids in the Chesapeake Bay entrance and adjacent shelf waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrnes, M. R.; Oertel, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics of suspended solids, including total suspended matter, total suspended inorganics, total suspended organics, particle size distribution, and the presence of the ten most prominent particle types were determined. Four research vessels simultaneously collected samples along four transects. Samples were collected within a 2-hour period that coincided with the maximum ebb penetration of Chesapeake Bay outwelling. The distribution of primary and secondary particle size modes indicate the presence of a surface or near-surface plume, possibly associated with three sources: (1) runoff, (2) resuspension of material within the Bay, and/or (3) resuspension of material in the area of shoals at the Bay mouth. Additional supportive evidence for this conclusion is illustrated with ocean color scanner data.

  10. Ragweed subpollen particles of respirable size activate human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pazmandi, Kitti; Kumar, Brahma V; Szabo, Krisztina; Boldogh, Istvan; Szoor, Arpad; Vereb, Gyorgy; Veres, Agota; Lanyi, Arpad; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Bacsi, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs) of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(P)H oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3(+) pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(P)H oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs) in the airways and SPPs' NAD(P)H oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins.

  11. Ragweed Subpollen Particles of Respirable Size Activate Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pazmandi, Kitti; Kumar, Brahma V.; Szabo, Krisztina; Boldogh, Istvan; Szoor, Arpad; Vereb, Gyorgy; Veres, Agota; Lanyi, Arpad; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Bacsi, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs) of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(P)H oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3+ pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(P)H oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs) in the airways and SPPs' NAD(P)H oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins. PMID:23251688

  12. Thoracic and respirable particle definitions for human health risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Provides estimates of the thoracic and respirable fractions, for adults and children during typical activities during both nasal and oral inhalation, that may be used in the design of experimental studies and interpretation of evidence of health effects.

  13. Thoracic and respirable particle definitions for human health risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Provides estimates of the thoracic and respirable fractions, for adults and children during typical activities during both nasal and oral inhalation, that may be used in the design of experimental studies and interpretation of evidence of health effects.

  14. Effectiveness of dust control methods for crystalline silica and respirable suspended particulate matter exposure during manual concrete surface grinding.

    PubMed

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Milz, Sheryl A; Wagner, Cynthia D; Bisesi, Michael S; Ames, April L; Khuder, Sadik; Susi, Pam; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2010-12-01

    Concrete grinding exposes workers to unacceptable levels of crystalline silica dust, known to cause diseases such as silicosis and possibly lung cancer. This study examined the influence of major factors of exposure and effectiveness of existing dust control methods by simulating field concrete grinding in an enclosed workplace laboratory. Air was monitored during 201 concrete grinding sessions while using a variety of grinders, accessories, and existing dust control methods, including general ventilation (GV), local exhaust ventilation (LEV), and wet grinding. Task-specific geometric mean (GM) of respirable crystalline silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled-grinding, while GV was off/on, were 0.17/0.09, 0.57/0.13, 1.11/0.44, and 23.1/6.80, respectively. Silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ using 100-125 mm (4-5 inch) and 180 mm (7 inch) grinding cups were 0.53/0.22 and 2.43/0.56, respectively. GM concentrations of silica dust were significantly lower for (1) GV on (66.0%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (99.0%), LEV:Shop-vac- (98.1%) or wet- (94.4%) vs. uncontrolled-grinding. Task-specific GM of respirable suspended particulate matter (RSP) concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled grinding, while GV was off/on, were 1.58/0.63, 7.20/1.15, 9.52/4.13, and 152/47.8, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP using 100-125 mm and 180 mm grinding cups were 4.78/1.62 and 22.2/5.06, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP were significantly lower for (1) GV on (70.2%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (98.9%), LEV:Shop-vac- (96.9%) or wet- (92.6%) vs. uncontrolled grinding. Silica dust and RSP were not significantly affected by (1) orientation of grinding surfaces (vertical vs. inclined); (2) water flow rates for wet grinding; (3) length of task-specific sampling time; or, (4) among cup sizes of 100, 115 or 125 mm. No combination of factors or control methods reduced an 8-hr exposure level to below the

  15. An experimental and theoretical study of the seepage migration of suspended particles with different sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Bing; Xu, Tao; Guo, Zhiguang

    2016-12-01

    This study experimentally investigates the effect of particle size, particle concentration and flow velocity on the migration of suspended particles of size 1.02-47 μm in porous media. The results show that at the same flow velocity, the peak values of the breakthrough curves decrease and corresponding pore volumes increase slightly with increasing particles size. The migration velocity of smaller suspended particles is even greater than water flow velocity, which is attributed to the size exclusion effect. With increase of the injected particle concentration, the deposition coefficients of small single particles increase at first and then tend to a steady state or even decrease slightly, explained by the maximum retention concentration. The dispersivity of small particles decreases with increasing velocity. However, at a high flow velocity, the hydrodynamic dispersivity becomes increasingly dominant with the increase of particle size. The deposition coefficients for large-sized particles are higher than those for small-sized particles, which is attributed to considerable mass removal due to straining. An analytical solution, considering the release effect of sorbed particles, is developed to account for the one-dimensional flow and dispersive effect using a source function method, and then three transport parameters—dispersivity, deposition coefficient and release coefficient—are fitted using the experimental results. Finally, suspended-particle migration is predicted by the proposed model for short-time constant-concentration injection and repeated three-pulse injection. Overall, particle size has a significant effect on the seepage migration parameters of suspended particles in porous media such as the particle velocity, dispersivity and deposition coefficient.

  16. [Impacts of Sediment Disturbance on the Distribution of Suspended Particle Size and Phosphorus].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-rui; Li, Da-peng; Liu, Yan-jian

    2016-04-15

    To clarify the influence of the sediments disturbance on the particle size distribution of suspended solids, and the influence of particle distribution on the forms of dissolved phosphorous in the overlaying water, the sediments and overlying water from Meiliang Bay, Taihu Lake, were used to conduct the indoor simulation experiments to investigate the particle size of suspended solids according to the Ubbelobde particle size criteria and the distribution of phosphorus compounds in the overlying water under the disturbance circumstances. The results indicated that the average proportions of small (0-10 microm), middle (10-20 microm) and large (> or = 20 microm) diameter particles presented different trends of increasing, decreasing and staying stable, respectively. It indicated the possible transformation of particle size of suspended solids from small-middle diameter to large diameter. In addition, the data of DTP/TP and DIP/TP showed a periodical variation with the corresponding periodical variety of particle diameter in suspended solids, while ns obvious variety of DTP and DIP was observed. It suggested that disturbance enhanced the ability of phosphorus immobilization by suspended solids. On the other band, the percentages of DTP in TP and DIP in TP were 19% and 13% under the disturbance, respectively, and they were obviously lower than those (DTP/TP, 80% and DIP/TP, 69% ) in the control. It indicated that tbs transformation of particle size of suspended solids from small-middle diameter to large diameter due to disturbance was in favor of tbe adsorption and sedimentation of dissolved phosphorus. Accordingly, the formation of particle phosphorus was enhanced. Therefore, it delayed the development of eutrophication in the water body.

  17. Suspended particle capture by synthetic vegetation in a laboratory flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauria, Kristen E.; Kerwin, Rachel E.; Nover, Daniel; Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    Vegetated floodplains and wetlands trap particles, a process that is important for water quality and wetland function and morphology. The rates of particle removal by vegetation remain poorly characterized, especially for small particles and vegetation coated with biofilm. In this study, we measured capture rates of road dust by arrays of grass-like synthetic vegetation in a laboratory flume. We performed 40 experiments in which stem density, flow velocity, the presence of biofilm, and initial particle concentration varied, and used an in situ particle size analyzer to measure the concentration of a continuous particle size distribution (1.25-250 µm diameter). We fit first-order decay models to the particle concentration measurements to determine particle capture rates and found that capture rates increased with particle size, stem density, and the presence of biofilm. Capture rates decreased with increasing flow velocity, which suggests that fast flows may resuspend particles from stems. We also calculated percent particle capture efficiencies and fit a new empirical model for capture efficiency to our results. We found that particle capture efficiency was highest for low stem density treatments and propose that stem density affects capture by altering turbulent kinetic energy.

  18. Ocean particle chemistry: The fractionation of rare earth elements between suspended particles and seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Sholkovitz, E.R. ); Landing, W.M.; Lewis, B.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Sargasso Sea suspended particles were sequentially digested with three chemical treatments (acetic acid, mild HCl/HNO[sub 3], and HF/HNO[sub 3]/HCl in a bomb). The latter two treatments dissolve detrital minerals, while the acetic acid removes surface coatings (organic matter and Mn oxides). The rare earth element (REE) composition of the surface coatings, in marked contrast to the crust-like REE composition of the two detrital phases, is extensively fractionated with respect to both filtered seawater and the crust. Surface coatings are responsible for the removal and fractionation of REEs from seawater and, as such, play a key role in the marine geochemical cycles of trace elements. Relative to seawater, the surface coatings are systematically enriched tenfold across the trivalent REEs from Lu to La and develop large positive Ce-anomalies. The Ce-anomalies of the coatings switch from being negative (seawater-like) in the upper 100 m to being strongly positive at greater depths. The ingrowth of Ce and LREEs on particle surfaces reflects the in situ oxidation of dissolved Ce(III) to particulate Ce(IV), and the preferential removal of LREE(III)s over HREE(III)s. REEs(III) fractionation of this type is consistent with particle/solution models. Both processes appear to be related to the in situ formation of Mn oxide particles from the oxidation of dissolved Mn(II) in the upper 200 m of the water column. Preferential removal of LREEs in the upper waters is countered by their preferential release at depth due to remineralization of surface coatings on particles. A new method is explored for estimating the residence time of suspended particles by combining Ce concentration data of dissolved and surface-bound phases with the Ce(III) oxidation rate measurements of MOFFETT (1990). A Ce-based residence time of thirteen days is similar in magnitude to the value calculated from U-[sup 234]Th disequilibria in the Sargasso Sea.

  19. Apparatus and method for concentrating and filtering particles suspended in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Fiechtner, Gregory J [Bethesda, MD; Cummings, Eric B [Livermore, CA; Singh, Anup K [Danville, CA

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed is a device for separating and concentrating particles suspended in a fluid stream by using dielectrophoresis (DEP) to trap and/or deflect those particles as they migrate through a fluid channel. The method uses fluid channels designed to constrain a liquid flowing through it to uniform electrokinetic flow velocities. This behavior is achieved by connecting deep and shallow sections of channels, with the channel depth varying abruptly along an interface. By careful design of abrupt changes in specific permeability at the interface, an abrupt and spatially uniform change in electrokinetic force can be selected. Because these abrupt interfaces also cause a sharp gradient in applied electric fields, a DEP force also can be established along the interface. Depending on the complex conductivity of the suspended particles and the immersion liquid, the DEP force can controllably complement or oppose the local electrokinetic force transporting the fluid through the channel allowing for manipulation of particles suspended in the transporting liquid.

  20. Primary study on scattering property for irregular suspended particles in water with T-matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanan; Feng, Peng

    2016-11-01

    In order to analyze the scattering characteristics of suspended particles in water, a detail research about the intensity distribution of scattering light based on T-matrix theory is presented in this paper. Two kinds of suspended particles: alga and sands are taken into consideration and three kinds of non-spheroid shape model: spheroid, finite circular cylinder and generalized Chebyshev are simulated. The relationship between intensity of scattering light and scattering angle, complex refractive index of suspended particle, wavelength of incident light, size, etc. are calculated. Numerical results show that most scattering light mainly focus on the forward direction and there is a decreasing trend with the increase of scattering angle and wavelength. And when the particles size and the wavelength of incident light changes, the scattered light intensity is significantly changed accordingly for all shape models.

  1. Effect of suspended particles upon drying process of volatile droplet sitting on solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, I.; Kochiya, K.

    Particle motion in volatile droplet on the solid surface especially the behavior of particles depositing in the vicinity of solid-liquid-gas boundary line contact line is focused This phenomenon is called as coffee stain problem Particle motion in the droplet is analyzed by reconstruction of spatio-temporal particle motion by applying three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry 3-D PTV We discuss the effect of the suspended particles upon the drying process of the droplet Morphological discussion on the particles stuck on the solid surface after the dryout the droplet is also conducted

  2. Indoor-outdoor relationships of respirable sulfates and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dockery, Douglas W.; Spengler, John D.

    Indoor and outdoor concentrations of respirable particulates and sulfates have been measured in 68 homes in six cities for at least 1 yr. A conservation of mass model was derived describing indoor concentrations in terms of outdoor concentrations, infiltration and indoor sources. The measured data were analysed to identify important building characteristics and to quantify their effect. The mean infiltration rate of outdoor fine particulates was found to be approximately 70%. Cigarette smoking was found to be the dominant indoor source of respirable particulates. Increased indoor concentrations of sulfates were found to be associated with smoking and also with gas stoves. The effect of full air conditioning of the building was to reduce infiltration of outdoor fine particulates by about one half, while preventing dilution and purging of internally generated pollutants. The model for indoor respirable particulate and sulfate levels was found to compare well with measurements.

  3. Development of Automated Image Analysis Software for Suspended Marine Particle Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    Development of Automated Image Analysis Software for Suspended Marine Particle Classification Scott Samson Center for Ocean Technology...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of Automated Image Analysis Software for Suspended...objective is to develop automated image analysis software to reduce the effort and time required for manual identification of plankton images. Automated

  4. Magnetic interaction of Janus magnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yujin; Kang, Tae Gon; Hulsen, Martien A; den Toonder, Jaap M J; Anderson, Patrick D

    2016-02-01

    We studied the magnetic interaction between circular Janus magnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid under the influence of an externally applied uniform magnetic field. The particles are equally compartmentalized into paramagnetic and nonmagnetic sides. A direct numerical scheme is employed to solve the magnetic particulate flow in the Stokes flow regime. Upon applying the magnetic field, contrary to isotropic paramagnetic particles, a single Janus particle can rotate due to the magnetic torque created by the magnetic anisotropy of the particle. In a two-particle problem, the orientation of each particle is found to be an additional factor that affects the critical angle separating the nature of magnetic interaction. Using multiparticle problems, we show that the orientation of the particles has a significant influence on the dynamics of the particles, the fluid flow induced by the actuated particles, and the final conformation of the particles. Straight and staggered chain structures observed experimentally can be reproduced numerically in a multiple particle problem.

  5. Sub-10-Micron and Respirable Particles in Lunar Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, B. L.; McKay, D. S.; Riofrio, L. M.; Taylor, L. A.; Gonzalez, C. P.

    2010-03-01

    Grain size analyses of Apollo 11 soil 10084 by a laser diffraction technique shows that this soil contains roughly 2% by volume in the respirable (2.5 µm and below) grain size, in agreement with our prior estimates based on extrapolation of sieve data.

  6. Measuring the mass, density, and size of particles and cells using a suspended microchannel resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Michel; Bryan, Andrea K.; Burg, Thomas P.; Babcock, Ken; Manalis, Scott R.

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of mass, density, and size of cells and nanoparticles using suspended microchannel resonators. The masses of individual particles are quantified as transient frequency shifts, while the particles transit a microfluidic channel embedded in the resonating cantilever. Mass histograms resulting from these data reveal the distribution of a population of heterogeneously sized particles. Particle density is inferred from measurements made in different carrier fluids since the frequency shift for a particle is proportional to the mass difference relative to the displaced solution. We have characterized the density of polystyrene particles, Escherichia coli, and human red blood cells with a resolution down to 10-4g/cm3.

  7. Achieving 'excellent' indoor air quality in commercial offices equipped with air-handling unit--respirable suspended particulate.

    PubMed

    Lam, K S; Chan, F S; Fung, W Y; Lui, B S S; Lau, L W L

    2006-04-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the feasibility of achieving ultra low respirable suspended particulates (RSP) in commercial offices without major modification of existing ventilation systems by enhancing the particulates removal efficiency of existing central ventilation systems. Four types of filters which include pre-filters, cartridge filters, bag filters and high efficiency particulates air (HEPA) filters were tested in a commercial building in Causeway Bay. The results show that an RSP objective of <20 microg/m3 could be met by removing RSP from both the return air and outdoor air supply simultaneously. This level of performance is classed as 'excellent' by the Hong Kong Government, Environmental Protection Department. Filters with efficiency that exceed 80% placed both in the return air and outdoor air were sufficient to meet the objective. It is not necessary to install HEPA filters to achieve the 'excellent' class. The outdoor air filter has great influence on the steady state indoor RSP concentration while the effective cleaning rate is governed by the return air filter. Higher efficiency filters increased the static drop but the volume flow of the air fan was not affected significantly. The additional cost incurred was <5% of the existing operation cost. This paper reports a field study of RSP control for an indoor office environment. The results are directly applicable to building service engineering in the design of ventilation systems using air-handling units. Field observations indicated that indoor RSP in an office environment could be suppressed below 20 microg/m3 within 1 h by the simultaneous filtration of outdoor air and return air. Outdoor air filtration has a great influence on the steady state indoor concentration and return air filtration governs the cleaning rate. It is believed that the results of this study could be extended to the cleaning of other indoor pollutants such as volatile organic compounds.

  8. Changing shapes and implied viscosities of suspended submicron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Sanchez, M. S.; Douet, C.; Wang, Y.; Bateman, A. P.; Gong, Z.; Kuwata, M.; Renbaum-Wolff, L.; Sato, B. B.; Liu, P. F.; Bertram, A. K.; Geiger, F. M.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-07-01

    The change in shape of atmospherically relevant organic particles is used to estimate the viscosity of the particle material without the need for removal from aerosol suspension. The dynamic shape factors χ of particles produced by α-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor, under conditions of particle coagulation, were measured while altering the relative humidity (RH) downstream of the flow tube. As relative humidity was increased, the results showed that χ could change from 1.27 to 1.02, corresponding to a transition from aspherical to nearly spherical shapes. The shape change could occur at elevated RH because the organic material had decreased viscosity and was therefore able to flow to form spherical shapes, as favored by the minimization of surface area. Numerical modeling was used to estimate the particle viscosity associated with this flow. Based on particle diameter and RH exposure time, the viscosity dropped from 10(8.7±2.0) to 10(7.0±2.0) Pa s (two sigma) for an increase in RH from < 5 to 58 % at 293 K. These results imply that the equilibration of the chemical composition of the particle phase with the gas phase can shift from hours at mid-range RH to days at low RH.

  9. Changing shapes and implied viscosities of suspended submicron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Sanchez, M. S.; Douet, C.; Wang, Y.; Bateman, A. P.; Gong, Z.; Kuwata, M.; Renbaum-Wolff, L.; Sato, B. B.; Liu, P. F.; Bertram, A. K.; Geiger, F. M.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-03-01

    The change in shape of atmospherically relevant organic particles is used to estimate the viscosity of the particle material without the need for removal from aerosol suspension. The dynamic shape factors χ of particles produced by α-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor, under conditions of particle coagulation, were measured while altering the relative humidity (RH) downstream of the flow tube. As relative humidity was increased, the results showed that χ could change from 1.27 to 1.02, corresponding to a transition from aspherical to nearly spherical shapes. The shape change could occur at elevated RH because the organic material had decreased viscosity and was therefore able to flow to form spherical shapes, as favored by minimization of surface area. Numerical modeling was used to estimate the particle viscosity associated with this flow. Based on particle diameter and RH exposure time, the viscosity dropped from 10(8.7±2.0) to 10(7.0±2.0) Pa s (2σ) for an increase in RH from < 5 to 58% at 293 K, corresponding to a solid to semisolid transition for the organic material. These results imply that the equilibration of the chemical composition of the particle phase with the gas phase can shift from hours at mid-range RH to weeks for low RH.

  10. Suspended particle and pathogen peak discharge buffering by a surface-flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Mulling, Bram T M; van den Boomen, Rob M; van der Geest, Harm G; Kappelhof, Joost W N M; Admiraal, Wim

    2013-03-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) have been shown to improve the water quality of treated wastewater. The capacity of CWs to reduce nutrients, pathogens and organic matter and restore oxygen regime under normal operating conditions cannot be extrapolated to periods of incidental peak discharges. The buffering capacity of CWs during peak discharges is potentially a key factor for water quality in the receiving waters. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the behaviour of peak discharges of suspended particles, (associated) physiochemical parameters and pathogenic organisms from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in a full scale constructed wetland (CW). By mixing clarified water and sludge rich water from the settlement tank of the WWTP, the suspended particle concentration was increased for 8 h from ± 3.5 to ± 230 mg L(-1), and discharged into a full scale horizontal surface flow constructed wetland. An increase of suspended particle concentration following the peak discharge concurred with increases in turbidity and oxygen demand, total nutrient load (nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon) and pathogens (Escherichia coli and Enterococci). Temperature, pH, conductivity and dissolved nutrient concentrations (nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon) were however unaffected by the initial peak discharge. After retention in the unvegetated ponds (the first CW compartment) the applied suspended particle peak with a total load of 86.2 kg was reduced by >99%. Similar peak buffering was observed for the turbidity, oxygen demand and settable volume. Simultaneously dissolved nutrient concentrations increased, indicating partial mineralization of the suspended particles during retention in the unvegetated ponds. The peak buffering of pathogens was lower (40-84%), indicating differences in removal processes between other suspended particles and pathogens. The results indicated that the suspended particles were probably mostly removed by sedimentation and mineralization

  11. Long-term measurements of respirable sulfates and particles inside and outside homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spengler, J. D.; Dockery, D. W.; Turner, W. A.; Wolfson, J. M.; Ferris, B. G.

    The results of extensive indoor and outdoor monitoring for respirable size particles and the sulfate fraction of these particles are reported. These air pollution measurements were obtained in conjunction with an epidemiologic study in six U.S. cities: Portage, Wisconsin; Topeka, Kansas; Kingston/Harriman, Tennessee; Watertown, Massachusetts; St. Louis, Missouri: and Steubenville, Ohio. The major source of indoor particulate matter is cigarette smoke, which contributes approximately 20 μm -3 to the indoor concentrations for each smoker. Even in homes without smokers, indoor particle concentrations equal or exceed outdoor levels. The indoor respirable sulfate concentrations are consistently lower than outdoor concentrations.

  12. Elemental Spatiotemporal Variations of Total Suspended Particles in Jeddah City

    PubMed Central

    Kadi, Mohammad W.

    2014-01-01

    Elements associated with total suspended particulate matter (TSP) in Jeddah city were determined. Using high-volume samplers, TSP samples were simultaneously collected over a one-year period from seven sampling sites. Samples were analyzed for Al, Ba, Ca, Cu, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Ti, V, Cr, Co, Ni, As, and Sr. Results revealed great dependence of element contents on spatial and temporal variations. Two sites characterized by busy roads, workshops, heavy population, and heavy trucking have high levels of all measured elements. Concentrations of most elements at the two sites exhibit strong spatial gradients and concentrations of elements at these sites are higher than other locations. The highest concentrations of elements were observed during June–August because of dust storms, significant increase in energy consumption, and active surface winds. Enrichment factors of elements at the high-level sites have values in the range >10~60 while for Cu and Zn the enrichment factors are much higher (~0–>700) indicating that greater percentage of TSP composition for these three elements in air comes from anthropogenic activities. PMID:24701161

  13. Desorption of radioactive cesium by seawater from the suspended particles in river water.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Masaki; Kirishima, Akira; Nagao, Seiya; Takamiya, Kouichi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Akiyama, Daisuke; Sato, Nobuaki

    2017-10-01

    In 2011, the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant dispersed radioactive cesium throughout the environment, contaminating the land, rivers, and sea. Suspended particles containing clay minerals are the transportation medium for radioactive cesium from rivers to the ocean because cesium is strongly adsorbed between the layers of clay minerals, forming inner sphere complexes. In this study, the adsorption and desorption behaviors of radioactive cesium from suspended clay particles in river water have been investigated. The radioactive cesium adsorption and desorption experiments were performed with two kinds of suspended particulate using a batch method with (137)Cs tracers. In the cesium adsorption treatment performed before the desorption experiments, simulated river water having a total cesium concentration ([(133+137)Cs(+)]total) of 1.3 nM (10(-9) mol/L) was used. The desorption experiments were mainly conducted at a solid-to-liquid ratio of 0.17 g/L. The desorption agents were natural seawater collected at 10 km north of the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant, artificial seawater, solutions of NaCl, KCl, NH4Cl, and (133)CsCl, and ultrapure water. The desorption behavior, which depends on the preloaded cesium concentration in the suspended particles, was also investigated. Based on the cesium desorption experiments using suspended particles, which contained about 1000 ng/g loaded cesium, the order of cesium desorption ratios for each desorption agent was determined as 1 M NaCl (80%) > 470 mM NaCl (65%) > 1 M KCl (30%) ≈ seawater (natural seawater and Daigo artificial seawater) > 1 M NH4Cl (20%) > 1 M (133)CsCl (15%) ≫ ultrapure water (2%). Moreover, an interesting result was obtained: The desorption ratio in the 470 mM NaCl solution was much higher than that in seawater, even though the Na(+) concentrations were identical. These results indicate that the cesium desorption mechanism is not a simple ion exchange reaction

  14. Thermal performance of heat pipe with suspended nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, K. N.; Solomon, A. Brusly; Pillai, B. C.; Ruba Singh, B. Jacob; Saravana Kumar, S.

    2012-11-01

    Nanofluids are employed as the working medium for a conventional cylindrical heat pipe. A cylindrical copper heat pipe of 19.5 mm outer diameter and 400 mm length was fabricated and tested with two different working fluids. The working fluids used in this study are DI-water and Nano-particles suspension (mixture of copper nano particle and DI-water). The overall heat transfer coefficient of the heat pipe was calculated based on the lumped thermal resistance network and compared with the heat transfer coefficient of base fluid filled heat pipe. There is a quantitative improvement in the heat transfer coefficient using nano-particles suspension as the working medium. A heat transfer correlation was also developed based on multiple regression least square method and the results were compared with that obtained by the experiment.

  15. Viscous constraints on squirmer microswimmers approaching suspended particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbarzadeh, Mehdi; Fu, Henry C.

    2015-11-01

    Microscopic self-propelled organisms often approach other particles to capture food, mate, or find new environments. The viscous Stokes flow around these small organisms push away particles, severely hindering approach. Previously, we investigated approach hydrodynamics by modeling a swimming organism as a sphere pushed by a constant force towards a force-free spherical target particle. We measured approach efficiency by examining how far the swimmer must travel before getting close to the target. For targets which are of bigger or comparable size to the swimmer, the swimmer travels less than 1.5 times the initial separation distance; for smaller targets the swimmer must travel farther, making approach infeasible. The constant force reliably models propulsion by a flagellum, but many microorganisms feed by using cilia-coated surfaces for propulsion or generation of feeding currents. Therefore, here we consider a force-free spherical squirmer model for the swimmer approaching a spherical force-free target particle. For squirmers, the ``squirmer parameter'' distinguishes whether the swimmer is a puller or pusher. We find that pullers can always approach any size target and a larger squirmer parameter will generate a stronger feeding current leading to less traveled distance. On the other hand, pushers approach targets only when the squirmer parameter is less than 1; for values larger than 1, the swimmer cannot get close to the target.

  16. Filter performance of n99 and n95 facepiece respirators against viruses and ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Eninger, Robert M; Honda, Takeshi; Adhikari, Atin; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi; Reponen, Tiina; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2008-07-01

    The performance of three filtering facepiece respirators (two models of N99 and one N95) challenged with an inert aerosol (NaCl) and three virus aerosols (enterobacteriophages MS2 and T4 and Bacillus subtilis phage)-all with significant ultrafine components-was examined using a manikin-based protocol with respirators sealed on manikins. Three inhalation flow rates, 30, 85, and 150 l min(-1), were tested. The filter penetration and the quality factor were determined. Between-respirator and within-respirator comparisons of penetration values were performed. At the most penetrating particle size (MPPS), >3% of MS2 virions penetrated through filters of both N99 models at an inhalation flow rate of 85 l min(-1). Inhalation airflow had a significant effect upon particle penetration through the tested respirator filters. The filter quality factor was found suitable for making relative performance comparisons. The MPPS for challenge aerosols was <0.1 mum in electrical mobility diameter for all tested respirators. Mean particle penetration (by count) was significantly increased when the size fraction of <0.1 mum was included as compared to particles >0.1 mum. The filtration performance of the N95 respirator approached that of the two models of N99 over the range of particle sizes tested ( approximately 0.02 to 0.5 mum). Filter penetration of the tested biological aerosols did not exceed that of inert NaCl aerosol. The results suggest that inert NaCl aerosols may generally be appropriate for modeling filter penetration of similarly sized virions.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Suspended Sediment Transportation Based on Particle Tracking Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, W. W.; Ying, C.; Mu, J. B.

    2017-08-01

    Coastal engineering that carried out on the muddy seabed were always accompanied by diffusion of suspended sediment, and that would impact on the surrounding marine environment. A 2-D tidal flow mathematical model of the Yueqing Bay was established based on the Lagrange particle tracking model, the diffusion of suspended sediment in pile foundation construction process of a new wharf in the Yueqing Bay was simulated through a continuous moving points method, the calculation results were compared with the one calculated by the traditional convection diffusion method, it showed that the results calculated from the two different methods were similar, therefore it proved the suitability of the Lagrange particle tracing model in the suspended sediment diffusion problems.

  18. Suspended sediment measurements and calculation of the particle load at HPP Fieschertal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, D.; Albayrak, I.; Abgottspon, A.; Boes, R. M.

    2016-11-01

    In the scope of a research project on hydro-abrasive erosion of Pelton turbines, a field study was conducted at the high-head HPP Fieschertal in Valais, Switzerland. The suspended sediment mass concentration (SSC) and particle size distribution (PSD) in the penstock have been continuously measured since 2012 using a combination of six measuring techniques. The SSC was on average 0.52 g/l and rose to 50 g/l in a major flood event in July 2012. The median particle size d 50 was usually 15 pm, rising up to 100 μm when particles previously having settled in the headwater storage tunnel were re-suspended at low water levels. The annual suspended sediment loads (SSL) varied considerably depending on flood events. Moreover, so-called particle loads (PLs) according to the relevant guideline of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62364) were calculated using four relations between particle size and the relative abrasion potential. For the investigated HPP, the time series of the SSL and the PLs had generally similar shapes over the three years. The largest differences among the PLs were observed during re-suspension events when the particles were considerably coarser than usual. Further investigations on the effects of particle sizes on hydroabrasive erosion of splitters and cut-outs of coated Pelton turbines are recommended.

  19. IUTAM Symposium on Hydrodynamic Diffusion of Suspended Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. H.

    1995-01-01

    The focus of the symposium was on multiparticle hydrodynamic interactions which lead to fluctuating motion of the particles and resulting particle migration and dispersion or diffusion. Implications of these phenomena were described for sedimentation, fluidization, suspension flows, granular flows, and fiber suspensions. Computer simulation techniques as well as experimental techniques were described. Each session had an invited leadoff talk which overviewed the session topic as well as described the speaker's own related research. Ample time for discussion was included after each talk as well as at the end of each session. The symposium started with a keynote talk on the first evening on What is so puzzling about hydrodynamic diffusion?, which set the tone for the rest of the meeting by emphasizing both recent advances and unanswered issues.

  20. Precipitation of suspended particles in wet-film cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Val'dberg, A.Y.; Kirsanova, N.S.

    1986-07-01

    The fact that wet and dry mechanical centrifugal dust collectors operate on the same principle allowed the authors to make the calculations for wet cyclones with an equation similar to one used previously. A figure shows that the efficiency of wet cyclones is much higher (20% higher on the average) than that of dry cyclones under the same operating conditions. This improvement is due to a decrease in the secondary discharge of dust particles from the wet wall of the device.

  1. Porous media grain size distribution and hydrodynamic forces effects on transport and deposition of suspended particles.

    PubMed

    Ahfir, Nasre-Dine; Hammadi, Ahmed; Alem, Abdellah; Wang, HuaQing; Le Bras, Gilbert; Ouahbi, Tariq

    2017-03-01

    The effects of porous media grain size distribution on the transport and deposition of polydisperse suspended particles under different flow velocities were investigated. Selected Kaolinite particles (2-30μm) and Fluorescein (dissolved tracer) were injected in the porous media by step input injection technique. Three sands filled columns were used: Fine sand, Coarse sand, and a third sand (Mixture) obtained by mixing the two last sands in equal weight proportion. The porous media performance on the particle removal was evaluated by analysing particles breakthrough curves, hydro-dispersive parameters determined using the analytical solution of convection-dispersion equation with a first order deposition kinetics, particles deposition profiles, and particle-size distribution of the recovered and the deposited particles. The deposition kinetics and the longitudinal hydrodynamic dispersion coefficients are controlled by the porous media grain size distribution. Mixture sand is more dispersive than Fine and Coarse sands. More the uniformity coefficient of the porous medium is large, higher is the filtration efficiency. At low velocities, porous media capture all sizes of suspended particles injected with larger ones mainly captured at the entrance. A high flow velocity carries the particles deeper into the porous media, producing more gradual changes in the deposition profile. The median diameter of the deposited particles at different depth increases with flow velocity. The large grain size distribution leads to build narrow pores enhancing the deposition of the particles by straining. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Suspended particle transport through constriction channel with Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Walther, Jens H.

    2017-08-01

    It is well known that translocation events of a polymer or rod through pores or narrower parts of micro- and nanochannels have a stochastic nature due to the Brownian motion. However, it is not clear whether the objects of interest need to have a larger size than the entrance to exhibit the deviation from the dynamics of the surrounding fluid. We show by numerical analysis that the particle injection into the narrower part of the channel is affected by thermal fluctuation, where the particles have spherical symmetry and are smaller than the height of the constriction. The Péclet number (Pe) is the order parameter that governs the phenomena, which clarifies the spatio-temporal significance of Brownian motion compared to hydrodynamics. Furthermore, we find that there exists an optimal condition of Pe to attain the highest flow rate of particles relative to the dispersant fluid flow. Our finding is important in science and technology from nanopore DNA sequencers and lab-on-a-chip devices to filtration by porous materials and chromatography.

  3. Apparatus and method for collection and concentration of respirable particles into a small fluid volume

    DOEpatents

    Simon, Jonathan N.; Brown, Steve B.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the collection of respirable particles and concentration of such particles into a small fluid volume. The apparatus captures and concentrates small (1-10 .mu.m) respirable particles into a sub-millileter volume of fluid. The method involves a two step operation, collection and concentration: wherein collection of particles is by a wetted surface having small vertical slits that act as capillary channels; and concentration is carried out by transfer of the collected particles to a small volume (sub-milliliter) container by centrifugal force whereby the particles are forced through the vertical slits and contact a non-wetted wall surface, and are deflected to the bottom where they are contained for analysis, such as a portable flow cytometer or a portable PCR DNA analysis system.

  4. Development of Automated Image Analysis Software for Suspended Marine Particle Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    Development of Automated Image Analysis Software for Suspended Marine Particle Classification Scott Samson Center for Ocean Technology...and global water column. 1 OBJECTIVES The project’s objective is to develop automated image analysis software to reduce the effort and time

  5. Single Particle Analysis of Oceanic Suspended Matters During the SEEDS II Iron Fertilization Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Y.; Narita, Y.; Uematsu, M.

    2006-12-01

    Oceanic suspended particles play an important role regulating the chemical composition of seawater through the removal of trace elements from surface water to deep water and their lateral transport. Therefore, physical and chemical properties of these particles reflect the characteristics of water mass and marine ecosystem under the perturbation of marine environment such as iron fertilization. To consider the physical and/or chemical variation of these particles in the water column, it is necessary to analyze size, number and chemical composition of individual particles. Suspended particles in the surface seawater were collected during the SEEDS II (Subarctic Iron Experiment for Ecosystem and Dynamics Study II) iron fertilization experiment in the summer of 2004. The particulate samples were analyzed by Electron probe X-ray micro analyzer (EPMA) and characterized by size and major and minor elements ranged from 0.4 to 10 μ m in diameter. These particles were classified into five groups based on their chemical compositions: Al-Si, Si-rich, Ca-rich, Organic and Others. Most of particles were Si-rich, Ca-rich and Organic. Si-rich and Ca-rich particles were mainly consist of detritus of phytoplankton.In the iron-fertilized patch area, Chl-a concentration covaried with dry weight, number and volume concentrations of the suspended particles. At 20 m depth, the number concentration of Organic particles having two peaks at 1.1 and 0.65 μ m in diameter increased within 2 days after the iron fertilization, and then gradually increased. It is suggested that the increase in suspended particles, mostly detritus of planktonic shells, corresponded to that in primary production. The contents by weight of Si in Si-rich particle and the content by weight of Ca in Ca-rich particle tended to decrease in size. In fine mode particle, Si-rich and Ca-rich particles contained more P and S as biolimiting elements and less Al, Ti, Mn, and Fe as crustal elements. The smaller Organic

  6. Relationships among particle number, surface area, and respirable mass concentrations in automotive engine manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, William A; Evans, Douglas E; Ku, Bon Ki; Maynard, Andrew D; Slavin, Thomas J; Peters, Thomas M

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between particle number, surface area, and respirable mass concentration measured simultaneously in a foundry and an automotive engine machining and assembly center. Aerosol concentrations were measured throughout each plant with a condensation particle counter for number concentration, a diffusion charger for active surface area concentration, and an optical particle counter for respirable mass concentration. At selected locations, particle size distributions were characterized with the optical particle counter and an electrical low pressure impactor. Statistical analyses showed that active surface area concentration was correlated with ultrafine particle number concentration and weakly correlated with respirable mass concentration. Correlation between number and active surface area concentration was stronger during winter (R2 = 0.6 for both plants) than in the summer (R2 = 0.38 and 0.36 for the foundry and engine plant respectively). The stronger correlation in winter was attributed to use of direct-fire gas fired heaters that produced substantial numbers of ultrafine particles with a modal diameter between 0.007 and 0.023 mu m. These correlations support findings obtained through theoretical analysis. Such analysis predicts that active surface area increasingly underestimates geometric surface area with increasing particle size, particularly for particles larger than 100 nm. Thus, a stronger correlation between particle number concentration and active surface area concentration is expected in the presence of high concentrations of ultrafine particles. In general, active surface area concentration may be a concentration metric that is distinct from particle number concentration and respirable mass concentration. For future health effects or toxicological studies involving nano-materials or ultrafine aerosols, this finding needs to be considered, as exposure metrics may influence data interpretation.

  7. Different sources of suspended sediment according to particle size determined by natural radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizugaki, S.; Ohtsuka, J.; Maruyama, M.; Hamamoto, S.; Murakami, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Extensive human activity and climate change have given great impacts on the sediment balance and connectivity between fluvial and coastal systems, causing sediment-related problems such as sedimentation in reservoir, coastal erosion and water pollution by prolonged turbid water. The dynamics of suspended sediment is one of the most important issues in watershed and coastal management. Suspended sediment load transported to ocean by a river commonly represents a mixture of sediments delivered from different locations and source types within the contributing catchment. In our previous study, we have found that the three natural radionuclides are available to discriminate the source areas of suspended sediment represented by six different bed rock type (sedimentary rock, accretionary sedimentary rock, accretionary basalt block, accretionary volcanic rock, plutonic rock and metamorphic rock), and that the contribution of each source areas to suspended sediment can be estimated (Mizugaki et al., 2012). To elucidate the sources of suspended sediment from mountain to coastal area, the fingerprinting was conducted using natural radionuclide tracers across a couple of adjacent watersheds, the Saru River and Mu River watersheds in central Hokkaido, northern Japan. We collected suspended sediments at outlets of the 13 sub-catchments (0.7-27.2 km2) and 12 stream channels with mid- to large-scaled watershed areas (17-1,333 km2), deposited sediments across a dam reservoir and coastal sediments, in total 389 samples. For collected sediment samples, grain size distributions were measured by laser-diffraction particle size analyzer. The specific surface areas of the samples were estimated using their grain size distribution and the spherical approximation of the particles in each class. For fingerprint the source of suspended sediment, three natural radionuclide activities, 212Pb, 228Ac and 40K, were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Specific surface area of the sediment showed

  8. Suspended particle effects on ClO2/ultraviolet light combined disinfection of effluent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-ling; Wang, Bao-zhen; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Jin-song; Huang, Wen-zhang

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of suspended solids of effluent often varies in a wide range, therefore the dose of ultraviolet light (UV) in disinfection process needs to be adjusted to meet the disinfection criterion at a high frequency, and the desired disinfection effect is difficult to be ensured. The particles size and particle-associated fecal coliform (F.C.) contribution, and their influence on UV disinfection were investigated when ClO2 and UV combined disinfection process was used. The results showed that suspended solids content had a major impact on UV disinfection efficiency, especially the large particle size fraction. Particles (D>10 microm) associated F. C. were difficult to be disinfected and were the main part of the tailings of F.C. inactivation curve. Pre-ClO2 oxidation could reduce the number of particles in effluent, and make large particles decrease to small ones. Therefore, the influence of particles on UV disinfection could be reduced after pre-ClO2 oxidation, and the resistance ability to particle loadings of combined process was enhanced. Moreover, the combined process has a lot of advantages, such as low toxicity, low operational/maintenance costs; it is also convenient to be established in the existing wastewater plant or the new planned one.

  9. Photocurrent spectroscopy of exciton and free particle optical transitions in suspended carbon nanotube pn-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shun-Wen; Theiss, Jesse; Hazra, Jubin; Aykol, Mehmet; Kapadia, Rehan; Cronin, Stephen B.

    2015-08-03

    We study photocurrent generation in individual, suspended carbon nanotube pn-junction diodes formed by electrostatic doping using two gate electrodes. Photocurrent spectra collected under various electrostatic doping concentrations reveal distinctive behaviors for free particle optical transitions and excitonic transitions. In particular, the photocurrent generated by excitonic transitions exhibits a strong gate doping dependence, while that of the free particle transitions is gate independent. Here, the built-in potential of the pn-junction is required to separate the strongly bound electron-hole pairs of the excitons, while free particle excitations do not require this field-assisted charge separation. We observe a sharp, well defined E{sub 11} free particle interband transition in contrast with previous photocurrent studies. Several steps are taken to ensure that the active charge separating region of these pn-junctions is suspended off the substrate in a suspended region that is substantially longer than the exciton diffusion length and, therefore, the photocurrent does not originate from a Schottky junction. We present a detailed model of the built-in fields in these pn-junctions, which, together with phonon-assistant exciton dissociation, predicts photocurrents on the same order of those observed experimentally.

  10. Laboratory and field evaluations of the LISST-100 instrument for suspended particle size determinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Cheng, R.T.; Wang, P.-F.; Richter, K.

    2001-01-01

    Advances in technology have resulted in a new instrument that is designed for in-situ determination of particle size spectra. Such an instrument that can measure undisturbed particle size distributions is much needed for sediment transport studies. The LISST-100 (Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry) uses the principle of laser diffraction to obtain the size distribution and volume concentration of suspended material in 32 size classes logarithmically spaced between 1.25 and 250 ??m. This paper describes a laboratory evaluation of the ability of LISST-100 to determine particle sizes using suspensions of single size, artificial particles. Findings show the instrument is able to determine particle size to within about 10% with increasing error as particle size increases. The instrument determines volume (or mass) concentration using a volume conversion factor Cv. This volume conversion factor is theoretically a constant. In the laboratory evaluation Cv is found to vary by a factor of about three over the particle size range between 5 and 200 ??m. Results from field studies in South San Francisco Bay show that values of mass concentration of suspended marine sediments estimated by LISST-100 agree favorably with estimates from optical backscatterance sensors if an appropriate value of Cv, according to mean size, is used and the assumed average particle (aggregate) density is carefully chosen. Analyses of size distribution of suspended materials in South San Francisco Bay over multiple tide cycles suggest the likelihood of different sources of sediment because of different size characteristics during flood and ebb cycles. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. Spatial and temporal dynamics of suspended particle characteristics and composition in Navigation Pool 19 of the Upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milde, Amanda S.

    2017-01-01

    Suspended particles are an essential component of large rivers influencing channel geomorphology, biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, and food web resources. The Upper Mississippi River (UMR) is a large floodplain river that exhibits pronounced spatiotemporal variation in environmental conditions and biota, providing an ideal environment for investigating dynamics of suspended particles in large river ecosystems. Here we investigated two questions: (1) How do suspended particle characteristics (e.g., size and morphology) vary temporally and spatially? and (2) What environmental variables have the strongest association with particle characteristics? Water sampling was conducted in June, August, and September of 2013 and 2014 in Navigation Pool 19 of the UMR. A FlowCAM particle imaging system was used to enumerate and measure particles 53–300 µm in diameter for size and shape characteristics (e.g., volume, elongation, and symmetry). Suspended particle characteristics varied considerably over space and time and were strongly associated with discharge and concentrations of nitrate + nitrite (NO3-) and soluble reactive phosphorous (SRP). Particle characteristics in backwaters were distinct from those in other habitats for most of the study period, likely due to reduced hydrologic connectivity and higher biotic production in backwaters. During low discharge, phytoplankton and zooplankton made up relatively greater proportions of the observed particles. Concurrently during low discharge, concentrations of chlorophyll, volatile suspended solids, and total phosphorous were higher. Our results suggest that there are complex interactions among space, time, discharge, and other environmental variables (e.g. water nutrients) which drive suspended particle dynamics in large rivers.

  12. Concentration Measurements of Suspended Load using ADV with Influence of the Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula

    2017-04-01

    ADV backscatter data can be used under certain conditions to gain information about the concentrations of suspended loads. This was shown in many studies before (Fugate and Friedrichs 2002; Chanson et al 2008; Ha et al. 2009). This paper reports on a pre-study to investigate the influence of particle size on concentration measurements for suspended sediment load with ADV. The study was conducted in a flume in the Oskar-von-Miller-Institute using fresh water from a river including the natural suspended load. The ADV used in the experiments was a Vectrino Profiler (Nortek). In addition water samples were taken for TSS and TOC. For the measurements a surge was generated in the flume to ensure that also particles of larger size will be present in the water phase. The measurements and samples were taken during the whole surge event. Therefore we were able to find a good correlation between the backscatter data of the ADV and the TSS as well as TOC results. For the decreasing part of the flow event the concentration of TOC in the suspended load of the water phase is decreasing much slower than the TSS and results in a damped decrease of the backscatter values. This means that the results for concentration measurements might be slightly influenced by the size of the particles. Further evaluations of measurements conducted with a LISST SL (Sequoia) will be investigated to show the trend of the particle sizes during this process and fortify this result. David C. Fugate, Carl T. Friedrichs, Determining concentration and fall velocity of estuarine particle populations using ADV, OBS and LISST, Continental Shelf Research, Volume 22, Issues 11-13, 2002 H.K. Ha, W.-Y. Hsu, J.P.-Y. Maa, Y.Y. Shao, C.W. Holland, Using ADV backscatter strength for measuring suspended cohesive sediment concentration, Continental Shelf Research, Volume 29, Issue 10, 2009 Hubert Chanson, Maiko Takeuchi, Mark Trevethan, Using turbidity and acoustic backscatter intensity as surrogate measures of

  13. What does respirator certification tell us about filtration of ultrafine particles?

    PubMed

    Eninger, Robert M; Honda, Takeshi; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2008-05-01

    Recent interest in exposures to ultrafine particles (less than 100 nm) in both environmental and occupational settings led the authors to question whether the protocols used to certify respirator filters provide adequate attention to ultrafine aerosols. The authors reviewed the particle size distribution of challenge aerosols and evaluated the aerosol measurement method currently employed in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) particulate respirator certification protocol for its ability to measure the contribution of ultrafine particles to filter penetration. Also considered were the differences between mechanical and electrically charged (electret) filters in light of the most penetrating particle size. It was found that the sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctylphthalate (DOP) aerosols currently used in respirator certification tests contain a significant fraction of particles in the ultrafine region. However, the photometric method deployed in the certification test is not capable of adequately measuring light scatter of particles below approximately 100 nm in diameter. Specifically, 68% (by count) and 8% (by mass) of the challenge NaCl aerosol particles and 10% (by count) and 0.3% (by mass) of the DOP particles below 100 nm do not significantly contribute to the filter penetration measurement. In addition, the most penetrating particle size for electret filters likely occurs at 100 nm or less under test conditions similar to those used in filter certification. The authors conclude, therefore, that the existing NIOSH certification protocol may not represent a worst-case assessment for electret filters because it has limited ability to determine the contribution of ultrafine aerosols, which include the most penetrating particle size for electret filters. Possible strategies to assess ultrafine particle penetration in the certification protocol are discussed.

  14. Settling velocities of fine suspended particles in the Changjiang Estuary, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shi, Z.; Zhou, H.J.; Eittreim, S.L.; Winterwerp, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Point-sampled suspended sediment concentration profiles (grain size largely < 32 ??m) were measured in August 1978, April 1990, and May 1990 in the Changjiang Estuary. They were selectively fit with the Rouse equation in order to calculate the median settling velocities ws,50 of fine suspended particles in the Changjiang Estuary, East China Sea. Calculated settling velocities ranged from 0.4 to 4.1 mm s-1. Furthermore, ws values increased with the mean concentration C?? of sediment in suspension. The best-fit equation for the field settling velocity of fine particles in the Changjiang Estuary can be expressed by the power law: ws = 2.37 C??0.84 (r2 < 0.3). ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. IMPACT OF SIPHONING ACTIVITY AND NATURALLY SUSPENDED PARTICLE LOAD ON MUSSEL KILL by PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Molloy

    2003-08-04

    Under this USDOE-NETL contract, the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens is being developed as a biocontrol agent for zebra mussels. The specific purpose of the contract is to identify biotic and abiotic factors that affect mussel kill. Ingestion of these bacteria by zebra mussels is required to achieve kill, and tests evaluating factors that relate to mussel feeding are contained in this report. Specifically the impact of the following two factors were investigated: (1) Mussel siphoning behavior--In nature, zebra mussels typically have their two shells spread apart and their inhalant siphon tube extended from between their shells for taking food particles into their mantle cavities (Fig. 1). Our tests indicated that there is a direct correlation between mussel siphoning activity and mussel mortality achieved by a bacterial treatment. Therefore, to encourage mussel feeding on bacteria, future pipe treatments within power plants should be carried out using procedures which minimize disturbance to mussel siphoning. 2. Naturally suspended particle loads--Since bacterial cells are lethal only if ingested by mussels, waters containing very high levels of naturally suspended particles might reduce the mortality that can be achieved by a bacterial treatment. If true, this inhibition might occur as a result of particle exclusion, i.e., there could be reduced ingestion of bacterial cells since they represent a reduced percentage of all particles ingested. Our tests indicated that a range of particle concentrations that might naturally exist in a turbid river did not inhibit mussel kill by the bacterial cells, but that an artificially high load of natural particles was capable of causing a reduction in kill. To be conservative, therefore, future pipe treatments should be timed to occur when intake waters have relatively low quantities of naturally suspended particulate matter.

  16. Vanadium Inhalation in a Mouse Model for the Understanding of Air-Suspended Particle Systemic Repercussion

    PubMed Central

    Fortoul, T. I.; Rodriguez-Lara, V.; Gonzalez-Villalva, A.; Rojas-Lemus, M.; Cano-Gutierrez, G.; Ustarroz-Cano, M.; Colin-Barenque, L.; Montaño, L. F.; García-Pelez, I.; Bizarro-Nevares, P.; Lopez-Valdez, N.; Falcon-Rodriguez, C. I.; Jimenez-Martínez, R. S.; Ruiz-Guerrero, M. L.; López-Zepeda, L. S.; Morales-Rivero, A.; Muñiz-Rivera-Cambas, A.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increased concern about the health effects that air-suspended particles have on human health which have been dissected in animal models. Using CD-1 mouse, we explore the effects that vanadium inhalation produce in different tissues and organs. Our findings support the systemic effects of air pollution. In this paper, we describe our findings in different organs in our conditions and contrast our results with the literature. PMID:21716674

  17. Tracking suspended particle transport via radium isotopes ((226)Ra and (228)Ra) through the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River system.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Richard N; Burnett, William C; Opsahl, Stephen P; Santos, Isaac R; Misra, Sambuddha; Froelich, Philip N

    2013-02-01

    Suspended particles in rivers can carry metals, nutrients, and pollutants downstream which can become bioactive in estuaries and coastal marine waters. In river systems with multiple sources of both suspended particles and contamination sources, it is important to assess the hydrologic conditions under which contaminated particles can be delivered to downstream ecosystems. The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River system in the southeastern United States represents an ideal system to study these hydrologic impacts on particle transport through a heavily-impacted river (the Chattahoochee River) and one much less impacted by anthropogenic activities (the Flint River). We demonstrate here the utility of natural radioisotopes as tracers of suspended particles through the ACF system, where particles contaminated with arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) have been shown to be contributed from coal-fired power plants along the Chattahoochee River, and have elevated concentrations in the surficial sediments of the Apalachicola Bay Delta. Radium isotopes ((228)Ra and (226)Ra) on suspended particles should vary throughout the different geologic provinces of this river system, allowing differentiation of the relative contributions of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers to the suspended load delivered to Lake Seminole, the Apalachicola River, and ultimately to Apalachicola Bay. We also use various geochemical proxies ((40)K, organic carbon, and calcium) to assess the relative composition of suspended particles (lithogenic, organic, and carbonate fractions, respectively) under a range of hydrologic conditions. During low (base) flow conditions, the Flint River contributed 70% of the suspended particle load to both the Apalachicola River and the bay, whereas the Chattahoochee River became the dominant source during higher discharge, contributing 80% of the suspended load to the Apalachicola River and 62% of the particles entering the estuary. Neither of these hydrologic

  18. Study of Hydrophilic Electrospun Nanofiber Membranes for Filtration of Micro and Nanosize Suspended Particles

    PubMed Central

    Asmatulu, Ramazan; Muppalla, Harish; Veisi, Zeinab; Khan, Waseem S.; Asaduzzaman, Abu; Nuraje, Nurxat

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric nanofiber membranes of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) blended with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were fabricated using an electrospinning process at different conditions and used for the filtration of three different liquid suspensions to determine the efficiency of the filter membranes. The three liquid suspensions included lake water, abrasive particles from a water jet cutter, and suspended magnetite nanoparticles. The major goal of this research work was to create highly hydrophilic nanofiber membranes and utilize them to filter the suspended liquids at an optimal level of purification (i.e., drinkable level). In order to overcome the fouling/biofouling/blocking problems of the membrane, a coagulation process, which enhances the membrane’s efficiency for removing colloidal particles, was used as a pre-treatment process. Two chemical agents, Tanfloc (organic) and Alum (inorganic), were chosen for the flocculation/coagulation process. The removal efficiency of the suspended particles in the liquids was measured in terms of turbidity, pH, and total dissolved solids (TDS). It was observed that the coagulation/filtration experiments were more efficient at removing turbidity, compared to the direct filtration process performed without any coagulation and filter media. PMID:24957063

  19. 3-D Lagrangian Measurements of Suspended Particles in San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. M.; Tse, I.; Variano, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    San Francisco Bay often appears brown. Its high suspended sediment concentrations give it the potential to move and mix large amounts of sediments from one environment, such as an urban stormwater outflow, to another, such as a wetland undergoing restoration. These sediments can carry with them persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals such as PCBs, mercury, or emerging contaminants. To predict sediment fate, almost all physical models describe the transport of suspended sediment with the advection-diffusion equation, which requires knowledge of the water currents and the diffusivity of sediment. Methods for estimating diffusivity to use in the model are not typically satisfying, and there remain fundamental questions about the accuracy and applicability of the typical approximation methods. We have developed a new tool that measures 3D tracks of suspended sediment in-situ, from which we compute diffusivity directly. We present here the results of the first deployment, in San Francisco Bay near the Berkeley shore. This site has highly active sediment and is important for transfer of sediment-associated contaminants, and sediment diffusivity is sensitive to wind, waves, tides and turbulence. We investigate these relationships using our preliminary, proof-of-concept, data. It also provides the foundation for future investigations of the behavior of sediment diffusivity and particle trajectories in different environments and the underlying theory of solute diffusivity in real-world conditions. In addition, these data enable the analysis of whether sediment particles in San Francisco Bay exhibit the 'preferential clustering' observed for some inertial particles in turbulent flow.

  20. Effects of solid particles suspended in fluid flow through an axial flow compressor stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabakoff, W.; Balan, C.

    1981-01-01

    An approximate method for calculating the flow properties of gas-particle mixture flowing over blades in a cascade is studied. Using an analytical method, the solid particle trajectory and location of collisions between the solid particles and the blade surfaces are determined. In addition an experimental investigation of the trajectories and velocities of solid particles suspended in a fluid passing through an axial flow compressor cascade was performed. The cascade blades were made of 2024 aluminum alloy and the solid particles used were quartz sand with average diameter of 165 microns. The following parameters were investigated: blade pressure distribution, and total pressure loss coefficient, both depending on the degree of erosion. In addition, a theoretical estimation of the blade erosion is compared with the experimental data.

  1. A suspended-particle rosette multi-sampler for discrete biogeochemical sampling in low-particle-density waters

    SciTech Connect

    Breier, J. A.; Rauch, C. G.; McCartney, K.; Toner, B. M.; Fakra, S. C.; White, S. N.; German, C. R.

    2010-06-22

    To enable detailed investigations of early stage hydrothermal plume formation and abiotic and biotic plume processes we developed a new oceanographic tool. The Suspended Particulate Rosette sampling system has been designed to collect geochemical and microbial samples from the rising portion of deep-sea hydrothermal plumes. It can be deployed on a remotely operated vehicle for sampling rising plumes, on a wire-deployed water rosette for spatially discrete sampling of non-buoyant hydrothermal plumes, or on a fixed mooring in a hydrothermal vent field for time series sampling. It has performed successfully during both its first mooring deployment at the East Pacific Rise and its first remotely-operated vehicle deployments along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It is currently capable of rapidly filtering 24 discrete large-water-volume samples (30-100 L per sample) for suspended particles during a single deployment (e.g. >90 L per sample at 4-7 L per minute through 1 {mu}m pore diameter polycarbonate filters). The Suspended Particulate Rosette sampler has been designed with a long-term goal of seafloor observatory deployments, where it can be used to collect samples in response to tectonic or other events. It is compatible with in situ optical sensors, such as laser Raman or visible reflectance spectroscopy systems, enabling in situ particle analysis immediately after sample collection and before the particles alter or degrade.

