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Sample records for respiratory chain activity

  1. Administration of memantine and imipramine alters mitochondrial respiratory chain and creatine kinase activities in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Stringari, Roberto B; Rezin, Gislaine T; Fraga, Daiane B; Daufenbach, Juliana F; Scaini, Giselli; Benedet, Joana; Rochi, Natália; Streck, Emílio L; Quevedo, João

    2012-04-01

    Several studies have appointed for a role of glutamatergic system and/or mitochondrial function in major depression. In the present study, we evaluated the creatine kinase and mitochondrial respiratory chain activities after acute and chronic treatments with memantine (N-methyl-D: -aspartate receptor antagonist) and imipramine (tricyclic antidepressant) in rats. To this aim, rats were acutely or chronically treated for 14 days once a day with saline, memantine (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) and imipramine (10, 20 and 30 mg/kg). After acute or chronic treatments, we evaluated mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, II, II-III and IV) and creatine kinase activities in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Our results showed that both acute and chronic treatments with memantine or imipramine altered respiratory chain complexes and creatine kinase activities in rat brain; however, these alterations were different with relation to protocols (acute or chronic), complex, dose and brain area. Finally, these findings further support the hypothesis that the effects of imipramine and memantine could be involve mitochondrial function modulation.

  2. Respiratory chain proteins.

    PubMed

    Kadenbach, B; Schneyder, B; Mell, O; Stroh, S; Reimann, A

    1991-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondrial DNA codes for 13 proteins, which are all components of energy transducing enzyme complexes of the respiratory chain, i.e. the complexes which translocate protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The number of subunits of these enzyme complexes increase with increasing evolutionary stage of the organism. The additional nuclear coded subunits of the enzyme complexes from higher organisms are involved in the regulation of respiration, as demonstrated by the influence of intraliposomal ATP and ADP on the reconstituted cytochrome c oxidase (COX) from bovine heart. This regulation is not found with the reconstituted enzyme from P. denitrificans, which lacks the nuclear coded subunits. Some of the nuclear coded subunits occur in tissue-specific isoforms, as reported for COX and NADH dehydrogenase. Tissue-specific regulation of COX activity is also demonstrated by the differential effects of intraliposomal ADP on the kinetics of reconstituted COX from bovine liver and heart, which differ in subunits VIa, VIIa and VIII. At least 3 different COX isozymes occur in bovine liver, heart or skeletal muscle and smooth muscle. An evolutionary relationship between COX subunits VIa and VIc and between VIIa and VIIb is suggested based on the crossreactivity of monoclonal antibodies, amino acid sequence homology and hybridization at low stringency of PCR-amplified cDNAs for subunits VIa-1, VIa-h and VIc from the rat.

  3. Respiratory chain enzyme activities in spermatozoa from untreated Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Molina, J A; Ruiz-Pesini, E; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; López-Pérez, M J; Alvarez, E; Berbel, A; Ortí-Pareja, M; Zurdo, M; Tallón-Barranco, A; de Bustos, F; Arenas, J

    1999-01-01

    We studied respiratory chain enzyme activities in spermatozoa homogenates from 12 untreated Parkinson's disease (PD) male patients and from 23 age matched healthy male controls. When compared with controls, PD patients showed significantly lower specific activities for complexes I+ III, II+III, and IV. However, citrate synthase corrected activities were similar in patients and controls. Values for enzyme activities in the PD group did not correlate with age at onset, duration, scores of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scales and Hoehn and Yahr staging. These results suggest that this tissue cannot be used to develop a diagnostic test for PD.

  4. Mitotane alters mitochondrial respiratory chain activity by inducing cytochrome c oxidase defect in human adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Hescot, Ségolène; Slama, Abdelhamid; Lombès, Anne; Paci, Angelo; Remy, Hervé; Leboulleux, Sophie; Chadarevian, Rita; Trabado, Séverine; Amazit, Larbi; Young, Jacques; Baudin, Eric; Lombès, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Mitotane, 1,1-dichloro-2-(o-chlorophenyl)-2-(p-chlorophenyl)ethane is the most effective medical therapy for adrenocortical carcinoma, but its molecular mechanism of action remains poorly understood. Although mitotane is known to have mitochondrial (mt) effects, a direct link to mt dysfunction has never been established. We examined the functional consequences of mitotane exposure on proliferation, steroidogenesis, and mt respiratory chain, biogenesis and morphology, in two human adrenocortical cell lines, the steroid-secreting H295R line and the non-secreting SW13 line. Mitotane inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and a time-dependent manner. At the concentration of 50 μM (14 mg/l), which corresponds to the threshold for therapeutic efficacy, mitotane drastically reduced cortisol and 17-hydroxyprogesterone secretions by 70%. This was accompanied by significant decreases in the expression of genes encoding mt proteins involved in steroidogenesis (STAR, CYP11B1, and CYP11B2). In both H295R and SW13 cells, 50 μM mitotane significantly inhibited (50%) the maximum velocity of the activity of the respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase (COX)). This effect was associated with a drastic reduction in steady-state levels of the whole COX complex as revealed by blue native PAGE and reduced mRNA expression of both mtDNA-encoded COX2 (MT-CO2) and nuclear DNA-encoded COX4 (COX4I1) subunits. In contrast, the activity and expression of respiratory chain complexes II and III were unaffected by mitotane treatment. Lastly, mitotane exposure enhanced mt biogenesis (increase in mtDNA content and PGC1α (PPARGC1A) expression) and triggered fragmentation of the mt network. Altogether, our results provide first evidence that mitotane induced a mt respiratory chain defect in human adrenocortical cells.

  5. Impairment of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activities in tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Santosh B; Save, Vipul C; Patil, Neela D; Mishra, Kaushala P; Tendolkar, Anil G

    2007-02-01

    During the last decade, disorders of the respiratory chain, so-called mitochondrial disorders, have emerged as a major clinical entity. Tetralogy of fallot (TOF) children>2 month of age are at risk for postoperative myocardial contractile failure. Myocardial ischemia is associated with a reduction in mitochondrial enzyme activity and have impaired metabolism resulting in decreased postoperative myocardial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentrations and increased lactate levels. With this in view, we measured the mitochondrial energy system (respiration and OXPHOS) and to study morphological changes from the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) muscle of patients with TOF. 30 infants with TOF were studied with age-matched control group consisted of 12 normal patients who died due to extracardiac causes. Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, OXPHOS, cytochrome content and ATPase activity were measured by documented standard procedure. Morphological changes examined with a transmission electron microscope. In the presence of glutamate and succinate as substrates, the rate of mitochondrial oxygen consumption was significantly lower in RVOT muscles (p<0.001) by using with and without addition of ADP. The ADP/O ratio indices for glutamate and succinate were not significantly affected. The activities of rotenone-sensitive NADH cytochrome c reductase (complexes I+III), cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) and the ratio of I and III to II and III complexes (complex I) were significantly lower in TOF (p<0.001). A significant reduction of total cytochrome content and ATPase activity (p<0.001) was noted in study group. Morphological changes were also seen in study group as compared with control. OXPHOS, mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I, I+III and IV, cytochrome content and ATPase activity are more impaired in RVOT muscles in patients with TOF.

  6. Acute and Chronic Treatments with Quetiapine Increase Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Activity in the Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Ignácio, Zuleide M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Abelaira, Helena M; Titus, Stephanie E; Carlessi, Anelise S; da Luz, Jaine R; Matias, Beatriz I; Bruchchen, Livia; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Rebelo, Joyce; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have found that the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial energy metabolism are impaired in major depressive disorder (MDD). Classic antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics can alter the function of enzymes involved in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism. Quetiapine is an atypical antipsychotic that, in addition to having a therapeutic benefit in treating MDD, appears to exert antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the acute and chronic effects of quetiapine on the activity of enzyme complexes I to IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and creatine kinase (CK) in brain regions involved with MDD. After a single dose or serial injections over 14 days of quetiapine (20, 40, and 80 mg) were administered, isolates from the pre- frontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens were analyzed for enzyme activity levels. The enzyme activity varied according to the dose, brain region, and acute or chronic dosing protocols. In general, complexes I-III activity was increased, especially after acute administration. Acute administration also increased the activity of complex IV and CK in the amygdala while complex I was inhibited in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. These results suggest that quetiapine produces an increase in respiratory chain complex activity, which may be underlying its efficacy against psychiatric disorders and neuronal damage.

  7. Activities of respiratory chain complexes and citrate synthase influenced by pharmacologically different antidepressants and mood stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Hroudova, Jana; Fisar, Zdenek

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions, impaired bioenergetics and dysfunction of neurotrophins are included in many neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. We investigated in vitro effects of pharmacologically different antidepressants and mood stabilizers on mitochondrial enzymes to discover, which mitochondrial functions could be involved in pathophysiology of mood disorders. In vitro effects of eight pharmacologically different antidepressants (desipramine, amitriptyline, imipramine, citalopram, venlafaxine, mirtazapine, tianeptine, and moclobemide) and three mood stabilizers (lithium, valproate, and olanzapine) on the activities of mitochondrial enzymes (citrate synthase and enzymes in electron transport chain, i.e. complexes I, II, IV) were measured in crude mitochondrial fraction isolated from pig brain. Most of the antidepressants and mood stabilizers inhibited the activities of respiratory electron transport chain complexes, complexes I and IV were the most affected. Statistically significant decrease of the complex I activity was caused by desipramine, amitriptyline, imipramine, citalopram, mirtazapine, valproate and olanzapine. Complex II was significantly inhibited only by amitriptyline, imipramine, citalopram and venlafaxine. Complex IV was significantly inhibited by all tested drugs except for citalopram and moclobemide. Unchanged or slightly increased citrate synthase activity was observed; significant activation of the enzyme was observed after citalopram, tianeptine and olanzapine. Our results indicate that antidepressants may act generally as inhibitors of complex I and complex IV of the electron transport chain. These mitochondrial enzymes are suggested as proper candidates in searching of new biological markers of mood disorders, targets of new antidepressants or predictors of response to pharmacotherapy.

  8. Cooperativity and flexibility of the protonmotive activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Papa, Sergio; Lorusso, Michele; Di Paola, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Functional and structural data are reviewed which provide evidence that proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase is associated with extended allosteric cooperativity involving the four redox centers in the enzyme . Data are also summarized showing that the H+/e- stoichiometry for proton pumping in the cytochrome span of the mitochondrial respiratory chain is flexible. The DeltapH component of the bulk-phase membrane electrochemical proton gradient exerts a decoupling effect on the proton pump of both the bc1 complex and cytochrome c oxidase. A slip in the pumping efficiency of the latter is also caused by high electron pressure. The mechanistic and physiological implications of proton-pump slips are examined. The easiness with which bulk phase DeltapH causes, at least above a threshold level, decoupling of proton pumping indicates that for active oxidative phosphorylation efficient protonic coupling between redox complexes and ATP synthase takes place at the membrane surface, likely in cristae, without significant formation of delocalized DeltamuH+. A role of slips in modulating oxygen free radical production by the respiratory chain and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis is discussed.

  9. A statistical algorithm showing coenzyme Q10 and citrate synthase as biomarkers for mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Yubero, D; Adin, A; Montero, R; Jou, C; Jiménez-Mallebrera, C; García-Cazorla, A; Nascimento, A; O'Callaghan, M M; Montoya, J; Gort, L; Navas, P; Ribes, A; Ugarte, M D; Artuch, R

    2016-12-01

    Laboratory data interpretation for the assessment of complex biological systems remains a great challenge, as occurs in mitochondrial function research studies. The classical biochemical data interpretation of patients versus reference values may be insufficient, and in fact the current classifications of mitochondrial patients are still done on basis of probability criteria. We have developed and applied a mathematic agglomerative algorithm to search for correlations among the different biochemical variables of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in order to identify populations displaying correlation coefficients >0.95. We demonstrated that coenzyme Q10 may be a better biomarker of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activities than the citrate synthase activity. Furthermore, the application of this algorithm may be useful to re-classify mitochondrial patients or to explore associations among other biochemical variables from different biological systems.

  10. A statistical algorithm showing coenzyme Q10 and citrate synthase as biomarkers for mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Yubero, D; Adin, A; Montero, R; Jou, C; Jiménez-Mallebrera, C; García-Cazorla, A; Nascimento, A; O'Callaghan, M M; Montoya, J; Gort, L; Navas, P; Ribes, A; Ugarte, M D; Artuch, R

    2016-12-05

    Laboratory data interpretation for the assessment of complex biological systems remains a great challenge, as occurs in mitochondrial function research studies. The classical biochemical data interpretation of patients versus reference values may be insufficient, and in fact the current classifications of mitochondrial patients are still done on basis of probability criteria. We have developed and applied a mathematic agglomerative algorithm to search for correlations among the different biochemical variables of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in order to identify populations displaying correlation coefficients >0.95. We demonstrated that coenzyme Q10 may be a better biomarker of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activities than the citrate synthase activity. Furthermore, the application of this algorithm may be useful to re-classify mitochondrial patients or to explore associations among other biochemical variables from different biological systems.

  11. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders.

  12. Chronic Stress Causes Sex-Specific and Structure-Specific Alterations in Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Activity in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    de Souza Mota, Carina; Weis, Simone Nardin; Almeida, Roberto Farina; Dalmaz, Carla; Guma, Fátima Therezinha Costa; Pettenuzzo, Letícia Ferreira

    2017-09-14

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces a variety of changes in brain function, some of which are mediated by glucocorticoids. The response to stress occurs in a sex-specific way, and may include mitochondrial and synaptic alterations. The synapse is highly dependent on mitochondrial energy supply, and when mitochondria become dysfunctional, they orchestrate cell death. This study aimed to investigate the CRS effects on mitochondrial respiratory chain activity, as well as mitochondrial potential and mass in cell body and synapses using hippocampus, cortex and striatum of male and female rats. Rats were divided into non-stressed (control) and stressed group (CRS during 40 days). Results showed that CRS increased complex I-III activity in hippocampus. We also observed an interaction between CRS and sex in the striatal complex II activity, since CRS induced a reduction in complex II activity in males, while in females this activity was increased. Also an interaction was observed between stress and sex in cortical complex IV activity, since CRS induced increased activity in females, while it was reduced in males. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) content in cortex and hippocampus was sexually dimorphic, with female rats presenting higher levels compared to males. No changes were observed in GR content, mitochondrial potential or mass of animals submitted to CRS. It was concluded that CRS induced changes in respiratory chain complex activities, and some of these changes are sex-dependent: these activities are increased in the striatal mitochondria by CRS protocol mainly in females, while in males it is decreased.

  13. Glucagon treatment of rats activates the respiratory chain of liver mitochondria at more than one site.

    PubMed

    Halestrap, A P

    1987-02-18

    The rate of reduction of ferricyanide in the presence and absence of antimycin and ubiquinone-1 was measured using liver mitochondria from control and glucagon treated rats. Glucagon treatment was shown to increase electron flow from both NADH and succinate to ubiquinone, and from ubiquinone to cytochrome c. 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) was shown to inhibit the oxidation of glutamate + malate to a much greater extent than that of succinate or duroquinol. Spectral and kinetic studies confirmed that electron flow between NADH and ubiquinone was the primary site of action but that the interaction of the ubiquinone pool with complex 3 was also affected. The effects of various respiratory chain inhibitors on the rate of uncoupled oxidation of succinate and glutamate + malate by control and glucagon treated mitochondria were studied. The stimulation of respiration seen in the mitochondria from glucagon treated rats was maintained or increased as respiration was progressively inhibited with DCMU, 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone (DBMIB), 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-n-oxide (HQNO) and colletotrichin, but greatly reduced when inhibition was produced with malonate or antimycin. These data were also shown to support the conclusion that glucagon treatment may cause some stimulation of electron flow through NADH dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase and through the bc1 complex, probably at the point of interaction of the complexes with the ubiquinone pool. The effects of glucagon treatment on duroquinol oxidation and the inhibitor titrations could not be mimicked by increasing the matrix volume, nor totally reversed by aging of mitochondria. These are both processes that have been suggested as the means by which glucagon exerts its effects on the respiratory chain (Armston, A.E., Halestrap, A.P. and Scott, R.D., 1982, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 681, 429-439). It is concluded that an additional mechanism for regulating electron flow must exist and a

  14. The effect of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) extract on respiratory chain system activity in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Juzyszyn, Z; Czerny, B; Myśliwiec, Z; Pawlik, A; Droździk, M

    2010-06-01

    The effect of artichoke extract on mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) activity in isolated rat liver mitochondria (including reaction kinetics) was studied. The effect of the extract on the activity of isolated cytochrome oxidase was also studied. Extract in the range of 0.68-2.72 microg/ml demonstrated potent and concentration-dependent inhibitory activity. Concentrations > or =5.4 microg/ml entirely inhibited MRC activity. The succinate oxidase system (MRC complexes II-IV) was the most potently inhibited, its activity at an extract concentration of 1.36 microg/ml being reduced by 63.3% compared with the control (p < 0.05). The results suggest a complex inhibitory mechanism of the extract. Inhibition of the succinate oxidase system was competitive (K(i) = 0.23 microg/ml), whereas isolated cytochrome oxidase was inhibited noncompetitively (K(i) = 126 microg/ml). The results of this study suggest that the salubrious effects of artichoke extracts may rely in part on the effects of their active compounds on the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain system.

  15. Respiratory-chain enzyme activities in isolated mitochondria of lymphocytes from untreated Parkinson's disease patients. Grupo-Centro de Trastornos del Movimiento.

    PubMed

    Martín, M A; Molina, J A; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Benito-León, J; Ortí-Pareja, M; Campos, Y; Arenas, J

    1996-05-01

    We studied respiratory-chain enzyme activities in lymphocyte mitochondria from 36 untreated Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and in 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The respiratory-chain enzyme activities did not differ significantly between patients and controls. Moreover, no patient showed respiratory-chain enzyme levels below normal range. Values for activities of complexes in the PD group did not correlate with age at onset, duration, scores of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating scales, or Hoehn and Yahr staging. These results suggest that the presence of defects of respiratory-chain complexes could depend on methodologic aspects, and that determinations of respiratory-chain enzymes in cell homogenates are not generally appropriate for evaluating abnormal mitochondrial dysfunction, especially when the amount of the specific enzyme is relatively low, as is the case of blood cells. In addition, the method of measuring complex I activity is critical for evaluating the results. In conclusion, our finding of normal mitochondrial function in lymphocyte mitochondria suggests that this tissue cannot be used to develop a diagnostic test for PD.

  16. The mitochondrial respiratory chain of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Oscar; Guerra, Guadalupe; Martínez, Federico; Pardo, Juan Pablo

    2004-10-04

    Ustilago maydis mitochondria contain the four classical components of the electron transport chain (complexes I, II, III, and IV), a glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase, and two alternative elements: an external rotenone-insensitive flavone-sensitive NADH dehydrogenase (NDH-2) and an alternative oxidase (AOX). The external NDH-2 contributes as much as complex I to the NADH-dependent respiratory activity, and is not modulated by Ca2+, a regulatory mechanism described for plant NDH-2, and presumed to be a unique characteristic of the external isozyme. The AOX accounts for the 20% residual respiratory activity after inhibition of complex IV by cyanide. This residual activity depends on growth conditions, since cells grown in the presence of cyanide or antimycin A increase its proportion to about 75% of the uninhibited rate. The effect of AMP, pyruvate and DTT on AOX was studied. The activity of AOX in U. maydis cells was sensitive to AMP but not to pyruvate, which agrees with the regulatory characteristics of a fungal AOX. Interestingly, the presence of DTT during cell permeabilisation protected the enzyme against inactivation. The pathways of quinone reduction and quinol oxidation lack an additive behavior. This is consistent with the competition of the respiratory components of each pathway for the quinol/quinone pool.

  17. Pivotal role of superoxides generated in the mitochondrial respiratory chain in peroxynitrite-dependent activation of phospholipase A2.

    PubMed Central

    Guidarelli, Andrea; Cantoni, Orazio

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of PC12 cells to reagent peroxynitrite promotes the release of arachidonic acid (AA) mediated by activation of phospholipase A(2) [Guidarelli, Palomba and Cantoni (2000) Br. J. Pharmacol. 129, 1539-1542]. We now present experimental evidence consistent with the notion that this response is not directly triggered by peroxynitrite but, rather, by reactive oxygen species generated at the level of complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In particular, superoxide (and not hydrogen peroxide) has a pivotal role in peroxynitrite-dependent activation of phospholipase A(2). This observation was confirmed by results showing that superoxide, or peroxynitrite, promotes release of AA in isolated mitochondria. Consistently, the release of AA elicited by either peroxynitrite or A23187 in intact cells was shown to be calcium-dependent and differentially affected by phospholipase A(2) inhibitors with different levels of specificity. In particular, the effects of peroxynitrite, unlike those of A23187, were both sensitive to low concentrations of two general phospholipase A(2) inhibitors and insensitive to arachidonyltrifluoromethyl ketone, which shows some selectivity towards cytosolic phospholipase A(2). In addition, peroxynitrite and A23187 synergistically enhanced the release of AA. Collectively, the above results demonstrate that peroxynitrite causes inhibition of complex III, followed by enforced formation of superoxides that stimulate the activity of a calcium-dependent PLA(2) isoform, probably localized in the mitochondria. PMID:11994047

  18. The Respiratory Chain of Plant Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Bayard T.

    1971-01-01

    Energy-linked reverse electron transport from succinate to endogenous NAD in tightly coupled mung bean (Phaseolus aureus) mitochondria may be driven by ATP if the two terminal oxidases of these mitochondria are inhibited, or may be driven by the free energy of succinate oxidation. This reaction is specific to the first site of energy conservation of the respiratory chain; it does not occur in the presence of uncoupler. If mung bean mitochondria become anaerobic during oxidation of succinate, their endogenous NAD becomes reduced in the presence of uncoupler, provided that both inorganic phosphate (Pi) and ATP are present. No reduction occurs in the absence of Pi, even in the presence of ATP added to provide a high phosphate potential. If fluorooxaloacetate is present in the uncoupled, aerobic steady state, no reduction of endogenous NAD occurs on anaerobiosis; this compound is an inhibitor of malate dehydrogenase. This result implies that endogenous NAD is reduced by malate formed from the fumarate generated during succinate oxidation. The source of free energy is most probably the endogenous energy stores in the form of acetyl CoA, or intermediates convertible to acetyl CoA, which removes the oxaloacetate formed from malate, thus driving the reaction towards reduction of NAD. In the absence of Pi and presence of oligomycin, oxidation of succinate by the alternative cyanide-insensitive oxidase pathway, in the presence of sulfide to inhibit cytochrome oxidase, does not reduce endogenous NAD, either in the aerobic steady state or in anaerobiosis. Under these conditions, only the reversed electron transport pathway from succinate to endogenous NAD is active and ATP cannot interact with the respiratory chain. The source of energy for NAD reduction must come from the respiratory chain, and this result shows that oxidation of succinate through the alternate pathway does not provide this energy. PMID:16657863

  19. The Enigma of the Respiratory Chain Supercomplex.

    PubMed

    Milenkovic, Dusanka; Blaza, James N; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Hirst, Judy

    2017-04-04

    Respiratory chain dysfunction plays an important role in human disease and aging. It is now well established that the individual respiratory complexes can be organized into supercomplexes, and structures for these macromolecular assemblies, determined by electron cryo-microscopy, have been described recently. Nevertheless, the reason why supercomplexes exist remains an enigma. The widely held view that they enhance catalysis by channeling substrates is challenged by both structural and biophysical information. Here, we evaluate and discuss data and hypotheses on the structures, roles, and assembly of respiratory-chain supercomplexes and propose a future research agenda to address unanswered questions.

  20. The Relationship between Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Activities in Muscle and Metabolites in Plasma and Urine: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Alban, Corinne; Fatale, Elena; Joulani, Abed; Ilin, Polina; Saada, Ann

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between 114 cases with decreased enzymatic activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes I-V (C I-V) in muscle and metabolites in urine and plasma was retrospectively examined. Less than 35% disclosed abnormal plasma amino acids and acylcarnitines, with elevated alanine and low free carnitine or elevated C4-OH-carnitine as the most common findings, respectively. Abnormal urine organic acids (OA) were detected in 82% of all cases. In CI and CII defects, lactic acid (LA) in combination with other metabolites was the most common finding. 3-Methylglutaconic (3MGA) acid was more frequent in CIV and CV, while Tyrosine metabolites, mainly 4-hydroxyphenyllactate, were common in CI and IV defects. Ketones were present in all groups but more prominent in combined deficiencies. There was a significant strong correlation between elevated urinary LA and plasma lactate but none between urine Tyrosine metabolites and plasma Tyrosine or urinary LA and plasma Alanine. All except one of 14 cases showed elevated FGF21, but correlation with urine OA was weak. Although this study is limited, we conclude that urine organic acid test in combination with plasma FGF21 determination are valuable tools in the diagnosis of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:28287425

  1. Ambroxol inhibits neutrophil respiratory burst activated by alpha chain integrin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peroni, D G; Moser, S; Gallo, G; Pigozzi, R; Tenero, L; Zanoni, L; Boner, A L; Piacentini, G L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-oxidant effect(s) of Ambroxol on neutrophils activated by ligand-binding of the drug with membrane-associated adhesion integrin CD11a and to estimate dose-response changes in oxygen free radical production. The amount of free radical production by anti-CD11a- and anti-CD4-coated neutrophils stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and challenged with increasing concentration of Ambroxol, was evaluated within a time frame of 90 minutes. A significant dose-dependent effect response of Ambroxol on O2‾ production by cells coated with anti-CD11a antibody was observed. This preliminary study opens a new perspective on the therapeutic role of Ambroxol as an antioxidant drug and for its potential use in controlling oxidative stress, particularly in leukocyte-dependent inflammation.

  2. The Respiratory Chain of Alkaliphilic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Ann Krulwich

    2008-01-29

    Alkaliphilic bacteria that grow at extremely high pH are confronted by particular bioenergetic problems in carrying out oxidative phosphorylation. This project focused on the properties and adaptations of the respiratory chain. The respiratory chain as a whole, the redox poises of its components and several individual complexes of the respiratory chain of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 have been characterized as part of this project and, importantly, this project has helped support the development of genetic tools that make B. pseudofirmus OF4 the most genetically tractable and, hence, most bioenergetically characterized extreme alkaliphile. Evidence has been obtained for a pivotal role of the cca3-type terminal oxidase in oxidative phosphorylation, especially at high pH and motifs that may be relevant to that special role have been identified.

  3. Administration of Harmine and Imipramine Alters Creatine Kinase and Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Activities in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Réus, Gislaine Z.; Stringari, Roberto B.; Gonçalves, Cinara L.; Scaini, Giselli; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Jeremias, Gabriela C.; Jeremias, Isabela C.; Ferreira, Gabriela K.; Streck, Emílio L.; Hallak, Jaime E.; Zuardi, Antônio W.; Crippa, José A.; Quevedo, João

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated mitochondrial respiratory chain and creatine kinase activities after administration of harmine (5, 10, and 15 mg/kg) and imipramine (10, 20, and 30 mg/kg) in rat brain. After acute treatment occurred an increase of creatine kinase in the prefrontal with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine in all doses, in the striatum with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine (5 and 10 mg/kg); harmine (15 mg/kg) decreased creatine kinase. In the chronic treatment occurred an increase of creatine kinase with imipramine (20 mg/kg), harmine (5 mg/kg) in the prefrontal with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine (5 and 10 mg/kg) in the striatum. In the acute treatment, the complex I increased in the prefrontal with harmine (15 mg/kg) and in the striatum with harmine (10 mg/kg); the complex II decreased with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) in the striatum; the complex IV increased with imipramine (30 mg/kg) in the striatum. In the chronic treatment, the complex I increased with harmine (5 mg/kg) in the prefrontal; the complex II increased with imipramine (20 mg/kg) in the prefrontal; the complex IV increased with harmine (5 mg/kg) in the striatum. Finally, these findings further support the hypothesis that harmine and imipramine could be involved in mitochondrial function. PMID:21969912

  4. In vitro effect of copper chloride exposure on reactive oxygen species generation and respiratory chain complex activities of mitochondria isolated from broiler liver.

    PubMed

    Su, Rongsheng; Wang, Rongmei; Guo, Shining; Cao, Huabin; Pan, Jiaqiang; Li, Chengmei; Shi, Dayou; Tang, Zhaoxin

    2011-12-01

    This study is to examine if Cu(2+) can act directly on mitochondria or indirectly by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), isolated broiler hepatic mitochondria were exposed to different concentrations of Cu(2+) (10, 30, 50 μM). Respiratory chain complex activities, ROS generation, respiratory control ratio (RCR) and mitochondrial membrane potential were investigated. Dose-dependent inhibition of respiratory chain complexes and induction of ROS were observed, which coincided with decreasing RCR both with glutamate + malate or succinate. Further investigation indicated that the membrane potential determined by rhodamine 123 release decreased after CuCl(2) exposure at 30 and 50 μM. In addition, the effects of the antioxidants NAC (200 μM) and GSH (200 μM) were studied at 50 μM Cu(2+). The results indicate that Cu can induce mitochondrial dysfunction in excessive dose and the effect of Cu(2+) exposure on respiratory chain is not site-specific, and antioxidants can protect the mitochondrial function by reducing the formation of free radicals.

  5. Pressure overload-induced mild cardiac hypertrophy reduces left ventricular transmural differences in mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and increases oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Kindo, Michel; Gerelli, Sébastien; Bouitbir, Jamal; Charles, Anne-Laure; Zoll, Joffrey; Hoang Minh, Tam; Monassier, Laurent; Favret, Fabrice; Piquard, François; Geny, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Increased mechanical stress and contractility characterizes normal left ventricular (LV) subendocardium (Endo) but whether Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities is reduced as compared to subepicardium (Epi) and whether pressure overload-induced LV hypertrophy (LVH) might modulate transmural gradients through increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is unknown. Methods: LVH was induced by 6 weeks abdominal aortic banding and cardiac structure and function were determined with echocardiography and catheterization in sham-operated and LVH rats (n = 10 for each group). Mitochondrial respiration rates, coupling, content and ROS production were measured in LV Endo and Epi, using saponin-permeabilized fibers, Amplex Red fluorescence and citrate synthase activity. Results: In sham, a transmural respiratory gradient was observed with decreases in endo maximal oxidative capacity (−36.7%, P < 0.01) and complex IV activity (−57.4%, P < 0.05). Mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was similar in both LV layers. Aortic banding induced mild LVH (+31.7% LV mass), associated with normal LV fractional shortening and end diastolic pressure. LVH reduced maximal oxidative capacity (−23.6 and −33.3%), increased mitochondrial H2O2 production (+86.9 and +73.1%), free radical leak (+27.2% and +36.3%) and citrate synthase activity (+27.2% and +36.3%) in Endo and Epi, respectively. Transmural mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity was reduced in LVH (−57.4 vs. −12.2%; P = 0.02). Conclusions: Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activities are reduced compared to LV Epi. Mild LVH impairs mitochondrial oxidative capacity, increases oxidative stress and reduces transmural complex IV activity. Further studies will be helpful to determine whether reduced LV transmural gradient in mitochondrial respiration might be a new marker of a transition from uncomplicated toward complicated LVH. PMID:22934079

  6. Consequences of aging on mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes in cultured human fibroblasts treated with ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Rupar, C A; Rip, J W

    1998-01-01

    The activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes with and without ascorbate pretreatment were assayed in 10- to 20-week-old cultures of human fibroblasts. Aging was associated with a significant loss of respiratory chain enzyme activities. The presence of ascorbate in the medium reduced the rate of loss of these enzymes. Free radical-mediated injuries may also contribute to aging since the changes seen in respiratory chain enzyme activities are similar to those seen in oxidatively stressed cells. This study demonstrates an age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory chain activity as well as a protective role for ascorbate in aging.

  7. The respiratory chain of Hydrogenomonas H16.

    PubMed Central

    Beatrice, M C; Chappell, J B

    1979-01-01

    The respiratory chain of Hydrogenomonas H16 is shown to consist of two pathways, one of which has as its oxidase and only cytochrome a high-potential b-type cytochrome which is concluded to be cytochrome o. The Km values for the oxygen of the two pathways are consistent with the high-potential b-type cytochrome functioning as a relatively high-affinity oxidase. PMID:107951

  8. High Molecular Weight Forms of Mammalian Respiratory Chain Complex II

    PubMed Central

    Nůsková, Hana; Holzerová, Eliška; Vrbacký, Marek; Pecina, Petr; Hejzlarová, Kateřina; Kľučková, Katarína; Rohlena, Jakub; Neuzil, Jiri; Houštěk, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain is organised into supramolecular structures that can be preserved in mild detergent solubilisates and resolved by native electrophoretic systems. Supercomplexes of respiratory complexes I, III and IV as well as multimeric forms of ATP synthase are well established. However, the involvement of complex II, linking respiratory chain with tricarboxylic acid cycle, in mitochondrial supercomplexes is questionable. Here we show that digitonin-solubilised complex II quantitatively forms high molecular weight structures (CIIhmw) that can be resolved by clear native electrophoresis. CIIhmw structures are enzymatically active and differ in electrophoretic mobility between tissues (500 – over 1000 kDa) and cultured cells (400–670 kDa). While their formation is unaffected by isolated defects in other respiratory chain complexes, they are destabilised in mtDNA-depleted, rho0 cells. Molecular interactions responsible for the assembly of CIIhmw are rather weak with the complexes being more stable in tissues than in cultured cells. While electrophoretic studies and immunoprecipitation experiments of CIIhmw do not indicate specific interactions with the respiratory chain complexes I, III or IV or enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, they point out to a specific interaction between CII and ATP synthase. PMID:23967256

  9. Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst enhances activities of heart mitochondrial enzymes and respiratory chain complexes in the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Sudheesh, N P; Ajith, T A; Janardhanan, K K

    2009-10-01

    Aging is associated with increased oxidative damage at multiple cellular levels, decline in cellular energy production and enhanced free radical status. The effect of the medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum on the activities of tricarboxylic acid (Krebs) cycle enzymes and mitochondrial complexes I-IV of the electron transport chain in aged rats were investigated. The activity of Krebs cycle enzymes, isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase as well as mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and IV were determined in heart of aged male Wistar rats orally administrated with 70% ethanolic extract (50 and 250 mg/kg) of G. lucidum. DL-alpha-lipoic acid (100 mg/kg) was taken as the positive control. Administration of the G. lucidum, once daily for 15 days, was significantly (P < 0.05) effective to enhance the Krebs cycle dehydrogenases, and mitochondrial electron transport chain complex IV activities in aged rats. The profound activity of the extract can be correlated to the significant antioxidant property of G. lucidum. The results of the study revealed that G. lucidum is effective to ameliorate the age associated decline of cellular energy status.

  10. Decaffeinated green tea extract rich in epigallocatechin-3-gallate prevents fatty liver disease by increased activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes in diet-induced obesity mice.

    PubMed

    Santamarina, Aline B; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Okuda, Marcos H; Santana, Aline A; Streck, Emilio L; Seelaender, Marilia; do Nascimento, Claudia M Oller; Ribeiro, Eliane B; Lira, Fábio S; Oyama, Lila Missae

    2015-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has been considered the hepatic manifestation of obesity. It is unclear whether supplementation with green tea extract rich in epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) influences the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and insulin resistance in the liver. EGCG regulated hepatic mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and was capable of improving lipid metabolism, attenuating insulin resistance in obese mice. Mice were divided into four groups: control diet+water (CW) or EGCG (CE) and hyperlipidic diet+water (HFW) or EGCG (HFE). All animals received water and diets ad libitum for 16 weeks. Placebo groups received water (0.1 ml/day) and EGCG groups (0.1 ml EGCG and 50 mg/kg/day) by gavage. Cytokines concentrations were obtained by ELISA, protein expression through Western blotting and mitochondrial complex enzymatic activity by colorimetric assay of substrate degradation. HFW increased body weight gain, adiposity index, retroperitoneal and mesenteric adipose tissue relative weight, serum glucose, insulin and Homeostasis Model Assessment of Basal Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR); glucose intolerance was observed in oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as well as ectopic fat liver deposition. HFE group decreased body weight gain, retroperitoneal and mesenteric adipose tissue relative weight, HOMA-IR, insulin levels and liver fat accumulation; increased complexes II-III and IV and malate dehydrogenase activities and improvement in glucose uptake in OGTT and insulin sensitivity by increased protein expression of total AKT, IRα and IRS1. We did not find alterations in inflammatory parameters analyzed. EGCG was able to prevent obesity stimulating the mitochondrial complex chain, increasing energy expenditure, particularly from the oxidation of lipid substrates, thereby contributing to the prevention of hepatic steatosis and improved insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Respiratory chain supercomplexes of mitochondria and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schägger, Hermann

    2002-09-10

    Respiratory chain complexes are fragments of larger structural and functional units, the respiratory chain supercomplexes or "respirasomes", which exist in bacterial and mitochondrial membranes. Supercomplexes of mitochondria and bacteria contain complexes III, IV, and complex I, with the notable exception of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which does not possess complex I. These supercomplexes often are stable to sonication but sensitive to most detergents except digitonin. In S. cerevisiae, a major component linking complexes III and IV together is cardiolipin.In Paracoccus denitrificans, complex I itself is rather detergent-sensitive and thus could not be obtained in detergent-solubilized form so far. However, it can be isolated as part of a supercomplex. Stabilization of complex I by binding to complex III was also found in human mitochondria. Further functional roles of the organization in a supercomplex are catalytic enhancement by reducing diffusion distances of substrates or, depending on the organism, channelling of the substrates quinone and cytochrome c. This makes redox reactions less dependent of midpoint potentials of substrates, and permits electron flow at low degree of substrate reduction.A dimeric state of ATP synthase seems to be specific for mitochondria. Exclusively, monomeric ATP synthase was found in Acetobacterium woodii, in P. denitrificans, and in spinach chloroplasts.

  12. Biogenesis of mitochondria in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) curds subjected to temperature stress and recovery involves regulation of the complexome, respiratory chain activity, organellar translation and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Rurek, Michal; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2015-01-01

    The biogenesis of the cauliflower curd mitochondrial proteome was investigated under cold, heat and the recovery. For the first time, two dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis was used to study the plant mitochondrial complexome in heat and heat recovery. Particularly, changes in the complex I and complex III subunits and import proteins, and the partial disintegration of matrix complexes were observed. The presence of unassembled subunits of ATP synthase was accompanied by impairment in mitochondrial translation of its subunit. In cold and heat, the transcription profiles of mitochondrial genes were uncorrelated. The in-gel activities of respiratory complexes were particularly affected after stress recovery. Despite a general stability of respiratory chain complexes in heat, functional studies showed that their activity and the ATP synthesis yield were affected. Contrary to cold stress, heat stress resulted in a reduced efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation likely due to changes in alternative oxidase (AOX) activity. Stress and stress recovery differently modulated the protein level and activity of AOX. Heat stress induced an increase in AOX activity and protein level, and AOX1a and AOX1d transcript level, while heat recovery reversed the AOX protein and activity changes. Conversely, cold stress led to a decrease in AOX activity (and protein level), which was reversed after cold recovery. Thus, cauliflower AOX is only induced by heat stress. In heat, contrary to the AOX activity, the activity of rotenone-insensitive internal NADH dehydrogenase was diminished. The relevance of various steps of plant mitochondrial biogenesis to temperature stress response and recovery is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Linkage of E2F1 transcriptional network and cell proliferation with respiratory chain activity in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazunori; Uchida, Tetsu; Fukumura, Motonori; Tamiya, Shigetoshi; Higurashi, Masato; Sakai, Hirosato; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Shibanuma, Motoko

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are multifunctional organelles; they have been implicated in various aspects of tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated a novel role of the basal electron transport chain (ETC) activity in cell proliferation by inhibiting mitochondrial replication and transcription (mtR/T) using pharmacological and genetic interventions, which depleted mitochondrial DNA/RNA, thereby inducing ETC deficiency. Interestingly, mtR/T inhibition did not decrease ATP levels despite deficiency in ETC activity in different cell types, including MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, but it severely impeded cell cycle progression, specifically progression during G2 and/or M phases in the cancer cells. Under these conditions, the expression of a group of cell cycle regulators was downregulated without affecting the growth signaling pathway. Further analysis suggested that the transcriptional network organized by E2F1 was significantly affected because of the downregulation of E2F1 in response to ETC deficiency, which eventually resulted in the suppression of cell proliferation. Thus, in this study, the E2F1-mediated ETC-dependent mechanism has emerged as the regulatory mechanism of cell cycle progression. In addition to E2F1, FOXM1 and BMYB were also downregulated, which contributed specifically to the defects in G2 and/or M phase progression. Thus, ETC-deficient cancer cells lost their growing ability, including their tumorigenic potential in vivo. ETC deficiency abolished the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the mitochondria and a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mimicked the deficiency, thereby suggesting that ETC activity signaled through ROS production. In conclusion, this novel coupling between ETC activity and cell cycle progression may be an important mechanism for coordinating cell proliferation and metabolism.

  14. Respiratory chain deficiency in nonmitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Pyle, Angela; Nightingale, Helen J.; Griffin, Helen; Abicht, Angela; Kirschner, Janbernd; Baric, Ivo; Cuk, Mario; Douroudis, Konstantinos; Feder, Lea; Kratz, Markus; Czermin, Birgit; Kleinle, Stephanie; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Karcagi, Veronika; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we report 5 patients with heterogeneous phenotypes and biochemical evidence of respiratory chain (RC) deficiency; however, the molecular diagnosis is not mitochondrial disease. Methods: The reported patients were identified from a cohort of 60 patients in whom RC enzyme deficiency suggested mitochondrial disease and underwent whole-exome sequencing. Results: Five patients had disease-causing variants in nonmitochondrial disease genes ORAI1, CAPN3, COLQ, EXOSC8, and ANO10, which would have been missed on targeted next-generation panels or on MitoExome analysis. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate that RC abnormalities may be secondary to various cellular processes, including calcium metabolism, neuromuscular transmission, and abnormal messenger RNA degradation. PMID:27066545

  15. ETFDH mutations, CoQ10 levels, and respiratory chain activities in patients with riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wen-Chen; Ohkuma, Aya; Hayashi, Yukiko K; López, Luis Carlos; Hirano, Michio; Nonaka, Ikuya; Noguchi, Satoru; Chen, Liang-Hui; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Nishino, Ichizo

    2009-03-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is a metabolic disorder due to dysfunction of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or ETF-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO). Mutations in ETFDH, encoding ETF-QO have been associated with both riboflavin-responsive and non-responsive MADD as well as a myopathic form of CoQ(10) deficiency, although pathomechanisms responsible for these different phenotypes are not well-defined. We performed mutation analysis in four Taiwanese MADD patients. Three novel ETFDH mutations were identified in four patients and all harbored the p.A84T mutation. Muscle CoQ(10) levels and respiratory chain activities measured in two patients were normal. Three patients improved on riboflavin together with carnitine. Our results show that not all MADD patients have CoQ(10) deficiency. Based upon our data, riboflavin and carnitine may be the first-line treatment for MADD.