  2. Inhalation of Respirable Crystalline Rifapentine Particles Induces Pulmonary Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Ashhurst, Anneliese S; Nagalingam, Gayathri; Britton, Warwick J; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2017-01-03

    Rifapentine is an anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB) drug with a prolonged half-life, but oral delivery results in low concentrations in the lungs because of its high binding (98%) to plasma proteins. We have shown that inhalation of crystalline rifapentine overcomes the limitations of oral delivery by significantly enhancing and prolonging the drug concentration in the lungs. The delivery of crystalline particles to the lungs may promote inflammation. This in vivo study characterizes the inflammatory response caused by pulmonary deposition of the rifapentine particles. The rifapentine powder was delivered to BALB/c mice by intratracheal insufflation at a dose of 20 mg/kg. The inflammatory response in the lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was examined at 12 h, 24 h, and 7 days post-treatment by flow cytometry and histopathology. At 12 and 24 h post-treatment, there was a significant influx of neutrophils into the lungs, and this returned to normal by day 7. A significant recruitment of macrophages occurred in the BAL at 24 h. Consistent with these findings, histopathological analysis demonstrated pulmonary vascular congestion and significant macrophage recruitment at 12 and 24 h post-treatment. In conclusion, the pulmonary delivery of crystalline rifapentine caused a transient neutrophil-associated inflammatory response in the lungs that resolved over 7 days. This observation may limit pulmonary delivery of rifapentine to once a week at a dose of 20 mg/kg or less. The effectiveness of weekly dosing with inhalable rifapentine will be assessed in murine Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

  3. Influence of alkaline suspended particles on the chemical composition of acid deposition in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C.S.; Lin, Z.J.; Wu, M.Y.; Liu, J.I.; Yuan, C.

    1998-12-31

    This study investigated the influence of alkaline suspended particles on the chemical composition of acid deposition both temporally and spatially in Kaohsiung metropolitan area in Taiwan. During the period of January--December, 1996, both wet and dry deposition samples were collected by automatic acid precipitation samplers at six sampling sites which covered the entire metropolitan area. Major cations (NH{sub 4}{sup +}, K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Ca{sup +2}, and Mg{sup +2}) and anions (F{sup {minus}}, Cl{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}) of acid deposition samples were analyzed in a central laboratory, while the pH value and conductivity of rainwater samples were measured in situ. Results from chemical analysis indicated that Ca{sup +2} was the most abundant cation in acid deposition samples. Major cations were Ca{sup +2} and NH{sub 4}{sup +}, while major anions were SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. This study also revealed that the pH value, suspended solids, Ca{sup +2}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} of rainwater decreased with rainy time in a sequential rainwater sampling process. It was estimated that approximately 80% of suspended particles could be washed out by rain droplets in the first hour of raining process. Therefore, alkaline suspended particles in the atmosphere played an very important role on the chemical composition of acid precipitation in Kaohsiung metropolitan area in Taiwan.

  4. A review of the effects of particle types on oil-suspended particulate matter aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Andrew; Yim, Un Hyuk

    2016-12-01

    Oil-suspended particulate matter aggregate (OSA) can form naturally when oil and particles interact. The interaction between oil and suspended particulate matter makes oil less sticky, and facilitates its dispersion in the water column. The high oil-water surface contact enhances the biodegradation of oil and thus increases the efficiency of remediation processes. There are many factors that affect OSA formation, but, particle type is one of the most important. Because different particle types have different physical, chemical, and biological properties, their interactions with oil differ greatly. Particle properties such as interlayer spaces, hydrophobicity, surface charges, polarity, organic content, and size affect the interactions between materials and oil. These different interactions determine the type, buoyancy, size, and stability of OSA that forms, thus determining its fate in the environment. This review provides a current understanding of (1) OSA formation mechanisms, (2) sources and classes of marine materials, (3) oil-particle interactions, (4) material properties and their effects on oil interaction, and (5) future research needs.

  5. Large particle penetration through N95 respirator filters and facepiece leaks with cyclic flow.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyungmin Jacob; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy; Shukla, Rakesh; Haruta, Hiroki; Sekar, Padmini; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate respirator filter and faceseal penetration of particles representing bacterial and fungal spore size ranges (0.7-4 mum). First, field experiments were conducted to determine workplace protection factors (WPFs) for a typical N95 filtering facepiece respirator (FFR). These data (average WPF = 515) were then used to position the FFR on a manikin to simulate realistic donning conditions for laboratory experiments. Filter penetration was also measured after the FFR was fully sealed on the manikin face. This value was deducted from the total penetration (obtained from tests with the partially sealed FFR) to determine the faceseal penetration. All manikin experiments were repeated using three sinusoidal breathing flow patterns corresponding to mean inspiratory flow rates of 15, 30, and 85 l min(-1). The faceseal penetration varied from 0.1 to 1.1% and decreased with increasing particle size (P < 0.001) and breathing rate (P < 0.001). The fractions of aerosols penetrating through the faceseal leakage varied from 0.66 to 0.94. In conclusion, even for a well-fitting FFR respirator, most particle penetration occurs through faceseal leakage, which varies with breathing flow rate and particle size.

  6. Flow regime and deposition pattern of evaporating binary mixture droplet suspended with particles.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2016-02-01

    The flow regimes and the deposition pattern have been investigated by changing the ethanol concentration in a water-based binary mixture droplet suspended with alumina nanoparticles. To visualize the flow patterns, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been applied in the binary liquid droplet containing the fluorescent microspheres. Three distinct flow regimes have been revealed in the evaporation. In Regime I, the vortices and chaotic flows are found to carry the particles to the liquid-vapor interface and to promote the formation of particle aggregation. The aggregates move inwards in Regime II as induced by the Marangoni flow along the droplet free surface. Regime III is dominated by the drying of the left water and the capillary flow driving particles radially outward is observed. The relative weightings of Regimes I and II, which are enhanced with an increasing load of ethanol, determine the motion of the nanoparticles and the formation of the final drying pattern.

  7. From suspended particles to strata: The fate of terrestrial substances in the Gaoping (Kaoping) submarine canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, James T.; Hung, Jia-Jang; Lin, Hui-Ling; Huh, Chih-An; Lee, Chon-Lin; Hsu, Ray T.; Huang, Ya-Wen; Chu, Joel C.

    2009-03-01

    The river-sea system consisting of the Gaoping (new spelling according to the latest government's directive, formerly spelled Kaoping) River (KPR), shelf, and Submarine Canyon (KPRSC) located off southern Taiwan is an ideal natural laboratory to study the source, pathway, transport, and fate of terrestrial substances. In 2004 during the flood season of the KPR, a system-wide comprehensive field experiment was conducted to investigate particle dynamics from a source-to-sink perspective in the KPRSC with the emphasis on the effect of particle size on the transport, settling, and sedimentation along the pathway. This paper reports the findings from (1) two sediment trap moorings each configured with a Technicap PPS 3/3 sediment trap, and an acoustic current meter (Aquadopp); (2) concurrent hydrographic profiling and water sampling was conducted over 8 h next to the sediment trap moorings; and (3) box-coring in the head region of the submarine canyon near the mooring sites. Particle samples from sediment traps were analyzed for mass fluxes, grain-size composition, total organic carbon (TOC) and nitrogen (TN), organic matter (OM), carbonate, biogenic opal, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), lithogenic silica and aluminum, and foraminiferal abundance. Samples from box cores were analyzed for grain-size distribution, TOC, particulate organic matter (POM), carbonate, biogenic opal, water content, and 210Pb ex. Water samples were filtered through 500, 250, 63, 10 µm sieves and 0.4 µm filter for the suspended sediment concentration of different size-classes. Results show that the river and shelf do not supply all the suspended particles near the canyon floor. The estimated mass flux near the canyon floor exceeds 800 g/m 2/day, whose values are 2-7 times higher than those at the upper rim of the canyon. Most of the suspended particles in the canyon are fine-grained (finer than medium silt) lithogenic sediments whose percentages are 90.2% at the upper rim and 93.6% in

  8. Behavior of suspended particles in the Changjiang Estuary: Size distribution and trace metal contamination.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingzhen; Wang, Xiaojing; Jian, Huimin; Chen, Hongtao; Yu, Zhigang

    2016-02-15

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM) samples were collected along a salinity gradient in the Changjiang Estuary in June 2011. A custom-built water elutriation apparatus was used to separate the suspended sediments into five size fractions. The results indicated that Cr and Pb originated from natural weathering processes, whereas Cu, Zn, and Cd originated from other sources. The distribution of most trace metals in different particle sizes increased with decreasing particle size. The contents of Fe/Mn and organic matter were confirmed to play an important role in increasing the level of heavy metal contents. The Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd contents varied significantly with increasing salinity in the medium-low salinity region, thus indicating the release of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd particles. Thus, the transfer of polluted fine particles into the open sea is probably accompanied by release of pollutants into the dissolved compartment, thereby amplifying the potential harmful effects to marine organisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Particle Size-Selective Assessment of Protection of European Standard FFP Respirators and Surgical Masks against Particles-Tested with Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Dong-Chir; Li, He-Yi; Tsai, Chieh-Fu; Chen, Chun-Wan; Chen, Jen-Kun

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the protection of disposable filtering half-facepiece respirators of different grades against particles between 0.093 and 1.61 μm. A personal sampling system was used to particle size-selectively assess the protection of respirators. The results show that about 10.9% of FFP2 respirators and 28.2% of FFP3 respirators demonstrate assigned protection factors (APFs) below 10 and 20, which are the levels assigned for these respirators by the British Standard. On average, the protection factors of FFP respirators were 11.5 to 15.9 times greater than those of surgical masks. The minimum protection factors (PFs) were observed for particles between 0.263 and 0.384 μm. No significant difference in PF results was found among FFP respirator categories and particle size. A strong association between fit factors and protection factors was found. The study indicates that FFP respirators may not achieve the expected protection level and the APFs may need to be revised for these classes of respirators. PMID:27195721

  10. ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF RESPIRABLE TIRE PARTICLES AND ASSESSMENT OF CARDIO-PULMONARY TOXICITY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elemental Analysis of Respirable Tire Particles and Assessment of Cardio-pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    R.R. Gottipolu, PhD1, E. Landa, PhD2, J.K. McGee, MS1, M.C. Schladweiler, BS1, J.G. Wallenborn, MS3, A.D. Ledbetter, BS1, J.E. Richards, MS1 and U.P. Kodavanti, PhD1. 1NHEER...

  11. ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF RESPIRABLE TIRE PARTICLES AND ASSESSMENT OF CARDIO-PULMONARY TOXICITY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elemental Analysis of Respirable Tire Particles and Assessment of Cardio-pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    R.R. Gottipolu, PhD1, E. Landa, PhD2, J.K. McGee, MS1, M.C. Schladweiler, BS1, J.G. Wallenborn, MS3, A.D. Ledbetter, BS1, J.E. Richards, MS1 and U.P. Kodavanti, PhD1. 1NHEER...

  12. Individual particle analysis of suspended materials in Onondaga Lake, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.L.; Jiao, Jianfu; DosSantos, S.G. ); Effler, S.W. )

    1991-04-01

    The chemical and physical characteristics of the particles of the near-surface waters of polluted, hypereutrophic, Onondaga Lake, NY, were observed by individual particle analysis techniques for the spring to fall interval of 1987. Strong temporal variations were documented for the projected particle area per unit volume (PAV), and the relative contribution that six chemical groupings of particles made to the overall assemblage of particles. These dynamics were regulated largely by (1) the composition and level of phytoplankton growth, (2) tributary loading of particles, particularly after runoff events, and (3) the precipitation of calcium carbonate. Approximately 85% of the PAV was associated with in-lake processes and {approximately} 15% was derived from tributary transport. Approximately 25% of the internally produced PAV was related to calcium carbonate precipitation; the remainder was associated with biological production. A once in 7-year runoff event caused a 5-fold increase in the concentration of suspended particles. Much of the increase was due to calcium carbonate precipitation that coated various nuclei particles.

  13. Sizing submicron suspended particles by using oblique illumination to measure optical scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, R.; Roberts, P. L.; Jaffe, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    As is widely known, microbes play a very important role in marine ecology such as in the microbial loop and the subsequent incorporation into the food chain. As such, sizing and counting microbes is a fundamental element of the study of the ocean ecology. Despite this, the detection and sizing of submicron particles has been problematic. In order to provide a technology to solve this problem we have developed a method to size submicron particles suspended in water. The method is based on an optical scattering measurement that combines an oblique incidence structure and high numerical aperture lenses. The data is then analyzed using a model that incorporates the physics of scatter from these small particles. The Oblique Illumination Scattering Meter (OLSM) measures scatter from a single particle over both the entire forward and backward directions. The scattered intensities are integrated respectively to calculate a ratio (R) of forward to backward scatter. Based on this ratio and its relationship to particle scatter, the particle diameter (D) can be estimated. Both theory and experimental results from a lab setup show that R monotonically increases with D from 0.1 to 0.8 microns. Results indicate that the size distribution of polystyrene beads down to 0.2 micro-meter diameter can be accurately retrieved from the experimental data. Currently, simulations, find that the relationship is valid for a variety of different refractive index of the particles, smaller than 1.47 and is independent of particle absorption.

  14. Glider monitoring of shelf suspended particle dynamics and transport during storm and flooding conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrin, François; Many, Gaël; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Martín, Jacobo; Puig, Pere; Houpert, Loic; Testor, Pierre; Kunesch, Stéphane; Mahiouz, Karim; Béguery, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    Transfers of particulate matter on continental margins primarily occur during energetic events. As part of the CASCADE (CAscading, Storm, Convection, Advection and Downwelling Events) experiment, a glider equipped with optical sensors was deployed in the coastal area of the Gulf of Lions, NW Mediterranean in March 2011 to assess the spatio-temporal variability of hydrology, suspended particles properties and fluxes during energetic conditions. This deployment complemented a larger observational effort, a part of the MOOSE (Mediterranean Ocean Observing System of the Environment) network, composed of a coastal benthic station, a surface buoy and moorings on the continental slope. This set of observations permitted to measure the impact of three consecutive storms and a flood event across the entire continental shelf. Glider data showed that the sediment resuspension and transport observed at the coastal station during the largest storm (Hs>4 m) was effective down to a water depth of 80 m. The mid-shelf mud belt, located between 40 and 90 m depth, appears as the zone where the along-shelf flux of suspended sediment is maximum. Besides, the across-shelf flux of suspended sediment converges towards the outer limit of the mid-shelf mud belt, where deposition of suspended particles probably occurs and contributes to the nourishment of this area. Hydrological structures, suspended particles transport and properties changed drastically during stormy periods and the following flood event. Prior to the storms, the shelf waters were weakly stratified due in particular to the presence of cold dense water on the inner- and mid-shelf. The storms rapidly swept away this dense water, as well as the resuspended sediments, along the shelf and towards a downstream submarine canyon. The buoyant river plumes that spread along the shelf after the flooding period provoked a restratification of the water column on the inner- and mid-shelf. The analysis of glider's optical data at

  15. Evaluation of the surface roughness effect on suspended particle deposition near unpaved roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dongzi; Gillies, John A.; Etyemezian, Vicken; Nikolich, George; Shaw, William J.

    2015-12-01

    The downwind transport and deposition of suspended dust raised by a vehicle driving on unpaved roads was studied for four differently vegetated surfaces in the USA states of Kansas and Washington, and one barren surface in Nevada. A 10 m high tower adjacent to the source (≈10 m downwind) and an array of multi-channel optical particle counters at three positions downwind of the source measured the flux of particles and the particle size distribution in the advecting dust plumes in the horizontal and vertical directions. Aerodynamic parameters such as friction velocity (u*) and surface roughness length (z0) were calculated from wind speed measurements made on the tower. Particle number concentration, PM10 mass exhibited an exponential decay along the direction of transport. Coarse particles accounted for ≈95% of the PM10 mass, at least to a downwind distance of 200 m from the source. PM10 removed by deposition was found to increase with increasing particle size and increasing surface roughness under similar moderate wind speed conditions. The surface of dense, long grass (1.2 m high and complete surface cover) had the greatest reduction of PM10 among the five surfaces tested due to deposition induced by turbulence effects created by the rougher surface and by enhanced particle impaction/interception effects to the grass blades.

  16. Evaluation of the surface roughness effect on suspended particle deposition near unpaved roads

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Dongzi; Gillies, J. A.; Etyemezian, V.; Nikolich, G.; Shaw, William J.

    2015-11-11

    The downwind transport and deposition of suspended dust raised by a vehicle driving on unpaved roads was studied for four differently vegetated surfaces in the USA states of Kansas and Washington, and one barren surface in Nevada. A 10 m high tower adjacent to the source (z10 m downwind) and an array of multi-channel optical particle counters at three positions downwind of the source measured the flux of particles and the particle size distribution in the advecting dust plumes in the horizontal and vertical directions. Aerodynamic parameters such as friction velocity (u*) and surface roughness length (z0) were calculated from wind speed measurements made on the tower. Particle number concentration, PM10 mass exhibited an exponential decay along the direction of transport. Coarse particles accounted for z95% of the PM10 mass, at least to a downwind distance of 200 m from the source. PM10 removed by deposition was found to increase with increasing particle size and increasing surface roughness under similar moderate wind speed conditions. The surface of dense, long grass (1.2 m high and complete surface cover) had the greatest reduction of PM10 among the five surfaces tested due to deposition induced by turbulence effects created by the rougher surface and by enhanced particle impaction/ interception effects to the grass blades.

  17. Holographic characterization of contaminants in water: Differentiation of suspended particles in heterogeneous dispersions.

    PubMed

    Philips, Laura A; Ruffner, David B; Cheong, Fook Chiong; Blusewicz, Jaroslaw M; Kasimbeg, Priya; Waisi, Basma; McCutcheon, Jeffrey R; Grier, David G

    2017-10-01

    Determining the size distribution and composition of particles suspended in water can be challenging in heterogeneous multicomponent samples. Light scattering techniques can measure the distribution of particle sizes, but provide no basis for distinguishing different types of particles. Direct imaging techniques can categorize particles by shape, but offer few insights into their composition. Holographic characterization meets this need by directly measuring the size, refractive index, and three-dimensional position of individual particles in a suspension. The ability to measure an individual colloidal particle's refractive index is a unique capability of holographic characterization. Holographic characterization is fast enough, moreover, to build up population distribution data in real time, and to track time variations in the concentrations of different dispersed populations of particles. We demonstrate these capabilities using a model system consisting of polystyrene microbeads co-dispersed with bacteria in an oil-in-water emulsion. We also demonstrate how the holographic fingerprint of different contaminants can contribute to identifying their source. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Suspended particle transport and circulation in San Francisco Bay - an overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conomos, T.J.; Peterson, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    Differences in the relative magnitude and timing of wind stress and river inflow in the northern and southern reaches of San Francisco Bay create different sedimentary conditions. The northern reach is a partially to well mixed estuary receiving most of the total annual fresh-water input (840 m3 sec−1) and suspended sediment input (4 × 106metric tons) into the bay; more than 80% of the sediment is received during winter. Density-driven nontidal estuarine circulation (~5 cm sec−1) maintains a turbidity maximum which changes seasonally in particle concentration (40 to 80 mg litre−1). Strong tidal currents (≤225 cm sec−1) and wind-generated waves resuspend sediment from the shallow bay floor: some of the riverborne sediment deposited during winter is resuspended during summer and transported landward to the turbidity maximum. Long-term sediment data (extrapolated from bathymetrie charts) indicate that the northern reach is an effective sediment trap. In contrast, long-term sediment data suggest that the southern reach is experiencing net erosion. The southern reach receives little river inflow or riverborne suspended sediment, and the average nontidal circulation is weak (≤2 cm sec−1). The principal source of suspended sediment (25 mg litre−1) in the southern reach is the shallow bay floor (average depth 6 m).

  19. Effective Interactions between Colloidal Particles Suspended in a Bath of Swimming Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, L.; Maggi, C.; Bernardini, M. L.; Rizzo, A.; di Leonardo, R.

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics of passive colloidal tracers in a bath of self-propelled particles is receiving a lot of attention in the context of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. Here we demonstrate that active baths are also capable of mediating effective interactions between suspended bodies. In particular we observe that a bath of swimming bacteria gives rise to a short range attraction similar to depletion forces in equilibrium colloidal suspensions. Using numerical simulations and experiments we show how the features of this interaction arise from the combination of nonequilibrium dynamics (peculiar of bacterial baths) and excluded volume effects.

  20. Biological flocculation of suspended particles in nutrient-rich aqueous ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Federico

    2009-09-01

    SummaryWe describe the development and testing of a mechanistic model (BFLOC) to predict the average size of sediment aggregates in nutrient-rich aqueous ecosystems. The original capability of BFLOC is to couple turbulence-induced flocculation of suspended minerals and micro-organisms with the nutrient-related dynamics of aggregate-attached micro-organisms. The model, calibrated and validated against the average floc size recorded at two stations in the Belgian North Sea [Fettweis, M., Francken, F., Pison V., Ven den Eynde, D., 2006. Suspended particulate matter dynamics and aggregate sizes in a high turbidity area. Marine Geology 235, 63-74], closely captured site conditions and significantly clarified interpretation of field measurements. Modeling results indicated that an accurate prediction of time-varying floc sizes was possible only by taking into account the organic fraction of the suspended particle matter and the micro-organism colonization of the floc micro-environment. BFLOC showed that the floc excess density strongly correlated with the floc biomass volume, while the settling velocity strongly correlated with the floc mineral volume. We noticed that the settling velocity was poorly correlated with the total floc volume (and floc size), suggesting a revision of current methods that assess suspended matter deposition uniquely on the basis of the floc size. Additionally, various hypotheses tested with BFLOC suggested that the effect of aggregate-attached biomass on aggregation and breakup rates was very small when it was accounted for with a first-order description. More generally, the sediment and biomass parameters found here were nearly site independent suggesting that the mechanistic approach of BFLOC was relatively robust.

  1. Spatial and temporal dynamics of suspended particle characteristics and composition in Navigation Pool 19 of the Upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milde, Amanda S.; Richardson, William B.; Strauss, Eric A.; Larson, James H.; Vallazza, Jon; Knights, Brent C.

    2017-01-01

    Suspended particles are an essential component of large rivers influencing channel geomorphology, biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, and food web resources. The Upper Mississippi River is a large floodplain river that exhibits pronounced spatiotemporal variation in environmental conditions and biota, providing an ideal environment for investigating dynamics of suspended particles in large river ecosystems. Here we investigated two questions: (i) How do suspended particle characteristics (e.g. size and morphology) vary temporally and spatially? and (ii) What environmental variables have the strongest association with particle characteristics? Water sampling was conducted in June, August, and September of 2013 and 2014 in Navigation Pool 19 of the Upper Mississippi River. A FlowCAM® (Flow Cytometer and Microscope) particle imaging system was used to enumerate and measure particles 53–300 μm in diameter for size and shape characteristics (e.g. volume, elongation, and symmetry). Suspended particle characteristics varied considerably over space and time and were strongly associated with discharge and concentrations of nitrate + nitrite (NO3−) and soluble reactive phosphorus. Particle characteristics in backwaters were distinct from those in other habitats for most of the study period, likely due to reduced hydrologic connectivity and higher biotic production in backwaters. During low discharge, phytoplankton and zooplankton made up relatively greater proportions of the observed particles. Concurrently during low discharge, concentrations of chlorophyll, volatile suspended solids, and total phosphorus were higher. Our results suggest that there are complex interactions among space, time, discharge, and other environmental variables (e.g. water nutrients), which drive suspended particle dynamics in large rivers.

  2. The fluctuation energy balance in non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Pähtz, Thomas; Durán, Orencio; Ho, Tuan-Duc; Valance, Alexandre; Kok, Jasper F.

    2015-01-15

    Here, we compare two extreme regimes of non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport, transport in light and heavy fluids (“saltation” and “bedload,” respectively), regarding their particle fluctuation energy balance. From direct numerical simulations, we surprisingly find that the ratio between collisional and fluid drag dissipation of fluctuation energy is significantly larger in saltation than in bedload, even though the contribution of interparticle collisions to transport of momentum and energy is much smaller in saltation due to the low concentration of particles in the transport layer. We conclude that the much higher frequency of high-energy particle-bed impacts (“splash”) in saltation is the cause for this counter-intuitive behavior. Moreover, from a comparison of these simulations to particle tracking velocimetry measurements which we performed in a wind tunnel under steady transport of fine and coarse sand, we find that turbulent fluctuations of the flow produce particle fluctuation energy at an unexpectedly high rate in saltation even under conditions for which the effects of turbulence are usually believed to be small.

  3. Influence of neighboring particles on the drag of a particle suspended in laminar flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Adam Vincent

    Understanding particle-fluid flows is very important for the areas of sedimentation in river beds, fluidized bed reactors, and other fields of multiphase flow. The effect of one particle on another in a fluid flow is not very well understood nor does a correlation exist to describe the behavior of the drag coefficient between particles. The use of Proteus was validated by comparison to previous studies to the result obtained through simulations in Proteus, including analysis of the wake structure of a single sphere. Two particles were then analyzed for various Reynolds numbers less than 250 but greater than 5 and for the dimensionless gap of L/D ≥ 2, where L is the distance between the two particle centers and D is the diameter of the particles. Two arrangements were used for simulation, with the particles spaced horizontally or vertically within the fluid flow. Both orientations were evaluated for the effects of the dimensionless gap on the drag coefficient. The wake structure at higher Reynolds numbers were also evaluated for effects due to neighboring particles. A correlation was developed for the case of the horizontal particles at a dimensionless gap, L/D ≥ 2 for the range of Reynolds numbers described. The orientation effect is then studied at a fixed distance for offsets of thirty, forty-five and sixty degrees from the horizontal. Results are also presented to evaluate the effect of the diameter of a neighboring particle. The current results are restricted to the case described in the work. Future studies may build on the current work to extend the work to other effects of neighboring particles and multiple particle influence.

  4. Effects of Spray Surfactant and Particle Charge on Respirable Coal Dust Capture.

    PubMed

    Tessum, Mei W; Raynor, Peter C

    2017-09-01

    Surfactant-containing water sprays are commonly used in coal mines to collect dust. This study investigates the dust collection performance of different surfactant types for a range of coal dust particle sizes and charges. Bituminous coal dust aerosol was generated in a wind tunnel. The charge of the aerosol was either left unaltered, charge-neutralized with a neutralizer, or positively- or negatively-charged using a diffusion charger after the particles were neutralized. An anionic, cationic, or nonionic surfactant spray or a plain water spray was used to remove the particles from the air flow. Some particles were captured while passing through spray section, whereas remaining particles were charge-separated using an electrostatic classifier. Particle size and concentration of the charge-separated particles were measured using an aerodynamic particle sizer. Measurements were made with the spray on and off to calculate overall collection efficiencies (integrated across all charge levels) and efficiencies of particles with specific charge levels. The diameter of the tested coal dust aerosol was 0.89 μm ± 1.45 [geometric mean ± geometric standard deviations (SD)]. Respirable particle mass was collected with 75.5 ± 5.9% (mean ± SD) efficiency overall. Collection efficiency was correlated with particle size. Surfactant type significantly impacted collection efficiency: charged particle collection by nonionic surfactant sprays was greater than or equal to collection by other sprays, especially for weakly-charged aerosols. Particle charge strength was significantly correlated with collection efficiency. Surfactant type affects charged particle spray collection efficiency. Nonionic surfactant sprays performed well in coal dust capture in many of the tested conditions.

  5. Polychromatic transmissometer for in situ measurements of suspended particles and gelbstoff in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Hans; Grisard, Klaus; Holtsch, Kurt; Reuter, Rainer; Stute, Uwe

    1997-10-01

    The beam attenuation coefficient is an optical parameter that sensitively depends on suspended and dissolved substances in water. Its measurement is not only of interest for an understanding of the radiative transfer in a water column. With appropriate algorithms for data interpretation, it also allows a fast determination of absorbing and scattering matter as time-series measurements or depth profiles that cannot easily be obtained with other methods. An instrument has been developed for measuring spectral attenuation coefficients over a wavelength range from 340 to 785 nm. The optical path length can be set between 0 and 400 mm. This allows application in a wide range of turbidity in coastal and inland (case 2 and case 3) waters and a calibration of the instrument during in-situ measurements. This makes the instrument suitable for long-term applications in which signals from conventional instruments would degrade owing to the biofouling of optical windows. From the data, the amount and the size distribution of suspended particles and the specific absorption of dissolved organic matter are derived in real time. Algorithms based on Monte Carlo methods are available for a classification of transparent particles and phytoplankton.

  6. Polychromatic in-situ transmissometer for measurements of suspended particles and yellow substance in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Hans; Reuter, Rainer; Stute, Uwe

    1997-02-01

    Hydrographic conditions are often characterized by large amounts of dissolved and particulate matter. These substances influence the optical properties of seawater, and the radiative transfer in the water column. The attenuation coefficient is an optical parameter which depends sensitively on suspended and dissolved substances. An instrument has been developed for measuring spectral attenuation coefficients over a wavelength range form 370 to 730 nm. The optical path length can be set between zero and 400 nm, which allows an application in a wide range of turbidity. The variable path length enables a calibration of the instrument during in situ measurements, which makes it suitable for long-term applications where signals from conventional instruments would degrade due to biofouling of optical windows. From the data, the concentration and size distribution of suspended particles, and the concentration of dissolved organic matter are derived in real time. Algorithms based on Monte Carlo methods are available for a specific evaluation of non-chlorophylleous particles and phytoplankton. Results of field applications are reported.

  7. Ultrasonic irradiation of deuterium-loaded palladium particles suspended in heavy water

    SciTech Connect

    Jorne, J.

    1996-01-01

    Ultrasonic irradiation of a slurry of deuterium-loaded palladium powder (1 {mu}m) suspended in heavy water causes cavitation and high-speed collisions between the palladium particles. High local temperatures, estimated at above the melting point of palladium (1828 K), cause melting and interparticle fusion. The expectation that such collisions can induce high stresses within the palladium particles and lead to favorable conditions for nuclear cold fusion of the deuterium atoms within the palladium lattice is checked by measuring the neutron rates during ultrasonic irradiation. Several bursts of neutron counting are observed and can be accounted for as background anomalism, although the highest observed neutron rate is about four times the background and cannot be explained as background. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the deuterium-loaded palladium powders reveals that after ultrasonic irradiation in heavy water, the palladium powder becomes partially oxidized and undergoes some compositional changes. 18 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Laboratory evaluation of the particle size effect on the performance of an elastomeric half-mask respirator against ultrafine combustion particles.

    PubMed

    He, Xinjian; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Reponen, Tiina; Yermakov, Michael; McKay, Roy; Haruta, Hiroki; Kimura, Kazushi

    2013-08-01

    This study quantified the particle size effect on the performance of elastomeric half-mask respirators, which are widely used by firefighters and first responders exposed to combustion aerosols. One type of elastomeric half-mask respirator equipped with two P-100 filters was donned on a breathing manikin while challenged with three combustion aerosols (originated by burning wood, paper, and plastic). Testing was conducted with respirators that were fully sealed, partially sealed (nose area only), or unsealed to the face of a breathing manikin to simulate different faceseal leakages. Three cyclic flows with mean inspiratory flow (MIF) rates of 30, 85, and 135 L/min were tested for each combination of sealing condition and combustion material. Additional testing was performed with plastic combustion particles at other cyclic and constant flows. Particle penetration was determined by measuring particle number concentrations inside and outside the respirator with size ranges from 20 to 200 nm. Breathing flow rate, particle size, and combustion material all had significant effects on the performance of the respirator. For the partially sealed and unsealed respirators, the penetration through the faceseal leakage reached maximum at particle sizes >100 nm when challenged with plastic aerosol, whereas no clear peaks were observed for wood and paper aerosols. The particles aerosolized by burning plastic penetrated more readily into the unsealed half-mask than those aerosolized by the combustion of wood and paper. The difference may be attributed to the fact that plastic combustion particles differ from wood and paper particles by physical characteristics such as charge, shape, and density. For the partially sealed respirator, the highest penetration values were obtained at MIF = 85 L/min. The unsealed respirator had approximately 10-fold greater penetration than the one partially sealed around the bridge of the nose, which indicates that the nose area was the primary leak

  9. X-ray fluorescence mapping of mercury on suspended mineral particles and diatoms in a contaminated freshwater system

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Baohua; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Miller, Carrie L; Wang, Wei; Lai, Barry; Brooks, Scott C; Kemner, Kenneth M; Liang, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) bioavailability and geochemical cycling is affected by its partitioning between the aqueous and particulate phases. We applied X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobes to directly visualize and quantify the spatial localization of Hg and its correlations with other elements of interest on suspended particles from a Hg contaminated freshwater system. Up to 175 g/g Hg is found on suspended particles. Mercury is heterogeneously distributed among phytoplankton (e.g., diatoms) and mineral particles that are rich in iron oxides and natural organic matter (NOM), possibly as Hg-NOM-iron oxide ternary complexes. The diatom-bound Hg is mostly found on outer surfaces of the cells, suggesting passive sorption of inorganic Hg on diatoms. Our results indicate that localized sorption of Hg onto suspended particles, including diatoms and NOM-coated oxide minerals, is an important sink for Hg in natural aquatic environments.

  10. Penetration of Combustion Aerosol Particles Through Filters of NIOSH-Certified Filtering Facepiece Respirators (FFRs).

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuang; Kim, Jinyong; Yermakov, Michael; Elmashae, Yousef; He, Xinjian; Reponen, Tiina; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2015-01-01

    Filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) are commonly worn by first responders, first receivers, and other exposed groups to protect against exposure to airborne particles, including those originated by combustion. Most of these FFRs are NIOSH-certified (e.g., N95-type) based on the performance testing of their filters against charge-equilibrated aerosol challenges, e.g., NaCl. However, it has not been examined if the filtration data obtained with the NaCl-challenged FFR filters adequately represent the protection against real aerosol hazards such as combustion particles. A filter sample of N95 FFR mounted on a specially designed holder was challenged with NaCl particles and three combustion aerosols generated in a test chamber by burning wood, paper, and plastic. The concentrations upstream (Cup) and downstream (Cdown) of the filter were measured with a TSI P-Trak condensation particle counter and a Grimm Nanocheck particle spectrometer. Penetration was determined as (Cdown/Cup) ×100%. Four test conditions were chosen to represent inhalation flows of 15, 30, 55, and 85 L/min. Results showed that the penetration values of combustion particles were significantly higher than those of the "model" NaCl particles (p < 0.05), raising a concern about applicability of the N95 filters performance obtained with the NaCl aerosol challenge to protection against combustion particles. Aerosol type, inhalation flow rate and particle size were significant (p < 0.05) factors affecting the performance of the N95 FFR filter. In contrast to N95 filters, the penetration of combustion particles through R95 and P95 FFR filters (were tested in addition to N95) were not significantly higher than that obtained with NaCl particles. The findings were attributed to several effects, including the degradation of an N95 filter due to hydrophobic organic components generated into the air by combustion. Their interaction with fibers is anticipated to be similar to those involving "oily" particles

  11. Ultrasonic device for real-time sewage velocity and suspended particles concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Abda, F; Azbaid, A; Ensminger, D; Fischer, S; François, P; Schmitt, P; Pallarès, A

    2009-01-01

    In the frame of a technological research and innovation network in water and environment technologies (RITEAU, Réseau de Recherche et d'Innovation Technologique Eau et Environnement), our research group, in collaboration with industrial partners and other research institutions, has been in charge of the development of a suitable flowmeter: an ultrasonic device measuring simultaneously the water flow and the concentration of size classes of suspended particles. Working on the pulsed ultrasound principle, our multi-frequency device (1 to 14 MHz) allows flow velocity and water height measurement and estimation of suspended solids concentration. Velocity measurements rely on the coherent Doppler principle. A self developed frequency estimator, so called Spectral Identification method, was used and compared to the classical Pulse-Pair method. Several measurements campaigns on one wastewater collector of the French city of Strasbourg gave very satisfactory results and showed smaller standard deviation values for the Doppler frequency extracted by the Spectral Identification method. A specific algorithm was also developed for the water height measurements. It relies on the water surface acoustic impedance rupture and its peak localisation and behaviour in the collected backscattering data. This algorithm was positively tested on long time measurements on the same wastewater collector. A large part of the article is devoted to the measurements of the suspended solids concentrations. Our data analysis consists in the adaptation of the well described acoustic behaviour of sand to the behaviour of wastewater particles. Both acoustic attenuation and acoustic backscattering data over multiple frequencies are analyzed for the extrapolation of size classes and respective concentrations. Under dry weather conditions, the massic backscattering coefficient and the overall size distribution showed similar evolution whatever the measurement site was and were suggesting a global

  12. Control of respirable particles in indoor air with portable air cleaners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offermann, F. J.; Sextro, R. G.; Fisk, W. J.; Grimsrud, D. T.; Nazaroff, W. W.; Nero, A. V.; Revzan, K. L.; Yater, J.

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles using in situ chamber decay tests. Following injection of cigarette smoke in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size with and without air cleaner operation. The size distribution of the tobacco smoke particles was log normal with a count median diameter of 0.15 μm and a geometric standard deviation of 2.0. Without air cleaner operation, the natural mass-averaged surface deposition rate of particles was observed to be 0.1 h -1. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filter devices, a residential-sized ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. Electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters removed particles at substantial rates, and a HEPA-type filter was most efficient air cleaner studied.

  13. Control of Respirable Particles in Indoor Air with Portable AirCleaners

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, F.J.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Grimsrud, D.T.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-10-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles using in situ chamber decay tests. Following injection of cigarette smoke in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size with and without air cleaner operation. The size distribution of the tobacco smoke particles was log normal with a count median diameter of 0.15 {micro}m and a geometric standard deviation of 2.0. Without air cleaner operation, the natural mass-averaged surface deposition rate of particles was observed to be 0.1 h{sup -1}. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filter devices, a residential-sized ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. Electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters removed particles at substantial rates, and a HEPA-type filter was the most efficient air cleaner studied.

  14. Hysteresis in suspended sediment to turbidity relations due to changing particle size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landers, Mark N.; Sturm, Terry W.

    2013-01-01

    Turbidity (T) is the most ubiquitous of surrogate technologies used to estimate suspended-sediment concentration (SSC). The effects of sediment size on turbidity are well documented; however, effects from changes in particle size distributions (PSD) are rarely evaluated. Hysteresis in relations of SSC-to-turbidity (SSC~T) for single stormflow events was observed and quantified for a data set of 195 concurrent measurements of SSC, turbidity, discharge, velocity, and volumetric PSD collected during five stormflows in 2009–2010 on Yellow River at Gees Mill Road in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. Regressions of SSC-normalized turbidity (T/SSC) on concurrently measured PSD percentiles show an inverse, exponential influence of particle size on turbidity that is not constant across the size range of the PSD. The majority of the influence of PSD on T/SSC is from particles of fine-silt and smaller sizes (finer than 16 microns). This study shows that small changes in the often assumed stability of the PSD are significant to SSC~T relations. Changes of only 5 microns in the fine silt and smaller size fractions of suspended sediment PSD can produce hysteresis in the SSC~T rating that can increase error and produce bias. Observed SSC~T hysteresis may be an indicator of changes in sediment properties during stormflows and of potential changes in sediment sources. Trends in the PSD time series indicate that sediment transport is capacity-limited for sand-sized sediment in the channel and supply-limited for fine silt and smaller sediment from the hillslope.

  15. Hysteresis in suspended sediment to turbidity relations due to changing particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, Mark N.; Sturm, Terry W.

    2013-09-01

    Turbidity (T) is the most ubiquitous of surrogate technologies used to estimate suspended-sediment concentration (SSC). The effects of sediment size on turbidity are well documented; however, effects from changes in particle size distributions (PSD) are rarely evaluated. Hysteresis in relations of SSC-to-turbidity (SSC˜T) for single stormflow events was observed and quantified for a dataset of 195 concurrent measurements of SSC, turbidity, discharge, velocity, and volumetric PSD collected during five stormflows in 2009-2010 on Yellow River at Gees Mill Road in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. Regressions of SSC-normalized turbidity (T/SSC) on concurrently measured PSD percentiles show an inverse, exponential influence of particle size on turbidity that is not constant across the size range of the PSD. The majority of the influence of PSD on T/SSC is from particles of fine silt and smaller sizes (finer than 16 µm). This study shows that small changes in the often assumed stability of the PSD are significant to SSC˜T relations. Changes of only 5 µm in the fine silt and smaller size fractions of suspended sediment PSD can produce hysteresis in the SSC˜T rating that can increase error and produce bias. Observed SSC˜T hysteresis may be an indicator of changes in sediment properties during stormflows and of potential changes in sediment sources. Trends in the PSD time series indicate that sediment transport is capacity limited for sand-sized sediment in the channel and supply limited for fine silt and smaller sediment from the hillslope.

  16. Hydrolytic ectoenzyme activity associated with suspended and sinking organic particles within the anoxic Cariaco Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Gordon T.; Thunell, Robert; Varela, Ramon; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Scranton, Mary I.

    2009-08-01

    Ectohydrolase activities of suspended microbiota were compared to those associated with sinking particles (sed-POM) retrieved from sediment traps deployed in the permanently anoxic Cariaco Basin. In shore-based assays, activities of aminopeptidase, β-glucosidase, chitinase and alkaline phosphatase were measured in samples obtained from oxic and anoxic depths using MUF- and MCA-labeled fluorogenic substrate analogs. Hydrolysis potentials for these enzymes in the seston varied widely over the nine cruises sampled (8 Nov 1996-3 May 2000) and among depths (15-1265 m); from <10 to over 1600 nM d -1 hydrolysate released, generally co-varying with one another and with suspended particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate nitrogen (PN). Hydrolytic potentials, prokaryotic abundances and POC/PN concentrations in sinking debris were 400-1.3×10 7 times higher than in comparable volumes of seawater. However when normalized to PN, hydrolytic potentials in sediment trap samples were not demonstrably higher than in Niskin bottle samples. We estimate that PN pools in sediment trap samples were turned over 2-1400 times (medians=7-26 x) slower by hydrolysis than were suspended PN pools. Median prokaryotic growth rates (divisions d -1) in sinking debris were also ˜150 times slower than for bacterioplankton. Hydrolytic potentials in surface oxic waters were generally faster than in underlying anoxic waters on a volumetric basis (nM hydrolysate d -1), but were not significantly ( p>0.05) different when normalized to PN or prokaryote abundances. Alkaline phosphatase was consistently the most active ectohydrolase in both sample types, suggesting that Cariaco Basin assemblages were adapted to decomposing phosphate esters in organic polymers. However, phosphorus limitation was not evident from nutrient inventories in the water column. Results support the hypothesis that efficiencies of polymer hydrolysis in anoxic waters are not inherently lower than in oxic waters.

  17. A New Miniature Respirable Sampler for In-mask Sampling: Part 1-Particle Size Selection Performance.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Peter; Thorpe, Andrew; Mogridge, Rhiannon; Lee, Taekhee; Harper, Martin

    2016-11-01

    The Health and Safety Laboratory has developed a miniature respirable sampler to gain a better understanding of the exposure of workers to hazardous substances when they are wearing respiratory protective equipment (RPE) or helmets with visors in the workplace. The study was in two parts and the first part, described herein, was to develop the sampler and test its collection characteristics. Assessment of the impact of the sampler on RPE safety and its comparability with traditional laboratory-based approaches to measure protection factors was discussed in a second article. The miniature sampler (weight-5.4g, length-13mm) was designed to fit into the space available between the nose and chin of an individual inside a filtering facepiece type mask and has a radially omnidirectional inlet with a porous foam particle selector that allows the collection of the respirable fraction on a downstream filter. The sampling efficiency was compared with the respirable convention. A close match with the respirable convention was obtained at a flow rate of 1 l min(-1) and the 50% penetration cut off value (d 50) was 4.08 µm. After 3 hours sampling in high humidity (95%), the penetration curve had shifted towards smaller particle sizes (d 50 = 3.81 µm) with 88% of the calculated bias values within 10%. The miniature sampler measured respirable dust and crystalline silica mass concentrations comparable with performance of the Safety In Mines Personal Dust Sampler (SIMPEDS), commonly used in Great Britain, at a flow rate of 0.8 l min(-1) The d 50 for the miniature sampler at 0.8 l min(-1) (4.4 µm) is within 5% of the d 50 of the SIMPEDS at its prescribed flow rate of 2.2 l min(-1) (4.2 µm). These results indicated that the miniature sampler was a good candidate to proceed with tests with RPE described in the second part of this series of two papers. © Crown copyright 2016.

  18. Particle size distributions and organic-inorganic compositions of suspended particulate matters around the Bohai Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Bian, Changwei; Bi, Rong; Jiang, Wensheng; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Xueqing

    2017-02-01

    Laser in situ scattering and transmissometry (LISST) significantly improves our ability to assess particle size distribution (PSD) in seawater, while wide-ranging measurements of the organic-inorganic compositions of suspended particulate matters (SPM) are still difficult by using traditional methods such as microscopy. In this study, PSD properties and SPM compositions around the Bohai Strait (China) were investigated based on the measurements by LISST in combination with hydro-biological parameters collected from a field survey in summer 2014. Four typical PSD shapes were found in the region, namely right-peak, left-peak, double-peak and negative-skew shapes. The double-peak and negative-skew shapes may interconvert into each other along with strong hydrodynamic variation. In the upper layer of the Bohai Sea, organic particles were in the majority, with inorganic particles rarely observed. In the bottom layer, SPM were the mixture of organic and inorganic matters. LISST provided valuable baseline information on size-resolved organic-inorganic compositions of SPM: the size of organic particles mainly ranged from 4 to 20 μm and 40 to 100 μm, while most SPM ranging from 20 to 40 μm were composed of inorganic sediment.

  19. Experimental investigation on removal of suspended particles from water using flax fibre geotextiles.

    PubMed

    Abbar, Bouamama; Alem, Abdellah; Pantet, Anne; Marcotte, Stéphane; Ahfir, Nasre-Dine; Duriatti, Davy

    2017-02-05

    Natural geotextiles are increasingly used in geotechnical applications such as bank protection and short-term soil reinforcement. This study aimed to highlight the behaviour of natural flax fibre geotextiles towards the retention of suspended particles (SP) present in urban runoff and often polluted. Indeed, it is well known that a large fraction of the heavy metals are often associated with the SP. Long-term filtration tests were performed on four laboratory filter designs. The objective was to study the influence of a nonwoven flax fibre geotextiles on SP transfer through a sandy porous media under saturated conditions. The experiments consisted of injecting SP in a column filled with sand with and without flax fibre geotextiles at a constant flow rate. The results showed that nonwoven flax fibre geotextiles can increase flow homogeneity. Retention efficiency of SP at column scale as well as spatial deposition profile was modified by the presence of geotextile. The use of flax fibre geotextiles increases considerably the durability of the filtration system. Particle size analysis of the particles retained in the sand medium and in geotextiles shows that the coarser particles are mainly deposited at the entrance of the column, and in the geotextiles.

  20. Coalescence phenomena of droplets with suspended particles in a tube flow at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, Masahiro; Ueno, Ichiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Kamiyama, Toshihiko; Wada, Takuma

    Coalescence phenomena of droplets in a tube flow at low Reynolds number are expected to be useful for fluid handling technique, controlling chemical reaction and so on. In the case of motion of droplets with suspended particles, Drug delivery system can be cited as one of applications. The coalescence phenomena are also underlying basis on analyzing the flow of multiphase fluids through porous media. Such phenomena can be seen, for instance, in enhanced oil recovery, breaking of emulsions in porous coalescers and so on. In this experiment, a glass tube of 2.0 mm in inner diameter, 7.0 mm in outer diameter, and 1500 mm in length is used as a test tube. Silicones oil is employed as the test fluid for the droplet. Mixture fluid of glycerol and pure water is used for a surrounding fluid in the tube flow. The density of the droplets is matched to that of the surrounding fluid by adding carbon tetrachloride. An over flow tank is used to keep the flow in the tube steady at a designated averaged velocity. The test tube is surrounded by a tank filled with a temperature-controlled water to keep the temperature of the system constant. Droplets are injected into the test tube using micro-syringes in front of inlet of the test tube. Behaviors of droplets and suspended particles are monitored by a digital video camera and high speed cameras placed on a sliding stage. The motion of the stage is electrically controlled to follow the travelling droplets in the test tube. Coalescence time of two droplets is measured. The coalescence time indicates a period between the instant when relative velocity of two droplets becomes zero after their apparent contact and the instant when the coalescence takes place. The coalescence time is compared with semi-theoretical formulas obtained using resistance exerted on liquid droplet in a tube creeping flow. When relative velocity of two droplets becomes zero after their apparent contact, clearance diameter of clearance area between droplets is

  1. Formation of nitrifying biofilms on small suspended particles in airlift reactors.

    PubMed

    Tijhuis, L; Huisman, J L; Hekkelman, H D; van Loosdrecht, M C; Heijnen, J J

    1995-09-05

    For a stable and reliable operation of a BAS-reactor a high, active biomass concentration is required with mainly biofilm-covered carriers. The effect of reactor conditions on the formation of nitrifying biofilms in BAS-reactors was investigated in this article. A start-up strategy to obtain predominantly biofilm-covered carriers, based on the balancing of detachment and a biomass production per carrier surface area, proved tp be very successful. The amount of biomass and the fraction of covered carrier were high and development of nitrification activity was fast, leading to a volumetric conversion of 5 kg(N) . m(-3) . d(-1) at a hydraulic retention time of 1h. A 1-week, continuous inoculation with suspended purely nitrifying microorganisms resulted in a swift start-up compared with batch addition of a small number of biofilms with some nitrification activity. The development of nitrifying biofilms was very similar to the formation of heterotrophic biofilms. In contrast to heterotrophic bio-films, the diameter of nitrifying biofilms increased during start-up. The detachment rate from nitrifying biofilms decreased with lower concentrations of bare carrier, in a fashion comparable with heterotrophic biofilms, but the nitrifying biofilms were much more robust and resistant. Standard diffusion theory combined with reaction kinetics are capable of predicting the activity and conversion of biofilms on small suspended particles. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons Inc.

  2. Effects of hydrodynamic retardation and interparticle interactions on the self-assembly in a drying droplet containing suspended solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebovka, N. I.; Khrapatiy, S.; Melnyk, R.; Vygornitskii, M.

    2014-05-01

    Self-assembly of particles, suspended in a drying droplet, were studied by the Monte Carlo method. The Brownian diffusion of particles was simulated accounting for the effect of hydrodynamic retardation and interparticle interactions. The model allowed for explaining formation of the "coffee ring" patterns even without accounting for the radial flows towards the three-phase contact line. Morphologies of the drying patterns and their dependence on interparticle interactions and concentration of particles are discussed.

  3. The oceanographic toolbox for the collection of sinking and suspended marine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, Andrew M. P.; Lam, Phoebe J.; Lamborg, Carl H.; Buesseler, Ken O.; Sanders, Richard; Riley, Jennifer S.; Marsay, Chris; Smith, Helen E. K.; Sargent, Elizabeth C.; Lampitt, Richard S.; Bishop, James K. B.

    2015-04-01

    Marine particles play a central role in controlling the transport, cycling, and inventories of many major elements and trace elements and isotopes throughout the oceans. Studies seeking to elucidate the biogeochemical roles of marine particles often require reliable ways to collect them from the ocean. Here, we review the oceanographic toolbox of techniques and instrumentation that are employed to collect both suspended and sinking particles. With these tools, it is possible to determine both the concentrations and vertical fluxes of important elements and individual particle types. We describe the various methods for quantifying the concentrations of particulate matter with in situ pumps, towed sampling devices, bottle collectors, and large volume capture devices. The uses of various types of flux collection platforms are discussed including surface tethered, neutrally buoyant, and bottom moored devices. We address the issues of sediment trap collection biases and the apparent inconsistencies that can arise due to differences in the temporal and spatial scales sampled by the various methodologies. Special attention is given to collection considerations made for the analysis of trace metals and isotopes, as these methodologies are of high importance to the ongoing GEOTRACES program which seeks to identify the processes and quantify fluxes that control the distributions of key trace elements and isotopes in the ocean. With the emergence of new particle collection methodologies and the continued reliance on traditional collection methods, it is imperative that we combine these multiple approaches in ways that will help improve their accuracy and precision while enhancing their utility in advancing understanding of the biogeochemical and ecological roles of marine particles.

  4. Dust Library of Plasmonically Enhanced Infrared Spectra of Individual Respirable Particles.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Antriksh; Ravi, Aruna; Li, Sirui; Nystrom, Steven V; Thompson, Zechariah; Coe, James V

    2016-09-01

    This work characterizes collections of infrared spectra of individual dust particles of ∼4 µm size that were obtained from three very different environments: our lab air, a home air filter, and the 11 September 2001 World Trade Center event. Particle collection was done either directly from the air or by placing dust powder from various samples directly on the plasmonic mesh with 5 µm square holes as air is pumped through the mesh. This arrangement enables the recording of "scatter-free" infrared absorption spectra of individual particles of size comparable to the probing wavelengths whose vibrational signatures are otherwise dominated by scattering and dispersive line shape distortions. The spectra are sensitive to the amounts of various infrared active components and analysis using a Mie-Bruggeman model for mixed composition particles provides volume fractions of the components. Inhalation of dust particles of ∼4 µm size has significant health consequences as these are among the largest inhaled into people's lungs. The chemical composition of ∼4 µm respirable particles is of great interest from health, atmospheric, and environmental perspectives as different environments may pose different hazards and spectroscopic challenges. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Comparison between Lagrangian and mesoscopic Eulerian modelling approaches for inertial particles suspended in decaying isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, A.; Moreau, M.; Simonin, O.; Helie, J.

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the accuracy of the mesoscopic approach proposed by Février et al. [P. Février, O. Simonin, K.D. Squires, Partitioning of particle velocities in gas-solid turbulent flows into a continuous field and a spatially uncorrelated random distribution: theoretical formalism and numerical study, J. Fluid Mech. 533 (2005) 1-46] by comparison against the Lagrangian approach for the simulation of an ensemble of non-colliding particles suspended in a decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence given by DNS. The mesoscopic Eulerian approach involves to solve equations for a few particle PDF moments: number density, mesoscopic velocity, and random uncorrelated kinetic energy (RUE), derived from particle flow ensemble averaging conditioned by the turbulent fluid flow realization. In addition, viscosity and diffusivity closure assumptions are used to compute the unknown higher order moments which represent the mesoscopic velocity and RUE transport by the uncorrelated velocity component. A detailed comparison between the two approaches is carried out for two different values of the Stokes number based on the initial fluid Kolmogorov time scale, St=0.17 and 2.2. In order to perform reliable comparisons for the RUE local instantaneous distribution and for the mesoscopic kinetic energy spectrum, the error due to the computation method of mesoscopic quantities from Lagrangian simulation results is evaluated and minimized. A very good agreement is found between the mesoscopic Eulerian and Lagrangian predictions for the small particle Stokes number case corresponding to the smallest particle inertia. For larger particle inertia, a bulk viscous term is included in the mesoscopic velocity governing equation to avoid spurious spatial oscillation that may arise due to the inability of the numerical scheme to resolve sharp number density gradients. As a consequence, for St=2.2, particle number density and RUE spatial distribution predicted by the

  6. Optimized goniometer for determination of the scattering phase function of suspended particles: simulations and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foschum, Florian; Kienle, Alwin

    2013-08-01

    We present simulations and measurements with an optimized goniometer for determination of the scattering phase function of suspended particles. We applied the Monte Carlo method, using a radially layered cylindrical geometry and mismatched boundary conditions, in order to investigate the influence of reflections caused by the interfaces of the glass cuvette and the scatterer concentration on the accurate determination of the scattering phase function. Based on these simulations we built an apparatus which allows direct measurement of the phase function from ϑ=7 deg to ϑ=172 deg without any need for correction algorithms. Goniometric measurements on polystyrene and SiO2 spheres proved this concept. Using the validated goniometer, we measured the phase function of yeast cells, demonstrating the improvement of the new system compared to standard goniometers. Furthermore, the scattering phase function of different fat emulsions, like Intralipid, was determined precisely.

  7. Particle Migration due to Viscoelasticity of the Suspending Liquid and Its Relevance in Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avino, Gaetano; Greco, Francesco; Maffettone, Pier Luca

    2017-01-01

    The fast growth of microfluidic applications based on complex fluids is a result of the unique fluid dynamics of these systems, enabling the creation of devices for health care or biological and chemical analysis. Microchannels designed to focus, concentrate, or separate particles suspended in viscoelastic liquids are becoming common. The key fluid dynamical issue on which such devices work is viscoelasticity-induced lateral migration. This phenomenon was discovered in the 1960s in macroscopic channels and has received great attention within the microfluidic community in the past decade. This review presents the current understanding, both from experiments and theoretical analysis, of viscoelasticity-driven cross-flow migration. Examples of promising microfluidic applications show the unprecedented capabilities offered by such technology based on geometrically simple microchannels and rheologically complex liquids.

  8. Controls on suspended particle properties and water clarity along a partially-mixed estuary, York River, Virginia, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, K.; Friedrichs, C. T.; Cartwright, G. M.; Bowers, D. G.

    2016-02-01

    The Chesapeake Bay and its associated tidal tributaries, which together form one of the United States' largest and most important estuaries, are among the many coastal systems where degraded water clarity is a major concern. Despite long-term decreases in sediment input, water clarity has continued to deteriorate in the southern Bay. Paradoxically, clarity has declined less in the northern Bay where riverine sediment load has recently increased. Here it is proposed that the disconnect between water clarity and sediment input is related to the dynamic nature of locally suspended estuarine particles, as well as the interaction between suspended organic particles and inorganic solids. Typical estuarine particles are not single solid particles, but clusters of inorganic and organic particles and water (i.e., flocs). Floc properties (such as size, composition, density and settling rate) are challenging to observe in-situ, so their influence on the optical properties of the system are not well-defined. By measuring important floc properties, the influence of organic particles and local hydrodynamics on those properties was investigated, and the influence of suspended flocs on light propagation was evaluated. This presentation focuses on observations collected along the York River estuary, a major tidal tributary in the lower Chesapeake Bay. Observations of estuarine particle properties and physical parameters were collected utilizing a combination of optical and acoustic instrumentation with transmissometers and irradiance meters. Light attenuation was more strongly correlated to total particle area than total mass concentration. Near the mouth, at low mass concentrations, smaller, compact, organic particles were observed. Particles became larger, less organic, and less dense up-estuary as mass concentrations increased. Results indicate the importance of organic material on suspended estuarine particle properties and resultant water clarity.

  9. A radiotracer study of cerium and manganese uptake onto suspended particles in Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Moffett, J.W. )

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of Ce(III) and Mn(II) were studied in Chesapeake Bay in March and July 1990 to establish the role of water column redox processes in contributing to Ce anomalies observed in this estuary (SHOLKOVITZ and ELDERFIELD, 1988; SHOLKOVITZ et al., 1992). Oxidation was measured by adding Mn(II) and Ce(III) to freshly collected water samples as radiotracers and measuring their uptake onto the ambient suspended particle assemblage. Mn(II) oxidation was measured by following the uptake of [sup 54]Mn(II) onto suspended particles and utilizing protocols established by other workers to distinguish oxidation from Mn(II) adsorption. The same protocols were applicable to Ce(III), using [sup 139]Ce(III), and were supported by the use of [sup 152]Eu(III) as a nonredox reactive control. Specific rates of Ce(III) and MN(II) oxidation measured at a station in the North Bay (depth = 4 m) in July were 2016% per day and 4032% per day, respectively. In March, at the same station, the specific rate of Mn(II) of oxidation was only 1-% per day, and Ce(III) oxidation was undetectable. Both Ce(III) and Mn(II) oxidation processes were inhibited by azide, indicating that they were microbially mediated. The seasonal differences probably reflect strong seasonal variation in the abundance of Mn oxidizing bacteria. No Ce(III) oxidation occured in samples collected below the oxic/anoxic interface in July. The specific rates of oxidation for both elements were over 1000 times higher than those measured in the Sargasso Sea. However, the specific rates for Ce(III) and Mn(II) were very similar to each other. This fact, coupled with similar spatial and temporal trends for specific oxidation rates, suggests a common mechanism of oxidation of both elements which may be significant in a wide range of marine environments.

  10. Control of respirable particles and radon progeny with portable air cleaners

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, F.J.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-02-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles and radon progeny. Following injection of cigarette smoke and radon in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particles and radon progeny concentrations were measured with and without air cleaner operation. Particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size. In tests with no air cleaner the natural decay rate for cigarette smoke was observed to be 0.2 hr/sup -1/. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filters, a residential ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. The electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters tested had significant particle removal rates, and a HEPA-type filter was the most efficient air cleaner. The evaluation of radon progeny control produced similar results; the air cleaners which were effective in removing particles were also effective in removing radon progeny. At low particle concentrations plateout of the unattached radon progeny is an important removal mechanism. Based on data from these tests, the plateout rate for unattached progeny was found to be 15 hr/sup -1/. The unattached fraction and the overall removal rate due to deposition of attached and unattached nuclides have been estimated for each radon decay product as a function of particle concentration. While air cleaning can be effective in reducing total radon progeny, concentrations of unattached radon progeny can increase with increasing air cleaning. 39 references, 26 figures, 9 tables.

  11. Attenuation of an ultrasonic beam by suspended particles and range of acoustic flow meters in sewer networks.

    PubMed

    Larrarte, Frédérique; François, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic flow meters are commonly used in wastewater management. Under certain circumstances, a reduction in the flow meter range may occur and cause significant error in the flow rate measurement. Attenuation due to suspended particles is one of the phenomena capable of reducing the flow meter range. The present paper examines attenuation resulting from re-suspended pond sediment over a wide range of concentration values. It appears that a formula established for sand suspensions provides a good estimate of ultrasound attenuation for these types of particles as well. Experiments conducted for wastewater under particle concentrations commonly encountered in sewer networks demonstrate that the attenuation by particles only contributes to a negligible extent towards intensity decay, in accordance with theoretical predictions. We also theoretically determine herein the operating conditions under which the range of an ultrasonic flow meter would be significantly reduced due to particle attenuation.

  12. Assessing controls on cross-shelf phytoplankton and suspended particle distributions using repeated bio-optical glider surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderikx Freitas, Fernanda; Siegel, David A.; Washburn, Libe; Halewood, Stuart; Stassinos, Erik

    2016-10-01

    Characterizing the space/time variability of bio-optical properties is essential to understand the mechanisms that control cross-shelf phytoplankton and suspended particle distributions in coastal waters. Approximately 400 high-resolution cross-shelf sections of bio-optical properties collected with an oceanographic glider in the coastal Santa Barbara Channel, California, revealed complex relationships among optical properties and environmental conditions. Surface waves were found as a proximate control on suspended sediment variability for both inner and midshelves. Increases in phytoplankton abundances attributed to horizontal advection and upwelling events were observed only on episodic time scales. The lack of all-encompassing linear relationships between environmental forcings and changes in cross-shelf phytoplankton highlights the challenge of decoupling bio-optical signals from their controlling processes in coastal zones where phytoplankton distributions are patchy, and where nearshore and offshore phytoplankton populations and suspended sediments often occupy the same portion of the water column. Clear relationships between runoff and productivity were not observed. Temporal variability of suspended particles and phytoplankton distributions were roughly independent from each other during stratified conditions. Synchronous increases in phytoplankton and suspended sediments were observed when associated with strong upwelling events that may induce mixing and promote productivity. The repeated glider sections illustrated many processes regulating phytoplankton and particle transport in the innershelf and showed the difficulty in establishing general connections between high-frequency changes in optical properties and potential environmental forcings in a complex coastal environment.

  13. Effect of particle size and composition of suspended sediment on denitrification in river water.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhimei; Liu, Ting; Xia, Xinghui; Xia, Na

    2016-01-15

    Rivers with high suspended sediment (SPS) concentration are common worldwide, and previous studies reported the occurrence of denitrification on SPS. In this work, effect of particle size and composition of SPS on denitrification in river water was studied in laboratory. The (15)N isotope tracer technique was used to investigate the denitrification in water containing 8 g L(-1) SPS with different particle sizes, including <20 μm, 20-50 μm, 50-100 μm, and 100-200 μm. The results showed that the denitrification rate was negatively related to particle size, and the SPS with particle size below 20 μm had the highest (15)N2 emission rate of 0.27 mg-N/m(3) · d, which was twice that of 100-200 μm. The denitrifying bacteria population in the system decreased with the increase of particle size, which was positively correlated with denitrification rate (p<0.05). There was a positive correlation between organic carbon content of SPS and denitrifying bacteria population (p<0.01), indicating that organic carbon is a key factor influencing denitrifying bacteria. Different from the (15)N2 production, (15)N2O emission rate reached the highest of 1.02 μg-N/m(3) · d in the system containing SPS of 20-50 μm, which was 14.8 times that of 100-200 μm. This was due to the difference in denitrifying bacteria species in different systems due to different oxic/anoxic conditions around SPS. This study suggests that not only the SPS concentration but also the SPS size and composition should be considered in studying the nitrogen cycle in river systems, especially for the production of N2O. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of the Particle Size Fraction associated with Heavy Metals in Suspended Sediments of the Yellow River

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qingzhen; Wang, Xiaojing; Jian, Huimin; Chen, Hongtao; Yu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the concentrations of particulate heavy metals and fluxes into the sea in the Yellow River were examined based on observational and measured data from January 2009 to December 2010. A custom-built water elutriation apparatus was used to separate suspended sediments into five size fractions. Clay and very fine silt is the dominant fraction in most of the suspended sediments, accounting for >40% of the samples. Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Fe and Mn are slightly affected by anthropogenic activities, while Cd is moderate affected. The concentrations of heavy metals increased with decrease in particle size. For suspended sediments in the Yellow River, on average 78%–82% of the total heavy metal loading accumulated in the <16 μm fraction. About 43% and 53% of heavy metal in 2009 and 2010 respectively, were readily transported to the Bohai Sea with “truly suspended” particles, which have potentially harmful effects on marine organisms. PMID:26083999

  15. The acoustic radiation force on a small thermoviscous or thermoelastic particle suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsen, Jonas; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-11-01

    We present a theoretical analysis (arxiv.org/abs/1507.01043) of the acoustic radiation force on a single small particle, either a thermoviscous fluid droplet or a thermoelastic solid particle, suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid. Our analysis places no restrictions on the viscous and thermal boundary layer thicknesses relative to the particle radius, but it assumes the particle to be small in comparison to the acoustic wavelength. This is the limit relevant to scattering of ultrasound waves from sub-micrometer particles. For particle sizes smaller than the boundary layer widths, our theory leads to profound consequences for the acoustic radiation force. For example, for liquid droplets and solid particles suspended in gasses we predict forces orders of magnitude larger than expected from ideal-fluid theory. Moreover, for certain relevant choices of materials, we find a sign change in the acoustic radiation force on different-sized but otherwise identical particles. These findings lead to the concept of a particle-size-dependent acoustophoretic contrast factor, highly relevant to applications in acoustic levitation or separation of micro-particles in gases, as well as to handling of μm- and nm-sized particles such as bacteria and vira in lab-on-a-chip systems.

  16. Real-time measurements of suspended sediment concentration and particle size using five techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, D.; Albayrak, I.; Abgottspon, A.; Boes, R. M.

    2016-11-01

    Fine sediments are important in the design and operation of hydropower plants (HPPs), in particular with respect to sediment management and hydro-abrasive erosion in hydraulic machines. Therefore, there is a need for reliable real-time measurements of suspended sediment mass concentration (SSC) and particle size distribution (PSD). The following instruments for SSC measurements were investigated in a field study during several years at the HPP Fieschertal in the Swiss Alps: (1) turbidimeters, (2) a Laser In-Situ Scattering and Trans- missometry instrument (LISST), (3) a Coriolis Flow and Density Meter (CFDM), (4) acoustic transducers, and (5) pressure sensors. LISST provided PSDs in addition to concentrations. Reference SSCs were obtained by gravimetrical analysis of automatically taken water samples. In contrast to widely used turbidimeters and the single-frequency acoustic method, SSCs obtained from LISST, the CFDM or the pressure sensors were less or not affected by particle size variations. The CFDM and the pressure sensors allowed measuring higher SSC than the optical or the acoustic techniques (without dilution). The CFDM and the pressure sensors were found to be suitable to measure SSC ≥ 2 g/l. In this paper, the measuring techniques, instruments, setup, methods for data treatment, and selected results are presented and discussed.

  17. Changes in particle size distribution of suspended sediment affected by gravity erosion on the Loess Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wen-Zhao; Xu, Xiang-Zhou; Liu, Ya-Kun; Zhang, Hong-Wu; Zhu, Ming-Dong

    2017-04-01

    Gravity erosion generates an enormous volume of sediment on the steep hillslopes throughout the world, yet the response from particle size distribution (PSD) of suspended sediment to mass failure remains poorly understood. Here rainfall simulation experiments were conducted on the natural loess slopes to induce a series of mass failures under rainfall intensity of 48 mm h-1, and then an index of enrichment/dilution ratio was used to quantitatively explore the change trend of suspended sediment PSD affected by gravity erosion. To determine suspended sediment, water samples were collected in a polyethylene bottle directly from the gully runoff and channel flow in the pre and during- slope failures events. Then, the particle fractions of samples were done by combining sieving method and photoelectric sedimentometer technique. The results are shown as follows: (1) Gravity erosion has a significant influence on the particle size distribution of suspended sediment. As the mass erosion occurred, the proportion of sand-sized particles was decreased from 71.2 to 50.8%, whereas the proportions of clay and silt were increased remarkably from 1.3 to 7.3% and 27.5 to 41.9%, respectively. Hence the sediment can be more easily transported into channel flow while the suspended sediment load becomes finer as gravitational erosion occurs. (2) The median particle size (d50), sediment heterogeneity (H) and fractal dimensions (D) were significantly correlated with gravity erosion. As a result, d50 was decreased from 0.084 to 0.051 mm, H was increase from 5.6 to 26.8, and D was magnified from 2.60 to 2.78. This implies that mass failure makes the particle size distribution of suspended sediment more nonuniform and irregular. (3) Suspended sediment tended to enrich in the silt and clay fractions, while it diluted in the sand fractions during landslide erosion. Meanwhile, the enrichment/dilution ratios were 13.9 for the clay fractions, 1.4 for clay, and 0.7 for sand. This reflects the

  18. Mean distance of two Brownian particles trapped in a suspended droplet and its dependence on the Debye length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Kosuke; Sakata, Shinya; Moritani, Kousuke; Inui, Norio

    2017-01-01

    The Brownian motion of two particles confined near the bottom of a suspended droplet was considered in order to examine the electrical double-layer interaction between them. The mean distance between the particles was expressed as a function of the Debye screening length. We report the application of Brownian particle trajectories for the experimental determination of the Debye screening length between gold particles trapped within a water droplet. This was computed through a comparison of the mean distance measured by observing the Brownian motion with its theoretical value.

  19. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes in Suspended Particles and Colloids, Chesapeake and San Francisco Estuaries, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigleo, A. C.; Macko, S. A.

    2002-04-01

    Chesapeake and San Francisco Bays, U.S.A., are both river dominated, temperate estuaries. The organic carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of the suspended particles (≥0·4 μm), however, show major differences for nitrogen and minor differences for carbon. In northern San Francisco Bay, the carbon isotope values averaged -26·2±0·2‰ δ 13C for suspended particles, and for Chesapeake Bay and the Potomac River, the average was -24·3±3·2‰. The nitrogen isotope ratios (δ 15N) of suspended particles in northern San Francisco Bay in late summer were +0·9±0·4‰, probably reflecting a nitrogen component from agricultural runoff. The values for Chesapeake Bay, and its subestuary, the Potomac River averaged +7·7±3·1‰, with the highest values occurring during summer when the primary source of nitrogen originated from remineralized organic material. Carbon and nitrogen isotope values for colloids (≤0·4 μm) were 8·2±1·7 for nitrogen and -26·0±1·6 for carbon (n=17) throughout both estuaries and the Potomac river. Ultrafiltrates, collected after filtration and ultrafiltration, had δ 15N values of +7·3±0·3 and δ 13C values of -24·5±1·7. The similarity of isotopic values between suspended particles and colloids in winter samples suggested that these colloids were formed by desorption or dissociation from resuspended sediments and soils. Summer colloids in San Francisco Bay were uniformly heavier by 7‰ than suspended particles suggesting that the lighter isotope was selectively utilized by heterotrophs, leaving an isotopically heavy colloid residual.

  20. Interaction of rising frazil with suspended particles: tank experiments with applications to nature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimnitz, E.; Clayton, J.R.; Kempema, E.W.; Payne, J.R.; Weber, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    Widespread occurrence of sediment-laden (turbid) sea ice and high concentrations of diatoms and foraminifers in ice have recently been reported from both polar regions. Many possible mechanisms of particle entrainment into ice have been postulated, among which scavenging by rising frazil ice and nucleation or adhesion of ice onto suspended particles appear to be the most likely ones. No reliable experimental data on the mechanisms, however, are available. Because of the importance of turbid ice for sediment transport, tanks for laboratory-scale experiments were constructed, in which frazil crystals produced at the base were monitored rising through water column laden with various types of particulate matter, including plankton. Observations made in salt water are reported here. Over a distance of 1.5 m, frazil < 1 mm in diameter grew to crystals or flocs several cm in diameter, rising at average velocities of 2 to 3 cm/s. Rise velocities were a function of frazil size, but varied greatly due to interactions of ice particles of different size and velocity and the resulting turbulence. Sand-size particles could be either trapped permanently by rising frazil, or were temporarily supported and again released. With live plankton, a several-fold enrichment of ice occurred, suggesting that their irregular shapes or appendages were caught by ice flocs. Diatom- and foram tests were also relatively effectively trapped. The concentration of silt- and clay-size terrigenous detritus in frazil tended to increase relative to the water. We found no preferential sorting by ice in this size range. Various kinds of evidence showed that ice does not nucleate onto foreign particles, and has no adhesive properties. Foreign material resided in the interstices of crystal aggregates, and particles denser than water could be released by agitation, suggesting that scavenging is a mechanical process. With rising frazil, the settling of particulate matter therefore is either retarded or

  1. Possible approach to cleaning 'problematic' LRW with large contents of suspended particles, oils and other organic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Ilin, V.; Karlin, Yu.; Laurson, A.; Volkov, Eu.; Dmitriev, S.

    2007-07-01

    A general structural scheme for cleaning 'problematic' liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) containing a large amount of suspended particles, oils and other organic substances has been proposed. The technological scheme includes two main stages: 1) separation of suspended particles, oil product emulsions and the larger part of colloidal particles from LRW by filtration, 2) purification of radioactive waters from radionuclides by membrane-sorption to the levels of radiation safety norms applied. The filtration stage is considered as a three-step process of 'problematic' LRW treatment including: 1) 'problematic' LRW extraction from storage tanks with a robot type device intended for washing out the bottom sediment (slurry), 2) separation of suspended particles, oil product emulsions and larger part of colloidal particles from LRW by filtration through porous or gauze diaphragms of 0.1 to 10 {mu}m pores (cells) in size, 3) concentration of separated slurry up to 100-200 g/l. Two main options of the membrane-sorption technologies, AQUA-EXPRESS and Reverse Osmosis, for LRW purification have been considered. Two possible options of porous or gauze diaphragms productivity and lifetime increase between their surface regenerations have been shown: 1) possibility of an oxidizer introduction into initial LRW, 2) possibility to rotate a filtering element (disk or cylinder type). (authors)

  2. Symbolic computation of the phoretic acceleration of convex particles suspended in a non-uniform gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Martin; Hütter, Markus

    2006-11-01

    A package has been developed for calculating analytic expressions for forces and torques onto an arbitrarily shaped convex tracer (aerosol) particle small compared to the mean free path of the surrounding nonequilibrium gas. The package PHORETIC allows to compute analytical (and also numerical) expressions for forces and torques stemming from elastic and diffusive scattering processes parameterized by an accommodation coefficient. The method is based on calculating half-sphere integral tensors of arbitrary rank and on integrating forces and torques acting on surface elements. The surrounding gas is completely specified by an arbitrarily shaped velocity distribution function. Accordingly, PHORETIC requires two inputs: A particle (surface) geometry and a velocity distribution function. For example, the particle may be a cylinder with flat end caps, and the distribution function the one of Maxwell (isotropic) or Grad (13th moment approximation). The package reproduces analytic results for spheres which were available in the literature, and the ones for other geometries (cylinders, cuboids, ellipsoids) which were, however, only partially available (some works considered only elastic collisions, others temperature, or pressure, or only velocity gradients, etc.). In addition, PHORETIC takes into account angular velocities which have been usually neglected and become relevant for non-spherical particles. The package is geared towards the implementation of dynamical equations for aerosol particles suspended in dilute or semidilute gases and as such helps to obtain concentration profiles and mobilities of aerosol particles depending on their shape (distribution) and environmental conditions. Program summaryTitle of program:PHORETIC Catalogue identifier:ADYI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYI_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Persons requesting the program must sign

  3. Biologically Induced Deposition of Fine Suspended Particles by Filter-Feeding Bivalves in Land-Based Industrial Marine Aquaculture Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Shaojun; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Industrial aquaculture wastewater contains large quantities of suspended particles that can be easily broken down physically. Introduction of macro-bio-filters, such as bivalve filter feeders, may offer the potential for treatment of fine suspended matter in industrial aquaculture wastewater. In this study, we employed two kinds of bivalve filter feeders, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, to deposit suspended solids from marine fish aquaculture wastewater in flow-through systems. Results showed that the biodeposition rate of suspended particles by C. gigas (shell height: 8.67±0.99 cm) and M. galloprovincialis (shell height: 4.43±0.98 cm) was 77.84±7.77 and 6.37±0.67 mg ind−1•d−1, respectively. The total solid suspension (TSS) deposition rates of oyster and mussel treatments were 3.73±0.27 and 2.76±0.20 times higher than that of the control treatment without bivalves, respectively. The TSS deposition rates of bivalve treatments were significantly higher than the natural sedimentation rate of the control treatment (P<0.001). Furthermore, organic matter and C, N in the sediments of bivalve treatments were significantly lower than those in the sediments of the control (P<0.05). It was suggested that the filter feeders C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis had considerable potential to filter and accelerate the deposition of suspended particles from industrial aquaculture wastewater, and simultaneously yield value-added biological products. PMID:25250730

  4. Biologically induced deposition of fine suspended particles by filter-feeding bivalves in land-based industrial marine aquaculture wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Shaojun; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Industrial aquaculture wastewater contains large quantities of suspended particles that can be easily broken down physically. Introduction of macro-bio-filters, such as bivalve filter feeders, may offer the potential for treatment of fine suspended matter in industrial aquaculture wastewater. In this study, we employed two kinds of bivalve filter feeders, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, to deposit suspended solids from marine fish aquaculture wastewater in flow-through systems. Results showed that the biodeposition rate of suspended particles by C. gigas (shell height: 8.67 ± 0.99 cm) and M. galloprovincialis (shell height: 4.43 ± 0.98 cm) was 77.84 ± 7.77 and 6.37 ± 0.67 mg ind(-1) • d(-1), respectively. The total solid suspension (TSS) deposition rates of oyster and mussel treatments were 3.73 ± 0.27 and 2.76 ± 0.20 times higher than that of the control treatment without bivalves, respectively. The TSS deposition rates of bivalve treatments were significantly higher than the natural sedimentation rate of the control treatment (P < 0.001). Furthermore, organic matter and C, N in the sediments of bivalve treatments were significantly lower than those in the sediments of the control (P < 0.05). It was suggested that the filter feeders C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis had considerable potential to filter and accelerate the deposition of suspended particles from industrial aquaculture wastewater, and simultaneously yield value-added biological products.

  5. X-ray fluorescence mapping of mercury on suspended mineral particles and diatoms in a contaminated freshwater system

    DOE PAGES

    Gu, B.; Mishra, B.; Miller, C.; ...

    2014-09-30

    Mercury (Hg) bioavailability and geochemical cycling is affected by its partitioning between the aqueous and particulate phases. We applied a synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe to visualize and quantify directly the spatial localization of Hg and its correlations with other elements of interest on suspended particles from a Hg-contaminated freshwater system. Up to 175 μg g−1 Hg is found on suspended particles, but less than 0.01% is in the form of methylmercury. Mercury is heterogeneously distributed among phytoplankton (e.g., diatoms) and mineral particles that are rich in iron oxides and natural organic matter (NOM). The diatom-bound Hg is mostly foundmore » on outer surfaces of the cells, suggesting passive sorption of Hg on diatoms. Our results indicate that localized sorption of Hg onto suspended particles, including diatoms and NOM-coated oxide minerals, may play an important role in affecting the partitioning, reactivity, and biogeochemical cycling of Hg in natural aquatic environments.« less

  6. Seasonal and spatial variability of light absorption by suspended particles in the southern Baltic: A mathematical description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meler, Justyna; Ostrowska, Mirosława; Stoń-Egiert, Joanna; Zabłocka., Monika

    2017-06-01

    This paper analyses the relationships between the light absorption coefficients at 440 nm ap(440) for particles suspended in the surface waters of the southern Baltic Sea and the concentrations of some optically significant constituents in these waters. The analysis covers two main groups of particles: phytoplankton and non-algal. For this purpose we use the extensive database of optical measurements acquired from 2006 to 2013 during 40 cruises of r/v Oceania in various regions of the southern Baltic: open waters, coastal waters, the Gulf of Gdańsk, the Pomeranian Bay and river mouths. Expressions are derived for each of these regions to describe the seasonal variations of the dependence of the light absorption coefficients for phytoplankton aph(440) and non-algal particles aNAP(440) on concentrations of chlorophyll a (Tchla) and suspended particulate matter in sea water (SPM). With a knowledge of these dependences, one can determine the overall absorption coefficient for all suspended particles in any part of the Baltic Sea in particular seasons from known Tchla and SPM concentrations using the relationship ap(440) = aph(440) + aNAP(440) = f(Tchla, SPM). These dependences reflect the characteristics of a study area and season, and their application increases the accuracy of determination of the overall absorption properties of suspended particles and their main constituents as confirmed by statistical error reduction, e.g. standard error factor falls from 1.46 to 1.38. The relationships derived in this work can be applied in the local remote sensing algorithms used for monitoring the southern Baltic.

  7. Status of respirable dust particle (RDP) concentration--a case study in Chennai city.

    PubMed

    Senthilnathan, T

    2005-06-01

    Air pollution has been aggravated by developments that typically occur, as countries become industrialised and higher levels of energy consumption. Respirable dust particles (RDP) is a general term for tiny air borne particles (under 10 microns PM 10) and it is categorised as critical primary air pollutant. Finer particulate matter less than 10 micron size have been identified as potential health hazard for human beings. A case study was carried out to assess RDP concentration present in the ambient air in Chennai city during the year 2000-2002. The study was conducted at Theagaraya nagar (T. Nagar), a most important commercial shopping place. The observed RDP concentrations are made statistical analysis and a high value of 607.1 microg/m(3) is recorded during October 2001. It is also found that 90% of the observed values exceed the recommended values of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The important finding of this research work is that the RDP data collected every year from this sampling station were found to give best fit for cubic equations which are very useful for analysing future trends.

  8. Protection of firefighters against combustion aerosol particles: simulated workplace protection factor of a half-mask respirator (pilot study).

    PubMed

    Dietrich, James; Yermakov, Michael; Reponen, Tiina; Kulkarni, Pramod; Qi, Chaolong; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2015-01-01

    The present pilot study investigated the penetration of ultrafine particles originated by combustion of different materials into elastomeric half-mask respirators equipped with two P100 filters. We determined the Simulated Workplace Protection Factor (SWPF) for 11 firefighters wearing elastomeric half-mask respirators and performing activities simulating those conducted during fire overhaul operations. The tests were performed in a controlled laboratory setting. A newly-developed battery-operated Portable Aerosol Mobility Spectrometer (PAMS) was used to measure size-resolved aerosol particle concentrations outside (C(out)) and inside (Cin) of an air-purifying respirator donned on a firefighter, and the SWPF was calculated as C(out)/C(in). Based on the total aerosol concentration, the "total" SWPF ranged from 4,222 (minimum) to 35,534 (maximum) with values falling primarily in a range from 11,171 (25 percentile) to 26,604 (75 percentile) and a median value being ≈15,000. This is consistent with the recently reported fit factor (FF) data base.((1)) The size-resolved SWPF data revealed a dependency on the particle size. It was concluded that a portable device such as PAMS can be used on firefighters during overhaul operations (as well as on other workers wearing elastomeric half-mask respirators) to monitor the aerosol concentrations in real time and ultimately help prevent overexposure.

  9. Influence of suspended particle concentration, composition and size on the variability of inherent optical properties of the Southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astoreca, R.; Doxaran, D.; Ruddick, K.; Rousseau, V.; Lancelot, C.

    2012-03-01

    Suspended particles play an important role in coastal waters by controlling to a large extent the variability of the water inherent optical properties (IOPs). In this study, focused on the complex waters of the Southern North Sea, the relationships between the concentration, composition and size of suspended particles and their optical properties (light absorption, and attenuation in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions) are investigated. Over a one-year period, field measurements were carried out along regular transects from the Belgian to the English coasts to cover a wide gradient of water masses. Results show that the area can be divided into three geographical zones, each one having specific biogeochemical and optical properties: Scheldt coastal zone (SCZ), Middle of the Southern North Sea (MSNS) and Thames coastal zone (TCZ). Concentrations of organic (inorganic) particles were always higher in the SCZ (TCZ). The MSNS was characterized by a high proportion of organic particles in low concentration. The spectral shape of particle attenuation reveals a wide range from negative to positive slopes. Particle size distributions reveal a power-law shape along the coasts (especially in the TCZ) and a bimodal distribution in the MSNS notably during the spring phytoplankton bloom. This bimodal size distribution and more precisely a size peak around 7 μm results in an unexpected negative spectral slope of the particle attenuation coefficient. Variations in the particulate mass-specific IOPs between the three regions were observed to predominate over seasonal variations. The implications in terms of inversion of IOPs into biogeochemical parameters, such as chlorophyll a and total suspended matter, in coastal waters are discussed.

  10. Spatial-temporal variations of phosphorus fractions in surface water and suspended particles in the Daliao River Estuary, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Qin, Yanwen; Han, Chaonan; Cao, Wei; Ma, Yingqun; Shi, Yao; Liu, Zhichao; Yang, Chenchen

    2016-08-01

    The transport and storage of phosphorus in estuary is a complex biogeochemical process as the result of the convergence of fresh and saline water. The objective of the current study is to investigate the spatial-temporal variations of phosphorus fractions in surface water and suspended particles of Daliao River Estuary, China. Samples were collected in August (wet season) and November (dry season), 2013. The results showed that total particulate phosphorus (TPP) in water accounted for more than 50 % of the total phosphorus (TP). Meanwhile, in suspended particles, more than 62 % of particulate phosphorus was in the form of bioavailable phosphorus, including exchangeable phosphorus (Exc-P), extractable organic phosphorus (Exo-P), and iron-bound phosphorus (Fe-P), which meant that the potential impacts of bioavailable phosphorus in suspended particles on estuarine water environment cannot be ignored. There were significantly seasonal variations of phosphorus fractions in the Daliao River Estuary. The concentrations of phosphorus fractions in water in wet season were much lower than that in dry season because of the dilution effect of larger rainfall in wet season. In addition, spatial distribution characteristics of phosphorus fractions were also obvious. Due to terrigenous phosphorus input from the upstream of tidal reach and seawater dilution effect in coastal estuary, total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentrations in water gradually decreased from tidal reach to coastal estuary. However, the concentrations of TPP and TP in water and Exo-P in suspended particles presented spatial fluctuation, and these were greatly attributed to sediment re-suspension in coastal estuary.

  11. Trace metal concentrations in suspended particles, sediments and clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) from Jiaozhou Bay of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian; Mu, Qinglin

    2006-10-01

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM), sediments and clams were collected at three sites in Jiaozhou Bay to assess the magnitude of trace metal pollution in the area. Metal concentrations in SPM (Cu: 40.11-203; Zn: 118-447; Pb: 50.1-132; Cd: 0.55-4.39; Cr: 147.6-288; Mn: 762-1670 microg/g), sediments (Cu: 17.64-34.26; Zn: 80.79-110; Pb: 24.57-49.59; Cd: 0.099-0.324; Cr: 41.6-88.1; Mn: 343-520 microg/g) and bivalves (Cu: 6.41-19.76; Zn: 35.5-85.5; Pb: 0.31-1.01; Cd: 0.51-0.67; Mn: 27.45-67.6 microg/g) are comparable to those reported for other moderately polluted world environments. SPM showed a less clear pattern. Metal concentrations in sediments displayed a clear geographical trend with values increasing with proximity to major urban centers. The clams (on dry weight) showed a complex pattern due to the variability introduced by age-related factors. Cd showed an apparent reverse industrial trend with higher concentrations in clams collected at distant stations. Zn, Pb and Mn showed no clear geographical pattern, whereas Cu increased in the clams collected in the most industrialized area. In addition, the bioaccumulation factors (BAF) were calculated. The result indicated that the studied Ruditapes philippinarum in Jiaozhou Bay possessed different bioaccumulation capacities for Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb and Mn, and Cd, Zn had a relatively high assimilation of those metals from sediment particles. A significant relationship with clam age was observed for Zn (positive) and Cu (negative) suggesting different physiological requirements for both metals with age. Trace metal concentrations measured in the tissue of the investigated clam were in the range considered safe by the WHO for human use.

  12. Inhibition of rainbow trout acetylcholinesterase by aqueous and suspended particle-associated organophosphorous insecticides.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Armin; Radau, Tanja S; Hahn, Torsten; Schulz, Ralf

    2007-06-01

    Spraydrift and edge-of-field runoff are important routes of pesticide entry into streams. Pesticide contamination originating from spraydrift usually resides in the water phase, while pesticides in contaminated runoff are to a large extent associated with suspended particles (SPs). The effects of two organophosphorous insecticides (OPs), chloropyrifos (CPF) and azinphos-methyl (AZP), on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in rainbow trout were compared between two exposure scenarios, simulating spraydrift- and runoff-borne contamination events in the Lourens River (LR), Western Cape, South Africa. NOECs of brain AChE inhibition, determined after 1h of exposure followed by 24h of recovery, were 0.33microgl(-1) for aqueous CPF, 200mgkg(-1) for SP-associated CPF and 20mgkg(-1) for SP-associated AZP (at 0.5gl(-1) SP). The highest aqueous AZP concentration tested (3.3microgl(-1)) was without significant effects. Previously reported peak levels of aqueous CPF in the LR ( approximately 0.2microgl(-1)) are close to its NOEC (this study), suggesting a significant toxicological risk to fish in the LR. By contrast, reported levels of SP-associated OPs in the LR are 20-200-fold lower than their NOECs (this study). In a comparative in situ study, trout were exposed for seven days at agricultural (LR2, LR3) and upstream reference (LR1) sites. No runoff occurred during the study. Brain AChE was significantly inhibited at LR3. However, OP levels at LR3 (CPF 0.01microgl(-1); AZP 0.14microgl(-1)) were minor compared to concentrations having effects in the laboratory (see above). Additionally, muscle AChE activity was significantly higher in caged trout from LR1 than in animals maintained in laboratory tanks.

  13. Negative DC corona discharge current characteristics in a flowing two-phase (air + suspended smoke particles) fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berendt, Artur; Domaszka, Magdalena; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy

    2017-04-01

    The electrical characteristics of a steady-state negative DC corona discharge in a two-phase fluid (air with suspended cigarette smoke particles) flowing along a chamber with a needle-to-plate electrode arrangement were experimentally investigated. The two-phase flow was transverse in respect to the needle-to-plate axis. The velocity of the transverse two-phase flow was limited to 0.8 m/s, typical of the electrostatic precipitators. We found that three discharge current modes of the negative corona exist in the two-phase (air + smoke particles) fluid: the Trichel pulses mode, the "Trichel pulses superimposed on DC component" mode and the DC component mode, similarly as in the corona discharge in air (a single-phase fluid). The shape of Trichel pulses in the air + suspended particles fluid is similar to that in air. However, the Trichel pulse amplitudes are higher than those in "pure" air while their repetition frequency is lower. As a net consequence of that the averaged corona discharge current in the two-phase fluid is lower than in "pure" air. It was also found that the average discharge current decreases with increasing suspended particle concentration. The calculations showed that the dependence of the average negative corona current (which is a macroscopic corona discharge parameter) on the particle concentration can be explained by the particle-concentration dependencies of the electric charge of Trichel pulse and the repetition frequency of Trichel pulses, both giving a microscopic insight into the electrical phenomena in the negative corona discharge. Our investigations showed also that the average corona discharge current in the two-phase fluid is almost unaffected by the transverse fluid flow up to a velocity of 0.8 m/s. Contribution to the topical issue "The 15th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi and Tomáš Hoder

  14. The active surface of suspended particles as a predictor of lung function and pulmonary symptoms in Austrian school children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshammer, Hanns; Neuberger, Manfred

    At a central elementary school in the capital of Upper Austria children aged 7-10 years underwent repeated respiratory health checkups (questionnaires, diaries, spirometry). Between March and May 2001 the daily means of the signals of a diffusion charging sensor, measuring the "active surface" of suspended particles, and a photoelectric aerosol sensor, measuring the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were related to spirometric results of the total 164 children examined and to the daily symptom scores of a susceptible subgroup. Significant reductions of forced vital capacity ( p=0.006) and forced expiratory volume in the first second ( p=0.001) and significant increases of wheezing ( p=0.001), shortness of breath ( p=0.041), cough in the evening ( p=0.031) and at night ( p=0.018) were found with increase of "active surface" of suspended particles measured at the adjacent outdoor monitoring station, but not with the increase of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Monitoring "active surface" of particles with diameters of about 10 nm-1 μm by means of a diffusion charging sensor might provide additional information in surveillance of particulate matter for prevention of acute effects on respiratory health.

  15. Application of a hollow-fiber, tangential-flow device for sampling suspended bacteria and particles from natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, J.S.; Harvey, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    The design and application of a hollow-fiber tangential-flow filtration device has been used to concentrate bacteria and suspended particles from large volume surface water and groundwater samples (i.e., hundreds of liters). Filtrate tlux rates (4–8 L min−1) are equal to or faster than those of other devices that are based on continuous flow centrifugation and plate and frame filtration. Particle recovery efficiencies for inorganic particles (approximately 90%) were similar to other dewatering devices, but microbial cell recoveries (30–90%) were greatly improved by this technique relative to other currently available methods. Although requirements for operation and maintenance of the device are minimal, its size, as with other dewatering devices, limits its applicability at remote sample sites. Nevertheless, it has proven useful for sample collection in studies involving microbial transport and analysis of particle-associated trace inorganic solutes.

  16. A hybrid method to estimate suspended particle sizes from satellite measurements over Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Deyong; Qiu, Zhongfeng; Hu, Chuanmin; Wang, Shengqiang; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Lufei; Peng, Tian; He, Yijun

    2016-09-01

    Particle-size distribution (PSD), a measure of particle concentrations at different sizes, is of great importance to the understanding of many biogeochemical processes in coastal marine ecosystems. Here, a hybrid method, including analytical, semianalytical, and empirical steps, is developed to estimate PSD through the median diameter of suspended particles (Dv50). Four cruise surveys were conducted to measure optical scattering properties, particle concentrations, spectral reflectance, and particle-size distributions (obtained with a LISST instrument covering a size range of 2.5-500 μm) in coastal waters of Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea, and Jiangsu coastal region. Based on the Mie scattering theory, Dv50 is closely related to mass-specific backscattering coefficient of suspended particles (bbp*), and their relationship is calibrated through a power model (R2 = 0.796, n = 67, p < 0.001) for the Dv50 range of 23.5-379.8 μm. The model is shown to perform better than the previously used inverse-proportion model. The retrieval of bbp* is through a bio-optical model that links remote sensing reflectance just beneath the surface to inherent optical properties, where a close empirical relationship is established between particulate backscattering and particle concentration. The hybrid method shows high degree of fitting (R2 = 0.875, n = 46, p < 0.001) between the measured and estimated Dv50 for the size range of 17.2-325.2 μm used in the model calibration, while validation using two independent data sets shows mean absolute percentage errors of 46.0% and 64.7%, respectively. Application of the hybrid method to MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data results in spatial distributions of Dv50 that are generally consistent with those from in situ observations, suggesting potential use of the method in studying particle dynamics through time series of remote sensing observations. However, its general applicability to other regions still requires further research.

  17. Particle-area dependence of mineral dust in the immersion mode: investigations with freely suspended drops in an acoustic levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, K.; Debertshäuser, M.; Eppers, O.; Schmithüsen, H.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-05-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of supercooled drops were measured by using an acoustic levitator. This technique allows to freely suspending single drops in air without electrical charges thereby avoiding any electrical influences which may affect the freezing process. Heterogeneous nucleation caused by several mineral dust particles (montmorillonite, two types of illite) was investigated in the immersion mode. Drops of 1 \\unit{mm} in radius were monitored by a video camera during cooling down to -28 °C to simulate the tropospheric temperature range. The surface temperature of the drops was remotely determined with an infra-red thermometer so that the onset of freezing was indicated. For comparisons, measurements with one particle type were additionally performed in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel with drops of 340 \\unit{{μ}m} radius freely suspended. The data were interpreted regarding the particle surfaces immersed in the drops. Immersion freezing was observed in a temperature range between -13 and -26 °C in dependence of particle type and surface area per drop. The results were evaluated by applying two descriptions of heterogeneous freezing, the stochastic and the singular model.

  18. Infrared spectral challenges of individual, respirable, micron-sized dust particles: Strong phonons and their distorted lineshapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, James

    2015-03-01

    Consideration of cluster properties as they grow through the nanosize regime and into the micron-sized regime, leads to expectations of bulk-like trends which are well understood. However, individual micron-sized particles are of comparable size to the wavelength of probing infrared (IR) light, so vibrational spectra will be dominated by scattering effects and lineshapes will have dispersion and saturation distortions. Airborne dust particles of ~ 4 micron widths are of particular health interest because they get past the nose, throat, and thorax and can be inhaled into people's lungs. This talk will describe the use of plasmonic metal mesh to obtain scatter-free, IR absorption spectra of single, ~ 4 micron respirable particles. A dust library of single particle IR spectra is being compiled to chemically characterize respirable dust and a Mie-Bruggeman model has been created to predict the IR spectra of collections of mixed-composition dust particles. Having dealt with scattering effects, the remaining difficulty involves the effect of strong phonons. Many of the most common mineral components of dust have strong phonons with intensity cross sections comparable to the size of the particle which leads to severe and interesting lineshape distortions. NSF CHE 1213293.

  19. [Second-hand smoke exposure in hospitality venues in Barcelona: measurement of respirable particles].

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Nazmy; López, María José; Sánchez-Martínez, Francesca; Fernández, Esteve; Nebot, Manel

    2011-01-01

    To quantify the concentration of respirable particles equal to or smaller than 2.5μm (PM(2.5)) as a marker of second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure in a sample of hospitality venues in Barcelona 2 years after the Spanish smoking law came into effect. We performed a cross-sectional descriptive study from October to December 2007. The study population consisted of 40 hospitality venues in Barcelona selected by a random route sampling, with representation of the different types of smoking regulation included in the law (smoking allowed, smoking ban and venues with smoking areas). SHS levels were quantified by measuring PM(2.5) concentrations, which were measured using a laser photometer (Side Pack AM 510 Personal Aerosol Monitor). The measurements were carried out for 5 minutes outside the venue and for 30 minutes inside the venue. In addition, observational variables related to the characteristics of the venue and signs of tobacco consumption were recorded. The concentration of PM(2.5) in venues where smoking was still allowed was five times higher than that in venues where smoking was banned (182μg/m(3) and 34μg/m(3), respectively) and exceeded the concentration established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as harmful (35μg/m(3)). However, in venues where smoking was banned, the concentration was lower than the EPA standard and there were no significant differences with the outdoor PM(2.5) concentration. Two years after the introduction of the Spanish smoking law, SHS exposure in venues where smoking was allowed was q still very high, representing a significant health risk for hospitality workers. Copyright © 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Particle size distribution of river-suspended sediments determined by in situ measured remote-sensing reflectance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanzhi; Huang, Zhaojun; Chen, Chuqun; He, Yijun; Jiang, Tingchen

    2015-07-10

    Suspended sediments in water bodies are classified into organic and inorganic matter and have been investigated by remote-sensing technology for years. Focusing on inorganic matter, however, detailed information such as the grain size of this matter has not been provided yet. In this study, we present a new solution for estimating inorganic suspended sediments' size distribution in highly complex Case 2 waters by using a simple spectrometer sensor rather than a backscattering sensor. An experiment was carried out in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) in the dry season to collect the remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs) and particle size distribution (PSD) of inorganic suspended sediments. Based on Mie theory, PSDs in the PRE waters were retrieved by Rrs, colored dissolved organic matter, and phytoplankton. The retrieved median diameters in 12 stations show good agreement with those of laboratory analysis at root mean square error of 2.604 μm (27.63%), bias of 1.924 μm (20.42%), and mean absolute error of 2.298 μm (24.37%). The retrieved PSDs and previous PSDs were compared, and the features of PSDs in the PRE waters were concluded.

  1. Synthesis of adenosine triphosphate in respiration-inhibited submitochondrial particles induced by microsecond electric pulses

    PubMed Central

    Teissie, Justin; Knox, Barry E.; Tsong, Tian Yow; Wehrle, Janna

    1981-01-01

    Phosphorylation of ADP to ATP was induced in nonrespiring submitochondrial particles (SMP) from rat liver by the application of electric pulses with field strengths of 10-35 kV/cm and a decay time of 60 μs. In all cases respiration was inhibited completely by using cyanide or rotenone. Newly formed ATP was measured by two independent methods, (i) the luciferase/luciferin bioluminescence assay and (ii) synthesis of [32P]ATP from ADP and 32Pi. Both methods gave consistent and essentially identical results. Above 10 kV/cm the amount of ATP synthesized increased with increasing field strength, and at 30 kV/cm, approximately 40 pmol of ATP was synthesized per mg of SMP protein per pulse. ATP synthesis was shown to be related to the field-induced transmembrane potential, not to Joule heating of the suspension. Synthesis was abolished by the uncouplers carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, and 2,4-dinitrophenol. The ionophores valinomycin and A23187 reduced the level of synthesis by 75% and 50%, respectively. ATP synthesis was also blocked by inhibitors of the F0F1 ATPase complex, oligomycin, N,N′-dicyclohexyl carbodiimide, venturicidin, and aurovertin. The activities of the adenine nucleotide translocator and adenylate kinase, as well as release of bound nucleotides, could be excluded as sources of the new ATP. The data indicate that the minimal applied field at which ATP synthesis could be detected is approximately 8 kV/cm, corresponding to a maximal induced membrane potential of 60 mV in SMP. The maximal synthesis occurred at around 30 kV/cm, or an induced transmembrane potential of 200 mV. The duration of the applied pulse was also found to be critical, with 8 μs being the minimal triggering time for the synthesis. The induction of ATP synthesis in nonrespiring SMP by an externally applied electrical field is a direct demonstration of the transformation, by the mitochondrial inner membrane, of electrical

  2. Influence of microorganism content in suspended particles on the particle-water partitioning of mercury in semi-enclosed coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jiyi; Kim, Hyunji; Han, Seunghee

    2014-02-01

    It is known that particle scavenging of mercury (Hg) can be affected by the abundance of particulate organic matter in coastal waters. However, the role of living organic particles in Hg scavenging is not yet completely understood. In this study, we hypothesized that an abundance of living organic particles (i.e., phytoplankton and bacteria) would influence the particle-water partitioning of Hg in coastal waters. Surface seawater samples were collected from eight stations in Gwangyang Bay, Korea, in three seasons (November 2009, April 2010, and October 2010) for the determination of concentrations of suspended particulate matter (including chlorophyll-a and bacteria), and Hg in unfiltered and filtered waters. We found that more Hg partitioned toward particulate matter when phytoplankton biomass, indicated from the chlorophyll-a concentration in a particle, was higher. In the low algal season, when [chlorophyll-a]<0.6 μg L(-1), the bacterial number, instead of chlorophyll-a concentration in particle, showed a positive correlation with the particle-water partition coefficient of Hg. Overall, microbial abundance seems to play a critical role in particle scavenging of Hg in coastal water. Taking this result in light of Hg in pristine coastal zones, we predict that increases in algal biomass amplify the potential for algae to transfer Hg to marine food chains.

  3. Dynamic behavior of fractional suspended solids and particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in highway runoff.

    PubMed

    Aryal, R K; Furumai, H; Nakajima, F; Boller, M

    2005-12-01

    A long-term continuous runoff monitoring was carried out in a highway in Winterthur, Switzerland. The total suspended solids (TSS) samples were fractionated into fine (< 45 microm) and coarse (> 45 microm) fraction and their wash-off behavior was studied. The fine and coarse fraction showed different wash-off behaviors. During the runoff the concentration of the fine fraction was less fluctuated compared to coarse. The fluctuation of the coarse fraction was more influenced by TSS concentration. The PAH content measurement in fine fraction showed less fluctuation compared to the coarse fraction. The PAH content in the coarse fraction was found decreasing with increasing the coarse fraction contribution to TSS.

  4. Measuring the porosity and compressibility of liquid-suspended porous particles using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Han, Endao; Van Ha, Nigel; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2017-05-21

    A key parameter describing the behavior of suspensions is the volume fraction ϕ of the solid particles that are dispersed in the liquid. Obtaining accurate values for ϕ becomes difficult for porous particles, because they can absorb some of the liquid. A prime example are the widely used cornstarch suspensions, for which ϕ usually is only estimated from the mass fraction of particles. Here we present a method to measure the effective porosity and compressibility of porous particles with ultrasound. We obtain the speed of sound in dilute cornstarch suspensions at multiple particle concentrations and with different solvent compressibilities. With the measured particle porosity of 0.31 we are able to calculate the volume fraction of the saturated particles reliably.

  5. Dynamics of magnetic particles suspended in Newtonian fluids under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Mingyang; Walker, Travis

    2016-11-01

    Anisotropic structures are commonly found in natural materials. Researchers are committed to developing meta-materials that mimic natural materials by introducing anisotropic filler particles. These materials can exhibit enhanced magnetic, mechanical, optical, and diffusive properties. In this study, a magnetic field is used to align magnetic oblate spheroids. We present an analytic solution based on a single-particle Stokes-flow model that describes the planar alignment of the particle in a rotating magnetic field. The analytic solution covers the full range of the magnetic field frequency agreeing well with our experimental results. Asymptotic solutions are also developed at both the high-frequency and the low-frequency limits of the field. The induced dipole of each particle can create its own magnetic field that can interact with neighboring particles, causing particles to aggregate. Different structures of particles are formed depending on the characteristics of the field, i.e., one-dimensional columns of particles in a constant field and two-dimensional sheets of particles in a rotating field. To simulate the realistic dynamics of the phenomena, we include hydrodynamic interactions between the particles via Stokesian dynamics.

  6. Effect of fluid and particle inertia on the rotation of an oblate spheroidal particle suspended in linear shear flow.

    PubMed

    Rosén, T; Do-Quang, M; Aidun, C K; Lundell, F

    2015-05-01

    This work describes the inertial effects on the rotational behavior of an oblate spheroidal particle confined between two parallel opposite moving walls, which generate a linear shear flow. Numerical results are obtained using the lattice Boltzmann method with an external boundary force. The rotation of the particle depends on the particle Reynolds number, Re(p)=Gd(2)ν(-1) (G is the shear rate, d is the particle diameter, ν is the kinematic viscosity), and the Stokes number, St=αRe(p) (α is the solid-to-fluid density ratio), which are dimensionless quantities connected to fluid and particle inertia, respectively. The results show that two inertial effects give rise to different stable rotational states. For a neutrally buoyant particle (St=Re(p)) at low Re(p), particle inertia was found to dominate, eventually leading to a rotation about the particle's symmetry axis. The symmetry axis is in this case parallel to the vorticity direction; a rotational state called log-rolling. At high Re(p), fluid inertia will dominate and the particle will remain in a steady state, where the particle symmetry axis is perpendicular to the vorticity direction and has a constant angle ϕ(c) to the flow direction. The sequence of transitions between these dynamical states were found to be dependent on density ratio α, particle aspect ratio r(p), and domain size. More specifically, the present study reveals that an inclined rolling state (particle rotates around its symmetry axis, which is not aligned in the vorticity direction) appears through a pitchfork bifurcation due to the influence of periodic boundary conditions when simulated in a small domain. Furthermore, it is also found that a tumbling motion, where the particle symmetry axis rotates in the flow-gradient plane, can be a stable motion for particles with high r(p) and low α.

  7. A New Miniature Respirable Sampler for In-mask Sampling: Part 1— Particle Size Selection Performance

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Peter; Thorpe, Andrew; Mogridge, Rhiannon; Lee, Taekhee; Harper, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The Health and Safety Laboratory has developed a miniature respirable sampler to gain a better understanding of the exposure of workers to hazardous substances when they are wearing respiratory protective equipment (RPE) or helmets with visors in the workplace. The study was in two parts and the first part, described herein, was to develop the sampler and test its collection characteristics. Assessment of the impact of the sampler on RPE safety and its comparability with traditional laboratory-based approaches to measure protection factors was discussed in a second article. The miniature sampler (weight—5.4 g, length—13 mm) was designed to ft into the space available between the nose and chin of an individual inside a filtering facepiece type mask and has a radially omnidirectional inlet with a porous foam particle selector that allows the collection of the respirable fraction on a downstream filter. The sampling efficiency was compared with the respirable convention. A close match with the respirable convention was obtained at a flow rate of 1 l min−1 and the 50% penetration cut off value (d50) was 4.08 μm. After 3 hours sampling in high humidity (95%), the penetration curve had shifted towards smaller particle sizes (d50 = 3.81 μm) with 88% of the calculated bias values within 10%. The miniature sampler measured respirable dust and crystalline silica mass concentrations comparable with performance of the Safety In Mines Personal Dust Sampler (SIMPEDS), commonly used in Great Britain, at a flow rate of 0.8 l min−1. The d50 for the miniature sampler at 0.8 l min−1 (4.4 μm) is within 5% of the d50 of the SIMPEDS at its prescribed flow rate of 2.2 l min−1 (4.2 μm). These results indicated that the miniature sampler was a good candidate to proceed with tests with RPE described in the second part of this series of two papers. PMID:27630151

  8. Evaluating unsupervised methods to size and classify suspended particles using digital in-line holography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, Emlyn J.; Buscombe, Daniel D.; Graham, George W.; Nimmo-Smith, W. Alex M.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial information can be gained from digital in-line holography of marine particles, eliminating depth-of-field and focusing errors associated with standard lens-based imaging methods. However, for the technique to reach its full potential in oceanographic research, fully unsupervised (automated) methods are required for focusing, segmentation, sizing and classification of particles. These computational challenges are the subject of this paper, in which we draw upon data collected using a variety of holographic systems developed at Plymouth University, UK, from a significant range of particle types, sizes and shapes. A new method for noise reduction in reconstructed planes is found to be successful in aiding particle segmentation and sizing. The performance of an automated routine for deriving particle characteristics (and subsequent size distributions) is evaluated against equivalent size metrics obtained by a trained operative measuring grain axes on screen. The unsupervised method is found to be reliable, despite some errors resulting from over-segmentation of particles. A simple unsupervised particle classification system is developed, and is capable of successfully differentiating sand grains, bubbles and diatoms from within the surf-zone. Avoiding miscounting bubbles and biological particles as sand grains enables more accurate estimates of sand concentrations, and is especially important in deployments of particle monitoring instrumentation in aerated water. Perhaps the greatest potential for further development in the computational aspects of particle holography is in the area of unsupervised particle classification. The simple method proposed here provides a foundation upon which further development could lead to reliable identification of more complex particle populations, such as those containing phytoplankton, zooplankton, flocculated cohesive sediments and oil droplets.

  9. Dynamic interaction between suspended particles and defects in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Grollau, S; Abbott, N L; de Pablo, J J

    2003-05-01

    Insertion of spherical particles into a uniform nematic liquid crystal gives rise to the formation of topological defects. In the present work, we investigate how a spherical particle accompanied by its topological defects interacts with neighboring disclination lines. We perform two- and three-dimensional dynamic simulations to analyze the effect of a particle on the annihilation process of two disclination lines. The dynamics of the liquid crystal is described by a time-dependent evolution equation on the symmetric traceless order parameter that includes some of the salient features of liquid crystalline materials: excluded volume effects, or equivalently, short-range order elasticity and long-range order elasticity. At the surface of the particle, the liquid crystal is assumed to exhibit strong homeotropic anchoring. The particle is located between two disclination lines of topological charges +1/2 and -1/2. Two-dimensional simulations indicate that the topological defects bound to the particle mediate an interaction between the two disclination lines which increases the attraction between them. This result is confirmed by three-dimensional simulations that provide a complete description of the director field and of the order parameter around the particle. These simulations indicate that a spherical particle between two disclination lines can be surrounded by a Saturn ring, and suggest that the dynamic behavior of disclination lines could be used to report the structure of a defect around the particle.

  10. DNS-DEM of Suspended Sediment Particles in an Open Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakseresht, Pedram; Apte, Sourabh; Finn, Justin

    2016-11-01

    DNS with point-particle based discrete element model (DEM) is used to study particle-turbulence interactions in an open channel flow at Reτ of 710, corresponding to the experimental observations of Righetti & Romano. Large particles of diameter 200 microns (10 in wall units) with volume loading on the order of 10-3 are simulated using four-way coupling with closure models for drag, added mass, lift, pressure, and inter-particle collision forces. The point-particle model is able to accurately capture the effect of particles on the fluid flow in the outer layer. However, the particle is significantly larger than the wall-normal grid in the near-wall region, but slightly smaller than the axial and longitudinal grid resolutions. The point-particle model fails to capture the interactions in the near-wall region. In order to improve the near-wall predictions, particles are represented by Lagrangian material points which are used to perform interpolations from the grid to the Lagrangian points and to distribute the two-way coupling force to the Eulerian grid. Predictions using this approach is compared with the experimental data to evaluate its effectiveness. NSF project #1133363, Sediment-Bed-Turbulence Coupling in Oscillatory Flows.

  11. Performance of High Flow Rate Personal Respirable Samplers When Challenged with Mineral Aerosols of Different Particle Size Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Peter; Thorpe, Andrew; Echt, Alan

    2016-01-01

    It is thought that the performance of respirable samplers may vary when exposed to dust aerosols with different particle sizes and wind speeds. This study investigated the performance of the GK 4.16 (RASCAL), GK 2.69, PPI 8, and FSP 10, high flow rate personal samplers when exposed to aerosols of mineral dust in a wind tunnel at two different wind speeds (1 and 2 m s−1) and orientations (towards and side-on to the source of emission). The mass median aerodynamic diameter of four aerosolized test dusts ranged from 8 to 25 µm with geometric standard deviations from 1.6 to 2 µm. The performance of each sampler type was compared with that of the SIMPEDS (Higgins–Dewell design) sampler. There was slight evidence to suggest that the performance of the FSP 10 is affected by the direction of the inlet relative to the air flow, although this was not significant when most respirable dust concentrations were compared, possibly due to the variability of paired dust concentration results. The GK 2.69, RASCAL, and PPI 8 samplers had similar performances, although the results when side-on to the emission source were generally slightly lower than the SIMPEDS. Despite slight differences between respirable dust concentrations the respirable crystalline silica values were not significantly different from the SIMPEDS. The GK family of cyclones obtained most precise results and more closely matched the SIMPEDS. A comparison with dust concentration results from previous calm air chamber studies (where wind speeds were < 0.4 m s−1) found that the relative performance between samplers was similar to those observed in this work indicating consistent performance relative to the SIMPEDS in both calm and moving air. PMID:26865560

  12. Mineralogical and chemical characterization of suspended atmospheric particles over the east Mediterranean based on synoptic-scale circulation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalderon-Asael, Boriana; Erel, Yigal; Sandler, Amir; Dayan, Uri

    Suspended atmospheric particles were collected in Israel in order to identify their nature and relationships with the major synoptic-scale circulation patterns. The particles were analyzed for their major and trace element concentrations and mineralogical composition. Samples were collected during three synoptic systems associated with desert dust storms: Red Sea trough, Sharav cyclone and cold depression, and during deep and shallow modes of Persian Gulf trough, which prevails in the summer months and is not associated with dust storms. All samples mostly contain particles smaller than 2 μm. The suspended desert dust is composed primarily of illite-smectite and calcite. Some indicative secondary minerals were found for each of the dust transporting synoptic systems (e.g., palygorskite for Red Sea trough). The bulk chemistry data support the mineralogical observations and reveal additional chemical signatures of each dust transporting system. For instance, Red Sea trough samples have significantly higher Ca/Al and Ca/Mg in the carbonate and Mg/Al in Al-silicate fraction than cold depression samples. Nevertheless, Sharav cyclone samples have intermediate values in spite of the fact that the source of the dust during these conditions is similar to cold depression (i.e., North Africa). Even though differences in the chemical and the mineralogical composition of desert dust do exist, this study reveals their overall chemical and mineralogical similarities. In contrast to the synoptic systems that carry desert dust, the inorganic fraction of the Persian Gulf trough samples contains significant amount (up to 50%) of non-mineral material that has a pronounced chemical signature in terms of major element concentrations (e.g., Al, Ca, Mg, Na, S) implying their anthropogenic nature, probably from countries around the Black Sea. This striking finding is indicative for atmospheric pollution in the Eastern Mediterranean region during the summer.