  16. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus nsp1α Inhibits NF-κB Activation by Targeting the Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex.

    PubMed

    Jing, Huiyuan; Fang, Liurong; Ding, Zhen; Wang, Dang; Hao, Wenqi; Gao, Li; Ke, Wenting; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2017-02-01

    Linear ubiquitination, a newly discovered posttranslational modification, is catalyzed by the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC), which is composed of three subunits: one catalytic subunit HOIP and two accessory molecules, HOIL-1L and SHARPIN. Accumulating evidence suggests that linear ubiquitination plays a crucial role in innate immune signaling and especially in the activation of the NF-κB pathway by conjugating linear polyubiquitin chains to NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO, also called IKKγ), the regulatory subunit of the IKK complex. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), an Arterivirus that has devastated the swine industry worldwide, is an ideal model to study the host's disordered inflammatory responses after viral infection. Here, we found that LUBAC-induced NF-κB and proinflammatory cytokine expression can be inhibited in the early phase of PRRSV infection. Screening the PRRSV-encoded proteins showed that nonstructural protein 1α (nsp1α) suppresses LUBAC-mediated NF-κB activation and its CTE domain is required for the inhibition. Mechanistically, nsp1α binds to HOIP/HOIL-1L and impairs the interaction between HOIP and SHARPIN, thus reducing the LUBAC-dependent linear ubiquitination of NEMO. Moreover, PRRSV infection also blocks LUBAC complex formation and NEMO linear-ubiquitination, the important step for transducing NF-κB signaling. This unexpected finding demonstrates a previously unrecognized role of PRRSV nsp1α in modulating LUBAC signaling and explains an additional mechanism of immune modulation by PRRSV.

  17. Nuclear Control of Respiratory Chain Expression by Nuclear Respiratory Factors and PGC-1-Related Coactivator

    PubMed Central

    Scarpulla, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    Expression of the respiratory apparatus depends on both nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Although these genes are sequestered in distinct cellular organelles, their transcription relies on nucleus-encoded factors. Certain of these factors are directed to the mitochondria, where they sponsor the bi-directional transcription of mitochondrial DNA. Others act on nuclear genes that encode the majority of the respiratory subunits and many other gene products required for the assembly and function of the respiratory chain. The nuclear respiratory factors, NRF-1 and NRF-2, contribute to the expression of respiratory subunits and mitochondrial transcription factors and thus have been implicated in nucleo-mitochondrial interactions. In addition, coactivators of the PGC-1 family serve as mediators between the environment and the transcriptional machinery governing mitochondrial biogenesis. One family member, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC), is an immediate early gene product that is rapidly induced by mitogenic signals in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. Like other PGC-1 family members, PRC binds NRF-1 and activates NRF-1 target genes. In addition, PRC complexes with NRF-2 and HCF-1 (host cell factor-1) in the activation of NRF-2-dependent promoters. HCF-1 functions in cell-cycle progression and has been identified as an NRF-2 coactivator. The association of these factors with PRC is suggestive of a role for the complex in cell growth. Finally, shRNA-mediated knock down of PRC expression results in a complex phenotype that includes the inhibition of respiratory growth on galactose and the loss of respiratory complexes. Thus, PRC may help integrate the expression of the respiratory apparatus with the cell proliferative program. PMID:19076454

  18. The breathing heart - mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction in cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Konstantin; Siddiqi, Nishat; Singh, Satnam; Neil, Christopher J; Dawson, Dana K; Frenneaux, Michael P

    2014-02-01

    The relentlessly beating heart has the greatest oxygen consumption of any organ in the body at rest reflecting its huge metabolic turnover and energetic demands. The vast majority of its energy is produced and cycled in form of ATP which stems mainly from oxidative phosphorylation occurring at the respiratory chain in the mitochondria. Apart from energy production, the respiratory chain is also the main source of reactive oxygen species and plays a pivotal role in the regulation of oxidative stress. Dysfunction of the respiratory chain is therefore found in most common heart conditions. The pathophysiology of mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction in hereditary cardiac mitochondrial disease, the ageing heart, in LV hypertrophy and heart failure, and in ischaemia-reperfusion injury is reviewed. We introduce the practising clinician to the complex physiology of the respiratory chain, highlight its impact on common cardiac disorders and review translational pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mitochondrial Cristae Shape Determines Respiratory Chain Supercomplexes Assembly and Respiratory Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cogliati, Sara; Frezza, Christian; Soriano, Maria Eugenia; Varanita, Tatiana; Quintana-Cabrera, Ruben; Corrado, Mauro; Cipolat, Sara; Costa, Veronica; Casarin, Alberto; Gomes, Ligia C.; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Salviati, Leonardo; Fernandez-Silva, Patricio; Enriquez, Jose A.; Scorrano, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Summary Respiratory chain complexes assemble into functional quaternary structures called supercomplexes (RCS) within the folds of the inner mitochondrial membrane, or cristae. Here, we investigate the relationship between respiratory function and mitochondrial ultrastructure and provide evidence that cristae shape determines the assembly and stability of RCS and hence mitochondrial respiratory efficiency. Genetic and apoptotic manipulations of cristae structure affect assembly and activity of RCS in vitro and in vivo, independently of changes to mitochondrial protein synthesis or apoptotic outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. We demonstrate that, accordingly, the efficiency of mitochondria-dependent cell growth depends on cristae shape. Thus, RCS assembly emerges as a link between membrane morphology and function. PMID:24055366

  20. Genetics of mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Rötig, A

    2014-05-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation, i.e. ATP synthesis by the oxygen-consuming respiratory chain (RC), supplies most organs and tissues with a readily usable energy source, and is already fully functioning before birth. This means that, in theory, RC deficiency can give rise to any symptom in any organ or tissue at any age and with any mode of inheritance, due to the twofold genetic origin of RC components (nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA). It has long been erroneously believed that RC disorders originate from mutations of mtDNA as, for some time, only mutations or deletions of mtDNA could be identified. However, the number of disease-causing mutations in nuclear genes is now steadily growing. These genes not only encode the various subunits of each complex, but also the ancillary proteins involved in the different stages of holoenzyme biogenesis, including transcription, translation, chaperoning, addition of prosthetic groups and assembly of proteins, as well as the various enzymes involved in mtDNA metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Metformin-induced inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain increases FGF21 expression via ATF4 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kook Hwan; Jeong, Yeon Taek; Kim, Seong Hun; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Hae-Youn; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Metformin induces FGF21 expression in an AMPK independent manner. •Metformin enhances FGF21 expression by inhibiting mitochondrial complex I activity. •The PERK-eIF2α-ATF4 axis is required for metformin-induced FGF21 expression. •Metformin activates the ATF4-FGF21 axis in the liver of mouse. •Metformin increases serum FGF21 level in diabetic human subjects. -- Abstract: Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is an endocrine hormone that exhibits anti-obesity and anti-diabetes effects. Because metformin is widely used as a glucose-lowering agent in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), we investigated whether metformin modulates FGF21 expression in cell lines, and in mice or human subjects. We found that metformin increased the expression and release of FGF21 in a diverse set of cell types, including rat hepatoma FaO, primary mouse hepatocytes, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Intriguingly, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was dispensable for the induction of FGF21 by metformin. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), which are additional targets of metformin, were not involved in metformin-induced FGF21 expression. Importantly, inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity by metformin resulted in FGF21 induction through PKR-like ER kinase (PERK)-eukaryotic translation factor 2α (eIF2α)-activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). We showed that metformin activated ATF4 and increased FGF21 expression in the livers of mice, which led to increased serum levels of FGF21. We also found that serum FGF21 level was increased in human subjects with T2D after metformin therapy for 6 months. In conclusion, our results indicate that metformin induced expression of FGF21 through an ATF4-dependent mechanism by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration independently of AMPK. Therefore, FGF21 induction by metformin might explain a portion of the beneficial metabolic effects of metformin.

  2. The effects of mutation of the anr gene on the aerobic respiratory chain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ray, A; Williams, H D

    1997-11-15

    The anr gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes a transcriptional regulator of anaerobic gene expression, homologous to the Fnr protein of Escherichia coli. We report here that Anr has a role in regulating the activity of the aerobic respiratory chain of P. aeruginosa. Strains with internal deletions in their anr gene had lowered levels of membrane bound cytochromes whilst the activity of the cytochrome c oxidase, cytochrome co (likely to be a cytochrome cbb3-type oxidase), and the cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway was markedly higher than in the wild-type strains. These data, and the finding that provision of multiple copies of the anr gene led to severe repression of these respiratory activities, suggest that Anr is a repressor of aerobic respiratory pathways and possibly the terminal oxidases themselves. In contrast, Anr activated cytochrome c peroxidase, a respiratory chain linked enzyme induced under low oxygen conditions.

  3. [Hepatocyte mitochondrion respiratory chain in rats with experimental toxic hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Shiriaeva, A P; Baĭdiuk, E V; Arkad'eva, A V; Okovityĭ, S V; Morozov, V I; Sakuta, G A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine hepatocyte mitochondrion respiratory chain in rats subjected to ethanol and CCl4 administration within 4 weeks to induce an experimental hepatitis. Oxygen consumption was determined as a measure of mitochondrion respiration chain function. The development of liver pathology was accompanied by fat accumulation, fibrosis, triglycerides and lipid peroxidation increase. Respiratory chain characteristics damage was found. Endogenous oxygen consumption by hepatocytes isolated from pathological liver was found 34% higher compared to control. Exogenous malate and pyruvate substrates delivery didn't stimulate cell respiration. Rotenone (the inhibitor of the I complex) decreased 27% oxygen consumption by pathological hepatocytes while dinitrophenol produced 37% cell respiration increase. States 3 (V3) and 4 (V4) mitochondrial respiration with malate + glutamate as substrates were found to be 70 and 56% higher accordingly compared to control level. V3 and Vd (dinitrophenol respiration) for mitochondria from pathological liver didn't differ from control when being tested with malate + glutamate or succinate as substrates. Cytochrome c oxidase activity increased (+ 80%) as compared to control. Administration of hypolipidemic agent simvastatin simultaneously with ethanol and CC14 resulted in decrease liver fat accumulation, fibrosis and peroxidation products. Simvastatin administration caused hepatocyte endogenous respiration decrease while malate + pyruvate, dinitrophenol or rotenone delivery produced oxygen consumption alterations similar to control. However, when isolated mitochondria from liver of simvastatin treated animals being tested the decrease of oxidative phosphorylation coupling for substrates malate + glutamate was found. While simvastatin did not cause changes in cytochrome c oxidase activity. We propose the hypothesis that the NCCR complex in rat mitochondria with experimental toxic hepatitis works extensively on

  4. Transcriptomic profiling of a chicken lung epithelial cell line (CLEC213) reveals a mitochondrial respiratory chain activity boost during influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Léa; Leymarie, Olivier; Chevalier, Christophe; Esnault, Evelyne; Moroldo, Marco; Da Costa, Bruno; Georgeault, Sonia; Roingeard, Philippe; Delmas, Bernard; Quéré, Pascale; Le Goffic, Ronan

    2017-01-01

    Avian Influenza virus (AIV) is a major concern for the global poultry industry. Since 2012, several countries have reported AIV outbreaks among domestic poultry. These outbreaks had tremendous impact on poultry production and socio-economic repercussion on farmers. In addition, the constant emergence of highly pathogenic AIV also poses a significant risk to human health. In this study, we used a chicken lung epithelial cell line (CLEC213) to gain a better understanding of the molecular consequences of low pathogenic AIV infection in their natural host. Using a transcriptome profiling approach based on microarrays, we identified a cluster of mitochondrial genes highly induced during the infection. Interestingly, most of the regulated genes are encoded by the mitochondrial genome and are involved in the oxidative phosphorylation metabolic pathway. The biological consequences of this transcriptomic induction result in a 2.5- to 4-fold increase of the ATP concentration within the infected cells. PB1-F2, a viral protein that targets the mitochondria was not found associated to the boost of activity of the respiratory chain. We next explored the possibility that ATP may act as a host-derived danger signal (through production of extracellular ATP) or as a boost to increase AIV replication. We observed that, despite the activation of the P2X7 purinergic receptor pathway, a 1mM ATP addition in the cell culture medium had no effect on the virus replication in our epithelial cell model. Finally, we found that oligomycin, a drug that inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation process, drastically reduced the AIV replication in CLEC213 cells, without apparent cellular toxicity. Collectively, our results suggest that AIV is able to boost the metabolic capacities of its avian host in order to provide the important energy needs required to produce progeny virus.

  5. Transcriptomic profiling of a chicken lung epithelial cell line (CLEC213) reveals a mitochondrial respiratory chain activity boost during influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Léa; Leymarie, Olivier; Chevalier, Christophe; Esnault, Evelyne; Moroldo, Marco; Da Costa, Bruno; Georgeault, Sonia; Roingeard, Philippe; Delmas, Bernard; Quéré, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    Avian Influenza virus (AIV) is a major concern for the global poultry industry. Since 2012, several countries have reported AIV outbreaks among domestic poultry. These outbreaks had tremendous impact on poultry production and socio-economic repercussion on farmers. In addition, the constant emergence of highly pathogenic AIV also poses a significant risk to human health. In this study, we used a chicken lung epithelial cell line (CLEC213) to gain a better understanding of the molecular consequences of low pathogenic AIV infection in their natural host. Using a transcriptome profiling approach based on microarrays, we identified a cluster of mitochondrial genes highly induced during the infection. Interestingly, most of the regulated genes are encoded by the mitochondrial genome and are involved in the oxidative phosphorylation metabolic pathway. The biological consequences of this transcriptomic induction result in a 2.5- to 4-fold increase of the ATP concentration within the infected cells. PB1-F2, a viral protein that targets the mitochondria was not found associated to the boost of activity of the respiratory chain. We next explored the possibility that ATP may act as a host-derived danger signal (through production of extracellular ATP) or as a boost to increase AIV replication. We observed that, despite the activation of the P2X7 purinergic receptor pathway, a 1mM ATP addition in the cell culture medium had no effect on the virus replication in our epithelial cell model. Finally, we found that oligomycin, a drug that inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation process, drastically reduced the AIV replication in CLEC213 cells, without apparent cellular toxicity. Collectively, our results suggest that AIV is able to boost the metabolic capacities of its avian host in order to provide the important energy needs required to produce progeny virus. PMID:28441462

  6. Myosin heavy chain expression in respiratory muscles of the rat.

    PubMed

    LaFramboise, W A; Watchko, J F; Brozanski, B S; Daood, M J; Guthrie, R D

    1992-03-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms of hind limb adult rat muscles and muscles with a range of respiratory activities were analyzed by a sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis technique that allowed electrophoretic separation of the three fast and one slow MHC isoform found in typical rat muscle. Costal and crural diaphragm muscle samples expressed a mixture of MHC beta/slow, MHC2A, and MHC2X but little MHC2B. In contrast, MHC2B was the dominant MHC isoform in the genioglossus, intercostal, and three abdominal muscles, all of which exhibited minimal expression of MHC beta/slow. The amount of MHC2X (relative to total MHC composition) was similar in the diaphragm, genioglossus, and transversus abdominis muscles, while considerably less was detected in the rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles. These results indicate that MHC2X is broadly and variably distributed among respiratory muscles. Furthermore, these data suggest that a large portion of 2X fibers (containing MHC2X), which cannot be detected by standard histochemical analysis, may be present in the genioglossus and transversus abdominis muscles as has been demonstrated for the diaphragm muscle. We speculate that an association exists between the level of MHC2X expression and frequency of respiratory recruitment.

  7. Respiratory chain analysis of skin fibroblasts in mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jessie M; Levandovskiy, Valeriy; MacKay, Neviana; Robinson, Brian H

    2004-09-01

    NADH:ubiquinone dehydrogenase (complex I) deficiency can be diagnosed from cultured skin fibroblasts using a number of methods, the most commonly used is a linked assay of rotenone-sensitive complex I + III activity (NADH:cytochrome c reductase). Because of interference from diaphorases, this method requires either the isolation of mitochondria (or at least partial purification). For a suitable mitochondrial preparation from skin fibroblasts, this requires the culturing of 4-20 individual 100mm tissue culture plates, depending on the purity of preparation required. These assays are therefore time-consuming, and do not assist in a rapid diagnosis. There is also no clear demarkation between the normal range of activity and the deficient range since mild mutations can produce only partial decreases in complex I activity. Equally, assaying patient cells that do not have a specific deficiency may prove to be time-wasting in the process of providing a quick, definitive clinical diagnosis. The lactate/pyruvate ratio of fibroblasts has been used to indicate the extent of respiratory chain involvement, as cells with a metabolic defect usually produce more lactate with an increased ratio from 25:1 to much higher values [Methods Enzymol. 264 (1996) 454]. This measurement may not always be conclusive, as the values can fluctuate as a result of culture medium, cell passage number, cell number and viability. In this report, we evaluate the use of pyruvate oxidation measurements from whole cells prepared from a single plate of cultured fibroblasts as an alternative to lactate/pyruvate ratios, or other methods both direct and indirect as indicators of the extent of respiratory chain involvement and the possibility of a defect within complex I. Whole cell 2-14C pyruvate oxidation appears to indicate the presence of a complex I defect in patients compared to normal controls more reliably than L/P ratios, but this has some puzzling exceptions.

  8. Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders in the Old Order Amish population.

    PubMed

    Ghaloul-Gonzalez, Lina; Goldstein, Amy; Walsh Vockley, Catherine; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Biery, Amy; Irani, Afifa; Ibarra, Jordan; Morton, D Holmes; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Vockley, Jerry

    2016-08-01

    The Old Order Amish populations in the US are one of the Plain People groups and are descendants of the Swiss Anabaptist immigrants who came to North America in the early eighteenth century. They live in numerous small endogamous demes that have resulted in reduced genetic diversity along with a high prevalence of specific genetic disorders, many of them autosomal recessive. Mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies arising from mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations have not previously been reported in the Plain populations. Here we present four different Amish families with mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders. Mutations in two mitochondrial encoded genes leading to mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder were identified in two patients. In the first case, MELAS syndrome caused by a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation (m.3243A>G) was identified in an extended Amish pedigree following a presentation of metabolic strokes in the proband. Characterization of the extended family of the proband by a high resolution melting assay identified the same mutation in many previously undiagnosed family members with a wide range of clinical symptoms. A MELAS/Leigh syndrome phenotype caused by a mtDNA mutation [m.13513G>A; p.Asp393Asn] in the ND5 gene encoding the ND5 subunit of respiratory chain complex I was identified in a patient in a second family. Mutations in two nuclear encoded genes leading to mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder were also identified in two patients. One patient presented with Leigh syndrome and had a homozygous deletion in the NDUFAF2 gene, while the second patient had a homozygous mutation in the POLG gene, [c.1399G>A; p.Ala467Thr]. Our findings identify mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency as a cause of disease in the Old Order Amish that must be considered in the context of otherwise unexplained systemic disease, especially if neuromuscular symptoms are present. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV deficiency complicated with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Hashimura, Yuya; Morioka, Ichiro; Hisamatsu, Chieko; Yokoyama, Naoki; Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Yokozaki, Hiroshi; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Itoh, Kyoko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2016-07-01

    A female infant born at 36 weeks gestational age with birthweight 2135 g, and who developed respiratory disorder, hyperlactacidemia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy after birth, was admitted to hospital at 3 days of age. After admission, bilious emesis, abdominal distention, and passage disorder of the gastrointestinal tract were resistant to various drugs. Exploratory laparotomy was performed at 93 days of age, but no organic lesions were identified and normal Meissner/Auerbach nerve plexus was confirmed, which led to a clinical diagnosis of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO). She was diagnosed with mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV deficiency on histopathology of the abdominal rectus muscle and enzyme activity measurement. This is the first report of a neonate with mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiency with intractable CIPO. CIPO can occur in neonates with mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder, necessitating differential diagnosis from Hirschsprung disease.

  10. Respiratory Chain of Colorless Algae II. Cyanophyta

    PubMed Central

    Webster, D. A.; Hackett, D. P.

    1966-01-01

    Whole cell difference spectra of the blue-green algae, Saprospira grandis, Leucothrix mucor, and Vitreoscilla sp. have one, or at the most 2, broad α-bands near 560 mμ. At −190° these bands split to give 4 peaks in the α-region for b and c-type cytochromes, but no α-band for a-type cytochromes is visible. The NADH oxidase activity of these organisms was shown to be associated with particulate fractions of cell homogenates. The response of this activity to inhibitors differed from the responses of the NADH oxidase activities of particulate preparations from the green algae and higher plants to the same inhibitors, but is more typical of certain bacteria. No cytochrome oxidase activity was present in these preparations. The respiration of Saprospira and Vitreoscilla can be light-reversibly inhibited by CO, and all 3 organisms have a CO-binding pigment whose CO complex absorbs near 570, 535, and 417 mμ. The action spectrum for the light reversal of CO-inhibited Vitreoscilla respiration shows maxima at 568, 534, and 416 mμ. The results suggest that the terminal oxidase in these blue-greens is an o-type cytochrome. Images PMID:5932404

  11. The Assembly Pathway of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex I.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Baertling, Fabian; Kownatzki, Daniel; Wessels, Hans J; Arnold, Susanne; Brandt, Ulrich; Nijtmans, Leo

    2017-01-10

    Mitochondrial complex I is the largest integral membrane enzyme of the respiratory chain and consists of 44 different subunits encoded in the mitochondrial and nuclear genome. Its biosynthesis is a highly complicated and multifaceted process involving at least 14 additional assembly factors. How these subunits assemble into a functional complex I and where the assembly factors come into play is largely unknown. Here, we applied a dynamic complexome profiling approach to elucidate the assembly of human mitochondrial complex I and its further incorporation into respiratory chain supercomplexes. We delineate the stepwise incorporation of all but one subunit into a series of distinct assembly intermediates and their association with known and putative assembly factors, which had not been implicated in this process before. The resulting detailed and comprehensive model of complex I assembly is fully consistent with recent structural data and the remarkable modular architecture of this multiprotein complex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Polyalthidin: new prenylated benzopyran inhibitor of the mammalian mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Zafra-Polo, M C; González, M C; Tormo, J R; Estornell, E; Cortes, D

    1996-10-01

    Polyalthidin (3), a new benzopyran derivative, was isolated from the stem bark of Polyalthia cerasoides. Its structure was established on the basis of chemical and spectral evidence. Polyalthidin has showed potent biological activity as an inhibitor of the mammalian mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  13. Multiple defects in the respiratory chain lead to the repression of genes encoding components of the respiratory chain and TCA cycle enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bourges, Ingrid; Mucchielli, Marie-Helene; Herbert, Christopher J; Guiard, Bernard; Dujardin, Geneviève; Meunier, Brigitte

    2009-04-17

    Respiratory complexes III, IV and V are formed by components of both nuclear and mitochondrial origin and are embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Their assembly requires the auxiliary factor Oxa1, and the absence of this protein has severe consequences on these three major respiratory chain enzymes. We have studied, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the effect of the loss of Oxa1 function and of other respiratory defects on the expression of nuclear genes encoding components of the respiratory complexes and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. We observed that the concomitant decrease in the level of two respiratory enzymes, complexes III and IV, led to their repression. These genes are known targets of the transcriptional activator complex Hap2/3/4/5 that plays a central role in the reprogramming of yeast metabolism when cells switch from a fermenting, glucose-repressed state to a respiring, derepressed state. We found that the Hap4 protein, the regulatory subunit of the transcriptional complex, was present at a lower level in the oxa1 mutants whereas no change in HAP4 transcript level was observed, suggesting a posttranscriptional modulation. In addition, an altered mitochondrial morphology was observed in mutants with decreased expression of Hap2/3/4/5 target genes. We suggest that the aberrant mitochondrial morphology, presumably caused by the severely decreased level of at least two respiratory enzymes, might be part of the signalling pathway linking the mitochondrial defect and Hap2/3/4/5.

  14. Paradoxical effect of mitochondrial respiratory chain impairment on insulin signaling and glucose transport in adipose cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiarong; Burkart, Alison; Nicoloro, Sarah M; Czech, Michael P; Straubhaar, Juerg; Corvera, Silvia

    2008-11-07

    Adipocyte function is crucial for the control of whole body energy homeostasis. Pathway analysis of differentiating 3T3-L1 adipocytes reveals that major metabolic pathways induced during differentiation involve mitochondrial function. However, it is not clear why differentiated white adipocytes require enhanced respiratory chain activity relative to pre-adipocytes. To address this question, we used small interference RNA to interfere with the induction of the transcription factor Tfam, which is highly induced between days 2 and 4 of differentiation and is crucial for replication of mitochondrial DNA. Interference with Tfam resulted in cells with decreased respiratory chain capacity, reflected by decreased basal oxygen consumption, and decreased mitochondrial ATP synthesis, but no difference in many other adipocyte functions or expression levels of adipose-specific genes. However, insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface and subsequent glucose transport are impaired in Tfam knockdown cells. Paradoxically, insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation is significantly enhanced in these cells. These studies reveal independent links between mitochondrial function, insulin signaling, and glucose transport, in which impaired respiratory chain activity enhances insulin signaling to Akt phosphorylation, but impairs GLUT4 translocation. These results indicate that mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction in adipocytes can cause impaired insulin responsiveness of GLUT4 translocation by a mechanism downstream of the Akt protein kinase.

  15. Methylmalonic acid, a biochemical hallmark of methylmalonic acidurias but no inhibitor of mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Kölker, Stefan; Schwab, Marina; Hörster, Friederike; Sauer, Sven; Hinz, Angela; Wolf, Nicole I; Mayatepek, Ertan; Hoffmann, Georg F; Smeitink, Jan A M; Okun, Jürgen G

    2003-11-28

    Methylmalonic acidurias are biochemically characterized by an accumulation of methylmalonic acid and alternative metabolites. An impairment of energy metabolism plays a key role in the pathophysiology of this disease, resulting in neurodegeneration of the basal ganglia and renal failure. It has become the subject of intense debates whether methylmalonic acid is the major toxin, inhibiting respiratory chain complex II. To elucidate whether methylmalonic acid is a respiratory chain inhibitor, we used spectrophotometric analysis of complex II activity in submitochondrial particles from bovine heart, radiometric analysis of 14C-labeled substrates (pyruvate, malate, succinate), and analysis of ATP production in muscle from mice. Methylmalonic acid revealed no direct effects on the respiratory chain function, i.e. on single electron transferring complexes I-IV, ATPase, and mitochondrial transporters. However, we identified a variety of variables that must be carefully controlled to avoid an artificial inhibition of complex II activity. In summary, the study verifies our hypothesis that methylmalonic acid is not the major toxic metabolite in methylmalonic acidurias. Inhibition of respiratory chain and tricarboxylic acid cycle is most likely induced by synergistically acting alternative metabolites, in particular 2-methylcitric acid, malonic acid, and propionyl-CoA.

  16. Incorporation of respiratory cytochromes in liposomes: an efficient strategy to study the respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Nantes, Iseli Lourenco; Mugnol, Katia Cristina Ugolini

    2008-01-01

    The electron transport system present in the photosynthetic apparatus and respiratory chain were evolutionary acquisitions that allowed the organisms to convert electromagnetic energy in chemical energy and thus improve the use of energy fuels. These systems acquired by prokaryotes were preserved in the highly complex organisms always with the participation of the cytochromes. Since the discovery of the cytochromes, and the isolation and association of these proteins to model membranes, the liposomes, have been used to investigative strategies to characterize the structure and function of these proteins. From these studies important findings have contributed to the comprehension of the energy transduction mechanisms and the role played by the nonredox subunits present in the protein complexes of the respiratory chain of eukaryotes.

  17. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is required for organismal adaptation to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Hamanaka, Robert B.; Weinberg, Samuel E.; Reczek, Colleen R.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hypoxia-Inducible Factors (HIFs) are crucial for cellular and organismal adaptation to hypoxia. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is the largest consumer of oxygen in most mammalian cells; however, it is unknown whether the respiratory chain is necessary for in vivo activation of HIFs and organismal adaptation to hypoxia. HIF-1 activation in the epidermis has been shown to be a key regulator of the organismal response to hypoxic conditions, including renal production of erythropoietin (Epo). Therefore, we conditionally deleted expression of TFAM in mouse epidermal keratinocytes. TFAM is required for maintenance of the mitochondrial genome and TFAM-null cells are respiratory-deficient. TFAM loss in epidermal keratinocytes reduced epidermal levels of HIF-1α protein and diminished the hypoxic induction of HIF-dependent transcription in epidermis. Furthermore, epidermal TFAM deficiency impaired hypoxic induction of renal Epo expression. Our results demonstrate that the mitochondrial respiratory chain is essential for in vivo HIF activation and organismal adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:27068470

  18. The Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Is Required for Organismal Adaptation to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Robert B; Weinberg, Samuel E; Reczek, Colleen R; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2016-04-19

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are crucial for cellular and organismal adaptation to hypoxia. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is the largest consumer of oxygen in most mammalian cells; however, it is unknown whether the respiratory chain is necessary for in vivo activation of HIFs and organismal adaptation to hypoxia. HIF-1 activation in the epidermis has been shown to be a key regulator of the organismal response to hypoxic conditions, including renal production of erythropoietin (Epo). Therefore, we conditionally deleted expression of TFAM in mouse epidermal keratinocytes. TFAM is required for maintenance of the mitochondrial genome, and TFAM-null cells are respiratory deficient. TFAM loss in epidermal keratinocytes reduced epidermal levels of HIF-1α protein and diminished the hypoxic induction of HIF-dependent transcription in epidermis. Furthermore, epidermal TFAM deficiency impaired hypoxic induction of renal Epo expression. Our results demonstrate that the mitochondrial respiratory chain is essential for in vivo HIF activation and organismal adaptation to hypoxia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Age Modulates Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Liver Toxicity: Dose-Dependent Decrease in Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complexes Activities and Coupling in Middle-Aged as Compared to Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Baratli, Yosra; Charles, Anne-Laure; Wolff, Valérie; Ben Tahar, Lotfi; Smiri, Leila; Bouitbir, Jamal; Zoll, Joffrey; Sakly, Mohsen; Auger, Cyril; Vogel, Thomas; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Geny, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activities and mitochondrial coupling in young (3 months) and middle-aged (18 months) rat liver, organ largely involved in body iron detoxification. Isolated liver mitochondria were extracted using differential centrifugations. Maximal oxidative capacities (Vmax, complexes I, III, and IV activities), Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities), and Vtmpd, (complex IV activity), together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0) were determined in controls conditions and after exposure to 250, 300, and 350 μg/ml Fe3O4 in young and middle-aged rats. In young liver mitochondria, exposure to IONPs did not alter mitochondrial function. In contrast, IONPs dose-dependently impaired all complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in middle-aged rat liver: Vmax (from 30 ± 1.6 to 17.9 ± 1.5; P < 0.001), Vsucc (from 33.9 ± 1.7 to 24.3 ± 1.0; P < 0.01), Vtmpd (from 43.0 ± 1.6 to 26.3 ± 2.2 µmol O2/min/g protein; P < 0.001) using Fe3O4 350 µg/ml. Mitochondrial coupling also decreased. Interestingly, 350 μg/ml Fe3O4 in the form of Fe3+ solution did not impair liver mitochondrial function in middle-aged rats. Thus, IONPs showed a specific toxicity in middle-aged rats suggesting caution when using it in old age. PMID:24949453

  20. Effects of alkyl side chain modification of coenzyme Q10 on mitochondrial respiratory chain function and cytoprotection.

    PubMed

    Fash, David M; Khdour, Omar M; Sahdeo, Sunil J; Goldschmidt, Ruth; Jaruvangsanti, Jennifer; Dey, Sriloy; Arce, Pablo M; Collin, Valérie C; Cortopassi, Gino A; Hecht, Sidney M

    2013-04-15

    The effect of the alkyl side chain length of coenzyme Q10 on mitochondrial respiratory chain function has been investigated by the use of synthetic ubiquinone derivatives. Three analogues (3, 4 and 6) were identified that exhibited significantly improved effects on mitochondrial oxygen consumption and mitochondrial membrane potential, and also conferred significant cytoprotection on cultured mammalian cells in which glutathione had been depleted by treatment with diethyl maleate. The analogues also exhibited lesser inhibition of the electron transport chain than idebenone. The results obtained provide guidance for the design of CoQ10 analogues with improved activity compared to that of idebenone (1), the latter of which is undergoing evaluation in the clinic as a therapeutic agent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Deficiency of respiratory chain complex I in Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Franz A; Neureiter, Daniel; Feichtinger, René G; Trost, Andrea; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara; Mayr, Johannes A

    2016-01-01

    Oncocytic cells (OCs) are characterized by an accumulation of mitochondria and their occurrence in the thyroid gland of patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is well known. However, their properties and functional relevance are poorly understood. We investigated OC lesions (n=212) in the thyroid of 12 HT patients. Loss of complex I protein was observed in oncocytic lesions of each of the patients. In addition to isolated complex I deficiency, 25% of oncocytic lesions showed combined deficiency of complex I and IV. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time a defect of respiratory chain complex I in OCs of HT patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  2. The branched mitochondrial respiratory chain from Debaryomyces hansenii: components and supramolecular organization.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Chiquete-Félix, Natalia; Espinasa-Jaramillo, Juan; Rosas-Lemus, Mónica; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Peña, Antonio; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The branched respiratory chain in mitochondria from the halotolerant yeast Debaryomyces hansenii contains the classical complexes I, II, III and IV plus a cyanide-insensitive, AMP-activated, alternative-oxidase (AOX). Two additional alternative oxidoreductases were found in this organism: an alternative NADH dehydrogenase (NDH2e) and a mitochondrial isoform of glycerol-phosphate dehydrogenase (MitGPDH). These monomeric enzymes lack proton pump activity. They are located on the outer face of the inner mitochondrial membrane. NDH2e oxidizes exogenous NADH in a rotenone-insensitive, flavone-sensitive, process. AOX seems to be constitutive; nonetheless, most electrons are transferred to the cytochromic pathway. Respiratory supercomplexes containing complexes I, III and IV in different stoichiometries were detected. Dimeric complex V was also detected. In-gel activity of NADH dehydrogenase, mass spectrometry, and cytochrome c oxidase and ATPase activities led to determine the composition of the putative supercomplexes. Molecular weights were estimated by comparison with those from the yeast Y. lipolytica and they were IV2, I-IV, III2-IV4, V2, I-III2, I-III2-IV, I-III2-IV2, I-III2-IV3 and I-III2-IV4. Binding of the alternative enzymes to supercomplexes was not detected. This is the first report on the structure and organization of the mitochondrial respiratory chain from D. hansenii. © 2013.

  3. Honokiol induces superoxide production by targeting mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingmei; Liao, Kai; Wang, Dayong

    2017-01-01

    Honokiol, a compound extracted from Magnolia officinalis, has antifungal activities by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and triggering apoptosis in Candida albicans. However, the mechanism of honokiol-induced oxidative stress is poorly understood. The present investigation was designed to determine the specific mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generation component. We found that honokiol induced mitochondrial ROS accumulation, mainly superoxide anions (O2•-) measured by fluorescent staining method. The mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I (C I) inhibitor rotenone completely blocked O2•- production and provided the protection from the killing action of honokiol. Moreover, respiratory activity and the C I enzyme activity was significantly reduced after honokiol treatment. The differential gene-expression profile also showed that genes involved in oxidoreductase activity, electron transport, and oxidative phosphorylation were upregulated. The present work shows that honokiol may bind to mitochondrial respiratory chain C I, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction, accompanied by increased cellular superoxide anion and oxidative stress. This work not only provides insights on the mechanism by which honokiol interferes with fungal cell, demonstrating previously unknown effects on mitochondrial physiology, but also raises a note of caution on the use of M. officinalis as a Chinese medicine due to the toxic for mitochondria and suggests the possibility of using honokiol as chemosensitizer.

  4. Respiratory Chain Analysis of Zymomonas mobilis Mutants Producing High Levels of Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Kensuke

    2012-01-01

    We previously isolated respiratory-deficient mutant (RDM) strains of Zymomonas mobilis, which exhibited greater growth and enhanced ethanol production under aerobic conditions. These RDM strains also acquired thermotolerance. Morphologically, the cells of all RDM strains were shorter compared to the wild-type strain. We investigated the respiratory chains of these RDM strains and found that some RDM strains lost NADH dehydrogenase activity, whereas others exhibited reduced cytochrome bd-type ubiquinol oxidase or ubiquinol peroxidase activities. Complementation experiments restored the wild-type phenotype. Some RDM strains seem to have certain mutations other than the corresponding respiratory chain components. RDM strains with deficient NADH dehydrogenase activity displayed the greatest amount of aerobic growth, enhanced ethanol production, and thermotolerance. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that all NADH dehydrogenase-deficient strains were mutated within the ndh gene, which includes insertion, deletion, or frameshift. These results suggested that the loss of NADH dehydrogenase activity permits the acquisition of higher aerobic growth, enhanced ethanol production, and thermotolerance in this industrially important strain. PMID:22660712

  5. Renal Tubular Mitochondrial Abnormalities in Complex II/III Respiratory Chain Deficiency.

    PubMed

    France, Joel; Ashoor, Isa; Craver, Randall

    2017-06-01

    Defects in the respiratory chain may present with a wide spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms. In this "Images in Pathology" discussion we correlate the clinical, histologic, and ultrastructural findings in a 12-year-old male with a complex II/III respiratory chain deficiency and kidney dysfunction.

  6. Evidence that the inhibitory effects of guanidinoacetate on the activities of the respiratory chain, Na+,K+-ATPase and creatine kinase can be differentially prevented by taurine and vitamins E and C administration in rat striatum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zugno, Alexandra I; Scherer, Emilene B S; Mattos, Cristiane; Ribeiro, César A J; Wannmacher, Clovis M D; Wajner, Moacir; Wyse, Angela T S

    2007-05-01

    Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency is an inherited neurometabolic disorder biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of guanidinoacetate (GAA) and depletion of creatine. Affected patients present epilepsy and mental retardation whose etiopathogeny is unclear. In a previous study we showed that instrastriatal administration of GAA caused a reduction of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and creatine kinase (CK) activities, as well as an increase in TBARS (an index of lipid peroxidation). In the present study we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of GAA on glucose uptake from [U-(14)C] acetate (citric acid cycle activity) and on the activities of complexes II, II-III, III and IV of the respiratory chain in striatum of rats. Results showed that 50 and 100 microM GAA (in vitro studies) and GAA administration (in vivo studies) significantly inhibited complexes II and II-III, respectively, but did not alter complexes III and IV, as well as CO(2) production. We also studied the influence of taurine or vitamins E and C on the inhibitory effects caused by intrastriatal administration of GAA on complexes II and II-III, Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and CK activities, and on TBARS in rat striatum. Pre-treatment with taurine and vitamins E and C revealed that taurine prevents the effects of intrastriatal administration of GAA on the inhibition of complex II, complex II-III, and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activities. Vitamins E and C prevent the effects of intrastriatal administration of GAA on the inhibition of CK and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activities, and on the increase of TBARS. The data suggest that GAA in vivo and in vitro treatment disturbs important parameters of striatum energy metabolism and that oxidative damage may be mediating these effects. It is presumed that defects in striatum bioenergetics might be involved in the pathophysiology of striatum damage characteristic of patients with GAMT-deficiency.

  7. Cu(II)-reduction by Escherichia coli cells is dependent on respiratory chain components.

    PubMed

    Volentini, Sabrina I; Farías, Ricardo N; Rodríguez-Montelongo, Luisa; Rapisarda, Viviana A

    2011-10-01

    Copper is both an essential nutrient and a toxic element able to catalyze free radicals formation which damage lipids and proteins. Although the available copper redox species in aerobic environment is Cu(II), proteins that participate in metal homeostasis use Cu(I). With isolated Escherichia coli membranes, we have previously shown that electron flow through the respiratory chain promotes cupric ions reduction by NADH dehydrogenase-2 and quinones. Here, we determined Cu(II)-reductase activity by whole cells using strains deficient in these respiratory chain components. Measurements were done by the appearance of Cu(I) in the supernatants of cells exposed to sub-lethal Cu(II) concentrations. In the absence of quinones, the Cu(II)-reduction rate decreased ~70% in respect to the wild-type strain, while this diminution was about 85% in a strain lacking both NDH-2 and quinones. The decrease was ~10% in the absence of only NDH-2. In addition, we observed that quinone deficient strains failed to grow in media containing either excess or deficiency of copper, as we have described for NDH-2 deficient mutants. Thus, the Cu(II)-reduction by E. coli intact cells is mainly due to quinones and to a lesser extent to NDH-2, in a quinone-independent way. To our knowledge, this is the first in vivo demonstration of the involvement of E. coli respiratory components in the Cu(II)-reductase activity which contributes to the metal homeostasis.