  13. Hydro-meteorological influences and multimodal suspended particle size distributions in the Belgian nearshore area (southern North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fettweis, Michael; Baeye, Matthias; Lee, Byung Joon; Chen, Peihung; Yu, Jason C. S.

    2012-04-01

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) were assessed in a coastal turbidity maximum area (southern North Sea) during a composite period of 37 days in January-April 2008. PSDs were measured with a LISST 100X and classified using entropy analysis in terms of subtidal alongshore flow. The PSDs during tide-dominated conditions showed distinct multimodal behaviour due to flocculation, revealing that the building blocks of flocs consist of primary particles (<3 μm) and flocculi (15 μm). Flocculi comprise clusters of clay minerals, whereas primary particles have various compositions (calcite, clays). The PSDs during storms with a NE-directed alongshore subtidal current (NE storms) are typically unimodal and characterised by mainly granular material (silt, sand) resuspended from the seabed. During storms with a SW-directed alongshore subtidal current (SW storms), by contrast, mainly flocculated material can be identified in the PSDs. The findings emphasise the importance of wind-induced advection, alongshore subtidal flow and highly concentrated mud suspensions (HCMSs) as regulating mechanisms of SPM concentration, as well as other SPM characteristics (cohesiveness or composition of mixed sediment particles) and size distribution in a high-turbidity area. The direction of subtidal alongshore flow during SW storm events results in an increase in cohesive SPM concentration, HCMS formation, and the armouring of sand; by contrast, there is a decrease in cohesive SPM concentration, no HCMS formation, and an increase in sand and silt in suspension during NE storms.

  14. Effect of evaporation and solutocapillary-driven flow upon motion and resultant deposition of suspended particles in volatile droplet on solid substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, I.; Kochiya, K.

    Particle motion in a volatile droplet on a solid surface, especially the behavior of particles depositing in the vicinity of a solid liquid gas boundary line (contact line) is focused. This phenomenon is called the ‘coffee stain problem’. Motion and deposition of the particles suspended in distilled water droplets and distilled water ethanol mixture droplets are discussed. The spatio-temporal particle motion is analyzed by the three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D PTV). A discussion of the morphology of the particles stuck to the solid surface after the dryout of the droplet is also given.

  15. Validating a universal model of particle transport lengths with laboratory measurements of suspended grain motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqshband, Suleyman; McElroy, Brandon; Mahon, Robert C.

    2017-05-01

    The mechanics of sediment transport are of fundamental importance for fluvio-deltaic morphodynamics. The present study focuses on quantifying particle motions and trajectories across a wide range of flow conditions. In particular, a continuous model is presented that predicts particle travel distances for saltation and suspension based on Rouse number and relative grain roughness. By utilizing a series of eight video cameras in a plexiglass flume direct measurements of the distributions of particle travel distances (excursion lengths) were obtained. To this end, experiments were carried out in dark under black lights with fluorescent painted plastic and quartz sand particles. For relatively high Rouse numbers indicating bed load dominant transport regime (P≥2.5), particle motion is governed by the effect of gravitational forces (settling velocities) and measured excursion lengths closely follow a Gaussian distribution. For P=2.5, particle motion is equally subjected to both gravitational and turbulent forces. Consequently, measured excursion lengths exhibit a bimodal distribution with two distinct peaks. As turbulent fluctuations increase and dominate particle motion over gravity (P<2.5), distributions of excursion lengths become unimodal and negative-skewed with mean values deviating from the modes. The predicted trend of linearly increasing excursion lengths with decreasing Rouse numbers is consistent with measured excursion lengths across a wide range of Rouse numbers >(P=1.8-8.9). Furthermore, measured excursion lengths are observed to fit within the predicted range of excursion lengths with no significant difference between measured excursion lengths of plastic and quartz sand particles.

  16. Determination of the Density of Protein Particles Using a Suspended Microchannel Resonator.

    PubMed

    Folzer, Emilien; Khan, Tarik A; Schmidt, Roland; Finkler, Christof; Huwyler, Jörg; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Koulov, Atanas V

    2015-12-01

    One of the analytical tools for characterization of subvisible particles, which gained popularity over the last years because of its unique capabilities, is the resonance mass measurement technique. However, a challenge that this technique presents is the need to know the exact density of the measured particles in order to obtain accurate size calculations. The density of proteinaceous subvisible particles has not been measured experimentally yet and to date researchers have been using estimated density values. In this paper, we report for a first-time experimental measurements of the density of protein particles (0.2-5 μm in size) using particles created by stressing three different proteins using four different types of stress conditions. Interestingly, the particle density values that were measured varied between 1.28 and 1.33 g/cm(3) and were lower than previous estimates. Furthermore, it was found that although the density of proteinaceous particles was affected to a very low degree by the stress conditions used to generate them, there is relatively larger difference between particles originating from different classes of proteins (e.g., monoclonal antibody vs. bovine serum albumin).

  17. Analysis of suspended solids by single-particle scattering. [for Lake Superior pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, S. R.; Smith, D. T.; Sydor, M.

    1979-01-01

    Light scattering by individual particulates is used in a multiple-detector system to categorize the composition of suspended solids in terms of broad particulate categories. The scattering signatures of red clay and taconite tailings, the two primary particulate contaminants in western Lake Superior, along with two types of asbestiform fibers, amphibole and chrysolite, were studied in detail. A method was developed to predict the concentration of asbestiform fibers in filtration plant samples for which electron microscope analysis was done concurrently. Fiber levels as low as 50,000 fibers/liter were optically detectable. The method has application in optical categorization of samples for remote sensing purposes and offers a fast, inexpensive means for analyzing water samples from filtration plants for specific particulate contaminants.

  18. Analysis of suspended solids by single-particle scattering. [for Lake Superior pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, S. R.; Smith, D. T.; Sydor, M.

    1979-01-01

    Light scattering by individual particulates is used in a multiple-detector system to categorize the composition of suspended solids in terms of broad particulate categories. The scattering signatures of red clay and taconite tailings, the two primary particulate contaminants in western Lake Superior, along with two types of asbestiform fibers, amphibole and chrysolite, were studied in detail. A method was developed to predict the concentration of asbestiform fibers in filtration plant samples for which electron microscope analysis was done concurrently. Fiber levels as low as 50,000 fibers/liter were optically detectable. The method has application in optical categorization of samples for remote sensing purposes and offers a fast, inexpensive means for analyzing water samples from filtration plants for specific particulate contaminants.

  19. Diesel Exhaust Exposure Assessment Among Tunnel Construction Workers-Correlations Between Nitrogen Dioxide, Respirable Elemental Carbon, and Particle Number.

    PubMed

    Hedmer, Maria; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Li, Huiqi; Albin, Maria; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Broberg, Karin

    2017-06-01

    Occupational exposure to diesel exhaust is common due the widespread use of diesel-powered combustion engines. Diesel exhaust is chemically complex and consists of thousands of compounds present as gases and particulate matter. Both nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and elemental carbon (EC) have been used as markers for diesel exhaust exposure. Currently EC is regarded as the best surrogate of diesel exhaust. The objective was to quantify the occupational exposure to diesel exhaust in underground tunnel construction work using a multi-metric approach, and to investigate the correlations between NO2, respirable EC, respirable organic carbon (OC), respirable total carbon (TC), respirable dust (RD), and particle number. Also, the use of NO2 as a proxy for diesel exhaust was evaluated, how much of the variability in the diesel exhaust exposure was attributed to within and between individual factors and if there was a difference between expert and self-administered measurements of NO2. The personal exposure to diesel exhaust was assessed by expert supervised measurements of NO2, EC, OC, TC, RD and particle number in the breathing zones of underground tunnel workers. Stationary sampling of NO2, EC, OC, TC, RD, size-fractioned mass concentration, and particle number were conducted. The personal and stationary measurements were conducted on three occasions simultaneously. The workers measured their exposure by repeated self-administered measurements of NO2. The self-administered measurements were performed twice for each worker with at least one month lag between the samplings. In the simultaneous sampling of diesel exhaust, the geometric mean (GM) concentration of NO2 and respirable EC were 72 µg m-3 (10th-90th percentile 34-140 µg m-3) and 2.6 µg m-3 (10th-90th percentile 1.6-7.3 µg m-3), respectively. The GM for OC and TC was 28 µg m-3 (10th-90th percentile 20-42 µg m-3) and 31 µg m-3 (10th-90th percentile 20-50 µg m-3), respectively. The GM for RD and particle number was

  20. Assessment of a New Method for Estimating Density of Suspended Particles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    S., J. P. , E. A. Cowan, and R. D. Powell, (1998), In situ observations of floc settling velocities in Glacier Bay, Alaska, Marine Geology, 145: 85...settling velocity to estimate particle density (e.g., Fennessy et al., 1994; Hill et al., 1998; Hill et al., 2011). With this method Stokes Law (or a...is particle settling velocity (m s-1), µ is the dynamic viscosity of water (kg m-1 s-1), g is gravitational acceleration (m s-2), D is particle

  1. Particle size distributions and the vertical distribution of suspended matter in the upwelling region off Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchen, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Various methods of presenting and mathematically describing particle size distribution are explained and evaluated. The hyperbolic distribution is found to be the most practical but the more complex characteristic vector analysis is the most sensitive to changes in the shape of the particle size distributions. A method for determining onshore-offshore flow patterns from the distribution of particulates was presented. A numerical model of the vertical structure of two size classes of particles was developed. The results show a close similarity to the observed distributions but overestimate the particle concentration by forty percent. This was attributed to ignoring grazing by zooplankton. Sensivity analyses showed the size preference was most responsive to the maximum specific growth rates and nutrient half saturation constants. The verical structure was highly dependent on the eddy diffusivity followed closely by the growth terms.

  2. Separation of particles, suspended in a conducting liquid, with the help of an alternating electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Korovin, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    The author studies MHD flow at low Reynolds numbers past a spherical particle with conductivity ..cap alpha../sub 1/ greater than or equal to0, moving in a viscous fluid at rest with conductivity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ not = ..cap alpha../sub 1/, filling the interior space of a long solenoid fed by an alternating current. It is shown that aside from the electromagnetic force calculated from the analog of Archimedes' principle, and from the Lorentz force arising from the interaction of eddy currents flowing in th particle with the magnetic field, the particle is also subjected to an electromagnetic propulsive force. A formula relating the local characteristics of the electromagnetic field with the velocity of the particle put into motion by the field but neglecting inertial effects is obtained.

  3. Multiphysics modelling of the separation of suspended particles via frequency ramping of ultrasonic standing waves.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Francisco J; Eberhardt, Sebastian; Möller, Dirk; Dual, Jurg; Knoerzer, Kai

    2013-03-01

    A model was developed to determine the local changes of concentration of particles and the formations of bands induced by a standing acoustic wave field subjected to a sawtooth frequency ramping pattern. The mass transport equation was modified to incorporate the effect of acoustic forces on the concentration of particles. This was achieved by balancing the forces acting on particles. The frequency ramping was implemented as a parametric sweep for the time harmonic frequency response in time steps of 0.1s. The physics phenomena of piezoelectricity, acoustic fields and diffusion of particles were coupled and solved in COMSOL Multiphysics™ (COMSOL AB, Stockholm, Sweden) following a three step approach. The first step solves the governing partial differential equations describing the acoustic field by assuming that the pressure field achieves a pseudo steady state. In the second step, the acoustic radiation force is calculated from the pressure field. The final step allows calculating the locally changing concentration of particles as a function of time by solving the modified equation of particle transport. The diffusivity was calculated as function of concentration following the Garg and Ruthven equation which describes the steep increase of diffusivity when the concentration approaches saturation. However, it was found that this steep increase creates numerical instabilities at high voltages (in the piezoelectricity equations) and high initial particle concentration. The model was simplified to a pseudo one-dimensional case due to computation power limitations. The predicted particle distribution calculated with the model is in good agreement with the experimental data as it follows accurately the movement of the bands in the centre of the chamber.

  4. Measurements of Plutonium and Americium in Soil Samples from Project 57 using the Suspended Soil Particle Sizing System (SSPSS)

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Bowen; Rowena Gonzalez; David S. Shafer

    2001-05-01

    As part of the preliminary site characterization conducted for Project 57, soils samples were collected for separation into several size-fractions using the Suspended Soil Particle Sizing System (SSPSS). Soil samples were collected specifically for separation by the SSPSS at three general locations in the deposited Project 57 plume, the projected radioactivity of which ranged from 100 to 600 pCi/g. The primary purpose in focusing on samples with this level of activity is that it would represent anticipated residual soil contamination levels at the site after corrective actions are completed. Consequently, the results of the SSPSS analysis can contribute to dose calculation and corrective action-level determinations for future land-use scenarios at the site.

  5. Suspended-sediment concentrations, yields, total suspended solids, turbidity, and particle-size fractions for selected rivers in Minnesota, 2007 through 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellison, Christopher A.; Savage, Brett E.; Johnson, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive sediment transport in rivers causes problems for flood control, soil conservation, irrigation, aquatic health, and navigation, as well as transporting harmful contaminants like organic chemicals and eutrophication-causing nutrients. In Minnesota, more than 5,800 miles of streams are identified as impaired by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) due to elevated levels of suspended sediment. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the MPCA, established a sediment monitoring network in 2007 and began systematic sampling of suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), total suspended solids (TSS), and turbidity in rivers across Minnesota to improve the understanding of fluvial sediment transport relations. Suspended-sediment samples were collected from 14 sites from 2007 through 2011. Analyses of these data indicated that the Zumbro River at Kellogg in southeast Minnesota had the highest mean SSC of 226 milligrams per liter (mg/L) followed by the Minnesota River at Mankato with a mean SSC of 193 mg/L. The single highest SSC of 1,250 mg/L was measured at the Zumbro River during the 2011 spring runoff. The lowest mean SSC of 21 mg/L was measured at Rice Creek in the northern Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area. Total suspended solids (TSS) have been used as a measure of fluvial sediment by the MPCA since the early 1970s; however, TSS concentrations have been known to underrepresent the amount of suspended sediment. For this study, comparisons between concurrently sampled SSC and TSS indicated significant differences at every site, with SSC on average two times larger than TSS concentrations. Regression analysis indicated that 7 out of 14 sites had poor or no relation between SSC and streamflow. Only two sites, the Knife River and the Wild Rice River at Twin Valley, had strong correlations between SSC and streamflow, with coefficient of determination (R2) values of 0.82 and 0.80, respectively. In contrast, turbidity had moderate to strong

  6. Respiration and carbon dynamics of free-living and particle-attached bacteria in coastal waters of NE Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, C.; Ke, Y.; Liu, H.

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial respiration (BR) rates are fundamental to understand the role of bacteria in carbon flow in aquatic ecosystem, and therefore it is critical to obtain reliable measurements. Prefiltration- (mostly 1-3μm) and dark-incubation- (mostly 24 h) based direct measurements of oxygen consumption have been the most commonly used method for BR. However, the prefiltration procedure and long incubation time may cause change of the bacterial abundance and structure, leading to inaccurate measurements. In this study, by measuring bacterial abundance, production and respiration of both particle-attached (PA) and free-living (FL) bacteria at two contrasting site in coastal NE Pacific from Nov 2014 to Mar 2015, we found that the 24 h growth rate of FL bacteria in the traditional BR incubations were significantly higher for 30% and 54% than those obtained for FL and total (FL+PA) bacteria in unfiltered incubations respectively, suggesting removal of protist grazers could cause a significant biomass accumulation during 24 h incubation than the in situ condition. This biomass overestimation resulted in 40% (±12%) overestimation of measured FL BR rates compared with the corrected in situ FL BR. Nevertheless, for the corrected in situ total BR, the rates were overestimated by traditional method in three measurements over nine for 6-46%, and were underestimated in the rest six measurements for 7-67%. Interestingly, those underestimations were attributed to the ignorance of PA bacteria due to prefiltration, which had larger cell size than the FL bacteria, accounted for 19% (±16%) in total bacterial abundance, and contributed to 50% (±19%) of total bacterial production. The average bacterial growth efficiency calculated by comparable 24 h integrated bacterial production and respiration was 0.42 (±0.24). Our results confirmed two major flaws in the current BR methodology, i.e., 1) it only measures the respiration of FL bacteria, and 2) the removal of grazers causing dramatic

  7. Suspended-sediment concentrations, loads, total suspended solids, turbidity, and particle-size fractions for selected rivers in Minnesota, 2007 through 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellison, Christopher A.; Savage, Brett E.; Johnson, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Sediment-laden rivers and streams pose substantial environmental and economic challenges. Excessive sediment transport in rivers causes problems for flood control, soil conservation, irrigation, aquatic health, and navigation, and transports harmful contaminants like organic chemicals and eutrophication-causing nutrients. In Minnesota, more than 5,800 miles of streams are identified as impaired by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) due to elevated levels of suspended sediment. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the MPCA, established a sediment monitoring network in 2007 and began systematic sampling of suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC), total suspended solids (TSS), and turbidity in rivers across Minnesota to improve the understanding of fluvial sediment transport relations. Suspended-sediment samples collected from 14 sites from 2007 through 2011 indicated that the Zumbro River at Kellogg in the driftless region of southeast Minnesota had the highest mean SSC of 226 milligrams per liter (mg/L) followed by the Minnesota River at Mankato with a mean SSC of 193 mg/L. During the 2011 spring runoff, the single highest SSC of 1,250 mg/L was measured at the Zumbro River. The lowest mean SSC of 21 mg/L was measured at Rice Creek in the northern Minneapolis- St. Paul metropolitan area. Total suspended solids (TSS) have been used as a measure of fluvial sediment by the MPCA since the early 1970s; however, TSS concentrations have been determined to underrepresent the amount of suspended sediment. Because of this, the MPCA was interested in quantifying the differences between SSC and TSS in different parts of the State. Comparisons between concurrently sampled SSC and TSS indicated significant differences at every site, with SSC on average two times larger than TSS concentrations. The largest percent difference between SSC and TSS was measured at the South Branch Buffalo River at Sabin, and the smallest difference was observed at the Des Moines

  8. Influence of suspended particles on the emission of organophosphate flame retardant from insulation boards.

    PubMed

    Lazarov, Borislav; Swinnen, Rudi; Poelmans, David; Spruyt, Maarten; Goelen, Eddy; Covaci, Adrian; Stranger, Marianne

    2016-09-01

    The influence of the presence of the so-called seed particles on the emission rate of Tris (1-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP) from polyisocyanurate (PIR) insulation boards was investigated in this study. Two Field and Laboratory Emission Test cells (FLEC) were placed on the surface of the same PIR board and respectively supplied with clean air (reference FLEC) and air containing laboratory-generated soot particles (test FLEC). The behavior of the area-specific emission rates (SER A ) over a time period of 10 days was studied by measuring the total (gas + particles) concentrations of TCIPP at the exhaust of each FLEC. The estimated SER A of TCIPP from the PIR board at the quasi-static equilibrium were found to be 0.82 μg m(-2) h(-1) in the absence of seed particles, while the addition of soot particles led to SER A of 2.16 μg m(-2) h(-1). This indicates an increase of the SER A of TCIPP from the PIR board with a factor of 3 in the presence of soot particles. The TCIPP partition coefficient to soot particles at the quasi-static equilibrium was 0.022 ± 0.012 m(3) μg(-1). In the next step, the influence of real-life particles on TCIPP emission rates was investigated by supplying the test FLEC with air from a professional kitchen where mainly frying and baking activities took place. Similar to the reference FLEC outcomes, SER A was also found to increase in this real-life experiment over a time period of 20 days by a factor 3 in the presence of particles generated during cooking activities. The median value of estimated particle-gas coefficient for this test was 0.062 ± 0.037 m(3) μg(-1).

  9. Advancing Water Quality Monitoring and Hydrologic Optics Studies for Inland Waters through An Individual Particle Analysis Technique in Characterizing Suspended Mineral Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, F.

    2016-02-01

    Light attenuation by suspended particles in aquatic systems is an important physical process regulating underwater light field (important to primary production) and water clarity (thus water quality), as well as the magnitudes and the spectral features of remote-sensing reflectance. Mineral (or inorganic) particles are a key component of the optical regimes of inland waters because of their higher refractive indices as compared with algal and detrital particles, and generally much higher concentrations than in open oceans. A unique individual particle analysis (IPA) technique (scanning electron microscopy interfaced with automated image and X-ray analyses) has been used to provide detailed characterizations (size, shape, and composition) of individual mineral particles collected from diverse freshwater systems in North America, including the Great Lakes and the Finger Lakes of New York. A summary metric, the projected area concentrations of mineral particles, has been demonstrated to strongly regulate some critical water quality parameters, such as turbidity, Secchi depth, and particulate phosphorus concentrations. In addition, IPA results can be used as inputs for theoretical calculations of optical coefficients (e.g., absorption, scattering, and backscattering) of the mineral particle populations (i.e., the inherent optical properties, IOPs). Here we present some highlights from our water quality and optics studies supported by this IPA technique: (1) demonstration of the regulating effects of mineral area concentrations on common water quality metrics, (2) partitioning of the bulk particulate IOPs into contributing components (e.g., algal particles, calcite, clay minerals), (3) pursuit of optical modeling (particulate scattering and backscattering) closure with bulk measurements (promising results documented), (4) development of bio-optical models parameterized on particulate organic carbon content for an inland lake, and (5) advancement of remote

  10. Arsenic speciation in water, suspended particles, and coastal organisms from the Taehwa River Estuary of South Korea.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seongjin; Kwon, Hye-Ok; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Lee, Jung-Suk; Khim, Jong Seong

    2016-07-15

    Water, suspended particulate matter (SPM), and biota samples were collected from the Taehwa River Estuary to determine the distributions, partitioning, and bioaccumulation of arsenicals. Six forms of As were quantitated by the use of HPLC-ICP/MS. As was found mainly near urban and industrial areas, and inorganic As(V) was the predominant As form in both water and SPM. Particulate arsenicals were found at the greatest concentrations in coarse particles (>180μm), followed by medium (30-180μm) and fine (0.45-30μm) particles, in freshwater. Arsenical concentrations were similar across the three particle fractions in saltwater. Field-based distribution coefficient (Kd) values for As depended strongly on SPM, with a less robust dependence on salinity. Concentrations of As were greater in macroalgae than in marine animals, such as fishes, bivalves, crabs, shrimps, and gastropods. Overall, the results of the present study provide useful information on the behaviors and fate of arsenicals in an estuarine environment.

  11. Evaluations of the Method to Measure Black Carbon Particles Suspended in Rainwater and Snow Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohata, S.; Moteki, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Kondo, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The mass concentrations and size distributions of black carbon (BC) particles in rainwater and snow are important parameters for improved understanding of the wet deposition of BC, is a key process in quantifying the impacts of BC on climate. In this study, we have evaluated a new method to measure these parameters. The approach consists of an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) used in conjunction with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The USN converts sample water into micron-size droplets at a constant rate and then extracts airborne BC particles by dehydrating the water droplets. The mass of individual BC particles is measured by the SP2, based on the laser-induced incandescence technique. The combination of the USN and SP2 enabled the measurement of BC particles using only small amount of sample water, typically 10 ml (Ohata et al., 2011). However, the loss of BC during the extraction process depends on their size. We determined the size-dependent extraction efficiency using polystyrene latex spheres (PSLs) with twelve different diameters between 100-1050 nm. The PSL concentrations in water were determined by the light extinction of at 532nm. The extraction efficiency of the USN showed broad maximum in the diameter range of 200-500nm, and decreased substantially at larger sizes. The extraction efficiency determined using the PSL standards agreed to within ±40% with that determined using laboratory-generated BC concentration standards. We applied this method to the analysis of rainwater collected in Tokyo and Okinawa over the East China Sea. Measured BC size distributions in all rainwater samples showed negligible contribution of the BC particles larger than 600nm to the total BC amounts. However, for BC particles in surface snow collected in Greenland and Antarctica, size distributions were sometimes shifted to much larger size ranges.

  12. Nanoparticle filtration performance of NIOSH-certified particulate air-purifying filtering facepiece respirators: evaluation by light scattering photometric and particle number-based test methods.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Samy; Eimer, Benjamin C

    2012-01-01

    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification test methods employ charge neutralized NaCl or dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols to measure filter penetration levels of air-purifying particulate respirators photometrically using a TSI 8130 automated filter tester at 85 L/min. A previous study in our laboratory found that widely different filter penetration levels were measured for nanoparticles depending on whether a particle number (count)-based detector or a photometric detector was used. The purpose of this study was to better understand the influence of key test parameters, including filter media type, challenge aerosol size range, and detector system. Initial penetration levels for 17 models of NIOSH-approved N-, R-, and P-series filtering facepiece respirators were measured using the TSI 8130 photometric method and compared with the particle number-based penetration (obtained using two ultrafine condensation particle counters) for the same challenge aerosols generated by the TSI 8130. In general, the penetration obtained by the photometric method was less than the penetration obtained with the number-based method. Filter penetration was also measured for ambient room aerosols. Penetration measured by the TSI 8130 photometric method was lower than the number-based ambient aerosol penetration values. Number-based monodisperse NaCl aerosol penetration measurements showed that the most penetrating particle size was in the 50 nm range for all respirator models tested, with the exception of one model at ~200 nm size. Respirator models containing electrostatic filter media also showed lower penetration values with the TSI 8130 photometric method than the number-based penetration obtained for the most penetrating monodisperse particles. Results suggest that to provide a more challenging respirator filter test method than what is currently used for respirators containing electrostatic media, the test method should utilize a sufficient number

  13. Rotational diffusion measurements of suspended colloidal particles using two-dimensional exchange nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Barrall, G.A.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Lee, Y.K.; Landfester, K.; Zimmermann, H.; Chingas, G.C.; Pines, A. |

    1996-01-01

    We present here an experimental and theoretical study of the application of two-dimensional exchange nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) to the investigation of the rotational diffusion of colloidal particles. The theoretical discussion includes the nature of the NMR frequency time-correlation function where the NMR interaction is represented by the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA). Time-correlation functions for the isotropic rotational diffusion of a suspension of colloidal particles containing single and multiple sites are derived in addition to time-correlation functions for the rotational diffusion of a suspension of symmetric top particles containing an isotropic distribution of a single CSA interaction. Simulations of two-dimensional exchange spectra for particles undergoing isotropic rotational diffusion are presented. We performed two-dimensional exchange NMR experiments on a colloidal suspension of spherical poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles which were synthesized with a 20{percent} enrichment in {sup 13}C at the carbonyl site. Rotational diffusion time-correlation functions determined from the experimental exchange spectra are consistent with the composition of the colloidal suspension. Detailed explanations of the syntheses of the enriched methyl {sup 13}C-(carbonyl)-methacrylate monomer and the small quantities of 20{percent} enriched {sup 13}C-(carbonyl)-poly(methyl methacrylate) microspheres used for this study are presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Measurements of the cross-sectional distributions of spherical particles suspended in rectangular channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, Takahiro; Yabu, Takuya; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Itano, Tomoaki; Sugihara-Seki, Masako

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the inertial migration of neutrally buoyant spherical particles using millimeter-sized rectangular channels of various aspect ratios (AR = 1 - 4.2), in the range of Reynolds numbers (Re) from 100 to 2000. The Reynolds number was defined as UH/ ν, where U is the maximum flow velocity, H is the length of the shorter face of the channel cross-section, and ν is the kinematic viscosity. Dilute suspensions of polystyrene particles of diameter d = 300 - 650 μm were used. For the size ratio d / H = 0 . 1 - 0.25, the observation of particle positions at downstream cross-sections revealed that the particles were aligned in a straight or curved line nearly parallel to the longer face of the channel cross-section and their probability density function showed a sharp peak at a certain distance from the channel centerline. These focusing positions of particles were found to depend on Re, d / H and AR. They approached the channel centerline with increasing Re. As AR increased for constant Re and constant d / H , focusing positions moved closer to the channel centerline, and reached asymptotic positions for AR>2.

  15. Sampling submicrometer particles suspended in near sonic and supersonic free jets. [from GTE exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martone, J. A.; Daley, P. S.; Boubel, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Aerosols containing solid, spherical stearic acid particles with a mean diameter of 0.8 micron and a geometric standard deviation of 1.28 were sampled with small bore front-facing aspirating probes in near-sonic and supersonic unheated free jets. The results are compared to compute the sampling error associated with a high-speed jet sample.

  16. Comparison of methods for developing contaminant-particle size distributions for suspended sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.D.; Burgoa, B.B.; Fontaine, T.A.

    1994-10-01

    Relationships between contaminant concentration and particle size distribution are required for modeling the transport of contaminated sediment. Standard methods, including the pipette and bottom withdrawal techniques, are unsatisfactory because of the lack of homogeneous separations of each size fraction, which results in uncertainty in the contaminant-particle size relation. In addition, the size fractions produced with these techniques do not contain enough mass for accurate contaminant analyses. To avoid these problems, an alternative method using a settling column and withdrawal times based on Stokes Law has been developed. Tests have been conducted using sediment samples contaminated with Cs-137 from a waste area at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The samples were separated into sand, coarse and fine silt, and clay-sized particles. The results for particle size distribution and associated contaminant concentrations were evaluated for the settling column, pipette, and bottom withdrawal methods. The settling column method provides homogeneous size fractions, larger aliquots of sediment for contaminant analysis, and is quicker in some cases and less complicated to perform than the other two methods.

  17. Atmospheric trace element concentrations in total suspended particles near Paris, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayrault, Sophie; Senhou, Abderrahmane; Moskura, Mélanie; Gaudry, André

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate today's trace element atmospheric concentrations in large urban areas, an atmospheric survey was carried out for 18 months, from March 2002 to September 2003, in Saclay, nearby Paris. The total suspended particulate matter (TSP) was collected continuously on quartz fibre filters. The TSP contents were determined for 36 elements (including Ag, Bi, Mo and Sb) using two analytical methods: Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The measured concentrations were in agreement within the uncertainties with the certified values for the polycarbonate reference material filter SRM-2783 (National Institute for Standard Technology NIST, USA). The measured concentrations were significantly lower than the recommended atmospheric concentrations. In 2003, the Pb atmospheric level at Saclay was 15 ng/m 3, compared to the 500 ng/m 3 guideline level and to the 200 ng/m 3 observed value in 1994. The typical urban background TSP values of 1-2, 0.2-1, 4-6, 10-30 and 3-5 ng/m 3 for As, Co, Cr, Cu and Sb, respectively, were inferred from this study and were compared with the literature data. The typical urban background TSP concentrations could not be realised for Cd, Pb and Zn, since these air concentrations are highly influenced by local features. The Zn concentrations and Zn/Pb ratio observed in Saclay represented a characteristic fingerprint of the exceptionally large extent of zinc-made roofs in Paris and its suburbs. The traffic-related origin of Ba, Cr, Cu, Pb and Sb was demonstrated, while the atmospheric source(s) of Ag was not identified.

  18. Endotoxin and dust at respirable and nonrespirable particle sizes are not consistent between cage- and floor-housed poultry operations.

    PubMed

    Kirychuk, Shelley P; Reynolds, Stephen J; Koehncke, Niels K; Lawson, Joshua; Willson, Philip; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; Marciniuk, Darcy; Classen, Henry L; Crowe, Trever; Just, Natasha; Schneberger, David; Dosman, James A

    2010-10-01

    Individuals engaged in work in intensive animal houses experience some of the highest rates of occupationally related respiratory symptoms. Organic dust and in particular endotoxin has been most closely associated with respiratory symptoms and lung function changes in workers. It has previously been shown that for intensive poultry operations, type of poultry housing [cage-housed (CH) versus floor-housed (FH)] can influence the levels of environmental contaminants. The goal of the study was to determine the differences in endotoxin and dust levels at different size fractions between CH and FH poultry operations. Fifteen CH and 15 FH poultry operations were sampled for stationary measurements (area) of dust and associated endotoxin. Fractioned samples were collected utilizing Marple cascade impactors. Gravimetric and endotoxin analysis were conducted on each of the filters. When assessed by individual Marple stage, there was significantly greater airborne endotoxin concentration (endotoxin units per cubic meter) in the size fraction >9.8 μm for the FH operations whereas at the size fraction 1.6-3.5 μm, the CH operations had significantly greater airborne endotoxin concentration than the FH operations. Endotoxin concentration in the dust mass (endotoxin units per milligram) was significantly greater in the CH operations as compared to the FH operations for all size fractions >1.6 μm. As such, endotoxin in the respirable fraction accounted for 24% of the total endotoxin in the CH operations whereas it accounted for only 11% in the FH operations. There was significantly more dust in all size fractions in the FH operations as compared to the CH poultry operations. There is more endotoxin in the presence of significantly lower dust levels in the respirable particle size fractions in CH poultry operations as compared to the FH poultry operations. This difference in respirable endotoxin may be important in relation to the differential respiratory response experienced by

  19. Revisiting the use of the immersed-boundary lattice-Boltzmann method for simulations of suspended particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountrakis, L.; Lorenz, E.; Hoekstra, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    no consistent measure to recalibrate the radius of the suspended particle.

  20. Scanning electron microscope and statistical analysis of suspended heavy metal particles in San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, A. Aragón; Villaseñor, G. Torres; Fernández, M. Monroy; Luszczewski Kudra, A.; Leyva Ramos, R.

    Three hundred samples of urban aerosol were collected in high-volume samplers from five urban locations situated near an important metallurgical plant in the city of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Whole samples were analyzed by atomic absorption (AA) for Pb, Cd, As, Cu, Ni, Fe and Cr. One hundred eighty of these samples were subjected to X-ray microanalysis (EDS) coupled with a scanning electron microscope to classify individual particles according to their chemical or mineralogical composition. The principal component analysis (PCA) obtained from the bulk sample analysis, and X-ray microanalysis from individual particles, confirmed chemical associations among elements directly and indirectly. PCA from bulk assays made the most effective use of X-ray microanalysis to characterize major particle types. Some chemical associations would be difficult to detect using microanalysis, alone, for example, in anthropogenic complex phases. In this work, the combined use of microanalysis and statistical methods permitted identification of associations among elements. We observed an association of Pb-As-Cd and Fe-Mn among the samples. In a second order, Pb-Fe, Pb-Mn, Fe-As, Fe-Cd, Cd-Mn and As-Mn showed a lower association. Only Ni and Cu appeared unassociated with any other element analyzed by AA. We characterized the mineral phases by size range, morphology and chemical composition using SEM-EDS to obtain a compositional approach of anthropogenic phases and peculiar morphology and size. A high percentage of heavy metal particles smaller than 2 μm were detected.

  1. Particle-size dependence of immersion freezing: Investigation of INUIT test aerosol particles with freely suspended water drops.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Karoline; Debertshäuser, Michael; Eppers, Oliver; Jantsch, Evelyn; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    One goal of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT) is to investigate the efficiencies of several test ice nuclei under comparable conditions but with different experimental techniques. In the present studies, two methods are used: the Mainz vertical wind tunnel and an acoustic levitator placed inside a cold chamber. In both cases drops are freely levitated, either at their terminal velocity in the wind tunnel updraft or around the nodes of a standing ultrasonic wave in the acoustic levitator. Thus, heat transfer conditions are well approximated, and wall contact effects on freezing as well as electrical charges of the drops are avoided. Drop radii are 370 μm and 1 mm, respectively. In the wind tunnel, drops are investigated at constant temperatures within a certain time period and the onset of freezing is observed directly. In the acoustic levitator, the drop temperature decreases during the experiments and is measured by an in-situ calibrated Infrared thermometer. The onset of freezing is indicated by a rapid rise of the drop surface temperature because of the release of latent heat. Investigated test ice nuclei are Snomax® as a proxy of biological particles and illite NX as well as K-feldspar as represents of mineral dust. The particle concentrations are 1 × 10-12 to 3 × 10-6 g Snomax® per drop and 5 × 10-9 to 5 × 10-5 g mineral dust per drop. Freezing temperatures are between -2 and -18° C in case of Snomax® and between -14 and -26° C in case of mineral dust. The lower the particle masses per drop the lower are the freezing temperatures. For similar particle concentrations in the drops, the median freezing temperatures determined by the two techniques agree well within the measurement errors. With the knowledge of the specific particle surface area of the mineral dusts, the results are interpreted also in terms of particle surface area per drop. Results from the wind tunnel experiments which are performed at constant temperatures indicate

  2. Respirable particles and carcinogens in the air of delaware hospitality venues before and after a smoking ban.

    PubMed

    Repace, James

    2004-09-01

    How do the concentrations of indoor air pollutants known to increase risk of respiratory disease, cancer, heart disease, and stroke change after a smoke-free workplace law? Real-time measurements were made of respirable particle (RSP) air pollution and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPAH), in a casino, six bars, and a pool hall before and after a smoking ban. Secondhand smoke contributed 90% to 95% of the RSP air pollution during smoking, and 85% to 95% of the carcinogenic PPAH, greatly exceeding levels of these contaminants encountered on major truck highways and polluted city streets. This air-quality survey demonstrates conclusively that the health of hospitality workers and patrons is endangered by tobacco smoke pollution. Smoke-free workplace laws eliminate that hazard and provide health protection impossible to achieve through ventilation or air cleaning.

  3. Use of xantham gum to suspend large particles during flow cytometric analysis and sorting.

    PubMed

    Freyer, J P; Fillak, D; Jett, J H

    1989-11-01

    In this report we describe the use of xantham gum as a biologically inert material for increasing the viscosity of a suspension of cells or particles during flow cytometric analysis and sorting. A 0.1% concentration of xantham gum in culture medium or saline will increase the viscosity approximately 9-fold. For suspensions of multicellular spheroids 100-400 microns in diameter the measured sedimentation velocity was approximately 9 times slower than that in medium alone. Thus, spheroids of 100 microns diameter remain in suspension in 0.1% xantham gum for 66 min, compared to 7.5 min in culture medium. This allows extended periods of sorting without stirring or agitating the sample suspension. The xantham gum solution is noncytotoxic for periods up to 8 h as measured by clonogenicity assay. Xantham gum has the added advantage that the viscosity is significantly reduced when the solution is subjected to shear stress, such as during flow. This technique should be applicable to extended sorting of suspensions of spheroids, plant cells, and other large particles, as well as for analyzing and sorting single cells for extended periods.

  4. Near-bottom suspended matter concentration on the Continental Shelf during storms: estimates based on in situ observations of light transmission and a particle size dependent transmissometer calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Butman, B.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory calibration of Sea Tech and Montedoro-Whitney beam transmissometers shows a linear relation between light attenuation coefficient (cp) and suspended matter concentration (SMC) for natural sediments and for glass beads. However the proportionality constant between cp and SMC depends on the particle diameter and particle type. Thus, to measure SMC, observations of light attenuation must be used with a time-variable calibration when suspended particle characteristics change with time. Because of this variable calibration, time series of light attenuation alone may not directly reflect SMC and must be interpreted with care. The near-bottom concentration of suspended matter during winter storms on the U.S. East Coast Continental Shelf is estimated from light transmission measurements made 2 m above the bottom and from the size distribution of suspended material collected simultaneously in sediment traps 3 m above the bottom. The average concentrations during six storms between December 1979 and February 1980 in the Middle Atlantic Bight ranged from 2 to 4 mg l1 (maximum concentration of 7 mg l1) and 8 to 12 mg l1 (maximum concentration of 22 mg l1) on the south flank of Georges Bank. ?? 1987.

  5. Characterization and Deposition of Respirable Large- and Small-Particle Bioaerosols ▿

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Richard J.; Webber, Daniel; Sellors, William; Collinge, Aaron; Frost, Andrew; Stagg, Anthony J.; Bailey, Stephen C.; Jayasekera, Pramukh N.; Taylor, Rosa R.; Eley, Steve; Titball, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    The deposition patterns of large-particle microbiological aerosols within the respiratory tract are not well characterized. A novel system (the flow-focusing aerosol generator [FFAG]) which enables the generation of large (>10-μm) aerosol particles containing microorganisms under laboratory conditions was characterized to permit determination of deposition profiles within the murine respiratory tract. Unlike other systems for generating large aerosol particles, the FFAG is compatible with microbiological containment and the inhalational challenge of animals. By use of entrapped Escherichia coli cells, Bacillus atrophaeus spores, or FluoSphere beads, the properties of aerosols generated by the FFAG were compared with the properties of aerosols generated using the commonly available Collison nebulizer, which preferentially generates small (1- to 3-μm) aerosol particles. More entrapped particulates (15.9- to 19.2-fold) were incorporated into 9- to 17-μm particles generated by the FFAG than by the Collison nebulizer. The 1- to 3-μm particles generated by the Collison nebulizer were more likely to contain a particulate than those generated by the FFAG. E. coli cells aerosolized using the FFAG survived better than those aerosolized using the Collison nebulizer. Aerosols generated by the Collison nebulizer and the FFAG preferentially deposited in the lungs and nasal passages of the murine respiratory tract, respectively. However, significant deposition of material also occurred in the gastrointestinal tract after inhalation of both the small (89.7%)- and large (61.5%)-particle aerosols. The aerosols generated by the Collison nebulizer and the FFAG differ with respect to mass distribution, distribution of the entrapped particulates, bacterial survival, and deposition within the murine respiratory tract. PMID:18723664

  6. Meteorological phenomena affecting the presence of solid particles suspended in the air during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñanos, P.; Galán, C.; Alcázar, P.; Dominguez, E.

    Winter is not traditionally considered to be a risky season for people who suffer from pollen allergies. However, increasing numbers of people are showing symptoms in winter. This prompted our investigation into the levels of solid material in the air, and some of the meteorological phenomena that allow their accumulation. This study showed a possible relationship between the phenomenon of thermal inversion, which occurs when very low temperatures, cloudless skies and atmospheric calms coincide, and an increase in the concentration of solid material in the atmosphere. Frequently, this situation is associated with other predictable phenomena such as fog, dew and frost. This may allow a warning system to be derived for urban pollution episodes. The effect caused by parameters such as wind and rainfall was also analysed. Solid material was differentiated into non-biological material from natural and non-natural sources (e.g. soot, dust, sand, diesel exhaust particles, partially burnt residues) and biological material. The latter mainly comprises pollen grains and fungal spores. Owing to its abundance and importance as a causal agent of winter allergies, Cupressaceae pollen was considered separately.

  7. [Distributions and pollution status of heavy metals in the suspended particles of the estuaries and coastal area of eastern Hainan].

    PubMed

    Xin, Cheng-Lin; Ren, Jing-Ling; Zhang, Gui-Ling; Shao, Ya-Ping; Zhang, Guo-Ling; Liu, Su-Mei

    2013-04-01

    The distributions and pollution status of heavy metals in the suspended particles were investigated in the Wanquan and Wenchang/Wenjiao estuaries and the coastal area of eastern Hainan in July 2008. The concentrations of metal elements (Al, Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu, Ni, V, Zn) were determined by ICP-AES after microwave digestion. Multivariate statistical methods (e. g. correlation analysis and principal factor analysis) were used to discuss the major factors controlling the variability of heavy metal concentrations and the pollution status in those areas. There was an obvious variability in particulate metal concentrations from upstream to estuary of both rivers. The concentrations first increased with increasing salinity and then decreased with further increase of the salinity; the concentrations were slightly higher at the coastal area in the east. The variability of particulate metal concentrations reduced significantly after the normalization by Al, indicating the effects of grain size. Enrichment factor calculation results showed that there was heavy metal pollution (especially Cu, Ni) in the Wenchang/Wenjiao River and estuary, while the situation in Wanquan River remained at pristine level. Concentrations of particulate metals in the study area were mainly controlled by source geology and provenance, as well as contamination from the discharge of waste water and biological activity.

  8. Current-use pesticides in stream water and suspended particles following runoff: exposure, effects, and mitigation requirements.

    PubMed

    Bereswill, Renja; Streloke, Martin; Schulz, Ralf

    2013-06-01

    The European Union's directive for sustainable use of pesticides requires implementing risk mitigation measures at streams threatened by pesticide entries. The need for mitigation measures was investigated at 10 stream sites within an intensively used arable region in central Germany by characterizing pesticide exposure following edge-of-field runoff and effects on the aquatic macroinvertebrates. Moreover, the influence of riparian buffer strip width (as a mitigation measure) at the sampling sites was considered. Generally, invertebrate fauna was dominated by pesticide-tolerant species, suggesting a high pesticide exposure at almost all sites. This result is also reflected by the elevated levels of suspended particle contamination in terms of toxic units (logTUMax  > -2), corresponding to one-hundredth of the median lethal concentration (LC50) to Daphnia magna. At two sites that received high aqueous-phase entries of the pyrethroid lambda-cyhalothrin (logTUMax  > -0.6), the abundance and number of sensitive species in terms of the species at risk index decreased during the pesticide application period. In contrast, no acute significant negative effects on macroinvertebrates were observed at sites characterised by low water-phase toxicity (logTUMax  < -3.5). An influence of riparian buffer strip width on pesticide exposure was not observed, supposedly because of the presence of erosion rills and ephemeral ditches. In conclusion, results show that mitigation measures (such as the improvement of currently present riparian buffer strips) are needed in the study area.

  9. Seasonal and spatial changes of free and bound organic acids in total suspended particles in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Bi, Xinhui; Zhao, Jinping; He, Lulu; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-12-01

    The concentrations and compositions of free and bound organic acids in total suspended particles from typical urban, suburban and forest park sites of Guangzhou were determined in this study. The free form of organic acids (solvent extractable) in aerosols in Guangzhou varied with site and season. The suburban samples contained the highest contents of alkanoic, alkenoic and dicarboxylic acids. These findings were consistent with a higher supply of hydrocarbons and NOx in the suburban area. However, concentrations of aromatic acids were similar in the urban, suburban and forest park sites. Generally, winter season samples of the acids from anthropogenic sources contained more organic acids than summer season samples due to stronger removal by wet deposition in the summer. For the acids from botanic sources, the summer season samples were higher. In addition to the free acids, bound acids (solvent non-extractable) mainly formed by esterification of free acids were also found in the samples. In general, bound acids were higher than free acids. Esterification is mainly controlled by the pKa of organic acids and the atmospheric pH value. This explains why aromatic and dicarboxylic acids occur mainly as bound forms and why the samples from urban sites contained high levels of bound acids as the pH of rain water can reach 4.53. Concentrations of alkanoic and alkenoic acids in the aerosols of Guangzhou were much higher than those in the other areas studied.

  10. Determination of buffering capacity of total suspended particle and its source apportionment using the chemical mass balance approach.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiao-Hui; Feng, Yin-Chang; Zhu, Tan; Zhang, Yu-Fen; Wu, Jian-Hui; Li, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    The samples of total suspended particle (TSP) from sources and TSP in the ambient atmosphere were collected in 2006 at Tianjin, People's Republic of China and analyzed for 16 chemical elements, two water-soluble ions, total carbon, and organic carbon. On the basis of the chemical mass balance (CMB) model, the contributions of different TSP sources to the ambient TSP were identified. The results showed that resuspended dust has the biggest contributions to the concentration of ambient TSP. The buffering capacity of each TSP source was also determined by an analytical chemistry method, and the result showed that the constructive dust (the dust emitted from construction work) had the strongest buffering capacity among the measured sources, whereas the coal combustion dust had the weakest buffering capacity. A calculation formula of the source of buffering capacity of ambient TSP was developed based on the result of TSP source apportionment and the identification of the buffering capacity of each TSP source in this study. The results of the source apportionment of the buffering capacity of ambient TSP indicated that open sources (including soil dust, resuspended dust, and constructive dust) were the dominant sources of the buffering capacity of the ambient TSP. Acid rain pollution in cities in Northern China might become serious with a decrease of open source pollution without reducing acidic sources. More efforts must be made to evaluate this potential risk, and countermeasures should be proposed as early as possible.

  11. Performance of an N95 filtering facepiece particulate respirator and a surgical mask during human breathing: two pathways for particle penetration.

    PubMed

    Grinshpun, Sergey A; Haruta, Hiroki; Eninger, Robert M; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy T; Lee, Shu-An

    2009-10-01

    The protection level offered by filtering facepiece particulate respirators and face masks is defined by the percentage of ambient particles penetrating inside the protection device. There are two penetration pathways: (1) through the faceseal leakage, and the (2) filter medium. This study aimed at differentiating the contributions of these two pathways for particles in the size range of 0.03-1 microm under actual breathing conditions. One N95 filtering facepiece respirator and one surgical mask commonly used in health care environments were tested on 25 subjects (matching the latest National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health fit testing panel) as the subjects performed conventional fit test exercises. The respirator and the mask were also tested with breathing manikins that precisely mimicked the prerecorded breathing patterns of the tested subjects. The penetration data obtained in the human subject- and manikin-based tests were compared for different particle sizes and breathing patterns. Overall, 5250 particle size- and exercise-specific penetration values were determined. For each value, the faceseal leakage-to-filter ratio was calculated to quantify the relative contributions of the two penetration pathways. The number of particles penetrating through the faceseal leakage of the tested respirator/mask far exceeded the number of those penetrating through the filter medium. For the N95 respirator, the excess was (on average) by an order of magnitude and significantly increased with an increase in particle size (p < 0.001): approximately 7-fold greater for 0.04 microm, approximately 10-fold for 0.1 microm, and approximately 20-fold for 1 microm. For the surgical mask, the faceseal leakage-to-filter ratio ranged from 4.8 to 5.8 and was not significantly affected by the particle size for the tested submicrometer fraction. Facial/body movement had a pronounced effect on the relative contribution of the two penetration pathways. Breathing intensity and

  12. Hydroclimatic influence on particle size distribution of suspended sediments evacuated from debris-covered Chorabari Glacier, upper Mandakini catchment, central Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Gokhale, Anupam Anand; Shukla, Tanuj; Dobhal, Dwarika Prasad

    2016-07-01

    Sediments released from high altitude glaciers exhibit varying evacuation patterns and transport characteristics owing to the presence of thick debris cover over the glacier. Despite the recent needs for integrated hydrometeorological studies in the Himalaya, little is known about the impacts of suspended sediment on hydropower generation, reservoir sedimentation, and abrasion of turbine components. Present study involves analysis of particle size distribution of suspended sediments to understand sediment evacuation patterns and transport characteristics in variable energy conditions during the ablation season. Peak suspended sediments were evacuated during extreme rainfall events. The estimated seasonal modern sediment erosion rate varies from 0.6 to 2.3 mm y- 1 for the study period (2009-2012). The analysis shows dominance of medium silt-sized to fine sand-sized particles having sediment size of 0.0156-0.25 mm corresponding to 70-80% without any significant seasonal variation. These transported sediments show that they are poorly sorted, coarser in nature with a nearly symmetrical to coarse skewed texture and kurtosis analysis suggesting mesokurtic distribution of sediments. The particle size fraction ranges between 4.65 and 5.23 ϕ, which is dominantly medium to coarse silty in texture. Results indicate that suspended sediments are evacuated in highly variable energy conditions through subglacial transport pathways because of increase in availability of meltwater with the progressive ablation season. Bulk geochemical characterization has been carried out to differentiate the source of suspended sediments and intensity of weathering. Chemical Index of Alterations (CIA) values of sediment flux range from 54.68 to 55.18 compared to the Upper Continental Crust (UCC) ~ 50, indicating moderate intensity of weathering. Mean seasonal (2009-2012) elemental fluxes and their contribution to the suspended sediment flux reflect that Si and Al are responsible for about 85% of

  13. A new device to measure the settling properties of suspended particles : instrumental development and first applications during runoff events in small watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legoût, Cédric; Wendling, Valentin; Gratiot, Nicolas; Mercier, Bernard; Coulaud, Catherine; Nord, Guillaume; Droppo, Ian; Ribolzi, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Most equations describing suspended particle transport balances the settling flux of particles against the turbulent flux of the flow. Although in-situ techniques have been developed to measure settling velocities of suspended particles in coastal areas, floodplain rivers and estuaries, they are not easily transferable to small and meso-scale watersheds. The main limitation lies in the range of concentrations frequently reaching several tens of grams per liter during runoff events. To overcome this instrumental limitation we developed an original System for the Characterization of Aggregates and Flocs (SCAF). An optical settling column, equipped with a vertical array of 16 optical sensors, was used to provide light transmission through a suspension during quiescent settling. It was specifically designed to be inserted in plastic bottles contained in classical sequential samplers, in order to obtain automatic measurements of the suspension immediately after its collection in the river. From the SCAF measurements, we calculate both the particle settling velocity distributions and the propensity of particles to flocculate. The prototypes were tested in laboratory conditions for a wide range of concentrations and material types, leading to consistent measurements with flocculation indices comprised between 0 and 80, respectively for non-cohesive and cohesive materials. First measurements in the field were achieved during runoff events at the outlet of small nested catchments in Lao PDR (MSEC network of environmental observatories) in order to explore the non-conservative behavior of the settling properties of eroded soil aggregates during their transfer.

  14. Correlation between suspended particles in the environmental air and causes of disease among inhabitants: cross-sectional studies using the vital statistics and air pollution data in Japan.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Kazuro; Mizuno, Shoichi; Miyasaka, Yoji; Mori, Toru

    2005-09-01

    To identify the diseases that correlate with suspended particle concentration in the ambient air, a cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted using the annual vital statistics and air pollution estimates of 1881 points throughout Japan. The concentration of suspended particulate matters (SPMs) 10 microm or less in diameter were hypothetically converted to PM(2.5) values (converted PM(2.5) or cPM(2.5)) by using a conversion factor obtained from 25 estimates in Japan. Among various causes of death, a significant correlation was observed between both the SPM and cPM(2.5) (SPM/cPM(2.5)) levels and the age-adjusted death rates of ischemic heart disease or hypertensive heart disease in both genders. Correlation was noted with pneumonia, asthma, chronic bronchitis/emphysema, or lung cancer only in females. Unexpectedly, breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer also showed significant increases in mortality rates related to the SPM/cPM(2.5) level, suggesting a role for suspended particles in the ambient air with or without gaseous component as a possible endocrine-disrupting, estrogenic agent. Multivariate regression analysis of confounding factors, smoking rate, population density, and hormone-related factors revealed consistent significance of SPM/cPM(2.5) in these diseases.

  15. Source apportionment of PAHs and n-alkanes in respirable particles in Tehran, Iran by wind sector and vertical profile.

    PubMed

    Moeinaddini, Mazaher; Esmaili Sari, Abbas; Riyahi bakhtiari, Alireza; Chan, Andrew Yiu-Chung; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Hawker, Darryl; Connell, Des

    2014-06-01

    The vertical concentration profiles and source contributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-alkanes in respirable particle samples (PM4) collected at 10, 100, 200 and 300-m altitude from the Milad Tower of Tehran, Iran during fall and winter were investigated. The average concentrations of total PAHs and total n-alkanes were 16.7 and 591 ng/m(3), respectively. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was applied to the chemical composition and wind data to apportion the contributing sources. The five PAH source factors identified were: 'diesel' (56.3% of total PAHs on average), 'gasoline' (15.5%), 'wood combustion, and incineration' (13%), 'industry' (9.2%), and 'road soil particle' (6.0%). The four n-alkane source factors identified were: 'petrogenic' (65% of total n-alkanes on average), 'mixture of petrogenic and biomass burning' (15%), 'mixture of biogenic and fossil fuel' (11.5%), and 'biogenic' (8.5%). Source contributions by wind sector were also estimated based on the wind sector factor loadings from PMF analysis. Directional dependence of sources was investigated using the conditional probability function (CPF) and directional relative strength (DRS) methods. The calm wind period was found to contribute to 4.4% of total PAHs and 5.0% of total n-alkanes on average. Highest average concentrations of PAHs and n-alkanes were found in the 10 and 100 m samples, reflecting the importance of contributions from local sources. Higher average concentrations in the 300 m samples compared to those in the 200 m samples may indicate contributions from long-range transport. The vertical profiles of source factors indicate the gasoline and road soil particle-associated PAHs, and the mixture from biogenic and fossil fuel source-associated n-alkanes were mostly from local emissions. The smaller average contribution of diesel-associated PAHs in the lower altitude samples also indicates that the restriction of diesel-fueled vehicle use in the central area

  16. Selective exposure and analysis of the sheep tracheal lobe as a model for toxicological studies of respirable particles

    SciTech Connect

    Begin, R.; Masse, S.; Rola-Pleszczynski, M.; Drapeau, G.; Dalle, D.

    1985-04-01

    A conscious sheep model, recently developed to study sequentially the bronchoalveolar milieu, was further refined to use in the rapid in vivo assessment of the biological effects of respirable particles. In this model, the anatomically isolated tracheal lobe was selectively exposed to either 100 ml phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (control group of 12 sheep), 100 mg of 0.1-..mu..m latex beads in 100 ml PBS (latex group of 12 sheep), or 100 mg of UICC Canadian chrysotile fibers in 100 ml PBS (asbestos group of 12 sheep). Bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) of the tracheal lobe were obtained prior to exposure and at Days 1, 8, 15, 21, 29, 45, and 60 after exposure. Whole-lung detailed pulmonary function tests (PFT) were performed at the same times and the histopathology of the lobe was examined in six sheep in each group at Days 29 and 60. In the latex group, there was no significant change in PFT, the BAL analyses documented early transient increase in cellularity (macrophages and neutrophils at Day 1) and only macrophages after; lung histology documented an early macrophagic alveolitis which decreased to less than 10% of the initial inflammatory reaction at Day 60, without other distortion of the lung and airway architecture. In the asbestos sheep, the only change in whole-lung PFT was a 10-torr fall in arterial O/sub 2/ pressure. BAL analyses documented persistent increases in macrophages, neutrophils, and lactate dehydrogenase as well as increasing ..gamma..-globulins. Lung histology revealed a macrophagic and neutrophilic peribronchiolar alveolitis, early fibrosis, and severe distortion of the small airways, lesions comparable to those of early asbestosis in sheep or humans.