  8. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is a modulator of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Jennifer Q.; Henning, Matthew S.; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and dysregulation of apoptosis are implicated in many diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. We investigate here the role of respiratory chain (RC) dysfunction in apoptosis, using mitochondrial DNA mutations as genetic models. Although some mutations eliminate the entire RC, others target specific complexes, resulting in either decreased or complete loss of electron flux, which leads to impaired respiration and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Despite these similarities, significant differences in responses to apoptotic stimuli emerge. Cells lacking RC are protected against both mitochondrial- and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress–induced apoptosis. Cells with RC, but unable to generate electron flux, are protected against mitochondrial apoptosis, although they have increased sensitivity to ER stress. Finally, cells with a partial reduction in electron flux have increased apoptosis under both conditions. Our results show that the RC modulates apoptosis in a context-dependent manner independent of ATP production and that apoptotic responses are the result of the interplay between mitochondrial functional state and environmental cues. PMID:18086914

  9. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed “lowest supercomplex” (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh’s disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  10. Kinetics of electron transfer through the respiratory chain.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qusheng; Bethke, Craig M

    2002-01-01

    We show that the rate at which electrons pass through the respiratory chain in mitochondria and respiring prokaryotic cells is described by the product of three terms, one describing electron donation, one acceptance, and a third, the thermodynamic drive. We apply the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics in the context of the chemiosmotic model of proton translocation and energy conservation. This approach leads to a closed-form expression that predicts steady-state electron flux as a function of chemical conditions and the proton motive force across the mitochondrial inner membrane or prokaryotic cytoplasmic membrane. The rate expression, derived considering reverse and forward electron flow, is the first to account for both thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the respiration rate. The expression can be simplified under specific conditions to give rate laws of various forms familiar in cellular physiology and microbial ecology. The expression explains the nonlinear dependence of flux on electrical potential gradient, its hyperbolic dependence on substrate concentration, and the inhibiting effects of reaction products. It provides a theoretical basis for investigating life under unusual conditions, such as microbial respiration in alkaline waters. PMID:12324402

  11. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is a modulator of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Jennifer Q; Henning, Matthew S; Starkov, Anatoly A; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2007-12-17

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and dysregulation of apoptosis are implicated in many diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. We investigate here the role of respiratory chain (RC) dysfunction in apoptosis, using mitochondrial DNA mutations as genetic models. Although some mutations eliminate the entire RC, others target specific complexes, resulting in either decreased or complete loss of electron flux, which leads to impaired respiration and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Despite these similarities, significant differences in responses to apoptotic stimuli emerge. Cells lacking RC are protected against both mitochondrial- and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis. Cells with RC, but unable to generate electron flux, are protected against mitochondrial apoptosis, although they have increased sensitivity to ER stress. Finally, cells with a partial reduction in electron flux have increased apoptosis under both conditions. Our results show that the RC modulates apoptosis in a context-dependent manner independent of ATP production and that apoptotic responses are the result of the interplay between mitochondrial functional state and environmental cues.

  12. AML cells have low spare reserve capacity in their respiratory chain that renders them susceptible to oxidative metabolic stress

    PubMed Central

    Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Jeyaraju, Danny V.; Chung, Timothy E.; Prabha, Swayam; Xu, Wei; Skrtic, Marko; Jhas, Bozhena; Hurren, Rose; Gronda, Marcela; Wang, Xiaoming; Jitkova, Yulia; Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Lin, Feng-Hsu; Maclean, Neil; Laister, Rob; Goard, Carolyn A.; Mullen, Peter J.; Xie, Stephanie; Penn, Linda Z.; Rogers, Ian M.; Dick, John E.; Minden, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration is a crucial component of cellular metabolism that can become dysregulated in cancer. Compared with normal hematopoietic cells, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and patient samples have higher mitochondrial mass, without a concomitant increase in respiratory chain complex activity. Hence these cells have a lower spare reserve capacity in the respiratory chain and are more susceptible to oxidative stress. We therefore tested the effects of increasing the electron flux through the respiratory chain as a strategy to induce oxidative stress and cell death preferentially in AML cells. Treatment with the fatty acid palmitate induced oxidative stress and cell death in AML cells, and it suppressed tumor burden in leukemic cell lines and primary patient sample xenografts in the absence of overt toxicity to normal cells and organs. These data highlight a unique metabolic vulnerability in AML, and identify a new therapeutic strategy that targets abnormal oxidative metabolism in this malignancy. PMID:25631767

  13. Effect of hexavalent chromium on electron leakage of respiratory chain in mitochondria isolated from rat liver.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ying; Zhong, Caigao; Zeng, Ming; Guan, Lan; Luo, Lei

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we explored reactive axygen species (ROS) production in mitochondria, the mechanism of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) hepatotoxicity, and the role of protection by GSH. Intact mitochondria were isolated from rat liver tissues and mitochondrial basal respiratory rates of NADH and FADH2 respiratory chains were determined. Mitochondria were treated with Cr(VI), GSH and several complex inhibitors. Mitochondria energized by glutamate/malate were separately or jointly treated with Rotenone (Rot), diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and antimycinA (Ant), while mitochondria energized by succinate were separately or jointly treated with Rot, DPI ' thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Ant. Cr(VI) concentration-dependently induced ROS production in the NADH and FADH2 respiratory chain in liver mitochondria. Basal respiratory rate of the mitochondrial FADH2 respiratory chain was significantly higher than that of NADH respiratory chain. Hepatic mitochondrial electron leakage induced by Cr(VI) from NADH respiratory chain were mainly from ubiquinone binding sites of complex I and complex III. Treatment with 50µM Cr(VI) enhances forward movement of electrons through FADH2 respiratory chain and leaking through the ubiquinone binding site of complex III. Moreover, the protective effect of GSH on liver mitochondria electron leakage is through removing excess H2O2 and reducing total ROS. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Loublier, Sandrine; Bayot, Aurelien; Rak, Malgorzata; El-Khoury, Riyad; Benit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. {yields} Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. {yields} Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  15. Chain reconfiguration in active noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Nairhita; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi

    2016-05-01

    In a typical single molecule experiment, the dynamics of an unfolded protein is studied by determining the reconfiguration time using long-range Förster resonance energy transfer, where the reconfiguration time is the characteristic decay time of the position correlation between two residues of the protein. In this paper we theoretically calculate the reconfiguration time for a single flexible polymer in the presence of active noise. The study suggests that though the mean square displacement grows faster, the chain reconfiguration is always slower in the presence of long-lived active noise with exponential temporal correlation. Similar behavior is observed for a worm-like semi-flexible chain and a Zimm chain. However it is primarily the characteristic correlation time of the active noise and not the strength that controls the increase in the reconfiguration time. In brief, such active noise makes the polymer move faster but the correlation loss between the monomers becomes slow.

  16. Respiratory chain complex I deficiency caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Swalwell, Helen; Kirby, Denise M; Blakely, Emma L; Mitchell, Anna; Salemi, Renato; Sugiana, Canny; Compton, Alison G; Tucker, Elena J; Ke, Bi-Xia; Lamont, Phillipa J; Turnbull, Douglass M; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W; Thorburn, David R

    2011-01-01

    Defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain are associated with a diverse spectrum of clinical phenotypes, and may be caused by mutations in either the nuclear or the mitochondrial genome (mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)). Isolated complex I deficiency is the most common enzyme defect in mitochondrial disorders, particularly in children in whom family history is often consistent with sporadic or autosomal recessive inheritance, implicating a nuclear genetic cause. In contrast, although a number of recurrent, pathogenic mtDNA mutations have been described, historically, these have been perceived as rare causes of paediatric complex I deficiency. We reviewed the clinical and genetic findings in a large cohort of 109 paediatric patients with isolated complex I deficiency from 101 families. Pathogenic mtDNA mutations were found in 29 of 101 probands (29%), 21 in MTND subunit genes and 8 in mtDNA tRNA genes. Nuclear gene defects were inferred in 38 of 101 (38%) probands based on cell hybrid studies, mtDNA sequencing or mutation analysis (nuclear gene mutations were identified in 22 probands). Leigh or Leigh-like disease was the most common clinical presentation in both mtDNA and nuclear genetic defects. The median age at onset was higher in mtDNA patients (12 months) than in patients with a nuclear gene defect (3 months). However, considerable overlap existed, with onset varying from 0 to >60 months in both groups. Our findings confirm that pathogenic mtDNA mutations are a significant cause of complex I deficiency in children. In the absence of parental consanguinity, we recommend whole mitochondrial genome sequencing as a key approach to elucidate the underlying molecular genetic abnormality. PMID:21364701

  17. Effect of 13-epi-sclareol on the bacterial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Lorena; Torres, Janet; Mendoza, Leonora; Urzúa, Alejandro; Ferreira, Jorge; Pavani, Mario; Wilkens, Marcela

    2004-11-01

    13-epi-sclareol is a labdane-type diterpene isolated from the resinous exudates of the medicinal plant species Pseudognaphalium cheiranthifolium (Lam.) Hilliard et Burtt. and P. heterotrichium (Phil.) A. Anderb. This compound has antibacterial activity only against Gram-positive bacteria, showing a bactericidal and lytic action. The interaction of 13- epi-sclareol with the bacterial respiratory chain was analyzed. The compound inhibited oxygen consumption of intact Gram-positive cells, but not with Gram-negative bacteria. The compound inhibited NADH oxidase and cytochrome c reductase activities, while coenzyme Q reductase and the cytochrome c oxidase activities were not affected. These results suggest that the target site of 13-epi-sclareol is located between coenzyme Q and cytochrome c. Using cytoplasmic membrane fractions, the results of the analysis of the enzyme activities associated with the respiratory chain complexes were the same for both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, indicating that the compound has no access to the cytoplasmic membrane of intact Gram-negative bacteria. Thus, the Gram-negative envelope may act as a physical barrier that prevents the access of this compound to the site of action.

  18. Propionyl-L-carnitine Corrects Metabolic and Cardiovascular Alterations in Diet-Induced Obese Mice and Improves Liver Respiratory Chain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mingorance, Carmen; Duluc, Lucie; Chalopin, Matthieu; Simard, Gilles; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri; Herrera, Maria Dolores; Alvarez de Sotomayor, Maria; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2012-01-01

    Aims Obesity is a primary contributor to acquired insulin resistance leading to the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular alterations. The carnitine derivate, propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC), plays a key role in energy control. Our aim was to evaluate metabolic and cardiovascular effects of PLC in diet-induced obese mice. Methods C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet for 9 weeks and then divided into two groups, receiving either free- (vehicle-HF) or PLC-supplemented water (200 mg/kg/day) during 4 additional weeks. Standard diet-fed animals were used as lean controls (vehicle-ST). Body weight and food intake were monitored. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were assessed, as well as the HOMAIR, the serum lipid profile, the hepatic and muscular mitochondrial activity and the tissue nitric oxide (NO) liberation. Systolic blood pressure, cardiac and endothelial functions were also evaluated. Results Vehicle-HF displayed a greater increase of body weight compared to vehicle-ST that was completely reversed by PLC treatment without affecting food intake. PLC improved the insulin-resistant state and reversed the increased total cholesterol but not the increase in free fatty acid, triglyceride and HDL/LDL ratio induced by high-fat diet. Vehicle-HF exhibited a reduced cardiac output/body weight ratio, endothelial dysfunction and tissue decrease of NO production, all of them being improved by PLC treatment. Finally, the decrease of hepatic mitochondrial activity by high-fat diet was reversed by PLC. Conclusions Oral administration of PLC improves the insulin-resistant state developed by obese animals and decreases the cardiovascular risk associated to this metabolic alteration probably via correction of mitochondrial function. PMID:22457831

  19. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F.; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Huang, Cher X.; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D.; Stokes, Matthew P.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Bell, George W.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26438848

  20. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Huang, Cher X; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D; Stokes, Matthew P; Silva, Jeffrey C; Bell, George W; MacArthur, Daniel G; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-10-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells.

  1. Metabolic flexibility of mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders predicted by computer modelling.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Łukasz P; Smith, Anthony C; Smith, Alexander G; Robinson, Alan J

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction causes a variety of life-threatening diseases affecting about 1 in 4300 adults. These diseases are genetically heterogeneous, but have the same outcome; reduced activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes causing decreased ATP production and potentially toxic accumulation of metabolites. Severity and tissue specificity of these effects varies between patients by unknown mechanisms and treatment options are limited. So far most research has focused on the complexes themselves, and the impact on overall cellular metabolism is largely unclear. To illustrate how computer modelling can be used to better understand the potential impact of these disorders and inspire new research directions and treatments, we simulated them using a computer model of human cardiomyocyte mitochondrial metabolism containing over 300 characterised reactions and transport steps with experimental parameters taken from the literature. Overall, simulations were consistent with patient symptoms, supporting their biological and medical significance. These simulations predicted: complex I deficiencies could be compensated using multiple pathways; complex II deficiencies had less metabolic flexibility due to impacting both the TCA cycle and the respiratory chain; and complex III and IV deficiencies caused greatest decreases in ATP production with metabolic consequences that parallel hypoxia. Our study demonstrates how results from computer models can be compared to a clinical phenotype and used as a tool for hypothesis generation for subsequent experimental testing. These simulations can enhance understanding of dysfunctional mitochondrial metabolism and suggest new avenues for research into treatment of mitochondrial disease and other areas of mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Respiratory activity of bacteria Acinetobacter calcoaceticus TM-31 during assimilation of alkane hydrocarbons].

    PubMed

    Ignatov, O V; Grechkina, E V; Muratova, A Iu; Turkovskaia, O V; Ignatov, V V

    2000-01-01

    The respiratory activity of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus TM-31 with resect to alkane hydrocarbons was studied. The dynamics of oxygen consumption by the cells while assimilating n-hexadecane was assayed by a modified technique using an oxygen electrode. The dependence of cell respiratory activity on the amount of n-hexadecane within the concentration range of 0.03-0.66% was determined. It was demonstrated that the cells also displayed respiratory activity towards other medium-chain n-alkanes: hexane, octane, decane, tridecane, and heptadecane. Thus, we demonstrated the possibility of determining alkanes by measuring the respiratory activities of microorganisms.

  3. The respiratory chain is the cell's Achilles' heel during UVA inactivation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bosshard, Franziska; Bucheli, Margarete; Meur, Yves; Egli, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Solar disinfection (SODIS) is used as an effective and inexpensive tool to improve the microbiological quality of drinking water in developing countries where no other means are available. Solar UVA light is the agent that inactivates bacteria during the treatment. Damage to bacterial membranes plays a crucial role in the inactivation process. This study showed that even slightly irradiated cells (after less than 1 h of simulated sunlight) were strongly affected in their ability to maintain essential parts of their energy metabolism, in particular of the respiratory chain (activities of NADH oxidase, succinate oxidase and lactate oxidase were measured). The cells' potential to generate ATP was also strongly inhibited. Many essential enzymes of carbon metabolism (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase) and defence against oxidative stress (catalases and glutathione-disulfide reductase) were reduced in their activity during SODIS. The work suggests that damage to membrane enzymes is a likely cause of membrane dysfunction (loss of membrane potential and increased membrane permeability) during UVA irradiation. In this study, the first targets on the way to cell death were found to be the respiratory chain and F(1)F(0) ATPase.

  4. Redox State and Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Function in Skeletal Muscle of LGMD2A Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Mats I.; Macneil, Lauren G.; Kitaoka, Yu; Alqarni, Fatimah; Suri, Rahul; Akhtar, Mahmood; Haikalis, Maria E.; Dhaliwal, Pavneet; Saeed, Munim; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Calpain-3 deficiency causes oxidative and nitrosative stress-induced damage in skeletal muscle of LGMD2A patients, but mitochondrial respiratory chain function and anti-oxidant levels have not been systematically assessed in this clinical population previously. Methods We identified 14 patients with phenotypes consistent with LGMD2A and performed CAPN3 gene sequencing, CAPN3 expression/autolysis measurements, and in silico predictions of pathogenicity. Oxidative damage, anti-oxidant capacity, and mitochondrial enzyme activities were determined in a subset of muscle biopsies. Results Twenty-one disease-causing variants were detected along the entire CAPN3 gene, five of which were novel (c.338 T>C, c.500 T>C, c.1525-1 G>T, c.2115+4 T>G, c.2366 T>A). Protein- and mRNA-based tests confirmed in silico predictions and the clinical diagnosis in 75% of patients. Reductions in antioxidant defense mechanisms (SOD-1 and NRF-2, but not SOD-2), coupled with increased lipid peroxidation and protein ubiquitination, were observed in calpain-3 deficient muscle, indicating a redox imbalance primarily affecting non-mitochondrial compartments. Although ATP synthase levels were significantly lower in LGMD2A patients, citrate synthase, cytochrome c oxidase, and complex I+III activities were not different from controls. Conclusions Despite significant oxidative damage and redox imbalance in cytosolic/myofibrillar compartments, mitochondrial respiratory chain function is largely maintained in skeletal muscle of LGMD2A patients. PMID:25079074

  5. Fluoride Increases Superoxide Production and Impairs the Respiratory Chain in ROS 17/2.8 Osteoblastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fina, Brenda Lorena; Lombarte, Mercedes; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    It is known that fluoride produces oxidative stress. Inflammation in bone tissue and an impairment of the respiratory chain of liver have been described in treatments with fluoride. Whether the impairment of the respiratory chain and oxidative stress are related is not known. The aim of this work was to study the effects of fluoride on the production of superoxide radical, the function of the respiratory chain and the increase in oxidative stress in ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic cells. We measured the effect of fluoride (100 µM) on superoxide production, oxygen consumption, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activities of cultured cells following the treatment with fluoride. Fluoride decreased oxygen consumption and increased superoxide production immediately after its addition. Furthermore, chronic treatment with fluoride increased oxidative stress status in osteoblastic cells. These results indicate that fluoride could damage bone tissue by inhibiting the respiratory chain, increasing the production of superoxide radicals and thus of the others reactive oxygen species. PMID:24964137

  6. Decoding Warburg's hypothesis: tumor-related mutations in the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Heredia, Jose M; Carnero, Amancio

    2015-12-08

    Otto Warburg observed that cancer cells derived their energy from aerobic glycolysis by converting glucose to lactate. This mechanism is in opposition to the higher energy requirements of cancer cells because oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) produces more ATP from glucose. Warburg hypothesized that this phenomenon occurs due to the malfunction of mitochondria in cancer cells. The rediscovery of Warburg's hypothesis coincided with the discovery of mitochondrial tumor suppressor genes that may conform to Warburg's hypothesis along with the demonstrated negative impact of HIF-1 on PDH activity and the activation of HIF-1 by oncogenic signals such as activated AKT. This work summarizes the alterations in mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins that have been identified and their involvement in cancer. Also discussed is the fact that most of the mitochondrial mutations have been found in homoplasmy, indicating a positive selection during tumor evolution, thereby supporting their causal role.

  7. Mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction variably increases oxidant stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Dingley, Stephen; Polyak, Erzsebet; Lightfoot, Richard; Ostrovsky, Julian; Rao, Meera; Greco, Todd; Ischiropoulos, Harry; Falk, Marni J

    2010-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and associated oxidant stress have been linked with numerous complex diseases and aging largely by in vitro determination of mitochondria oxidant production and scavenging. We applied targeted in vivo fluorescence analyses of mitochondria-dense pharyngeal tissue in Caenorhabditis elegans to better understand relative mitochondrial effects, particularly on matrix oxidant burden, of respiratory chain complex, MnSOD, and insulin receptor mutants displaying variable longevity. The data demonstrate significantly elevated in vivo matrix oxidant burden in the short-lived complex I mutant, gas-1(fc21), which was associated with limited superoxide scavenging capacity despite robust MnSOD induction, as well as decreased mitochondria content and membrane potential. Significantly increased MnSOD activity was associated with in vivo matrix oxidant levels similar to wild-type in the long-lived respiratory chain complex III mutant, isp-1(qm150). Yet, despite greater superoxide scavenging capacity in the complex III mutant than in the significantly longer-lived insulin receptor mutant, daf-2(e1368), only the former showed modest oxidative stress sensitivity. Furthermore, increased longevity was seen in MnSOD knockout mutants (sod-2(ok1030) and sod-2(gk257)) that had decreased MnSOD scavenging capacity and increased in vivo matrix oxidant burden. Thus, factors beside oxidant stress must underlie RC mutant longevity in C. elegans. This work highlights the utility of the C. elegans model as a tractable means to non-invasively monitor multi-dimensional in vivo consequences of primary mitochondrial dysfunction.

  8. The mechanism of coupling between oxido-reduction and proton translocation in respiratory chain enzymes.

    PubMed

    Papa, Sergio; Capitanio, Giuseppe; Papa, Francesco

    2017-06-21

    The respiratory chain of mitochondria and bacteria is made up of a set of membrane-associated enzyme complexes which catalyse sequential, stepwise transfer of reducing equivalents from substrates to oxygen and convert redox energy into a transmembrane protonmotive force (PMF) by proton translocation from a negative (N) to a positive (P) aqueous phase separated by the coupling membrane. There are three basic mechanisms by which a membrane-associated redox enzyme can generate a PMF. These are membrane anisotropic arrangement of the primary redox catalysis with: (i) vectorial electron transfer by redox metal centres from the P to the N side of the membrane; (ii) hydrogen transfer by movement of quinones across the membrane, from a reduction site at the N side to an oxidation site at the P side; (iii) a different type of mechanism based on co-operative allosteric linkage between electron transfer at the metal redox centres and transmembrane electrogenic proton translocation by apoproteins. The results of advanced experimental and theoretical analyses and in particular X-ray crystallography show that these three mechanisms contribute differently to the protonmotive activity of cytochrome c oxidase, ubiquinone-cytochrome c oxidoreductase and NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase of the respiratory chain. This review considers the main features, recent experimental advances and still unresolved problems in the molecular/atomic mechanism of coupling between the transfer of reducing equivalents and proton translocation in these three protonmotive redox complexes. © 2017 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  9. The oral administration of D-galactose induces abnormalities within the mitochondrial respiratory chain in the brain of rats.

    PubMed

    Budni, Josiane; Garcez, Michelle Lima; Mina, Francielle; Bellettini-Santos, Tatiani; da Silva, Sabrina; Luz, Aline Pereira da; Schiavo, Gustavo Luiz; Batista-Silva, Hemily; Scaini, Giselli; Streck, Emílio Luiz; Quevedo, João

    2017-02-24

    D-Galactose (D-gal) chronic administration via intraperitoneal and subcutaneous routes has been used as a model of aging and Alzheimer disease in rodents. Intraperitoneal and subcutaneous administration of D-gal causes memory impairments, a reduction in the neurogenesis of adult mice, an increase in the levels of the amyloid precursor protein and oxidative damage; However, the effects of oral D-gal remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the oral administration of D-gal induces abnormalities within the mitochondrial respiratory chain of rats. Male Wistar rats (4 months old) received D-gal (100 mg/kg v.o.), during the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th or 8th weeks by oral gavage. The activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes was measured in the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks after the administration of D-gal. The activity of the respiratory chain complex I was found to have increased in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in the 1st, 6th and 8th weeks, while the activity of the respiratory chain complex II increased in the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks within the hippocampus and in the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks within the prefrontal cortex. The activity of complex II-III increased within the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in each week of oral D-gal treatment. The activity of complex IV increased within the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in the 1st, 2nd, 6th and 8th weeks of treatment. After 4 weeks of treatment the activity increased only in hippocampus. In conclusion, the present study showed that the oral administration of D-gal increased the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I, II, II-III and IV in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, the administration of D-gal via the oral route seems to cause the alterations in the mitochondrial respiratory complexes observed in brain neurodegeneration.

  10. Fenretinide induces mitochondrial ROS and inhibits the mitochondrial respiratory chain in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Roos; Leen, René; Tytgat, Godelieve A M; Caron, Huib N; van Kuilenburg, André B P

    2010-03-01

    Fenretinide induces apoptosis in neuroblastoma by induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we investigated the role of mitochondria in fenretinide-induced cytotoxicity and ROS production in six neuroblastoma cell lines. ROS induction by fenretinide was of mitochondrial origin, demonstrated by detection of superoxide with MitoSOX, the scavenging effect of the mitochondrial antioxidant MitoQ and reduced ROS production in cells without a functional mitochondrial respiratory chain (Rho zero cells). In digitonin-permeabilized cells, a fenretinide concentration-dependent decrease in ATP synthesis and substrate oxidation was observed, reflecting inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. However, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain was not required for ROS production. Co-incubation of fenretinide with inhibitors of different complexes of the respiratory chain suggested that fenretinide-induced ROS production occurred via complex II. The cytotoxicity of fenretinide was exerted through the generation of mitochondrial ROS and, at higher concentrations, also through inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  11. Oestrogen regulates mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme transcription in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Johann, S; Dahm, M; Kipp, M; Beyer, C; Arnold, S

    2010-08-01

    The regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism is not only important for normal functioning of neurones, but also appears to be essential during acute damage and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. This makes mitochondria an interesting regulatory target for therapeutic approaches. Oestrogen is well-recognised as a protective hormone in the central nervous system under pathological threats. In the present study, we analysed the influence of oestrogen on the expression of mitochondria-encoded genes and mitochondrial activity in spinal cord cells both in vitro and vivo. Hormone application increased the transcription of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes (MRCE). This effect was observed in cultured spinal cord neurones, where it was inhibited by a nuclear oestrogen receptor (ER) antagonist and mainly mediated by the activation of ERbeta. No effect of oestrogen was observed in cultured spinal cord astroglia. In addition, the mitochondrial transcription factor A and nuclear respiratory factor 1 were up-regulated by oestrogen in a similar way as MRCE in vitro, and ATP levels were elevated after the application of the specific ERbeta agonist 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile in cultured spinal cord nerve cells. The exposure of young male mice to oestrogen yielded increased levels of MRCE transcripts in the spinal cord. These data clearly show that systemic application of oestrogen stimulates MRCE expression in the spinal cord and predominantly in neurones. Further studies are required to demonstrate the potency of oestrogen to counteract pathological damage by stabilising mitochondrial performance.

  12. Mitochondrial Ca2+ influx targets cardiolipin to disintegrate respiratory chain complex II for cell death induction

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, M-S; Schwall, C T; Pazarentzos, E; Datler, C; Alder, N N; Grimm, S

    2014-01-01

    Massive Ca2+ influx into mitochondria is critically involved in cell death induction but it is unknown how this activates the organelle for cell destruction. Using multiple approaches including subcellular fractionation, FRET in intact cells, and in vitro reconstitutions, we show that mitochondrial Ca2+ influx prompts complex II of the respiratory chain to disintegrate, thereby releasing an enzymatically competent sub-complex that generates excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) for cell death induction. This Ca2+-dependent dissociation of complex II is also observed in model membrane systems, but not when cardiolipin is replaced with a lipid devoid of Ca2+ binding. Cardiolipin is known to associate with complex II and upon Ca2+ binding coalesces into separate homotypic clusters. When complex II is deprived of this lipid, it disintegrates for ROS formation and cell death. Our results reveal Ca2+ binding to cardiolipin for complex II disintegration as a pivotal step for oxidative stress and cell death induction. PMID:24948011

  13. Succinate-cytochrome c reductase: assessment of its value in the investigation of defects of the respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R W; Birch-Machin, M A; Bartlett, K; Turnbull, D M

    1993-06-19

    Defects of the respiratory chain are important causes of human disease and one of the most commonly used assays in the investigation of these patients is the measurement of succinate-cytochrome c reductase. However, this assay measures several components of the respiratory chain and the ability to detect a partial defect in one enzyme complex will depend on the amount of control exerted by that enzyme step on overall electron flux. We show that measurement of succinate-cytochrome c reductase activity may fail to detect partial defects of complex III and therefore is of limited diagnostic value in the identification of complex III defects. However, complex II is a major point of control of flux through succinate-cytochrome reductase and it is likely that measurement of the latter will detect defects of complex II.

  14. [Application of the polymerase chain reaction for detecting respiratory syncytial virus].

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, L; Chacón, D; Valdivia, A; Savón, C; Goyenechea, A

    1997-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed in order to identify the respiratory syncytial virus by using the reference strain. The high sensitivity and specificity obtained show the PCR utility for detecting the RSV genoma and its application on the diagnosis.

  15. Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Occurrence of non-functioning components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in the presence of proteinase inhibitors: evidence for proteolytic control over assembly of the respiratory chain.

    PubMed Central

    Galkin, A V; Tsoi, T V; Luzikov, V N

    1980-01-01

    Yeast was grown in glucose- or galactose-containing media without or with proteinase inhibitors, phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride and pepstatin. Culture growth was practically not affected by these compounds. Yeast growth on glucose in the presence of either phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride or pepstatin entails accumulation of cytochromes c, c1, b and aa3 to a 25--30% excess above the control by the stationary phase, while cell respiration is unaffected. During growth on galactose the maximal cytochrome content (per unit weight of biomass) is reached in the mid-exponential phase and then decreases by 30--40% towards the stationary phase, while cell respiration remains constant. Addition of phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride or pepstatin in the mid-exponential phase blocks the decrease in cytochrome levels and has no effect on cell respiration. Mitochondrial populations isolated from stationary-phase control and phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride-grown cells glucose cultures display identical succinate oxidase and partial-respiratory-chain activities, despite the differences in cytochrome contents. However, the activities of individual respiratory complexes measured after maximal activation are nearly proportional to the amounts of corresponding components. The same situation holds true for mitochondrial populations from mid-exponential-phase, stationary-phase control and stationary-phase inhibitor-grown cells of galactose cultures. The findings suggest that the 'surplus' respiratory-chain components do not participate in electron flow because of the lack of interaction with adjacent carriers. PMID:7004440

  16. Muscle-fiber transdifferentiation in an experimental model of respiratory chain myopathy.

    PubMed

    Venhoff, Nils; Lebrecht, Dirk; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Venhoff, Ana C; Bissé, Emmanuel; Kirschner, Janbernd; Walker, Ulrich A

    2012-10-29

    Skeletal muscle fiber composition and muscle energetics are not static and change in muscle disease. This study was performed to determine whether a mitochondrial myopathy is associated with adjustments in skeletal muscle fiber-type composition. Ten rats were treated with zidovudine, an antiretroviral nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor that induces a myopathy by interfering with mitochondrial functions. Soleus muscles were examined after 21 weeks of treatment. Ten untreated rats served as controls. Zidovudine induced a myopathy with mitochondrial DNA depletion, abnormalities in mitochondrial ultrastructure, and reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity. Mitochondrial DNA was disproportionally more diminished in type I compared with type II fibers, whereas atrophy predominated in type II fibers. Compared with those of controls, zidovudine-exposed soleus muscles contained an increased proportion (256%) of type II fibers, whereas neonatal myosin heavy chains remained repressed, indicating fiber-type transformation in the absence of regeneration. Microarray gene-expression analysis confirmed enhanced fast-fiber isoforms, repressed slow-fiber transcripts, and reduced neonatal fiber transcripts in the mitochondrial myopathy. Respiratory chain transcripts were diminished, whereas the enzymes of glycolysis and glycogenolysis were enhanced, indicating a metabolic adjustment from oxidative to glycolytic capacities. A coordinated regulation was found of transcription factors known to orchestrate type II fiber formation (upregulation of MyoD, Six1, Six2, Eya1, and Sox6, and downregulation of myogenin and ERRγ). The type I to type II fiber transformation in mitochondrial myopathy implicates mitochondrial function as a new regulator of skeletal muscle fiber type.

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction and respiratory chain defects in a rodent model of methotrexate-induced enteritis.

    PubMed

    Kolli, V K; Natarajan, K; Isaac, B; Selvakumar, D; Abraham, P

    2014-10-01

    The efficacy of methotrexate (MTX), a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, is limited by its gastrointestinal toxicity and the mechanism of which is not clear. The present study investigates the possible role of mitochondrial damage in MTX-induced enteritis. Small intestinal injury was induced in Wistar rats by the administration of 7 mg kg(-1) body wt. MTX intraperitoneally for 3 consecutive days. MTX administration resulted in severe small intestinal injury and extensive damage to enterocyte mitochondria. Respiratory control ratio, the single most useful and reliable test of mitochondrial function, and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yll)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction, a measure of cell viability were significantly reduced in all the fractions of MTX-treated rat enterocytes. A massive decrease (nearly 70%) in the activities of complexes II and IV was also observed. The results of the present study suggest that MTX-induced damage to enterocyte mitochondria may play a critical role in enteritis. MTX-induced alteration in mitochondrial structure may cause its dysfunction and decreases the activities of the electron chain complexes. MTX-induced mitochondrial damage can result in reduced adenosine triphosphate synthesis, thereby interfering with nutrient absorption and enterocyte renewal. This derangement may contribute to malabsorption of nutrients, diarrhea, and weight loss seen in patients on MTX chemotherapy.

  18. The effects of acetylcolletotrichin on the mitochondrial respiratory chain

    PubMed Central

    Foucher, Bernard; Chappell, J. B.; McGivan, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    1. Acetylcolletotrichin is a phytotoxic compound that has been isolated from the culture medium of the fungus Colletotrichum capsici (Grove et al., 1966). 2. With isolated liver and kidney mitochondria acetylcolletotrichin markedly inhibited the oxidation of succinate and those substrates with NAD-linked dehydrogenases, but did not inhibit the oxidation of ascorbate in the presence of tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine. In this respect its action was similar to that of antimycin A. 3. Acetylcolletotrichin differed from antimycin in that, even at high concentrations which produced a maximal inhibitory effect, its action was partially reversed by uncoupling agents. Also acetylcolletotrichin had no detectable effect on the oxidative activity of blowfly flight-muscle mitochondria and was not very effective with heart mitochondria. 4. Acetylcolletotrichin inhibited the oxidative activity of liver mitochondria more markedly when respiration was stimulated by ADP together with phosphate and was less effective when respiration was stimulated by uncoupling agents. 5. There was an unusual interaction between the succinate oxidation system and the oxidation of glutamate together with malate. Thus, glutamate together with malate, even in the presence of rotenone, markedly decreased the effectiveness of acetylcolletotrichin in inhibiting succinate oxidation. 6. These effects were paralleled in the observed redox changes of cytochrome c. 7. The unusual behaviour of the cytochromes b in the presence of acetylcolletotrichin is described, and it is suggested tentatively that this inhibitor acts between cytochromes b with absorption maxima at 30°C of approximately 560 and 565nm. PMID:4372992

  19. Effectiveness of cough etiquette maneuvers in disrupting the chain of transmission of infectious respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of recommended measures, such as “cover your mouth when coughing”, in disrupting the chain of transmission of infectious respiratory diseases (IRD) has been questioned. The objective of the current study was to determine the effectiveness of simple primary respiratory hygiene/cough etiquette maneuvers in blocking droplets expelled as aerosol during coughing. Method In this study, 31 healthy non-smokers performed cough etiquette maneuvers in an effort to cover their voluntarily elicited best effort coughs in an open bench format. A laser diffraction system was used to obtain accurate, non-invasive, quantitative, real time measurements of the size and number of droplets emitted during the assessed cough etiquette maneuvers. Results Recommended cough etiquette maneuvers did not block the release and dispersion of a variety of different diameter droplets to the surrounding environment. Droplets smaller than one-micron size dominate the total number of droplets leaked when practicing assessed maneuvers. Conclusions All the assessed cough etiquette maneuvers, performed as recommended, do not block droplets expelled as aerosol when coughing. This aerosol can penetrate profound levels of the respiratory system. Practicing these assessed primary respiratory hygiene/cough etiquette maneuvers would still permit direct, indirect, and/or airborne transmission and spread of IRD, such as influenza and Tuberculosis. All the assessed cough etiquette maneuvers, as recommended, do not fully interrupt the chain of transmission of IRD. This knowledge urges us all to critically review recommended CE and to search for new evidence-based procedures that effectively disrupt the transmission of respiratory pathogens. Interrupting the chain of transmission of IRD will optimize the protection of first responders, paramedics, nurses, and doctors working in triage sites, emergency rooms, intensive care units, and the general public against cough

  20. A stopped-flow dual-wavelength spectrophotometer suitable for the study of respiratory chains.

    PubMed Central

    Garland, P B; Littleford, S J; Haddock, B A

    1976-01-01

    The requirements for a dual-wavelength stopped-flow spectrophotometer to be suitable for studying limited quantities of respiratory-chain preparations are described. They can be met by a design using mainly commercially available components. The constructed apparatus has a dead-time of approx. 2.6 ms, a mixing ratio of 17:1, and a minimal requirement for 0.5 ml of mixed reactants per flow. PMID:938452

  1. Muscle-fiber transdifferentiation in an experimental model of respiratory chain myopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Skeletal muscle fiber composition and muscle energetics are not static and change in muscle disease. This study was performed to determine whether a mitochondrial myopathy is associated with adjustments in skeletal muscle fiber-type composition. Methods Ten rats were treated with zidovudine, an antiretroviral nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor that induces a myopathy by interfering with mitochondrial functions. Soleus muscles were examined after 21 weeks of treatment. Ten untreated rats served as controls. Results Zidovudine induced a myopathy with mitochondrial DNA depletion, abnormalities in mitochondrial ultrastructure, and reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity. Mitochondrial DNA was disproportionally more diminished in type I compared with type II fibers, whereas atrophy predominated in type II fibers. Compared with those of controls, zidovudine-exposed soleus muscles contained an increased proportion (256%) of type II fibers, whereas neonatal myosin heavy chains remained repressed, indicating fiber-type transformation in the absence of regeneration. Microarray gene-expression analysis confirmed enhanced fast-fiber isoforms, repressed slow-fiber transcripts, and reduced neonatal fiber transcripts in the mitochondrial myopathy. Respiratory chain transcripts were diminished, whereas the enzymes of glycolysis and glycogenolysis were enhanced, indicating a metabolic adjustment from oxidative to glycolytic capacities. A coordinated regulation was found of transcription factors known to orchestrate type II fiber formation (upregulation of MyoD, Six1, Six2, Eya1, and Sox6, and downregulation of myogenin and ERRγ). Conclusions The type I to type II fiber transformation in mitochondrial myopathy implicates mitochondrial function as a new regulator of skeletal muscle fiber type. PMID:23107834

  2. A Comprehensive Genomic Analysis Reveals the Genetic Landscape of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Nyuzuki, Hiromi; Moriyama, Yohsuke; Mizuno, Yosuke; Hirata, Tomoko; Yatsuka, Yukiko; Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Kato, Hidemasa; Okuda, Akihiko; Tamaru, Shunsuke; Borna, Nurun Nahar; Banshoya, Kengo; Aigaki, Toshiro; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Ohnuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagao, Asuteka; Maehata, Hazuki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nagasaki, Masao; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fushimi, Takuya; Shimura, Masaru; Kaiho-Ichimoto, Keiko; Harashima, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Taro; Mori, Masato; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders have the highest incidence among congenital metabolic disorders characterized by biochemical respiratory chain complex deficiencies. It occurs at a rate of 1 in 5,000 births, and has phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in about 1,500 nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins may cause mitochondrial dysfunction of energy production and mitochondrial disorders. More than 250 genes that cause mitochondrial disorders have been reported to date. However exact genetic diagnosis for patients still remained largely unknown. To reveal this heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive genomic analyses for 142 patients with childhood-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies. The approach includes whole mtDNA and exome analyses using high-throughput sequencing, and chromosomal aberration analyses using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We identified 37 novel mutations in known mitochondrial disease genes and 3 mitochondria-related genes (MRPS23, QRSL1, and PNPLA4) as novel causative genes. We also identified 2 genes known to cause monogenic diseases (MECP2 and TNNI3) and 3 chromosomal aberrations (6q24.3-q25.1, 17p12, and 22q11.21) as causes in this cohort. Our approaches enhance the ability to identify pathogenic gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies in clinical settings. They also underscore clinical and genetic heterogeneity and will improve patient care of this complex disorder. PMID:26741492

  3. Imbalance of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complexes in the Epidermis Induces Severe Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Daniela; Brachvogel, Bent; Hornig-Do, Hue-Tran; Neuhaus, Johannes F G; Holzer, Tatjana; Tobin, Desmond J; Niessen, Carien M; Wiesner, Rudolf J; Baris, Olivier R

    2017-08-31

    Accumulation of large-scale mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions and chronic, subclinical inflammation are concomitant during skin aging, thus raising the question of a causal link. To approach this, we generated mice expressing a mutant mitochondrial helicase (K320E-TWINKLE) in the epidermis in order to accelerate the accumulation of mtDNA deletions in this skin compartment. Mice displayed low amounts of large-scale deletions as well as a dramatic depletion of mtDNA in the epidermis and showed macroscopic signs of severe skin inflammation. The mtDNA alterations led to an imbalanced stoichiometry of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, inducing a unique combination of cytokine expression, causing a severe inflammatory phenotype, with massive immune cell infiltrates already before birth. Altogether, these data unraveled a previously unknown link between an imbalanced stoichiometry of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and skin inflammation, and suggest that severe respiratory chain dysfunction, as observed in few cells leading to a mosaic in aged tissues, might be involved in the development of chronic sub-clinical inflammation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Coenzyme Q biosynthesis and its role in the respiratory chain structure.

    PubMed

    Alcázar-Fabra, María; Navas, Plácido; Brea-Calvo, Gloria

    2016-08-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a unique electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which is synthesized on-site by a nuclear encoded multiprotein complex. CoQ receives electrons from different redox pathways, mainly NADH and FADH2 from tricarboxylic acid pathway, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that support key aspects of the metabolism. Here we explore some lines of evidence supporting the idea of the interaction of CoQ with the respiratory chain complexes, contributing to their superassembly, including respirasome, and its role in reactive oxygen species production in the mitochondrial inner membrane. We also review the current knowledge about the involvement of mitochondrial genome defects and electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase mutations in the induction of secondary CoQ deficiency. This mechanism would imply specific interactions coupling CoQ itself or the CoQ-biosynthetic apparatus with the respiratory chain components. These interactions would regulate mitochondrial CoQ steady-state levels and function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Comprehensive Genomic Analysis Reveals the Genetic Landscape of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Masakazu; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Kishita, Yoshihito; Nyuzuki, Hiromi; Moriyama, Yohsuke; Mizuno, Yosuke; Hirata, Tomoko; Yatsuka, Yukiko; Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Kato, Hidemasa; Okuda, Akihiko; Tamaru, Shunsuke; Borna, Nurun Nahar; Banshoya, Kengo; Aigaki, Toshiro; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Ohnuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagao, Asuteka; Maehata, Hazuki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nagasaki, Masao; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fushimi, Takuya; Shimura, Masaru; Kaiho-Ichimoto, Keiko; Harashima, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Taro; Mori, Masato; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders have the highest incidence among congenital metabolic disorders characterized by biochemical respiratory chain complex deficiencies. It occurs at a rate of 1 in 5,000 births, and has phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in about 1,500 nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins may cause mitochondrial dysfunction of energy production and mitochondrial disorders. More than 250 genes that cause mitochondrial disorders have been reported to date. However exact genetic diagnosis for patients still remained largely unknown. To reveal this heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive genomic analyses for 142 patients with childhood-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies. The approach includes whole mtDNA and exome analyses using high-throughput sequencing, and chromosomal aberration analyses using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We identified 37 novel mutations in known mitochondrial disease genes and 3 mitochondria-related genes (MRPS23, QRSL1, and PNPLA4) as novel causative genes. We also identified 2 genes known to cause monogenic diseases (MECP2 and TNNI3) and 3 chromosomal aberrations (6q24.3-q25.1, 17p12, and 22q11.21) as causes in this cohort. Our approaches enhance the ability to identify pathogenic gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies in clinical settings. They also underscore clinical and genetic heterogeneity and will improve patient care of this complex disorder.

  6. Respiratory chain of alkalophilic bacteria. Annual progress report, June 15, 1981-May 15, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Krulwich, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    In view of the increased energy cost of life at extremely alkaline pH, the extraordinary qualitative and quantitative array of respiratory chain components of alkalophilic bacteria, and the normal growth yields and O/sub 2/ consumption rates of such organisms, it has been proposed that the obligately alkalophilic bacteria possess structural/functional properties of the respiratory chain such that particularly efficient energy conservation is facilitated. The respiratory chain components of Bacillus alcalophilus have been studied in comparison with its non-alkalophilic mutant derivative; a similar study of Bacillus firmus RAB and non-alkalophilic RABN is now partially completed. The alkalophiles contain high quantities of many distinct redox carriers as compared to their derivative and other non-alkalophiles. Determinations of H/sup +/7O ratios are now in progress. A system for study of the regulation of cytochrome expression, as a function of pH, has been developed. Failure of obligate alkalophiles to grow at pH 7.0 now appears to relate to the low membrane potentials produced by respiration at that pH, rather than a failure of pH homeostasis. Since alkalophilic cells are found to be viable at pH 7.0, incubations can be conducted for study of functional and regulatory aspects of respiration.

  7. Respiratory chain of a pathogenic fungus, Microsporum gypseum: effect of the antifungal agent pyrrolnitrin.

    PubMed

    Wong, D T; Horng, J S; Gordee, R S

    1971-04-01

    Pyrrolnitrin has been reported to inhibit Bacillus megaterium primarily by forming complexes with phospholipids and to block electron transfer of Saccharomyces cerevisiae between succinate or reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and coenzyme Q. We found that pyrrolnitrin inhibited respiration of conidia of Microsporum gypseum. In mitochondrial preparations, pyrrolnitrin strongly inhibited respiration and the rotenone-sensitive NADH-cytochrome c reductase. The rotenone-insensitive NADH-cytochrome c reductase, the succinate-cytochrome c reductase, and the reduction of dichlorophenolindophenol by either NADH or succinate were inhibited to a lesser extent. However, the activity of cytochrome oxidase was not affected by pyrrolnitrin. The extent of reduction of flavoproteins by NADH and succinate, measured at 465 - 510 nm, was unaltered; however, the reduction of cytochrome b, measured at 560 - 575 nm, was partially inhibited by pyrrolnitrin. The level of totally reduced cytochrome b was restored with antimycin A. We, therefore, concluded that the primary site of action of this antifungal antibiotic is to block electron transfer between the flavoprotein of the NADH-dehydrogenase and cytochrome b segment of the respiratory chain of M. gypseum.

  8. Respiratory Chain of a Pathogenic Fungus, Microsporum gypseum: Effect of the Antifungal Agent Pyrrolnitrin

    PubMed Central

    Wong, David T.; Horng, Jong-Sin; Gordee, Robert S.

    1971-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin has been reported to inhibit Bacillus megaterium primarily by forming complexes with phospholipids and to block electron transfer of Saccharomyces cerevisiae between succinate or reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and coenzyme Q. We found that pyrrolnitrin inhibited respiration of conidia of Microsporum gypseum. In mitochondrial preparations, pyrrolnitrin strongly inhibited respiration and the rotenone-sensitive NADH-cytochrome c reductase. The rotenone-insensitive NADH-cytochrome c reductase, the succinate-cytochrome c reductase, and the reduction of dichlorophenolindophenol by either NADH or succinate were inhibited to a lesser extent. However, the activity of cytochrome oxidase was not affected by pyrrolnitrin. The extent of reduction of flavoproteins by NADH and succinate, measured at 465 - 510 nm, was unaltered; however, the reduction of cytochrome b, measured at 560 - 575 nm, was partially inhibited by pyrrolnitrin. The level of totally reduced cytochrome b was restored with antimycin A. We, therefore, concluded that the primary site of action of this antifungal antibiotic is to block electron transfer between the flavoprotein of the NADH-dehydrogenase and cytochrome b segment of the respiratory chain of M. gypseum. PMID:4323963

  9. Specific requirements of nonbilayer phospholipids in mitochondrial respiratory chain function and formation

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Charli D.; Basu Ball, Writoban; Pryce, Erin N.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition affects mitochondrial function by influencing the assembly of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes into supercomplexes. For example, the loss of cardiolipin (CL), a signature non–bilayer-forming phospholipid of mitochondria, results in disruption of MRC supercomplexes. However, the functions of the most abundant mitochondrial phospholipids, bilayer-forming phosphatidylcholine (PC) and non–bilayer-forming phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), are not clearly defined. Using yeast mutants of PE and PC biosynthetic pathways, we show a specific requirement for mitochondrial PE in MRC complex III and IV activities but not for their formation, whereas loss of PC does not affect MRC function or formation. Unlike CL, mitochondrial PE or PC is not required for MRC supercomplex formation, emphasizing the specific requirement of CL in supercomplex assembly. Of interest, PE biosynthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can functionally substitute for the lack of mitochondrial PE biosynthesis, suggesting the existence of PE transport pathway from ER to mitochondria. To understand the mechanism of PE transport, we disrupted ER–mitochondrial contact sites formed by the ERMES complex and found that, although not essential for PE transport, ERMES facilitates the efficient rescue of mitochondrial PE deficiency. Our work highlights specific roles of non–bilayer-forming phospholipids in MRC function and formation. PMID:27226479

  10. Novel inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain: oximes and pyrrolines isolated from Penicillium brevicompactum and synthetic analogues.

    PubMed

    Cantín, Angel; López-Gresa, M Pilar; González, M Carmen; Moya, Pilar; Miranda, Miguel Angel; Primo, Jaime; Romero, Vanessa; Peris, Eva; Estornell, Ernesto

    2005-10-19

    The capacity of inhibition of the mammalian mitochondrial respiratory chain of brevioxime 5a, a natural insecticide compound isolated from Penicillium brevicompactum culture broth, and another 15 analogue compounds, other oximes 5b and 5c; two diastereomeric pyrrolidines 1c' and 1c' '; five pyrrolines 3c', 3c' ' (diastereomers between them), 3a, 3b, and 6; two oxazines 4c' and 4c' ' (also diastereomers between them); and four pyrrol derivatives 7-10, are analyzed in this paper. Compounds 3b, 3c', 3c' ', 4c', 4c' ', 5b, 5c, 6, and 10 were found to be inhibitors of the integrated electron transfer chain (NADH oxidase activity) in beef heart submitochondrial particles (SMP), establishing that all of them except compound 3b and 6 only affected to complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The most potent product was 5b, with an IC50 of 0.27 microM, similar to the IC50 values of other known complex I inhibitors. The diastereomeric pairs 1c'/1c' ', 3c'/3c' ', 4c'/4c' ', and 5c have not been previously described. Chemical characterization, on the basis of spectral data, is also shown.

  11. Targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain of Cryptococcus through antifungal chemosensitization: a model for control of non-fermentative pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enhanced control of species of Cryptococcus, non-fermentative yeast pathogens, was achieved by chemosensitization through co-application of certain compounds with a conventional antimicrobial drug. The species of Cryptococcus tested showed higher sensitivity to mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibi...

  12. Phasic Motor Activity of Respiratory and Non-Respiratory Muscles in REM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Fraigne, Jimmy J.; Orem, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, we quantified the profiles of phasic activity in respiratory muscles (diaphragm, genioglossus and external intercostal) and non-respiratory muscles (neck and extensor digitorum) across REM sleep. We hypothesized that if there is a unique pontine structure that controls all REM sleep phasic events, the profiles of the phasic twitches of different muscle groups should be identical. Furthermore, we described how respiratory parameters (e.g., frequency, amplitude, and effort) vary across REM sleep to determine if phasic processes affect breathing. Methods: Electrodes were implanted in Wistar rats to record brain activity and muscle activity of neck, extensor digitorum, diaphragm, external intercostal, and genioglossal muscles. Ten rats were studied to obtain 313 REM periods over 73 recording days. Data were analyzed offline and REM sleep activity profiles were built for each muscle. In 6 animals, respiratory frequency, effort, amplitude, and inspiratory peak were also analyzed during 192 REM sleep periods. Results: Respiratory muscle phasic activity increased in the second part of the REM period. For example, genioglossal activity increased in the second part of the REM period by 63.8% compared to the average level during NREM sleep. This profile was consistent between animals and REM periods (η2 = 0.58). This increased activity seen in respiratory muscles appeared as irregular bursts and trains of activity that could affect rythmo-genesis. Indeed, the increased integrated activity seen in the second part of the REM period in the diaphragm was associated with an increase in the number (28.3%) and amplitude (30%) of breaths. Non-respiratory muscle phasic activity in REM sleep did not have a profile like the phasic activity of respiratory muscles. Time in REM sleep did not have an effect on nuchal activity (P = 0.59). Conclusion: We conclude that the concept of a common pontine center controlling all REM phasic events is not supported by our

  13. Thermally activated fragmentation of a homopolymer chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugmann, Simon; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2011-03-01

    We consider the thermally activated fragmentation of a homopolymer chain, which can exhibit strongly non-Markovian behavior on the timescale of interest. In our model the dynamics of the intact chain is a Rouse one until a bond breaks and bond breakdown is considered as a first passage problem over a barrier to an absorbing boundary. Using the framework of the Wilemski-Fixman approximation we calculate activation times of individual bonds for free and grafted polymer chains. We show that these times crucially depend on the length of the chain and the location of the bond yielding a minimum at the free chain ends. Going beyond the Wilemski-Fixman approximation we show that a generalized form of the renewal equation for barrier crossings serves to improve the quantitative agreement between numerical simulations and analytical predictions. The authors thankfully acknowledge financial support by DFG within the SFB 555 research collaboration program.

  14. Respiratory chain supercomplexes set the threshold for respiration defects in human mtDNA mutant cybrids.

    PubMed

    D'Aurelio, Marilena; Gajewski, Carl D; Lenaz, Giorgio; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2006-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations cause heterogeneous disorders in humans. MtDNA exists in multiple copies per cell, and mutations need to accumulate beyond a critical threshold to cause disease, because coexisting wild-type mtDNA can complement the genetic defect. A better understanding of the molecular determinants of functional complementation among mtDNA molecules could help us shedding some light on the mechanisms modulating the phenotypic expression of mtDNA mutations in mitochondrial diseases. We studied mtDNA complementation in human cells by fusing two cell lines, one containing a homoplasmic mutation in a subunit of respiratory chain complex IV, COX I, and the other a distinct homoplasmic mutation in a subunit of complex III, cytochrome b. Upon cell fusion, respiration is recovered in hybrids cells, indicating that mitochondria fuse and exchange genetic and protein materials. Mitochondrial functional complementation occurs frequently, but with variable efficiency. We have investigated by native gel electrophoresis the molecular organization of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in complementing hybrid cells. We show that the recovery of mitochondrial respiration correlates with the presence of supramolecular structures (supercomplexes) containing complexes I, III and IV. We suggest that critical amounts of complexes III or IV are required in order for supercomplexes to form and provide mitochondrial functional complementation. From these findings, supercomplex assembly emerges as a necessary step for respiration, and its defect sets the threshold for respiratory impairment in mtDNA mutant cells.

  15. Repairing oxidized proteins in the bacterial envelope using respiratory chain electrons.

    PubMed

    Gennaris, Alexandra; Ezraty, Benjamin; Henry, Camille; Agrebi, Rym; Vergnes, Alexandra; Oheix, Emmanuel; Bos, Julia; Leverrier, Pauline; Espinosa, Leon; Szewczyk, Joanna; Vertommen, Didier; Iranzo, Olga; Collet, Jean-François; Barras, Frédéric

    2015-12-17

    The reactive species of oxygen and chlorine damage cellular components, potentially leading to cell death. In proteins, the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine is converted to methionine sulfoxide, which can cause a loss of biological activity. To rescue proteins with methionine sulfoxide residues, living cells express methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) in most subcellular compartments, including the cytosol, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Here we report the identification of an enzymatic system, MsrPQ, repairing proteins containing methionine sulfoxide in the bacterial cell envelope, a compartment particularly exposed to the reactive species of oxygen and chlorine generated by the host defence mechanisms. MsrP, a molybdo-enzyme, and MsrQ, a haem-binding membrane protein, are widely conserved throughout Gram-negative bacteria, including major human pathogens. MsrPQ synthesis is induced by hypochlorous acid, a powerful antimicrobial released by neutrophils. Consistently, MsrPQ is essential for the maintenance of envelope integrity under bleach stress, rescuing a wide series of structurally unrelated periplasmic proteins from methionine oxidation, including the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA. For this activity, MsrPQ uses electrons from the respiratory chain, which represents a novel mechanism to import reducing equivalents into the bacterial cell envelope. A remarkable feature of MsrPQ is its capacity to reduce both rectus (R-) and sinister (S-) diastereoisomers of methionine sulfoxide, making this oxidoreductase complex functionally different from previously identified Msrs. The discovery that a large class of bacteria contain a single, non-stereospecific enzymatic complex fully protecting methionine residues from oxidation should prompt a search for similar systems in eukaryotic subcellular oxidizing compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum.

  16. Repairing oxidized proteins in the bacterial envelope using respiratory chain electrons

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Camille; Agrebi, Rym; Vergnes, Alexandra; Oheix, Emmanuel; Bos, Julia; Leverrier, Pauline; Espinosa, Leon; Szewczyk, Joanna; Vertommen, Didier; Iranzo, Olga; Collet, Jean-François; Barras, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The reactive species of oxygen (ROS) and chlorine (RCS) damage cellular components, potentially leading to cell death. In proteins, the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine (Met) is converted to methionine sulfoxide (Met-O), which can cause a loss of biological activity. To rescue proteins with Met-O residues, living cells express methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) in most subcellular compartments, including the cytosol, mitochondria and chloroplasts 1-3. Here, we report the identification of an enzymatic system, MsrPQ, repairing Met-O containing proteins in the bacterial cell envelope, a compartment particularly exposed to the ROS and RCS generated by the host defense mechanisms. MsrP, a molybdo-enzyme, and MsrQ, a heme-binding membrane protein, are widely conserved throughout Gram-negative bacteria, including major human pathogens. MsrPQ synthesis is induced by hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a powerful antimicrobial released by neutrophils. Consistently, MsrPQ is essential for the maintenance of envelope integrity under bleach stress, rescuing a wide series of structurally unrelated periplasmic proteins from Met oxidation, including the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA. For this activity, MsrPQ uses electrons from the respiratory chain, which represents a novel mechanism to import reducing equivalents into the bacterial cell envelope. A remarkable feature of MsrPQ is its capacity to reduce both R- and S- diastereoisomers of Met-O, making this oxidoreductase complex functionally different from previously identified Msrs. The discovery that a large class of bacteria contain a single, non-stereospecific enzymatic complex fully protecting Met residues from oxidation should prompt search for similar systems in eukaryotic subcellular oxidizing compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). PMID:26641313

  17. Respiratory control determines respiration and nitrogenase activity of Rhizobium leguminosarum bacteroids.

    PubMed

    Haaker, H; Szafran, M; Wassink, H; Klerk, H; Appels, M

    1996-08-01

    The relationship between the O2 input rate into a suspension of Rhizobium leguminosarum bacteroids, the cellular ATP and ADP pools, and the whole-cell nitrogenase activity during L-malate oxidation has been studied. It was observed that inhibition of nitrogenase by excess O2 coincided with an increase of the cellular ATP/ADP ratio. When under this condition the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was added, the cellular ATP/ADP ratio was lowered while nitrogenase regained activity. To explain these observations, the effects of nitrogenase activity and CCCP on the O2 consumption rate of R. leguminosarum bacteroids were determined. From 100 to 5 microM O2, a decline in the O2 consumption rate was observed to 50 to 70% of the maximal O2 consumption rate. A determination of the redox state of the cytochromes during an O2 consumption experiment indicated that at O2 concentrations above 5 microM, electron transport to the cytochromes was rate-limiting oxidation and not the reaction of reduced cytochromes with oxygen. The kinetic properties of the respiratory chain were determined from the deoxygenation of oxyglobins. In intact cells the maximal deoxygenation activity was stimulated by nitrogenase activity or CCCP. In isolated cytoplasmic membranes NADH oxidation was inhibited by respiratory control. The dehydrogenase activities of the respiratory chain were rate-limiting oxidation at O2 concentrations (if >300 nM. Below 300 nM the terminal oxidase system followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km of 45 +/- 8 nM). We conclude that (i) respiration in R. leguminosarum bacteroids takes place via a respiratory chain terminating at a high-affinity oxidase system, (ii) the activity of the respiratory chain is inhibited by the proton motive force, and (iii) ATP hydrolysis by nitrogenase can partly relieve the inhibition of respiration by the proton motive force and thus stimulate respiration at nanomolar concentrations of O2.

  18. The respiratory chains of four strains of the alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Abbrescia, A; Martino, P L; Panelli, D; Sardanelli, A M; Papa, S; Alifano, P; Palese, L L; Gaballo, A

    2014-01-01

    A comparative analysis of terminal respiratory enzymes has been performed on four strains of Bacillus clausii used for preparation of a European probiotic. These four strains originated most probably from a common ancestor through early selection of stable clones for industrial propagation. They exhibit a low level of intra-specific diversity and a high degree of genomic conservation, making them an attractive model to study the different bioenergetics behaviors of alkaliphilic bacilli. The analysis of the different bioenergetics responses has been carried out revealing striking differences among the strains. Two out of the four strains have shown a functional redundancy of the terminal part of the respiratory chain. The biochemical data correlate with the expression level of the mRNA of cytochrome c oxidase and quinol oxidase genes (heme-copper type). The consequences of these different bioenergetics behaviors are also discussed.

  19. Effects of membrane-bound glucose dehydrogenase overproduction on the respiratory chain of Gluconobacter oxydans.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Maria; Schweiger, Paul; Deppenmeier, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    The acetic acid bacterium Gluconobacter oxydans incompletely oxidizes carbon sources as a natural part of its metabolism, and this feature has been exploited for many biotechnological applications. The most important enzymes used to harness the biocatalytic oxidative capacity of G. oxydans are the pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent dehydrogenases. The membrane-bound PQQ-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), encoded by gox0265, was used as model protein for homologous membrane protein production using the previously described Gluconobacter expression vector pBBR1p452. The mgdh gene had ninefold higher expression in the overproduction strain compared to the parental strain. Furthermore, membranes from the overexpression strain had a five- and threefold increase of mGDH activity and oxygen consumption rates, respectively. Oxygen consumption rate of the membrane fraction could not be increased by the addition of a substrate combination of glucose and ethanol in the overproduction strain, indicating that the terminal quinol oxidases of the respiratory chain were rate limiting. In contrast, addition of glucose and ethanol to membranes of the control strain increased oxygen consumption rates approaching the observed rates with G. oxydans overproducing mGDH. The higher glucose oxidation rates of the mGDH overproduction strain corresponded to a 70 % increase of the gluconate production rate compared to the control strain. The high rate of glucose oxidation may be useful in the industrial production of gluconates and ketogluconates, or as whole-cell biosensors. Furthermore, mGDH was purified to homogeneity by one-step strep-tactin affinity chromatography and characterized. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a membrane integral quinoprotein being purified by affinity chromatography and serves as a proof-of-principle for using G. oxydans as a host for membrane protein expression and purification.

  20. Specific requirements of nonbilayer phospholipids in mitochondrial respiratory chain function and formation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Charli D; Basu Ball, Writoban; Pryce, Erin N; Gohil, Vishal M

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition affects mitochondrial function by influencing the assembly of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes into supercomplexes. For example, the loss of cardiolipin (CL), a signature non-bilayer-forming phospholipid of mitochondria, results in disruption of MRC supercomplexes. However, the functions of the most abundant mitochondrial phospholipids, bilayer-forming phosphatidylcholine (PC) and non-bilayer-forming phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), are not clearly defined. Using yeast mutants of PE and PC biosynthetic pathways, we show a specific requirement for mitochondrial PE in MRC complex III and IV activities but not for their formation, whereas loss of PC does not affect MRC function or formation. Unlike CL, mitochondrial PE or PC is not required for MRC supercomplex formation, emphasizing the specific requirement of CL in supercomplex assembly. Of interest, PE biosynthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can functionally substitute for the lack of mitochondrial PE biosynthesis, suggesting the existence of PE transport pathway from ER to mitochondria. To understand the mechanism of PE transport, we disrupted ER-mitochondrial contact sites formed by the ERMES complex and found that, although not essential for PE transport, ERMES facilitates the efficient rescue of mitochondrial PE deficiency. Our work highlights specific roles of non-bilayer-forming phospholipids in MRC function and formation. © 2016 Baker et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  1. Phasic motor activity of respiratory and non-respiratory muscles in REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Fraigne, Jimmy J; Orem, John M

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we quantified the profiles of phasic activity in respiratory muscles (diaphragm, genioglossus and external intercostal) and non-respiratory muscles (neck and extensor digitorum) across REM sleep. We hypothesized that if there is a unique pontine structure that controls all REM sleep phasic events, the profiles of the phasic twitches of different muscle groups should be identical. Furthermore, we described how respiratory parameters (e.g., frequency, amplitude, and effort) vary across REM sleep to determine if phasic processes affect breathing. Electrodes were implanted in Wistar rats to record brain activity and muscle activity of neck, extensor digitorum, diaphragm, external intercostal, and genioglossal muscles. Ten rats were studied to obtain 313 REM periods over 73 recording days. Data were analyzed offline and REM sleep activity profiles were built for each muscle. In 6 animals, respiratory frequency, effort, amplitude, and inspiratory peak were also analyzed during 192 REM sleep periods. Respiratory muscle phasic activity increased in the second part of the REM period. For example, genioglossal activity increased in the second part of the REM period by 63.8% compared to the average level during NREM sleep. This profile was consistent between animals and REM periods (η(2)=0.58). This increased activity seen in respiratory muscles appeared as irregular bursts and trains of activity that could affect rythmo-genesis. Indeed, the increased integrated activity seen in the second part of the REM period in the diaphragm was associated with an increase in the number (28.3%) and amplitude (30%) of breaths. Non-respiratory muscle phasic activity in REM sleep did not have a profile like the phasic activity of respiratory muscles. Time in REM sleep did not have an effect on nuchal activity (P=0.59). We conclude that the concept of a common pontine center controlling all REM phasic events is not supported by our data. There is a drive in REM sleep that

  2. C1orf163/RESA1 is a novel mitochondrial intermembrane space protein connected to respiratory chain assembly.

    PubMed

    Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Prell, Florian; Thiede, Bernd; Götz, Monika; Wosiek, Dominik; Ott, Christine; Rudel, Thomas

    2014-02-20

    Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in mitochondria takes place at the inner membrane, which folds into numerous cristae. The stability of cristae depends, among other things, on the mitochondrial intermembrane space bridging complex. Its components include inner mitochondrial membrane protein mitofilin and outer membrane protein Sam50. We identified a conserved, uncharacterized protein, C1orf163 [SEL1 repeat containing 1 protein (SELRC1)], as one of the proteins significantly reduced after the knockdown of Sam50 and mitofilin. We show that C1orf163 is a mitochondrial soluble intermembrane space protein. Sam50 depletion affects moderately the import and assembly of C1orf163 into two protein complexes of approximately 60kDa and 150kDa. We observe that the knockdown of C1orf163 leads to reduction of levels of proteins belonging to the OXPHOS complexes. The activity of complexes I and IV is reduced in C1orf163-depleted cells, and we observe the strongest defects in the assembly of complex IV. Therefore, we propose C1orf163 to be a novel factor important for the assembly of respiratory chain complexes in human mitochondria and suggest to name it RESA1 (for RESpiratory chain Assembly 1). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The impact of dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on respiratory illness in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Hageman, Jeske H J; Hooyenga, Pieter; Diersen-Schade, Deborah A; Scalabrin, Deolinda M Felin; Wichers, Harry J; Birch, Eileen E

    2012-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that intake of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA), especially omega-3 LCPUFA, improves respiratory health early in life. This review summarizes publications from 2009 through July 2012 that evaluated effects of fish, fish oil or LCPUFA intake during pregnancy, lactation, and early postnatal years on allergic and infectious respiratory illnesses. Studies during pregnancy found inconsistent effects in offspring: two showed no effects and three showed protective effects of omega-3 LCPUFA on respiratory illnesses or atopic dermatitis. Two studies found that infants fed breast milk with higher omega-3 LCPUFA had reduced allergic manifestations. Earlier introduction of fish improved respiratory health or reduced allergy in four studies. Three randomized controlled trials showed that providing LCPUFA during infancy or childhood reduced allergy and/or respiratory illness while one found no effect. Potential explanations for the variability among studies and possible mechanisms of action for LCPUFA in allergy and respiratory disease are discussed.

  4. Xanthommatin formation in rat liver mitochondria and its inhibition by respiratory chain substrates.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, H; Nagamura, Y; Ishiguro, I

    1983-11-01

    3-Hydroxykynurenine is condensed to xanthommatin by cytochrome c and cytochrome oxidase in rat liver mitochondria. In intact mitochondria the reaction is inhibited by respiratory chain substrates. However, this was not the case with preincubated mitochondria or with isolated cytochrome c and cytochrome oxidase. The inhibition of xanthommatin formation in native mitochondria by succinate was abolished by addition of antimycin A or malonate, whereas the inhibition by citrate, glutamate or fumarate was not impaired by antimycin A or amobarbital. However, after preincubation of mitochondria at 37 degrees C for 30 min the inhibition disappeared in these cases too. It is suggested that the inhibition by succinate is due to the supply of reduced cytochrome b which competes with 3-hydroxykynurenine for ferricytochrome c, while the other respiratory chain substrates inhibit xanthommatin formation only in the case of intact mitochondria by a yet unknown mechanism. These inhibition mechanisms prevent xanthommatin formation in rat liver mitochondria, even though 3-hydroxykynurenine is synthesized in the outer mitochondrial membrane.

  5. The role of succinate in the respiratory chain of Trypanosoma brucei procyclic trypomastigotes.

    PubMed

    Turrens, J F

    1989-04-15

    Trypanosoma brucei procyclic trypomastigotes were made permeable by using digitonin (0-70 micrograms/mg of protein). This procedure allowed exposure of coupled mitochondria to different substrates. Only succinate and glycerol phosphate (but not NADH-dependent substrates) were capable of stimulating oxygen consumption. Fluorescence studies on intact cells indicated that addition of succinate stimulates NAD(P)H oxidation, contrary to what happens in mammalian mitochondria. Addition of malonate, an inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, stimulated NAD(P)H reduction. Malonate also inhibited intact-cell respiration and motility, both of which were restored by further addition of succinate. Experiments carried out with isolated mitochondrial membranes showed that, although the electron transfer from succinate to cytochrome c was inhibitable by antimycin, NADH-cytochrome c reductase was antimycin-insensitive. We postulate that the NADH-ubiquinone segment of the respiratory chain is replaced by NADH-fumarate reductase, which reoxidizes the mitochondrial NADH and in turn generates succinate for the respiratory chain. This hypothesis is further supported by the inhibitory effect on cell growth and respiration of 3-methoxyphenylacetic acid, an inhibitor of the NADH-fumarate reductase of T. brucei.

  6. Respiratory chain of the alkalophilic bacterium Bacillus firmus RAB and its non-alkalophilic mutant derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Kitada, M.; Lewis, R.J.; Krulwich, T.A.

    1983-04-01

    The membrane-bound respiratory chain components of alkalophilic Bacillus firmus RAB were studied by difference spectroscopy and oxidation-reduction potentiometric titrations. Cytochromes with the following midpoint potentials were identified at pH 9.0: a-type cytochromes, +110 and +210 mV; b-type cytochromes, +20, -120, -280, and -400 mV; and cytochrome c, +60 mV. Only the higher-potential cytochrome a showed an upward shift in midpoint potential when titrated at pH 7.0. Parallel studies of a non-alkalophilic mutant derivate of B. firmus RAB, strain RABN, revealed the presence of only one species each of a-, b-, and c-type cytochromes which exhibited midpoint potentials of +110, -150, and +160 mV, respectively, at pH 7.0. Membranes of both strains were found to contain menaquinone. At pH 9.0, NADH caused the reduction of essentially all of the cytochromes that were seen in fully reduced preparations of wild-type B. firmus RAB membranes. By contrast, at pH 7.0, NADH failed to appreciably reduce the b-type cytochromes. These findings may relate to our recent proposal that an inadequacy in energy transduction (production of a proton motive force) by the alkalophilic respiratory chain at pH 7.0 is what precludes the growth of B. firmus RAB at a neutral pH. 13 references, 7 figures.

  7. Possible role of mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects in aristolochic acid I-induced acute nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhenzhou Bao, Qingli Sun, Lixin Huang, Xin Wang, Tao Zhang, Shuang Li, Han Zhang, Luyong

    2013-01-15

    This report describes an investigation of the pathological mechanism of acute renal failure caused by toxic tubular necrosis after treatment with aristolochic acid I (AAI) in Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. The rats were gavaged with AAI at 0, 5, 20, or 80 mg/kg/day for 7 days. The pathologic examination of the kidneys showed severe acute tubular degenerative changes primarily affecting the proximal tubules. Supporting these results, we detected significantly increased concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in the rats treated with AAI, indicating damage to the kidneys. Ultrastructural examination showed that proximal tubular mitochondria were extremely enlarged and dysmorphic with loss and disorientation of their cristae. Mitochondrial function analysis revealed that the two indicators for mitochondrial energy metabolism, the respiratory control ratio (RCR) and ATP content, were reduced in a dose-dependent manner after AAI treatment. The RCR in the presence of substrates for complex I was reduced more significantly than in the presence of substrates for complex II. In additional experiments, the activity of respiratory complex I, which is partly encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), was more significantly impaired than that of respiratory complex II, which is completely encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). A real-time PCR assay revealed a marked reduction of mtDNA in the kidneys treated with AAI. Taken together, these results suggested that mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects play critical roles in the pathogenesis of kidney injury induced by AAI, and that the same processes might contribute to aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► AAI-induced acute renal failure in rats and the proximal tubule was the target. ► Tubular mitochondria were morphologically aberrant in ultrastructural examination. ► AAI impair mitochondrial bioenergetic function and mtDNA replication.

  8. Structure of the Zymomonas mobilis respiratory chain: oxygen affinity of electron transport and the role of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Balodite, Elina; Strazdina, Inese; Galinina, Nina; McLean, Samantha; Rutkis, Reinis; Poole, Robert K; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2014-09-01

    The genome of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis encodes a bd-type terminal oxidase, cytochrome bc1 complex and several c-type cytochromes, yet lacks sequences homologous to any of the known bacterial cytochrome c oxidase genes. Recently, it was suggested that a putative respiratory cytochrome c peroxidase, receiving electrons from the cytochrome bc1 complex via cytochrome c552, might function as a peroxidase and/or an alternative oxidase. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis, by construction of a cytochrome c peroxidase mutant (Zm6-perC), and comparison of its properties with those of a mutant defective in the cytochrome b subunit of the bc1 complex (Zm6-cytB). Disruption of the cytochrome c peroxidase gene (ZZ60192) caused a decrease of the membrane NADH peroxidase activity, impaired the resistance of growing culture to exogenous hydrogen peroxide and hampered aerobic growth. However, this mutation did not affect the activity or oxygen affinity of the respiratory chain, or the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction. Furthermore, the peroxide resistance and membrane NADH peroxidase activity of strain Zm6-cytB had not decreased, but both the oxygen affinity of electron transport and the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction were affected. It is therefore concluded that the cytochrome c peroxidase does not terminate the cytochrome bc1 branch of Z. mobilis, and that it is functioning as a quinol peroxidase.

  9. Multistationary and Oscillatory Modes of Free Radicals Generation by the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Revealed by a Bifurcation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Selivanov, Vitaly A.; Cascante, Marta; Friedman, Mark; Schumaker, Mark F.; Trucco, Massimo; Votyakova, Tatyana V.

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain transforms energy satisfying cellular demand and generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that act as metabolic signals or destructive factors. Therefore, knowledge of the possible modes and bifurcations of electron transport that affect ROS signaling provides insight into the interrelationship of mitochondrial respiration with cellular metabolism. Here, a bifurcation analysis of a sequence of the electron transport chain models of increasing complexity was used to analyze the contribution of individual components to the modes of respiratory chain behavior. Our algorithm constructed models as large systems of ordinary differential equations describing the time evolution of the distribution of redox states of the respiratory complexes. The most complete model of the respiratory chain and linked metabolic reactions predicted that condensed mitochondria produce more ROS at low succinate concentration and less ROS at high succinate levels than swelled mitochondria. This prediction was validated by measuring ROS production under various swelling conditions. A numerical bifurcation analysis revealed qualitatively different types of multistationary behavior and sustained oscillations in the parameter space near a region that was previously found to describe the behavior of isolated mitochondria. The oscillations in transmembrane potential and ROS generation, observed in living cells were reproduced in the model that includes interaction of respiratory complexes with the reactions of TCA cycle. Whereas multistationarity is an internal characteristic of the respiratory chain, the functional link of respiration with central metabolism creates oscillations, which can be understood as a means of auto-regulation of cell metabolism. PMID:23028295

  10. Job activities and respiratory symptoms among farmworkers in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Mirabelli, Maria C.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Chatterjee, Arjun B.; Isom, Scott; Chen, Haiying; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Howard, Timothy D.; Quandt, Sara A.; Vallejos, Quirina M.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory health is an important component of the ability to perform physically demanding work. We assessed the prevalence of self-reported respiratory symptoms among Latino farmworkers primarily engaged in crop production and investigated work activities as risk factors for respiratory symptoms. During June-September 2008, 122 farmworkers completed up to three interviewer-administered questionnaires. We estimated the associations between work activities and wheezing symptoms using alternating logistic regression, controlling for age and smoking. At the first data collection, 24% (n=29) of farmworkers reported ever wheezing and 8% reported wheezing within the past month. Though not statistically significant, the odds of wheezing were elevated for individuals who reported performing tobacco-related work in the last three days. The odds were decreased among individuals who reported harvesting activities (odds ratio: 0.3, 95% confidence interval: 0.1, 1.0). Among Latino farmworkers, respiratory symptoms may be associated with work activities. PMID:21864106

  11. Nitric oxide inhibits specific enzymes in the Krebs cycle and the respiratory chain of rat hepatocyte mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, J.; Billiar, T.R.; Curran, R.D.; Kim, R.; Simmons, R.L. )

    1990-02-26

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly-reactive molecule produced from L-arginine as recently described. In macrophages and tumor cells, NO inhibits specific mitochondrial enzymes presumably by attacking their intrinsic 4Fe-4S centers. The susceptible enzymes include aconitase of the Krebs cycle and oxidoreductase (complex II) of the electron transport chain. The authors have recently demonstrated that hepatocytes (HC) produce NO in large amounts in response to endotoxin and inflammatory cytokines. To determine whether HC suffer a similar enzyme inhibition, the authors exposed rat HC to increasing concentrations of NO solutions for 5 minutes. The activity of aconitase, complex 1, complex 2, and complex 4 (cytochrome oxidase) was determined by measuring O{sub 2} consumption after addition of enzyme-specific substrates. An NO concentration-dependent inhibition of aconitase, complex 1, and complex 2 was measured. After exposure to 0.6 mM solution, the activity of aconitase was blocked to non-measurable values while complex 1 was reduced to 11 + 8%, and complex 2 to 36 + 2% of the activity of control HC. Complex 4 of the respiratory chain remained intact at 100 + 8%. These data indicate that HC, like other cell types, are susceptible to inhibition of important steps of energy production by NO. As NO is produced in response to septic stimuli, this mechanism may play a role in the metabolic dysfunction of HC in sepsis.

  12. Active learning of respiratory physiology improves performance on respiratory physiology examinations.

    PubMed

    Rao, S P; DiCarlo, S E

    2001-12-01

    Active involvement in the learning process has been suggested to enhance creative thinking, judgement, interpretation, and problem-solving skills. Therefore, educators are encouraged to create an active-learning environment by incorporating active-learning strategies into the class. However, there is very little documentation of the effectiveness of active-learning strategies. Furthermore, faculty are often reluctant to incorporate new strategies without documentation of the effectiveness of these strategies. To address this concern, we compared the performance of two individual classes on an identical respiratory physiology examination. One class was taught respiratory physiology using active-learning strategies. The other class was taught respiratory physiology using the traditional lecture format. The results document that students who learned using active-learning strategies did significantly better (P < 0.05) on the respiratory physiology examination than students who learned by the traditional lecture format (61 +/- 2.2 vs. 86 +/- 1.0). Thus, by actively involving students in the learning process, academic performance is enhanced.

  13. The vitamin D receptor inhibits the respiratory chain, contributing to the metabolic switch that is essential for cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Consiglio, Marco; Destefanis, Michele; Morena, Deborah; Foglizzo, Valentina; Forneris, Mattia; Pescarmona, Gianpiero; Silvagno, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    We recently described the mitochondrial localization and import of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in actively proliferating HaCaT cells for the first time, but its role in the organelle remains unknown. Many metabolic intermediates that support cell growth are provided by the mitochondria; consequently, the identification of proteins that regulate mitochondrial metabolic pathways is of great interest, and we sought to understand whether VDR may modulate these pathways. We genetically silenced VDR in HaCaT cells and studied the effects on cell growth, mitochondrial metabolism and biosynthetic pathways. VDR knockdown resulted in robust growth inhibition, with accumulation in the G0G1 phase of the cell cycle and decreased accumulation in the M phase. The effects of VDR silencing on proliferation were confirmed in several human cancer cell lines. Decreased VDR expression was consistently observed in two different models of cell differentiation. The impairment of silenced HaCaT cell growth was accompanied by sharp increases in the mitochondrial membrane potential, which sensitized the cells to oxidative stress. We found that transcription of the subunits II and IV of cytochrome c oxidase was significantly increased upon VDR silencing. Accordingly, treatment of HaCaT cells with vitamin D downregulated both subunits, suggesting that VDR may inhibit the respiratory chain and redirect TCA intermediates toward biosynthesis, thus contributing to the metabolic switch that is typical of cancer cells. In order to explore this hypothesis, we examined various acetyl-CoA-dependent biosynthetic pathways, such as the mevalonate pathway (measured as cholesterol biosynthesis and prenylation of small GTPases), and histone acetylation levels; all of these pathways were inhibited by VDR silencing. These data provide evidence of the role of VDR as a gatekeeper of mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and a facilitator of the diversion of acetyl-CoA from the energy-producing TCA cycle

  14. The Vitamin D Receptor Inhibits the Respiratory Chain, Contributing to the Metabolic Switch that Is Essential for Cancer Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Morena, Deborah; Foglizzo, Valentina; Forneris, Mattia; Pescarmona, Gianpiero; Silvagno, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    We recently described the mitochondrial localization and import of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in actively proliferating HaCaT cells for the first time, but its role in the organelle remains unknown. Many metabolic intermediates that support cell growth are provided by the mitochondria; consequently, the identification of proteins that regulate mitochondrial metabolic pathways is of great interest, and we sought to understand whether VDR may modulate these pathways. We genetically silenced VDR in HaCaT cells and studied the effects on cell growth, mitochondrial metabolism and biosynthetic pathways. VDR knockdown resulted in robust growth inhibition, with accumulation in the G0G1 phase of the cell cycle and decreased accumulation in the M phase. The effects of VDR silencing on proliferation were confirmed in several human cancer cell lines. Decreased VDR expression was consistently observed in two different models of cell differentiation. The impairment of silenced HaCaT cell growth was accompanied by sharp increases in the mitochondrial membrane potential, which sensitized the cells to oxidative stress. We found that transcription of the subunits II and IV of cytochrome c oxidase was significantly increased upon VDR silencing. Accordingly, treatment of HaCaT cells with vitamin D downregulated both subunits, suggesting that VDR may inhibit the respiratory chain and redirect TCA intermediates toward biosynthesis, thus contributing to the metabolic switch that is typical of cancer cells. In order to explore this hypothesis, we examined various acetyl-CoA-dependent biosynthetic pathways, such as the mevalonate pathway (measured as cholesterol biosynthesis and prenylation of small GTPases), and histone acetylation levels; all of these pathways were inhibited by VDR silencing. These data provide evidence of the role of VDR as a gatekeeper of mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and a facilitator of the diversion of acetyl-CoA from the energy-producing TCA cycle

  15. Activity of respiratory system during laser irradiation of brain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, N. A.; Sergeyeva, L. I.

    1984-06-01

    The performance of one of the principal links of the respiratory system, the respiratory center, was studied as a function of the exposure of the medulla oblongata and the sensomotor zone of the cerebral hemisphere cortex to low level laser irradiation in the red wavelength of the spectrum. Experiments were done on white rats under barbital anesthesia. Under such conditions a substantial effect was observed on the activity of the respiratory center. Laser light may display activating or inhibitory influences, in some cases the bilateral symmetry of the activity of the respiratory center is affected indicating deep changes in the integrative mechanism of the functioning of the right and left sides of the hemispheres. The laser beam effect depends on many factors: specific light properties, duration of the exposure, repetition of exposures, initial functional state of the CNS, etc.