  17. Particles and enzymes: Combining nanoscale zero valent iron and organochlorine respiring bacteria for the detoxification of chloroethane mixtures.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Joanna C; Boparai, Hardiljeet K; Lee, Matthew J; O'Carroll, Denis M; Barnes, Robert J; Manefield, Michael J

    2016-05-05

    Nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) and organochlorine respiring bacteria (ORB) are two technologies used to detoxify chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). nZVI can rapidly detoxify high CAH concentrations, but is quickly oxidised and unable to degrade certain CAHs (e.g., 1,2-dichlorothane). In contrast, ORB can dechlorinate CAHs resistant to nZVI (e.g., 1,2-dichlorothane) but are inhibited by other CAHs of concern degradable by nZVI (e.g., chloroform and carbon tetrachloride). Combining the two was proposed as a unique treatment train to overcome each technology's shortcomings. In this study, this combined remedy was investigated using a mixture of 1,2-dichloroethane, degradable by ORB but not nZVI, and 1,1,2-trichloroethane, susceptible to both. Results indicated that nZVI rapidly dechlorinated 1,1,2-trichloroethane when supplied above 0.5 g/L, however ORB were inhibited and unable to dechlorinate 1,2-dichloroethane. pH increase and ionic species associated with nZVI did not significantly impact ORB, pinpointing Fe(0) particles as responsible for ORB inhibition. Below 0.05 g/L nZVI, ORB activity was stimulated. Results suggest that combining ORB and nZVI at appropriate doses can potentially treat a wider range of CAHs than each individual remedy. At field sites where nZVI was applied, it is likely that in situ nZVI concentrations were below the threshold of negative consequences.

  18. Residence time of suspended particles in the Garonne River (SW France): indications derived from Th-234, Be-7 and Pb-210

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sabine; Saari, Hanna-Kaïsa

    2013-04-01

    Particulates that enter the ocean from rivers are the products of integrated basin-wide processes (soil erosion, sediment transport and deposition in watersheds). The fate of sediments in river is therefore challenging and generally analysed using hydrodynamics models. An alternative method relies on the use of fallout radioactive tracers to identify sediment source regions and/or to estimate suspended sediment age or the fraction of the suspended sediment recently eroded from the landscape. This work presents the application of naturally occurring radionuclides: Pb-210 (T1/2 = 22.3 years) and Be-7 (T1/2 = 53 days), both delivered by atmospheric fallout, and Th-234 (T1/2 = 24.1 days), to investigate residence times of particles in the lower Garonne River (South-West France). Th-234, produced continuously by decay of U-238, is widely used in marine sciences for studying particle dynamic on time-scales of days to weeks, but a major limitation to extend its application from the ocean to river is the activity (level, variability) of its parent, U-238, in contrast with the high and rather constant levels of oceanic uranium. The Garonne River has a watershed of 55 000 km2 with a mean discharge of 650 m3 s-1 (range: 12500 m3 s-1). It flows westward about 647 km from the Spanish Pyrenees, ending into the Gironde, its common estuary with the Dordogne River. To investigate suspended particle dynamic of the lower Garonne River, monthly samplings were performed from January 2006 to December 2007 at selected sites along this river system, including a site in its estuarine section. Dissolved and particulate activities of radionuclides were determined using a low-background, well-shaped gamma spectrometer. Additional data (river discharge, rain rate, suspended particulate concentrations) were also collected to better interpret radionuclide data. Whereas dissolved fractions are always negligible, particulate Th-234, Be-7 and Pb-210 activities present marked spatio

  19. The trajectories of particles suspended in electrolytes under the influence of crossed electric and magnetic fields. Possible explanation of the sensitivity of organism to magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Gunter, R C; Bamberger, S; Valet, G; Crossin, M; Ruhenstroth-Bauer, G

    1977-12-27

    We observed that particles, suspended in an electrolyte and brought into crossed magnetic and electric fields of low intensities, will deviate in the central part of the electrophoresis chamber of a standard Zeiss Cytopherometer with a component vertical to both fields. The direction and magnitude, however, were sharply at variance with what would be expected by the action of the Lorentz force (EMF) on the surface of the particles. The magnitude of the deviation depends upon the magnetic and electric field strength, the ion concentration of the suspension medium and the geometry of the chamber. The movement of the particles is due to streaming of the electrolyte which is mainly caused by inhomogeneities of the electric field in the electrophoresis chamber. The magnitude of the effect is high enough to occur physiological conditions. Magneto-electrophoretic streaming might eventually act as a transducer mechanism which could explain the ability of some animals to orientate themselves in the geomagnetic field.

  20. Particle surface area dependence of mineral dust in immersion freezing mode: investigations with freely suspended drops in an acoustic levitator and a vertical wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, K.; Debertshäuser, M.; Eppers, O.; Schmithüsen, H.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-11-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of supercooled drops were measured using an acoustic levitator. This technique allows one to freely suspend single drops in the air without any wall contact. Heterogeneous nucleation by two types of illite (illite IMt1 and illite NX) and a montmorillonite sample was investigated in the immersion mode. Drops of 1 mm in radius were monitored by a video camera while cooled down to -28 °C to simulate freezing within the tropospheric temperature range. The surface temperature of the drops was contact-free, determined with an infrared thermometer; the onset of freezing was indicated by a sudden increase of the drop surface temperature. For comparison, measurements with one particle type (illite NX) were additionally performed in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel with drops of 340 μm radius freely suspended. Immersion freezing was observed in a temperature range between -13 and -26 °C as a function of particle type and particle surface area immersed in the drops. Isothermal experiments in the wind tunnel indicated that after the cooling stage freezing still proceeds, at least during the investigated time period of 30 s. The results were evaluated by applying two descriptions of heterogeneous freezing, the stochastic and the singular model. Although the wind tunnel results do not support the time-independence of the freezing process both models are applicable for comparing the results from the two experimental techniques.

  1. Suspended-sediment concentrations, bedload, particle sizes, surrogate measurements, and annual sediment loads for selected sites in the lower Minnesota River Basin, water years 2011 through 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groten, Joel T.; Ellison, Christopher A.; Hendrickson, Jon S.

    2016-12-20

    Accurate measurements of fluvial sediment are important for assessing stream ecological health, calculating flood levels, computing sediment budgets, and managing and protecting water resources. Sediment-enriched rivers in Minnesota are a concern among Federal, State, and local governments because turbidity and sediment-laden waters are the leading impairments and affect more than 6,000 miles of rivers in Minnesota. The suspended sediment in the lower Minnesota River is deleterious, contributing about 75 to 90 percent of the suspended sediment being deposited into Lake Pepin. The Saint Paul District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Lower Minnesota River Watershed District collaborate to maintain a navigation channel on the lower 14.7 miles of the Minnesota River through scheduled dredging operations. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency has adopted a sediment-reduction strategy to reduce sediment in the Minnesota River by 90 percent by 2040.The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, and the Lower Minnesota River Watershed District, collected suspended-sediment, bedload, and particle-size samples at five sites in the lower Minnesota River Basin during water years 2011 through 2014 and surrogate measurements of acoustic backscatter at one of these sites on the lower Minnesota River during water years 2012 through 2016 to quantify sediment loads and improve understanding of sediment-transport relations. Annual sediment loads were computed for calendar years 2011 through 2014.Data collected from water years 2011 through 2014 indicated that two tributaries, Le Sueur River and High Island Creek, had the highest sediment yield and concentrations of suspended sediment. These tributaries also had greater stream gradients than the sites on the Minnesota River. Suspended fines were greater than suspended sand at all sites in the study area. The range of median particle sizes matched

  2. Assessing and accounting for the impact of respiratory motion on FDG uptake and viable volume for liver lesions in free-breathing PET using respiration-suspended PET images as reference

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guang Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Humm, John L.; Burger, Irene A.; Ridge, Carole A.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To assess and account for the impact of respiratory motion on the variability of activity and volume determination of liver tumor in positron emission tomography (PET) through a comparison between free-breathing (FB) and respiration-suspended (RS) PET images. Methods: As part of a PET/computed tomography (CT) guided percutaneous liver ablation procedure performed on a PET/CT scanner, a patient's breathing is suspended on a ventilator, allowing the acquisition of a near-motionless PET and CT reference images of the liver. In this study, baseline RS and FB PET/CT images of 20 patients undergoing thermal ablation were acquired. The RS PET provides near-motionless reference in a human study, and thereby allows a quantitative evaluation of the effect of respiratory motion on PET images obtained under FB conditions. Two methods were applied to calculate tumor activity and volume: (1) threshold-based segmentation (TBS), estimating the total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and the segmented volume and (2) histogram-based estimation (HBE), yielding the background-subtracted lesion (BSL) activity and associated volume. The TBS method employs 50% of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) as the threshold for tumors with SUV{sub max} ≥ 2× SUV{sub liver-bkg}, and tumor activity above this threshold yields TLG{sub 50%}. The HBE method determines local PET background based on a Gaussian fit of the low SUV peak in a SUV-volume histogram, which is generated within a user-defined and optimized volume of interest containing both local background and lesion uptakes. Voxels with PET intensity above the fitted background were considered to have originated from the tumor and used to calculate the BSL activity and its associated lesion volume. Results: Respiratory motion caused SUV{sub max} to decrease from RS to FB by −15% ± 11% (p = 0.01). Using TBS method, there was also a decrease in SUV{sub mean} (−18% ± 9%, p = 0.01), but an increase in TLG{sub 50%} (18%

  3. Role of microbial Fe(III) reduction and solution chemistry in aggregation and settling of suspended particles in the Mississippi River Delta plain, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaisi, D.P.; Ji, S.; Dong, H.; Blake, R.E.; Eberl, D.D.; Kim, J.

    2008-01-01

    River-dominated delta areas are primary sites of active biogeochemical cycling, with productivity enhanced by terrestrial inputs of nutrients. Particle aggregation in these areas primarily controls the deposition of suspended particles, yet factors that control particle aggregation and resulting sedimentation in these environments are poorly understood. This study was designed to investigate the role of microbial Fe(III) reduction and solution chemistry in aggregation of suspended particles in the Mississippi Delta. Three representative sites along the salinity gradient were selected and sediments were collected from the sediment-water interface. Based on quantitative mineralogical analyses 88-89 wt.% of all minerals in the sediments are clays, mainly smectite and illite. Consumption of SO421 and the formation of H2S and pyrite during microbial Fe(III) reduction of the non-sterile sediments by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 in artificial pore water (APW) media suggest simultaneous sulfate and Fe(III) reduction activity. The pHPZNPC of the sediments was ??? 3.5 and their zeta potentials at the sediment-water interface pH (6.9-7.3) varied from -35 to -45 mV, suggesting that both edges and faces of clay particles have negative surface charge. Therefore, high concentrations of cations in pore water are expected to be a predominant factor in particle aggregation consistent with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Experiments on aggregation of different types of sediments in the same APW composition revealed that the sediment with low zeta potential had a high rate of aggregation. Similarly, addition of external Fe(II) (i.e. not derived from sediments) was normally found to enhance particle aggregation and deposition in all sediments, probably resulting from a decrease in surface potential of particles due to specific Fe(II) sorption. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) images showed predominant face-to-face clay aggregation in native

  4. Comparison of fluvial suspended-sediment concentrations and particle-size distributions measured with in-stream laser diffraction and in physical samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Straub, Timothy D.; Curran, Christopher A.; Landers, Mark N.; Domanski, Marian M.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-diffraction technology, recently adapted for in-stream measurement of fluvial suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs) and particle-size distributions (PSDs), was tested with a streamlined (SL), isokinetic version of the Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry (LISST) for measuring volumetric SSCs and PSDs ranging from 1.8-415 µm in 32 log-spaced size classes. Measured SSCs and PSDs from the LISST-SL were compared to a suite of 22 datasets (262 samples in all) of concurrent suspended-sediment and streamflow measurements using a physical sampler and acoustic Doppler current profiler collected during 2010-12 at 16 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Illinois and Washington (basin areas: 38 – 69,264 km2). An unrealistically low computed effective density (mass SSC / volumetric SSC) of 1.24 g/ml (95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.45 g/ml) provided the best-fit value (R2 = 0.95; RMSE = 143 mg/L) for converting volumetric SSC to mass SSC for over 2 orders of magnitude of SSC (12-2,170 mg/L; covering a substantial range of SSC that can be measured by the LISST-SL) despite being substantially lower than the sediment particle density of 2.67 g/ml (range: 2.56-2.87 g/ml, 23 samples). The PSDs measured by the LISST-SL were in good agreement with those derived from physical samples over the LISST-SL's measureable size range. Technical and operational limitations of the LISST-SL are provided to facilitate the collection of more accurate data in the future. Additionally, the spatial and temporal variability of SSC and PSD measured by the LISST-SL is briefly described to motivate its potential for advancing our understanding of suspended-sediment transport by rivers.

  5. Comparison of fluvial suspended-sediment concentrations and particle-size distributions measured with in-stream laser diffraction and in physical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Straub, Timothy D.; Curran, Christopher A.; Landers, Mark N.; Domanski, Marian M.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-diffraction technology, recently adapted for in-stream measurement of fluvial suspended-sediment concentrations (SSCs) and particle-size distributions (PSDs), was tested with a streamlined (SL), isokinetic version of the Laser In Situ Scattering and Transmissometry (LISST) for measuring volumetric SSCs and PSDs ranging from 1.8 to 415 μm in 32 log-spaced size classes. Measured SSCs and PSDs from the LISST-SL were compared to a suite of 22 data sets (262 samples in all) of concurrent suspended-sediment and streamflow measurements using a physical sampler and acoustic Doppler current profiler collected during 2010-2012 at 16 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Illinois and Washington (basin areas: 38-69,264 km2). An unrealistically low computed effective density (mass SSC/volumetric SSC) of 1.24 g/mL (95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.45 g/mL) provided the best-fit value (R2 = 0.95; RMSE = 143 mg/L) for converting volumetric SSC to mass SSC for over two orders of magnitude of SSC (12-2,170 mg/L; covering a substantial range of SSC that can be measured by the LISST-SL) despite being substantially lower than the sediment particle density of 2.67 g/mL (range: 2.56-2.87 g/mL, 23 samples). The PSDs measured by the LISST-SL were in good agreement with those derived from physical samples over the LISST-SL's measureable size range. Technical and operational limitations of the LISST-SL are provided to facilitate the collection of more accurate data in the future. Additionally, the spatial and temporal variability of SSC and PSD measured by the LISST-SL is briefly described to motivate its potential for advancing our understanding of suspended-sediment transport by rivers.

  6. Concentration of lead, cadmium, and iron in sediment dust and total suspended particles before and after initialisation of integral production in iron and steel work plant Zenica.

    PubMed

    Prcanović, Halim; Duraković, Mirnes; Beganović, Sanela

    2012-06-01

    Poor air quality is a common fact for all areas with base industry. The city of Zenica was once the metallurgical centre of Ex-Yugoslavia and is therefore highly polluted at present. Air pollution peaked in 1987 when average concentration of pollutants was extremely high (daily average concentration of SO(2) was 1800 μg m(-3)). With the beginning of the war in 1992, integral production in the steel work plant was shut down, to be re-launched in 2008. Limit values for iron do not exist, but iron has been monitored in Zenica for the past 28 years because of the presence of steel works. Concentrations of cadmium and lead have also been measured because they are very much present in polluted areas with steel works. The concentration of mentioned elements in air deposit and total suspended particles before and after integral production in the steel work plant was re-launched is the subject of this paper. Total suspended particles were measured in two locations using German standard VDI 2463 Blatt 4. Sediment dust was measured in nine locations using Bergerhoff method. The concentration of iron, lead, and cadmium was performed in the chemical laboratory of the Metallurgical Institute "Kemal Kapetanović" Zenica using standard methods. Higher concentrations of these parameters during the period of integral production clearly point to the impact of steel works on Zenica valley.

  7. Apparatus for preparing mimics of suspended particles in the troposphere and their controlled deposition onto individual lung cells in culture with measurement of downstream biological response.

    PubMed

    Haddrell, Allen E; Ishii, Hiroshi; van Eeden, Stephan F; Agnes, George R

    2005-06-01

    Inhalation exposure to particles <10 microm in size that are suspended in the troposphere (PM10) is a factor in respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. The extent of the injury, local to systemic inflammation, is dependent on the number, size, and composition of the particles to which an individual is exposed. The physical properties of and compounds on PM10 that are responsible for these adverse effects on human health are the subject of intense investigation. Here, we report a laboratory method that involved the creation of 1-120 particles per trial that were of known size and composition, followed by deposition of them directly onto individual human lung cells within a cell culture, and after an incubation period, a downstream biological response was measured. To illustrate this methodology, particles that each contained 50 pg of lipopolysaccharide were created and deposited onto individual cells over a region <0.36 mm2 within a genetically modified A549 cell culture. The biological readout was the relative expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 after 24 h of incubation using an immunocytochemistry assay. The apparatus and methodology introduced here enables studies at the interface between the relevant but diverse areas of atmospheric particle chemistry and lung cell biology to identify the chemical and physical factors of PM10 that cause/exacerbate respiratory and cardiovascular diseases by triggering various biological pathways.

  8. Precise determination of the refractive index of suspended particles: light transmission as a function of refractive index mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClymer, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    Many fluids appear white because refractive index differences lead to multiple scattering. In this paper, we use safe, low-cost commercial index matching fluids to quantitatively study light transmission as a function of index mismatch, reduce multiple scattering to allow single scattering probes, and to precisely determine the index of refraction of suspended material. The transmission profile is compared with Rayleigh-Gans and Mie theory predictions. The procedure is accessible as a student laboratory project, while providing advantages over other standard methods of measuring the refractive index of an unknown nanoparticle, making it valuable to researchers.

  9. Scanning and transmission electron microscope of suspended lead-rich particles in the air of San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, A. Aragón; Villaseñor, G. Torres; Jacinto, P. Santiago; Fernández, M. Monroy

    In the city of San Luis Potosi exists an important metallurgical plant and is known that in the adjacent urban zone, there is a high concentration of lead in the air, it is also supposed that most of the particles with lead have an anthropogenic origin because these particles show morphological characteristics and chemical composition very different in comparison with common lead minerals. In this work it was proved that most of the airborne particles with lead present in this urban zone, effectively came from the copper smelter. The airborne particles with lead were compared with particles with lead obtained starting from samples of slag and lead calcine of the copper smelter. To perform the comparative study, these particles were studied with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS) in conjunction with scanning electron microscope to obtain chemical composition and associated morphological characteristics. Results suggest that these particles, composed of only one phase, are chemically distinct from any crustal lead mineral. Because of the complexity of the chemical composition of these particles (Pb, S, Cu, As, Fe, Zn, Cd, Sb, O), some of the airborne particles were analyzed by transmission microscopy in order to associate crystalline structure with any particular chemical phase.

  10. How does breathing frequency affect the performance of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator and a surgical mask against surrogates of viral particles?

    PubMed

    He, Xinjian; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2014-01-01

    Breathing frequency (breaths/min) differs among individuals and levels of physical activity. Particles enter respirators through two principle penetration pathways: faceseal leakage and filter penetration. However, it is unknown how breathing frequency affects the overall performance of N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) and surgical masks (SMs) against viral particles, as well as other health-relevant submicrometer particles. A FFR and SM were tested on a breathing manikin at four mean inspiratory flows (MIFs) (15, 30, 55, and 85 L/min) and five breathing frequencies (10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 breaths/min). Filter penetration (Pfilter) and total inward leakage (TIL) were determined for the tested respiratory protection devices against sodium chloride (NaCl) aerosol particles in the size range of 20 to 500 nm. "Faceseal leakage-to-filter" (FLTF) penetration ratios were calculated. Both MIF and breathing frequency showed significant effects (p < 0.05) on Pfilter and TIL. Increasing breathing frequency increased TIL for the N95 FFR whereas no clear trends were observed for the SM. Increasing MIF increased Pfilter and decreased TIL resulting in decreasing FLTF ratio. Most of FLTF ratios were >1, suggesting that the faceseal leakage was the primary particle penetration pathway at various breathing frequencies. Breathing frequency is another factor (besides MIF) that can significantly affect the performance of N95 FFRs, with higher breathing frequencies increasing TIL. No consistent trend of increase or decrease of TIL with either MIF or breathing frequency was observed for the tested SM. To potentially extend these findings beyond the manikin/breathing system used, future studies are needed to fully understand the mechanism causing the breathing frequency effect on the performance of respiratory protection devices on human subjects.

  11. Suspended microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Casavant, Benjamin P; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Berthier, Jean; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I; Bischel, Lauren L; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P; Beebe, David J

    2013-06-18

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale structures devoid of a ceiling and floor. We developed a simple and ubiquitous model predicting fluid flow in suspended microfluidic systems and show that it encompasses many known capillary phenomena. Suspended microfluidics was used to create arrays of collagen membranes, mico Dots (μDots), in a horizontal plane separating two fluidic chambers, demonstrating a transwell platform able to discern collective or individual cellular invasion. Further, we demonstrated that μDots can also be used as a simple multiplexed 3D cellular growth platform. Using the μDot array, we probed the combined effects of soluble factors and matrix components, finding that laminin mitigates the growth suppression properties of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Based on the same fluidic principles, we created a suspended microfluidic metabolite extraction platform using a multilayer biphasic system that leverages the accessibility of open microchannels to retrieve steroids and other metabolites readily from cell culture. Suspended microfluidics brings the high degree of fluidic control and unique functionality of closed microfluidics into the highly accessible and robust platform of open microfluidics.

  12. Suspended microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Casavant, Benjamin P.; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Berthier, Jean; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.; Bischel, Lauren L.; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J.; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale structures devoid of a ceiling and floor. We developed a simple and ubiquitous model predicting fluid flow in suspended microfluidic systems and show that it encompasses many known capillary phenomena. Suspended microfluidics was used to create arrays of collagen membranes, mico Dots (μDots), in a horizontal plane separating two fluidic chambers, demonstrating a transwell platform able to discern collective or individual cellular invasion. Further, we demonstrated that μDots can also be used as a simple multiplexed 3D cellular growth platform. Using the μDot array, we probed the combined effects of soluble factors and matrix components, finding that laminin mitigates the growth suppression properties of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Based on the same fluidic principles, we created a suspended microfluidic metabolite extraction platform using a multilayer biphasic system that leverages the accessibility of open microchannels to retrieve steroids and other metabolites readily from cell culture. Suspended microfluidics brings the high degree of fluidic control and unique functionality of closed microfluidics into the highly accessible and robust platform of open microfluidics. PMID:23729815

  13. Penetration of fiber versus spherical particles through filter media and faceseal leakage of N95 filtering facepiece respirators with cyclic flow.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyungmin Jacob; Turkevich, Leonid; Miller, Matthew; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Ha, KwonChul; Reponen, Tiina

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated differences in penetration between fibers and spherical particles through faceseal leakage of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator. Three cyclic breathing flows were generated corresponding to mean inspiratory flow rates (MIF) of 15, 30, and 85 L/min. Fibers had a mean diameter of 1 μm and a median length of 4.9 μm (calculated aerodynamic diameter, d(ae) = 1.73 μm). Monodisperse polystyrene spheres with a mean physical diameter of 1.01 μm (PSI) and 1.54 μm (PSII) were used for comparison (calculated d(ae) = 1.05 and 1.58 μm, respectively). Two optical particle counters simultaneously determined concentrations inside and outside the respirator. Geometric means (GMs) for filter penetration of the fibers were 0.06, 0.09, and 0.08% at MIF of 15, 30, and 85 L/min, respectively. Corresponding values for PSI were 0.07, 0.12, and 0.12%. GMs for faceseal penetration of fibers were 0.40, 0.14, and 0.09% at MIF of 15, 30, and 85 L/min, respectively. Corresponding values for PSI were 0.96, 0.41, and 0.17%. Faceseal penetration decreased with increased breathing rate for both types of particles (p ≤ 0.001). GMs of filter and faceseal penetration of PSII at an MIF of 30 L/min were 0.14% and 0.36%, respectively. Filter penetration and faceseal penetration of fibers were significantly lower than those of PSI (p < 0.001) and PSII (p < 0.003). This confirmed that higher penetration of PSI was not due to slightly smaller aerodynamic diameter, indicating that the shape of fibers rather than their calculated mean aerodynamic diameter is a prevailing factor on deposition mechanisms through the tested respirator. In conclusion, faceseal penetration of fibers and spherical particles decreased with increasing breathing rate, which can be explained by increased capture by impaction. Spherical particles had 2.0-2.8 times higher penetration through faceseal leaks and 1.1-1.5 higher penetration through filter media than fibers, which can be attributed to

  14. Penetration of Fiber Versus Spherical Particles Through Filter Media and Faceseal Leakage of N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirators with Cyclic Flow

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyungmin Jacob; Turkevich, Leonid; Miller, Matthew; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Ha, KwonChul; Reponen, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated differences in penetration between fibers and spherical particles through faceseal leakage of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator. Three cyclic breathing flows were generated corresponding to mean inspiratory flow rates (MIF) of 15, 30, and 85 L/min. Fibers had a mean diameter of 1 μm and a median length of 4.9 μm (calculated aerodynamic diameter, dae = 1.73 μm). Monodisperse polystyrene spheres with a mean physical diameter of 1.01 μm (PSI) and 1.54 μm (PSII) were used for comparison (calculated dae = 1.05 and 1.58 μm, respectively). Two optical particle counters simultaneously determined concentrations inside and outside the respirator. Geometric means (GMs) for filter penetration of the fibers were 0.06, 0.09, and 0.08% at MIF of 15, 30, and 85 L/min, respectively. Corresponding values for PSI were 0.07, 0.12, and 0.12%. GMs for faceseal penetration of fibers were 0.40, 0.14, and 0.09% at MIF of 15, 30, and 85 L/min, respectively. Corresponding values for PSI were 0.96, 0.41, and 0.17%. Faceseal penetration decreased with increased breathing rate for both types of particles (p ≤ 0.001). GMs of filter and faceseal penetration of PSII at an MIF of 30 L/min were 0.14% and 0.36%, respectively. Filter penetration and faceseal penetration of fibers were significantly lower than those of PSI (p < 0.001) and PSII (p < 0.003). This confirmed that higher penetration of PSI was not due to slightly smaller aerodynamic diameter, indicating that the shape of fibers rather than their calculated mean aerodynamic diameter is a prevailing factor on deposition mechanisms through the tested respirator. In conclusion, faceseal penetration of fibers and spherical particles decreased with increasing breathing rate, which can be explained by increased capture by impaction. Spherical particles had 2.0–2.8 times higher penetration through faceseal leaks and 1.1–1.5 higher penetration through filter media than fibers, which can be attributed to

  15. Experimental and Theoretical Study on Circular Disk Particles Suspended in Centrifugal and Non-Centrifugal Force Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Torii, Shuichi; Watanabe, Yoshimi; Tanaka, Satoyuki; Yano, Toshiaki; Iino, Naoko

    2008-02-15

    Theoretical and experimental studies are performed on suspension particle motion in Centrifugal and Non-Centrifugal Force Environment, i.e., in both an axially rotating drum and a stable liquid tank. The particle velocity of circular disks is measured by PTV (Particle Tracking Velocimetry) method and is predicted by BBO (Basset-Boussinesq-Ossen) equation. It is found that (1) as time progresses, one side of the disk in the axially rotating drum is attracted toward the drum wall and its velocity is affected by the rotating speed, (2) when the particle moves in the Stokes' regime, its velocity is linearly increased with the distance from the center of the drum, (3) in contrast, the autorotation of the disk occurs in the non-centrifugal force field, and (4) the corresponding drag coefficient in the low Reynolds number region is in good agreement with the theoretical value of the sphere.

  16. Sorption of lindane to river biofilms, suspended particles and sediments in the presence and absence of Cr(VI) and As(V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z.; Dong, D.; Hua, X.; Lan, X.; Liang, D.

    2013-12-01

    Few study has focused on the effects of Cr(VI) and As(V) which are often in the form of anionic groups in natural aquatic environment on the sorption of dissolved hydrophobic organic pollutants (HOPs) onto natural solid materials from water. In this study, we compared the sorption thermodynamics of lindene as a model dissolved HOP on biofilms, suspended particles and surface sediments collected from the same river in the presence and absence of Cr(VI) and As(V). Visual MINTEQ (version 3.0) was applied to calculate Cr(VI) and As(V) species in the sorption system. CrO42- (89%) was the main Cr(VI) species and HAsO42- (78%) and H2AsO4- (22%) were the As(V) species. Compared with Freundlich and the dual reactive domain model, linear model gave a better fit for the lindane sorption isotherms on the biofilms, particles and sediments (Fig.1). For the lindane sorption on the biofilms, the linear model distribution coefficient (KL) were reduced by 48.0% and 47.6% in the presence of Cr(VI) and As(V), respectively; For that on the suspended particles, KL were reduced by 6.2% and 10.8%, respectively; For the sediments, KL were reduced by 30.2% and 34.5%, respectively. In general, the presence of Cr(VI) and As(V) inhibited lindane sorption onto the three solids and inhibition level decreased in the order biofilms > sediments > particles. In contrast to the promotion of metal cations on the dissolved HOPs sorption onto natural solid materials, anionic Cr(VI) and As(V) groups suppressed the sorption. This indicated that anionic Cr(VI) and As(V) groups might occupy some sorption sites on solids and then occurred competitive sorption with lindane. Taking account of the errors in experiment, effects on the sorption between Cr(VI) and As(V) has no significant difference. This shown that the type of metal has little effect on the HOPs sorption onto natural solids. This result was consistent with that in other related studis. In addition, we inferred that the differences of component

  17. Cd isotopic composition in the suspended and sinking particles of the surface water of the South China Sea: The effects of biotic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shun-Chung; Lee, Der-Chuen; Ho, Tung-Yuan

    2015-10-01

    We determined the Cd isotopic composition of size-fractionated phytoplankton, zooplankton and sinking particles collected in the top 160 m of a deep water time series station in the South China Sea (SCS) to investigate the fractionation effects of major biotic activities. The isotopic composition (ε114/110Cd = [(114Cd /110Cd)sample / (114Cd /110Cd)NIST 3108 - 1 ] ×104) ranged from -2.5 to +7.0, from -9.3 to +6.7, from -1.2 to +4.5, and from -0.2 to + 3.2 ε in the plankton of size fractions 10-60, 60-150, >150, and >100 μm, respectively. The composition in the two smallest fractions, dominated by phytoplankton, was lower than the ambient seawater value (+8 to + 9 ε), indicating that the phytoplankton preferentially take up relatively light Cd isotopes. The insignificant difference between the composition of phytoplankton and zooplankton suggests that the fractionation effect through zooplankton grazing may be relatively small. The composition in the sinking particles at 30 m, ranging from +8.1 to + 12.8 ε, was significantly heavier than the composition in the suspended particles and the composition increased with depth, ranging from +11.5 to + 20.8 ε at 100 m, and from +16.0 to + 18.0 ε at 160 m. The increasing isotopic value with depth indicates that the processes of microbial degradation and/or zooplankton repackaging preferentially decomposed relatively light Cd in the sinking particles. The comparable isotopic composition between sinking particles and dissolved Cd indicates that the fractionation effects of major biotic activities, including phytoplankton uptake, microbial degradation and zooplankton repackaging, take place at similar magnitudes and result in insignificant net biological fractionation effects of Cd in the mixed layer.

  18. Tobacco Smoke: Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Stable Free Radicals in Mechanisms of Oxidative Damage, Carcinogenesis and Synergistic Effects with Other Respirable Particles

    PubMed Central

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Vlachogianni, Thomais; Fiotakis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains many toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic chemicals, as well as stable and unstable free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the particulate and the gas phase with the potential for biological oxidative damage. Epidemiological evidence established that smoking is one of the most important extrinsic factor of premature morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to investigate oxidative and carcinogenic mechanisms of tobacco and synergistic action with other respirable particles in the respiratory system of smokers. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and spin-trapping techniques were used to study stable free radicals in the cigarette tar, and unstable superoxide anion (O2•−) and hydroxyl (HO•) radicals in the smoke Results showed that the semiquinone radical system has the potential for redox recycling and oxidative action. Further, results proved that aqueous cigarette tar (ACT) solutions can generate adducts with DNA nucleobases, particularly the mutagenic 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (a biomarker for carcinogenesis). Also, we observed synergistic effects in the generation of HO•, through the Fenton reaction, with environmental respirable particles (asbestos fibres, coal dust, etc.) and ambient particulate matter (PM), such as PM10, PM2.5 and diesel exhaust particles (DEP). The highest synergistic effects was observed with the asbestos fibres (freshly grounded), PM2.5 and DEP. Finally, we discuss results from our previous study of conventional cellulose acetate filters and “bio-filters” with hemoglobin impregnated activated carbon, which showed that these filters do not substantially alter the free radical content of smoke in the particulate and in the gaseous phase. PMID:19440393

  19. Effects of suspended particles on the rate of mass transfer to a rotating disk electrode. [Ferric cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Roha, D.J.

    1981-06-01

    Limiting currents for the reduction of ferric cyanide at a rotating disk were determined in the presence of 0 to 40 percent by volume of spherical glass beads. Experiments were conducted with six different particle diameters, and with rotation speeds in the range of 387 to 270 rpm, usong both a 0.56 cm and a 1.41 cm radius disk electrode. It was established that at a given rpm upon addition of glass beads in the limiting current, i/sub L/, may increase to more than three times its value without solids. This increase in limiting current density is greater at high rotation speeds and with the larger disk electrode. i/sub L/ as a function of particle diameter yields at maximum at approx. 10 ..mu..m. Two mass transfer models are offered to explain this behavior, both of which assume that the beads are in contact with the disk electrode and moving parallel to its surface. In the surface renewal model it is assumed that complete mixing takes place with the passage of each bead and the boundary layer is replaced with fresh bulk solution. While with the particle film model it is assumed the bead and a clinging film of fluid rotate together. The film promotes mass transfer by alternately absorbing and desorbing the diffusing species. The particle film model best explains the observed behavior of the limiting current density. Calculations of stirring power required verses i/sub L/ observed, show that adding beads to increase i/sub L/ consumes less additional power than simply increasing the rotation speed alone and even permits a decrease in the amount of stirring energy required per unit reactant consumed, at limiting current conditions.

  20. Determination of physical and dynamic properties of suspended particles in water column with ultrasonic scanning in between the water surface and stable sediment layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, Dursun; Alpar, Bedri; Ozeren, Sinan; Cagatay, Namık; Sari, Erol; Vardar, Denizhan; Eris, Kadir

    2015-04-01

    The behavior of seafloor sediment with its water column should be known against any occurrences of anoxic or oxic conditions. The most important ones of these conditions are possible leakage of natural gas or escape of liquids from sediment. On the basis of combined solid/liquid flow dynamics in sedimentation, such kind of events can change, even in an effective manner, the dynamic movements of molecules and their cumulative mass of particules, i.e. the suspended materials. The deployment of suitable sediment traps or ultrasonic transducers somewhere in the water column are not easy attempts in order to obtain useful information about the state of suspended materials during sedimentation. These are usually bulky instruments; therefore they may behave like an anti-move suppresser on the particles moving in the float direction, in oxic and anoxic manner. These instruments, on the other hand, may cover the effects of diffusive flow or bubble formed gas and fluid escape from the sediment surface into the water column. Ultrasonic scanners, however, are able to make observations in a remote manner, without affecting such artificial events. Our field trials were successfully completed at the historical estuary called Halic of Marmara sea . The physical properties; such as the velocity of particles, their travel directions, their dimensions and the ability to observe anti-compositor crushes of shock waves of the bubbles are only a few of these observations in natural ambience. The most important problem solved about water pressure during 3 atmosphere . The sensor has been tested successfully few times. We used the ''High voltage electric isolator oil filling'' to the inside of the scanner for pressure equalization between outer side and inner body of probe at a depth of (20 meters) beneath the sea surface . The transmitted signals by the planar crystal of the transducer become weaker under the pressure of overlying water column in depths. Our efforts are now focused on the

  1. Properties of poly(styrene/alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzyl-polyglycidol) microspheres suspended in water. Effect of sodium chloride and temperature on particle diameters and electrophoretic mobility.

    PubMed

    Basinska, Teresa; Slomkowski, Stanislaw; Kazmierski, Slawomir; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2008-08-19

    Hydrodynamic and electrophoretic properties of core-shell poly(styrene/alpha- tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzyl-polyglycidol) (P(S/PGL)) microspheres suspended in water are described. The microspheres were obtained by surfactant-free emulsion copolymerization of styrene and alpha- tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzyl-polyglycidol macromonomer ( M n = 2800, M w/ M n = 1.05). The process yielded microspheres with number average diameter D n = 270 nm and with low diameter dispersity index D w/ D n = 1.01. Shells of P(S/PGL) microspheres were enriched in polyglycidol. Molar fraction of polyglycidol monomeric units in the shells (determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) was equal to 0.34, which is much higher than the average molar fraction of polyglycidol monomeric units in whole particles of 0.048. Influences of NaCl concentration and temperature on P(S/PGL) microsphere diameters and on their electrophoretic mobility were investigated. It was found that hydrodynamic diameter of P(S/PGL) microspheres, determined by photon correlation spectroscopy, decreased significantly when temperature did exceed a certain value (transition temperature, T t). It has been found that the decrease is more pronounced for higher concentrations of NaCl in the medium. For microspheres suspended in 10 (-1) M NaCl, the hydrodynamic diameter decreased by 8% whereas for the same particles in pure water the diameter decreased by 5.2%. The process of shrinkage was fully reversible. Values of T t for P(S/PGL) microspheres were lower for higher concentrations of NaCl. Adjustment of salt concentration allowed controlling T t in a range from 44.4 to 49.9 degrees C. 13C NMR relaxation time measurements (T 1) for carbon atoms in polyglycidol macromonomer revealed that T 1 did increase with increasing temperature (in temperature range from 25 to 75 degrees C) indicating higher motion of chains at higher temperature. Addition of NaCl did not induce a substantial change of T 1 in the mentioned temperature

  2. Suspended-sediment transport measurement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Of the two operationally defined phases of fluvial-sediment transport – suspended load and bedload – collection of suspended-load data is the more common. This is a reflection of a number of factors including the general predominance of suspended load over bedload in mass transport and the greater difficulty and costs associated with collecting bedload data. Acquisition of suspended-sediment data for sediment-transport computations requires collection of water-sediment samples that represent, or can be reliably adjusted to represent, the mean discharge-weighted concentration and particle-size distribution in a cross section at the time of sample collection. Analytical results from a sufficient number of representative samples obtained with concurrent water-discharge values are needed to compute suspended-sediment discharge for the period of interest.

  3. Optical Characterisation of Suspended Particles in the Mackenzie River Plume (Canadian Arctic Ocean) and Implications for Ocean Colour Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doxaran, D.; Ehn, J.; Belanger, S.; Matsuoka, A.; Hooker, S.; Babin, M.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change significantly impacts Arctic shelf regions in terms of air temperature, ultraviolet radiation, melting of sea ice, precipitation, thawing of permafrost and coastal erosion. Direct consequences have been observed on the increasing Arctic river flow and a large amount of organic carbon sequestered in soils at high latitudes since the last glacial maximum can be expected to be delivered to the Arctic Ocean during the coming decade. Monitoring the fluxes and fate of this terrigenous organic carbon is problematic in such sparsely populated regions unless remote sensing techniques can be developed and proved to be operational. The main objective of this study is to develop an ocean colour algorithm to operationally monitor dynamics of suspended particulate matter (SPM) on the Mackenzie River continental shelf (Canadian Arctic Ocean) using satellite imagery. The water optical properties are documented across the study area and related to concentrations of SPM and particulate organic carbon (POC). Robust SPM and POC : SPM proxies are identified, such as the light backscattering and attenuation coefficients, and relationships are established between these optical and biogeochemical parameters. Following a semi-analytical approach, a regional SPM quantification relationship is obtained for the inversion of the water reflectance signal into SPM concentration. This relationship is reproduced based on independent field optical measurements. It is successfully applied to a selection of MODIS satellite data which allow estimating fluxes at the river mouth and monitoring the extension and dynamics of the Mackenzie River surface plume in 2009, 2010 and 2011. Good agreement is obtained with field observations representative of the whole water column in the river delta zone where terrigenous SPM is mainly constrained (out of short periods of maximum river outflow). Most of the seaward export of SPM is observed to occur within the west side of the river mouth. Future

  4. Seasonal variations in the cycling of aluminium, cadmium and manganese in a Scottish sea loch: biogeochemical processes involving suspended particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, I. R.; Hydes, D. J.; Statham, P. J.; Overnell, J.

    1999-11-01

    Concentrations of Al, Cd and Mn were determined in water and particles collected from water bottles over one year during 19 surveys of a silled fjord. Nutrient and hydrographic data were also collected. Particle fluxes were determined at one site using a sediment trap array. Concentrations of dissolved Al showed the strongest (negative) relationship to salinity ( r=0.91). This correlation decreased with the onset of the diatom bloom and was insignificant immediately post bloom. Removal of dissolved Al was coincident with an increase in particulate Al concentrations. The degree of removal could be predicted from previously reported Al/Si uptake ratios. Concentrations of leachable P in particulate material from the sediment traps increase at the onset of the bloom and decrease coincident with rapid regeneration as the bloom crashed. Particulate leachable Cd showed a lag in apparent uptake and regeneration relative to particulate leachable P. A substantial amount (ca. 53%) of the annual particle flux of Mn to the deepest trap is material recycled at the sediment surface and is not accumulated in the bottom sediment. Dissolved and particulate Mn levels in the loch have a strong seasonal pattern with low values prior to the spring phytoplankton bloom and increased values after the bloom crash. Maximum concentrations were observed in late autumn. Levels decreased to near pre-bloom values early the following year. This suggests bacterial decay of deposited organic carbon associated with the spring bloom-maintained suboxic conditions at or near the seawater-sediment interface throughout the majority of the year. After exhaustion of this organic matter pool recycling ceased for a brief (2-3 months) winter period.

  5. Size of Suspended Bacterial Cells and Association of Heterotrophic Activity with Size Fractions of Particles in Estuarine and Coastal Waters †

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Ferguson, Randolph L.; Rublee, Parke A.

    1984-01-01

    The size of bacteria and the size distribution of heterotrophic activity were examined in estuarine, neritic, and coastal waters. The data indicated the small size of suspended marine bacteria and the predominance of free-living cells in numerical abundance and in the incorporation of dissolved amino acids. The average per-cell volume of suspended marine bacteria in all environments was less than 0.1 μm3. Cell volume ranged from 0.072 to 0.096 μm3 at salinities of 0 to 34.3‰ in the Newport River estuary, N.C., and from 0.078 to 0.096 μm3 in diverse areas of the Gulf of Mexico. Thus, the free-living bacteria were too small to be susceptible to predation by copepods. In the Newport River estuary, ca. 93 to 99% of the total number of cells and 75 to 97% of incorporated tritium (from 3H-labeled mixed amino acids) retained by a 0.2-μm-pore-size filter passed through a 3.0-μm-pore-size filter. Although the amino acid turnover rate per cell was higher for the bacteria in the >3.0-μm size fraction than in the <3.0-μm size fraction, the small number of bacteria associated with the >3.0-μm size particles resulted in the low relative contribution of attached bacteria to total heterotrophic activity in the estuary. For coastal and neritic samples, collected off the coast of Georgia and northeast Florida and in the plume of the Mississippi River, 56 to 98% of incorporated label passed through a 3.0-μm-pore-size filter. The greatest activity in the >3.0-μm fraction in the Georgia Bight was at nearshore stations and in the bottom samples. Our data were consistent with the hypothesis that resuspension of bottom material is an important factor in influencing the proportion of heterotrophic activity attributable to particle-associated bacteria. PMID:16346582

  6. Suspended particulate matter in the Chesapeake Bay entrance and adjacent shelf waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingerich, K. J.; Oertel, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    Approximately 400 samples were collected from the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay for various analyses, including 138 for suspended solids. Characteristics of suspended solids that were analyzed included: total suspended matter; total suspended inorganics, total suspended organics; percent organics; particle size distribution; and presence or absence of 11 of the most prominent particle types.

  7. Reversible electrically-driven magnetic domain wall rotation in multiferroic heterostructures to manipulate suspended on-chip magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Mark; Sohn, Hyunmin; Liang, Cheng-Yen; Hockel, Joshua; Wetzlar, Kyle; Keller, Scott; McLellan, Brenda; Marcus, Matthew; Doran, Andrew; Young, Anthony; Kläui, Mathias; Carman, Gregory; Bokor, Jeffrey; Candler, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate reversible electrically-driven, strain-mediated domain wall (DW) rotation in Ni rings fabricated on piezoelectric [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) O3]0.66-[PbTiO3]0.34 (PMN-PT) substrates. An electric field applied across the PMN-PT substrate induces a strain in the Ni rings producing DW rotation around the ring toward the dominant PMN-PT strain axis by inverse magnetostriction. We observe DWs reversibly cycled between their initial and rotated state as a function of the applied electric field with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photo-emission electron microscopy. The DW rotation is analytically predicted using a fully coupled micromagnetic/elastodyanmic multi-physics simulation to verify that the experimental behavior is caused by the electrically-generated strain in this multiferroic system. Finally, this DW rotation is used to capture and manipulate magnetic particles in a fluidic environment to demonstrate a proof-of-concept energy-efficient pathway for multiferroic-based lab-on-a-chip applications. Supported by TANMS (NSF 11-537), E3S, US Dept of Energy (DE-AC02-05CH11231), EU, and DFG.

  8. Assessment of the relationship between total suspended particles and the response of two biological indicators transplanted to an urban area in central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreras, H. A.; Rodriguez, J. H.; González, C. M.; Wannaz, E. D.; Garcia Ferreyra, F.; Perez, C. A.; Pignata, M. L.

    Samples of the vascular plant Tradescantia pallida and the lichen Usnea amblyoclada were exposed from October 2004 to April 2005 in three sites with different local sources of air pollution in Córdoba city, Argentina. Simultaneous determinations of the ambient levels of total suspended particles were made for each site. Young inflorescenses of T. pallida were collected in November, February and April and the frequency of micronuclei was determined on early tetrads of pollen mother cells. Physiological parameters and the elemental composition of lichen thalli were measured from samples exposed and replaced every month. Significant differences among sampling sites were observed in the frequency of micronuclei measured in T. pallida as well as in many physiological parameters and elements accumulated in lichen thalli. The mass of particulate material as well as the concentration of Ca, Mn, Cu, Zn and Sr was significantly different in different sampling sites, too. These results suggest that in situ biomonitoring using both higher plants and lichens may be of use to characterize air pollution in areas devoid of instrumental monitoring techniques or where it is necessary to explore the distribution of air contaminants at a microscale.

  9. Tomographic particle-image velocimetry and thermography in Rayleigh-Bénard convection using suspended thermochromic liquid crystals and digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciofalo, M.; Signorino, M.; Simiano, M.

    2003-02-01

    Steady-state flow and temperature fields in shallow rectangular enclosures heated from below were visualized and quantitatively characterized by using glycerol as the working fluid and suspended thermochromic liquid crystals as tracers. Couples of photographs taken on 120 transparency film for two orthogonal sets of vertical plane sections were digitized by a 1,200-dpi flatbed scanner and split into HSL (hue-saturation-lightness) components by using commercial general-purpose image processing software. Two-dimensional velocity fields were obtained from the lightness component by a two-frame cross-correlation technique using a commercial particle-image velocimetry (PIV) package. Temperature fields were obtained from the hue component on the basis of an in situ calibration procedure, conducted under conditions of stable thermal stratification. Finally, 2D flow and temperature distributions were interpolated by a purpose-written Fortran program to give 3D flow and thermal fields in the enclosure. Results are presented here for the case of a 1:2:4 aspect ratio cavity at a Rayleigh number of ˜ 14,500, for which a complex 3D flow and temperature distribution was observed.

  10. Removal of antibiotics from water in the coexistence of suspended particles and natural organic matters using amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants: A combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuying; Yang, Zhen; Ren, Kexin; Tian, Ziqi; Dong, Chang; Ma, Ruixue; Yu, Ge; Yang, Weiben

    2016-11-05

    Contamination of trace antibiotics is widely found in surface water sources. This work delineates removal of trace antibiotics (norfloxacin (NOR), sulfadiazine (SDZ) or tylosin (TYL)) from synthetic surface water by flocculation, in the coexistence of inorganic suspended particles (kaolin) and natural organic matter (humic acid, HA). To avoid extra pollution caused by petrochemical products-based modification reagents, environmental-friendly amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants, Ctrp and Ctyr, with different functional aromatic-rings structures were employed. Jar tests at various pHs exhibited that, Ctyr, owning phenol groups as electron donors, was favored for elimination of cationic NOR (∼50% removal; optimal pH: 6; optimal dosage: 4mg/L) and TYL (∼60% removal; optimal pH: 7; optimal dosage: 7.5mg/L), due to π-π electron donator-acceptor (EDA) effect and unconventional H-bonds. Differently, Ctrp with indole groups as electron acceptor had better removal rate (∼50%) of SDZ anions (electron donator). According to correlation analysis, the coexisted kaolin and HA played positive roles in antibiotics' removal. Detailed pairwise interactions in molecular level among different components were clarified by spectral analysis and theoretical calculations (density functional theory), which are important for both the structural design of new flocculants aiming at targeted contaminants and understanding the environmental behaviors of antibiotics in water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of compounds bound to suspended solids causing sub-lethal toxic effects in Daphnia magna. A field study on re-suspended particles during river floods in Ebro River.

    PubMed

    Rivetti, Claudia; Gómez-Canela, Cristian; Lacorte, Silvia; Díez, Sergi; Lázaro, Wilkinson L; Barata, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Identifying chemicals causing adverse effects in organisms present in water remains a challenge in environmental risk assessment. This study aimed to assess and identify toxic compounds bound to suspended solids re-suspended during a prolonged period of flushing flows in the lower part of Ebro River (NE, Spain). This area is contaminated with high amounts of organochlorine and mercury sediment wastes. Chemical characterization of suspended material was performed by solid phase extraction using a battery of non-polar and polar solvents and analyzed by GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS. Mercury content was also determined for all sites. Post-exposure feeding rates of Daphnia magna were used to assess toxic effects of whole and filtered water samples and of re-constituted laboratory water with re-suspended solid fractions. Organochlorine and mercury residues in the water samples increased from upstream to downstream locations. Conversely, toxic effects were greater at the upstream site than downstream of the superfund Flix reservoir. A further analysis of the suspended solid fraction identified a toxic component eluted within the 80:20 methanol:water fraction. Characterization of that toxic component fraction by LC-MS/MS identified the phytotoxin anatoxin-a, whose residue levels were correlated with observed feeding inhibition responses. Further feeding inhibition assays conducted in the lab using anatoxin-a produced from Planktothrix agardhii, a filamentous cyanobacteria, confirmed field results. This study provides evidence that in real field situation measured contaminant residues do not always agree with toxic effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Simultaneous determination of radiocesium ((135)Cs, (137)Cs) and plutonium ((239)Pu, (240)Pu) isotopes in river suspended particles by ICP-MS/MS and SF-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liguo; Zheng, Jian; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Pan, Shaoming; Wang, Zhongtang; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2016-10-01

    Due to radioisotope releases in the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, long-term monitoring of radiocesium ((135)Cs and (137)Cs) and Pu isotopes ((239)Pu and (240)Pu) in river suspended particles is necessary to study the transport and fate of these long-lived radioisotopes in the land-ocean system. However, it is expensive and technically difficult to collect samples of suspended particles from river and ocean. Thus, simultaneous determination of multi-radionuclides remains as a challenging topic. In this study, for the first time, we report an analytical method for simultaneous determination of radiocesium and Pu isotopes in suspended particles with small sample size (1-2g). Radiocesium and Pu were sequentially pre-concentrated using ammonium molybdophosphate and ferric hydroxide co-precipitation, respectively. After the two-stage ion-exchange chromatography separation from the matrix elements, radiocesium and Pu isotopes were finally determined by ICP-MS/MS and SF-ICP-MS, respectively. The interfering elements of U ((238)U(1)H(+) and (238)U(2)H(+) for (239)Pu and (240)Pu, respectively) and Ba ((135)Ba(+) and (137)Ba(+) for (135)Cs and (137)Cs, respectively) were sufficiently removed with the decontamination factors of 1-8×10(6) and 1×10(4), respectively, with the developed method. Soil reference materials were utilized for method validation, and the obtained (135)Cs/(137)Cs and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios, and (239+240)Pu activities showed a good agreement with the certified/information values. In addition, the developed method was applied to analyze radiocesium and Pu in the suspended particles of land water samples collected from Fukushima Prefecture after the FDNPP accident. The (135)Cs/(137)Cs atom ratios (0.329-0.391) and (137)Cs activities (23.4-152Bq/g) suggested radiocesium contamination of the suspended particles mainly originated from the accident-released radioactive contaminates, while similar Pu contamination of suspended

  13. Suspended-slurry reactor

    SciTech Connect

    2016-03-22

    An apparatus for generating a large volume of gas from a liquid stream is disclosed. The apparatus includes a first channel through which the liquid stream passes. The apparatus also includes a layer of catalyst particles suspended in a solid slurry for generating gas from the liquid stream. The apparatus further includes a second channel through which a mixture of converted liquid and generated gas passes. A heat exchange channel heats the liquid stream. A wicking structure located in the second channel separates the gas generated from the converted liquid.

  14. Modeling Total Suspended Solids (TSS) Concentrations in Narragansett Bay.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work covers mechanistic modeling of suspended particulates in estuarine systems with an application to Narragansett Bay, RI. Suspended particles directly affect water clarity and attenuate light in the water column. Water clarity affects both phytoplankton and submerged aqua...

  15. Modeling Total Suspended Solids (TSS) Concentrations in Narragansett Bay.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work covers mechanistic modeling of suspended particulates in estuarine systems with an application to Narragansett Bay, RI. Suspended particles directly affect water clarity and attenuate light in the water column. Water clarity affects both phytoplankton and submerged aqua...

  16. 40 CFR 230.21 - Suspended particulates/turbidity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Impacts on Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.21 Suspended particulates/turbidity. (a) Suspended particulates in the aquatic ecosystem consist of fine-grained mineral particles...

  17. 40 CFR 230.21 - Suspended particulates/turbidity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Impacts on Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.21 Suspended particulates/turbidity. (a) Suspended particulates in the aquatic ecosystem consist of fine-grained mineral particles...

  18. 40 CFR 230.21 - Suspended particulates/turbidity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Impacts on Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.21 Suspended particulates/turbidity. (a) Suspended particulates in the aquatic ecosystem consist of fine-grained mineral particles...

  19. 40 CFR 230.21 - Suspended particulates/turbidity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Impacts on Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.21 Suspended particulates/turbidity. (a) Suspended particulates in the aquatic ecosystem consist of fine-grained mineral particles...

  20. 40 CFR 230.21 - Suspended particulates/turbidity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Impacts on Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.21 Suspended particulates/turbidity. (a) Suspended particulates in the aquatic ecosystem consist of fine-grained mineral particles...

  1. Seasonal variability of microplankton community respiration in the Celtic Sea, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Martin, E. E.; Davis, C. E.; Mahaffey, C.; Purdie, D. A.; Robinson, C.

    2016-02-01

    The downward flux and ultimate storage of particulate and dissolved organic carbon in shelf seas is constrained by the respiration of bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton in the water column. In order to apportion respiration to the different plankton size classes in the water column and associated with particles, we undertook a seasonal study of plankton community respiration in the Celtic Sea (UK) as part of the NERC Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry programme. Fast, slow sinking and suspended particles were collected using Marine Snow Catchers. Community respiration rates (CR) were estimated from oxygen consumption measured with both traditional Winkler titrations and optodes and from in vivo reduction rates of a tetrazolium salt (INT) in two size-fractions (0.2-0.8 µm and >0.8 µm). The concentration of reduced INT was significantly correlated with the concentration of oxygen consumed (r = 0.641, p<0.001, n = 113) supporting previous suggestions that INT is a good proxy of respiration. As expected, CR varied seasonally, with the highest depth-integrated rates (surface to 1% incident irradiance) in April 2015 (152 ± 4 mmol O2 m-2 d-1) in response to the spring phytoplankton bloom and the lowest rates in November 2014 (20 ± 4 mmol O2 m-2 d-1). CR usually decreased with depth except in November when it was similar above and below a weak thermocline. In general, 32 % of community respiration was attributable to cells in the 0.2 to 0.8 µm size class, however, during the April phytoplankton bloom this contribution decreased to 17 %. In the fast sinking particles the contribution of the 0.2 to 0.8 µm size class to CR increased with depth with an average of 25 % above the thermocline and an average of 33 % below it. These results will be interpreted alongside concentrations of particulate and dissolved organic material and plankton biomass in the context of this coordinated physical and biogeochemical annual study.