  16. [Study of cardiac, respiratory, and motor activity in rat fetuses].

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, O P; Vdovichenko, N D

    2009-01-01

    Development of the cardiac, respiratory, and motor activity was studied in rat fetuses with preserved placenta circulation was studied at the 16th, 18th, and 20th gestation days. The presence of three main movement types has been found: complexes of generalization activity, local movements, and jerks. In development of respiratory function, there is observed a gradual transition from individual inspirations to series of respiratory movements and then to formation of periodic respiration episodes. At the studied period, the heart rate has been found to increase. The existence of the slow-wave modulations it the heart rate with a period of 20-40 s has been revealed. Analysis of interrelations between the respiratory and motor systems has shown that in the 16-day fetuses, each respiratory movement is accompanied by extensor jerk. By the 20th days of embryonic development (E20), uncoupling of the respiratory and motor activities occurs. Comparison of the activity observed in the cardiac and somatomotor systems has shown that at E16, the cardiac rhythm fluctuations do not depend on the motor excitation jerks. In the 18-day fetuses, brief slowing down (decelerations) of the cardiac rhythm appeared during the motor activity jerks, whereas at E20, on the contrary, an increase of frequency (accelerations) of the cardiac rhythm occurred.

  17. Electrode assemblies composed of redox cascades from microbial respiratory electron transfer chains

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Andrew J.; Marritt, Sophie; Bradley, Justin; Shi, Liang; McMillan, Duncan G.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Richardson, David; Butt, Julea N.

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory and photosynthetic electron transfer chains are dependent on vectorial electron transfer through a series of redox proteins. Examples include electron transfer from NapC to NapAB nitrate reductase in Paracoccus denitrificans and from CymA to Fcc3 (flavocytochrome c3) fumarate reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In the present article, we demonstrate that graphite electrodes can serve as surfaces for the stepwise adsorption of NapC and NapAB, and the stepwise adsorption of CymA and Fcc3. Aspects of the catalytic properties of these assemblies are different from those of NapAB and Fcc3 adsorbed in isolation. We propose that this is due to the formation of NapC-NapAB and of CymA-Fcc3 complexes that are capable of supporting vectorial electron transfer.

  18. Development and implementation of standardized respiratory chain spectrophotometric assays for clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Medja, F; Allouche, S; Frachon, P; Jardel, C; Malgat, M; Mousson de Camaret, B; Slama, A; Lunardi, J; Mazat, J P; Lombès, A

    2009-09-01

    Diversity of respiratory chain spectrophotometric assays may lead to difficult comparison of results between centers. The French network of mitochondrial diseases diagnostic centers undertook comparison of the results obtained with different protocols in the French diagnostic centers. The diversity of protocols was shown to have striking consequences, which prompted the network to undertake standardization and optimization of the protocols with respect to clinical diagnosis, i.e. high velocity while maintaining linear kinetics relative to time and enzyme concentration. Assays were set up on animal tissues and verified on control human muscle and fibroblasts. Influence of homogenization buffer and narrow range of optimal concentration of phosphate, substrate and tissue were shown. Experimental data and proposed protocols have been posted on a free access website. Their subsequent use in several diagnostic centers has improved consistency for all assays.

  19. Alpha-chain disease with involvement of the respiratory tract in a Dutch child

    PubMed Central

    Stoop, J. W.; Ballieux, R. E.; Hijmans, W.; Zegers, B. J. W.

    1971-01-01

    A description is given of an 8-year-old girl of pure Dutch extraction who, since age 4, has shown unclassifiable skin changes, marked eosinophilia and diffuse infiltrative pulmonary changes with enlarged mediastinal lymph glands, dyspnoea and impaired diffusion. The patient's serum contained a large amount of proteins related to the Fc-fragment of IgA. She developed a pharyngeal tumour with the histological characteristics of a paragranuloma. The mucosa of the lower air passages is regarded as a possible site of origin of the abnormal serum protein. The disease was therefore interpreted as a disorder of the secretory IgA system, and this patient could well represent the respiratory form of the alpha-chain disease, described so far. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:4111693

  20. In vivo functional investigations of lactic acid in patients with respiratory chain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Touati, G; Rigal, O; Lombes, A; Frachon, P; Giraud, M; de Baulny, H O.

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 4 September 1996
 OBJECTIVE—To assess the prevalence of in vivo detectable abnormalities of lactate metabolism in mitochondrial disorders.
DESIGN—Retrospective study in a metabolic investigation unit.
PATIENTS—28 patients with a respiratory chain disorder identified from biochemical or genetic analyses, or both, and 133 age matched controls. Controls were children in whom causes of secondary hyperlactataemia and/or disorders, affecting the energy pathways could be excluded.
METHODS—Lactate and pyruvate were measured in blood, together with other intermediary metabolism indices, before and one hour after four meals each day. Lactate and creatinine in a 24 hour urine sample collected at the same time were analysed. When basal hyperlactataemia was not evident, an intravenous glucose or pyruvate loading test was performed as a provocative test.
RESULTS—Abnormal lactate metabolism was found in 25 of 28 patients thus demonstrating the potential usefulness of these investigations in the diagnosis of mitochondrial diseases. Moderate lactate accumulation was present in relatively mild disease, associated with a mitochondrial DNA mutation and combined respiratory complexes deficiency. By contrast, high lactate concentrations were observed in very young children, with severe disease, isolated complex deficiency, and no apparent mitochondrial DNA defect.

 PMID:9059154

  1. Role of dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in infant allergies and respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Shek, Lynette P; Chong, Mary Foong-Fong; Lim, Jia Yi; Soh, Shu-E; Chong, Yap-Seng

    2012-01-01

    Maternal nutrition has critical effects on the developing structures and functions of the fetus. Malnutrition during pregnancy can result in low birth weight and small for gestational age babies, increase risk for infection, and impact the immune system. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been reported to have immunomodulatory effects. Decreased consumption of omega-6 PUFAs, in favor of more anti-inflammatory omega-3 PUFAs in modern diets, has demonstrated the potential protective role of omega-3 PUFAs in allergic and respiratory diseases. In this paper, we examine the role of PUFAs consumption during pregnancy and early childhood and its influence on allergy and respiratory diseases. PUFAs act via several mechanisms to modulate immune function. Omega-3 PUFAs may alter the T helper (Th) cell balance by inhibiting cytokine production which in turn inhibits immunoglobulin E synthesis and Th type 2 cell differentiation. PUFAs may further modify cellular membrane, induce eicosanoid metabolism, and alter gene expression. These studies indicate the benefits of omega-3 PUFAs supplementation. Nevertheless, further investigations are warranted to assess the long-term effects of omega-3 PUFAs in preventing other immune-mediated diseases, as well as its effects on the later immunodefense and health status during early growth and development.

  2. Thiamine triphosphate synthesis in rat brain occurs in mitochondria and is coupled to the respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Gangolf, Marjorie; Wins, Pierre; Thiry, Marc; El Moualij, Benaïssa; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2010-01-01

    In animals, thiamine deficiency leads to specific brain lesions, generally attributed to decreased levels of thiamine diphosphate, an essential cofactor in brain energy metabolism. However, another far less abundant derivative, thiamine triphosphate (ThTP), may also have a neuronal function. Here, we show that in the rat brain, ThTP is essentially present and synthesized in mitochondria. In mitochondrial preparations from brain (but not liver), ThTP can be produced from thiamine diphosphate and P(i). This endergonic process is coupled to the oxidation of succinate or NADH through the respiratory chain but cannot be energized by ATP hydrolysis. ThTP synthesis is strongly inhibited by respiratory chain inhibitors, such as myxothiazol and inhibitors of the H(+) channel of F(0)F(1)-ATPase. It is also impaired by disruption of the mitochondria or by depolarization of the inner membrane (by protonophores or valinomycin), indicating that a proton-motive force (Deltap) is required. Collapsing Deltap after ThTP synthesis causes its rapid disappearance, suggesting that both synthesis and hydrolysis are catalyzed by a reversible H(+)-translocating ThTP synthase. The synthesized ThTP can be released from mitochondria in the presence of external P(i). However, ThTP probably does not accumulate in the cytoplasm in vivo, because it is not detected in the cytosolic fraction obtained from a brain homogenate. Our results show for the first time that a high energy triphosphate compound other than ATP can be produced by a chemiosmotic type of mechanism. This might shed a new light on our understanding of the mechanisms of thiamine deficiency-induced brain lesions.

  3. Insect cells respiratory activity in bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Soraia Athie Calil; Santos, Mariza Gerdulo; Yokomizo, Adriana Yurie; Pereira, Carlos Augusto; Tonso, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    Specific respiration rate ( \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document}$$ Q_{{{\\text{O}}_{2} }} $$\\end{document}) is a key parameter to understand cell metabolism and physiological state, providing useful information for process supervision and control. In this work, we cultivated different insect cells in a very controlled environment, being able to measure \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document}$$ Q_{{{\\text{O}}_{2} }} $$\\end{document}. Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells have been used through virus infection as host for foreign protein expression and bioinsecticide production. Transfected Drosophila melanogaster (S2) cells can be used to produce different proteins. The objective of this work is to investigate respiratory activity and oxygen transfer during the growth of different insect cells lines as Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9), Drosophila melanogaster (S2) wild and transfected for the expression of GPV and EGFP. All experiments were performed in a well-controlled 1-L bioreactor, with SF900II serum free medium. Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells reached 10.7 × 106 cells/mL and maximum specific respiration rate (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document}$$ Q_{{{\\text{O}}_{2} \\max }} $$\\end{document}) of 7.3 × 10−17 molO2/cell s. Drosophila melanogaster (S2) cells achieved 51.2 × 106 cells/mL and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage

  4. A Functional Approach towards Understanding the Role of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain in an Endomycorrhizal Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Mercy, Louis; Lucic-Mercy, Eva; Nogales, Amaia; Poghosyan, Areg; Schneider, Carolin; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are crucial components of fertile soils, able to provide several ecosystem services for crop production. Current economic, social and legislative contexts should drive the so-called “second green revolution” by better exploiting these beneficial microorganisms. Many challenges still need to be overcome to better understand the mycorrhizal symbiosis, among which (i) the biotrophic nature of AMF, constraining their production, while (ii) phosphate acts as a limiting factor for the optimal mycorrhizal inoculum application and effectiveness. Organism fitness and adaptation to the changing environment can be driven by the modulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, strongly connected to the phosphorus processing. Nevertheless, the role of the respiratory function in mycorrhiza remains largely unexplored. We hypothesized that the two mitochondrial respiratory chain components, alternative oxidase (AOX) and cytochrome oxidase (COX), are involved in specific mycorrhizal behavior. For this, a complex approach was developed. At the pre-symbiotic phase (axenic conditions), we studied phenotypic responses of Rhizoglomus irregulare spores with two AOX and COX inhibitors [respectively, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) and potassium cyanide (KCN)] and two growth regulators (abscisic acid – ABA and gibberellic acid – Ga3). At the symbiotic phase, we analyzed phenotypic and transcriptomic (genes involved in respiration, transport, and fermentation) responses in Solanum tuberosum/Rhizoglomus irregulare biosystem (glasshouse conditions): we monitored the effects driven by ABA, and explored the modulations induced by SHAM and KCN under five phosphorus concentrations. KCN and SHAM inhibited in vitro spore germination while ABA and Ga3 induced differential spore germination and hyphal patterns. ABA promoted mycorrhizal colonization, strong arbuscule intensity and positive mycorrhizal growth dependency (MGD). In ABA treated plants, R. irregulare

  5. Bioflavonoid effects on the mitochondrial respiratory electron transport chain and cytochrome c redox state.

    PubMed

    Moini, H; Arroyo, A; Vaya, J; Packer, L

    1999-01-01

    The polyphenolic structure common to flavonoids enables them to donate electrons and exert antioxidant activity. Since the mitochondrial electron transport chain consists of a series of redox intermediates, the effect of flavonoids in a complex mixture of polyphenols, as well as related pure flavonoids, was evaluated on the rat liver mitochondrial electron transport chain. A French maritime pine bark extract (PBE), a complex mixture of polyphenols and related pure flavonoids, was able to reduce cytochrome c reversibly, possibly by donation of electrons to the iron of the heme group; the donated electrons can be utilized by cytochrome c oxidase. Among single flavonoids tested, (-)-epicatechin gallate had the greatest ability to reduce cytochrome c. In addition, PBE competitively inhibited electron chain activity in both whole mitochondria and submitochondrial particles. A 3.5-fold increase in the apparent Km value for succinate was calculated from reciprocal plots. Among the flavonoids tested, taxifolin and (-)-epicatechin gallate showed minor inhibitory effects, while (+/-)-catechin and (+)-epicatechin were ineffective. Activities of NADH-ubiquinone, succinate-ubiquinone, and ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductases were inhibited by low concentrations of PBE to a similar extent. However, inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase activity required 4-fold higher PBE concentrations. These results suggest that flavonoids reduce cytochrome c and that PBE inhibits electron transport chain activity mainly through NADH-ubiquinone, succinate-ubiquinone, and ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductases.

  6. Respiratory-related pharyngeal constrictor muscle activity in decerebrate cats.

    PubMed

    Kuna, S T; Vanoye, C R

    1997-11-01

    Respiratory-related activity of the hyopharyngeus (middle pharyngeal constrictor) and thyropharyngeus (inferior pharyngeal constrictor) muscles was determined in decerebrate, tracheotomized adult cats and compared with the electromyographic activity of the thyroarytenoid, a vocal cord adductor. During quiet breathing, the hyopharyngeus and usually the thyroarytenoid exhibited phasic activity during expiration and tonic activity throughout the respiratory cycle. Respiratory-related thyropharyngeus activity was absent under these conditions. Progressive hyperoxic hypercapnia and progressive isocapnic hypoxia increased phasic expiratory activity in both pharyngeal constrictor (PC) muscles but tended to suppress thyroarytenoid activity. Passively induced hypocapnia and the central apnea that followed the cessation of the mechanical hyperventilation were associated with tonic activation of the hyopharyngeus and thyroarytenoid but no recruitment in thyropharyngeus activity. The expiratory phase of a sigh and progressive pneumothorax were associated with an increase in phasic thyroarytenoid activity but no change in phasic PC activity. The results indicate that a variety of stimuli modulate respiratory-related PC activity, suggesting that the PC muscles may have a role in the regulation of upper airway patency during respiration.

  7. Effects of physical activity on exercise tests and respiratory function

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y; Macera, C; Addy, C; Sy, F; Wieland, D; Blair, S

    2003-01-01

    Background: Exercise is an important component of pulmonary rehabilitation for patients with chronic lung disease. Objective: To explore the role of physical activity in maintaining cardiac and respiratory function in healthy people. Methods: Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured by a maximal treadmill test (MTT), and respiratory function was tested by spirometry. The cross sectional study included data from 24 536 healthy persons who were examined at the Cooper Clinic between 1971 and 1995; the longitudinal study included data from 5707 healthy persons who had an initial visit between 1971 and 1995 and a subsequent visit during the next five years. All participants were aged 25–55 years and completed a cardiorespiratory test and a medical questionnaire. Results: In the cross sectional study, after controlling for covariates, being active and not being a recent smoker were associated with better cardiorespiratory fitness and respiratory function in both men and women. In the follow up study, persons who remained or became active had better MTT than persons who remained or became sedentary. Men who remained active had higher forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) than the other groups. Smoking was related to lower cardiorespiratory fitness and respiratory function. Conclusions: Physical activity and non-smoking or smoking cessation is associated with maintenance of cardiorespiratory fitness. Change in physical activity habits is associated with change in cardiorespiratory fitness, but respiratory function contributed little to this association during a five year follow up. PMID:14665592

  8. Changes in mitochondrial electron transport chain activity during insect metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, M E

    2007-02-01

    The midgut of the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) is a highly aerobic tissue that is destroyed by programmed cell death during larval-pupal metamorphosis. The death of the epithelium begins after commitment to pupation, and the oxygen consumption of isolated midgut mitochondria decreases soon after commitment. To assess the role of the electron transport chain in this decline in mitochondrial function, the maximal activities of complexes I-IV of the respiratory chain were measured in isolated midgut mitochondria. Whereas there were no developmental changes in the activity of complex I or III, activities of complexes II and IV [cytochrome c oxidase (COX)] were higher in mitochondria from precommitment than postcommitment larvae. This finding is consistent with a higher rate of succinate oxidation in mitochondria isolated from precommitment larvae and reveals that the metamorphic decline in mitochondrial respiration is due to the targeted destruction or inactivation of specific sites within the mitochondria, rather than the indiscriminate destruction of the organelles. The COX turnover number (e- x s(-1) x cytochrome aa3(-1)) was greater for the enzyme from precommitment than postcommitment larvae, indicating a change in the enzyme structure and/or its lipid environment during the early stages of metamorphosis. The turnover number of COX in the intact mitochondria (in organello COX) was also lower in postcommitment larvae. In addition to changes in the protein or membrane phospholipids, the metamorphic decline in this rate constant may be a result of the observed loss of endogenous cytochrome c.

  9. [Aspect of brain MRI in mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency. A diagnostic algorithm of the most common mitochondrial genetic mutations].

    PubMed

    Devaux-Bricout, M; Grévent, D; Lebre, A-S; Rio, M; Desguerre, I; De Lonlay, P; Valayannopoulos, V; Brunelle, F; Rötig, A; Munnich, A; Boddaert, N

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are due to deficiency of the respiratory chain and are characterized by a broad clinical and genetic heterogeneity that makes diagnosis difficult. Some clinical presentations are highly suggestive of given gene mutations, allowing rapid genetic diagnosis. However, owing to the wide pattern of symptoms in mitochondrial disorders and the constantly growing number of disease genes, their genetic diagnosis is frequently difficult and genotype/phenotype correlations remain elusive. For this reason, brain MRI appears as a useful tool for genotype/phenotype correlations. Here, we report the most frequent neuroradiological signs in mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency and we propose a diagnostic algorithm based on neuroimaging features, so as to direct molecular genetic tests in patients at risk of mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency. This algorithm is based on the careful analysis of five areas on brain MRI: (1) basal ganglia (hyperintensities on T2 or calcifications); (2) cerebellum (hyperintensities on T2 or atrophy); (3) brainstem (hyperintensities on T2 or atrophy); (4) white matter (leukoencephalopathy); (5) cortex (sub-tentorial atrophy); (6) stroke-like episodes. We believe that the combination of brain MRI features is of value to support respiratory chain deficiency and direct molecular genetic tests.

  10. Kinetic evidence against partitioning of the ubiquinone pool and the catalytic relevance of respiratory-chain supercomplexes

    PubMed Central

    Blaza, James N.; Serreli, Riccardo; Jones, Andrew J. Y.; Mohammed, Khairunnisa; Hirst, Judy

    2014-01-01

    In mitochondria, four respiratory-chain complexes drive oxidative phosphorylation by sustaining a proton-motive force across the inner membrane that is used to synthesize ATP. The question of how the densely packed proteins of the inner membrane are organized to optimize structure and function has returned to prominence with the characterization of respiratory-chain supercomplexes. Supercomplexes are increasingly accepted structural entities, but their functional and catalytic advantages are disputed. Notably, substrate “channeling” between the enzymes in supercomplexes has been proposed to confer a kinetic advantage, relative to the rate provided by a freely accessible, common substrate pool. Here, we focus on the mitochondrial ubiquinone/ubiquinol pool. We formulate and test three conceptually simple predictions of the behavior of the mammalian respiratory chain that depend on whether channeling in supercomplexes is kinetically important, and on whether the ubiquinone pool is partitioned between pathways. Our spectroscopic and kinetic experiments demonstrate how the metabolic pathways for NADH and succinate oxidation communicate and catalyze via a single, universally accessible ubiquinone/ubiquinol pool that is not partitioned or channeled. We reevaluate the major piece of contrary evidence from flux control analysis and find that the conclusion of substrate channeling arises from the particular behavior of a single inhibitor; we explain why different inhibitors behave differently and show that a robust flux control analysis provides no evidence for channeling. Finally, we discuss how the formation of respiratory-chain supercomplexes may confer alternative advantages on energy-converting membranes. PMID:25331896

  11. Kinetic evidence against partitioning of the ubiquinone pool and the catalytic relevance of respiratory-chain supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Blaza, James N; Serreli, Riccardo; Jones, Andrew J Y; Mohammed, Khairunnisa; Hirst, Judy

    2014-11-04

    In mitochondria, four respiratory-chain complexes drive oxidative phosphorylation by sustaining a proton-motive force across the inner membrane that is used to synthesize ATP. The question of how the densely packed proteins of the inner membrane are organized to optimize structure and function has returned to prominence with the characterization of respiratory-chain supercomplexes. Supercomplexes are increasingly accepted structural entities, but their functional and catalytic advantages are disputed. Notably, substrate "channeling" between the enzymes in supercomplexes has been proposed to confer a kinetic advantage, relative to the rate provided by a freely accessible, common substrate pool. Here, we focus on the mitochondrial ubiquinone/ubiquinol pool. We formulate and test three conceptually simple predictions of the behavior of the mammalian respiratory chain that depend on whether channeling in supercomplexes is kinetically important, and on whether the ubiquinone pool is partitioned between pathways. Our spectroscopic and kinetic experiments demonstrate how the metabolic pathways for NADH and succinate oxidation communicate and catalyze via a single, universally accessible ubiquinone/ubiquinol pool that is not partitioned or channeled. We reevaluate the major piece of contrary evidence from flux control analysis and find that the conclusion of substrate channeling arises from the particular behavior of a single inhibitor; we explain why different inhibitors behave differently and show that a robust flux control analysis provides no evidence for channeling. Finally, we discuss how the formation of respiratory-chain supercomplexes may confer alternative advantages on energy-converting membranes.

  12. Nonuniform spatial patterns of respiratory activity within biofilms during disinfection.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C T; Yu, F P; McFeters, G A; Stewart, P S

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent stains in conjunction with cryoembedding and image analysis were applied to demonstrate spatial gradients in respiratory activity within bacterial biofilms during disinfection with monochloramine. Biofilms of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown together on stainless steel surfaces in continuous-flow annular reactors were treated with 2 mg of monochloramine per liter (influent concentration) for 2 h. Relatively little biofilm removal occurred as evidenced by total cell direct counts. Plate counts (of both species summed) indicated an average 1.3-log decrease after exposure to 2 mg of monochloramine per liter. The fluorogenic redox indicator 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) and the DNA stain 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) were used to differentiate respiring and nonrespiring cells in biofilms. Epifluorescence micrographs of frozen biofilm cross sections clearly revealed gradients of respiratory activity within biofilms in response to monochloramine treatment. These gradients in specific respiratory activity were quantified by calculating the ratio of CTC and DAPI intensities measured by image analysis. Cells near the biofilm-bulk fluid interface lost respiratory activity first. After 2 h of biocide treatment, greater respiratory activity persisted deep in the biofilm than near the biofilm-bulk fluid interface. PMID:7793945

  13. Neuropathologic Characterization of Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia Type 6 Associated With Cardiomyopathy and Hydrops Fetalis and Severe Multisystem Respiratory Chain Deficiency due to Novel RARS2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lax, Nichola Z.; Alston, Charlotte L.; Schon, Katherine; Park, Soo-Mi; Krishnakumar, Deepa; He, Langping; Falkous, Gavin; Ogilvy-Stuart, Amanda; Lees, Christoph; King, Rosalind H.; Hargreaves, Iain P.; Brown, Garry K.; McFarland, Robert; Dean, Andrew F.; Taylor, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal recessive mutations in the RARS2 gene encoding the mitochondrial arginyl-transfer RNA synthetase cause infantile-onset myoencephalopathy pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 (PCH6). We describe 2 sisters with novel compound heterozygous RARS2 mutations who presented perinatally with neurologic features typical of PCH6 but with additional features including cardiomyopathy, hydrops, and pulmonary hypoplasia and who died at 1 day and 14 days of age. Magnetic resonance imaging findings included marked cerebellar hypoplasia, gyral immaturity, punctate lesions in cerebral white matter, and unfused deep cerebral grey matter. Enzyme histochemistry of postmortem tissues revealed a near-global cytochrome c oxidase-deficiency; assessment of respiratory chain enzyme activities confirmed severe deficiencies involving complexes I, III, and IV. Molecular genetic studies revealed 2 RARS2 gene mutations: a c.1A>G, p.? variant predicted to abolish the initiator methionine, and a deep intronic c.613-3927C>T variant causing skipping of exons 6–8 in the mature RARS2 transcript. Neuropathologic investigation included low brain weights, small brainstem and cerebellum, deep cerebral white matter pathology, pontine nucleus neuron loss (in 1 sibling), and peripheral nerve pathology. Mitochondrial respiratory chain immunohistochemistry in brain tissues confirmed an absence of complexes I and IV immunoreactivity with sparing of mitochondrial numbers. These cases expand the clinical spectrum of RARS2 mutations, including antenatal features and widespread mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies in postmortem brain tissues. PMID:26083569

  14. Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Forward and Reverse Electron Fluxes in the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain

    PubMed Central

    Selivanov, Vitaly A.; Votyakova, Tatyana V.; Pivtoraiko, Violetta N.; Zeak, Jennifer; Sukhomlin, Tatiana; Trucco, Massimo; Roca, Josep; Cascante, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) are primary signals that modulate cellular adaptation to environment, and are also destructive factors that damage cells under the conditions of hypoxia/reoxygenation relevant for various systemic diseases or transplantation. The important role of ROS in cell survival requires detailed investigation of mechanism and determinants of ROS production. To perform such an investigation we extended our rule-based model of complex III in order to account for electron transport in the whole RC coupled to proton translocation, transmembrane electrochemical potential generation, TCA cycle reactions, and substrate transport to mitochondria. It fits respiratory electron fluxes measured in rat brain mitochondria fueled by succinate or pyruvate and malate, and the dynamics of NAD+ reduction by reverse electron transport from succinate through complex I. The fitting of measured characteristics gave an insight into the mechanism of underlying processes governing the formation of free radicals that can transfer an unpaired electron to oxygen-producing superoxide and thus can initiate the generation of ROS. Our analysis revealed an association of ROS production with levels of specific radicals of individual electron transporters and their combinations in species of complexes I and III. It was found that the phenomenon of bistability, revealed previously as a property of complex III, remains valid for the whole RC. The conditions for switching to a state with a high content of free radicals in complex III were predicted based on theoretical analysis and were confirmed experimentally. These findings provide a new insight into the mechanisms of ROS production in RC. PMID:21483483

  15. Mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction modulates metalloproteases -1, -3 and -13 in human normal chondrocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Cillero-Pastor, Berta; Rego-Pérez, Ignacio; Oreiro, Natividad; Fernandez-Lopez, Carlos; Blanco, Francisco J

    2013-08-09

    Mitochondrion has an important role in the osteoarthritis (OA) pathology. We have previously demonstrated that the alteration of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) contributes to the inflammatory response of the chondrocyte. However its implication in the process of cartilage destruction is not well understood yet. In this study we have investigated the relationship between the MRC dysfunction and the regulation of metalloproteases (MMPs) in human normal chondrocytes in culture. Human normal chondrocytes were isolated from human knees obtained form autopsies of donors without previous history of rheumatic disease. Rotenone, 3-Nitropropionic acid (NPA), Antimycin A (AA), Sodium azide and Oligomycin were used to inhibit the activity of the mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, IV and V respectively. The mRNA expression of MMPs -1, -3 and -13 was studied by real time PCR. The intracellular presence of MMP proteins was evaluated by western blot. The liberation of these proteins to the extracellular media was evaluated by ELISA. The presence of proteoglycans in tissue was performed with tolouidin blue and safranin/fast green. Immunohistochemistry was used for evaluating MMPs on tissue. Firstly, cells were treated with the inhibitors of the MRC for 24 hours and mRNA expression was evaluated. An up regulation of MMP-1 and -3 mRNA levels was observed after the treatment with Oligomycin 5 and 100 μg/ml (inhibitor of the complex V) for 24 hours. MMP-13 mRNA expression was reduced after the incubation with AA 20 and 60 μg/ml (inhibitor of complex III) and Oligomycin. Results were validated at protein level observing an increase in the intracellular levels of MMP-1 and -3 after Oligomycin 25 μg/ml stimulation [(15.20±8.46 and 4.59±1.83 vs. basal=1, respectively (n=4; *P<0.05)]. However, AA and Oligomycin reduced the intracellular levels of the MMP-13 protein (0.70±0.16 and 0.3±0.24, respectively vs. basal=1). In order to know whether the MRC dysfunction had an

  16. Mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction modulates metalloproteases -1, -3 and -13 in human normal chondrocytes in culture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondrion has an important role in the osteoarthritis (OA) pathology. We have previously demonstrated that the alteration of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) contributes to the inflammatory response of the chondrocyte. However its implication in the process of cartilage destruction is not well understood yet. In this study we have investigated the relationship between the MRC dysfunction and the regulation of metalloproteases (MMPs) in human normal chondrocytes in culture. Methods Human normal chondrocytes were isolated from human knees obtained form autopsies of donors without previous history of rheumatic disease. Rotenone, 3-Nitropropionic acid (NPA), Antimycin A (AA), Sodium azide and Oligomycin were used to inhibit the activity of the mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, IV and V respectively. The mRNA expression of MMPs -1, -3 and -13 was studied by real time PCR. The intracellular presence of MMP proteins was evaluated by western blot. The liberation of these proteins to the extracellular media was evaluated by ELISA. The presence of proteoglycans in tissue was performed with tolouidin blue and safranin/fast green. Immunohistochemistry was used for evaluating MMPs on tissue. Results Firstly, cells were treated with the inhibitors of the MRC for 24 hours and mRNA expression was evaluated. An up regulation of MMP-1 and -3 mRNA levels was observed after the treatment with Oligomycin 5 and 100 μg/ml (inhibitor of the complex V) for 24 hours. MMP-13 mRNA expression was reduced after the incubation with AA 20 and 60 μg/ml (inhibitor of complex III) and Oligomycin. Results were validated at protein level observing an increase in the intracellular levels of MMP-1 and -3 after Oligomycin 25 μg/ml stimulation [(15.20±8.46 and 4.59±1.83 vs. basal=1, respectively (n=4; *P<0.05)]. However, AA and Oligomycin reduced the intracellular levels of the MMP-13 protein (0.70±0.16 and 0.3±0.24, respectively vs. basal=1). In order to know whether the

  17. Primary Respiratory Chain Disease Causes Tissue-Specific Dysregulation of the Global Transcriptome and Nutrient-Sensing Signaling Network

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Tsukikawa, Mai; Peng, Min; Polyak, Erzsebet; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Ostrovsky, Julian; McCormack, Shana; Place, Emily; Clarke, Colleen; Reiner, Gail; McCormick, Elizabeth; Rappaport, Eric; Haas, Richard; Baur, Joseph A.; Falk, Marni J.

    2013-01-01

    Primary mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) diseases are heterogeneous in etiology and manifestations but collectively impair cellular energy metabolism. Mechanism(s) by which RC dysfunction causes global cellular sequelae are poorly understood. To identify a common cellular response to RC disease, integrated gene, pathway, and systems biology analyses were performed in human primary RC disease skeletal muscle and fibroblast transcriptomes. Significant changes were evident in muscle across diverse RC complex and genetic etiologies that were consistent with prior reports in other primary RC disease models and involved dysregulation of genes involved in RNA processing, protein translation, transport, and degradation, and muscle structure. Global transcriptional and post-transcriptional dysregulation was also found to occur in a highly tissue-specific fashion. In particular, RC disease muscle had decreased transcription of cytosolic ribosomal proteins suggestive of reduced anabolic processes, increased transcription of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, shorter 5′-UTRs that likely improve translational efficiency, and stabilization of 3′-UTRs containing AU-rich elements. RC disease fibroblasts showed a strikingly similar pattern of global transcriptome dysregulation in a reverse direction. In parallel with these transcriptional effects, RC disease dysregulated the integrated nutrient-sensing signaling network involving FOXO, PPAR, sirtuins, AMPK, and mTORC1, which collectively sense nutrient availability and regulate cellular growth. Altered activities of central nodes in the nutrient-sensing signaling network were validated by phosphokinase immunoblot analysis in RC inhibited cells. Remarkably, treating RC mutant fibroblasts with nicotinic acid to enhance sirtuin and PPAR activity also normalized mTORC1 and AMPK signaling, restored NADH/NAD+ redox balance, and improved cellular respiratory capacity. These data specifically highlight a common pathogenesis

  18. Evaluation of the In Vivo and In Vitro Effects of Fructose on Respiratory Chain Complexes in Tissues of Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Macongonde, Ernesto António; Vilela, Thais Ceresér; Scaini, Giselli; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Ferreira, Bruna Klippel; Costa, Naithan Ludian Fernandes; de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; Avila, Silvio; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by fructose and fructose-1-phosphate accumulation in tissues and biological fluids of patients. This disease results from a deficiency of aldolase B, which metabolizes fructose in the liver, kidney, and small intestine. We here investigated the effect of acute fructose administration on the activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) in cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle of male 30-day-old Wistar rats. The rats received subcutaneous injection of sodium chloride (0.9%; control group) or fructose solution (5 μmol/g; treated group). One hour later, the animals were euthanized and the cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle were isolated and homogenized for the investigations. Acute fructose administration increased complex I-III activity in liver. On the other hand, decreased complexes II and II-III activities in skeletal muscle and MDH in kidney were found. Interestingly, none of these parameters were affected in vitro. Our present data indicate that fructose administration elicits impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of the HFI patients. PMID:26770008

  19. Evaluation of the In Vivo and In Vitro Effects of Fructose on Respiratory Chain Complexes in Tissues of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macongonde, Ernesto António; Vilela, Thais Ceresér; Scaini, Giselli; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Ferreira, Bruna Klippel; Costa, Naithan Ludian Fernandes; de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; Avila Junior, Silvio; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by fructose and fructose-1-phosphate accumulation in tissues and biological fluids of patients. This disease results from a deficiency of aldolase B, which metabolizes fructose in the liver, kidney, and small intestine. We here investigated the effect of acute fructose administration on the activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) in cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle of male 30-day-old Wistar rats. The rats received subcutaneous injection of sodium chloride (0.9%; control group) or fructose solution (5 μmol/g; treated group). One hour later, the animals were euthanized and the cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle were isolated and homogenized for the investigations. Acute fructose administration increased complex I-III activity in liver. On the other hand, decreased complexes II and II-III activities in skeletal muscle and MDH in kidney were found. Interestingly, none of these parameters were affected in vitro. Our present data indicate that fructose administration elicits impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of the HFI patients.

  20. The mitochondrial respiratory chain of the secondary green alga Euglena gracilis shares many additional subunits with parasitic Trypanosomatidae.

    PubMed

    Perez, Emilie; Lapaille, Marie; Degand, Hervé; Cilibrasi, Laura; Villavicencio-Queijeiro, Alexa; Morsomme, Pierre; González-Halphen, Diego; Field, Mark C; Remacle, Claire; Baurain, Denis; Cardol, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    The mitochondrion is an essential organelle for the production of cellular ATP in most eukaryotic cells. It is extensively studied, including in parasitic organisms such as trypanosomes, as a potential therapeutic target. Recently, numerous additional subunits of the respiratory-chain complexes have been described in Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi. Since these subunits had apparently no counterparts in other organisms, they were interpreted as potentially associated with the parasitic trypanosome lifestyle. Here we used two complementary approaches to characterise the subunit composition of respiratory complexes in Euglena gracilis, a non-parasitic secondary green alga related to trypanosomes. First, we developed a phylogenetic pipeline aimed at mining sequence databases for identifying homologues to known respiratory-complex subunits with high confidence. Second, we used MS/MS proteomics after two-dimensional separation of the respiratory complexes by Blue Native- and SDS-PAGE both to confirm in silico predictions and to identify further additional subunits. Altogether, we identified 41 subunits that are restricted to E. gracilis, T. brucei and T. cruzi, along with 48 classical subunits described in other eukaryotes (i.e. plants, mammals and fungi). This moreover demonstrates that at least half of the subunits recently reported in T. brucei and T. cruzi are actually not specific to Trypanosomatidae, but extend at least to other Euglenozoa, and that their origin and function are thus not specifically associated with the parasitic lifestyle. Furthermore, preliminary biochemical analyses suggest that some of these additional subunits underlie the peculiarities of the respiratory chain observed in Euglenozoa.

  1. Behavioral inspiratory inhibition: inactivated and activated respiratory cells.

    PubMed

    Orem, J

    1989-11-01

    1. Eleven adult cats were trained to stop inspiration in response to a conditioning stimulus. The conditioning stimuli were presented at the onset of inspiration at intervals of approximately 20-30 s. Intratracheal pressures, diaphragmatic activity, and the extracellular activity of single medullary respiratory neurons were recorded while the animals performed this response. 2. Inactivation of the diaphragm to the conditioning stimuli occurred at latencies that varied from 40 to 110 ms and averaged 74 +/- 32 (SD) ms. 3. The subjects of this report are 38 inspiratory neurons that were inactivated and 19 cells that were activated when inspiration was stopped behaviorally. These cells were located in the region of n. ambiguus and the ventrolateral n. of tractus solitarius. 4. The inspiratory cells that were inactivated behaviorally had the following characteristics: 1) Most had an augmenting inspiratory profile with (n = 14) or without (n = 9) postinspiratory activity. Other types were inspiratory throughout (n = 5), decrementing inspiratory (n = 3), tonic inspiratory (n = 4), early inspiratory (n = 2), and expiratory-inspiratory (n = 1). 2) Their mean discharge rate was 39 +/- 2.7 (SE) Hz. 3) The latency of their inactivation in response to the task averaged 81 +/- 4.9 (SE) ms, and 4) Their activity corresponded closely to breathing not only during the behavioral response but also during eupnea (eta 2 = 0.62 +/- 0.04, mean +/- SE) and respiratory acts such as sneezing, sniffing, meowing, and purring. 5. The cells that were activated when inspiration was stopped behaviorally had the following characteristics. 1) As a group, they had discharge profiles related to every phase of the respiratory cycle. 2) They were recorded in the same region as, and often simultaneously with, respiratory cells that were inactivated. 3) Their activity patterns were highly variable such that the signal strength and consistency of the respiratory component of that activity were weak (eta 2

  2. L-lactate enzyme electrode obtained with immobilized respiratory chain from Escherichia coli and oxygen probe for specific determination of L-lactate in yogurt, wine and blood.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, E; Burstein, C

    An enzyme electrode for L-lactate measurements in various biological media was prepared with an immobilized bacterial respiratory chain fixed to a Clark electrode. The enzymatic film, which was easy to prepare, contained bacteria immobilized in gelatin, tanned with glutaraldehyde. This electrode was sensitive to 0.1 mM L-lactate and could be utilized to 10 mM. The apparent K50 was 5 mM. Less than 8% of the respiration rate with L-lactate was measured with D-lactate and succinate. The competitive inhibitors D-lactate and pyruvate had a K50 of 50 mM. They could be quantitatively measured by inhibition in a range between 5 and 50 mM. It was also possible to discriminate between L-lactate and various metabolites of the respiratory chain: L-malate, succinate, 3-glycero-phosphate or NAD(P)H. Growing E. coli on 1% D-L-lactate as the sole carbon source in minimal medium induced L-lactate respiration tenfold. All other respiratory activities remained below 10% of the activity with L-lactate. A computerized instrument allowed successive measurements every 3 min for more than 10 h with the same enzymatic film. Most of the measured samples required dilution but no clarification or purification. This enzyme electrode may have many applications in basic research (metabolism, enzymology) and applied research (blood, yogurt, juices, wine).

  3. Remnant signal peptides on non-exported enzymes: implications for the evolution of prokaryotic respiratory chains.

    PubMed

    Ize, Bérengère; Coulthurst, Sarah J; Hatzixanthis, Kostas; Caldelari, Isabelle; Buchanan, Grant; Barclay, Elaine C; Richardson, David J; Palmer, Tracy; Sargent, Frank

    2009-12-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is a prokaryotic protein targeting system dedicated to the transmembrane translocation of folded proteins. Substrate proteins are directed to the Tat translocase by signal peptides bearing a conserved SRRxFLK 'twin-arginine' motif. In Escherichia coli, most of the 27 periplasmically located Tat substrates are cofactor-containing respiratory enzymes, and many of these harbour a molybdenum cofactor at their active site. Molybdenum cofactor-containing proteins are not exclusively located in the periplasm, however, with the major respiratory nitrate reductase (NarG) and the biotin sulfoxide reductase (BisC), for example, being located at the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. Interestingly, both NarG and BisC contain 'N-tail' regions that bear some sequence similarity to twin-arginine signal peptides. In this work, we have examined the relationship between the non-exported N-tails and the Tat system. Using a sensitive genetic screen for Tat transport, variant N-tails were identified that displayed Tat transport activity. For the NarG 36-residue N-tail, six amino acid changes were needed to induce transport activity. However, these changes interfered with binding by the NarJ biosynthetic chaperone and impaired biosynthesis of the native enzyme. For the BisC 36-residue N-tail, only five amino acid substitutions were needed to restore Tat transport activity. These modifications also impaired in vivo BisC activity, but it was not possible to identify a biosynthetic chaperone for this enzyme. These data highlight an intimate genetic and evolutionary link between some non-exported redox enzymes and those transported across membranes by the Tat translocation system.