  2. Global gene expression changes in human embryonic lung fibroblasts induced by organic extracts from respirable air particles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, we used cell-free assays to demonstrate the toxic effects of complex mixtures of organic extracts from urban air particles (PM2.5) collected in four localities of the Czech Republic (Ostrava-Bartovice, Ostrava-Poruba, Karvina and Trebon) which differed in the extent and sources of air pollution. To obtain further insight into the biological mechanisms of action of the extractable organic matter (EOM) from ambient air particles, human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL12469) were treated with the same four EOMs to assess changes in the genome-wide expression profiles compared to DMSO treated controls. Method For this purpose, HEL cells were incubated with subtoxic EOM concentrations of 10, 30, and 60 μg EOM/ml for 24 hours and global gene expression changes were analyzed using human whole genome microarrays (Illumina). The expression of selected genes was verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Results Dose-dependent increases in the number of significantly deregulated transcripts as well as dose-response relationships in the levels of individual transcripts were observed. The transcriptomic data did not differ substantially between the localities, suggesting that the air pollution originating mainly from various sources may have similar biological effects. This was further confirmed by the analysis of deregulated pathways and by identification of the most contributing gene modulations. The number of significantly deregulated KEGG pathways, as identified by Goeman's global test, varied, depending on the locality, between 12 to 29. The Metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 exhibited the strongest upregulation in all 4 localities and CYP1B1 had a major contribution to the upregulation of this pathway. Other important deregulated pathways in all 4 localities were ABC transporters (involved in the translocation of exogenous and endogenous metabolites across membranes and DNA repair), the Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways (associated

  3. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles inhibit cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhimin; Morrow, Matthew P; Asefa, Tewodros; Sharma, Krishna K; Duncan, Cole; Anan, Abhishek; Penefsky, Harvey S; Goodisman, Jerry; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2008-05-01

    We studied the effect of two types of mesoporous silica nanoparticles, MCM-41 and SBA-15, on mitochondrial O 2 consumption (respiration) in HL-60 (myeloid) cells, Jurkat (lymphoid) cells, and isolated mitochondria. SBA-15 inhibited cellular respiration at 25-500 microg/mL; the inhibition was concentration-dependent and time-dependent. The cellular ATP profile paralleled that of respiration. MCM-41 had no noticeable effect on respiration rate. In cells depleted of metabolic fuels, 50 microg/mL SBA-15 delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration by 12 min and 200 microg/mL SBA-15 by 34 min; MCM-41 also delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration. Neither SBA-15 nor MCM-41 affected cellular glutathione. Both nanoparticles inhibited respiration of isolated mitochondria and submitochondrial particles.

  4. Particle loading time and humidity effects on the efficiency of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator model under constant and inhalation cyclic flows.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Alireza; Haghighat, Fariborz; Bahloul, Ali; Brochot, Clothilde; Ostiguy, Claude

    2015-06-01

    It is necessary to investigate the efficiencies of filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) exposed to ultrafine particles (UFPs) for long periods of time, since the particle loading time may potentially affect the efficiency of FFRs. This article aims to investigate the filtration efficiency for a model of electrostatic N95 FFRs with constant and 'inhalation-only' cyclic flows, in terms of particle loading time effect, using different humidity conditions. Filters were exposed to generated polydisperse NaCl particles. Experiments were performed mimicking an 'inhalation-only' scenario with a cyclic flow of 85 l min(-1) as the minute volume [or 170 l min(-1) as mean inhalation flow (MIF)] and for two constant flows of 85 and 170 l min(-1), under three relative humidity (RH) levels of 10, 50, and 80%. Each test was performed for loading time periods of 6h and the particle penetration (10-205.4nm in electrical mobility diameter) was measured once every 2h. For a 10% RH, the penetration of smaller size particles (<80nm), including the most penetrating particle size (MPPS), decreased over time for both constant and cyclic flows. For 50 and 80% RH levels, the changes in penetration were typically observed in an opposite direction with less magnitude. The penetrations at MPPS increased with respect to loading time under constant flow conditions (85 and 170 l min(-1)): it did not substantially increase under cyclic flows. The comparison of the cyclic flow (85 l min(-1) as minute volume) and constant flow equal to the cyclic flow minute volume indicated that, for all conditions the penetration was significantly less for the constant flow than that of cyclic flow. The comparison between the cyclic (170 l min(-1) as MIF) and constant flow equal to cyclic flow MIF indicated that, for the initial stage of loading, the penetrations were almost equal, but they were different for the final stages of the loading time. For a 10% RH, the penetration of a wide range of sizes was observed

  5. Improving suspended sediment measurements by automatic samplers.

    PubMed

    Gettel, Melissa; Gulliver, John S; Kayhanian, Masoud; DeGroot, Gregory; Brand, Joshua; Mohseni, Omid; Erickson, Andrew J

    2011-10-01

    Suspended solids either as total suspended solids (TSS) or suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is an integral particulate water quality parameter that is important in assessing particle-bound contaminants. At present, nearly all stormwater runoff quality monitoring is performed with automatic samplers in which the sampling intake is typically installed at the bottom of a storm sewer or channel. This method of sampling often results in a less accurate measurement of suspended sediment and associated pollutants due to the vertical variation in particle concentration caused by particle settling. In this study, the inaccuracies associated with sampling by conventional intakes for automatic samplers have been verified by testing with known suspended sediment concentrations and known particle sizes ranging from approximately 20 μm to 355 μm under various flow rates. Experimental results show that, for samples collected at a typical automatic sampler intake position, the ratio of sampled to feed suspended sediment concentration is up to 6600% without an intake strainer and up to 300% with a strainer. When the sampling intake is modified with multiple sampling tubes and fitted with a wing to provide lift (winged arm sampler intake), the accuracy of sampling improves substantially. With this modification, the differences between sampled and feed suspended sediment concentration were more consistent and the sampled to feed concentration ratio was accurate to within 10% for particle sizes up to 250 μm.

  6. Long-term observation of water-soluble chemical components and acid-digested metals in the total suspended particles collected at Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, D.; Okada, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Nakama, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Somada, Y.; Ijyu, M.; Azechi, S.; Oshiro, Y.; Nakaema, F.; Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.

    2011-12-01

    The economic growth and population increase in recent Asia have been increasing air pollution. Emission rate of air pollutants from Asia, in particular oxides of nitrogen, surpassed those from North America and Europe and should continue to exceed them for decades. Okinawa Island is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km south of South Korea. Its location is ideal in observing East Asia's air quality because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background clean air and can be compared with continental air masses which have been affected by anthropogenic activities. We collected total suspended particles (TSP) on quartz filters by using a high volume air sampler at the Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS), Okinawa, Japan during August 2005 and August 2010. Sampling duration was one week for each sample. We determined the concentrations of water-soluble anions, cations, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and acid-digested metals in TSP samples using ion chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry, total organic carbon analyzer and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), respectively. Seasonal variation of water-soluble chemical components and acid-digested metals showed that the concentrations were the lowest in summer, higher in fall and winter, and the highest in spring. When air mass came from Asian continent, the concentrations of water-soluble chemical components and acid-digested metals were much higher compared to the other directions, suggesting long-range transport of air pollutants from Asian continent. Also, when the air mass came from Asian continent (75-100% dominant), the mean concentrations of non-sea salt sulfate and nitrate increased ca. 1.8 times and ca. 3.7 times, respectively between 2005 and 2010, and the ratio of nitrate to

  7. The crucial role of particle surface reactivity in respirable quartz-induced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species formation and APE/Ref-1 induction in rat lung

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Catrin; Knaapen, Ad M; Becker, Andrea; Höhr, Doris; Haberzettl, Petra; van Schooten, Frederik J; Borm, Paul JA; Schins, Roel PF

    2005-01-01

    Persistent inflammation and associated excessive oxidative stress have been crucially implicated in quartz-induced pulmonary diseases, including fibrosis and cancer. We have investigated the significance of the particle surface reactivity of respirable quartz dust in relation to the in vivo generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and the associated induction of oxidative stress responses in the lung. Therefore, rats were intratracheally instilled with 2 mg quartz (DQ12) or quartz whose surface was modified by either polyvinylpyridine-N-oxide (PVNO) or aluminium lactate (AL). Seven days after instillation, the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analysed for markers of inflammation (total/differential cell counts), levels of pulmonary oxidants (H2O2, nitrite), antioxidant status (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity), as well as for markers of lung tissue damage, e.g. total protein, lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase. Lung homogenates as well as sections were investigated regarding the induction of the oxidative DNA-lesion/oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) using HPLC/ECD analysis and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Homogenates and sections were also investigated for the expression of the bifunctional apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE/Ref-1) by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Significantly increased levels of H2O2 and nitrite were observed in rats treated with non-coated quartz, when compared to rats that were treated with either saline or the surface-modified quartz preparations. In the BALF, there was a strong correlation between the number of macrophages and ROS, as well as total cells and RNS. Although enhanced oxidant generation in non-coated DQ12-treated rats was paralleled with an increased total antioxidant capacity in the BALF, these animals also showed significantly enhanced lung tissue damage. Remarkably however, elevated ROS levels were not associated

  8. Combined exposure of diesel exhaust particles and respirable Soufrière Hills volcanic ash causes a (pro-)inflammatory response in an in vitro multicellular epithelial tissue barrier model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomašek, Ines; Horwell, Claire J.; Damby, David; Barošová, Hana; Geers, Christoph; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J. D.

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundThere are justifiable health concerns regarding the potential adverse effects associated with human exposure to volcanic ash (VA) particles, especially when considering communities living in urban areas already exposed to heightened air pollution. The aim of this study was, therefore, to gain an imperative, first understanding of the biological impacts of respirable VA when exposed concomitantly with diesel particles.MethodsA sophisticated in vitro 3D triple cell co-culture model of the human alveolar epithelial tissue barrier was exposed to either a single or repeated dose of dry respirable VA (deposited dose of 0.26 ± 0.09 or 0.89 ± 0.29 μg/cm2, respectively) from Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat for a period of 24 h at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Subsequently, co-cultures were exposed to co-exposures of single or repeated VA and diesel exhaust particles (DEP; NIST SRM 2975; 0.02 mg/mL), a model urban pollutant, at the pseudo-ALI. The biological impact of each individual particle type was also analysed under these precise scenarios. The cytotoxic (LDH release), oxidative stress (depletion of intracellular GSH) and (pro-)inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-1β) responses were assessed after the particulate exposures. The impact of VA exposure upon cell morphology, as well as its interaction with the multicellular model, was visualised via confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively.ResultsThe combination of respirable VA and DEP, in all scenarios, incited an heightened release of TNF-α and IL-8 as well as significant increases in IL-1β, when applied at sub-lethal doses to the co-culture compared to VA exposure alone. Notably, the augmented (pro-)inflammatory responses observed were not mediated by oxidative stress. LSM supported the quantitative assessment of cytotoxicity, with no changes in cell morphology within the barrier model evident. A direct interaction of the VA with all

  9. Combined exposure of diesel exhaust particles and respirable Soufrière Hills volcanic ash causes a (pro-)inflammatory response in an in vitro multicellular epithelial tissue barrier model.

    PubMed

    Tomašek, Ines; Horwell, Claire J; Damby, David E; Barošová, Hana; Geers, Christoph; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J D

    2016-12-12

    There are justifiable health concerns regarding the potential adverse effects associated with human exposure to volcanic ash (VA) particles, especially when considering communities living in urban areas already exposed to heightened air pollution. The aim of this study was, therefore, to gain an imperative, first understanding of the biological impacts of respirable VA when exposed concomitantly with diesel particles. A sophisticated in vitro 3D triple cell co-culture model of the human alveolar epithelial tissue barrier was exposed to either a single or repeated dose of dry respirable VA (deposited dose of 0.26 ± 0.09 or 0.89 ± 0.29 μg/cm(2), respectively) from Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat for a period of 24 h at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Subsequently, co-cultures were exposed to co-exposures of single or repeated VA and diesel exhaust particles (DEP; NIST SRM 2975; 0.02 mg/mL), a model urban pollutant, at the pseudo-ALI. The biological impact of each individual particle type was also analysed under these precise scenarios. The cytotoxic (LDH release), oxidative stress (depletion of intracellular GSH) and (pro-)inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-1β) responses were assessed after the particulate exposures. The impact of VA exposure upon cell morphology, as well as its interaction with the multicellular model, was visualised via confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The combination of respirable VA and DEP, in all scenarios, incited an heightened release of TNF-α and IL-8 as well as significant increases in IL-1β, when applied at sub-lethal doses to the co-culture compared to VA exposure alone. Notably, the augmented (pro-)inflammatory responses observed were not mediated by oxidative stress. LSM supported the quantitative assessment of cytotoxicity, with no changes in cell morphology within the barrier model evident. A direct interaction of the VA with all three cell types of

  10. Source tracing of fluvial suspended sediments by magnetic and geochemical particle characterization: example of the Canche watershed (Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patault, Edouard; Alary, Claire; Franke, Christine; Gauthier, Arnaud; Abriak, Nor-Edine

    2016-04-01

    In France, erosion by water run-off is estimated to 1.5 t ha-1yr-1 and can exceed 10 t ha-1yr-1 in large growing areas, such as the North of France (Nord-Pas-de-Calais). In this region, the Canche watershed (1294 km2) sustains heavy loss of fertile soils. The land use is mainly dominated by arable lands (80%) and in 2013, 104 kt of suspended sediment transited to the estuary. As demonstrated in literature, agricultural soil erosion leads to the gradual disappearance and depletion of fertile soil, which constitute a non-renewable resource at human time scale. Additionally, water erosion can significantly damage the aquatic habitat and can be responsible for the input of nutrients, bacteria, pesticides, heavy metals and radionuclides into surface waters. Conscious of these effects, many programs have emerged in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais to reduce erosion. This study presents a combination of environmental magnetic proxy parameters and geochemical analyses on sediments and suspended particulate matter. The aim is to develop effective tools to trace erosion by water run-off and quantify this process. In order to identify the respective sediment sources in the Canche watershed, sediment trap samples of suspended particulate matter were recovered at key positions along the Canche watershed. The preliminary results show that magnetic concentration (Mrs) shows typical values for the agricultural soils in the region, but these variations in magnetic concentrations and total irons concentrations are not always correlated, which may be explained by the iron speciation. In calculating the so-called S-ratio for each sample we can distinguish changes in magneto-mineralogy (and thus iron speciation) from magnetite-dominated assemblages in the mainstream Canche (naturel background signal) to high-coercivity-dominated assemblages in the tributaries, typical for soil erosion material rich in hematite/goethite. In combination with the element concentrations from ICP analyses, this proxy

  11. Laboratory report on iodine (129I and 127I) speciation, transformation and mobility in Handford groundwater, suspended particles and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Santschi, P. H.; Xu, C.; Zhang, S.; Ho, Y.; Li, H.; Schwehr, K.; Kaplan, D. I.

    2012-09-01

    were on average 89% greater than iodide Kd values, and the Kd values for both species tended to increase with the amount of organic carbon (OC) present in the sediment. It is especially noteworthy that this trend existed at the very low OC concentrations that naturally exist in the Hanford sediments. Iodine and OC can form essentially irreversible covalent bonds, thereby providing a yet unstudied 129I retardation reaction at the Hanford Site. In addition to the transformation of iodine species, the sediment collected from the vadose zone also released stable iodide into the aqueous phase. It was found that the three sediments all took up the ambient iodate from the groundwater and slowly transformed it into iodide under the laboratory conditions, likely dependent on the abundance of reducing agents such as organic matter and Fe2+. Therefore two competitive iodine processes were identified, the tendency for the sediment to reduce iodate to iodide, and the groundwater chemistry to maintain the iodine as iodate, presumably it is largely the result of natural pH and dissolved O2/Eh levels. Suspended carbonate (and silica) particles collected from Hanford groundwater contained elevated amounts of iodine (142 ± 8 μg/g iodine), consisting mainly of iodate (>99%). Iodate was likely incorporated into the carbonate structure during calcite precipitation upon degasing of CO2 as the groundwater samples were removed from the subsurface. This concentration of groundwater iodate in precipitated carbonate has implication to long-term fate and transport of 129I and on active in-situ 129I groundwater remediation. This study provides some of the first groundwater radioiodine speciation studies conducted in arid environments and provides much needed mechanistic descriptions to permit making informed decisions about low-cost/high intellectual input remediation options, such as monitored natural

  12. Evaluation of respirator filters for asbestos fibers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Holmes, Thomas D; Fan, Bijian

    2006-01-01

    Fiber aerosols are known to have different aerodynamic behaviors than spherical particles and usually carry higher electrostatic charges. We investigated the effects of flow rate and charge status of filter cartridges on the penetration of spherical and fiber aerosols. Four types of test respirator filters were selected: two for passive respirators, one for a powered respirator, and one disposable respirator. Surface charges on respirator filters were determined using a noncontact field electrostatic field meter. Penetration tests were performed for filter cartridges before and after charge neutralization. The surface charge measurements on the respirator filters showed that some filters, including those used in disposable face masks, are charged to enhance the collection efficiency. Only high-efficiency particulate air filters performed consistently for both spherical test aerosols and the three types of asbestos fibers. The surface charge potential of filter cartridges and flow rate did not appear to affect the performance of these filters. In contrast to the high-efficiency filters, the aerosol penetration performance of low-efficiency filters and face masks deteriorated when the charge potential on the filter was removed. Our data also showed that the surface charges decreased in a high-temperature, high-humidity environment and disappeared after 1 week. Deposition of spherical particles and fibers in the charged disposable facemask filter was enhanced. For charged-neutralized, low-efficiency filter cartridges, asbestos fibers may penetrate more than spherical particles with a mean particle size of 0.3 microm diameter.

  13. Nosepiece respiration monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, A. L.; Long, L. E.; Rice, N. E.

    1968-01-01

    Comfortable, inexpensive nosepiece respiration monitor produces rapid response signals to most conventional high impedance medical signal conditioners. The monitor measures respiration in a manner that produces a large signal with minimum delay.

  14. Respirator Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... it last? That depends on how much filtering capacity the respirator has and the amount of hazard ... and it will vary by each respirator model's capacities. That's why your emergency plan must include some ...

  15. [Research on the Content Characteristics and Pollution Evaluation of Heavy Metals in Filtered Water and Suspended Particles from Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia Sections of the Yellow River in Wet Season Using HR-ICP-MS].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-ling; Liu, Jing-jun; Deng, Feng-yu; Zuo, Hang; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Li-yang; Liu, Ying

    2015-10-01

    The content characteristics, pollution evaluation and source identification of 6 heavy Metals (Cd, Pb, Cr, As, Cu and Zn) in filtered water and 9 heavy Metals (Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, V, Co, Zn and Mn) in suspended particles from 10 sampling sites such as Zhaojunfuqiao (S1) and Baotoufuqiao (S2), etc. from Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia sections of the Yellow River in 2012 Wet Season were studied to understand the condition of the heavy metal pollution in Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia Sections of the Yellow River by using high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS). Multivariate geochemical approaches and statistical analysis were also exploited for assessing the level of heavy metals in filtered water and suspended particles from studied area. The results showed that in filtering water, only the concentrations of Cr exceeded the standard value of Environmental Quality Standard for Surface Water (GB3838-2002) and were the highest (74.8-94.7 μg x L(-1)) among all elements in 10 sampling sites; Single factor pollution index (I(i)) results suggested that the water quality in all sampling sites were contaminated by both Cr and total nitrogen (TN), with the exception of TN in Baotoufuqiao (S2); Integrated Nemerow pollution index (I) indicated that the I values in all sampling sites were between 1-2 (light pollution), which implied that the water quality in Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia sections, especially downstream sections (S1-S6) of the Yellow River wasn't an ideal source for drinking and using in aquaculture any more. In suspended particles, concentrations of heavy metals were relatively higher than their soil background values in 10 sampling sites, except Ni in S10 (34.7 μg x L(-1)). Index of geo-accumulation (I(geo)) indicated that the I(geo) values of Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, V, Co, Zn and Mn in all sampling sites were less than 1 (unpolluted or unpolluted-moderately polluted), respectively, while I(geo)Cd were the highest in 10

  16. Spatial variability of concentrations of chlorophyll a, dissolved organic matter and suspended particles in the surface layer of the Kara Sea in September 2011 from lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelevin, V. V.; Zavjalov, P. O.; Belyaev, N. A.; Konovalov, B. V.; Kravchishina, M. D.; Mosharov, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents results of underway remote laser sensing of the surface water layer in continuous automatic mode using the UFL-9 fluorescent lidar onboard the R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh during cruise 59 in the Kara Sea in 2011. The description of the lidar, the approach to interpreting seawater fluorescence data, and certain methodical aspects of instrument calibration and measurement are presented. Calibration of the lidar is based on laboratory analysis of water samples taken from the sea surface during the cruise. Spatial distribution of chlorophyll a, total organic carbon and suspended matter concentrations in the upper quasi-homogeneous layer are mapped and the characteristic scales of the variability are estimated. Some dependencies between the patchiness of the upper water layer and the atmospheric forcing and freshwater runoff are shown.

  17. Particle-associated contaminants in street dust, parking lot dust, soil, lake-bottom sediment, and suspended and streambed sediment, Lake Como and Fosdic Lake watersheds, Fort Worth, Texas, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Jennifer T.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Werth, Charles J.; Yang, Yanning

    2006-01-01

    A previous study by the U.S. Geological Survey of impaired water bodies in Fort Worth, Texas, reported elevated but variable concentrations of particle-associated contaminants (PACs) comprising chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and trace elements in suspended and bed sediment of lakes and streams affected by urban land use. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Fort Worth, collected additional samples during October 2004 to investigate sources of PACs in the watersheds of two impaired lakes: Lake Como and Fosdic Lake. Source materials and aquatic sediment were sampled and analyzed for PACs. Source materials sampled consisted of street dust and soil from areas with residential and commercial land use and parking lot dust from sealed and unsealed parking lots. Aquatic sediment sampled consisted of bottom-sediment cores from the two lakes and suspended and streambed sediment from the influent stream of each lake. Samples were analyzed for chlorinated hydrocarbons (organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, major and trace elements, organic carbon, grain size, and radionuclides.

  18. Respirator Performance against Nanoparticles under Simulated Workplace Activities

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Evanly; Zhuang, Ziqing; Horvatin, Matthew; Liu, Yuewei; He, Xinjian; Rengasamy, Samy

    2017-01-01

    Filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) and elastomeric half-mask respirators (EHRs) are commonly used by workers for protection against potentially hazardous particles, including engineered nanoparticles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of these types of respirators against 10–400 nm particles using human subjects exposed to NaCl aerosols under simulated workplace activities. Simulated workplace protection factors (SWPFs) were measured for eight combinations of respirator models (2 N95 FFRs, 2 P100 FFRs, 2 N95 EHRs, and 2 P100 EHRs) worn by 25 healthy test subjects (13 females and 12 males) with varying face sizes. Before beginning a SWPF test for a given respirator model, each subject had to pass a quantitative fit test. Each SWPF test was performed using a protocol of six exercises for 3 min each: (i) normal breathing, (ii) deep breathing, (iii) moving head side to side, (iv) moving head up and down, (v) bending at the waist, and (vi) a simulated laboratory-vessel cleaning motion. Two scanning mobility particle sizers were used simultaneously to measure the upstream (outside the respirator) and downstream (inside the respirator) test aerosol; SWPF was then calculated as a ratio of the upstream and downstream particle concentrations. In general, geometric mean SWPF (GM-SWPF) was highest for the P100 EHRs, followed by P100 FFRs, N95 EHRs, and N95 FFRs. This trend holds true for nanoparticles (10–100 nm), larger size particles (100–400 nm), and the ‘all size’ range (10–400 nm). All respirators provided better or similar performance levels for 10–100 nm particles as compared to larger 100–400 nm particles. This study found that class P100 respirators provided higher SWPFs compared to class N95 respirators (P<0.05) for both FFR and EHR types. All respirators provided expected performance (i.e. fifth percentile SWPF > 10) against all particle size ranges tested. PMID:26180261

  19. Jamming/flowing transition of non-Brownian particles suspended in a iso-density fluid flowing in a 2D rectangular duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burel, Maxym; Martin, Sylvain; Bonnefoy, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    We present the results of an experimental study on the jamming/flowing transition. A suspension of neutrally buoyant large particles flows in an horizontal rectangular duct, where an artificial restriction triggers jamming. We show that the avalanche distribution size is exponential, that is memoryless. We further demonstrate that the avalanche size diverges when the restriction size approaches a critical value and that this divergence is well described by a power law. The parameters (critical opening size and divergence velocity) are compared to literature values and show a strong similarity with others systems. Another result of this paper is the study of the influence of the particle morphology. We show that, for a moderate restriction size, the dead-zone formed right upstream of the restriction is larger for angular particles but, paradoxically, that the avalanche size is larger for polyhedra compared to spheres by at least one order of magnitude.

  20. Models and prediction of turbulent flow with suspended particles. Report on the work done by Rouen University in 1984-85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlemont, A.; Desjonqueres, P.; Gouesbet, G.; Julien, B.

    1985-12-01

    The validity of the Stokes term contained in the Tchen equation and the overall validity of the Tchen equation are examined. Criteria are found to decide whether the Stokes contribution is sufficient to describe the main term of the movement of a particle in a turbulent flow. For the overall analysis it is noticed that some forces are not included in the Tchen equation and that the Arnason experimental results indicating the easier dispersion of larger particles should be explained. A Lagrangian approach is adopted and the Scope computer program was developed. Results show that an exponential Lagrangian correlation is not good enough. A correlation using Frenkiel functions is being explored.

  1. Optimizing the deposition of hydrogen evolution sites on suspended semiconductor particles using on-line photocatalytic reforming of aqueous methanol solutions.

    PubMed

    Busser, G Wilma; Mei, Bastian; Muhler, Martin

    2012-11-01

    The deposition of hydrogen evolution sites on photocatalysts is a crucial step in the multistep process of synthesizing a catalyst that is active for overall photocatalytic water splitting. An alternative approach to conventional photodeposition was developed, applying the photocatalytic reforming of aqueous methanol solutions to deposit metal particles on semiconductor materials such as Ga₂O₃ and (Ga₀.₆ Zn₀.₄)(N₀.₆O₀.₄). The method allows optimizing the loading of the co-catalysts based on the stepwise addition of their precursors and the continuous online monitoring of the evolved hydrogen. Moreover, a synergetic effect between different co-catalysts can be directly established.

  2. Composition, size distribution, optical properties and radiative effects of re-suspended local mineral dust of Rome area by individual-particle microanalysis and radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrodangelo, A.; Salzano, R.; Bassani, C.; Pareti, S.; Perrino, C.

    2015-05-01

    New information on the PM10 mineral dust from site-specific (Rome area, Latium) outcropped rocks, and on the microphysics, optical properties and radiative effects of mineral dust at local level were gained in this work. A multi-disciplinary approach was used, based on individual-particle scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy-dispersive microanalysis (SEM XEDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of dust, size distribution of mineral particles, and radiative transfer modelling (RTM).The mineral composition of Rome lithogenic PM10 varies between an end-member dominated by silicate minerals and one exclusively composed of calcite. The first is obtained from volcanic lithotypes, the second from travertine or limestones; lithogenic PM10 with intermediate composition derives mainly from siliciclastic rocks or marlstones of Rome area. Size and mineral species of PM10 particles of silicate-dominated dust types are tuned mainly by weathering and, to lesser extent, by debris formation or crystallization; chemical precipitation of CaCO3 plays a major role in calcite-dominated types. These differences are evidenced by the diversity of volume distributions, within either dust types, or mineral species. Further differences are observed between volume distributions of calcite from travertine (natural source) and from road dust (anthropic source), specifically on the width, shape and enrichment of the fine fraction (unimodal at 5 μm a.d. for travertine, bimodal at 3.8 and 1.8 μm a.d. for road dust). Log-normal probability density functions of volcanics and travertine dusts affect differently the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the asymmetry parameter (g) in the VISible and Near Infrared (NIR) regions, depending also on the absorbing/non-absorbing character of volcanics and travertine, respectively. The downward component of the BOA solar irradiance simulated by RTM for a volcanics-rich or travertine-rich atmosphere shows that volcanics contribution to the solar

  3. Speech and respiration.

    PubMed

    Conrad, B; Schönle, P

    1979-04-12

    This investigation deals with the temporal aspects of air volume changes during speech. Speech respiration differs fundamentally from resting respiration. In resting respiration the duration and velocity of inspiration (air flow or lung volume change) are in a range similar to that of expiration. In speech respiration the duration of inspiration decreases and its velocity increases; conversely, the duration of expiration increases and the volume of air flow decreases dramatically. The following questions arise: are these two respiration types different entities, or do they represent the end points of a continuum from resting to speech respiration? How does articulation without the generation of speech sound affect breathing? Does (verbalized?) thinking without articulation or speech modify the breathing pattern? The main test battery included four tasks (spontaneous speech, reading, serial speech, arithmetic) performed under three conditions (speaking aloud, articulating subvocally, quiet performance by tryping to exclusively 'think' the tasks). Respiratory movements were measured with a chest pneumograph and evaluated in comparison with a phonogram and the identified spoken text. For quiet performance the resulting respiratory time ratio (relation of duration of inspiration versus expiration) showed a gradual shift in the direction of speech respiration--the least for reading, the most for arithmetic. This change was even more apparent for the subvocal tasks. It is concluded that (a) there is a gradual automatic change from resting to speech respiration and (b) the degree of internal verbalization (activation of motor speech areas) defines the degree of activation of the speech respiratory pattern.

  4. Voluntary use of respirators.

    PubMed

    Feiner, Lynn

    2009-11-01

    Allowing voluntary use of respirators can provide workers with an added level of comfort and relief from nuisance levels of particulates, gases, or vapors. But misuse can result in illness or injury to the worker. Understanding and following OSHA's guidelines on voluntary use of respirators is one of the many ways you help provide a safe workplace and ensure your employees stay healthy.

  5. Characterization of inhalable, thoracic, and respirable fractions and ultrafine particle exposure during grinding, brazing, and welding activities in a mechanical engineering factory.

    PubMed

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Leso, Veruscka; Fontana, Luca; Cottica, Danilo; Bergamaschi, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the emission sources of fine and ultrafine particles (UFPs) during brazing, welding, and grinding in a mechanical engineering factory and to characterize UFP exposure by measuring size distributions, number, and surface area concentrations. Samplings lasted 4 hours and were conducted during 5 days using the Grimm 1.109 portable aerosol spectrometer, the Grimm portable NanoCheck™ 1.320, the electrical low pressure impactor, and the nanoparticle aerosol monitor AeroTrak™ 9000. Higher concentrations of fine particles were observed in welding and grinding activities. The highest values of UFP number and alveolar surface area concentrations were detected in the welding booth. Potential emission sources of fine particles and UFPs can be identified by the multifaceted approach outlined in this study. This sampling strategy provides important data on key UFP metrics.

  6. Long-term trends in suspended chlorophyll a and vertical particle flux with respect to changing physical conditions in eastern Fram Strait, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nöthig, Eva-Maria; Bauerfeind, Eduard; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka; Kraft, Angelina; Bracher, Astrid; Cherkasheva, Alexandra; Fahl, Kirsten; Hardge, Kristin; Kaleschke, Lars; Lalande, Catherine; Metfies, Katja; Peeken, Ilka; Klages, Michael; Soltwedel, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The Fram Strait is the main gateway for water, heat, sea ice and plankton exchanges between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic. The abundance and composition of phyto- and zooplankton communities is governed to a large extent by key physical factors such as water temperature, salinity, currents, stratification of the water column and the presence or absence of sea ice. With our study we aim at tracing effects of environmental changes in pelagic system structure and impacts on the fate of organic matter produced in the upper water column in a region that is anticipated to react rapidly to climate change. Chlorophyll a, an indicator of biomass standing stock of phytoplankton, has been measured in the upper 100 m of the water column since 1991 during several summer cruises (with RV 'Polarstern') across Fram Strait. Chlorophyll a measurements are used to validate productivity estimates by remote sensing from space. The quantity and composition of export fluxes of organic matter including biomarker have been measured since 2000 by annually moored sediment traps deployed at 200-300m at the AWI long-term observatory HAUSGARTEN in eastern Fram Strait (79°/4°E). Along with sinking particles, zooplankton (so-called 'swimmers') was also caught in the traps. Analyses of the material collected by the sediment traps allowed us to track seasonal and inter-annual changes in the surface waters at HAUSGARTEN. We present temporal trends in the chlorophyll a distribution (1991-2012), in swimmer composition in the traps (2000-2009), and in the export of biomarker (2000-2008), particulate organic carbon, particulate biogenic silica, calcium carbonate, and the protist composition (2000-2012), in relation to the changing sea ice cover and water temperature. Whereas chlorophyll a (integrated values 0-100m) showed only a slight increase, the swimmer composition and the composition of the annual particle flux changed after a warm water event occurring from 2005-2007. The warm anomaly

  7. Performance of submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) with and without the addition of the different particle sizes of GAC as suspended medium.

    PubMed

    Johir, M A; Shanmuganathan, S; Vigneswaran, S; Kandasamy, J

    2013-08-01

    In this study the effect of different particle sizes of granular activated carbon (GAC) on the performance of a submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) was investigated. The sizes of GAC used were 150-300, 300-600 and 600-1200 μm. The SMBR was operated at a filtration flux of 20 L/m(2)h. The removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) with the addition of GAC was 95%. The concentration of biopolymers, humic, building block and low molecular weight neutral and acids in the SMBR effluent was reduced by 20%, 66-76%, 20-50%, 30-56%, respectively. It helped to reduce the sludge volume index (SVI) and transmembrane pressure (TMP) development by 30-40% and 58%, respectively. However, the removal of NH₄(+) and PO₄(3-) was relatively low of 35-45% and 34-43%, respectively. The SMBR effluent was rich in PO₄(3-) and was removed/recovered using hydrated ferric oxide (HFO). The removal of PO₄(3-) was almost 90%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Seasonal Control of Surface-Water Dissolved Iron Concentrations by Suspended Particle Concentrations on the Northern Gulf of Alaska Continental Shelf and Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crusius, J.; Schroth, A. W.; Campbell, R.; Cullen, J. T.; Dillman, D.; Resing, J.

    2012-12-01

    The continental shelf region of the northern Gulf of Alaska (GoA) supports a productive ecosystem including an important commercial fishery. Downwelling winds during most of the year imply that some mechanism other than upwelling must be supplying the essential nutrients iron and nitrate. Although it is well known that iron limits productivity offshore in the GoA, we have a poor understanding of the controls on Fe supply. Data from cruises from 2010 provide some new insight into the mechanisms of Fe supply. Cruises were carried out along a transect extending from the mouth of the Copper River to ~40 km beyond the shelf break three times per year including early April, early May, and late July. High-resolution surface-water sampling was carried out, as well as bottle casts at 5 stations. High, fairly uniform concentrations of "total dissolvable iron" (TDFe; unfiltered sample acidified to pH=1.7) as well as "dissolved" Fe (dFe) were observed spanning the shelf in April, suggesting sediment resuspension is an important source of dFe to surface waters at that time. By contrast, high dFe and TDFe concentrations in late July coincide with low-salinity surface water, which in this location indicates a glacial meltwater source. Throughout spring and summer high particle concentrations across much of the shelf appear to "buffer" dFe concentrations to ~3 nmol/kg, which are close to those observed by Lippiatt et al (2010) in the region. This is consistent with dFe concentrations being determined by the organic ligand concentrations that, in turn, are fairly constant. In late July, surface water dFe concentrations are ~0.5 nmol/kg on the outer shelf and up to ~50 km further offshore. These dFe concentrations on the outer shelf are much lower in July than earlier in the year, owing to Fe removal by phytoplankton uptake and by scavenging, as well as by the lack of particulate Fe sources to surface waters in July. However, the high surface-water dFe observed ~50 km beyond the

  9. Aerosol penetration through filtering facepieces and respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Lehtimäki, M; Willeke, K

    1992-09-01

    Air-purifying respirators must be certified following the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) filter test criteria (30 CFR 11). The criteria specify a range for the mean particle size and the measure of spread permissible for the test aerosol. The authors' experiments have shown that aerosol penetration as a function of particle size differs considerably among certified respirators of the same type. Filtering facepieces (disposable respirators) and cartridges of the dust-mist, dust-mist-fume, and high-efficiency particulate air type were tested. The respirators were sealed to mannequins in a test chamber. The aerosol concentrations inside and outside the respirator were measured by an aerodynamic particle sizer and a laser aerosol spectrometer over a particle size range of 0.1 to 15 microns. Five flow rates ranging from 5 to 100 L/min were used to study flow dependency. The aerosol penetration through the filters is presented as a function of particle size. Aerosol penetration and pressure drop are combined to express the performance of each filter in terms of "quality factor." Under the same test conditions, the quality factor of one respirator may be as much as 6.6 times more than that of another respirator of the same type. The filter quality factor has a greater aerosol size dependency as airflow and aerosol size increase. In general, cartridges have a larger surface area than filtering facepieces but not necessarily lower filter penetration or higher filter quality.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Tolerance to long-term exposure of suspended benthic sediments and drill cuttings in the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ann I; van Oevelen, Dick; Purser, Autun; Thomsen, Laurenz

    2013-05-15

    The cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa was exposed to suspended particles (<63 μm) for 12 weeks. Skeletal growth was significantly lower under exposure concentrations of ∼25 mg l⁻¹ than ∼5 mg l⁻¹ and there was a trend of lower growth rates when exposed to water-based drill cuttings than to natural benthic sediment. Polyp extension was less in corals exposed to higher material concentrations, which provides a possible explanation for observed skeletal growth differences between particle concentrations. Particle exposure had no significant impact on respiration or proportions of tissue and fatty acids in corals. The volume of additional cleaning mucus released by exposed corals was low and release did not significantly affect coral energy expenditure. Our results indicate that L. pertusa polyps can deal comparatively well with enhanced particle deposition rates and suspended matter concentrations. However, a small pilot experiment indicated that coral larvae might be particularly vulnerable to high particle concentrations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of detached/re-suspended solids from sewer sediment on the sewage phase bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Leung, H D; Chen, G; Sharma, K

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to make an assessment of the effects of the detached/re-suspended solids on the bacterial activity in the sewage phase of a gravity sewer. A physical sewer-model was used to simulate two extreme conditions: sewage flow without the presence of sewer sediment, and filtered sewage flow with the sediment. The first scenario was to evaluate the effect of the settling of solids on the bacterial activity, while the second scenario was to examine the effect of purely re-suspended or detached solids. The water media were aerated to obtain an initial DO level at about 6 mg/L, and the bacterial activity was monitored at a regular time interval during each operation. Two bacterial cell staining techniques, one using 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenyl indole (DAPI), and another using 5-cyano 2, 3-ditoyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC), were employed to measure the amount of total and respiring bacteria, respectively. Both the DAPI and CTC counts decreased with time in the first case, while that increased with time in the second case. The bacterial activity in a sewer phase was observed to be contributed by smaller sized particles. Also, the solids originated from the sewer sediment through re-suspension or detachment demonstrated a higher bacterial activity than the solids originally present in the sewage.

  12. Respiration in Aquatic Insects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, John

    1985-01-01

    This article: (1) explains the respiratory patterns of several freshwater insects; (2) describes the differences and mechanisms of spiracular cutaneous, and gill respiration; and (3) discusses behavioral aspects of selected aquatic insects. (ML)

  13. Respiration in Aquatic Insects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, John

    1985-01-01

    This article: (1) explains the respiratory patterns of several freshwater insects; (2) describes the differences and mechanisms of spiracular cutaneous, and gill respiration; and (3) discusses behavioral aspects of selected aquatic insects. (ML)

  14. Diffusiophoretic Focusing of Suspended Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Nan; Nery-Azevedo, Rodrigo; Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.; Squires, Todd M.

    2016-12-01

    Using a microfluidic system to impose and maintain controlled, steady-state multicomponent p H and electrolyte gradients, we present systems where the diffusiophoretic migration of suspended colloids leads them to focus at a particular position, even in steady-state gradients. We show that naively superpositing effects of each gradient may seem conceptually and qualitatively reasonable, yet is invalid due to the coupled transport of these multicomponent electrolytes. In fact, reformulating the classic theories in terms of the flux of each species (rather than local gradients) reveals rather stringent conditions that are necessary for diffusiophoretic focusing in steady gradients. Either particle surface properties must change as a function of local composition in solution (akin to isoelectric focusing in electrophoresis), or chemical reactions must occur between electrolyte species, for such focusing to be possible. The generality of these findings provides a conceptual picture for understanding, predicting, or designing diffusiophoretic systems.

  15. Performance of dust respirators with facial seal leaks. I. Experimental

    SciTech Connect

    Hinds, W.C.; Kraske, G.

    1987-10-01

    The ability of representative half-mask and single-use respirators with facial seal leaks to provide protection against aerosols was evaluated by experimental measurement. Respirators were mounted on a manikin in a test chamber and operated at seven steady flow rates over the range of 2 to 150 L/min. Samples of polydisperse and monodisperse aerosols were taken from inside and outside the respirator and analyzed by a calibrated optical particle counter over the particle-size range 0.1 to 11.3 ..mu..m. Measurements were made separately for filter performance as a function of particle size and flow rate, and simulated leak performance as a function of particle size, pressure drop, and leak size. Flow rate vs. pressure drop measurements were made for all filters and leaks tested. For a given leak condition the percentage of the total flow traversing the leak varied several fold over the usual range of airflow rates through a respirator. Aerosol penetration was found to depend strongly on particle size and flow rate for filters, and to depend strongly on particle size and less strongly on pressure drop for leaks. One can conclude from these measurements that the aerosol-size distribution inside a respirator will nearly always be significantly different from that outside the respirator.

  16. The transport of 'suspended' sediment by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Anthony; Cooper, James; Wainwright, John; Sekiguichi, Tomohiro

    2013-04-01

    Coherent turbulent flow structures, such as eddy-like, macro-turbulent structures and smaller scale bursting events, cause a two-way vertical exchange of momentum between the sediment bed and the water surface. Thus movement of suspended particles in open channel flows has a strong correlation with the advection and propagation of these turbulent flow structures, controlling entrainment , travel and deposition. Consequently, there is an argument in favour of the view that suspended sediment merely travels in suspension, but that its distance of travel is finite, and that between periods of travel it is at rest on the bed of the river. To test his hypothesis we added 25 kg of fluorescent sand, fine enough to be transported in suspension, into a steady flow discharge of 0.95 cumecs in the 160-m-long flume at Tsukuba University. After the flow event, a few grains of the sand were identified less than 5 m from the point of introduction and progressively (but irregularly) more downflume. Although our results are both limited and preliminary due to the nature of the existing flume, they clearly show that suspended sediment has a virtual velocity that is less than that of the flow in which the sediment is suspended. For the sediment-size range and flow velocity used in our experiment this virtual velocity is of the order of 50% of the water velocity.

  17. Suspended sediment transport under estuarine tidal channel conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sternberg, R.W.; Kranck, K.; Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A modified version of the GEOPROBE tripod has been used to monitor flow conditions and suspended sediment distribution in the bottom boundary layer of a tidal channel within San Francisco Bay, California. Measurements were made every 15 minutes over three successive tidal cycles. They included mean velocity profiles from four electromagnetic current meters within 1 m of the seabed; mean suspended sediment concentration profiles from seven miniature nephelometers operated within 1 m of the seabed; near-bottom pressure fluctuations; vertical temperature gradient; and bottom photographs. Additionally, suspended sediment was sampled from four levels within 1 m of the seabed three times during each successive flood and ebb cycle. While the instrument was deployed, STD-nephelometer measurements were made throughout the water column, water samples were collected each 1-2 hours, and bottom sediment was sampled at the deployment site. From these measurements, estimates were made of particle settling velocity (ws) from size distributions of the suspended sediment, friction velocity (U*) from the velocity profiles, and reference concentration (Ca) was measured at z = 20 cm. These parameters were used in the suspended sediment distribution equations to evaluate their ability to predict the observed suspended sediment profiles. Three suspended sediment particle conditions were evaluated: (1) individual particle size in the 4-11 ?? (62.5-0.5 ??m) range with the reference concentration Ca at z = 20 cm (C??), (2) individual particle size in the 4-6 ?? size range, flocs representing the 7-11 ?? size range with the reference concentration Ca at z = 20 cm (Cf), and (3) individual particle size in the 4-6 ?? size range, flocs representing the 7-11 ?? size range with the reference concentration predicted as a function of the bed sediment size distribution and the square of the excess shear stress. In addition, computations of particle flux were made in order to show vertical variations

  18. Suspended sediment in Trail Creek at Michigan City, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crawford, Charles G.; Jacques, David V.

    1992-01-01

    Trail Creek is a small (54.1-square-mile drainage area) tributary of Lake Michigan located in northwestern Indiana. A harbor at the mouth of the stream has experienced excessive sediment deposition. A study was done to investigate the suspended-sediment characteristics of Trail Creek. The study included analysis of suspended-sediment concentration and particle-size data, and estimates of annual suspended-sediment load. Suspended-sediment concentrations ranged from only a few milligrams per liter at low flows to about 300 milligrams per liter at high flows. At low flows, the suspended sediment was mostly silt- and clay-sized material (less than 0.062 millimeter). The percentage of silt- and clay-sized material gradually decreased to about 50 percent of the suspended sediment at high flows. Estimates of the annual suspended-sediment load for the 1981-90 water years were calculated by the flow-duration, rating-curve method. Annual loads ranged from 3,690 to 8,250 tons. The average annual load for the 10-year period was 6,180 tons. Annual suspended-sediment yield (load per unit drainage area) averaged 114 tons per square mile; this value is within the range of values from 14 other previously investigated streams in northern Indiana. Average annual yields of these 14 streams ranged from 11 to 152 tons per square mile; the median annual yield was 56 tons per square mile.

  19. Pulmonary toxicology of respirable particles. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Cross, F.T.; Dagle, G.E.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1980-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 44 papers presented in these proceedings. The last paper (Stannard) in the proceedings is an historical review of the field of inhalation toxicology and is not included in the analytics. (DS)

  20. Inclusions in freely suspended smectic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stannarius, Ralf; Harth, Kirsten

    Smectic liquid crystal phases have a unique property: Like soap solutions, they can form stable freely suspended films. Their aspect ratios can be larger than one million to one. Such films can serve as models for two-dimensional (2D) uids, with or without in-plane anisotropy. Solid or liquid inclusions trapped in these films by capillary forces can move in the film plane and interact with other inclusions, with film thickness gradients or the film boundaries, and even with the local orientation field. We describe preparation techniques to incorporate particles or droplets in thin smectic films, and optical observation methods. Several aspects make inclusions in freely suspended films interesting research objects: They provide rich information on capillary forces as well as surface and interfacial tensions, they can serve as platforms for hydrodynamic studies in 2D, and they may help to understand coalescence dynamics at the transition from 2D to 3D...

  1. [Suspended particulates and lung health].

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Manfred; Moshammer, Hanns

    2004-01-01

    Based on several severe air pollution episodes, a temporal correlation between high concentrations of particulate matter (PM) and SO2 pollution and acute increases in respiratory and cardiopulmonary mortality had been established in Vienna for the 1970's. After air pollution had decreased in Austria in the 1980's--as documented by data on SO2, and total suspended particles (TSP)--no such associations between day-to-day changes of SO2 and TSP and mortality have been documented any more, however, traffic related pollutants like fine particles and NO2 remained a problem. Therefore, short term effects of PM on lung function, morbidity and mortality were investigated in Vienna, Linz, Graz and a rural control area. Long-term exposure and chronic disease--even more important for public health--were studied in repeated cross-sectional, a mixed longitudinal and a birth cohort study on school children in the city of Linz. Lung function growth was found impaired from long-term exposure to air pollutants and improved in districts where ambient air pollution had decreased. Where only TSP and SO2 had decreased, no continuous improvement of small airway function was found and end-expiratory flow rates stayed impaired where NO2-reduction from technical improvements of cars and industry was counterbalanced by increase of motorized (diesel) traffic. Remaining acute effects of ambient air pollution in 2001 from PM, NO2 and co-pollutants found in a time series study also show that continuing efforts are necessary. Active surface of particles inhaled several hours to days before spirometry was found related to short-term reductions in forced vital capacity-FVC (p<0.01), forced expiratory volume in one second-FEV1 (p<0.01) and maximal expiratory flow rate at 50% of vital capacity-MEF50 (p<0.05). In pupils with asthma or previous airway obstruction 4-week-diaries proved that the following symptoms increased with acute exposure to higher active surface of particles: wheezing (p<0

  2. Dispersive suspended microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Yu; Lu, Yue-Le; Wu, Tong; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Dong-Hui

    2011-11-14

    A novel sample pre-treatment technique termed dispersive suspended microextraction (DSME) coupled with gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) has been developed for the determination of eight organophosphorus pesticides (ethoprophos, malathion, chlorpyrifos, isocarbophos, methidathion, fenamiphos, profenofos, triazophos) in aqueous samples. In this method, both extraction and two phases' separation process were performed by the assistance of magnetic stirring. After separating the two phases, 1 μL of the suspended phase was injected into GC for further instrument analysis. Varieties of experiment factors which could affect the experiment results were optimized and the following were selected: 12.0 μL p-xylene was selected as extraction solvent, extraction speed was 1200 rpm, extraction time was 30 s, the restoration speed was 800 rpm, the restoration time was 8 min, and no salt was added. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detections (LODs) varied between 0.01 and 0.05 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSDs, n=6) ranged from 4.6% to 12.1%. The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 0.1-100.0 μg L(-1). Correlation coefficients (r) varied from 0.9964 to 0.9995. The enrichment factors (EFs) were between 206 and 243. In the final experiment, the developed method has been successfully applied to the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in wine and tap water samples and the obtained recoveries were between 83.8% and 101.3%. Compared with other pre-treatment methods, DSME has its own features and could achieve satisfied results for the analysis of trace components in complicated matrices.

  3. Efficiency of Respirator Filter Media against Diesel Particulate Matter: A Comparison Study Using Two Diesel Particulate Sources.

    PubMed

    Burton, Kerrie A; Whitelaw, Jane L; Jones, Alison L; Davies, Brian

    2016-07-01

    Diesel engines have been a mainstay within many industries since the early 1900s. Exposure to diesel particulate matter (DPM) is a major issue in many industrial workplaces given the potential for serious health impacts to exposed workers; including the potential for lung cancer and adverse irritant and cardiovascular effects. Personal respiratory protective devices are an accepted safety measure to mitigate worker exposure against the potentially damaging health impacts of DPM. To be protective, they need to act as effective filters against carbon and other particulates. In Australia, the filtering efficiency of respiratory protective devices is determined by challenging test filter media with aerosolised sodium chloride to determine penetration at designated flow rates. The methodology outlined in AS/NZS1716 (Standards Australia International Ltd and Standards New Zealand 2012. Respiratory protective devices. Sydney/Wellington: SAI Global Limited/Standards New Zealand) does not account for the differences between characteristics of workplace contaminants like DPM and sodium chloride such as structure, composition, and particle size. This study examined filtering efficiency for three commonly used AS/NZS certified respirator filter models, challenging them with two types of diesel emissions; those from a diesel generator and a diesel engine. Penetration through the filter media of elemental carbon (EC), total carbon (TC), and total suspended particulate (TSP) was calculated. Results indicate that filtering efficiency assumed by P2 certification in Australia was achieved for two of the three respirator models for DPM generated using the small diesel generator, whilst when the larger diesel engine was used, filtering efficiency requirements were met for all three filter models. These results suggest that the testing methodology specified for certification of personal respiratory protective devices by Standards Australia may not ensure adequate protection for

  4. Physical properties of suspended dust in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Olafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Olafur; Skrabalova, Lenka; Sigurdardottir, Gudmunda; Branis, Martin; Hladil, Jindrich; Chadimova, Leona; Skala, Roman; Navratil, Tomas; Menar, Sibylle von Lowis of; Thorsteinsson, Throstur

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric Dust Measurements (ADMI 2013) of one of the most active dust sources in Iceland (Mælifellsandur) were conducted during season with high precipitation on August 8th-18th, 2013. We measured mass concentrations (PM2.5 and PM10), particle size distributions in size range 0.3-10μm and number concentrations during rather small dust event. Dust samples of the event were analyzed (morpho-textural observations, optical and scanning-electron microscopy). Two TSI 8520 DustTrak Aerosol Monitors (light-scattering laser photometers that measure aerosol mass concentrations in range 0.001 to 100 mg/m3) and one TSI Optical Particle Sizer (OPS) 3330 (optical scattering from single particle up to 16 different channels - 0.3 to 10 μm - measuring particle size distribution) were used. We measured a dust event which occurred during wet and low wind/windless conditions as result of surface heating in August 2013. Maximum particle number concentration (PM~0.3-10 µm) reached 149954 particles cm-3 min-1 while mass concentration (PM<10 µm) was 1757 µg m-3 min-1. Suspended dust was very fine with the highest number of particles in size range 0.3-0.337 µm, followed by particles 1.5-5 µm in diameter. Close-to-ultrafine particle size distributions showed a significant increase in number with the severity of the dust event. Number concentrations were well correlated with mass concentrations. The mineralogy and geochemical compositions showed that glaciogenic dust contains sharp-tipped shards with bubbles and 80 % of the particulate matter is volcanic glass rich in heavy metals. Wet dust particles were mobilized within < 4 hours. Here we introduced a comprehensive study on physical properties of the Icelandic dust aerosol and the first scientific study of particle size distributions in an Icelandic dust event including findings on initiation of dust suspension.

  5. Suspended graphene variable capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AbdelGhany, M.; Mahvash, F.; Mukhopadhyay, M.; Favron, A.; Martel, R.; Siaj, M.; Szkopek, T.

    2016-12-01

    Electromechanical variable capacitors, or varactors, find a wide range of applications including sensing applications and the tuning of electrical circuit resonance. We demonstrate a nano-electromechanical graphene varactor, a variable capacitor wherein the capacitance is tuned by voltage controlled deflection of a dense array of suspended graphene membranes. The low flexural rigidity of graphene monolayers is exploited to achieve low actuation voltage and high tunable capacitance density in an ultra-thin structure. Large arrays comprising thousands of suspensions were fabricated to give a tunable capacitance of over 10 pF mm-2. This capacitance density suggests that graphene offers a potential solution to the challenge of reducing the size of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). A capacitance tuning of 55% was achieved with a 10 V actuating voltage, exceeding the 50% tuning limit of Hookean parallel plate pull-in without the use of complex mechanical schemes that occupy substrate area. Capacitor behavior was investigated experimentally, and described by a simple theoretical model. Mechanical properties of the graphene membranes were measured independently using atomic force microscopy. We present a comparison of state-of-the-art MEMS and graphene varactors. The quality factor of graphene varactors is limited by graphene sheet resistance, pull-in voltage can be improved with more aggressive scaling, while the power handling and cycling stability of graphene varactors remains unknown.

  6. Evaluating turbidity and suspended-sediment concentration relations from the North Fork Toutle River basin near Mount St. Helens, Washington; annual, seasonal, event, and particle size variations - a preliminary analysis.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uhrich, Mark A.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Mosbrucker, Adam; Christianson, Tami

    2015-01-01

    Regression of in-stream turbidity with concurrent sample-based suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) has become an accepted method for producing unit-value time series of inferred SSC (Rasmussen et al., 2009). Turbidity-SSC regression models are increasingly used to generate suspended-sediment records for Pacific Northwest rivers (e.g., Curran et al., 2014; Schenk and Bragg, 2014; Uhrich and Bragg, 2003). Recent work developing turbidity-SSC models for the North Fork Toutle River in Southwest Washington (Uhrich et al., 2014), as well as other studies (Landers and Sturm, 2013, Merten et al., 2014), suggests that models derived from annual or greater datasets may not adequately reflect shorter term changes in turbidity-SSC relations, warranting closer inspection of such relations. In-stream turbidity measurements and suspended-sediment samples have been collected from the North Fork Toutle River since 2010. The study site, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgage 14240525 near Kid Valley, Washington, is 13 river km downstream of the debris avalanche emplaced by the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (Lipman and Mullineaux, 1981), and 2 river km downstream of the large sediment retention structure (SRS) built from 1987–1989 to mitigate the associated sediment hazard. The debris avalanche extends roughly 25 km down valley from the edifice of the volcano and is the primary source of suspended sediment moving past the streamgage (NF Toutle-SRS). Other significant sources are debris flow events and sand deposits upstream of the SRS, which are periodically remobilized and transported downstream. Also, finer material often is derived from the clay-rich original debris avalanche deposit, while coarser material can derive from areas such as fluvially reworked terraces.

  7. REGULATORY MECHANISMS OF CELLULAR RESPIRATION

    PubMed Central

    Barron, E. S. Guzman; Nelson, Leonard; Ardao, Maria Isabel

    1948-01-01

    Oxidizing agents of sulfhydryl groups such as iodosobenzoate, alkylating agents such as iodoacetamide, and mercaptide-forming agents such as cadmium chloride, mercuric chloride, p-chloromercuribenzoate, sodium arsenite, and p-carboxyphenylarsine oxide, added in small concentrations to a suspension of sea urchin sperm produced an increase in respiration. When the concentration was increased there was an inhibition. These effects are explained by postulating the presence in the cells of two kinds of sulfhydryl groups: soluble sulfhydryl groups, which regulate cellular respiration, and fixed sulfhydryl groups, present in the protein moiety of enzymes. Small concentrations of sulfhydryl reagents combine only with the first, thus producing an increase in respiration; when the concentration is increased, the fixed sulfhydryl groups are also attacked and inhibition of respiration is the consequence. Other inhibitors of cell respiration, such as cyanide and urethanes, which do not combine with —SH groups, did not stimulate respiration in small concentration. PMID:18891144

  8. particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

    2014-05-01

    We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

  9. 7 CFR 1206.21 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.21 Suspend. Suspend means...

  10. 7 CFR 1206.21 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.21 Suspend. Suspend means...

  11. 7 CFR 1206.21 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.21 Suspend. Suspend means...

  12. 7 CFR 1206.21 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.21 Suspend. Suspend means...

  13. 7 CFR 1206.21 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.21 Suspend. Suspend means...

  14. 7 CFR 1216.27 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.27 Suspend. Suspend...

  15. 7 CFR 1216.27 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.27 Suspend. Suspend...

  16. 7 CFR 1216.27 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.27 Suspend. Suspend...

  17. 7 CFR 1216.27 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.27 Suspend. Suspend...

  18. Suspended sediment fluxes in the Humber catchment, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wass, Paul D.; Leeks, Graham J. L.

    1999-05-01

    An extensive sediment monitoring network was established within the LOIS programme, involving 10 of the main tributaries of the River Humber (UK). Its primary purpose was to measure the flux of suspended sediment to the estuary. A turbidity monitoring system was developed to provide a continuous record of suspended sediment concentration in the rivers, from which the fluxes were calculated. Linear relationships were established between suspended sediment concentration and turbidity (with slopes varying from 0·89 to 1·69) to enable the conversion of nephelometric turbidity [NTU] to suspended sediment concentration [mg l-1]. Potential uncertainties were identified and quantified. The suspended sediment flux to the Humber (November 1994-October 1997) was calculated to be 699 861 t, equivalent to a yield of 15 t km-2 yr-1. Large temporal and spatial variations in the flux were measured during the monitoring period, in response to factors such as climate, land use, catchment scale, deposition and reservoir trapment. The particle size composition of the suspended sediment was measured and found to vary little, except at very high discharges, when it coarsened. The organic content of the sediment was found to be directly related to the discharge of sewage effluent to the rivers.

  19. Acoustic measuring techniques for suspended sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, P.; Felix, D.; Storti, G.; Lattuada, M.; Fleckenstein, P.; Deschwanden, F.

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic signals can be used in various ways for suspended sediment monitoring. One possibility which lends itself particularly well in the context of hydropower plants (HPPs), is to use installations for acoustic discharge measurement (ADM). Such installations already exist at waterways of many HPPs. Similar to certain turbidimeters, the attenuation of the forward scattered signal travelling through the water-sediment mixture is correlated with suspended sediment concentration (SSC). This correlation can be based on reference SSCs, e.g. from gravimetric analyses of bottle samples. Without the need of additional sensors and practically maintenance-free, this method is used successfully in the HPP Fieschertal to warn the HPP operator of high SSC to prevent excessive turbine abrasion. Acoustic methods and systems that allow for estimating both SSC and particle size distribution (PSD) are under development. The simultaneous determination of SSC and PSD is not possible using a single frequency. Therefore, multi-frequency approaches are investigated for generally scattered signals. When backscattered signals are used, a stronger frequency dependency can be exploited. However, the reliable simultaneous determination of particle size (and distribution) and concentration is still a major challenge due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and an ill- posed problem of estimating concentration and size from recorded signals. The optimal setup configuration (angles, frequencies) for such a system is not unique and further investigations are recommended.

  20. Measuring runoff-suspended solids using an improved turbidometer method.

    PubMed

    Ginting, Daniel; Mamo, Martha

    2006-01-01

    Differences in particle size distribution between runoff standards and unknown samples affect the accuracy of estimation of total suspended solids (TSS) concentration using the nephelometric turbidity (NTU) method. The objective was to quantify the effects of a sucrose solution as suspending medium and contrasting particle size distribution on nephelometric turbidity and accuracy of TSS estimation. Nineteen benchmark soils varying in texture and color were divided into particle size distribution of <250 and <2000 microm. Soils from these two aggregate classes were then made into suspension ranging from 0.2 to 15 g L-1 using distilled deionized water. Runoff suspensions ranging from 0.2 to 21 g L-1 were also collected from different watersheds. Turbidity of soil and runoff suspensions was measured in sucrose solution and in distilled deionized water. The sucrose solution density ranged from 1.10 to 1.30 kg L-1. Increasing sucrose solution density decreased turbidity. The TSS concentration was most sensitive to changes in turbidity with the 1.30 kg L-1 sucrose solution. Using the 1.30 kg L-1 sucrose solution, particle size bias and error of TSS estimates were decreased by at least 20% compared to distilled deionized water. Reduction in refraction index differences between the suspended particles and sucrose solution combined with reduced particle settling and reduced Brownian motion resulted in dampening the effects of particle size distribution. We propose a sucrose solution of 1.30 kg L-1 as a better suspending medium to dampen the effect of particle size distribution and thus improve suspension TSS concentration estimation.

  1. Hybrid respiration-signal conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinard, G. A.; Steffen, D. A.; Sturm, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Hybrid impedance-pneumograph and respiration-rate signal conditioner element of hand-held vital signs monitor measures changes in impedance of chest during breathing cycle and generates analog respiration signal as output along with synchronous square wave that can be monitored by breath-rate processor.

  2. Inhibition of mouse liver respiration by Chelidonium majus isoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Barreto, M Carmo; Pinto, Ruy E; Arrabaça, João D; Pavão, M Leonor

    2003-12-15

    The alkaloids from Chelidonium majus L. which had a significant inhibitory effect in mitochondrial respiration were those which contain a positive charge due to a quaternary nitrogen atom, i.e., chelerythrine, sanguinarine, berberine and coptisine, both with malate+glutamate or with succinate as substrates. When malate+glutamate was used as substrate, chelerythrine and berberine, which contain methoxy groups, were particularly more active, since they had a strong effect even at low concentrations. In submitochondrial particles, berberine and coptisine had a marked inhibitory effect on NADH dehydrogenase activity but practically no effect on succinate dehydrogenase activity, whereas chelerythrine and sanguinarine inhibited more strongly succinate dehydrogenase than NADH dehydrogenase, which is in agreement with the results found for mitochondrial respiration. Protopine and allocryptopine, which did not inhibit mitochondrial respiration, strongly inhibited NADH dehydrogenase in submitochondrial particles, but had no effect on succinate dehydrogenase activity.

  3. Pulmonary epithelial response in the rat lung to instilled Montserrat respirable dusts and their major mineral components

    PubMed Central

    Housley, D; Berube, K; Jones, T; Anderson, S; Pooley, F; Richards, R

    2002-01-01

    Background: The Soufriere Hills, a stratovolcano on Montserrat, started erupting in July 1995, producing volcanic ash, both from dome collapse pyroclastic flows and phreatic explosions. The eruptions/ash resuspension result in high concentrations of suspended particulate matter in the atmosphere, which includes cristobalite, a mineral implicated in respiratory disorders. Aims: To conduct toxicological studies on characterised samples of ash, together with major components of the dust mixture (anorthite, cristobalite), and a bioreactive mineral control (DQ12 quartz). Methods: Rats were challenged with a single mass (1 mg) dose of particles via intratracheal instillation and groups sacrificed at one, three, and nine weeks. Acute bioreactivity of the particles was assessed by increases in lung permeability and inflammation, changes in epithelial cell markers, and increase in the size of bronchothoracic lymph nodes. Results: Data indicated that respirable ash derived from pyroclastic flows (20.1% cristobalite) or phreatic explosion (8.6% cristobalite) had minimal bioreactivity in the lung. Anorthite showed low bioreactivity, in contrast to pure cristobalite, which showed progressive increases in lung damage. Conclusion: Results suggests that either the percentage mass of cristobalite particles present in Montserrat ash was not sufficient as a catalyst in the lung environment, or its surface reactivity was masked by the non-reactive volcanic glass components during the process of ash formation. PMID:12107295

  4. Effects of Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation (UVGI) on N95 Respirator Filtration Performance and Structural Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Lindsley, William G.; Martin, Stephen B.; Thewlis, Robert E.; Sarkisian, Khachatur; Nwoko, Julian O.; Mead, Kenneth R.; Noti, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to disinfect and reuse disposable N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) may be needed during a pandemic of an infectious respiratory disease such as influenza. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) is one possible method for respirator disinfection. However, UV radiation degrades polymers, which presents the possibility that UVGI exposure could degrade the ability of a disposable respirator to protect the worker. To study this, we exposed both sides of material coupons and respirator straps from four models of N95 FFRs to UVGI doses from 120–950 J/cm2. We then tested the particle penetration, flow resistance, and bursting strengths of the individual respirator coupon layers, and the breaking strength of the respirator straps. We found that UVGI exposure led to a small increase in particle penetration (up to 1.25%) and had little effect on the flow resistance. UVGI exposure had a more pronounced effect on the strengths of the respirator materials. At the higher UVGI doses, the strength of the layers of respirator material was substantially reduced (in some cases, by >90%). The changes in the strengths of the respirator materials varied considerably among the different models of respirators. UVGI had less of an effect on the respirator straps; a dose of 2360 J/cm2 reduced the breaking strength of the straps by 20–51%. Our results suggest that UVGI could be used to effectively disinfect disposable respirators for reuse, but the maximum number of disinfection cycles will be limited by the respirator model and the UVGI dose required to inactivate the pathogen. PMID:25806411

  5. Effects of Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation (UVGI) on N95 Respirator Filtration Performance and Structural Integrity.

    PubMed

    Lindsley, William G; Martin, Stephen B; Thewlis, Robert E; Sarkisian, Khachatur; Nwoko, Julian O; Mead, Kenneth R; Noti, John D

    2015-01-01

    The ability to disinfect and reuse disposable N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) may be needed during a pandemic of an infectious respiratory disease such as influenza. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) is one possible method for respirator disinfection. However, UV radiation degrades polymers, which presents the possibility that UVGI exposure could degrade the ability of a disposable respirator to protect the worker. To study this, we exposed both sides of material coupons and respirator straps from four models of N95 FFRs to UVGI doses from 120-950 J/cm(2). We then tested the particle penetration, flow resistance, and bursting strengths of the individual respirator coupon layers, and the breaking strength of the respirator straps. We found that UVGI exposure led to a small increase in particle penetration (up to 1.25%) and had little effect on the flow resistance. UVGI exposure had a more pronounced effect on the strengths of the respirator materials. At the higher UVGI doses, the strength of the layers of respirator material was substantially reduced (in some cases, by >90%). The changes in the strengths of the respirator materials varied considerably among the different models of respirators. UVGI had less of an effect on the respirator straps; a dose of 2360 J/cm(2) reduced the breaking strength of the straps by 20-51%. Our results suggest that UVGI could be used to effectively disinfect disposable respirators for reuse, but the maximum number of disinfection cycles will be limited by the respirator model and the UVGI dose required to inactivate the pathogen.

  6. Respirators, internal dose, and Oyster Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Michal, R.

    1996-06-01

    This article looks at the experience of Oyster Creek in relaxing the requirements for the use of respirators in all facets of plant maintenance, on the overall dose received by plant maintenance personnel. For Roger Shaw, director of radiological controls for three years at GPU Nuclear Corporation`s Oyster Creek nuclear plant the correct dose balance is determined on a job-by-job basis: Does the job require a respirator, which is an effective means of decreasing worker inhalation of airborne radioactive particles? Will wearing a respirator slow down a worker, consequently increasing whole body radiation exposure by prolonging the time spent in fields of high external radiation? How does respiratory protection affect worker safety and to what degree? While changes to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s 10CFR20 have updated the radiation protection requirements for the nuclear industry, certain of the revisions have been directed specifically at reducing worker dose, Shaw said. {open_quotes}It basically delineates that dose is dose,{close_quotes} Shaw said, {open_quotes}regardless of whether it is acquired externally or internally.{close_quotes} The revision of Part 20 changed the industry`s attitude toward internal dose, which had always been viewed negatively. {open_quotes}Internal dose was always seen as preventable by wearing respirators and by using engineering techniques such as ventilation control and decontamination,{close_quotes} Shaw said, {open_quotes}whereas external dose, although reduced where practical, was seen as a fact of the job.{close_quotes}

  7. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; ...

    2016-04-13

    Dependence on the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. We systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Moreover, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquidmore » interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle.« less

  8. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; Dujardin, Erik; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Checco, Antonio

    2016-04-13

    Dependence on the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. We systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Moreover, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquid interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle.

  9. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    PubMed Central

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; Dujardin, Erik; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Checco, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. Here, we systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Further, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquid interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle. PMID:27072195

  10. Respiration in the open ocean.

    PubMed

    del Giorgio, Paul A; Duarte, Carlos M

    2002-11-28

    A key question when trying to understand the global carbon cycle is whether the oceans are net sources or sinks of carbon. This will depend on the production of organic matter relative to the decomposition due to biological respiration. Estimates of respiration are available for the top layers, the mesopelagic layer, and the abyssal waters and sediments of various ocean regions. Although the total open ocean respiration is uncertain, it is probably substantially greater than most current estimates of particulate organic matter production. Nevertheless, whether the biota act as a net source or sink of carbon remains an open question.

  11. Production and turnover of suspended organic detritus in the coastal water of the southeastern continental shelf. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1984-12-01

    Data processing from the GABEX II study of 1981 have been completed, and manuscripts are nearing completion at this time. In April, 1985, we will participate in the study of removal of coastal water from the continental shelf (SPREX). Our role will be to follow the movement and degradation of particulate organic matter as it is transported across the shelf by wind-driven mixing events. Total suspended C and N will be measured, as well as production of bacteria and numbers of bacteria and protozoa. In preparation from SPREX, we are developing a sensitive method for measuring microbial respiration in the water. Beginning in the summer of 1985, we will participate in a series of studies of the biological processes in the coastal water off the coast of Georgia (BIOTRANS). In preparation for that we are developing a system for following production and degradation of particles in a large water sample under laboratory conditions. This will, of course, be supplemented by field observations. To evaluate the suspension of particulate matter of benthic origin we are constructing an annular flume in which box cores of bottom sediment will be inserted to measure the shear stress necessary to resuspend naturally produced materials. We are continuing field and laboratory studies of the roles of bacteria in the production, as well as the utilization of particulate organic materials. The production of macroflocs has been shown by us to involve the adherence of bacteria to particles and to each other. The macroflocs do not develop in sterile conditions.

  12. Workplace performance of a loose-fitting powered air purifying respirator during nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivisto, Antti J.; Aromaa, Mikko; Koponen, Ismo K.; Fransman, Wouter; Jensen, Keld A.; Mäkelä, Jyrki M.; Hämeri, Kaarle J.

    2015-04-01

    Nanoparticle (particles with diameter ≤100 nm) exposure is recognized as a potentially harmful size fraction for pulmonary particle exposure. During nanoparticle synthesis, the number concentrations in the process room may exceed 10 × 106 cm-3. During such conditions, it is essential that the occupants in the room wear highly reliable high-performance respirators to prevent inhalation exposure. Here we have studied the in-use program protection factor (PPF) of loose-fitting powered air purifying respirators, while workers were coating components with TiO2 or Cu x O y nanoparticles under a hood using a liquid flame spray process. The PPF was measured using condensation particle counters, an electrical low pressure impactor, and diffusion chargers. The room particle concentrations varied from 4 × 106 to 40 × 106 cm-3, and the count median aerodynamic diameter ranged from 32 to 180 nm. Concentrations inside the respirator varied from 0.7 to 7.2 cm-3. However, on average, tidal breathing was assumed to increase the respirator concentration by 2.3 cm-3. The derived PPF exceeded 1.1 × 106, which is more than 40 × 103 times the respirator assigned protection factor. We were unable to measure clear differences in the PPF of respirators with old and new filters, among two male and one female user, or assess most penetrating particle size. This study shows that the loose-fitting powered air purifying respirator provides very efficient protection against nanoparticle inhalation exposure if used properly.

  13. Suspended animation for delayed resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, R; Safar, P; Tisherman, S A; Basford, R; Bruttig, S P; Capone, A; Dubick, M A; Ernster, L; Hattler, B G; Hochachka, P; Klain, M; Kochanek, P M; Kofke, W A; Lancaster, J R; McGowan, F X; Oeltgen, P R; Severinghaus, J W; Taylor, M J; Zar, H

    1996-02-01

    Suspended animation is defined as the therapeutic induction of a state of tolerance to temporary complete systemic ischemia, i.w., protection-preservation of the whole organism during prolonged circulatory arrest ( > or = 1 hr), followed by resuscitation to survival without brain damage. The objectives of suspended animation include: a) helping to save victims of temporarily uncontrollable (internal) traumatic (e.g., combat casualties) or nontraumatic (e.g., ruptured aortic aneurysm) exsanguination, without severe brain trauma, by enabling evacuation and resuscitative surgery during circulatory arrest, followed by delayed resuscitation; b) helping to save some nontraumatic cases of sudden death, seemingly unresuscitable before definite repair; and c) enabling selected (elective) surgical procedures to be performed which are only feasible during a state of no blood flow. In the discussion session, investigators with suspended animation-relevant research interests brainstorm on present knowledge, future research potentials, and the advisability of a major research effort concerning this subject. The following topics are addressed: the epidemiologic facts of sudden death in combat casualties, which require a totally new resuscitative approach; the limits and potentials of reanimation research; complete reversibility of circulatory arrest of 1 hr in dogs under profound hypothermia ( < 10 degrees C), induced and reversed by portable cardiopulmonary bypass; the need for a still elusive pharmacologic or chemical induction of suspended animation in the field; asanguinous profound hypothermic low-flow with cardiopulmonary bypass; electric anesthesia; opiate therapy; lessons learned by hypoxia tolerant vertebrate animals, hibernators, and freeze-tolerant animals (cryobiology); myocardial preservation during open-heart surgery; organ preservation for transplantation; and reperfusion-reoxygenation injury in vital organs, including the roles of nitric oxide and free radicals

  14. Magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocking, G.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly (MSRWA) is the product of a development effort funded by the Air Force Materials Laboratory (AFML) at Wright Patterson AFB. The specific objective of the project was to establish the manufacturing processes for samarium cobalt magnets and demonstrate their use in a space application. The development was successful on both counts. The application portion of the program, which involves the magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly, is emphasized. The requirements for the reaction wheel were based on the bias wheel requirements of the DSP satellite. The tasks included the design, fabrication, and test of the unit to the DSP program qualification requirements.

  15. Electromechanically Tunable Suspended Optical Nanoantenna.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Razinskas, Gary; Feichtner, Thorsten; Grossmann, Swen; Christiansen, Silke; Hecht, Bert

    2016-04-13

    Coupling mechanical degrees of freedom with plasmonic resonances has potential applications in optomechanics, sensing, and active plasmonics. Here we demonstrate a suspended two-wire plasmonic nanoantenna acting like a nanoelectrometer. The antenna wires are supported and electrically connected via thin leads without disturbing the antenna resonance. As a voltage is applied, equal charges are induced on both antenna wires. The resulting equilibrium between the repulsive Coulomb force and the restoring elastic bending force enables us to precisely control the gap size. As a result the resonance wavelength and the field enhancement of the suspended optical nanoantenna can be reversibly tuned. Our experiments highlight the potential to realize large bandwidth optical nanoelectromechanical systems.

  16. From breathing to respiration.

    PubMed

    Fitting, Jean-William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of breathing remained an enigma for a long time. The Hippocratic school described breathing patterns but did not associate breathing with the lungs. Empedocles and Plato postulated that breathing was linked to the passage of air through pores of the skin. This was refuted by Aristotle who believed that the role of breathing was to cool the heart. In Alexandria, breakthroughs were accomplished in the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Later, Galen proposed an accurate description of the respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing. However, his heart-lung model was hampered by the traditional view of two non-communicating vascular systems - veins and arteries. After a period of stagnation in the Middle Ages, knowledge progressed with the discovery of pulmonary circulation. The comprehension of the purpose of breathing progressed by steps thanks to Boyle and Mayow among others, and culminated with the contribution of Priestley and the discovery of oxygen by Lavoisier. Only then was breathing recognized as fulfilling the purpose of respiration, or gas exchange. A century later, a controversy emerged concerning the active or passive transfer of oxygen from alveoli to the blood. August and Marie Krogh settled the dispute, showing that passive diffusion was sufficient to meet the oxygen needs.

  17. Respiration in spiders (Araneae).

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Anke

    2016-05-01

    Spiders (Araneae) are unique regarding their respiratory system: they are the only animal group that breathe simultaneously with lungs and tracheae. Looking at the physiology of respiration the existence of tracheae plays an important role in spiders with a well-developed tracheal system. Other factors as sex, life time, type of prey capture and the high ability to gain energy anaerobically influence the resting and the active metabolic rate intensely. Most spiders have metabolic rates that are much lower than expected from body mass; but especially those with two pairs of lungs. Males normally have higher resting rates than females; spiders that are less evolved and possess a cribellum have lower metabolic rates than higher evolved species. Freely hunting spiders show a higher energy turnover than spiders hunting with a web. Spiders that live longer than 1 year will have lower metabolic rates than those species that die after 1 year in which development and reproduction must be completed. Lower temperatures and starvation, which most spiders can cope with, will decrease the metabolic rate as well.

  18. Insights into Particle Cycling from Thorium and Particle Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Marchal, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Marine particles are a main vector by which the biological carbon pump in the ocean transfers carbon from the atmosphere to the deep ocean. Marine particles exist in a continuous spectrum of sizes, but they can be functionally grouped into a small, suspended class (which constitutes most of the total particle mass) and a large, sinking class (which contributes most of the particle flux). These two classes are connected by aggregation and disaggregation processes. The interplay of processes that create, aggregate, and destroy marine particles determines the strength and transfer efficiency of the biological pump. Measurements of radiocarbon, barium, and organic biomarkers on suspended and sinking particles have provided qualitative insights into particle dynamics, and measurements of thorium isotopes have provided quantitative estimates of rates. Here, we review what has been learned so far about particle dynamics in the ocean from chemical measurements on suspended and sinking particles. We then discuss future directions for this approach.

  19. Insights into particle cycling from thorium and particle data.

    PubMed

    Lam, Phoebe J; Marchal, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Marine particles are a main vector by which the biological carbon pump in the ocean transfers carbon from the atmosphere to the deep ocean. Marine particles exist in a continuous spectrum of sizes, but they can be functionally grouped into a small, suspended class (which constitutes most of the total particle mass) and a large, sinking class (which contributes most of the particle flux). These two classes are connected by aggregation and disaggregation processes. The interplay of processes that create, aggregate, and destroy marine particles determines the strength and transfer efficiency of the biological pump. Measurements of radiocarbon, barium, and organic biomarkers on suspended and sinking particles have provided qualitative insights into particle dynamics, and measurements of thorium isotopes have provided quantitative estimates of rates. Here, we review what has been learned so far about particle dynamics in the ocean from chemical measurements on suspended and sinking particles. We then discuss future directions for this approach.

  20. Manikin-based performance evaluation of N95 filtering-facepiece respirators challenged with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Balazy, Anna; Toivola, Mika; Reponen, Tiina; Podgórski, Albert; Zimmer, Anthony; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2006-04-01

    Protection of the human respiratory system from exposure to nanoparticles is becoming an emerging issue in occupational hygiene. The potential adverse health effects associated with particles of approximately 1-100 nm are probably greater than submicron or micron-sized particles. The performance of two models of N95 half-facepiece-filtering respirators against nano-sized particles was evaluated at two inhalation flow rates, 30 and 85 l min(-1), following a manikin-based protocol. The aerosol concentration was measured outside and inside the facepiece using the Wide-Range Particle Spectrometer. Sodium chloride particles, conventionally used to certify N-series respirators under NIOSH 42 CFR 84 regulations, were utilized as the challenge aerosol. The targeted particle sizes ranged from 10 to 600 nm, although the standard certification tests are performed with particles of approximately 300 nm, which is assumed to be the most penetrating size. The results indicate that the nanoparticle penetration through a face-sealed N95 respirator may be in excess of the 5% threshold, particularly at high respiratory flow rates. Thus, N95 respirators may not always provide the expected respiratory protection for workers. The highest penetration values representing the poorest respirator protection conditions were observed in the particle diameter range of approximately 30-70 nm. Based on the theoretical simulation, we have concluded that for respirators utilizing mechanical filters, the peak penetration indeed occurs at the particle diameter of approximately 300 nm; however, for pre-charged fiber filters, which are commonly used for N95 respirators, the peak shifts toward nano-sizes. This study has confirmed that the neutralization of particles is a crucial element in evaluating the efficiency of a respirator. The variability of the respirator's performance was determined for both models and both flow rates. The analysis revealed that the coefficient of variation of the penetration

  1. Relationships between microbial extracellular enzymatic activity and suspended and sinking particulate organic matter: seasonal transformations in the North Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, A. L.; Deming, J. W.

    Despite the importance of hydrolytic activities by bacterial extracellular enzymes (EE) in the temperate ocean, little is known about the role of extracellular enzymatic activity (EEA) in determining the fate of particulate organic matter (POM) in polar seas. To explore the issue further, we measured various chemical and bacterial parameters in the near-0°C waters of the North Water during the months of May and July of 1998. Seawater (SW) samples were collected by Niskin bottle at the depth of the chlorophyll fluorescence maximum (8-90 m), while samples of sinking particles and aggregates were collected in short-term (0.5-1.2 d), unpoisoned, floating sediment traps deployed at depths typically below the mixed layer (50-136 m). Samples were analyzed for POC, PON, and abundance of total and actively respiring bacteria. They were also incubated with fluorescently tagged substrate analogs to measure potential maximal rates of three classes of EE (leucine-aminopeptidase, chitobiase, and β-glucosidase) at -1°C. The percentage of actively respiring bacteria was always higher in sediment trap samples than in SW (medians of 38% and 24% versus 10% and 12% in May and July, respectively). Cell-specific rates of EEA were also higher in the trap samples and, for both sample types, similar to published rates from temperate waters. Rates of EEA when scaled to the abundance of actively respiring bacteria, however, did not differ between sample types, suggesting that the elevated EEA associated with sinking material is due to the greater abundance of metabolically active cells supported by such material and not due to enhanced enzyme expression in general, as suggested by previous studies. In this study, leucine-aminopeptidase activity was always much higher than the other classes of EEA, becoming even more dominant later in the season; it always correlated positively with the abundance of both total and actively respiring bacteria. Enzyme ratios indicating protease dominance

  2. Quantifying suspended sediment yield with fingerprinting technique in coastal catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizugaki, Shigeru; Ohtsuka, Junichi; Ohashi, Masami; Tanise, Atsushi; Shimme, Ryuichi

    2017-04-01

    The suspended sediment load transported by a river will commonly represent a mixture of sediment delivered from different locations and from various source types within the contributing catchment. Sediment yield of catchment is well known to depend on dominant geology underlying in the catchment, but the variation in sediment yield has rarely been quantified. The objective of this study was to quantify the suspended sediment yield of various lithological area within catchment. To achieve the objective, the fingerprinting was conducted using natural radionuclide tracers across a couple of adjacent coastal catchments, the Saru River and the Mukawa River in Hokkaido, northern Japan. Fingerprinting technique showed that the suspended sediment was mainly originated from sedimentary rock and metamorphic rock, while coastal sand was mainly originated from plutonic rock and melange matrix of accretionary complex. Suspended sediment yield was quantified for each lithological source group with fingerprinting technique and hydrological observation, showing the highest in the metamorphic rock area, where the landslide scar densely distributes. These results suggest that mass movement and weathering features depending on lithology can control the contribution of source to suspended sediment and its particle size from mountain to coastal area.

  3. 78 FR 18601 - Respirator Certification Fees; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Respirator Certification Fees; Public Meeting... stakeholders to present information the impact of an increase on respirator fees on individual respirator... in respirator certification and approval fees on individual respirator manufacturers, the...

  4. Effects of uniformities of deposition of respirable particles on filters on determining their quartz contents by using the direct on-filter X-ray diffraction (DOF XRD) method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Hwa; Tsaia, Perng-Jy; Lai, Chane-Yu; Peng, Ya-Lian; Soo, Jhy-Charm; Chen, Cheng-Yao; Shih, Tung-Sheng

    2010-04-15

    In this study, field samplings were conducted in three workplaces of a foundry plant, including the molding, demolding, and bead blasting, respectively. Three respirable aerosol samplers (including a 25-mm aluminum cyclone, nylon cyclone, and IOSH cyclone) were used side-by-side to collect samples from each selected workplace. For each collected sample, the uniformity of the deposition of respirable dusts on the filter was measured and its free silica content was determined by both the DOF XRD method and NIOSH 7500 XRD method (i.e., the reference method). A same trend in measured uniformities can be found in all selected workplaces: 25-mm aluminum cyclone>nylon cyclone>IOSH cyclone. Even for samples collected by the sampler with the highest uniformity (i.e., 25-mm aluminum cyclone), the use of the DOF XRD method would lead to the measured free silica concentrations 1.15-2.89 times in magnitude higher than that of the reference method. A new filter holder should be developed with the minimum uniformity comparable to that of NIOSH 7500 XRD method (=0.78) in the future. The use of conversion factors for correcting quartz concentrations obtained from the DOF XRD method based on the measured uniformities could be suitable for the foundry industry at this stage.

  5. Toward clean suspended CVD graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Yulaev, Alexander; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela R.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Myers, Alline; Leite, Marina S.; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2016-08-26

    The application of suspended graphene as electron transparent supporting media in electron microscopy, vacuum electronics, and micromechanical devices requires the least destructive and maximally clean transfer from their original growth substrate to the target of interest. Here, we use thermally evaporated anthracene films as the sacrificial layer for graphene transfer onto an arbitrary substrate. We show that clean suspended graphene can be achieved via desorbing the anthracene layer at temperatures in the 100 °C to 150 °C range, followed by two sequential annealing steps for the final cleaning, using a Pt catalyst and activated carbon. The cleanliness of the suspended graphene membranes was analyzed employing the high surface sensitivity of low energy scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A quantitative comparison with two other commonly used transfer methods revealed the superiority of the anthracene approach to obtain a larger area of clean, suspended CVD graphene. Lastly, our graphene transfer method based on anthracene paves the way for integrating cleaner graphene in various types of complex devices, including the ones that are heat and humidity sensitive.

  6. Toward clean suspended CVD graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Yulaev, Alexander; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela R.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Myers, Alline; Leite, Marina S.; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2016-08-26

    The application of suspended graphene as electron transparent supporting media in electron microscopy, vacuum electronics, and micromechanical devices requires the least destructive and maximally clean transfer from their original growth substrate to the target of interest. Here, we use thermally evaporated anthracene films as the sacrificial layer for graphene transfer onto an arbitrary substrate. We show that clean suspended graphene can be achieved via desorbing the anthracene layer at temperatures in the 100 °C to 150 °C range, followed by two sequential annealing steps for the final cleaning, using a Pt catalyst and activated carbon. The cleanliness of the suspended graphene membranes was analyzed employing the high surface sensitivity of low energy scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A quantitative comparison with two other commonly used transfer methods revealed the superiority of the anthracene approach to obtain a larger area of clean, suspended CVD graphene. Lastly, our graphene transfer method based on anthracene paves the way for integrating cleaner graphene in various types of complex devices, including the ones that are heat and humidity sensitive.

  7. Toward Clean Suspended CVD Graphene.

    PubMed

    Yulaev, Alexander; Cheng, Guangjun; Walker, Angela R Hight; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Myers, Alline; Leite, Marina S; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    The application of suspended graphene as electron transparent supporting media in electron microscopy, vacuum electronics, and micromechanical devices requires the least destructive and maximally clean transfer from their original growth substrate to the target of interest. Here, we use thermally evaporated anthracene films as the sacrificial layer for graphene transfer onto an arbitrary substrate. We show that clean suspended graphene can be achieved via desorbing the anthracene layer at temperatures in the 100 °C to 150 °C range, followed by two sequential annealing steps for the final cleaning, using Pt catalyst and activated carbon. The cleanliness of the suspended graphene membranes was analyzed employing the high surface sensitivity of low energy scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A quantitative comparison with two other commonly used transfer methods revealed the superiority of the anthracene approach to obtain larger area of clean, suspended CVD graphene. Our graphene transfer method based on anthracene paves the way for integrating cleaner graphene in various types of complex devices, including the ones that are heat and humidity sensitive.

  8. Interpreting, measuring, and modeling soil respiration

    Treesearch

    Michael G. Ryan; Beverly E. Law

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of soil respiration in determining ecosystem carbon balance, and the conceptual basis for measuring and modeling soil respiration. We developed it to provide background and context for this special issue on soil respiration and to synthesize the presentations and discussions at the workshop. Soil respiration is the largest component of...

  9. High concentration suspended sediment measurments using acontinuous fiber optic in-stream transmissometer

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Chris G.; Laycak, Danny T.; Hoppes, William; Tran,Nguyen T.; Shi, Frank G.

    2004-05-26

    Suspended sediment loads mobilized during high flow periods in rivers and streams are largely uncharacterized. In smaller and intermittent streams, a large storm may transport a majority of the annual sediment budget. Therefore monitoring techniques that can measure high suspended sediment concentrations at semi-continuous time intervals are needed. A Fiber optic In-stream Transmissometer (FIT) is presented for continuous measurement of high concentration suspended sediment in storm runoff. FIT performance and precision were demonstrated to be reasonably good for suspended sediment concentrations up to 10g/L. The FIT was compared to two commercially available turbidity devices and provided better precision and accuracy at both high and low concentrations. Both turbidity devices were unable to collect measurements at concentrations greater than 4 g/L. The FIT and turbidity measurements were sensitive to sediment particle size. Particle size dependence of transmittance and turbidity measurement poses the greatest problem for calibration to suspended sediment concentration. While the FIT was demonstrated to provide acceptable measurements of high suspended sediment concentrations, approaches to real-time suspended sediment detection need to address the particle size dependence in concentration measurements.

  10. Advanced testing method to evaluate the performance of respirator filter media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Golshahi, Laleh; Chen, Da-Ren

    2016-10-02

    Filter media for respirator applications are typically exposed to the cyclic flow condition, which is different from the constant flow condition adopted in filter testing standards. To understand the real performance of respirator filter media in the field it is required to investigate the penetration of particles through respirator filters under cyclic flow conditions representing breathing flow patterns of human beings. This article reports a new testing method for studying the individual effect of breathing frequency (BF) and peak inhalation flow rate (PIFR) on the particle penetration through respirator filter media. The new method includes the use of DMA (Differential Mobility Analyzer)-classified particles having the most penetrating particle size, MPPS (at the constant flowrate of equivalent mean inhalation flow rate, MIFR) as test aerosol. Two condensation particle counters (CPCs) are applied to measure the particle concentrations at the upstream and downstream of test filter media at the same time. Given the 10 Hz sampling time of CPCs, close-to-instantaneous particle penetration could be measured. A pilot study was performed to demonstrate the new testing method. It is found that the effect of BF on the particle penetration of test respirator filter media is of importance at all the tested peak inhalation flow rates (PIFRs), which is different from those reported in the previous work.

  11. Pure insulin highly respirable powders for inhalation.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Anna Giulia; Cagnani, Stefano; Sonvico, Fabio; Rossi, Alessandra; Barata, Pedro; Colombo, Gaia; Colombo, Paolo; Buttini, Francesca

    2014-01-23

    The aim of the present research was to investigate the possibility to obtain by spray drying an insulin pulmonary powder respirable and stable at room temperature without the use of excipients. Several insulin spray-dried powders were prepared with or without the addition of excipients (mannitol, bovine serum albumin, aspartic acid) from water dispersions or from acidic aqueous solutions. Each formulation was characterized using laser diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and in vitro aerosol performance with a Turbospin DPI device. Stability was assessed by the quantification of impurities with a molecular mass greater than that of insulin (HMWP) and related proteins (A21+ORP). Insulin powders prepared without excipients from an acid solution showed a shrivelled, raisin-like shape of non-aggregated microparticles and a high respirability (FPF>65%). The optimal result with respect to respirability and stability was reached when the pH of the insulin acetic acid solution to spray dry was adjusted at pH 3.6 with ammonium hydroxide. The median volume diameter of the obtained powder was 4.04 μm, insulin content 95%, emitted dose of 89.5%, MMAD 1.79 μm and fine particle fraction of 83.6%. This powder was stable at room temperature over a period of eighteen months with respect to the content of A21+ORP. As far as the HMWP content was concerned, the powder complied with the specification limits for a period of five months. The insulin acetic powder opens up the possibility of a more effective pulmonary therapy less dependent on refrigerated storage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 21 CFR 1404.1010 - Suspending official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspending official. 1404.1010 Section 1404.1010 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.1010 Suspending official. (a) Suspending official means an agency official...

  13. Suspended Solids Profiler Shop Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2000-01-19

    The Suspended Solids Profiler (SSP) Instrument is planned to be installed in the AZ-101 tank to measure suspended solids concentrations during mixer pump testing. The SSP sensor uses a reflectance measurement principle to determine the suspended solids concentrations. The purpose of this test is to provide a documented means of verifying that the functional components of the SSP operate properly.

  14. Toward clean suspended CVD graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Yulaev, Alexander; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela R.; ...

    2016-08-26

    The application of suspended graphene as electron transparent supporting media in electron microscopy, vacuum electronics, and micromechanical devices requires the least destructive and maximally clean transfer from their original growth substrate to the target of interest. Here, we use thermally evaporated anthracene films as the sacrificial layer for graphene transfer onto an arbitrary substrate. We show that clean suspended graphene can be achieved via desorbing the anthracene layer at temperatures in the 100 °C to 150 °C range, followed by two sequential annealing steps for the final cleaning, using a Pt catalyst and activated carbon. The cleanliness of the suspendedmore » graphene membranes was analyzed employing the high surface sensitivity of low energy scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A quantitative comparison with two other commonly used transfer methods revealed the superiority of the anthracene approach to obtain a larger area of clean, suspended CVD graphene. Lastly, our graphene transfer method based on anthracene paves the way for integrating cleaner graphene in various types of complex devices, including the ones that are heat and humidity sensitive.« less

  15. Quantitative suspended sediment mapping using aircraft remotely sensed multispectral data. [in Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Suspended sediment is an important environmental parameter for monitoring water quality, water movement, and land use. Quantitative suspended sediment determinations were made from analysis of aircraft remotely sensed multispectral digital data. A statistical analysis and derived regression equation were used to determine and plot quantitative suspended sediment concentration contours in the tidal James River, Virginia, on May 28, 1974. From the analysis, a single band, Band 8 (0.70-0.74 microns), was adequate for determining suspended sediment concentrations. A correlation coefficient of 0.89 was obtained with a mean inaccuracy of 23.5 percent for suspended sediment concentrations up to about 50 mg/l. Other water quality parameters - secchi disc depth and chlorophyll - also had high correlations with the remotely sensed data. Particle size distribution had only a fair correlation with the remotely sensed data.

  16. Protocol evaluation of the total suspended solids and suspended sediment concentration methods: solid recovery efficiency and application for stormwater analysis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Licheng; Li, Yingxia; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2008-09-01

    Total suspended solids (TSS) is routinely measured in water and wastewater treatment plants, and protocols are well-known. The TSS measurement in stormwater is more difficult, because the particle size and density can be much greater, biasing the sample if it is collected from a poorly mixed location or allowed to settle in a quiescent collection container. An alternative method, called suspended sediment concentration (SSC), uses a different protocol, which analyzes the entire contents of the sample collection container. The SSC method is not compatible with many monitoring programs, which require several constituents to be analyzed from a single sample container, such as from a flow-weighted composite sample. This paper addresses TSS protocol using glass beads and samples with known particle size distribution and shows that proper mixing, combined with appropriate pipettes, can largely avoid sampling error for typical sediments as large as 250 microm with specific gravity of 2.6.

  17. Electrical stimulation to restore respiration.

    PubMed

    Creasey, G; Elefteriades, J; DiMarco, A; Talonen, P; Bijak, M; Girsch, W; Kantor, C

    1996-04-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used for over 25 years to restore breathing to patients with high quadriplegia causing respiratory paralysis and patients with central alveolar hypoventilation. Three groups have developed electrical pacing systems for long-term support of respiration in humans. These systems consist of electrodes implanted on the phrenic nerves, connected by leads to a stimulator implanted under the skin, and powered and controlled from a battery-powered transmitter outside the body. The systems differ principally in the electrode design and stimulation waveform. Approximately 1,000 people worldwide have received one of the three phrenic pacing devices, most with strongly positive results: reduced risk of tracheal problems and chronic infection, the ability to speak and smell more normally, reduced risk of accidental interruption of respiration, greater independence, and reduced costs and time for ventilatory care. For patients with partial lesions of the phrenic nerves, intercostal muscle stimulation may supplement respiration.

  18. Ambient Tropospheric Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is a complex mixture of solid and liquid particles suspended in ambient air (also known as the atmospheric aerosol). Ambient PM arises from a wide-range of sources and/or processes, and consists of particles of different shapes, sizes, and com...

  19. Ambient Tropospheric Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is a complex mixture of solid and liquid particles suspended in ambient air (also known as the atmospheric aerosol). Ambient PM arises from a wide-range of sources and/or processes, and consists of particles of different shapes, sizes, and com...

  20. [Dark respiration of terrestrial vegetations: a review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin-Wei; Yuan, Feng-Hui; Guan, De-Xin; Wu, Jia-Bing

    2013-06-01

    The source and sink effect of terrestrial plants is one of the hotspots in terrestrial ecosystem research under the background of global change. Dark respiration of terrestrial plants accounts for a large fraction of total net carbon balance, playing an important role in the research of carbon cycle under global climate change. However, there is little study on plant dark respiration. This paper summarized the physiological processes of plant dark respiration, measurement methods of the dark respiration, and the effects of plant biology and environmental factors on the dark respiration. The uncertainty of the dark respiration estimation was analyzed, and the future hotspots of related researches were pointed out.

  1. Direction-dependent freezing of diamagnetic colloidal tracers suspended in paramagnetic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Passow, Christopher; Fischer, Birgit; Sprung, Michael; Köckerling, Martin; Wagner, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    The dynamic behavior of an inverse ferrofluid consisting of diamagnetic, spherical silica particles suspended in the paramagnetic ionic liquid (EMIm)2[Co(NCS)4] is investigated by means of x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy in the presence of an external magnetic field. Dipole-dipole interactions between the diamagnetic holes in the paramagnetic continuum of the suspending medium induce a direction-dependence of the diffusive motion of the colloidal particles: due to a magnetic repulsion perpendicular to the direction of an external field the diffusive motion of the colloidal particles is selectively frozen in this direction.

  2. Modeling Hydrodynamics, Water Temperature, and Suspended Sediment in Detroit Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Sobieszczyk, Steven; Bragg, Heather M.

    2007-01-01

    Detroit Lake is a large reservoir on the North Santiam River in west-central Oregon. Water temperature and suspended sediment are issues of concern in the river downstream of the reservoir. A CE-QUAL-W2 model was constructed to simulate hydrodynamics, water temperature, total dissolved solids, and suspended sediment in Detroit Lake. The model was calibrated for calendar years 2002 and 2003, and for a period of storm runoff from December 1, 2005, to February 1, 2006. Input data included lake bathymetry, meteorology, reservoir outflows, and tributary inflows, water temperatures, total dissolved solids, and suspended sediment concentrations. Two suspended sediment size groups were modeled: one for suspended sand and silt with particle diameters larger than 2 micrometers, and another for suspended clay with particle diameters less than or equal to 2 micrometers. The model was calibrated using lake stage data, lake profile data, and data from a continuous water-quality monitor on the North Santiam River near Niagara, about 6 kilometers downstream of Detroit Dam. The calibrated model was used to estimate sediment deposition in the reservoir, examine the sources of suspended sediment exiting the reservoir, and examine the effect of the reservoir on downstream water temperatures.

  3. Suspended sediment in the St. Francis River at St. Francis, Arkansas, 1986-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, W. Reed; Barks, C. Shane; Hall, Alan P.

    2000-01-01

    Daily suspended-sediment concentrations were analyzed from the St. Francis River at St. Francis, Arkansas during 1986 through 1995. Suspended-sediment particle size distribution was measured in selected samples from 1978 through 1998. These data are used to assess changes in suspended-sediment concentrations and loads through time. Suspended-sediment concentrations were positively related to discharge. At higher flows, percent silt-clay was negatively related to discharge. Nonparametric trend analysis (Mann-Kendall test) of suspended-sediment concentration over the period of record indicated a slight decrease in concentration. Flow-adjusted residuals of suspended-sediment concentration also decreased slightly through the same period. No change was identified in annual suspended-sediment load or annual flow-weighted concentration. Continued monitorig of daily-suspended-sediment concentrations at this site and others, and similar data analysis at other sites where data are available will provide a better understanding of sediment transport withint the St. Francis River.

  4. Soil Respiration - A Geochemist's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cappellen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Soil biogeochemistry is largely driven by the decomposition of plant-derived organic matter by soil microorganisms. In addition to its effects on water quality and soil fertility, the decomposition of organic matter couples soil processes to climate, via the production and emission of greenhouse gases. In this presentation, I will review a number of key factors controlling the rate of decomposition of soil organic matter. In particular, I will discuss the importance of the spatial and temporal variations in redox conditions as drivers of soil respiration. The discussion will highlight the limitations of current soil respiration models based on partitioning soil organic matter in a finite number of pools of different degradability. In order to predict the sensitivity of soil respiration to anthropogenic pressures - including climate warming - it is crucial to relate the apparent degradability of soil organic matter to the geochemical and hydrological dynamics of the soil environment. Overall, there remains much scope for geochemists to help develop more robust, process-based, representations of soil respiration in global carbon models and climate predictions.

  5. Turbidity - a Semi-Continuous Monitoring Option for Suspended Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendvay, J. M.; Rosasco, M. V.; David, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    Redwood Creek, a third order coastal stream flowing through Muir Woods National Monument and Golden Gate National Recreation Area in Marin County, California, was once the spawning grounds for a relatively large population of Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). In recent years less than 1% of historic populations have been returning to the stream. Redwood creek is currently undergoing extensive ecological restoration in an attempt to improve the spawning habitat for the salmon. The original stream path has been altered in the past to make way for development and the National Park Service has been working towards restoring much of the stream's natural functionality with the hope that the salmon population will increase. The restoration process has altered the surrounding riparian landscape in the Redwood Creek watershed. Riparian disturbance caused by vegetation and levee removal as a part of the restoration process followed by installation of seedlings raises concern about the concentration of sediments in the water. Throughout 2011-2012 three parameters for water quality were monitored at Redwood Creek. Suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and total suspended solids (TSS) measurements to determine the concentration of suspended particles in the water column at a given point in time. Turbidity, measured in Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) is a measure of the water's cloudiness caused by suspended particles. Turbidity measurements are favored as they provide a semi-automated monitoring option. Therefore, development of a relationship between turbidity and SSC and TSS is desired. Water samples were analyzed for TSS and SSC using the EPA standard methods, and Turbidity was measured using a Hach 2100Q portable turbidimeter. Additional semi-continuous monitoring of turbidity was completed in situ using Hydrolab DS5X datasondes (with self-cleaning turbidity sensor). The relationship between TSS, SSC and turbidity was determined using a linear regression model for

  6. Thixotropic particles suspensions and method for their formation

    DOEpatents

    Garino, T.J.

    1997-06-17

    Thixotropic particle suspensions are prepared by controlling the quantity of dispersant composition used for particle coating to an amount which is less than that quantity that would provide a full coating of dispersant on all particles suspended. 5 figs.

  7. Suspended sediment transport in an estuarine tidal channel within San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sternberg, R.W.; Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.; Kranck, K.

    1986-01-01

    Size distributions of the suspended sediment samples, estimates of particle settling velocity (??s), friction velocity (U*), and reference concentration (Ca) at z = 20 cm were used in the suspended sediment distribution equations to evaluate their ability to predict the observed suspended sediment profiles. Three suspended sediment particle conditions were evaluated: (1) individual particle sizes in the 4-11 ?? (62.5-0.5 ??m) size range with the reference concentration Ca at z = 20 cm (C??); (2) individual particle sizes in the 4-6 ?? size range, flocs representing the 7-11 ?? size range with the reference concentration Ca at z = 20 cm (Cf); and (3) individual particle sizes in the 4-6 ?? size range, flocs representing the 7-11 ?? size range with the reference concentration predicted as a function of the bed sediment size distribution and the square of the excess shear stress. An analysis was also carried out on the sensitivity of the suspended sediment distribution equation to deviations in the primary variables ??s, U*, and Ca. In addition, computations of mass flux were made in order to show vertical variations in mass flux for varying flow conditions. ?? 1986.

  8. Dynamics and yielding of binary self-suspended nanoparticle fluids.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Akanksha; Yu, Hsiu-Yu; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Choudhury, Snehashis; Narayanan, Suresh; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-07-14

    Yielding and flow transitions in bi-disperse suspensions of particles are studied using a model system comprised of self-suspended spherical nanoparticles. An important feature of the materials is that the nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in the absence of a solvent. Addition of larger particles to a suspension of smaller ones is found to soften the suspensions, and in the limit of large size disparities, completely fluidizes the material. We show that these behaviors coincide with a speeding-up of de-correlation dynamics of all particles in the suspensions and are accompanied by a reduction in the energy dissipated at the yielding transition. We discuss our findings in terms of ligand-mediated jamming and un-jamming of hairy particle suspensions.

  9. Physicochemical properties of respirable-size lunar dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, D. S.; Cooper, B. L.; Taylor, L. A.; James, J. T.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Pieters, C. M.; Wentworth, S. J.; Wallace, W. T.; Lee, T. S.

    2015-02-01

    We separated the respirable dust and other size fractions from Apollo 14 bulk sample 14003,96 in a dry nitrogen environment. While our toxicology team performed in vivo and in vitro experiments with the respirable fraction, we studied the size distribution and shape, chemistry, mineralogy, spectroscopy, iron content and magnetic resonance of various size fractions. These represent the finest-grained lunar samples ever measured for either FMR np-Fe0 index or precise bulk chemistry, and are the first instance we know of in which SEM/TEM samples have been obtained without using liquids. The concentration of single-domain, nanophase metallic iron (np-Fe0) increases as particle size diminishes to 2 μm, confirming previous extrapolations. Size-distribution studies disclosed that the most frequent particle size was in the 0.1-0.2 μm range suggesting a relatively high surface area and therefore higher potential toxicity. Lunar dust particles are insoluble in isopropanol but slightly soluble in distilled water (~0.2 wt%/3 days). The interaction between water and lunar fines, which results in both agglomeration and partial dissolution, is observable on a macro scale over time periods of less than an hour. Most of the respirable grains were smooth amorphous glass. This suggests less toxicity than if the grains were irregular, porous, or jagged, and may account for the fact that lunar dust is less toxic than ground quartz.

  10. Measuring suspended sediment: Chapter 10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, J.R.; Landers, M.N.

    2013-01-01

    Suspended sediment in streams and rivers can be measured using traditional instruments and techniques and (or) surrogate technologies. The former, as described herein, consists primarily of both manually deployed isokinetic samplers and their deployment protocols developed by the Federal Interagency Sedimentation Project. They are used on all continents other than Antarctica. The reliability of the typically spatially rich but temporally sparse data produced by traditional means is supported by a broad base of scientific literature since 1940. However, the suspended sediment surrogate technologies described herein – based on hydroacoustic, nephelometric, laser, and pressure difference principles – tend to produce temporally rich but in some cases spatially sparse datasets. The value of temporally rich data in the accuracy of continuous sediment-discharge records is hard to overstate, in part because such data can often overcome the shortcomings of poor spatial coverage. Coupled with calibration data produced by traditional means, surrogate technologies show considerable promise toward providing the fluvial sediment data needed to increase and bring more consistency to sediment-discharge measurements worldwide.

  11. Suspended matter in surface waters of the Atlantic continental margin from Cape Cod to the Florida Keys.

    PubMed

    Manheim, F T; Meade, R H; Bond, G C

    1970-01-23

    Appreciable Amounts Of suspended matter (> 1.0 milligram per liter) in surface waters are restricted to within a few kilometers of the Atlantic coast. Particles that escape estuaries or are discharged by rivers into the shelf region tend to travel longshoreward rather than seaward. Suspended matter farther offshore, chiefly amorphous organic particles, totals 0.1 milligram per liter or less. Soot, fly ash, processed cellulose, and other pollutants are widespread.

  12. Suspended matter in surface waters of the Atlantic continental margin from Cape Cod to the Florida keys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.; Meade, R.H.; Bond, G.C.

    1970-01-01

    Appreciable amounts of suspended matter (> 1.0 milligram per liter) in surface waters are restricted to within a few kilometers of the Atlantic coast. Particles that escape estuaries or are discharged by rivers into the shelf region tend to travel longshoreward rather than seaward. Suspended matter farther offshore, chiefly amorphous organic particles, totals 0.1 milligram per liter or less. Soot, fly ash, processed cellulose, and other pollutants are widespread.

  13. 7 CFR 1218.20 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.20 Suspend....

  14. 7 CFR 1218.20 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.20 Suspend....

  15. 7 CFR 1218.20 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.20 Suspend....

  16. 7 CFR 1218.20 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.20 Suspend....

  17. 7 CFR 1218.20 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.20 Suspend....

  18. 7 CFR 1221.30 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.30 Suspend....

  19. 7 CFR 1221.30 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.30 Suspend....

  20. 7 CFR 1221.30 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.30 Suspend....

  1. 7 CFR 1221.30 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.30 Suspend....

  2. 7 CFR 1221.30 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.30 Suspend....

  3. 7 CFR 1280.124 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAMB PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Lamb Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1280.124 Suspend....

  4. Cardiopulmonary fitness and respirator clearance: an update.

    PubMed

    Belafsky, Sheri; Vlach, Justin; McCurdy, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses five key questions regarding respirator clearance: What is the efficacy of different methods of respirator clearance? Which diagnostic test is most predictive of cardiac event during respirator use? Is spirometry accurate in predicting respiratory distress/insufficiency during respirator use? Is exercise tolerance testing accurate in predicting cardiac injury during respirator use? Which periodicity of clearance evaluations is most protective against cardiac event during respirator use? The medical literature was searched using PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science. Relevant articles were reviewed to assess current recommendations and practices in respirator clearance. Between the years 1970 and 2011, 144 articles were identified, and 21 were included in this review. Current recommendations for respirator clearance are based on consensus rather than outcome studies, and opinions differed between expert sources. Many authors observed the need for cost-effective respirator clearance, but none proposed evidence-based strategies. Prospective studies on respirator clearance that evaluate cardiac and pulmonary outcomes are necessary to establish an evidence base for improving the validity, efficiency, and consistency of respirator clearance testing.

  5. [Research advances in forest soil respiration].

    PubMed

    Luan, Junwei; Xiang, Chenghua; Luo, Zongshi; Gong, Yuanbo

    2006-12-01

    Among the methods of measuring forest soil respiration, infrared CO2 analysis is the optimal one so far. Comparing with empirical model, the process-based model in simulating the production and transportation of soil CO2 has the advantage of considering the biological and physical processes of soil respiration. Generally, soil respiration is positively correlated with soil temperature and moisture, but there are still many uncertainties about the relationships between soil respiration and forest management activities such as firing, cutting, and fertilization. The relationships of soil respiration with vegetation type and soil microbial biomass, as well as the spatial heterogeneity of soil respiration, are the hotspots in recent researches. Some issues and future development in forest soil respiration research were discussed in this paper.

  6. Defining an exposure-response relationship for suspended kaolin clay particulates and aquatic organisms: work toward defining a water quality guideline for suspended solids.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Andrew K; Palmer, Carolyn G

    2015-04-01

    Water quality guidelines for suspended solids generally rely on the percentage departure from reference condition, an approach that has been criticized. Attempts to develop a biological effects-base guideline have, however, been confounded by low data availability. Furthermore, the high biological response variability to suspended solids exposure suggests that organisms are responding not only to exposure concentration and duration but also to other mechanisms of effect associated with suspended particles (e.g., size, shape, and geochemical composition). An alternative option is to develop more situation and site specific guidelines by generating biological effects data to suspended particles of a particular geochemistry and restricted size range. With this in mind, aquatic organism responses to kaolin clay particle exposure were collated from the literature and incorporated into 2 exposure-response relationship approaches. The species sensitivity distribution approach produced a hazardous concentration affecting 5% of species estimate of 58 mg/L for mortality responses, and 36 mg/L for sublethal data. The severity-of-ill-effect approach produced similar estimates for lethal and sublethal data. These results suggest that aquatic organisms are slightly more tolerant of kaolin clay particles than particles from barite or bentonite clays, based on results from previous studies on these clay types. This type of information can enable better estimates of the risk faced by aquatic organisms exposed to suspended solids. For example, when the sediments of a particular water body are dominated by a particular type of clay particle, then the most appropriate exposure-response relationship can be applied. © 2015 SETAC.

  7. Droplet Suspended on a Wire Begins Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion Experiment completing a number of successful burns on STS-94, July 11, 1997, MET:9/17:40 (approximate). The photo shows a droplet of 95% heptane and 5% hexadecane, suspended and positioned by the fiber wire, just as it is being ignited by the glowing coil beneath. Study of the physical properties of burning fuel from this experiment is expected to contribute to more efficient use of fossil fuels and reduction of combustion by-products on Earth. The sequence is from a time-lapse movie (34 seconds condensed to 12 seconds), and clearly shows particles emanating from the droplet during the burn. The droplet shrank to nothing as it was consumed. FSDC-2 studied fundamental phenomena related to liquid fuel droplet combustion in air. Pure fuels and mixtures of fuels were burned as isolated single and dual droplets with and without forced air convection. The FSDC guest investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (1.2 MB, 11-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300180.html.

  8. Ignition of Droplet Suspended on a Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion Experiment completing a number of successful burns on STS-94, July 11, 1997, MET:9/17:40 (approximate). The photo shows a droplet of 95% heptane and 5% hexadecane, suspended and positioned by the fiber wire, just as it is being ignited by the glowing coil beneath. Study of the physical properties of burning fuel from this experiment is expected to contribute to more efficient use of fossil fuels and reduction of combustion by-products on Earth. The sequence is from a time-lapse movie (34 seconds condensed to 12 seconds), and clearly shows particles emanating from the droplet during the burn. The droplet shrank to nothing as it was consumed. FSDC-2 studied fundamental phenomena related to liquid fuel droplet combustion in air. Pure fuels and mixtures of fuels were burned as isolated single and dual droplets with and without forced air convection. The FSDC guest investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (133KB JPEG, 656 x 741 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300181.html.

  9. Surface tension of Nanofluid-type fuels containing suspended nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanvir, Saad; Qiao, Li

    2012-04-01

    The surface tension of ethanol and n-decane based nanofluid fuels containing suspended aluminum (Al), aluminum oxide (Al2O3), and boron (B) nanoparticles as well as dispersible multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were measured using the pendant drop method by solving the Young-Laplace equation. The effects of nanoparticle concentration, size and the presence of a dispersing agent (surfactant) on surface tension were determined. The results show that surface tension increases both with particle concentration (above a critical concentration) and particle size for all cases. This is because the Van der Waals force between particles at the liquid/gas interface increases surface free energy and thus increases surface tension. At low particle concentrations, however, addition of particles has little influence on surface tension because of the large distance between particles. An exception is when a surfactant was used or when (MWCNTs) was involved. For such cases, the surface tension decreases compared to the pure base fluid. The hypothesis is the polymer groups attached to (MWCNTs) and the surfactant layer between a particle and the surround fluid increases the electrostatic force between particles and thus reduce surface energy and surface tension.

  10. Controls of suspended sediment concentration, nutrient content, and transport in a subtropical wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noe, G.B.; Harvey, J.W.; Schaffranek, R.W.; Larsen, L.G.