  4. Maintenance of respiratory chain function in mouse hearts with severely impaired mtDNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Freyer, Christoph; Park, Chan Bae; Ekstrand, Mats I.; Shi, Yonghong; Khvorostova, Julia; Wibom, Rolf; Falkenberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2010-01-01

    The basal mitochondrial transcription machinery is essential for biogenesis of the respiratory chain and consists of mitochondrial RNA polymerase, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mitochondrial transcription factor B2. This triad of proteins is sufficient and necessary for mtDNA transcription initiation. Abolished mtDNA transcription caused by tissue-specific knockout of TFAM in the mouse heart leads to early onset of a severe mitochondrial cardiomyopathy with lethality within the first post-natal weeks. Here, we describe a mouse model expressing human TFAM instead of the endogenous mouse TFAM in heart. These rescue mice have severe reduction in mtDNA transcription initiation, but, surprisingly, are healthy at the age of 52 weeks with near-normal steady-state levels of transcripts. In addition, we demonstrate that heavy-strand mtDNA transcription normally terminates at the termination-associated sequence in the control region. This termination is abolished in rescue animals resulting in heavy (H)-strand transcription of the entire control region. In conclusion, we demonstrate here the existence of an unexpected mtDNA transcript stabilization mechanism that almost completely compensates for the severely reduced transcription initiation in rescue hearts. Future elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanism may provide a novel pathway to treat mitochondrial dysfunction in human pathology. PMID:20566479

  5. Acute and chronic mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency differentially regulate lysosomal biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Mosquera, Lorena; Diogo, Cátia V.; Yambire, King Faisal; Santos, Gabriela L.; Luna Sánchez, Marta; Bénit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre; Lopez, Luis Carlos; Milosevic, Ira; Raimundo, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are key cellular signaling platforms, affecting fundamental processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. However, it remains unclear how mitochondrial signaling affects other organelles, particularly lysosomes. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) impairments elicit a stress signaling pathway that regulates lysosomal biogenesis via the microphtalmia transcription factor family. Interestingly, the effect of mitochondrial stress over lysosomal biogenesis depends on the timeframe of the stress elicited: while RC inhibition with rotenone or uncoupling with CCCP initially triggers lysosomal biogenesis, the effect peaks after few hours and returns to baseline. Long-term RC inhibition by long-term treatment with rotenone, or patient mutations in fibroblasts and in a mouse model result in repression of lysosomal biogenesis. The induction of lysosomal biogenesis by short-term mitochondrial stress is dependent on TFEB and MITF, requires AMPK signaling and is independent of calcineurin signaling. These results reveal an integrated view of how mitochondrial signaling affects lysosomes, which is essential to fully comprehend the consequences of mitochondrial malfunction, particularly in the context of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:28345620

  6. Alternative oxidase: a respiratory electron transport chain pathway essential for maintaining photosynthetic performance during drought stress.

    PubMed

    Vanlerberghe, Greg C; Martyn, Greg D; Dahal, Keshav

    2016-07-01

    Photosynthesis and respiration are the hubs of energy metabolism in plants. Drought strongly perturbs photosynthesis as a result of both diffusive limitations resulting from stomatal closure, and in some cases biochemical limitations that are associated with a reduced abundance of key photosynthetic components. The effects of drought on respiration, particularly respiration in the light (RL ), are less understood. The plant mitochondrial electron transport chain includes a non-energy conserving terminal oxidase called alternative oxidase (AOX). Several studies have shown that drought increases AOX transcript, protein and maximum capacity. Here we review recent studies comparing wild-type (WT) tobacco to transgenic lines with altered AOX protein amount. Specifically during drought, RL was compromised in AOX knockdown plants and enhanced in AOX overexpression plants, compared with WT. Significantly, these differences in RL were accompanied by dramatic differences in photosynthetic performance. Knockdown of AOX increased the susceptibility of photosynthesis to drought-induced biochemical limitations, while overexpression of AOX delayed the development of such biochemical limitations, compared with WT. Overall, the results indicate that AOX is essential to maintaining RL during drought, and that this non-energy conserving respiration maintains photosynthesis during drought by promoting energy balance in the chloroplast. This review also outlines several areas for future research, including the possibility that enhancement of non-energy conserving respiratory electron sinks may be a useful biotechnological approach to increase plant performance during stress. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  7. Immunochemical analysis of respiratory-chain components of micrococcus luteus (lysodeikticus).

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, B A; Owen, P

    1983-01-01

    Membrane-bound antigens of the respiratory chain of Micrococcus luteus were analyzed by crossed immunoelectrophoresis after growth of the organism in the presence of 59Fe, the flavin adenine dinucleotide-flavin mononucleotide precursor D-[2-14C]riboflavin, or the heme precursor 5-amino-[4-(14)C]levulinic acid. Using zymograms and procedures of selective extraction in conjunction with autoradiography, it was possible to resolve and partially characterize a number of antigens. Succinate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.99.1) was shown to possess covalently bound flavin and nonheme iron and was possibly present as a complex with cytochrome. Three other dehydrogenases, namely, NADH dehydrogenase, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (EC 1.6.99.3), and malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37), contained flavin in noncovalent linkage, the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase also possessing nonheme iron. Four other discrete antigens (or antigen complexes) containing both iron and heme centers also resolved, as were two minor immunogens possessing iron as the sole detectable prosthetic group. Images PMID:6848487

  8. The PINK1-Parkin pathway promotes both mitophagy and selective respiratory chain turnover in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vincow, Evelyn S; Merrihew, Gennifer; Thomas, Ruth E; Shulman, Nicholas J; Beyer, Richard P; MacCoss, Michael J; Pallanck, Leo J

    2013-04-16

    The accumulation of damaged mitochondria has been proposed as a key factor in aging and the pathogenesis of many common age-related diseases, including Parkinson disease (PD). Recently, in vitro studies of the PD-related proteins Parkin and PINK1 have found that these factors act in a common pathway to promote the selective autophagic degradation of damaged mitochondria (mitophagy). However, whether Parkin and PINK1 promote mitophagy under normal physiological conditions in vivo is unknown. To address this question, we used a proteomic approach in Drosophila to compare the rates of mitochondrial protein turnover in parkin mutants, PINK1 mutants, and control flies. We found that parkin null mutants showed a significant overall slowing of mitochondrial protein turnover, similar to but less severe than the slowing seen in autophagy-deficient Atg7 mutants, consistent with the model that Parkin acts upstream of Atg7 to promote mitophagy. By contrast, the turnover of many mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) subunits showed greater impairment in parkin than Atg7 mutants, and RC turnover was also selectively impaired in PINK1 mutants. Our findings show that the PINK1-Parkin pathway promotes mitophagy in vivo and, unexpectedly, also promotes selective turnover of mitochondrial RC subunits. Failure to degrade damaged RC proteins could account for the RC deficits seen in many PD patients and may play an important role in PD pathogenesis.

  9. Airflow synchronous with oscillatory acceleration reflects involuntary respiratory muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard E; Lee, Hsueh-Tze; Loring, Stephen H

    2004-06-25

    To explore mechanisms causing involuntary airflow synchronous with oscillatory axial whole body acceleration (oscillatory axial acceleration, OAA) such as that during locomotion, we monitored airflow, acceleration, and electromyograms (EMGs) of the rib cage and abdominal muscles in standing subjects undergoing OAA at 3, 6, and 9 Hz at accelerations of 0.1-0.95 g. Subjects relaxed or performed static respiratory maneuvers at constant lung volume with glottis open. Oscillatory airflows (0.01-3.01 s(-1)) synchronous with OAA were not consistent with expectations for a passive respiratory system, and were larger during active respiratory efforts than during relaxation. Peak inspiratory airflow usually preceded peak upward acceleration by 90-180 degrees. In 80% of runs with respiratory muscles voluntarily activated or relaxed, EMGs showed activity synchronous with OAA. Changes in periodic muscle activity coincided with changes in oscillatory airflow. We conclude that periodic muscle activity, probably a reflex response to body wall deformation during OAA, strongly influences the involuntary airflow synchronous with OAA.

  10. PINK1 and Parkin control localized translation of respiratory chain component mRNAs on mitochondria outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Stephan; Wu, Zhihao; Klinkenberg, Michael; Sun, Yaping; Auburger, Georg; Guo, Su; Lu, Bingwei

    2015-01-06

    Mitochondria play essential roles in many aspects of biology, and their dysfunction has been linked to diverse diseases. Central to mitochondrial function is oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), accomplished by respiratory chain complexes (RCCs) encoded by nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. How RCC biogenesis is regulated in metazoans is poorly understood. Here we show that Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated genes PINK1 and Parkin direct localized translation of certain nuclear-encoded RCC (nRCC) mRNAs. Translationally repressed nRCC mRNAs are localized in a PINK1/Tom20-dependent manner to mitochondrial outer membrane, where they are derepressed and activated by PINK1/Parkin through displacement of translation repressors, including Pumilio and Glorund/hnRNP-F, a Parkin substrate, and enhanced binding of activators such as eIF4G. Inhibiting the translation repressors rescued nRCC mRNA translation and neuromuscular-degeneration phenotypes of PINK1 mutant, whereas inhibiting eIF4G had opposite effects. Our results reveal previously unknown functions of PINK1/Parkin in RNA metabolism and suggest new approaches to mitochondrial restoration and disease intervention.

  11. Enantiospecific semisynthesis of (+)-almuheptolide-A, a novel natural heptolide inhibitor of the mammalian mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, A; Tormo, J R; Cabedo, N; Estornell, E; Figadère, B; Cortes, D

    1998-12-17

    The development of novel styryl lactone derivatives as bioactive compounds and the semisynthesis of both 4,5-dialkoxylated eight-membered-ring lactones with a heptolide skeleton (almuheptolide-A (1) type) and 7-alkoxylated delta-lactones with a saturated furanopyrone skeleton (etharvensin (8) type) have been successfully achieved from the chiral unsaturated alpha-pyrone altholactone (7). This new method is a direct and one-step enantiospecific alkoxylation of altholactone (7) in concentrated acid medium, followed by formation of the eight-membered-ring zeta-lactone. The reaction mechanism operating in the synthesis of the heptolide skeleton is postulated to be a direct Michael-type addition. Concerted opening of both the alpha-pyrone and tetrahydrofuran rings and subsequent intramolecular rearrangement with the ring closure lead to almuheptolide-A (1). This compound (1) and its diacetated derivative (1a) showed potent and selective inhibitory activity toward mammalian mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I. This mechanism of action, reported here for the first time, provides a possible explanation for the cytotoxic and antitumor activities previously described for related natural compounds.

  12. Respiratory-related activation of human abdominal muscles during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Kirk A; Feingold, Howard; Fuller, David D; Jenkins, Megan; Mateika, Jason H; Fregosi, Ralph F

    2002-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that abdominal muscles are active during the expiratory phase of the respiratory cycle during exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) activities of external oblique and rectus abdominis muscles were recorded during incremental exercise to exhaustion and during 30 min of constant work rate exercise at an intensity of 85 % of the peak oxygen consumption rate (V̇O2). High amplitude intramuscular EMG activities of both abdominal muscles could be evoked with postural manoeuvres in all subjects. During cycling, respiratory-related activity of the external obliques was evoked in four of seven subjects, whereas rectus abdominis activity was observed in six of the seven subjects. We measured only the activity that was confined exclusively to the expiratory phase of the respiratory cycle. Expiratory activity of both muscles increased with exercise intensity, although peak values averaged only 10-20 or 20-40 % of the peak activity (obtained during maximal, voluntary expiratory efforts) for the external oblique and rectus abdominis muscles, respectively. To estimate how much of the recorded abdominal muscle activity was supporting leg movements during exercise, we compared the activity at the very end of incremental exercise to that recorded during the first five respiratory cycles after the abrupt cessation of exercise, when ventilation was still very high. Although external oblique activity was reduced after exercise stopped, clear expiratory activity remained. Rectus abdominis activity remained high after exercise cessation, showing a gradual decline that approximated the decline in ventilation. During constant work rate exercise, EMG activities increased to 40-50 and 5-10 % of peak in rectus and external oblique muscles, respectively, and then plateaued for the remainder of the bout in spite of a continual upward drift in V̇O2 and pulmonary ventilation. Linear regression analysis showed that the rise in respiratory-related expiratory muscle activity

  13. Pontine respiratory activity involved in inspiratory/expiratory phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Mörschel, Michael; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Control of the timing of the inspiratory/expiratory (IE) phase transition is a hallmark of respiratory pattern formation. In principle, sensory feedback from pulmonary stretch receptors (Breuer–Hering reflex, BHR) is seen as the major controller for the IE phase transition, while pontine-based control of IE phase transition by both the pontine Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF) and parabrachial complex is seen as a secondary or backup mechanism. However, previous studies have shown that the BHR can habituate in vivo. Thus, habituation reduces sensory feedback, so the role of the pons, and specifically the KF, for IE phase transition may increase dramatically. Pontine-mediated control of the IE phase transition is not completely understood. In the present review, we discuss existing models for ponto-medullary interaction that may be involved in the control of inspiratory duration and IE transition. We also present intracellular recordings of pontine respiratory units derived from an in situ intra-arterially perfused brainstem preparation of rats. With the absence of lung inflation, this preparation generates a normal respiratory pattern and many of the recorded pontine units demonstrated phasic respiratory-related activity. The analysis of changes in membrane potentials of pontine respiratory neurons has allowed us to propose a number of pontine-medullary interactions not considered before. The involvement of these putative interactions in pontine-mediated control of IE phase transitions is discussed. PMID:19651653

  14. Unique quadruple immunofluorescence assay demonstrates mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction in osteoblasts of aged and PolgA−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Philip F.; Rocha, Mariana C.; Grady, John P.; Chrysostomou, Alexia; Hipps, Daniel; Watson, Sharon; Greaves, Laura C.; Deehan, David J.; Turnbull, Doug M.

    2016-01-01

    Fragility fractures caused by osteoporosis affect millions of people worldwide every year with significant levels of associated morbidity, mortality and costs to the healthcare economy. The pathogenesis of declining bone mineral density is poorly understood but it is inherently related to increasing age. Growing evidence in recent years, especially that provided by mouse models, suggest that accumulating somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations may cause the phenotypic changes associated with the ageing process including osteoporosis. Methods to study mitochondrial abnormalities in individual osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteocytes are limited and impair our ability to assess the changes seen with age and in animal models of ageing. To enable the assessment of mitochondrial protein levels, we have developed a quadruple immunofluorescence method to accurately quantify the presence of mitochondrial respiratory chain components within individual bone cells. We have applied this technique to a well-established mouse model of ageing and osteoporosis and show respiratory chain deficiency. PMID:27553587

  15. Unique quadruple immunofluorescence assay demonstrates mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction in osteoblasts of aged and PolgA(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Philip F; Rocha, Mariana C; Grady, John P; Chrysostomou, Alexia; Hipps, Daniel; Watson, Sharon; Greaves, Laura C; Deehan, David J; Turnbull, Doug M

    2016-08-24

    Fragility fractures caused by osteoporosis affect millions of people worldwide every year with significant levels of associated morbidity, mortality and costs to the healthcare economy. The pathogenesis of declining bone mineral density is poorly understood but it is inherently related to increasing age. Growing evidence in recent years, especially that provided by mouse models, suggest that accumulating somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations may cause the phenotypic changes associated with the ageing process including osteoporosis. Methods to study mitochondrial abnormalities in individual osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteocytes are limited and impair our ability to assess the changes seen with age and in animal models of ageing. To enable the assessment of mitochondrial protein levels, we have developed a quadruple immunofluorescence method to accurately quantify the presence of mitochondrial respiratory chain components within individual bone cells. We have applied this technique to a well-established mouse model of ageing and osteoporosis and show respiratory chain deficiency.

  16. The activity of grepafloxacin against respiratory pathogens in the UK.

    PubMed

    Wise, R; Andrews, J M

    1997-12-01

    The in-vitro activity of grepafloxacin was compared with that of other antimicrobials against respiratory tract pathogens collected from 15 UK laboratories over the winter of 1995-96. Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae was not encountered, but macrolide resistance was seen in approximately 10% of strains. Grepafloxacin (MIC90 0.25 mg/L) was four- to eight-fold more active than ciprofloxacin. Twelve percent of Haemophilus influenzae were beta-lactamase producers, macrolides were relatively inactive yet fluoroquinolones were highly active. Moraxella catarrhalis were highly susceptible to fluoroquinolones and macrolides. The activity of grepafloxacin against respiratory tract pathogens should make it a useful agent in the treatment of infections at this site.

  17. Inhibition of electron flow through complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Ray, S; Dutta, S; Halder, J; Ray, M

    1994-10-01

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of Ehrlich-ascites-carcinoma (EAC)-cell mitochondria was tested by using different respiratory substrates, electron donors at different segments of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and site-specific inhibitors to identify the specific respiratory complex which might be involved in the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption by these cells. The results indicate that methylglyoxal strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxo-glutarate and malate plus pyruvate-dependent respiration, whereas, at a much higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit succinate-dependent respiration. Methylglyoxal also fails to inhibit respiration which is initiated by duroquinol, an artificial electron donor. Moreover, methylglyoxal cannot inhibit oxygen consumption when the NNN'N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by-pass is used. The inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is identical on both ADP-stimulated and uncoupler-stimulated respiration. Lactaldehyde, a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of EAC-cell mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal. We suggest that methylglyoxal possibly inhibits the electron flow through complex I of the EAC-cell mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  18. Pump-probe microscopy of respiratory chain pigments: towards non-fluorescent label-free metabolic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingue, Scott R.; Chicco, Adam J.; Bartels, Randy A.; Wilson, Jesse W.

    2017-02-01

    Current label-free metabolic microscopy techniques are limited to obtaining contrast from fluorescent molecules NAD(P)H and FAD+, and are unable to determine redox state along the mitochondrial respiratory chain itself. The respiratory chain electron carriers do not fluoresce, but some are heme proteins that have redox-dependent absorption spectra. The most prominent of these, cytochrome c, has been extensively characterized by transient absorption spectroscopy, which suggests that pump-probe measurements in the vicinity of 450 - 600 nm can provide strong contrast between its redox states. Motivated by the success of pump-probe microscopy targeting another heme protein, hemoglobin, we seek to extend the technique to the cytochromes, with the ultimate goal of dissecting respiratory chain function of individual cells in live tissue. To that end, we have developed a new optical system producing ultrafast, visible, independently-tunable pulse pairs via sum-frequency generation of nonlinearly broadened pulses in periodically-poled lithium niobate. The system is pumped by a homebuilt fiber-based oscillator/amplifier emitting 1060 nm pulses at 1.3 W (63 MHz repetition rate), and produces tunable pulses in the vicinity of 488 and 532 nm. Pump-probe spectroscopy of cytochrome c with this source reveals differences in excited-state absorption relaxation times between redox states. Though redox contrast is weak with this setup, we argue that this can be improved with a resonant galvo-scanning microscope. Moreover, pump-probe images were acquired of brown adipose tissue (which contains dense mitochondria), demonstrating label-free contrast from excited-state absorption in respiratory chain hemes.

  19. [Benign congenital myopathy associated with a partial deficiency of complexes I and III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain

    PubMed

    Castro-Gago, M; Eirís, J; Pintos, E; Rodrigo, E; Blanco-Barca, O; Campos, Y; Arenas, J

    Isolated or combined enzyme deficiencies of the mitochondrial respiratory chain results in a number of clinical heterogeneous conditions. When presented in the neonatal period or early in the infancy the course is usually severe, although isolated cases with benign evolution have also been described. To describe the clinical and biochemical characteristics of a child with a benign form of mitochondrial myopathy due to a combined deficiency of the complexes I and III of the respiratory chain. A 40 days-old male, the second son of a young non-consanguineous couple, presented with axial congenital hypotonia, asymmetrical macrocephaly, mild enlargement of the liver, mild coarsening of facial features, increased CK serum values, persistently elevation of serum lactate and lactate/pyruvate ratio and external hydrocephalus. Electromyogram and histological muscle examination were normal but analysis of the respiratory chain disclosed a deficiency of the complexes I and III. From 13 months-age onwards clinical detailed abnormalities progressively ameliorated and also did it serum CK, lactate and external hydrocephalus. We think that on clinical, basic biochemical and histological grounds there are some similarities between this case of congenital unspecific myopathy and benign reversible form of mitochondrial myopathy, arguing in favor of a possible relationship between both conditions.

  20. Mutation in PNPT1, which encodes a polyribonucleotide nucleotidyltransferase, impairs RNA import into mitochondria and causes respiratory-chain deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vedrenne, Vanessa; Gowher, Ali; De Lonlay, Pascale; Nitschke, Patrick; Serre, Valérie; Boddaert, Nathalie; Altuzarra, Cecilia; Mager-Heckel, Anne-Marie; Chretien, Florence; Entelis, Nina; Munnich, Arnold; Tarassov, Ivan; Rötig, Agnès

    2012-11-02

    Multiple-respiratory-chain deficiency represents an important cause of mitochondrial disorders. Hitherto, however, mutations in genes involved in mtDNA maintenance and translation machinery only account for a fraction of cases. Exome sequencing in two siblings, born to consanguineous parents, with severe encephalomyopathy, choreoathetotic movements, and combined respiratory-chain defects allowed us to identify a homozygous PNPT1 missense mutation (c.1160A>G) that encodes the mitochondrial polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase). Blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that no PNPase complex could be detected in subject fibroblasts, confirming that the substitution encoded by c.1160A>G disrupts the trimerization of the protein. PNPase is predominantly localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is implicated in RNA targeting to human mitochondria. Mammalian mitochondria import several small noncoding nuclear RNAs (5S rRNA, MRP RNA, some tRNAs, and miRNAs). By RNA hybridization experiments, we observed a significant decrease in 5S rRNA and MRP-related RNA import into mitochondria in fibroblasts of affected subject 1. Moreover, we found a reproducible decrease in the rate of mitochondrial translation in her fibroblasts. Finally, overexpression of the wild-type PNPT1 cDNA in fibroblasts of subject 1 induced an increase in 5S rRNA import in mitochondria and rescued the mitochondrial-translation deficiency. In conclusion, we report here abnormal RNA import into mitochondria as a cause of respiratory-chain deficiency.

  1. Respiratory chain components involved in the glycerophosphate dehydrogenase-dependent ROS production by brown adipose tissue mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Vrbacký, Marek; Drahota, Zdenek; Mrácek, Tomás; Vojtísková, Alena; Jesina, Pavel; Stopka, Pavel; Houstek, Josef

    2007-07-01

    Involvement of mammalian mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (mGPDH, EC 1.1.99.5) in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was studied in brown adipose tissue mitochondria by different spectroscopic techniques. Spectrofluorometry using ROS-sensitive probes CM-H2DCFDA and Amplex Red was used to determine the glycerophosphate- or succinate-dependent ROS production in mitochondria supplemented with respiratory chain inhibitors antimycin A and myxothiazol. In case of glycerophosphate oxidation, most of the ROS originated directly from mGPDH and coenzyme Q while complex III was a typical site of ROS production in succinate oxidation. Glycerophosphate-dependent ROS production monitored by KCN-insensitive oxygen consumption was highly activated by one-electron acceptor ferricyanide, whereas succinate-dependent ROS production was unaffected. In addition, superoxide anion radical was detected as a mGPDH-related primary ROS species by fluorescent probe dihydroethidium, as well as by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with DMPO spin trap. Altogether, the data obtained demonstrate pronounced differences in the mechanism of ROS production originating from oxidation of glycerophosphate and succinate indicating that electron transfer from mGPDH to coenzyme Q is highly prone to electron leak and superoxide generation.

  2. Regulation of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Biogenesis by Estrogens/Estrogen Receptors and Physiological, Pathological and Pharmacological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Qiang; Cammarata, Patrick R.; Baines, Christopher P.; Yager, James D.

    2009-01-01

    There has been increasing evidence pointing to the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) as a novel and important target for the actions of 17β-estradiol(E2) and estrogen receptors (ER) in a number of cell types and tissues that have high demands for mitochondrial energy metabolism. This novel E2-mediated mitochondrial pathway involves the cooperation of both nuclear and mitochondrial ERα and ERβ and their co-activators on the coordinate regulation of both nuclear DNA- and mitochondrial DNA-encoded genes for MRC proteins. In this paper, we have: 1) comprehensively reviewed studies that reveal a novel role of estrogens and ERs in the regulation of MRC biogenesis; 2) discussed their physiological, pathological and pharmacological implications in the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis in relation to estrogen-mediated carcinogenesis, anticancer drug resistance in human breast cancer cells, neuro-protection for Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease in brain, cardiovascular protection in human heart and their beneficial effects in lens physiology related to cataract in the eye; and 3) pointed out new research directions to address the key questions in this important and newly emerging area. We also suggest a novel conceptual approach that will contribute to innovative regimines for the prevention or treatment of a wide variety of medical complications based on E2/ER-mediated MRC biogenesis pathway. PMID:19559056

  3. Micromachined polymerase chain reaction system for multiple DNA amplification of upper respiratory tract infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chia-Sheng; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chang, Chih-Ching; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Huang, Fu-Chun; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2005-01-15

    This paper presents a micro polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for the DNA-based diagnosis of microorganism genes and the detection of their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The micro PCR chip comprises cheap biocompatible soda-lime glass substrates with integrated thin-film platinum resistors as heating/sensing elements, and is fabricated using micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) techniques in a reliable batch-fabrication process. The heating and temperature sensing elements are made of the same material and are located inside the reaction chamber in order to ensure a uniform temperature distribution. This study performs the detection of several genes associated with upper respiratory tract infection microorganisms, i.e. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemopilus influenze, Staphylococcu aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Neisseria meningitides, together with their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The lower thermal inertia of the proposed micro PCR chip relative to conventional bench-top PCR systems enables a more rapid detection operation with reduced sample and reagent consumption. The experimental data reveal that the high heating and cooling rates of the system (20 and 10 degrees C/s, respectively) permit successful DNA amplification within 15 min. The micro PCR chip is also capable of performing multiple DNA amplification, i.e. the simultaneous duplication of multiple genes under different conditions in separate reaction wells. Compared with the large-scale PCR system, it is greatly advantageous for fast diagnosis of multiple infectious diseases. Multiplex PCR amplification of two DNA segments in the same well is also feasible using the proposed micro device. The developed micro PCR chip provides a crucial tool for genetic analysis, molecular biology, infectious disease detection, and many other biomedical applications.

  4. Investigation of polymerase chain reaction assays to improve detection of bacterial involvement in bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Bell, Colin J; Blackburn, Paul; Elliott, Mark; Patterson, Tony I A P; Ellison, Sean; Lahuerta-Marin, Angela; Ball, Hywel J

    2014-09-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) causes severe economic losses to the cattle farming industry worldwide. The major bacterial organisms contributing to the BRD complex are Mannheimia haemolytica, Histophilus somni, Mycoplasma bovis, Pasteurella multocida, and Trueperella pyogenes. The postmortem detection of these organisms in pneumonic lung tissue is generally conducted using standard culture-based techniques where the presence of therapeutic antibiotics in the tissue can inhibit bacterial isolation. In the current study, conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were used to assess the prevalence of these 5 organisms in grossly pneumonic lung samples from 150 animals submitted for postmortem examination, and the results were compared with those obtained using culture techniques. Mannheimia haemolytica was detected in 51 cases (34%) by PCR and in 33 cases (22%) by culture, H. somni was detected in 35 cases (23.3%) by PCR and in 6 cases (4%) by culture, Myc. bovis was detected in 53 cases (35.3%) by PCR and in 29 cases (19.3%) by culture, P. multocida was detected in 50 cases (33.3%) by PCR and in 31 cases (20.7%) by culture, and T. pyogenes was detected in 42 cases (28%) by PCR and in 31 cases (20.7%) by culture, with all differences being statistically significant. The PCR assays indicated positive results for 111 cases (74%) whereas 82 cases (54.6%) were culture positive. The PCR assays have demonstrated a significantly higher rate of detection of all 5 organisms in cases of pneumonia in cattle in Northern Ireland than was detected by current standard procedures. © 2014 The Author(s).

  5. Mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors modulate the metal-induced inner mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Elena A

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the protective action of stigmatellin (an inhibitor of complex III of mitochondrial electron transport chain, mtETC) against the heavy metal-induced cytotoxicity, we tested its effectiveness against mitochondrial membrane permeabilization produced by heavy metal ions Cd²(+), Hg²(+), Cu²(+) and Zn²(+), as well as by Ca²(+) (in the presence of P(i)) or Se (in form of Na₂SeO₃) using isolated rat liver mitochondria. It was shown that stigmatellin modulated mitochondrial swelling produced by these metals/metalloids in the isotonic sucrose medium in the presence of ascorbate plus tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (complex IV substrates added for energization of the mitochondria). It was found that stigmatellin and other mtETC inhibitors enhanced the mitochondrial swelling induced by selenite. However, in the same medium, all the mtETC inhibitors tested as well as cyclosporin A and bongkrekic acid did not significantly affect Cu²(+)-induced swelling. In contrast, the high-amplitude swelling produced by Cd²(+), Hg²(+), Zn²(+), or Ca²(+) plus P(i) was significantly depressed by these inhibitors. Significant differences in the action of these metals/metalloids on the redox status of pyridine nucleotides, transmembrane potential and mitochondrial respiration were also observed. In the light of these results as well as the data from the recent literature, our hypothesis on a possible involvement of the respiratory supercomplex, formed by complex I (P-site) and complex III (S-site) in the mitochondrial permeabilization mediated by the mitochondrial transition pore, is updated.

  6. Influences of neck afferents on sympathetic and respiratory nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Bolton, P S; Kerman, I A; Woodring, S F; Yates, B J

    1998-11-15

    It is well established that the vestibular system influences the sympathetic nervous system and the respiratory system; presumably, vestibulosympathetic and vestibulorespiratory responses participate in maintaining stable blood pressure and blood oxygenation during movement and changes in posture. Many brainstem neurons that generate vestibulospinal reflexes integrate signals from the labyrinth and neck muscles to distinguish between head movements on a stable body and whole body movements. In the present study, responses were recorded from the splanchnic (sympathetic), hypoglossal (inspiratory) and abdominal (expiratory) nerves during stimulation of the C2 dorsal root ganglion or C2 or C3 nerve branches innervating dorsal neck muscles. Stimulation of neck afferents using low current intensities, in many cases less than twice the threshold for producing an afferent volley recordable from the cord dorsum, elicited changes in sympathetic and respiratory nerve activity. These data suggest that head rotation on a stable body would elicit both cervical and vestibular inputs to respiratory motoneurons and sympathetic preganglionic neurons. The effects of cervical afferent stimulation on abdominal, splanchnic and hypoglossal nerve activity were not abolished by transection of the brainstem caudal to the vestibular nuclei; thus, pathways in addition to those involving the vestibular nuclei are involved in relaying cervical inputs to sympathetic preganglionic neurons and respiratory motoneurons. Transection of the C1-3 dorsal roots enhanced responses of the splanchnic and abdominal nerves to pitch head rotations on a fixed body but diminished responses of the hypoglossal nerve. Thus, neck and vestibular afferent influences on activity of respiratory pump muscles and sympathetic outflow appear to be antagonistic, so that responses will occur during whole body movements but not head movements on a stationary trunk. In contrast, neck and vestibular influences on tongue

  7. Interrelation between respiratory and contractile activity of Physarum polycephalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avsievich, T. I.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2017-06-01

    Different types of endoplasmic oscillatory activity of Physarum polycephalum plasmodium driven by external influences were investigated. Shuttle velocity oscillations of the endoplasm in an isolated plasmodium strand have been analysed using short-time Fourier (STFT) and wavelet transform. Spectral characteristics calculated from the obtained data allowed us to reveal two internal harmonic oscillators with frequencies differing twice with high accuracy (~2%), or one oscillator in which the frequency doubled with the phase shift. The amplitudes and phases of these harmonics only determine contractile activity, self-organisation and migration of the strand. Inhibitors of the cellular respiration (KCN-SHAM) were applied to demonstrate the interrelation between respiratory pathways with contractile activity. Both internal oscillators showed high sensitivity to the respiratory inhibitors: fast cessation of oscillation in the presence of inhibitors and gradual recovery when they have been removed.

  8. Effect of structured physical activity on respiratory outcomes in sedentary elderly adults with mobility limitations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of structured physical activity on respiratory outcomes in community dwelling elderly adults with mobility limitations. DESIGN: Multicenter, randomized trial of physical activity vs health education, with respiratory variables prespecified as tertiary outcomes over...

  9. YME1L controls the accumulation of respiratory chain subunits and is required for apoptotic resistance, cristae morphogenesis, and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Stiburek, Lukas; Cesnekova, Jana; Kostkova, Olga; Fornuskova, Daniela; Vinsova, Kamila; Wenchich, Laszlo; Houstek, Josef; Zeman, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA) proteases are involved in the quality control and processing of inner-membrane proteins. Here we investigate the cellular activities of YME1L, the human orthologue of the Yme1 subunit of the yeast i‑AAA complex, using stable short hairpin RNA knockdown and expression experiments. Human YME1L is shown to be an integral membrane protein that exposes its carboxy-terminus to the intermembrane space and exists in several complexes of 600–1100 kDa. The stable knockdown of YME1L in human embryonic kidney 293 cells led to impaired cell proliferation and apoptotic resistance, altered cristae morphology, diminished rotenone-sensitive respiration, and increased susceptibility to mitochondrial membrane protein carbonylation. Depletion of YME1L led to excessive accumulation of nonassembled respiratory chain subunits (Ndufb6, ND1, and Cox4) in the inner membrane. This was due to a lack of YME1L proteolytic activity, since the excessive accumulation of subunits was reversed by overexpression of wild-type YME1L but not a proteolytically inactive YME1L variant. Similarly, the expression of wild-type YME1L restored the lamellar cristae morphology of YME1L-deficient mitochondria. Our results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial inner-membrane proteostasis to both mitochondrial and cellular function and integrity and reveal a novel role for YME1L in the proteolytic regulation of respiratory chain biogenesis. PMID:22262461

  10. Analysis of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes using blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE)

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Pooja; Wang, Xu; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are cellular organelles that produce energy in the form of ATP through a process termed oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), which occurs via the protein complexes of the electron transport chain (ETC). In recent years it has become unequivocally clear that mitochondrial complexes of the ETC are not static entities in the inner mitochondrial membrane. These complexes are dynamic and in mammals they aggregate in different stoichiometric combinations to form supercomplexes (SCs) or respirasomes. It has been proposed that the net respiration is more efficient via SCs than via isolated complexes. However, it still needs to be determined whether the activity of a particular SC is associated with a disease etiology. Here we describe a simplified method to visualize and assess in-gel activity of SCs and the individual complexes with a good resolution on blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). PMID:26928661

  11. Leg ischaemia before circulatory arrest alters brain leucocyte count and respiratory chain redox state.

    PubMed

    Yannopoulos, Fredrik S; Arvola, Oiva; Haapanen, Henri; Herajärvi, Johanna; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Jensen, Hanna; Kiviluoma, Kai; Juvonen, Tatu

    2014-03-01

    adenine dinucleotide autofluorescence had statistically significant differences at 10 min after cooling and at 120 and 180 min after hypothermic circulatory arrest. Remote ischaemic preconditioning seems to provide better mitochondrial respiratory chain function as indicated by the higher NADH content. It simultaneously provides a reduction of adherent leucocytes in cerebral vessels after hypothermic circulatory arrest. Additionally, it might provide some degree of cellular organ preservation as implied by the electron microscopy results.

  12. Leg ischaemia before circulatory arrest alters brain leucocyte count and respiratory chain redox state

    PubMed Central

    Yannopoulos, Fredrik S.; Arvola, Oiva; Haapanen, Henri; Herajärvi, Johanna; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Jensen, Hanna; Kiviluoma, Kai; Juvonen, Tatu

    2014-01-01

    reperfusion. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide autofluorescence had statistically significant differences at 10 min after cooling and at 120 and 180 min after hypothermic circulatory arrest. CONCLUSIONS Remote ischaemic preconditioning seems to provide better mitochondrial respiratory chain function as indicated by the higher NADH content. It simultaneously provides a reduction of adherent leucocytes in cerebral vessels after hypothermic circulatory arrest. Additionally, it might provide some degree of cellular organ preservation as implied by the electron microscopy results. PMID:24343749

  13. Immunolocalization of an alternative respiratory chain in Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae spores: mitosomes retain their role in microsporidial energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dolgikh, Viacheslav V; Senderskiy, Igor V; Pavlova, Olga A; Naumov, Anton M; Beznoussenko, Galina V

    2011-04-01

    Microsporidia are a group of fungus-related intracellular parasites with severely reduced metabolic machinery. They lack canonical mitochondria, a Krebs cycle, and a respiratory chain but possess genes encoding glycolysis enzymes, a glycerol phosphate shuttle, and ATP/ADP carriers to import host ATP. The recent finding of alternative oxidase genes in two clades suggests that microsporidial mitosomes may retain an alternative respiratory pathway. We expressed the fragments of mitochondrial chaperone Hsp70 (mitHsp70), mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mitG3PDH), and alternative oxidase (AOX) from the microsporidium Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae in Escherichia coli. Immunoblotting with antibodies against recombinant polypeptides demonstrated specific accumulation of both metabolic enzymes in A. locustae spores. At the same time comparable amounts of mitochondrial Hsp70 were found in spores and in stages of intracellular development as well. Immunoelectron microscopy of ultrathin cryosections of spores confirmed mitosomal localization of the studied proteins. Small amounts of enzymes of an alternative respiratory chain in merogonial and early sporogonial stages, alongside their accumulation in mature spores, suggest conspicuous changes in components and functions of mitosomes during the life cycle of microsporidia and the important role of these organelles in parasite energy metabolism, at least at the final stages of sporogenesis.

  14. Immunolocalization of an Alternative Respiratory Chain in Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae Spores: Mitosomes Retain Their Role in Microsporidial Energy Metabolism ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dolgikh, Viacheslav V.; Senderskiy, Igor V.; Pavlova, Olga A.; Naumov, Anton M.; Beznoussenko, Galina V.

    2011-01-01

    Microsporidia are a group of fungus-related intracellular parasites with severely reduced metabolic machinery. They lack canonical mitochondria, a Krebs cycle, and a respiratory chain but possess genes encoding glycolysis enzymes, a glycerol phosphate shuttle, and ATP/ADP carriers to import host ATP. The recent finding of alternative oxidase genes in two clades suggests that microsporidial mitosomes may retain an alternative respiratory pathway. We expressed the fragments of mitochondrial chaperone Hsp70 (mitHsp70), mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mitG3PDH), and alternative oxidase (AOX) from the microsporidium Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae in Escherichia coli. Immunoblotting with antibodies against recombinant polypeptides demonstrated specific accumulation of both metabolic enzymes in A. locustae spores. At the same time comparable amounts of mitochondrial Hsp70 were found in spores and in stages of intracellular development as well. Immunoelectron microscopy of ultrathin cryosections of spores confirmed mitosomal localization of the studied proteins. Small amounts of enzymes of an alternative respiratory chain in merogonial and early sporogonial stages, alongside their accumulation in mature spores, suggest conspicuous changes in components and functions of mitosomes during the life cycle of microsporidia and the important role of these organelles in parasite energy metabolism, at least at the final stages of sporogenesis. PMID:21296913

  15. Stimulation of Menaquinone-Dependent Electron Transfer in the Respiratory Chain of Bacillus subtilis by Membrane Energization

    PubMed Central

    Azarkina, N.; Konstantinov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    At a pH of ≤7, respiration of Bacillus subtilis cells on endogenous substrates shut down almost completely upon addition of an uncoupler (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone [CCCP]) and a K+-ionophore (valinomycin). The same effect was observed with cell spheroplasts lacking the cell wall. The concentration of CCCP required for 50% inhibition of the endogenous respiration in the presence of K+-valinomycin was below 100 nM. Either CCCP or valinomycin alone was much less efficient than the combination of the two. The inhibitory effect was easily reversible and depended specifically on the H+ and K+ concentrations in the medium. Similar inhibition was observed with respect to the reduction of the artificial electron acceptors 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) and N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine cation (TMPD+), which intercept reducing equivalents at the level of menaquinol. Oxidation of the reduced DCPIP or TMPD in the bacterial cells was not sensitive to uncoupling. The same loss of the electron transfer activities as induced by the uncoupling was observed upon disruption of the cells during isolation of the membranes; the residual activities were not further inhibited by the uncoupler and ionophores. We conclude that the menaquinone-dependent electron transfer in the B. subtilis respiratory chain is facilitated, thermodynamically or kinetically, by membrane energization. A requirement for an energized state of the membrane is not a specific feature of succinate oxidation, as proposed in the literature, since it was also observed in a mutant of B. subtilis lacking succinate:quinone reductase as well as for substrates other than succinate. Possible mechanisms of the energy-dependent regulation of menaquinone-dependent respiration in B. subtilis are discussed. PMID:12218020

  16. The purification and properties of the respiratory-chain reduced nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase of Torulopsis utilis

    PubMed Central

    Tottmar, S. O. C.; Ragan, C. I.

    1971-01-01

    1. An NADH–ferricyanide reductase activity has been isolated from the respiratory chain of Torulopsis utilis by using detergents. The isolated enzyme contains non-haem iron, acid-labile sulphide and FMN in the molar proportions 27.5:28.4:1. The preparation is free of FAD and largely free of cytochrome. 2. The enzyme catalyses ferricyanide reduction by NADPH at about 1% of the rate with NADH, and reacts poorly with acceptors other than ferricyanide. The rates of reduction of some acceptors are, as percentages of the rate with ferricyanide: menadione, 0.35%; lipoate, 0.01%; cytochrome c, 0.065%; dichlorophenolindophenol, 0.35%; ubiquinone-1, 0.08%. 3. Several properties of submitochondrial particles of T. utilis (non-haem iron, acid-labile sulphide, FMN and an NADH-reducible electron-paramagnetic-resonance signal) were found to co-purify with the NADH–ferricyanide reductase activity. Thus about 70% of the FMN and, within the limits of accuracy of the experiments, 100% of the non-haem iron and acid-labile sulphide of submitochondrial particles derived from T. utilis cells grown under conditions of glycerol limitation (but relatively low iron availability) can be attributed to the NADH–ferricyanide reductase. 4. It was also shown that the component of submitochondrial particles specifically bleached at 460nm by NADH [species 1 of Ragan & Garland (1971)] co-purifies with the NADH–ferricyanide reductase. 5. This successful purification of an NADH dehydrogenase from T. utilis forms a starting point for investigating the molecular properties of phenotypically modified mitochondrial NADH oxidation pathways that lack energy conservation between NADH and the cytochromes. PMID:4399788

  17. Cholinergic-receptor-independent dysfunction of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes, reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential and ATP depletion underlie necrotic cell death induced by the organophosphate poison mevinphos.

    PubMed

    Chan, J Y H; Chan, S H H; Dai, K Y; Cheng, H L; Chou, J L J; Chang, A Y W

    2006-12-01

    Our current understanding of the nature of cell death that is associated with fatal organophosphate poisoning and the underlying cellular mechanisms is surprisingly limited. Taking advantage of the absence in an in vitro system of acetylcholinesterase, the pharmacological target of organophosphate compounds, the present study evaluated the hypothesis that the repertoire of cholinergic receptor-independent cellular events that underlie fatal organophosphate poisoning entails induction of mitochondrial dysfunction, followed by bioenergetic failure that leads to necrotic cell death because of ATP depletion. Pheochromocytoma PC12 cells incubated with the organophosphate pesticide mevinphos (0.4 or 4mumol) for 1 or 3h underwent a dose-related and time-dependent loss of cell viability that was not reversed by muscarinic (atropine) or nicotinic (mecamylamine) blockade. This was accompanied by depressed NADH cytochrome c reductase, succinate cytochrome c reductase or cytochrome c oxidase activity in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential, decreased ATP concentration, elevated ADP/ATP ratio, increased lactate dehydrogenase release and necrotic cell death. We conclude that Mev induces cholinergic receptor-independent necrotic cell death by depressing the activity of Complexes I to IV in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, eliciting reduction in mitochondrial transmembrane potential, depleting intracellular ATP contents and damaging cell membrane integrity.

  18. [Wheat root cells functioning under inhibition of I and II complexes of mitochondrial respiratory chain].

    PubMed

    Polygalova, O O; Bufetov, E N; Ponomareva, A A

    2007-01-01

    A joint effect of rotenone and malonate on the intensity of respiration, output of K+ and ultrastructure of wheat root cells treated for 6 h was studied. The addition of malonate to rotenone containing solution, in which wheat roots had been incubated for an hour, caused further decrease in respiration intensity and K+ output into external medium. Many mitochondria acquired torus shape in 2h after malonate addition. The increase in respiratory intensity and re-entry of K+ from the incubation medium into the cells were observed during following hours of incubation. We assume that reparation and adaptation processes took place in this case. The observed contacts of endoplasmic reticulum lumens with mitochondria are indicative of possible synthesis of an enzyme able to metabolize malonate to acetyl-CoA and CO2. We propose that torus shape of mitochondria is due to the increase in their outer surfaces, that, in turn, is a result of activation of external NAD(P)H-dehydrogenase. These findings may be evidence of possible adaptation of the root cells to the joint effect of the inhibitors.

  19. Analysis of Respiratory Chain Regulation in Roots of Soybean Seedlings1

    PubMed Central

    Millar, A. Harvey; Atkin, Owen K.; Ian Menz, R.; Henry, Beverley; Farquhar, Graham; Day, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in the respiratory rate and the contribution of the cytochrome (Cyt) c oxidase and alternative oxidase (COX and AOX, respectively) were investigated in soybean (Glycine max L. cv Stevens) root seedlings using the 18O-discrimination method. In 4-d-old roots respiration proceeded almost entirely via COX, but by d 17 more than 50% of the flux occurred via AOX. During this period the capacity of COX, the theoretical yield of ATP synthesis, and the root relative growth rate all decreased substantially. In extracts from whole roots of different ages, the ubiquinone pool was maintained at 50% to 60% reduction, whereas pyruvate content fluctuated without a consistent trend. In whole-root immunoblots, AOX protein was largely in the reduced, active form at 7 and 17 d but was partially oxidized at 4 d. In isolated mitochondria, Cyt pathway and succinate dehydrogenase capacities and COX I protein abundance decreased with root age, whereas both AOX capacity and protein abundance remained unchanged. The amount of mitochondrial protein on a dry-mass basis did not vary significantly with root age. It is concluded that decreases in whole-root respiration during growth of soybean seedlings can be largely explained by decreases in maximal rates of electron transport via COX. Flux via AOX is increased so that the ubiquinone pool is maintained in a moderately reduced state. PMID:9662551

  20. Mitochondrial respiratory chain adaptations in macrophages contribute to antibacterial host defence

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cano, Sarai; Enamorado, Michel; Ugolini, Matteo; Nistal-Villán, Estanislao; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Pelegrín, Pablo; Sander, Leif E.; Enríquez, José A.; Sancho, David

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages tightly scale their core metabolism upon activation, but the precise regulation of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) and its functional implications are currently unknown. Here we show that recognition of live bacteria by macrophages transiently decreased the assembly of ETC complex I (CI) and CI-containing supercomplexes and switched the relative contribution of CI and CII to mitochondrial respiration. This was mediated by the phagosomal NADPH-oxidase and the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent tyrosine-kinase Fgr. It required Toll-like receptor signalling and the NLRP3 inflammasome, which were both connected to bacterial viability-specific immune responses. Inhibition of CII during E. coli infection normalized serum levels of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and IL-10 to levels found in mice treated with dead bacteria, and impaired control of bacteria. We thus identified ETC adaptations as an early immune-metabolic checkpoint that adjusts innate immune responses to bacterial infection. PMID:27348412

  1. Mitochondrial respiratory-chain adaptations in macrophages contribute to antibacterial host defense.

    PubMed

    Garaude, Johan; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Martínez-Cano, Sarai; Enamorado, Michel; Ugolini, Matteo; Nistal-Villán, Estanislao; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Pelegrín, Pablo; Sander, Leif E; Enríquez, José A; Sancho, David

    2016-09-01

    Macrophages tightly scale their core metabolism after being activated, but the precise regulation of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain (ETC) and its functional implications are currently unknown. Here we found that recognition of live bacteria by macrophages transiently decreased assembly of the ETC complex I (CI) and CI-containing super-complexes and switched the relative contributions of CI and CII to mitochondrial respiration. This was mediated by phagosomal NADPH oxidase and the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent tyrosine kinase Fgr. It required Toll-like receptor signaling and the NLRP3 inflammasome, which were both connected to bacterial viability-specific immune responses. Inhibition of CII during infection with Escherichia coli normalized serum concentrations of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and IL-10 to those in mice treated with dead bacteria and impaired control of bacteria. We have thus identified ETC adaptations as an early immunological-metabolic checkpoint that adjusts innate immune responses to bacterial infection.

  2. Chlorogenic Compounds from Coffee Beans Exert Activity against Respiratory Viruses.

    PubMed

    Sinisi, Valentina; Stevaert, Annelies; Berti, Federico; Forzato, Cristina; Benedetti, Fabio; Navarini, Luciano; Camps, Anita; Persoons, Leentje; Vermeire, Kurt

    2017-05-01

    Chlorogenic acids are secondary metabolites in diverse plants. Some chlorogenic acids extracted from traditional medicinal plants are known for their healing properties, e.g., against viral infections. Also, green coffee beans are a rich source of chlorogenic acids, with 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid being the most abundant chlorogenic acid in coffee. We previously reported the synthesis of the regioisomers of lactones, bearing different substituents on the quinidic core. Here, 3,4-O-dicaffeoyl-1,5-γ-quinide and three dimethoxycinnamoyl-γ-quinides were investigated for in vitro antiviral activities against a panel of 14 human viruses. Whereas the dimethoxycinnamoyl-γ-quinides did not show any antiviral potency in cytopathogenic effect reduction assays, 3,4-O-dicaffeoyl-1,5-γ-quinide exerted mild antiviral activity against herpes simplex viruses, adenovirus, and influenza virus. Interestingly, when the compounds were evaluated against respiratory syncytial virus, a potent antiviral effect of 3,4-O-dicaffeoyl-1,5-γ-quinide was observed against both subtypes of respiratory syncytial virus, with EC50 values in the submicromolar range. Time-of-addition experiments revealed that this compound acts on an intracellular post-entry replication step. Our data show that 3,4-O-dicaffeoyl-1,5-γ-quinide is a relevant candidate for lead optimization and further mechanistic studies, and warrants clinical development as a potential anti-respiratory syncytial virus drug. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Cannabinoid-Induced Changes in the Activity of Electron Transport Chain Complexes of Brain Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the activity of individual mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, II/III, IV) and citrate synthase induced by pharmacologically different cannabinoids. In vitro effects of selected cannabinoids on mitochondrial enzymes were measured in crude mitochondrial fraction isolated from pig brain. Both cannabinoid receptor agonists, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, anandamide, and R-(+)-WIN55,212-2, and antagonist/inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptors, AM251, and cannabidiol were examined in pig brain mitochondria. Different effects of these cannabinoids on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and citrate synthase were found. Citrate synthase activity was decreased only by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and AM251. Significant increase in the complex I activity was induced by anandamide. At micromolar concentration, all the tested cannabinoids inhibited the activity of electron transport chain complexes II/III and IV. Stimulatory effect of anandamide on activity of complex I may participate on distinct physiological effects of endocannabinoids compared to phytocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoids. Common inhibitory effect of cannabinoids on activity of complex II/III and IV confirmed a non-receptor-mediated mechanism of cannabinoid action on individual components of system of oxidative phosphorylation.

  4. Role of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for detection of respiratory viruses in critically ill children with respiratory disease: Is it time for a change in algorithm?

    PubMed

    Aramburo, Angela; van Schaik, Sandrijn; Louie, Janice; Boston, Erica; Messenger, Sharon; Wright, Carolyn; Lawrence Drew, W

    2011-07-01

    To identify the respiratory viral pathogens associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection in critically ill pediatric patients by using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and compare results with those of direct fluorescence antibody assay testing. Observational cohort study. Pediatric intensive care unit at a tertiary care academic hospital. Pediatric patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with severe respiratory symptoms consistent with viral lower respiratory tract infection. None. Respiratory samples of pediatric patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with severe respiratory symptoms between January 2008 and July 2009 were tested with direct fluorescence antibody assay and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. At least one viral agent was detected in 70.5% of specimens by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and in 16.5% by direct fluorescence antibody assay (p < .001). Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction increased the total viral yield five-fold compared to direct fluorescence antibody assay. Rhinovirus was the most commonly identified virus (41.6%). For viruses included in the direct fluorescence antibody assay panel, direct fluorescence antibody assay had a sensitivity of 0.42 (95% confidence interval 0.25-0.61) and a specificity of 1 (95% confidence interval 0.86-1.00) compared with real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Coinfections were not uncommon, in particular with rhinovirus, and these patients tended to have higher mortality. Direct fluorescence antibody assay testing is a suboptimal method for the detection of respiratory viruses in critically ill children with lower respiratory tract infection. Given the importance of a prompt and accurate viral diagnosis for this group of patients, we suggest that real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction becomes part of the routine diagnostic

  5. Surveyor Nuclease: a new strategy for a rapid identification of heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutations in patients with respiratory chain defects.

    PubMed

    Bannwarth, Sylvie; Procaccio, Vincent; Paquis-Flucklinger, Veronique

    2005-06-01

    Molecular analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a critical step in diagnosis and genetic counseling of respiratory chain defects. No fast method is currently available for the identification of unknown mtDNA point mutations. We have developed a new strategy based on complete mtDNA PCR amplification followed by digestion with a mismatch-specific DNA endonuclease, Surveyor Nuclease. This enzyme, a member of the CEL nuclease family of plant DNA endonucleases, cleaves double-strand DNA at any mismatch site including base substitutions and small insertions/deletions. After digestion, cleavage products are separated and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The size of the digestion products indicates the location of the mutation, which is then confirmed and characterized by sequencing. Although this method allows the analysis of 2 kb mtDNA amplicons and the detection of multiple mutations within the same fragment, it does not lead to the identification of homoplasmic base substitutions. Homoplasmic pathogenic mutations have been described. Nevertheless, most homoplasmic base substitutions are neutral polymorphisms while deleterious mutations are typically heteroplasmic. Here, we report that this method can be used to detect mtDNA mutations such as m.3243A>G tRNA(Leu) and m.14709T>C tRNA(Glu) even when they are present at levels as low as 3% in DNA samples derived from patients with respiratory chain defects. Then, we tested five patients suffering from a mitochondrial respiratory chain defect and we identified a variant (m.16189T>C) in two of them, which was previously associated with susceptibility to diabetes and cardiomyopathy. In conclusion, this method can be effectively used to rapidly and completely screen the entire human mitochondrial genome for heteroplasmic mutations and in this context represents an important advance for the diagnosis of mitochondrial diseases.

  6. Interactions between cardiac, respiratory, and brain activity in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musizza, Bojan; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2005-05-01

    The electrical activity of the heart (ECG), respiratory function and electric activity of the brain (EEG) were simultaneously recorded in conscious, healthy humans. Instantaneous frequencies of the heart beat, respiration and α-waves were then determined from 30-minutes recordings. The instantaneous cardiac frequency was defined as the inverse value of the time interval between two consecutive R-peaks. The instantaneous respiratory frequency was obtained from recordings of the excursions of thorax by application of the Hilbert transform. To obtain the instantaneous frequency of α-waves, the EEG signal recorded from the forehead was first analysed using the wavelet transform. Then the frequency band corresponding to α-waves was extracted and the Hilbert transform applied. Synchronization analysis was performed and the direction of coupling was ascertained, using pairs of instantaneous frequencies in each case. It is shown that the systems are weakly bidirectionally coupled. It was confirmed that, in conscious healthy humans, respiration drives cardiac activity. We also demonstrate from these analyses that α-activity drives both respiration and cardiac activity.

  7. Rapid toxicity testing based on mitochondrial respiratory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haubenstricker, M.E. ); Holodnick, S.E.; Mancy, K.H. ); Brabec, M.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The need exists for rapid and inexpensive methods to determine the health effects of environmental contaminants on biological systems. One of the current research approaches for assessing cytotoxicity is to monitor the respiratory activity of the mitochondrion, a sensitive, nonspecific subcellular target site. Detected changes in mitochondrial function after the addition of a test chemical could be correlated to toxic effects. Mitochondrial respiration can be characterized by three indices: state 3 and state 4 respiratory rates, and the respiratory control ratio (RCR). State 4, the idle or resting state, results when coupled mitochondrial respire in a medium containing inorganic phosphate and a Kreb's cycle substrate in the absence of a phosphate acceptor such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP). In the presence of ADP the respiration rate increases to a maximum (state 3), accompanied by phosphorylation of ADP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The ratio of state 3 to state 4, or RCR, indicates how tightly the oxidative phosphorylation process is coupled. The synthesis of ATP by mitochondria is influenced by a number of compounds, most of which are either uncouplers or inhibitors.

  8. Use of polyurethane foam deformation sensor to record respiratory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredov, V. I.; Baranov, V. S.

    1980-05-01

    The sensor developed has some substantial advantages over other known types. It is highly sensitive over a wide range of strain loads. The level of the output signal is linearly related to the force exerted on it, and it is sufficient for direct recording without using amplifiers of electric signals. The sensor is based on elastic, spongy material, polyurethane foam (porolon) with current-conducting material on the pore surface, current-conducting carbon black or electrode paste. The elastic properties of the sensor are built in the actual base of the strain-sensitive element, which simplifies the construction substantially and increases the reliability of the unit. In order to test the possibility of using this sensor to examine respiratory function, human pneumograms were recorded with the subject in a calm state along with the respiratory activity of experimental animals (dogs). Samples of the respiratory curve are shown. The simplicity of design of the sensor makes it possible to use it in various physiological experiments.

  9. Clinical validation of 3 commercial real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus from upper respiratory tract specimens.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Deqa H; AlHetheel, AbdulKarim F; Mohamud, Hanat S; Aldosari, Kamel; Alzamil, Fahad A; Somily, Ali M

    2017-04-01

    Since discovery of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), a novel betacoronavirus first isolated and characterized in 2012, MERS-CoV real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assays represent one of the most rapidly expanding commercial tests. However, in the absence of extensive evaluations of these assays on positive clinical material of different sources, evaluating their diagnostic effectiveness remains challenging. We describe the diagnostic performance evaluation of 3 common commercial MERS-CoV rRT-PCR assays on a large panel (n = 234) of upper respiratory tract specimens collected during an outbreak episode in Saudi Arabia. Assays were compared to the RealStar® MERS-CoV RT-PCR (Alton Diagnostics, Hamburg, Germany) assay as the gold standard. Results showed i) the TIB MolBiol® LightMix UpE and Orf1a assays (TIB MolBiol, Berlin, Germany) to be the most sensitive, followed by ii) the Anyplex™ Seegene MERS-CoV assay (Seegene, Seoul, Korea), and finally iii) the PrimerDesign™ Genesig® HCoV_2012 assay (PrimerDesign, England, United Kingdom). We also evaluate a modified protocol for the PrimerDesign™ Genesig® HCoV_2012 assay.

  10. Use of whole-exome sequencing to determine the genetic basis of multiple mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Robert W; Pyle, Angela; Griffin, Helen; Blakely, Emma L; Duff, Jennifer; He, Langping; Smertenko, Tania; Alston, Charlotte L; Neeve, Vivienne C; Best, Andrew; Yarham, John W; Kirschner, Janbernd; Schara, Ulrike; Talim, Beril; Topaloglu, Haluk; Baric, Ivo; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Abicht, Angela; Czermin, Birgit; Kleinle, Stephanie; Morris, Andrew A M; Vassallo, Grace; Gorman, Grainne S; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Turnbull, Douglass M; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; McFarland, Robert; Horvath, Rita; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2014-07-02

    Mitochondrial disorders have emerged as a common cause of inherited disease, but their diagnosis remains challenging. Multiple respiratory chain complex defects are particularly difficult to diagnose at the molecular level because of the massive number of nuclear genes potentially involved in intramitochondrial protein synthesis, with many not yet linked to human disease. To determine the molecular basis of multiple respiratory chain complex deficiencies. We studied 53 patients referred to 2 national centers in the United Kingdom and Germany between 2005 and 2012. All had biochemical evidence of multiple respiratory chain complex defects but no primary pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutation. Whole-exome sequencing was performed using 62-Mb exome enrichment, followed by variant prioritization using bioinformatic prediction tools, variant validation by Sanger sequencing, and segregation of the variant with the disease phenotype in the family. Presumptive causal variants were identified in 28 patients (53%; 95% CI, 39%-67%) and possible causal variants were identified in 4 (8%; 95% CI, 2%-18%). Together these accounted for 32 patients (60% 95% CI, 46%-74%) and involved 18 different genes. These included recurrent mutations in RMND1, AARS2, and MTO1, each on a haplotype background consistent with a shared founder allele, and potential novel mutations in 4 possible mitochondrial disease genes (VARS2, GARS, FLAD1, and PTCD1). Distinguishing clinical features included deafness and renal involvement associated with RMND1 and cardiomyopathy with AARS2 and MTO1. However, atypical clinical features were present in some patients, including normal liver function and Leigh syndrome (subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy) seen in association with TRMU mutations and no cardiomyopathy with founder SCO2 mutations. It was not possible to confidently identify the underlying genetic basis in 21 patients (40%; 95% CI, 26%-54%). Exome sequencing enhances the ability to identify

  11. The distribution of electron flow in the branched respiratory chain of Micrococcus luteus.

    PubMed Central

    Artzatbanov VYu; Ostrovsky, D N

    1990-01-01

    Endogenous coupled respiration of Micrococcus luteus protoplasts showed a relatively high resistance to low concentrations of KCN, 2-nonyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide (NQNO) and dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide (DCCD) when the inhibitors were applied individually. In the presence of both KCN and NQNO (or DCCD), O2 uptake was strongly inhibited. The proteolysis of external membrane proteins of protoplasts also induced the high sensitivity of endogenous coupled respiration to low KCN. The effects of NQNO, DCCD and proteolysis were explained by the inhibition of an alternative respiratory system when reducing equivalents passed preferentially down the KCN-sensitive cytochrome oxidase. Uncoupling of the cell membrane increased the electron flow via the cytochrome oxidase-containing respiratory branch. It is suggested that the energy state of cells could control the electron-flow distribution between two branches, and quinones of different levels of reduction could be involved in the mechanism of respiratory branching. PMID:2156496

  12. The distribution of electron flow in the branched respiratory chain of Micrococcus luteus.

    PubMed

    Artzatbanov VYu; Ostrovsky, D N

    1990-03-01

    Endogenous coupled respiration of Micrococcus luteus protoplasts showed a relatively high resistance to low concentrations of KCN, 2-nonyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide (NQNO) and dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide (DCCD) when the inhibitors were applied individually. In the presence of both KCN and NQNO (or DCCD), O2 uptake was strongly inhibited. The proteolysis of external membrane proteins of protoplasts also induced the high sensitivity of endogenous coupled respiration to low KCN. The effects of NQNO, DCCD and proteolysis were explained by the inhibition of an alternative respiratory system when reducing equivalents passed preferentially down the KCN-sensitive cytochrome oxidase. Uncoupling of the cell membrane increased the electron flow via the cytochrome oxidase-containing respiratory branch. It is suggested that the energy state of cells could control the electron-flow distribution between two branches, and quinones of different levels of reduction could be involved in the mechanism of respiratory branching.

  13. Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Dysfunction in Dorsal Root Ganglia of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats and Its Correction by Insulin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Subir K. Roy; Zherebitskaya, Elena; Smith, Darrell R.; Akude, Eli; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila; Jolivalt, Corinne G.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Fernyhough, Paul

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impairments in mitochondrial physiology may play a role in diabetic sensory neuropathy. We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction in sensory neurons is due to abnormal mitochondrial respiratory function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Rates of oxygen consumption were measured in mitochondria from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of 12- to- 22-week streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats, diabetic rats treated with insulin, and age-matched controls. Activities and expression of components of mitochondrial complexes and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were analyzed. RESULTS Rates of coupled respiration with pyruvate + malate (P + M) and with ascorbate + TMPD (Asc + TMPD) in DRG were unchanged after 12 weeks of diabetes. By 22 weeks of diabetes, respiration with P + M was significantly decreased by 31–44% and with Asc + TMPD by 29–39% compared with control. Attenuated mitochondrial respiratory activity of STZ-diabetic rats was significantly improved by insulin that did not correct other indices of diabetes. Activities of mitochondrial complexes I and IV and the Krebs cycle enzyme, citrate synthase, were decreased in mitochondria from DRG of 22-week STZ-diabetic rats compared with control. ROS levels in perikarya of DRG neurons were not altered by diabetes, but ROS generation from mitochondria treated with antimycin A was diminished compared with control. Reduced mitochondrial respiratory function was associated with downregulation of expression of mitochondrial proteins. CONCLUSIONS Mitochondrial dysfunction in sensory neurons from type 1 diabetic rats is associated with impaired rates of respiratory activity and occurs without a significant rise in perikaryal ROS. PMID:20103706

  14. Respiratory muscle strength in the physically active elderly.

    PubMed

    Summerhill, Eleanor M; Angov, Nadia; Garber, Carol; McCool, F Dennis

    2007-12-01

    Advancing age is associated with a decline in the strength of the skeletal muscles, including those of respiration. Respiratory muscles can be strengthened with nonrespiratory activities. We therefore hypothesized that regular exercise in the elderly would attenuate this age-related decline in respiratory muscle strength. Twenty-four healthy subjects older than 65 years were recruited (11 males and 13 females). A comprehensive physical activity survey was administered, and subjects were categorized as active (n = 12) or inactive (n = 12). Each subject underwent testing of maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PI(max) and PE(max)). Diaphragmatic thickness (tdi) was measured via two-dimensional B-mode ultrasound. There were no significant differences between the active and inactive groups with respect to age (75 vs. 73 years) or body weight (69.1vs. 69.9 kg). There were more women (9) than men (3) in the inactive group. Diaphragm thickness was greater in the active group (0.31 +/- 0.06 cm vs. 0.25 +/- 0.04 cm; p = 0.011). PE(max) and PI(max) were also greater in the active group (130 +/- 44 cm H(2)O vs. 80 +/- 24 cm H(2)O; p = 0.002; and 99 +/- 32 cm H(2)O vs. 75 +/- 14 cm H(2)O; p = 0.03). There was a positive association between PI(max )and tdi (r = 0.43, p = 0.03). Regular exercise was positively associated with diaphragm muscle thickness in this cohort. As PE(max) was higher in the active group, we postulate that recruitment of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles during nonrespiratory activities may be the source of this training effect.

  15. Activated mouse eosinophils protect against lethal respiratory virus infection.

    PubMed

    Percopo, Caroline M; Dyer, Kimberly D; Ochkur, Sergei I; Luo, Janice L; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Lee, James J; Lee, Nancy A; Domachowske, Joseph B; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2014-01-30

    Eosinophils are recruited to the airways as a prominent feature of the asthmatic inflammatory response where they are broadly perceived as promoting pathophysiology. Respiratory virus infections exacerbate established asthma; however, the role of eosinophils and the nature of their interactions with respiratory viruses remain uncertain. To explore these questions, we established acute infection with the rodent pneumovirus, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), in 3 distinct mouse models of Th2 cytokine-driven asthmatic inflammation. We found that eosinophils recruited to the airways of otherwise naïve mice in response to Aspergillus fumigatus, but not ovalbumin sensitization and challenge, are activated by and degranulate specifically in response to PVM infection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated eosinophils from both Aspergillus antigen and cytokine-driven asthma models are profoundly antiviral and promote survival in response to an otherwise lethal PVM infection. Thus, although activated eosinophils within a Th2-polarized inflammatory response may have pathophysiologic features, they are also efficient and effective mediators of antiviral host defense.

  16. Mitochondrial function in flying honeybees (Apis mellifera): respiratory chain enzymes and electron flow from complex III to oxygen.

    PubMed

    Suarez, R K; Staples, J F; Lighton, J R; Mathieu-Costello, O

    2000-03-01

    The biochemical bases for the high mass-specific metabolic rates of flying insects remain poorly understood. To gain insights into mitochondrial function during flight, metabolic rates of individual flying honeybees were measured using respirometry, and their thoracic muscles were fixed for electron microscopy. Mitochondrial volume densities and cristae surface densities, combined with biochemical data concerning cytochrome content per unit mass, were used to estimate respiratory chain enzyme densities per unit cristae surface area. Despite the high content of respiratory enzymes per unit muscle mass, these are accommodated by abundant mitochondria and high cristae surface densities such that enzyme densities per unit cristae surface area are similar to those found in mammalian muscle and liver. These results support the idea that a unit area of mitochondrial inner membrane constitutes an invariant structural unit. Rates of O(2) consumption per unit cristae surface area are much higher than those estimated in mammals as a consequence of higher enzyme turnover rates (electron transfer rates per enzyme molecule) during flight. Cytochrome c oxidase, in particular, operates close to its maximum catalytic capacity (k(cat)). Thus, high flux rates are achieved via (i) high respiratory enzyme content per unit muscle mass and (ii) the operation of these enzymes at high fractional velocities.

  17. Measuring Interference of Drug-Like Molecules with the Respiratory Chain: Toward the Early Identification of Mitochondrial Uncouplers in Lead Finding

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Hans; Diekert, Kerstin; Dörner, Wolfgang; Dröse, Stefan; Licher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The electron transport chain (ETC) couples electron transfer between donors and acceptors with proton transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The resulting electrochemical proton gradient is used to generate chemical energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Proton transfer is based on the activity of complex I–V proteins in the ETC. The overall electrical activity of these proteins can be measured by proton transfer using Solid Supported Membrane technology. We tested the activity of complexes I, III, and V in a combined assay, called oxidative phosphorylation assay (oxphos assay), by activating each complex with the corresponding substrate. The oxphos assay was used to test in-house substances from different projects and several drugs currently available on the market that have reported effects on mitochondrial functions. The resulting data were compared to the influence of the respective compounds on mitochondria as determined by oxygen consumption and to data generated with an ATP depletion assay. The comparison shows that the oxidative phosphorylation assay provides both a rapid approach for detecting interaction of compounds with respiratory chain proteins and information on their mode of interaction. Therefore, the oxphos assay is a useful tool to support structure activity relationship studies by allowing early identification of mitotoxicity and for analyzing the outcome of phenotypic screens that are susceptible to the generation of mitotoxicity-related artifacts. PMID:23992120

  18. Partial comparison of the NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel Assay with the Luminex xTAG Respiratory Panel Fast Assay V2 and singleplex real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Scala, Alessia; Bianchini, Sonia; Presicce, Maria Lory; Mori, Alessandro; Sciarrabba, Calogero Sathya; Fior, Giulia; Principi, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    In this study, 185 nasopharyngeal swabs were tested to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the Luminex NxTAG (NxTAG) Respiratory Pathogen Panel (RPP) Assay with those of the Luminex Respiratory Virus Panel (RVP) Fast Assay v2 and singleplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The NxTAG Assay identified at least one infectious agent in 164 (88.7%) of the swabs. In 91 (6.2%) tests with negative results with the RVP Fast Assay v2, a virus was identified by the NxTAG (P < 0.001). With the NxTAG Assay, the detection rates were significantly higher for respiratory syncytial virus (P = 0.003), human metapneumovirus (P < 0.001), human rhinovirus/human enterovirus (P = 0.009) and human adenovirus (P < 0.001). Finally, the NxTAG Assay identified M. pneumoniae in 32 of 44 (72.7%) PCR-positive samples. However, the concordance with real-time PCR results was low for both assays. In conclusion, the results indicate that the NxTAG Assay overcomes some of the limitations of previous Luminex assays, although further studies are needed for a more complete evaluation of the new assay.

  19. The SFT-1 and OXA-1 respiratory chain complex assembly factors influence lifespan by distinct mechanisms in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background C. elegans mitochondrial (Mit) mutants have disrupted mitochondrial electron transport chain function, yet, surprisingly, they are often long-lived, a property that has offered unique insights into the molecular mechanisms of aging. In this study, we examine the phenotypic consequences of reducing the expression of the respiratory chain complex assembly factors sft-1 (homologous to human SURF1) and oxa-1 (homologous to human OXA1) by RNA interference (RNAi). Mutations in human SURF1 are associated with Leigh syndrome, a neurodegenerative condition of the brain caused by cytochrome oxidase (COX) deficiency. Both SURF1 and OXA1 are integral proteins of the inner mitochondrial membrane, functioning in the COX assembly pathway. Results RNAi of both of these genes in C. elegans is associated with increased longevity, but the mechanism by which lifespan is extended is different in each case. sft-1(RNAi) animals display lifespan extension that is dependent on the daf-16 insulin-like signaling pathway, and associated with sensitivity to oxidative stress. oxa-1(RNAi) animals, in contrast, exhibit increased longevity that is at least partially independent of daf-16, and associated with a reduced developmental rate and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Conclusions This study further delineates the consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction within a whole organism that will ultimately help provide new models for human mitochondrial-associated diseases. The difference in phenotype observed upon down-regulation of these two COX assembly factors, as well as phenotypic differences between these factors and other respiratory chain components analyzed thus far, illustrates the complex inter-relationships that exist among energy metabolism, reproduction and aging even in this simplest of metazoan model organisms. PMID:24472117

  20. Effect of nitric oxide on mitochondrial respiratory activity of human articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Maneiro, E; Lopez-Armada, M; de Andres, M C; Carames, B; Martin, M; Bonilla, A; del Hoyo, P; Galdo, F; Arenas, J; Blanco, F

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial activity and its relation with the apoptosis of human articular chondrocytes. Materials and methods: Mitochondrial function was evaluated by analysing respiratory chain enzyme complexes, citrate synthase (CS) activities, and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). The activities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes (complex I: NADH CoQ1 reductase, complex II: succinate dehydrogenase, complex III: ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase, complex IV: cytochrome c oxidase) and CS were measured in human articular chondrocytes isolated from normal cartilage. The Δψm was measured by 5,5',6,6'-tetracholoro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazole carbocyanide iodide (JC-1) using flow cytometry. Apoptosis was analysed by flow cytometry. The mRNA expression of caspases was analysed by ribonuclease protection analysis and the detection of protein synthesis by western blotting. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was used as an NO compound donor. Results: SNP at concentrations higher than 0.5 mmol/l for 24 hours induced cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis. SNP elicited mRNA expression of caspase-3 and caspase-7 and down regulated bcl-2 synthesis in a dose and time dependent manner. Furthermore, 0.5 mM SNP induced depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane at 5, 12, and 24 hours. Analysis of the MRC showed that at 5 hours, 0.5 mM SNP reduced the activity of complex IV by 33%. The individual inhibition of mitochondrial complex IV with azide modified the Δψm and induced apoptosis. Conclusions: This study suggests that the effect of NO on chondrocyte survival is mediated by its effect on complex IV of the MRC. PMID:15708893

  1. Evidence that the flux control coefficient of the respiratory chain is high during gluconeogenesis from lactate in hepatocytes from starved rats. Implications for the hormonal control of gluconeogenesis and action of hypoglycaemic agents.

    PubMed

    Pryor, H J; Smyth, J E; Quinlan, P T; Halestrap, A P

    1987-10-15

    1. Increasing concentrations of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), a mild respiratory-chain inhibitor [Halestrap (1987) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 927, 280-290], caused progressive inhibition of glucose production from lactate + pyruvate by hepatocytes from starved rats incubated in the presence or absence of oleate and gluconeogenic hormones. 2. No significant changes in tissue ATP content were observed, but there were concomitant decreases in ketone-body output and cytochrome c reduction and increases in NADH fluorescence and the ratios of [lactate]/[pyruvate] and [beta-hydroxybutyrate]/[acetoacetate]. 3. The inhibition by DCMU of palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by isolated liver mitochondria was used to calculate a flux control coefficient of the respiratory chain towards gluconeogenesis. In the presence of 1 mM-oleate, the calculated values were 0.61, 0.39 and 0.25 in the absence of hormone and in the presence of glucagon or phenylephrine respectively, consistent with activation of the respiratory chain in situ as previously suggested [Quinlan & Halestrap (1986) Biochem. J. 236, 789-800]. 4. Cytoplasmic oxaloacetate concentrations were shown to decrease under these conditions, implying inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase. 5. Inhibition of gluconeogenesis from fructose and dihydroxyacetone was also observed with DCMU and was accompanied by an increased output of lactate + pyruvate, suggesting that activation of pyruvate kinase was occurring. With the latter substrate, measurements of tissue ADP and ATP contents showed that DCMU caused a small fall in [ATP]/[ADP] ratio. 6. Two inhibitors of fatty acid oxidation, pent-4-enoate and 2-tetradecylglycidate, were shown to abolish and to decrease respectively the effects of hormones, but not valinomycin, on gluconeogenesis from lactate + pyruvate, without changing tissue ATP content. 7. It is concluded that the hormonal increase in mitochondrial matrix volume stimulates fatty acid oxidation and respiratory-chain

  2. Antitussive activity and respiratory system effects of levodropropizine in man.

    PubMed

    Bossi, R; Braga, P C; Centanni, S; Legnani, D; Moavero, N E; Allegra, L

    1988-08-01

    Antitussive activity of the new antitussive drug, levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526), was evaluated in healthy volunteers by the classical method of citric acid-induced coughing. Levodropropizine dose-dependently reduced cough frequency. Maximal inhibition was observed at 6 h after administration. Cough intensity was also reduced, as shown by the analysis of cough noise. Levodropropizine, at the dosage of 60 mg t.i.d., had no adverse effects on respiratory function nor on airway clearance mechanisms: in fact, it did not affect spirometric parameters. Levodropropizine had no effects on the rheological properties of mucus nor on ciliary activity of airway epithelium.

  3. Depression of mitochondrial respiratory enzyme activity in rostral ventrolateral medulla during acute mevinphos intoxication in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yen, David H T; Chan, Julie Y H; Tseng, H P; Huang, C I; Lee, C H; Chan, Samuel H H; Chang, Alice Y W

    2004-04-01

    We investigated possible changes in bioenergetics at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), a medullary site where sympathetic vasomotor tone originates and where the organophosphate poison mevinphos (Mev) acts to elicit cardiovascular intoxication. In Sprague-Dawley rats maintained under propofol anesthesia, microinjection bilaterally of Mev (10 nmol) into the RVLM induced progressive hypotension that was accompanied by an early augmentation (80-100 min post-Mev; Phase I), followed by a decrease (>100 min post-Mev; Phase II) in the power density of the vasomotor components (0-0.8 Hz) in systemic arterial pressure (SAP) signals. Enzyme assay revealed that local application of Mev into the RVLM also significantly and progressively depressed the activity of NADH cytochrome c reductase (marker for Complexes I and III) and cytochrome c oxidase (marker for Complex IV) in the mitochondrial respiratory chain of the RVLM, but not the heart. On the other hand, the activity of succinate cytochrome c reductase (marker for Complexes II and III) remained unaltered. Both the cardiovascular consequences and depression of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes elicited by Mev were significantly antagonized on comicroinjection of atropine (3.5 or 7 nmol) bilaterally into the RVLM. We conclude that Mev adversely effects cardiovascular control by acting as a cholinesterase inhibitor in the RVLM, whose neuronal activity is intimately related to the death process. The resulting accumulation of acetylcholine and prolonged activation of muscarinic receptors in the RVLM is manifested by a selective dysfunction of respiratory enzyme Complexes I and IV in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that underlies cardiovascular toxicity associated with organophosphate poisons such as Mev.

  4. Lack of mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits of complex I and alteration of the respiratory chain in Nicotiana sylvestris mitochondrial deletion mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gutierres, Sophie; Sabar, Mohammed; Lelandais, Christine; Chetrit, Philippe; Diolez, Philippe; Degand, Hervé; Boutry, Marc; Vedel, Fernand; de Kouchkovsky, Yaroslav; De Paepe, Rosine

    1997-01-01

    We previously have shown that Nicotiana sylvestris cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) mutants I and II present large mtDNA deletions and that the NAD7 subunit of complex I (the main dehydrogenase of the mitochondrial respiratory chain) is absent in CMS I. Here, we show that, despite a large difference in size in the mtDNA deletion, CMS I and II display similar alterations. Both have an impaired development from germination to flowering, with partial male sterility that becomes complete under low light. Besides NAD7, two other complex I subunits are missing (NAD9 and the nucleus-encoded, 38-kDa subunit), identified on two-dimensional patterns of mitochondrial proteins. Mitochondria isolated from CMS leaves showed altered respiration. Although their succinate oxidation through complex II was close to that of the wild type, oxidation of glycine, a priority substrate of plant mitochondria, was significantly reduced. The remaining activity was much less sensitive to rotenone, indicating the breakdown of Complex I activity. Oxidation of exogenous NADH (coupled to proton gradient generation and partly sensitive to rotenone) was strongly increased. These results suggest respiratory compensation mechanisms involving additional NADH dehydrogenases to complex I. Finally, the capacity of the cyanide-resistant alternative oxidase pathway was enhanced in CMS, and higher amounts of enzyme were evidenced by immunodetection. PMID:9096412

  5. Emerging principles and neural substrates underlying tonic sleep-state-dependent influences on respiratory motor activity.

    PubMed

    Horner, Richard L

    2009-09-12

    Respiratory muscles with dual respiratory and non-respiratory functions (e.g. the pharyngeal and intercostal muscles) show greater suppression of activity in sleep than the diaphragm, a muscle almost entirely devoted to respiratory function. This sleep-related suppression of activity is most apparent in the tonic component of motor activity, which has functional implications of a more collapsible upper airspace in the case of pharyngeal muscles, and decreased functional residual capacity in the case of intercostal muscles. A major source of tonic drive to respiratory motoneurons originates from neurons intimately involved in states of brain arousal, i.e. neurons not classically involved in generating respiratory rhythm and pattern per se. The tonic drive to hypoglossal motoneurons, a respiratory motor pool with both respiratory and non-respiratory functions, is mediated principally by noradrenergic and glutamatergic inputs, these constituting the essential components of the wakefulness stimulus. These tonic excitatory drives are opposed by tonic inhibitory glycinergic and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) inputs that constrain the level of respiratory-related motor activity, with the balance determining net motor tone. In sleep, the excitatory inputs are withdrawn and GABA release into the brainstem is increased, thus decreasing respiratory motor tone and predisposing susceptible individuals to hypoventilation and obstructive sleep apnoea.

  6. In-vitro activity of sparfloxacin in comparison with currently available antimicrobials against respiratory tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Baquero, F; Cantón, R

    1996-05-01

    Bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents is an ever-increasing problem. The in-vitro activity of sparfloxacin compared with that of currently available antimicrobial agents against pathogens implicated in respiratory tract infections is reviewed. Sparfloxacin is a fluoroquinolone active against both penicillin-susceptible and -resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae. It is also active against many other respiratory tract pathogens and may be a suitable alternative for empirical therapy of community-acquired respiratory tract infections.

  7. Ionizable side chains at catalytic active sites of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie; Eisenberg, Bob

    2012-05-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1,072 Å(3). The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes.

  8. Riboflavin-Responsive and -Non-responsive Mutations in FAD Synthase Cause Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase and Combined Respiratory-Chain Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Rikke K J; Koňaříková, Eliška; Giancaspero, Teresa A; Mosegaard, Signe; Boczonadi, Veronika; Mataković, Lavinija; Veauville-Merllié, Alice; Terrile, Caterina; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Haack, Tobias B; Auranen, Mari; Leone, Piero; Galluccio, Michele; Imbard, Apolline; Gutierrez-Rios, Purificacion; Palmfeldt, Johan; Graf, Elisabeth; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Oppenheim, Marcus; Schiff, Manuel; Pichard, Samia; Rigal, Odile; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Möslinger, Dorothea; Feichtinger, René G; Talim, Beril; Topaloglu, Haluk; Coskun, Turgay; Gucer, Safak; Botta, Annalisa; Pegoraro, Elena; Malena, Adriana; Vergani, Lodovica; Mazzà, Daniela; Zollino, Marcella; Ghezzi, Daniele; Acquaviva, Cecile; Tyni, Tiina; Boneh, Avihu; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Gregersen, Niels; Mayr, Johannes A; Horvath, Rita; Barile, Maria; Prokisch, Holger

    2016-06-02

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies (MADDs) are a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders with combined respiratory-chain deficiency and a neuromuscular phenotype. Despite recent advances in understanding the genetic basis of MADD, a number of cases remain unexplained. Here, we report clinically relevant variants in FLAD1, which encodes FAD synthase (FADS), as the cause of MADD and respiratory-chain dysfunction in nine individuals recruited from metabolic centers in six countries. In most individuals, we identified biallelic frameshift variants in the molybdopterin binding (MPTb) domain, located upstream of the FADS domain. Inasmuch as FADS is essential for cellular supply of FAD cofactors, the finding of biallelic frameshift variants was unexpected. Using RNA sequencing analysis combined with protein mass spectrometry, we discovered FLAD1 isoforms, which only encode the FADS domain. The existence of these isoforms might explain why affected individuals with biallelic FLAD1 frameshift variants still harbor substantial FADS activity. Another group of individuals with a milder phenotype responsive to riboflavin were shown to have single amino acid changes in the FADS domain. When produced in E. coli, these mutant FADS proteins resulted in impaired but detectable FADS activity; for one of the variant proteins, the addition of FAD significantly improved protein stability, arguing for a chaperone-like action similar to what has been reported in other riboflavin-responsive inborn errors of metabolism. In conclusion, our studies identify FLAD1 variants as a cause of potentially treatable inborn errors of metabolism manifesting with MADD and shed light on the mechanisms by which FADS ensures cellular FAD homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Inhibition of the respiratory chain by the alkaloids berberine sulfate, alpinigenine, and tetrahydropalmatine].