    2010-01-01

    Redistribution of largely organic sediment from low elevation sloughs to higher elevation ridges is a leading hypothesis for the formation and maintenance of the native ridge and slough landscape pattern found in peat wetlands of the Florida Everglades. We tested this redistribution hypothesis by measuring the concentration and characteristics of suspended sediment and its associated nutrients in the flowpaths of adjacent ridge and slough plant communities. Over two wet seasons we found no sustained differences in suspended sediment mass concentrations, particle-associated P and N concentrations, or sizes of suspended particles between ridge and slough sites. Discharge of suspended sediment, particulate nutrients, and solutes were nearly double in the slough flowpath compared to the ridge flowpath due solely to deeper and faster water flow in sloughs. Spatial and temporal variations in suspended sediment were not related to water velocity, consistent with a hypothesis that the critical sheer stress causing entrainment is not commonly exceeded in the present-day managed Everglades. The uniformity in the concentrations and characteristics of suspended sediment at our research site suggests that sediment and particulate nutrient redistribution between ridges and sloughs does not occur, or rarely occurs, in the modern Everglades.

  11. Measuring suspended sediment in small mountain streams

    Treesearch

    Robert B. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Measuring suspended sediment concentration in streams provides a way of monitoring the effects of forest management activities on water quality. Collecting data on suspended sediment is an act of sampling. The nature of the delivery process and the circumstances under which data are collected combine to produce highly variable results that are difficult to analyze and...

  12. 7 CFR 1216.27 - Suspend.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.27 Suspend. Suspend... operation of an Order, or part thereof, during a particular period of time specified in the rule. ...

  13. 5 CFR 919.1010 - Suspending official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspending official. 919.1010 Section 919.1010 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... official. (a) Suspending official means an agency official who is authorized to impose suspension....

  14. Suspending and Reinstating Joint Activities with Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevalley, Eric; Bangerter, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Interruptions are common in joint activities like conversations. Typically, interrupted participants suspend the activity, address the interruption, and then reinstate the activity. In conversation, people jointly commit to interact and to talk about a topic, establishing these commitments sequentially. When a commitment is suspended, face is…

  15. Respirable dust control in grinding gray iron castings.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, D; Baron, P; Willeke, K

    1987-02-01

    High speed grinding of gray iron castings long has been associated with excessive exposure to crystalline silica. Not all workers engaged in these operations are protected by conventional ventilation techniques. Dust in the air that has been entrained by the spinning grinding wheel and not captured in the grinder hood has been postulated to be a major exposure source. A pilot grinding operation was constructed, and the size distribution and concentration of airborne particles were measured with the aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). Various control measures proved effective in reducing the respirable dust concentration: increased exhaust ventilation, and installation of baffles and/or the use of an air jet to deflect the entrained air stream. The concentration of respirable dust is the breathing zone was reduced approximately 20-fold through the combined use of increased ventilation, interior baffles, and an air jet. The air jet and baffle utilized at the base ventilation rate reduced the respirable dust concentration by a factor of three to four, whereas the baffle alone halved the concentration.

  16. Effect of Rocking Movements on Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Omlin, Ximena; Crivelli, Francesco; Heinicke, Lorenz; Zaunseder, Sebastian; Achermann, Peter; Riener, Robert

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, rocking has been used to promote sleep in babies or toddlers. Recent research suggested that relaxation could play a role in facilitating the transition from waking to sleep during rocking. Breathing techniques are often used to promote relaxation. However, studies investigating head motions and body rotations showed that vestibular stimulation might elicit a vestibulo-respiratory response, leading to an increase in respiration frequency. An increase in respiration frequency would not be considered to promote relaxation in the first place. On the other hand, a coordination of respiration to rhythmic vestibular stimulation has been observed. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of different movement frequencies and amplitudes on respiration frequency. Furthermore, we tested whether subjects adapt their respiration to movement frequencies below their spontaneous respiration frequency at rest, which could be beneficial for relaxation. Twenty-one healthy subjects (24–42 years, 12 males) were investigated using an actuated bed, moving along a lateral translation. Following movement frequencies were applied: +30%, +15%, -15%, and -30% of subjects’ rest respiration frequency during baseline (no movement). Furthermore, two different movement amplitudes were tested (Amplitudes: 15 cm, 7.5 cm; movement frequency: 0.3 Hz). In addition, five subjects (25–28 years, 2 males) were stimulated with their individual rest respiration frequency. Rocking movements along a lateral translation caused a vestibulo-respiratory adaptation leading to an increase in respiration frequency. The increase was independent of the applied movement frequencies or amplitudes but did not occur when stimulating with subjects’ rest respiration frequency. Furthermore, no synchronization of the respiration frequency to the movement frequency was observed. In particular, subjects did not lower their respiration frequency below their resting frequency. Hence, it was not

  17. Correlation of ERTS multispectral imagery with suspended matter and chlorophyll in lower Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowker, D. E.; Fleischer, P.; Gosink, T. A.; Hanna, W. J.; Ludwick, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of using multispectral satellite imagery to monitor the characteristics of estuarine waters is being investigated. Preliminary comparisons of MSS imagery with suspended matter concentrations, particle counts, chlorophyll, transmittance and bathymetry have been made. Some visual correlation of radiance with particulates and chlorophyll has been established. Effects of bathymetry are present, and their relation to transmittance and radiance is being investigated. Greatest detail in suspended matter is revealed by MSS band 5. Near-surface suspended sediment load and chlorophyll can be observed in bands 6 and 7. Images received to date have partially defined extent and location of high suspensate concentrations. Net quantity of suspended matter in the lower Bay has been decreasing since the inception of the study, and represents the diminution of turbid flood waters carried into the Bay in late September, 1972. The results so far point to the utility of MSS imagery in monitoring estuarine water character for the assessment of siltation, productivity, and water types.

  18. Respirable concrete dust--silicosis hazard in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Linch, Kenneth D

    2002-03-01

    Concrete is an extremely important part of the infrastructure of modern life and must be replaced as it ages. Many of the methods of removing, repairing, or altering existing concrete structures have the potential for producing vast quantities of respirable dust. Since crystalline silica in the form of quartz is a major component of concrete, airborne respirable quartz dust may be produced during construction work involving the disturbance of concrete, thereby producing a silicosis hazard for exposed workers. Silicosis is a debilitating and sometimes fatal lung disease resulting from breathing microscopic particles of crystalline silica. Between 1992 and 1998, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) made visits to construction projects where concrete was being mechanically disturbed in order to obtain data concerning respirable crystalline silica dust exposures. The construction activities studied included: abrasive blasting, concrete pavement sawing and drilling, and asphalt/concrete milling. Air samples of respirable dust were obtained using 10-mm nylon cyclone pre-separators, 37-mm polyvinyl chloride (PVC) filters, and constant-flow pumps calibrated at 1.7 L/min. In addition, high-volume respirable dust samples were obtained on 37-mm PVC filters using 1/2" metal cyclones (Sensidyne model 18) and constant-flow pumps calibrated at 9.0 L/min. Air sample analysis included total weight gain by gravimetric analysis according to NIOSH Analytical Method 600 and respirable crystalline silica (quartz and cristobalite) using x-ray diffraction, as per NIOSH Analytical Method 7500. For abrasive blasting of concrete structures, the respirable crystalline silica (quartz) concentration ranged up to 14.0 mg/m3 for a 96-minute sample resulting in an eight-hour time-weighted average (TWA) of 2.8 mg/m3. For drilling concrete highway pavement the respirable quartz concentrations ranged up to 4.4 mg/m3 for a 358-minute sample, resulting in an eight-hour TWA

  19. Soil respiration under climate warming: differential response of heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Lingli; Piao, Shilong; Janssens, Ivan A; Tang, Jianwu; Liu, Weixing; Chi, Yonggang; Wang, Jing; Xu, Shan

    2014-10-01

    Despite decades of research, how climate warming alters the global flux of soil respiration is still poorly characterized. Here, we use meta-analysis to synthesize 202 soil respiration datasets from 50 ecosystem warming experiments across multiple terrestrial ecosystems. We found that, on average, warming by 2 °C increased soil respiration by 12% during the early warming years, but warming-induced drought partially offset this effect. More significantly, the two components of soil respiration, heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration showed distinct responses. The warming effect on autotrophic respiration was not statistically detectable during the early warming years, but nonetheless decreased with treatment duration. In contrast, warming by 2 °C increased heterotrophic respiration by an average of 21%, and this stimulation remained stable over the warming duration. This result challenged the assumption that microbial activity would acclimate to the rising temperature. Together, our findings demonstrate that distinguishing heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration would allow us better understand and predict the long-term response of soil respiration to warming. The dependence of soil respiration on soil moisture condition also underscores the importance of incorporating warming-induced soil hydrological changes when modeling soil respiration under climate change. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Effects of respirator use on worker performance

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, R.

    1995-03-01

    In 1993, EPRI funded Yankee Atomic Electric Company to examine the effects of respirator use on worker efficiency. Phase I of Yankee`s effort was to develop a study design to determine respirator effects. Given success in Phase I, a larger population will be tested to determine if a stasitically significant respirator effect on performance can be measured. This paper summarizes the 1993 EPRI/Yankee Respirator Effects of Pilot Study, and describes the study design for the 1994 EPRI/Yankee Respirator Study to be conducted at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant. Also described is a summary of respirator effect studies that have been conducted during the last ten (10) years.

  1. Mucous Secretion and Cilia Beating Defend Developing Coral Larvae from Suspended Sediments.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Gerard F; Jones, Ross J; Clode, Peta L; Negri, Andrew P

    Suspended sediments produced from dredging activities, or added to the sediment budget via river runoff, are a concern for marine resource managers. Understanding the impact of suspended sediments on critical life history stages of keystone species like corals is fundamental to effective management of coastlines and reefs. Coral embryos (Acropora tenuis and A. millepora) and larvae (A. tenuis, A. millepora and Pocillopora acuta) were subjected to a range of suspended sediment concentrations of different sediment types (siliciclastic and carbonate) to assess concentration-response relationships on ecologically relevant endpoints, including survivorship and ability to metamorphose. Embryos were subjected to short (12 h) suspended sediment exposures from ages of 3-12 hours old or a long (30 h) exposure at 6 hours old. Neither the survivorship nor metamorphosis function of embryos were significantly affected by realistic sediment exposures to ~1000 mg L-1. However, some embryos exhibited a previously undescribed response to dynamically suspended sediments, which saw 10% of the embryos form negatively buoyant cocoons at siliciclastic suspended sediment concentrations ≥35 mg L-1. Scanning electron and optical microscopy confirmed the presence of a coating on these embryos, possibly mucus with incorporated sediment particles. Cocoon formation was common in embryos but not in larvae, and occurred more often after exposure to siliciclastic rather than carbonate sediments. Once transferred into sediment-free seawater, functional ~36-h-old embryos began emerging from the cocoons, coinciding with cilia development. Ciliated (> 36-h-old) larvae exposed to suspended sediments for 60 h were also observed to secrete mucus and were similarly unaffected by suspended sediment concentrations to ~800 mg L-1. This study provides evidence that mucous secretion and cilia beating effectively protect coral embryos and larvae from suspended sediment and that these mechanisms may enhance

  2. Mucous Secretion and Cilia Beating Defend Developing Coral Larvae from Suspended Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ross J.; Clode, Peta L.; Negri, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Suspended sediments produced from dredging activities, or added to the sediment budget via river runoff, are a concern for marine resource managers. Understanding the impact of suspended sediments on critical life history stages of keystone species like corals is fundamental to effective management of coastlines and reefs. Coral embryos (Acropora tenuis and A. millepora) and larvae (A. tenuis, A. millepora and Pocillopora acuta) were subjected to a range of suspended sediment concentrations of different sediment types (siliciclastic and carbonate) to assess concentration-response relationships on ecologically relevant endpoints, including survivorship and ability to metamorphose. Embryos were subjected to short (12 h) suspended sediment exposures from ages of 3–12 hours old or a long (30 h) exposure at 6 hours old. Neither the survivorship nor metamorphosis function of embryos were significantly affected by realistic sediment exposures to ~1000 mg L-1. However, some embryos exhibited a previously undescribed response to dynamically suspended sediments, which saw 10% of the embryos form negatively buoyant cocoons at siliciclastic suspended sediment concentrations ≥35 mg L-1. Scanning electron and optical microscopy confirmed the presence of a coating on these embryos, possibly mucus with incorporated sediment particles. Cocoon formation was common in embryos but not in larvae, and occurred more often after exposure to siliciclastic rather than carbonate sediments. Once transferred into sediment-free seawater, functional ~36-h-old embryos began emerging from the cocoons, coinciding with cilia development. Ciliated (> 36-h-old) larvae exposed to suspended sediments for 60 h were also observed to secrete mucus and were similarly unaffected by suspended sediment concentrations to ~800 mg L-1. This study provides evidence that mucous secretion and cilia beating effectively protect coral embryos and larvae from suspended sediment and that these mechanisms may enhance

  3. Validation of Respirator Filter Efficacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    A 1980’ s unpublished ECBC report presented calculations of the required degree of filtration needed to protect a respirator wearer from a given...tested against three bioaerosols ranging in size from 0.69 – 0.88 µm aerodynamic diameter (Mycobacterium abscessus , staphylococcus epidermidis , and 10...and penetration beginning with 99.97% @ 0.3 µm for 10 cm/ s face velocity, a fiber diameter of 0.9 µm, a 0.07 solidity, a 0.3 mm media thickness, and

  4. Continuous measurement of suspended-sediment discharge in rivers by use of optical backscatterance sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, D.H.; Wright, S.A.; Bogen, J.; Fergus, T.; Walling, D.

    2003-01-01

    Optical sensors have been used to measure turbidity and suspended-sediment concentration by many marine and estuarine studies, and optical sensors can provide automated, continuous time series of suspended-sediment concentration and discharge in rivers. Three potential problems with using optical sensors are biological fouling, particle-size variability, and particle-reflectivity variability. Despite varying particle size, output from an optical backscatterance sensor in the Sacramento River at Freeport, California, USA, was calibrated successfully to discharge-weighted, cross-sectionally averaged suspended-sediment concentration, which was measured with the equal discharge-, or width-increment, methods and an isokinetic sampler. A correction for sensor drift was applied to the 3-year time series. However, the calibration of an optical backscatterance sensor used in the Colorado River at Cisco, Utah, USA, was affected by particle-size variability. The adjusted time series at Freeport was used to calculate hourly suspended-sediment discharge that compared well with daily values from a sediment station at Freeport. The appropriateness of using optical sensors in rivers should be evaluated on a site-specific basis and measurement objectives, potential particle size effects, and potential fouling should be considered.

  5. A measurement criterion for accurate mass detection using vibrating suspended microchannel resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Han; Zhang, Wen-Ming; Jiang, Hui-Ming; Hu, Kai-Ming; Hong, Fang-Jun; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a measurement criterion is presented to ensure the accuracy of mass detection using suspended microchannel resonators. The dynamic characteristics of the microchannel resonator with an added suspended particle are investigated to analyze and clarify the measurement principle for mass detection. It indicates that the vibration properties of the suspended particle have a significant effect on the measurement accuracy and the generation of systematic error. The fluid-structure interaction vibration of the particle driven by the resonator is solved by the lattice Boltzmann method integrated with the immersed boundary method. The effects of several important factors, including the particle density, fluid viscosity, and oscillating frequency, are studied and discussed. The results demonstrate that the Reynolds number and the density ratio are the two crucial parameters which affect the measurement accuracy and error generation. As the Reynolds number or the density ratio increases, the measurement precision degrades. Moreover, once the Reynolds number decreases to a critical value, the systematic error of mass detection reduces to zero. The measurement criterion can be taken as the guide to accurately detect the mass of suspended particle in the resonator.

  6. Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study #43442

    SciTech Connect

    Chochoms, Michael

    2016-04-20

    This course, Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study (#43442), addresses training requirements for supervisors of respirator wearers as specified by the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) Standard for Respiratory Protection, ANSI Z88.2, and as incorporated by reference in the Department of Energy (DOE) Worker Health and Safety Rule, 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 851. This course also presents the responsibilities of supervisors of respirator wearers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  7. Shenzhen: city of suspended possibility.

    PubMed

    Bach, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This essay on Shenzhen, China, presents three vignettes addressing the question of home in a city of migrants. The first section explores the ubiquitous narratives of success forming the city's foundational myth. The second follows this myth into the world of a Shenzhen filmmaker and his characters, as they navigate the tension between the idea of home and the urge to start anew, resulting in the suspended possibility of the title. The last section looks at young architects who hope to preserve the city's heterotopic sites of migrants and original villagers through architectural innovations. The cases show how an economy of desire supplements the political economy of this export-driven city. The city appears as an urban desiring machine that produces itself as an object of desire for the migrants of all classes who flock to its factories, "urban villages", white-collar jobs, luxury villas and underground economy. The essay is an encounter with the mythology of success and failure, the intertwining of home as an end and home as the beginning, and with the manipulation of space that allows residents to control their own subjectivity.

  8. An evaluation of respirator maintenance requirements.

    PubMed

    Brosseau, L M; Traubel, K

    1997-03-01

    A telephone survey was developed as part of a pilot study to evaluate the inspection, cleaning, maintenance, and storage aspects of respirator protection programs (RPP). Regulations and consensus standards such as those published by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) or the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) require or recommend that RPP contain elements that ensure that the respirators provide proper protection. A great deal of research has been done to evaluate the effectiveness of new respirators; however, little research has been conducted to evaluate how respirators behave over time in real industrial settings Respirator inspection, cleaning, maintenance, and storage are significant factors in determining how well a respirator continues to perform. The telephone survey was developed by reviewing the requirements and recommendations of CFR 1910.134 and ANSI Z88.2-1980. Approximately 30 companies were selected based on their use of negative air-purifying respirators. Most of the companies represented the hardgoods manufacturing or service industries. Although the majority of companies were meeting requirements, responses indicated that the following improvements in RPP were necessary: (1) inspection of all respirator parts should be carried out before and after each use, (2) replacement parts should be made readily available on site, (3) regular cleaning should be performed, and (4) more hands-on practice with respirators and their maintenance should be incorporated into training sessions.

  9. Respirator selection for clandestine methamphetamine laboratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gary O; Bronder, Gregory D; Larson, Scott A; Parker, Jay A; Metzler, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    First responders to illicit drug labs may not always have SCBA protection available. Air-purifying respirators using organic vapor cartridges with P-100 filters may not be sufficient. It would be better to use a NIOSH-approved CBRN respirator with its required multi-purpose cartridge system, which includes a P-100 filter. This would remove all the primary drug lab contaminants—organic vapors, acid gases, ammonia, phosphine, iodine, and airborne meth particulates. To assure the proper selection and use of a respirator, it is recommended that the contaminants present be identified and quantified and the OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134 respirator protection program requirements followed.

  10. Effect of suspended solids on the flow-induced corrosion of a modified Al-2.5Mg alloy in arabian gulf water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Zaki; Aleem, B. J. Abdul

    1992-02-01

    Suspended solids increase the rate of corrosion and decrease the resistance of a modified Al-2.5Mg alloy to pitting in Arabian Gulf water. It has been shown by electrochemical studies that the pitting potential of the alloy shifts to more negative values in the presence of suspended solids. The rate of mass transfer and the limiting current is significantly increased by suspended particles.

  11. Methodology for assessing respiration and cellular incorporation of radiolabeled substrates by soil microbial communities (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbins, D.C.; Pfaender, F.K.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for determining biodegradation kinetics of both naturally occurring and xenobiotic compounds in surface and subsurface soil samples. The method measures both respiration and uptake into cellular biomass of 14C-labeled substrates. After separation of the cells and the soil particles by centrifugation, the cells were trapped on membrane filters for liquid scintillation counting. Mass balances were easily obtained. The technique was used to measure metabolic activity in soil profiles, including unsaturated and saturated zones. First-order rate constants were determined for amino acid metabolism and for m-cresol metabolism. Saturation kinetics were observed for amino acids and m-cresol. m-Cresol values for uptake often exceeded those for respiration by greater than a factor of ten. Saturation was not observed in many horizons. Frequently, respiration obeyed saturation kinetics, whereas uptake was first order. It is concluded that measuring only kinetics of respiration may lead to severe underestimations of biodegradation rates.

  12. Technological advances in suspended-sediment surrogate monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John R.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.

    2009-01-01

    Surrogate technologies to continuously monitor suspended sediment show promise toward supplanting traditional data collection methods requiring routine collection and analysis of water samples. Commercially available instruments operating on bulk optic (turbidity), laser optic, pressure difference, and acoustic backscatter principles are evaluated based on cost, reliability, robustness, accuracy, sample volume, susceptibility to biological fouling, and suitable range of mass concentration and particle size distribution. In situ turbidimeters are widely used. They provide reliable data where the point measurements can be reliably correlated to the river's mean cross section concentration value, effects of biological fouling can be minimized, and concentrations remain below the sensor's upper measurement limit. In situ laser diffraction instruments have similar limitations and can cost 6 times the approximate $5000 purchase price of a turbidimeter. However, laser diffraction instruments provide volumetric-concentration data in 32 size classes. Pressure differential instruments measure mass density in a water column, thus integrating substantially more streamflow than a point measurement. They are designed for monitoring medium-to-large concentrations, are generally unaffected by biological fouling, and cost about the same as a turbidimeter. However, their performance has been marginal in field applications. Acoustic Doppler profilers use acoustic backscatter to measure suspended sediment concentrations in orders of magnitude more streamflow than do instruments that rely on point measurements. The technology is relatively robust and generally immune to effects of biological fouling. Cost of a single-frequency device is about double that of a turbidimeter. Multifrequency arrays also provide the potential to resolve concentrations by clay silt versus sand size fractions. Multifrequency hydroacoustics shows the most promise for revolutionizing collection of continuous

  13. A method for evaluating aerosol leakage through the interface between protective suits and full-face respirators.

    PubMed

    Arnoldsson, Kristina; Danielsson, Signar; Thunéll, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Military personnel and first responders use a range of personal equipment including protective suits, gloves, boots, and respirators to prevent exposure of their skin and airways to hazardous chemical, biological, radiological, and/or nuclear substances. Although each individual item of personal protective equipment is well tested against existing standards, it is also necessary to consider the performance of the interfaces between items in terms of prevention from exposure, and the protection system as a whole. This article presents an aerosol challenge method for assessing the performance of the interface between a respirator and the hood of a protective suit. The interface is formed between the sealing strip of the hood and the surface of the respirator's outer sealing area and is affected by how well the sealing strip can cover and adapt to the sealing area. The method evaluates the leakage of particles of different sizes into the hood via the interface by particle counting at sampling points around the respirator's perimeter. Three different respirators were tested together with a single hood having a tight-fitting seal. The method variation between measurements was low but increased appreciably when the protective ensemble was re-dressed between measurements. This demonstrates the difficulty of achieving a reliable and reproducible seal between respirator and hood under normal conditions. Different leakage patterns were observed for the three respirators and were linked to some specific design features, namely the respirator's sealing area at the chin and its width at cheek level. Induced leak experiments showed that to detect substantial particle leakage, channels at the hood-respirator interface must be quite large. The method outlined herein provides a straightforward way of evaluating hood-respirator interfaces and could be useful in the further development of personal protective equipment.

  14. Uncoupling Mitochondrial Respiration for Diabesity.

    PubMed

    Larrick, James W; Larrick, Jasmine W; Mendelsohn, Andrew R

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, the mechanism of adaptive thermogenesis was ascribed to the expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown and beige adipocytes. UCP1 is known to catalyze a proton leak of the inner mitochondrial membrane, resulting in uncoupled oxidative metabolism with no production of adenosine triphosphate and increased energy expenditure. Thus increasing brown and beige adipose tissue with augmented UCP1 expression is a viable target for obesity-related disorders. Recent work demonstrates an UCP1-independent pathway to uncouple mitochondrial respiration. A secreted enzyme, PM20D1, enriched in UCP1+ adipocytes, exhibits catalytic and hydrolytic activity to reversibly form N-acyl amino acids. N-acyl amino acids act as endogenous uncouplers of mitochondrial respiration at physiological concentrations. Administration of PM20D1 or its products, N-acyl amino acids, to diet-induced obese mice improves glucose tolerance by increasing energy expenditure. In short-term studies, treated animals exhibit no toxicity while experiencing 10% weight loss primarily of adipose tissue. Further study of this metabolic pathway may identify novel therapies for diabesity, the disease state associated with diabetes and obesity.

  15. Exposure of taxi drivers and office workers to total and respirable manganese in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Zayed, J; Mikhaïl, M; Loranger, S; Kennedy, G; L'Espérance, G

    1996-04-01

    This research measured the exposure of two groups of workers to respirable and total manganese (Mn) and characterized the Mn particles emitted from an automobile tailpipe. The exposure of 20 office workers and 9 taxi drivers in Toronto to total airborne Mn and respirable Mn was measured over a 7-day period, 24 hours per day. Subjects were asked to wear two pumps (one included a size-selective cyclone that collected the respirable particles), and two battery chargers were supplied to each person so that the pump batteries could be recharged overnight while sampling continued. All filters were analyzed by neutron activation. In addition, Mn particles emitted from a car were collected directly at the exhaust. Particles were observed using secondary electron images in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and their elemental composition was determined by energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. The Mn concentrations obtained for the group of office workers ranged from 0.001 to 0.034 microgram/m3 for respirable Mn and from 0.002 to 0.044 microgram/m3 for total Mn. For the taxi drivers the Mn concentrations ranged from 0.007 to 0.032 microgram/m3 for respirable Mn and from 0.008 to 0.073 microgram/m3 for total Mn. There was a significant difference (p < 0.05) between the two groups for both respirable and total Mn. SEM analysis showed that the particles were mostly heterogeneous agglomerates varying from 1 to 100 microns. Even if the specific exposure to Mn from automobiles has not been directly established, these results suggest that the related increase of exposure may be limited.

  16. Basic hydraulic experiment on the saturated concentration of suspended load due to tsunamis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Somekawa, Shiho

    2016-04-01

    When tsunamis arrive in the shallow sea, a huge amount of suspended load is generated by large velocity and strong turbulence. The suspended load causes the geomorphic processes of erosion and deposition. Because the suspended load cannot be increased endlessly, it should have the saturated concentration. Many numerical models of sediment transport due to tsunamis have assumed a constant value of 1% for the saturated concentration empirically. However, it is supposed as a function of velocity. In this study, a hydraulic experiment was carried out to investigate a relationship between velocity and the saturated concentration of suspended load when tsunamis attack. A water circulation pipe used in the experiment was 10 cm in a diameter, 260 cm in length and 50 cm in width. A velocity of water flow in the pipe had been controlled by two pumps and two valves. It was changed from 0.24 to 1.22 m/s. Various amounts of sand was spread on the bottom of pipe. The amount of sand was changed from 0.1 to 10% as converted in the concentration of suspended load if all sand suspended. A diameter and a density of the sand were 0.267 mm and 2.64 x 103 kg/m^3. A condition of sediment transport in the pipe was recorded by video camera from a transparent window at the side of pipe. The condition was judged as all sand particles were suspended or not. The former condition indicates that the concentration of suspended load is saturated and the latter does it is not saturated. When velocity was smaller than 0.47 m/s, there was no suspended load because of a weak tractive force. When velocity became larger, the suspended load was generated and the concentration also became higher. However, the concentration had the upper limit and surplus sand appeared on the bed of pipe when velocity became much larger. The condition gave the saturated concentration of suspended load. When velocity was 0.665 m/s, the saturated concentration was smaller than 1% which is used in many numerical simulations

  17. A Novel Device for Measuring Respirable Dustiness Using Low Mass Powder Samples

    PubMed Central

    O’Shaughnessy, Patrick T.; Kang, Mitchell; Ellickson, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Respirable dustiness represents the tendency of a powder to generate respirable airborne dust during handling and therefore indicates the propensity for a powder to become an inhalation hazard. The dustiness of fourteen powders, including ten different nanopowders, was evaluated with the use of a novel low mass dustiness tester (LMDT) designed to minimize the use of the test powder. The aerosol created from 15-mg powder samples falling down a tube were measured with an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). Particle counts integrated throughout the pulse of aerosol created by the falling powder were used to calculate a respirable dustiness mass fraction (D, mg/kg). An amorphous silicon dioxide nanopowder produced a respirable D of 121.4 mg/kg which was significantly higher than all other powders (p<0.001). Many nanopowders produced D values of that were not significantly different from large-particle powders such as Arizona Road Dust and Bentonite clay. In general, fibrous nanopowders and powders with primary particles > 100 nm are not as dusty as those containing granular, nano-sized primary particles. The method used here, incorporating an APS, represents a deviation from a standard method but resulted in dustiness values comparable to other standard methods. PMID:22335240

  18. Satellite power using magnetically suspended flywheel stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, James A.; Anand, Davinder K.

    1987-01-01

    Research activities with magnetically suspended flywheels are reported. The purpose of the effort is to critically examine and further the development of all the key technologies which impact the inertial energy storage system. The results presented discuss the concept of a magnetically suspended flywheel as it applies to a 500 Watt-hour energy storage system. The proposed system is currently under hardware development and is based upon two pancake magnetic bearings arranged in a vertical stack.

  19. Stability of suspended graphene under Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovsky, E. M.; Zarzuela, R.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a graphene sheet suspended above a conducting surface. Treating graphene as an elastic membrane subjected to Casimir force, we study its stability against sagging towards the conductor. There exists a critical elevation at the edges below which the central part of the suspended graphene nucleates a trunk that sinks under the action of the Casimir force. The dependence of the critical elevation on temperature, dimensions, and the elastic stress applied to the graphene sheet is computed.

  20. Observations on the use of acoustic Doppler velocimeters over rough beds with suspended sediment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Acoustic Doppler velocimeters provide a means for measuring velocities and turbulence in challenging circumstances, such as in flows with suspended particles, which are difficult or impossible with laser-based techniques. The relatively non-intrusive measurement resulting from the offset sampling v...

  1. Direct reading of electrocardiograms and respiration rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, J. P.

    1969-01-01

    Technique for reading heart and respiration rates is more accurate and direct than the previous method. Index of a plastic calibrated card is aligned with a point on the electrocardiogram. Complexes are counted as indicated on the card and heart or respiration rate is read directly from the appropriate scale.

  2. Photosynthesis and Respiration in a Jar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttner, Joseph K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity that reduces the biosphere to a water-filled jar to simulate the relationship between cellular respiration, photosynthesis, and energy. Allows students in high school biology and related courses to explore quantitatively cellular respiration and photosynthesis in almost any laboratory setting. (ASK)

  3. Photosynthesis and Respiration in a Jar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttner, Joseph K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity that reduces the biosphere to a water-filled jar to simulate the relationship between cellular respiration, photosynthesis, and energy. Allows students in high school biology and related courses to explore quantitatively cellular respiration and photosynthesis in almost any laboratory setting. (ASK)

  4. 78 FR 18535 - Respirator Certification Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... respiratory protection market generated revenues around $1,830 million in 2007, the most recent data available.\\4\\ A summary of market segmentation, by respirator type, is offered in Table 1, below. \\4\\ Frost... and paint applications and hazardous materials management. Of the U.S. respirator market of products...

  5. Respirators: APR Issuer Self Study 33461

    SciTech Connect

    Chochoms, Michael

    2016-07-13

    Respirators: APR Issuer Self-Study (course 33461) is designed to introduce and familiarize employees selected as air-purifying respirator (APR) issuers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with the responsibilities, limitations, procedures, and resources for issuing APRs at LANL. The goal is to enable these issuers to consistently provide proper, functioning APRs to authorized users

  6. Mitochondrial respiration is sensitive to cytoarchitectural breakdown.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Judith; Angelin, Alessia A; Wallace, Douglas C; Eckmann, David M

    2016-11-07

    An abundance of research suggests that cellular mitochondrial and cytoskeletal disruption are related, but few studies have directly investigated causative connections between the two. We previously demonstrated that inhibiting microtubule and microfilament polymerization affects mitochondrial motility on the whole-cell level in fibroblasts. Since mitochondrial motility can be indicative of mitochondrial function, we now further characterize the effects of these cytoskeletal inhibitors on mitochondrial potential, morphology and respiration. We found that although they did not reduce mitochondrial inner membrane potential, cytoskeletal toxins induced significant decreases in basal mitochondrial respiration. In some cases, basal respiration was only affected after cells were pretreated with the calcium ionophore A23187 in order to stress mitochondrial function. In most cases, mitochondrial morphology remained unaffected, but extreme microfilament depolymerization or combined intermediate doses of microtubule and microfilament toxins resulted in decreased mitochondrial lengths. Interestingly, these two particular exposures did not affect mitochondrial respiration in cells not sensitized with A23187, indicating an interplay between mitochondrial morphology and respiration. In all cases, inducing maximal respiration diminished differences between control and experimental groups, suggesting that reduced basal respiration originates as a largely elective rather than pathological symptom of cytoskeletal impairment. However, viability experiments suggest that even this type of respiration decrease may be associated with cell death.

  7. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Respiration in Sleep.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bliwise, Donald L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Associations between depression and impaired respiration in sleep are frequently noted clinically. This relationship was documented psychometrically with the Geriatric Depression Scale, a self-report measure of nonsomatic depressive symptoms. Mean values and effect size suggest that impaired respiration in sleep was associated with only relatively…

  8. Settleable and Non-Settleable Suspended Sediments in the Ogeechee River Estuary, Georgia, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, M.

    2000-06-01

    Suspended particle dynamics were investigated in the Ogeechee River Estuary during neap tide in July 1996. Samples were operationally separated into ' truly suspended ' (settling velocity <0·006 cm s-1) and ' settleable ' (settling velocity >0·006 cm s-1) fractions over the course of a tidal cycle to determine whether these two fractions were comprised of particles with differing biological and chemical characteristics. Total suspended sediment, organic carbon and nitrogen, chlorophyll a and phaeopigment concentrations were measured in each fraction, as well as rates of bacterial hydrolytic enzyme activity [β-1,4-glucosidase (βGase) and β-xylosidase (βXase)]. The majority of the suspended sediment (by weight) was in the truly suspended fraction; all measured parameters were largely associated with this fraction as well. When compared to the settleable material, the truly suspended material was significantly higher in % POC (5·7±0·6 vs. 3·9±1·8), % chlorophyll (0·07±0·02 vs. 0·03±0·01), % phaeopigment (0·030±0·006 vs. 0·018±0·012), and weight-specific maximal uptake rates (Vmaxper mg suspended sediment) of both enzymes (1·8±0·4 vs. 0·7± 0·2 nmol mg-1 h-1βGase and 1·1±0·3vs . 0·3±0·2 nmol mg-1 h-1βXase), providing clear evidence for a qualitative distinction between the two fractions. These results are interpreted to mean that the more organic-rich, biologically active material associated with the suspended fraction is likely to have a different fate in this Estuary, as ' truly suspended ' sediments will be readily transported whereas ' settleable ' sediments will settle and be resuspended with each tide. These types of qualitative differences should be incorporated into models of particle dynamics in estuaries.

  9. Temperature Effect on Suspended Cohesive Sediment Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalingam, S.; Chandra, V.

    2016-12-01

    The deposition of suspended cohesive sediments takes place in the form of flocculation which is governed by flow and sediment characteristics. Suspended cohesive sediments adsorb contaminants from surrounding environment during their transport from river to the ocean. These sediments partially settle at low velocity regions along the river and huge amount of sediments settle at the estuaries. The settled sediments affect both biological and chemical dynamics of aquatic environment. Hence, it is important to understand the behaviour of suspended cohesive sediments under different flow and sediment conditions. Temperature is one such parameter which influences the flow behaviour. In literature, the effect of water temperature on the behaviour of suspended cohesive sediments has received very little attention. Research studies based on settling column experiments have stated that cohesive sediment settling velocity increases with an increase of water temperature. In contrary, annular flume based studies have reported that the settling velocity increases with decrease of water temperature. Hence, this research work is mainly focussed to find the effect of temperature on suspended cohesive sediment concentration. Experiments are conducted at high water temperatures (30°, 40° and 50°C) in an annular flume using Kaolin (d50=7.9μm) at different bed shear stresses (0.01, 0.05 and 0.1Pa) and concentrations (1, 2 and 4g/L). Ionized water is used for conducting the experiments. The temporal variation of suspended cohesive sediment concentration and corresponding mean floc size are reported.

  10. Artificial Respiration and Artificial Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Joseph; Brook, Morris H.; Lopez, Jose F.

    1965-01-01

    A training program in the newer methods of treatment of acute cardiopulmonary emergencies which was developed at the University Hospital, University of Saskatchewan, is reported. Artificial respiration by the chance rescuer, primary and secondary resuscitation, and post-resuscitation measures involving the use of special drugs and equipment by trained personnel are described. Figures and tables designed for wall-mounting and ready reference in an emergency situation are presented. Firstaid ventilatory adjuncts for use by trained personnel are classified and critically appraised, and the propriety of their use is emphasized. A plea is made to the medical profession and allied agencies to assume the responsibility of spreading knowledge of the new techniques more widely. Unless effective treatment is instituted early enough to prevent death or permanent anoxic damage to heart and brain, follow-through therapy will often be fruitless. PMID:14339303

  11. Ordering of Fine Particles in a Planar Magnetron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Totsuji, H.; Ishihara, O.; Sato, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Adachi, S.

    2008-09-07

    Fine particles injected in a planar magnetron were pushed upward by diffusible plasma, leading to being suspended by the force balance with the gravity and forming three-dimensional structures on the two-dimensional structure formed by particle strings.

  12. Improving respiration measurements with gas exchange analyzers.

    PubMed

    Montero, R; Ribas-Carbó, M; Del Saz, N F; El Aou-Ouad, H; Berry, J A; Flexas, J; Bota, J

    2016-12-01

    Dark respiration measurements with open-flow gas exchange analyzers are often questioned for their low accuracy as their low values often reach the precision limit of the instrument. Respiration was measured in five species, two hypostomatous (Vitis Vinifera L. and Acanthus mollis) and three amphistomatous, one with similar amount of stomata in both sides (Eucalyptus citriodora) and two with different stomata density (Brassica oleracea and Vicia faba). CO2 differential (ΔCO2) increased two-fold with no change in apparent Rd, when the two leaves with higher stomatal density faced outside. These results showed a clear effect of the position of stomata on ΔCO2. Therefore, it can be concluded that leaf position is important to guarantee the improvement of respiration measurements increasing ΔCO2 without affecting the respiration results by leaf or mass units. This method will help to increase the accuracy of leaf respiration measurements using gas exchange analyzers.

  13. Sleep and Respiration in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, John B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Sleep is often reported to be of poor quality in microgravity, and studies on the ground have shown a strong relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption. During the 16-day Neurolab mission, we studied the influence of possible changes in respiratory function on sleep by performing comprehensive sleep recordings on the payload crew on four nights during the mission. In addition, we measured the changes in the ventilatory response to low oxygen and high carbon dioxide in the same subjects during the day, hypothesizing that changes in ventilatory control might affect respiration during sleep. Microgravity caused a large reduction in the ventilatory response to reduced oxygen. This is likely the result of an increase in blood pressure at the peripheral chemoreceptors in the neck that occurs when the normally present hydrostatic pressure gradient between the heart and upper body is abolished. This reduction was similar to that seen when the subjects were placed acutely in the supine position in one-G. In sharp contrast to low oxygen, the ventilatory response to elevated carbon dioxide was unaltered by microgravity or the supine position. Because of the similarities of the findings in microgravity and the supine position, it is unlikely that changes in ventilatory control alter respiration during sleep in microgravity. During sleep on the ground, there were a small number of apneas (cessation of breathing) and hypopneas (reduced breathing) in these normal subjects. During sleep in microgravity, there was a reduction in the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour compared to preflight. Obstructive apneas virtually disappeared in microgravity, suggesting that the removal of gravity prevents the collapse of upper airways during sleep. Arousals from sleep were reduced in microgravity compared to preflight, and virtually all of this reduction was as a result of a reduction in the number of arousals from apneas and hypopneas. We conclude that any sleep

  14. Effects of sinking velocities and microbial respiration rates on the attenuation of particulate carbon fluxes through the mesopelagic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, A. M. P.; Boyd, P. W.; Buesseler, K. O.

    2015-02-01

    The attenuation of sinking particle fluxes through the mesopelagic zone is an important process that controls the sequestration of carbon and the distribution of other elements throughout the oceans. Case studies at two contrasting sites, the oligotrophic regime of the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) and the mesotrophic waters of the west Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) sector of the Southern Ocean, revealed large differences in the rates of particle-attached microbial respiration and the average sinking velocities of marine particles, two parameters that affect the transfer efficiency of particulate matter from the base of the euphotic zone into the deep ocean. Rapid average sinking velocities of 270 ± 150 m d-1 were observed along the WAP, whereas the average velocity was 49 ± 25 m d-1 at the BATS site. Respiration rates of particle-attached microbes were measured using novel RESPIRE (REspiration of Sinking Particles In the subsuRface ocEan) sediment traps that first intercepts sinking particles then incubates them in situ. RESPIRE experiments yielded flux-normalized respiration rates of 0.4 ± 0.1 day-1 at BATS when excluding an outlier of 1.52 day-1, while these rates were undetectable along the WAP (0.01 ± 0.02 day-1). At BATS, flux-normalized respiration rates decreased exponentially with respect to depth below the euphotic zone with a 75% reduction between the 150 and 500 m depths. These findings provide quantitative and mechanistic insights into the processes that control the transfer efficiency of particle flux through the mesopelagic and its variability throughout the global oceans.

  15. Distribution and dispersal of suspended particulate matter on the Ebro continental shelf, northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palanques, A.; Drake, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrographic data, water and bottom-sediment samples, and a GEOPROBE tripod experiment were used to examine the distribution and dynamics of suspended particulate matter on the Ebro shelf in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. In the absence of strong winds and storms, primary sediment supply from the Ebro River is dispersed along the shelf by a general southward flow. In such calm conditions, suspended-matter concentrations on the shelf are lower than 3 mg/l and transfer of material from the shelf to the slope takes place principally over the shelf edge north of the Columbretes Islands. Very fine sediment deposited in a mid-shelf mud belt (30-80 m deep) is cohesive and resistant to erosion. Only relatively rare, strong storms are able to resuspend particles from the deeper, central region of this cohesive deposit. When resuspension takes place, suspended-particulate-matter concentration increases and the general dispersal pattern of suspended matter is altered. Near the seafloor, distribution of suspended matter is greatly influenced by the distribution of the mid-shelf muds from which particles are resuspended. Resuspension occurs more intensively and frequently along the shallower (20-40 m) edge of the cohesive deposit and near the delta. ?? 1990.

  16. Physicochemical characterization and evaluation of suspending properties of arabinoxylan from Ispaghula (Plantago ovata) husk.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Sajid; Erum, Alia; Saghir, Shazia; Tulain, Umme Ruqia; Rashid, Ayesha

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of arabinoxylan as potential suspending agent, an effective alternative to commercially used excipients for the preparation of pharmaceutical suspensions. Alkali extraction was done to separate arabinoxylan from ispaghula (Plantago ovata) seed husk by alkali extraction its physicochemical characterization was done and the suspending properties of arabinoxylan isolated were evaluated comparatively with those of bentonite at different concentration ranges of 0.125,0.25,0.5 and 1% in Zinc oxide suspension. The parameters employed for evaluation were sedimentation volume, degree of flocculation, flow rate, density, pH, redispersibility, microbiological evaluation and particle size analysis. Physicochemical characterization of arabinoxylan indicates its suitability as excipient as it has fair flow properties, low moisture content and almost neutral pH. Arabinoxylan at low conc. 0.125% showed sedimentation volume comparable to commercially used suspending agents such as bentonite 1% while suspensions containing higher concentrations such as 0.25% (sedimentation volume 92%), 0.5% (sedimentation volume 94%) and 1% conc. (sedimentation volume 98%) of arabinoxylan remained almost completely suspended during study period of 7 days. Formulations containing 0.125% and 0.25% arabinoxylan as suspending agents are easily redispersible as compared to bentonite containing formulation while formulation containing 0.5% arabinoxylan are moderately redispersible while formulation containing 1% suspending agent gel upon storage and was not redispersible. Furthermore arabinoxylan produces stable, highly flocculated suspension, which fulfilled microbiological, and particle size specifications, however the formulations containing higher arabinoxylan 1% concentration gel upon storage. So it is concluded that arabinoxylan could be used as effective suspending agent at low concentrations in Zinc oxide suspension.

  17. The effect of gender and respirator brand on the association of respirator fit with facial dimensions.

    PubMed

    Oestenstad, R Kent; Elliott, Leshan J; Beasley, T Mark

    2007-12-01

    This study examined the association of facial dimensions with respirator fit considering the effect of gender and respirator brand. Forty-one subjects (20 white females and 21 white males) participated in the study. Each subject was measured for 12 facial dimensions using anthropometric sliding and spreading calipers and a steel measuring tape. Three quantitative fit tests were conducted with the same subject wearing one size of three different brands of half-mask respirators resulting in a total of nine fit tests. Linear mixed model analysis was used to model respirator fit as a function of gender and respirator brand while controlling for facial dimensions. Results indicated that the gender by respirator brand interaction was not statistically significant (p = 0.794), and there was no significant difference in respirator fit between males and females (p = 0.356). There was a significant difference in respirator fit among respirator brands (p < 0.001). Because correlations between facial dimensions and respirator fit differed across gender and respirator brand, six separate linear mixed models were fit to assess which facial dimensions most strongly relate to respirator fit using a "one variable at a step" backward elimination procedure. None of the 12 facial dimensions were significantly associated with respirator fit in all six models. However, bigonial breadth and menton-nasion length were significantly associated with respirator fit in five of the six models, and biectoorbitale breadth, bizygomatic breadth, and lip width were significantly associated with respirator fit in four of the six models. Although this study resulted in significant findings related to the correlation of respirator fit with menton-nasion length and lip width (the dimensions currently used to define the half-mask respirator test panel), other facial dimensions were also shown to be significantly associated with respirator fit. Based on these findings and findings from previous studies

  18. Continuous-flow centrifugation to collect suspended sediment for chemical analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conn, Kathleen E.; Dinicola, Richard S.; Black, Robert W.; Cox, Stephen E.; Sheibley, Richard W.; Foreman, James R.; Senter, Craig A.; Peterson, Norman T.

    2016-12-22

    polychlorinated biphenyls. The particle-size distribution of the captured sediment changes to a more fine-grained sample during centrifugation, and the necessity to account for this change when extrapolating chemical concentrations on the centrifuged sediment sample to the environmental water system is discussed.The data produced using this method will help eliminate a data gap of suspended sediment-bound chemical concentrations, and will support management decisions, such as chemical source-control efforts or in-stream restoration activities. When coupled with streamflow and sediment flux data, it will improve estimates of riverine chemical fluxes, and will aid in assessing the importance and impacts of suspended sediment-bound chemicals to downstream freshwater and coastal marine ecosystems.

  19. Impact of Mining Waste on Airborne Respirable Particulates in Northeastern Oklahoma, United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric dispersion of particles from mine waste is potentially an important route of human exposure to metals in communities close to active and abandoned mining areas. In this study, we assessed sources of mass and metal concentrations in two size fractions of respirable pa...

  20. Impact of Mining Waste on Airborne Respirable Particulates in Northeastern Oklahoma, United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric dispersion of particles from mine waste is potentially an important route of human exposure to metals in communities close to active and abandoned mining areas. In this study, we assessed sources of mass and metal concentrations in two size fractions of respirable pa...

  1. A New Simple Suspended-Load Sampler: Continuous Particulate Matter Collection from Rivers with Low and High Suspended Matter Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralik, Martin; Miesbauer, Hermann; Humer, Franko; Oberndorfer, Hermann

    2010-05-01

    Please fill in your abstract text. Suspended particulate matter (SPM) or suspended load in waters is the part of the stream load that is carried for a considerable period of time in suspension. Long term suspended sediment monitoring is hampered by the limited sample size or enormous investments in equipment and/or working hours. In addition many samplers are limited to easily accessible sampling points equipped with electric power supply or to certain types of streams and cannot operate unattended in case of floods. The sorption characteristics of the suspended particulate matter (wash load) have been recognized as important transporters of natural and anthropogenic trace constituents. To allow repeated analyses sometimes several grams of dried SPM are needed. All parts of the sediment sampler are available as spare parts in hardware stores and made of polyvinylchloride (PVC). The inlet device is connected with the sampler by a tubing of several meter length. Without a pump the sampler can be positioned at a safe place lower than the inlet device to allow a continuous flow. Only a small portion (0.001-0.002 l/s) of the river water flows down through the central pipe by gravitational force to the bottom of the container. Due to the considerable larger diameter of the container the water rises very slowly (1-3 hours) and leaves the container at a small overflow-pipe allowing a nearly complete settling and/or flocculation (80-90%) of the suspended load in the container. The sampler was tested in an alpine torrent and two rivers in flat areas. The newly developed sampler offers following advantages. The sampler (1) is inexpensive and robust, (2) operates in case of small cascade or cataracts (>0.5 m) without power supply, (3) can be used singly or in lateral or vertical nests, (4) allows continuous settling and flocculation without perturbation by vibrating movements of the sampler (5) is resistant to plugging and clogging by coarser particles and plant debris, (6

  2. Clinical pulmonary function and industrial respirator wear

    SciTech Connect

    Raven, P.B.; Moss, R.F.; Page, K.; Garmon, R.; Skaggs, B.

    1981-12-01

    This investigation was the initial step in determining a clinical pulmonary test which could be used to evaluate workers as to their suitability to industrial respirator wear. Sixty subjects, 12 superior, 37 normal, and 11 moderately impaired with respect to lung function tests were evaluated with a battery of clinical pulmonary tests while wearing an industrial respirator. The respirator was a full-face mask (MSA-Ultravue) demand breathing type equipped with an inspiratory resistance of 85mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow and an expiratory resistance of 25mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow. Comparisons of these tests were made between the three groups of subjects both with and without a respirator. It appears that those lung tests which measure the flow characteristics of the lung especially those that are effort dependant are more susceptible to change as a result of respirator wear. Hence, the respirator affects the person with superior lung function to a greater degree than the moderately impaired person. It was suggested that the clinical test of 15 second maximum voluntary ventilations (MVV./sub 25/) may be the test of choice for determining worker capability in wearing an industrial respirator.

  3. Concentration, clay mineral composition and Coulter counter size distribution of suspended sediment in the turbidity maximum of the Jiaojiang river estuary, Zhejiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B. G.; Eisma, D.; Xie, Q. Ch.; Kalf, J.; Li, Y.; Xia, X.

    1999-09-01

    Measurements of current velocities, concentrations of suspended matter and Coulter counter size distributions of the suspended matter during the tidal cycle at the surface, at mid-depth and near to the bottom were carried out during spring and neap tide in the Jiaojiang river estuary, Zhejiang, China. The results indicate that a lutocline was present during most of the tidal cycle, except during the highest tides when the suspended-matter concentrations were approximately uniform over the entire water depth. Suspended-matter concentrations showed a relation with maximum flow velocities in the surface water and with increasing flow velocities in the bottom water, with regular deposition and resuspension during the tidal cycle. The clay mineral composition of the suspended matter indicated that most of the suspended matter was supplied by the Chang Jiang river. There was probably also some local supply and local sorting. The suspended-matter particle size, measured with a Coulter counter, became larger (with a larger standard deviation) when the suspended-matter concentration increased, and smaller when the suspended-matter concentration decreased. Size sorting during the tidal cycle indicated deflocculation and reflocculation processes; break-up of about 10 to 20% of the flocs in suspension is sufficient to produce the shift in the Coulter counter size distributions observed. This led to the conclusion that the trend in the smectite concentration in the estuary was the result of local sorting of smectite-containing particles after floc break-up.

  4. A study of metal ion adsorption at low suspended-solid concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, Cecily C.Y.; Davis, J.A.; Kuwabara, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure for conducting adsorption studies at low suspended solid concentrations in natural waters (<50 mg l-1) is described. Methodological complications previously associated with such experiments have been overcome. Adsorption of zinc ion onto synthetic colloidal titania (TiO2) was studied as a function of pH, supporting electrolyte (NaCl) concentration (0??1-0??002 m) and particle concentration (2-50 mg l-1). The lack of success of the Davis Leckie site bonding model in describing Zn(II) adsorption emphasizes the need for further studies of adsorption at low suspended-solid concentrations. ?? 1987.

  5. Monitoring baseline suspended sediment in forested basins: the effects of sampling on suspended sediment rating curves

    Treesearch

    Robert B. Thomas

    1988-01-01

    Abstract - Rating curves are widely used for directly assessing changes in the suspended sediment delivery process and indirectly for estimating total yields. Four sampling methods were simulated-over a 31-day record of suspended sediment from the North Fork of the Mad River near Korbel, California. The position and size of the four groups of plotted slope/intercept...

  6. Dispersal of suspended matter in Makasar Strait and the Flores Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisma, D.; Kalf, J.; Karmini, M.; Mook, W. G.; van Put, A.; Bernard, P.; van Grieken, R.

    In November 1984 in Makasar and the Flores Basin water samples were collected (T, S, dissolved O 2, total CO 2), bottom samples (sediment composition) and suspended matter (particle composition, particle size). A sediment trap was moored in the Flores Basin at 4600 m depth for nearly four months, covering the dry season. In the Flores Basin there are indications for bottom flow resuspending bottom material or preventing suspended material from settling; in Makasar Strait there is probably inflow of deep water both from the south and from the north, resulting in a very slow bottom water flor. Bottom deposits in Makasar Strait and the Flores Basin are predominantly terrigenous, with an admixture of organic carbonate and silica (mostly coccoliths). Volcanic material is primarily present near to the volcanoes in the south and reaches the deeper basins by slumping. In the suspended matter no volcanic particles and little planktonic material were found, although the latter form 10 to 15% of the top sediment and of the material deposited in the sediment trap. In suspension particles with a large concentration of tin (Sn) were found associated mainly with iron. They probably come from northern Kalimantan or northern Sulawesi. Suspended matter concentrations were mainly less than 0.5 mg·dm -3, only off the Mahakam river mouth were concentrations higher than 1 mg·dm -3. Particle size was erratic because of the variable composition of the coarser particles in suspension. Organic matter concentrations in suspension (in mg·dm -3) roughly follow the distribution of total suspended matter but organic content (in %) of the suspended matter does not show any trends. All organic matter in suspension is of marine origin except in the Mahakam river and estuary. Deposition rates, as estimated from the sediment trap results, are 150 mg·cm -2·a -1 for the total sediment, 26 mg·cm -2·a -1 for carbonate and 13 mg·cm -2·a -1 for organic matter. Flocs and fibres in suspension were

  7. Suspended two-dimensional electron and hole gases

    SciTech Connect

    Kazazis, D.; Bourhis, E.; Gierak, J.; Gennser, U.; Bourgeois, O.; Antoni, T.

    2013-12-04

    We report on the fabrication of fully suspended two-dimensional electron and hole gases in III-V heterostructures. Low temperature transport measurements verify that the properties of the suspended gases are only slightly degraded with respect to the non-suspended gases. Focused ion beam technology is used to pattern suspended nanostructures with minimum damage from the ion beam, due to the small width of the suspended membrane.

  8. BOREAS TE-5 Soil Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected measurements in the NSA and SSA on gas exchange, gas composition, and tree growth. Soil respiration data were collected from 26-May-94 to 07-Sep-94 in the BOREAS NSA and SSA to compare the soil respiration rates in different forest sites using a LI-COR 6200 soil respiration chamber (model 6299). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distrobuted Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  9. Respirator Filter Efficiency Testing Against Particulate and Biological Aerosols Under Moderate to High Flow Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    mainly of charge- neutralized dioctyl phthalate (DOP), sodium chloride (NaCl), corn oil, or polystyrene latex (PSL) spheres. The aerosol concentrations...function of particle size for several filtering facepieces and DM, DFM, and HEPA respirator cartridges using corn oil particles over a size range of...globigii, M luteus, and P. alcaligenes, monodisperse urea aerosols (1.5, 3, 5, 7, and 9 um), and a NaCl aerosol (0.6 Vtm MMAD, 2.3 GSD). Bacterial

  10. [Performance evaluation of two N95 filtering-facepiece respirators on decomposition products of sulfur hexafluoride].

    PubMed

    Zhu, X C; Lu, W; Nie, X Q; Zhou, M; Zhang, R B; Qin, S X; Chen, W H

    2016-05-20

    To assess the filtration efficiency of two N95 filtering-facepiece respirators (FFRs) for the decomposition products of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). Two types of N95 FFRs (the particulate and the acid-proof respirators) were selected in this study. The decomposition products of SF6, including particles, hydrogen fluoride (HF) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) , were measured under experimental condition by using TSI PortaCount Plus, fluorine ion-selective electrodes and spectrophotometer separately. The filtration efficiency was then calculated and compared. Both two models of N95 respirators had lowest filtration efficiency larger than 95% for particles under airflow ranged from 10 to 95 L/min. When exposed to different concentrations of HF (low: 0.00~1.99 mg/m(3), middle: 2.00~3.99 mg/m(3), high: >4 mg/m(3)) , the acid-proof N95 respirator was more effective than the particulate respirator (P<0.05) with a filtration efficiency of 98.83%, 99.08%, and 99.03% versus 48.44%, 45.71%, and 47.31%. For four SO2 concentration ranges (0.00~2.49 mg/m(3), 2.50~4.99 mg/m(3), 5.00~9.99 mg/m(3), and >10.00 mg/m(3)) , the acid-proof respirator showed a high filtration efficiency within exposure to 1.5 hours: 95.73%, 98.67%, 98.14%, and 97.78%, respectively, when exposure duration extended to 4 hours, the filtration efficiency of the acid-proof respirator decreased to 91.97%, 82.28%, 70.12%, and 58.56%, respectively. Both the particulate and the acid-proof N95 FFRs met national standards on the particulate filtration efficiency. The acid-proof N95 respirator demonstrates to be more effective in filtering HF and SO2 than the particulate respirator. The filtration efficiency could decrease to an unsafe condition under longer exposure duration, timely replacement of respirator is recommended at the workplace.

  11. Respiration in Neonate Sea Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Paladino, Frank V.; Strohl, Kingman P.; Pilar Santidrián, T.; Klann, Kenneth; Spotila, James R.

    2007-01-01

    The pattern and control of