    PubMed

    Schewe; Müller, W

    1976-01-01

    The three alcaloids inhibited the NADH oxidase system of electron transfer particles from beef heart up to 90--100 percent. The concentrations of half-inhibition amounted to 50 muM for berberine sulphate and tetrahydropalmatine and 0.55 mM for alpinigenine. All three compounds showed comparable inhibitions on the succinate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase system only at concentrations 20--25 times as high. The site of action may be the iron sulphur region of the complex I of the electron transfer system. The biological importance of this respiratory inhibitions should be taken into account.

  10. Antiviral activity of carnosic acid against respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory infection and a major public health threat worldwide. To date, no vaccine or effective therapeutic agent has been developed. In a screen for potential therapeutic agents against hRSV, we discovered that an extract of Rosmarinus officinalis exerted a strong inhibitory effect against hRSV infection. Subsequent studies identified carnosic acid as a bioactive constituent responsible for anti-hRSV activity. Carnosic acid has been shown to exhibit potent antioxidant and anti-cancer activities. Anti-RSV activity of carnosic acid was further investigated in this study. Methods Effects of extracts from various plants and subfractions from R. officinalis on hRSV replication were determined by microneutralization assay and plaque assay. Several constituents were isolated from ethyl acetate fraction of R. officinalis and their anti-RSV activities were assessed by plaque assay as well as reverse-transcription quantitative PCR to determine the synthesis of viral RNAs. Results Among the tested bioactive constituents of R. officinalis, carnosic acid displayed the most potent anti-hRSV activity and was effective against both A- and B-type viruses. Carnosic acid efficiently suppressed the replication of hRSV in a concentration-dependent manner. Carnosic acid effectively suppressed viral gene expression without inducing type-I interferon production or affecting cell viability, suggesting that it may directly affect viral factors. A time course analysis showed that addition of carnosic acid 8 hours after infection still effectively blocked the expression of hRSV genes, further suggesting that carnosic acid directly inhibited the replication of hRSV. Conclusions The current study demonstrates that carnosic acid, a natural compound that has already been shown to be safe for human consumption, has anti-viral activity against hRSV, efficiently blocking the replication of this virus. Carnosic

  11. Studies on the formation of lactate and pyruvate from glucose in cultured skin fibroblasts: implications for detection of respiratory chain defects.

    PubMed

    Wijburg, F A; Feller, N; Scholte, H R; Przyrembel, H; Wanders, R J

    1989-09-01

    We investigated the time course of the formation of lactate and pyruvate from glucose in cultured skin fibroblasts from controls, from a patient with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency and from controls treated with inhibitors of the individual respiratory chain complexes. Fibroblasts from the patient and inhibitor treated fibroblasts produced more lactate and less pyruvate; this resulted in a significant increase in the lactate to pyruvate ratio, reflecting an increased cytosolic NADH/NAD+ redox state. We conclude that measurement of lactate and pyruvate production from glucose in cultured skin fibroblasts can be of value in the diagnosis of inherited diseases of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  12. Immortalized Parkinson's disease lymphocytes have enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity

    PubMed Central

    Annesley, Sarah J.; Lay, Sui T.; De Piazza, Shawn W.; Sanislav, Oana; Hammersley, Eleanor; Allan, Claire Y.; Francione, Lisa M.; Bui, Minh Q.; Chen, Zhi-Ping; Ngoei, Kevin R. W.; Tassone, Flora; Kemp, Bruce E.; Storey, Elsdon; Evans, Andrew; Loesch, Danuta Z.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In combination with studies of post-mortem Parkinson's disease (PD) brains, pharmacological and genetic models of PD have suggested that two fundamental interacting cellular processes are impaired – proteostasis and mitochondrial respiration. We have re-examined the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in lymphoblasts isolated from individuals with idiopathic PD and an age-matched control group. As previously reported for various PD cell types, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by PD lymphoblasts was significantly elevated. However, this was not due to an impairment of mitochondrial respiration, as is often assumed. Instead, basal mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis are dramatically elevated in PD lymphoblasts. The mitochondrial mass, genome copy number and membrane potential were unaltered, but the expression of indicative respiratory complex proteins was also elevated. This explains the increased oxygen consumption rates by each of the respiratory complexes in experimentally uncoupled mitochondria of iPD cells. However, it was not attributable to increased activity of the stress- and energy-sensing protein kinase AMPK, a regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and activity. The respiratory differences between iPD and control cells were sufficiently dramatic as to provide a potentially sensitive and reliable biomarker of the disease state, unaffected by disease duration (time since diagnosis) or clinical severity. Lymphoblasts from control and PD individuals thus occupy two distinct, quasi-stable steady states; a ‘normal’ and a ‘hyperactive’ state characterized by two different metabolic rates. The apparent stability of the ‘hyperactive’ state in patient-derived lymphoblasts in the face of patient ageing, ongoing disease and mounting disease severity suggests an early, permanent switch to an alternative metabolic steady state. With its associated, elevated ROS production, the ‘hyperactive’ state might not cause pathology

  13. Prospective application of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for diagnosing influenza infections in respiratory samples from a children's hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Claas, E C; van Milaan, A J; Sprenger, M J; Ruiten-Stuiver, M; Arron, G I; Rothbarth, P H; Masurel, N

    1993-01-01

    A prospective clinical evaluation of the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RNA PCR) for detection of influenza viruses was carried out with specimens from 342 patients of a children's hospital in The Netherlands. The RNA PCR, carried out directly on the specimens without an organic extraction, showed a sensitivity and specificity which are superior to those of direct immunofluorescence and comparable to those of cell culture combined with immunofluorescence (culture/IF). Negative results can be obtained within 2 days by the RNA PCR but may take up to 14 days by culture/IF. Because culturing is the standard technique for the detection of respiratory viruses, at this moment there are no strong arguments to replace culture/IF with RNA PCR for the detection of influenza A virus. Images PMID:8370755

  14. Reconstitution of the membrane-bound, ubiquinone-dependent pyruvate oxidase respiratory chain of Escherichia coli with the cytochrome d terminal oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Koland, J.G.; Miller, M.J.; Gennis, R.B.

    1984-01-31

    Pyruvate oxidase is a flavoprotein dehydrogenase located on the inner surface of the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane and coupled to the E. coli aerobic respiratory chain. The role of quinones in the pyruvate oxidase system is investigated, and a minimal respiratory chain is described consisting of only two pure proteins plus ubiquinone 8 incorporated in phospholipid vesicles. The enzymes used in this reconstitution are the flavorprotein and the recently purified E. coli cytochrome d terminal oxidase. The catalytic velocity of the reconstituted liposome system is about 30% of that observed when the flavoprotein is reconstituted with E. coli membranes. It is also shown that electron transport from pyruvate to oxygen in the liposome system generates a transmembrane potential of at least 180 mV (negative inside), which is sensitive to the uncouplers carbonyl cyanide p-(trichloromethoxy)phenylhydrazone and valinomycin. A transmembrane potential is also generated by the oxidation of ubiquinol 1 by the terminal oxidase in the absence of the flavoprotein. It is concluded that: the flavoprotein can directly reduce ubiquinone 8 within the phospholipid bilayer; menaquinone 8 will not effectively substitute for ubiquinone 8 in this electron-transfer chain; and the cytochrome d terminal oxidase functions as a ubiquinol 8 oxidase and serves as a coupling site in the E. coli aerobic respiratory chain. These investigations suggest a relatively simple organization for the E. coli respiratory chain.

  15. Reconstitution of the membrane-bound, ubiquinone-dependent pyruvate oxidase respiratory chain of Escherichia coli with the cytochrome d terminal oxidase.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; Miller, M J; Gennis, R B

    1984-01-31

    Pyruvate oxidase is a flavoprotein dehydrogenase located on the inner surface of the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane and coupled to the E. coli aerobic respiratory chain. In this paper, the role of quinones in the pyruvate oxidase system is investigated, and a minimal respiratory chain is described consisting of only two pure proteins plus ubiquinone 8 incorporated in phospholipid vesicles. The enzymes used in this reconstitution are the flavoprotein and the recently purified E. coli cytochrome d terminal oxidase. The catalytic velocity of the reconstituted liposome system is about 30% of that observed when the flavoprotein is reconstituted with E. coli membranes. It is also shown that electron transport from pyruvate to oxygen in the liposome system generates a transmembrane potential of at least 180 mV (negative inside), which is sensitive to the uncouplers carbonyl cyanide p-(tri-chloromethoxy)phenylhydrazone and valinomycin. A trans-membrane potential is also generated by the oxidation of ubiquinol 1 by the terminal oxidase in the absence of the flavoprotein. It is concluded that (1) the flavoprotein can directly reduce ubiquinone 8 within the phospholipid bilayer, (2) menaquinone 8 will not effectively substitute for ubiquinone 8 in this electron-transfer chain, and (3) the cytochrome d terminal oxidase functions as a ubiquinol 8 oxidase and serves as a "coupling site" in the E. coli aerobic respiratory chain. These investigations suggest a relatively simple organization for the E. coli respiratory chain.

  16. Does breathing type influence electromyographic activity of obligatory and accessory respiratory muscles?

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M F; Valenzuela, S; Miralles, R; Portus, C; Santander, H; Fuentes, A D; Celhay, I

    2014-11-01

    Craniomandibular electromyographic (EMG) studies frequently include several parameters, e.g. resting, chewing and tooth-clenching. EMG activity during these parameters has been recorded in the elevator muscles, but little is known about the respiratory muscles. The aim of this study was to compare EMG activity in obligatory and accessory respiratory muscles between subjects with different breathing types. Forty male subjects were classified according to their breathing type into two groups of 20 each: costo-diaphragmatic breathing type and upper costal breathing type. Bipolar surface electrodes were placed on the sternocleidomastoid, diaphragm, external intercostal and latissimus dorsi muscles. EMG activity was recorded during the following tasks: (i) normal quiet breathing, (ii) maximal voluntary clenching in intercuspal position, (iii) natural rate chewing until swallowing threshold, (iv) short-time chewing. Diaphragm EMG activity was significantly higher in the upper costal breathing type than in the costo-diaphragmatic breathing type in all tasks (P < 0·05). External intercostal EMG activity was significantly higher in the upper costal breathing type than in the costo-diaphragmatic breathing type in tasks 3 and 4 (P < 0·05). Sternocleidomastoid and latissimus dorsi EMG activity did not show significant differences between breathing types in the tasks studied (P > 0·05). The significantly higher EMG activity observed in subjects with upper costal breathing than in the costo-diaphragmatic breathing type suggests that there could be differences in motor unit recruitment strategies depending on the breathing type. This may be an expression of the adaptive capability of muscle chains in subjects who clinically have a different thoraco-abdominal expansion during inspiration at rest.

  17. Glucose Modulates Respiratory Complex I Activity in Response to Acute Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Cannino, Giuseppe; El-Khoury, Riyad; Pirinen, Marja; Hutz, Bettina; Rustin, Pierre; Jacobs, Howard T.; Dufour, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Proper coordination between glycolysis and respiration is essential, yet the regulatory mechanisms involved in sensing respiratory chain defects and modifying mitochondrial functions accordingly are unclear. To investigate the nature of this regulation, we introduced respiratory bypass enzymes into cultured human (HEK293T) cells and studied mitochondrial responses to respiratory chain inhibition. In the absence of respiratory chain inhibitors, the expression of alternative respiratory enzymes did not detectably alter cell physiology or mitochondrial function. However, in permeabilized cells NDI1 (alternative NADH dehydrogenase) bypassed complex I inhibition, whereas alternative oxidase (AOX) bypassed complex III or IV inhibition. In contrast, in intact cells the effects of the AOX bypass were suppressed by growth on glucose, whereas those produced by NDI1 were unaffected. Moreover, NDI1 abolished the glucose suppression of AOX-driven respiration, implicating complex I as the target of this regulation. Rapid Complex I down-regulation was partly released upon prolonged respiratory inhibition, suggesting that it provides an “emergency shutdown” system to regulate metabolism in response to dysfunctions of the oxidative phosphorylation. This system was independent of HIF1, mitochondrial superoxide, or ATP synthase regulation. Our findings reveal a novel pathway for adaptation to mitochondrial dysfunction and could provide new opportunities for combatting diseases. PMID:23007390

  18. Respiratory chain protein turnover rates in mice are highly heterogeneous but strikingly conserved across tissues, ages, and treatments

    PubMed Central

    Karunadharma, Pabalu P.; Basisty, Nathan; Chiao, Ying Ann; Dai, Dao-Fu; Drake, Rachel; Levy, Nick; Koh, William J.; Emond, Mary J.; Kruse, Shane; Marcinek, David; Maccoss, Michael J.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) produces most of the cellular ATP and requires strict quality-control mechanisms. To examine RC subunit proteostasis in vivo, we measured RC protein half-lives (HLs) in mice by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with metabolic [2H3]-leucine heavy isotope labeling under divergent conditions. We studied 7 tissues/fractions of young and old mice on control diet or one of 2 diet regimens (caloric restriction or rapamycin) that altered protein turnover (42 conditions in total). We observed a 6.5-fold difference in mean HL across tissues and an 11.5-fold difference across all conditions. Normalization to the mean HL of each condition showed that relative HLs were conserved across conditions (Spearman’s ρ = 0.57; P < 10–4), but were highly heterogeneous between subunits, with a 7.3-fold mean range overall, and a 2.2- to 4.6-fold range within each complex. To identify factors regulating this conserved distribution, we performed statistical analyses to study the correlation of HLs to the properties of the subunits. HLs significantly correlated with localization within the mitochondria, evolutionary origin, location of protein-encoding, and ubiquitination levels. These findings challenge the notion that all subunits in a complex turnover at comparable rates and suggest that there are common rules governing the differential proteolysis of RC protein subunits under divergent cellular conditions.—Karunadharma, P. P., Basisty, N., Chiao, Y. A., Dai, D.-F., Drake, R., Levy, N., Koh, W. J., Emond, M. J., Kruse, S., Marcinek, D., Maccoss, M. J., Rabinovitch, P. S. Respiratory chain protein turnover rates in mice are highly heterogeneous but strikingly conserved across tissues, ages, and treatments. PMID:25977255

  19. Amyloid-beta leads to impaired cellular respiration, energy production and mitochondrial electron chain complex activities in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rhein, V; Baysang, G; Rao, S; Meier, F; Bonert, A; Müller-Spahn, F; Eckert, A

    2009-09-01

    Evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it has been recently proposed that mitochondria are involved in the biochemical pathway by which Abeta can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we investigated the specific effects of Abeta on mitochondrial function under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory functions and energy metabolism were analyzed in control and in human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Mitochondrial respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in vital cells was measured with a high-resolution respirometry system (Oxygraph-2k). In addition, we determined the individual activities of mitochondrial complexes I-IV that compose ETC and ATP cellular levels. While the activities of complexes I and II did not change between cell types, complex IV activity was significantly reduced in APP cells. In contrast, activity of complex III was significantly enhanced in APP cells, as compensatory response in order to balance the defect of complex IV. However, this compensatory mechanism could not prevent the strong impairment of total respiration in vital APP cells. As a result, the respiratory control ratio (state3/state4) together with ATP production decreased in the APP cells in comparison with the control cells. Chronic exposure to soluble Abeta protein may result in an impairment of energy homeostasis due to a decreased respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain which, in turn, may accelerate neurons demise.

  20. Diaphragmatic activity during weaning from respiratory support in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Kraaijenga, Juliette V; de Waal, Cornelia G; Hutten, Gerard J; de Jongh, Frans H; van Kaam, Anton H

    2017-07-01

    To determine if weaning from nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) to lesser supportive low flow nasal cannula (LFNC) results in a change in electrical activity of the diaphragm in preterm infants. Prospective observational study. Neonatal intensive care unit. Stable preterm infants weaned from nCPAP to LFNC (1 L/min). Change in diaphragmatic activity, expressed as amplitude, peak and tonic activity, measured by transcutaneous electromyography (dEMG) from 30 min before (baseline) until 180 min after weaning. Subgroup analysis was performed based on success or failure of the weaning attempt. Fifty-nine preterm infants (gestational age: 29.0±2.4 weeks, birth weight: 1210±443 g) accounting for 74 weaning attempts were included. A significant increase in dEMG amplitude (median, IQR: 21.3%, 3.6-41.4), peak (22.1%, 8.7-40.5) and tonic activity (14.3%, -1.9-38.1) was seen directly after weaning. This effect slowly decreased over time. Infants failing the weaning attempt tended to have a higher diaphragmatic activity than those successfully weaned. Weaning from nCPAP to LFNC leads to an increase in diaphragmatic activity measured by dEMG and is most prominent in preterm infants failing the weaning attempt. dEMG monitoring might be a useful parameter to guide weaning from respiratory support in preterm infants. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Other Community Respiratory Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wunderink, Richard G

    2017-03-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-based diagnosis has become the standard for viral pneumonia and other respiratory tract infections. Expansion of respiratory viral panels (RVPs) outside of influenza and, possibly, respiratory syncytial virus has led to the ability to diagnose viral infections for which no approved specific antiviral treatment exists. Careful clinical evaluation of the patient with a positive RVP is, therefore, critical given the limited repertoire of treatments. Generic treatments with intravenous immunoglobulin, ribavirin, and interferons may benefit select severe viral pneumonia patients, whereas cidofovir has activity for severe adenoviral pneumonia.

  2. Chain Stories - A Collaborative Writing Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, Bronagh E.

    Use of group story writing in second language classes is discussed, and specific instructional techniques are outlined. In this activity, students sit in a circle and each begins to write a story. The story beginning is passed to the next student, who adds a portion and passes the story on. This pattern continues until stories are completed and…

  3. Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) supply chain collaboration development methodology

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.; CHAPMAN,LEON D.

    2000-03-15

    The Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project during the last five years of work with the U.S. Integrated Textile Complex (retail, apparel, textile, and fiber sectors) has developed an inter-enterprise supply chain collaboration development methodology. The goal of this methodology is to enable a supply chain to work more efficiently and competitively. The outcomes of this methodology include: (1) A definitive description and evaluation of the role of business cultures and supporting business organizational structures in either inhibiting or fostering change to a more competitive supply chain; (2) ``As-Is'' and proposed ``To-Be'' supply chain business process models focusing on information flows and decision-making; and (3) Software tools that enable and support a transition to a more competitive supply chain, which results form a business driven rather than technologically driven approach to software design. This methodology development will continue in FY00 as DAMA engages companies in the soft goods industry in supply chain research and implementation of supply chain collaboration.

  4. Developmental transitions in the myosin heavy chain phenotype of human respiratory muscle.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, J S; Brozanski, B S; Daood, M; Watchko, J F

    1996-01-01

    We studied the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms in the costal diaphragm (DIA) and the genioglossus (GG) muscles from 16 to 42 weeks gestation in the human using Western blotting techniques. Embryonic/neonatal MHC (MHCemb/neo) was the predominant isoform expressed in the DIA and GG at 16-24 weeks gestation. Subsequently, MHCemb/neo expression declined and the expression of MHCslow and MHC2A increased. At term, the DIA MHC phenotype was a composite of MHCemb/neo (15% of the total MHC complement), MHCslow (32%), MHC2A (47%), and MHC2B (6%); whereas, the GG was largely comprised of MHC2A (74%). We conclude that human DIA and GG demonstrate temporally dependent changes in MHC expression during gestation- and muscle-specific MHC phenotypes as they approach term.

  5. Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) model for supply chain collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    CHAPMAN,LEON D.; PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.

    2000-03-13

    The Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project during the last five years of work with the U.S. Integrated Textile Complex (retail, apparel, textile, and fiber sectors) has developed an inter-enterprise architecture and collaborative model for supply chains. This model will enable improved collaborative business across any supply chain. The DAMA Model for Supply Chain Collaboration is a high-level model for collaboration to achieve Demand Activated Manufacturing. The five major elements of the architecture to support collaboration are (1) activity or process, (2) information, (3) application, (4) data, and (5) infrastructure. These five elements are tied to the application of the DAMA architecture to three phases of collaboration - prepare, pilot, and scale. There are six collaborative activities that may be employed in this model: (1) Develop Business Planning Agreements, (2) Define Products, (3) Forecast and Plan Capacity Commitments, (4) Schedule Product and Product Delivery, (5) Expedite Production and Delivery Exceptions, and (6) Populate Supply Chain Utility. The Supply Chain Utility is a set of applications implemented to support collaborative product definition, forecast visibility, planning, scheduling, and execution. The DAMA architecture and model will be presented along with the process for implementing this DAMA model.

  6. Chained Activation of the Motor System during Language Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Barbara F.; Borghi, Anna M.; Buccino, Giovanni; Riggio, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to investigate whether and how one important characteristic of the motor system, that is its goal-directed organization in motor chains, is reflected in language processing. This possibility stems from the embodied theory of language, according to which the linguistic system re-uses the structures of the motor system. The participants were presented with nouns of common tools preceded by a pair of verbs expressing grasping or observational motor chains (i.e., grasp-to-move, grasp-to-use, look-at-to-grasp, and look-at-to-stare). They decided whether the tool mentioned in the sentence was the same as that displayed in a picture presented shortly after. A primacy of the grasp-to-use motor chain over the other motor chains in priming the participants' performance was observed in both the experiments. More interestingly, we found that the motor information evoked by the noun was modulated by the specific motor-chain expressed by the preceding verbs. Specifically, with the grasping chain aimed at using the tool, the functional motor information prevailed over the volumetric information, and vice versa with the grasping chain aimed at moving the tool (Experiment 2). Instead, the functional and volumetric information were balanced for those motor chains that comprise at least an observational act (Experiment 1). Overall our results are in keeping with the embodied theory of language and suggest that understanding sentences expressing an action directed toward a tool drives a chained activation of the motor system. PMID:28265247

  7. Chained Activation of the Motor System during Language Understanding.

    PubMed

    Marino, Barbara F; Borghi, Anna M; Buccino, Giovanni; Riggio, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to investigate whether and how one important characteristic of the motor system, that is its goal-directed organization in motor chains, is reflected in language processing. This possibility stems from the embodied theory of language, according to which the linguistic system re-uses the structures of the motor system. The participants were presented with nouns of common tools preceded by a pair of verbs expressing grasping or observational motor chains (i.e., grasp-to-move, grasp-to-use, look-at-to-grasp, and look-at-to-stare). They decided whether the tool mentioned in the sentence was the same as that displayed in a picture presented shortly after. A primacy of the grasp-to-use motor chain over the other motor chains in priming the participants' performance was observed in both the experiments. More interestingly, we found that the motor information evoked by the noun was modulated by the specific motor-chain expressed by the preceding verbs. Specifically, with the grasping chain aimed at using the tool, the functional motor information prevailed over the volumetric information, and vice versa with the grasping chain aimed at moving the tool (Experiment 2). Instead, the functional and volumetric information were balanced for those motor chains that comprise at least an observational act (Experiment 1). Overall our results are in keeping with the embodied theory of language and suggest that understanding sentences expressing an action directed toward a tool drives a chained activation of the motor system.

  8. Respiratory activity of the neonatal dorsolateral pons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Arata, Akiko

    2009-08-31

    The lateral and medial parabrachial and the Kölliker-Fuse nuclei (NPB/KF) are well known respiratory modulating centers in adulthood, but their role in neonates is largely unknown. We examined the role of the NPB/KF using hemi-sectioned pons-brainstem-spinal cord preparations in neonatal rats. Electrical stimulation applied at various intensities and delays in relation to the onset of spontaneous inspiratory C4 bursts, evoked transient depression or termination of C4 activity. This depression/termination was greatly attenuated either after perfusion of the NMDA-receptor antagonists (MK-801 or APV) or after microinjecting MK-801 into NPB/KF. Furthermore systemic application of the GABA-A receptor antagonist bicuculline reduced NPB/KF evoked inhibition of the C4 burst. Finally, we identified inspiratory, tonic inspiratory, expiratory, and inspiratory-expiratory (I-E) neurons which was major in the recorded neurons in the NPB/KF using the whole-cell patch-clamp method. MK-801 significantly decreased the driving potential and burst duration of I-E neurons. We conclude that neonatal NPB/KF mediated inspiratory off-switch operates on similar synaptic mechanisms as an adult.

  9. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Exerts Antiviral Activity against Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dabo, Abdoulaye J.; Cummins, Neville; Eden, Edward; Geraghty, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Increased lung levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) are frequently observed during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and elevated MMP9 concentrations are associated with severe disease. However little is known of the functional role of MMP9 during lung infection with RSV. To determine whether MMP9 exerted direct antiviral potential, active MMP9 was incubated with RSV, which showed that MMP9 directly prevented RSV infectivity to airway epithelial cells. Using knockout mice the effect of the loss of Mmp9 expression was examined during RSV infection to demonstrate MMP9’s role in viral clearance and disease progression. Seven days following RSV infection, Mmp9-/- mice displayed substantial weight loss, increased RSV-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and reduced clearance of RSV from the lungs compared to wild type mice. Although total bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell counts were similar in both groups, neutrophil recruitment to the lungs during RSV infection was significantly reduced in Mmp9-/- mice. Reduced neutrophil recruitment coincided with diminished RANTES, IL-1β, SCF, G-CSF expression and p38 phosphorylation. Induction of p38 signaling was required for RANTES and G-CSF expression during RSV infection in airway epithelial cells. Therefore, MMP9 in RSV lung infection significantly enhances neutrophil recruitment, cytokine production and viral clearance while reducing AHR. PMID:26284919

  10. Building a complex complex: Assembly of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Formosa, Luke E; Dibley, Marris G; Stroud, David A; Ryan, Michael T

    2017-08-07

    Mitochondrial complex I is the primary entry point for electrons into the electron transport chain, required for the bulk of cellular ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation. Complex I consists of 45 subunits, which are encoded by both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Currently, at least 15 assembly factors are known to be required for the complete maturation of complex I. Mutations in the genes encoding subunits and assembly factors lead to complex I deficiency, which can manifest as mitochondrial disease. The current model of complex I assembly suggests that the enzyme is built by the association of a set of smaller intermediate modules containing specific conserved core subunits and additional accessory subunits. Each module must converge in a spatially and temporally orchestrated fashion to allow assembly of the mature holoenzyme to occur. This review outlines the current understanding of complex I biogenesis, with an emphasis on the assembly factors that facilitate the building of this architectural giant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Spontaneous physical activity in a respiratory chamber is correlated to habitual physical activity.

    PubMed

    Snitker, S; Tataranni, P A; Ravussin, E

    2001-10-01

    During a stay in a respiratory chamber without an exercise protocol, physical activity is limited to activities of daily living, change of posture and 'fidgeting,' collectively referred to as spontaneous physical activity (SPA). SPA is quite variable among individuals and is a heritable trait. A low SPA during a chamber stay is a predictor of weight gain in men. However, it remains to be established whether physical activity in a respiratory chamber relates to physical activity under habitual, free-living conditions. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether physical activity in a chamber is correlated to habitual, free-living physical activity. Fifty healthy, non-diabetic Pima Indians (30 M/20 F, 30+/-6 y; 37+/-10% body fat; means+/-s.d.) completed a 24 h stay in the respiratory chamber followed by a 7 day measurement of habitual, free-living energy expenditure by doubly labeled water. Free-living physical activity was expressed as activity energy expenditure (AEE(FL); daily energy expenditure-(sleeping metabolic rate+thermic effect of food)), physical activity level (PAL(FL); daily energy expenditure/sleeping metabolic rate) and body-size independent activity units. Activity during the chamber stay was expressed as PAL(Ch), AEE(Ch), and based on radar sensor measurements, as percentage of time with activity (SPA(Radar)). AEE(FL) (averaging 930+/-310 kcal/day (3.89+/-1.30 MJ/day)) was correlated to AEE(CH) (averaging 440+/-160 kcal/day (1.84+/-0.67 MJ/day)) and higher in men than in women (r=0.53, P=0.003) and r=0.53, P=0.02, respectively). Likewise, PAL(FL) (averaging 1.75+/-0.21) was correlated to PAL(Ch) (averaging 1.42+/-0.10) and higher in men than in women (r=0.49, P=0.006 and r=0.42, P=0.02, respectively). Free-living activity expressed in body-size independent activity units (averaging 17.8+/-7.0) was correlated to SPA(Radar) (averaging 6.4+/-1.7) with no effect of sex (r=0.30, P=0.03). Physical activity in a respiratory chamber was

  12. Emergency department syndromic surveillance providing early warning of seasonal respiratory activity in England.

    PubMed

    Hughes, H E; Morbey, R; Hughes, T C; Locker, T E; Pebody, R; Green, H K; Ellis, J; Smith, G E; Elliot, A J

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal respiratory infections place an increased burden on health services annually. We used a sentinel emergency department syndromic surveillance system to understand the factors driving respiratory attendances at emergency departments (EDs) in England. Trends in different respiratory indicators were observed to peak at different points during winter, with further variation observed in the distribution of attendances by age. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed acute respiratory infection and bronchitis/bronchiolitis ED attendances in patients aged 1-4 years were particularly sensitive indicators for increasing respiratory syncytial virus activity. Using near real-time surveillance of respiratory ED attendances may provide early warning of increased winter pressures in EDs, particularly driven by seasonal pathogens. This surveillance may provide additional intelligence about different categories of attendance, highlighting pressures in particular age groups, thereby aiding planning and preparation to respond to acute changes in EDs, and thus the health service in general.

  13. In vitro visualization of respiratory neuron activity in the newborn mouse ventral medulla.

    PubMed

    Onimaru, Hiroshi; Arata, Akiko; Arata, Satoru; Shirasawa, Senji; Cleary, Michael L

    2004-11-25

    To clarify the neuronal organization of the respiratory center of the mouse, we analyzed the spatio-temporal pattern of respiratory neuron activity in the ventral medulla of a newborn mouse preparation, using optical recordings. We also demonstrated optical images of the respiratory activity of two different lines of knock-out mice (Tlx3-/-, Pbx3-/-) that exhibit respiratory failure leading to neonatal death from dysfunction of central respiratory neuron activity. In the wild type mice, the respiratory neuron activity in the para-facial region of the rostral medulla appeared prior to inspiratory activity in the more caudal ventrolateral medulla. This rostral to caudal activity pattern was basically preserved in Tlx3-/- mice though the activity was more dispersed and weaker than in the wild type mice. Such an activity pattern was not clearly detected in Pbx3-/- mouse preparations. The difference in the spatio-temporal pattern between Tlx3-/- and Pbx3-/- suggests different levels of functional disorder of the respiratory center.

  14. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Anthony L.; Rooney, John P.; Kubik, Laura L.; Gonzalez, Claudia P.; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes. PMID:26106885

  15. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes.

    PubMed

    Luz, Anthony L; Rooney, John P; Kubik, Laura L; Gonzalez, Claudia P; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes.

  16. Nasal swab samples and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays in community-based, longitudinal studies of respiratory viruses: the importance of sample integrity and quality control.

    PubMed

    Alsaleh, Asma N; Whiley, David M; Bialasiewicz, Seweryn; Lambert, Stephen B; Ware, Robert S; Nissen, Michael D; Sloots, Theo P; Grimwood, Keith

    2014-01-09

    Carefully conducted, community-based, longitudinal studies are required to gain further understanding of the nature and timing of respiratory viruses causing infections in the population. However, such studies pose unique challenges for field specimen collection, including as we have observed the appearance of mould in some nasal swab specimens. We therefore investigated the impact of sample collection quality and the presence of visible mould in samples upon respiratory virus detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Anterior nasal swab samples were collected from infants participating in an ongoing community-based, longitudinal, dynamic birth cohort study. The samples were first collected from each infant shortly after birth and weekly thereafter. They were then mailed to the laboratory where they were catalogued, stored at -80°C and later screened by PCR for 17 respiratory viruses. The quality of specimen collection was assessed by screening for human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using endogenous retrovirus 3 (ERV3). The impact of ERV3 load upon respiratory virus detection and the impact of visible mould observed in a subset of swabs reaching the laboratory upon both ERV3 loads and respiratory virus detection was determined. In total, 4933 nasal swabs were received in the laboratory. ERV3 load in nasal swabs was associated with respiratory virus detection. Reduced respiratory virus detection (odds ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.27-0.44) was observed in samples where the ERV3 could not be identified. Mould was associated with increased time of samples reaching the laboratory and reduced ERV3 loads and respiratory virus detection. Suboptimal sample collection and high levels of visible mould can impact negatively upon sample quality. Quality control measures, including monitoring human DNA loads using ERV3 as a marker for epithelial cell components in samples should be undertaken to optimize the validity of real-time PCR results for

  17. Nasal swab samples and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays in community-based, longitudinal studies of respiratory viruses: the importance of sample integrity and quality control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carefully conducted, community-based, longitudinal studies are required to gain further understanding of the nature and timing of respiratory viruses causing infections in the population. However, such studies pose unique challenges for field specimen collection, including as we have observed the appearance of mould in some nasal swab specimens. We therefore investigated the impact of sample collection quality and the presence of visible mould in samples upon respiratory virus detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Methods Anterior nasal swab samples were collected from infants participating in an ongoing community-based, longitudinal, dynamic birth cohort study. The samples were first collected from each infant shortly after birth and weekly thereafter. They were then mailed to the laboratory where they were catalogued, stored at -80°C and later screened by PCR for 17 respiratory viruses. The quality of specimen collection was assessed by screening for human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using endogenous retrovirus 3 (ERV3). The impact of ERV3 load upon respiratory virus detection and the impact of visible mould observed in a subset of swabs reaching the laboratory upon both ERV3 loads and respiratory virus detection was determined. Results In total, 4933 nasal swabs were received in the laboratory. ERV3 load in nasal swabs was associated with respiratory virus detection. Reduced respiratory virus detection (odds ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.27-0.44) was observed in samples where the ERV3 could not be identified. Mould was associated with increased time of samples reaching the laboratory and reduced ERV3 loads and respiratory virus detection. Conclusion Suboptimal sample collection and high levels of visible mould can impact negatively upon sample quality. Quality control measures, including monitoring human DNA loads using ERV3 as a marker for epithelial cell components in samples should be undertaken to optimize the

  18. Relationship between insulin A chain regions and insulin biological activities

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shi-Zhen; Huang, Yi-Ding; Jie, Xin-Feng; Feng, You-Min; Niu, Jing-Yi

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between insulin A chain regions and insulin biological activities, we designed a series of insulin analogues with changes at A21, A12-18 of C-terminal helical region and A8-10 located in the region of A6-A11 intra-chain disulphide bond. METHODS: Insulin A-chain analogues were prepared by stepwise Fmoc solid-phase manual synthesis and then combined with natural B-chain of porcine insulin to yield corresponding insulin analogues. Their biological activities were tested by receptor binding, mouse convulsion and immunological assay. RESULTS: [A21Ala]Ins retains 70.3% receptor binding capacity and 60% in vivo biological activity. [DesA13-14, A21Ala]Ins and [DesA12-13-14-15, A21Ala] Ins still have definite biological activity, 7.9% and 4.0% receptor binding, and 6.2% and 3.3% in vivo biological activity respectively. [A15Asn, A17Pro, A21Ala]Ins maintains 10.4% receptor binding and 10% in vivo biological activity. [A8His, A9Arg, A10Pro, A21Ala]Ins, [A8His, A9Lys, A10Pro, A21Ala]Ins and [A8His, A9Lys, A10Arg, A21Ala]Ins have 51.9%, 44.3% and 32.1% receptor binding respectively, 50%, 40% and 30% in vivo biological activity respectively, and 28.8%, 29.6% and 15.4% immunological activity respectively. CONCLUSION: A21Asn can be replaced by simple amino acid residues. The A chains with gradually damaged structur al integrity in A12-18 helical region and the demolition of the A12-18 helical region by the substitution of Pro and Asn for A17Glu and A15Gln respectively ca n combine with the B chain and the combination products show definite biological activity, the helical structure of A12-18 is essential for biological activities of insulin. A8-10 is not much concerned with biological activities, but is much more important antigenically in binding to its antibodies, these results may help us design a new type of insulin analogue molecule. PMID:11819600

  19. Liver Transplantation for Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Disorder: A Single-Center Experience and Excellent Marker of Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Sakamoto, S; Uchida, H; Narumoto, S; Shigeta, T; Fukuda, A; Ito, R; Irie, R; Yoshioka, T; Murayama, K; Kasahara, M

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder (MRCD) can cause liver failure requiring liver transplantation (LT), although it is often difficult to diagnose before LT. From 2005 to 2016, 9 MRCD patients with the median age at LT of 6 months underwent LT in our institute. Their clinical courses were retrospectively reviewed and the laboratory parameters were compared between the MRCD patients and 10 patients with acute liver failure unrelated to MRCD (non-MRCD). Five patients had extrahepatic manifestations, including developmental disorders in 3 and failure to thrive in 3, before LT. Only 3 patients (33.3%) were diagnosed before LT. Between MRCD and non-MRCD, lactate was significantly high and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio (L/P ratio) tended to be higher in MRCD. From the receiver operating characteristic curve, the optimal cutoff value of lactate was 50.0 mg/dL and that of L/P ratio was 23.2. Patient survival rate of MRCD was 77.8%, although 2 patients with mitochondrial depletion syndrome suffered from de novo pulmonary hypertension after LT. Our experiences showed the difficulty of preoperative diagnosis, and preoperative extrahepatic manifestations did not always mean poor outcome. Our study showed that lactate value and L/P ratio can be excellent predictors of MRCD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Early Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy in an STXBP1 Patient with Lactic Acidemia and Normal Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Bhoj, Elizabeth; McCormick, Elizabeth; Wang, Fengxiang; Snyder, James; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhao, Yan; Kim, Cecilia; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Tian, Lifeng; Falk, Marni J.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of clinical findings have been associated with mutations in Syntaxin Binding Protein 1 (STXBP1), including multiple forms of epilepsy, nonsyndromic intellectual disability, and movement disorders. STXBP1 mutations have recently been associated with mitochondrial pathology, although it remains unclear if this phenotype is a part of the core feature for this gene disorder. We report a 7-year-old boy who presented for diagnostic evaluation of intractable epilepsy, episodic ataxia, resting tremor, and speech regression following a period of apparently normal early development. Mild lactic acidemia was detected on one occasion at the time of an intercurrent illness. Due to the concern for mitochondrial disease, ophthalmologic evaluation was performed that revealed bilateral midperiphery pigmentary mottling. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) testing demonstrated a bilaterally thickened ganglion cell layer in the perifovea. Skeletal muscle biopsy analysis showed no mitochondrial abnormalities or respiratory chain dysfunction. Exome sequencing identified a de novo c.1651C>T (p.R551C) mutation in STXBP1. Although mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported in some individuals, our proband had only mild lactic acidemia and no skeletal muscle tissue evidence of mitochondrial disease pathology. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction is not an obligate feature of STXBP1 disease. PMID:27069701

  1. Detection of Haemophilus influenzae in respiratory secretions from pneumonia patients by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Abdeldaim, Guma M K; Strålin, Kristoffer; Kirsebom, Leif A; Olcén, Per; Blomberg, Jonas; Herrmann, Björn

    2009-08-01

    A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the omp P6 gene was developed to detect Haemophilus influenzae. Its specificity was determined by analysis of 29 strains of 11 different Haemophilus spp. and was compared with PCR assays having other target genes: rnpB, 16S rRNA, and bexA. The method was evaluated on nasopharyngeal aspirates from 166 adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia. When 10(4) DNA copies/mL was used as cutoff limit for the method, P6 PCR had a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 96.0% compared with the culture. Of 20 culture-negative but P6 PCR-positive cases, 18 were confirmed by fucK PCR as H. influenzae. Five (5.9%) of 84 nasopharyngeal aspirates from adult controls tested PCR positive. We conclude that the P6 real-time PCR is both sensitive and specific for identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions. Quantification facilitates discrimination between disease-causing H. influenzae strains and commensal colonization.

  2. Respiratory chain protein turnover rates in mice are highly heterogeneous but strikingly conserved across tissues, ages, and treatments.

    PubMed

    Karunadharma, Pabalu P; Basisty, Nathan; Chiao, Ying Ann; Dai, Dao-Fu; Drake, Rachel; Levy, Nick; Koh, William J; Emond, Mary J; Kruse, Shane; Marcinek, David; Maccoss, Michael J; Rabinovitch, Peter S

    2015-08-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) produces most of the cellular ATP and requires strict quality-control mechanisms. To examine RC subunit proteostasis in vivo, we measured RC protein half-lives (HLs) in mice by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with metabolic [(2)H3]-leucine heavy isotope labeling under divergent conditions. We studied 7 tissues/fractions of young and old mice on control diet or one of 2 diet regimens (caloric restriction or rapamycin) that altered protein turnover (42 conditions in total). We observed a 6.5-fold difference in mean HL across tissues and an 11.5-fold difference across all conditions. Normalization to the mean HL of each condition showed that relative HLs were conserved across conditions (Spearman's ρ = 0.57; P < 10(-4)), but were highly heterogeneous between subunits, with a 7.3-fold mean range overall, and a 2.2- to 4.6-fold range within each complex. To identify factors regulating this conserved distribution, we performed statistical analyses to study the correlation of HLs to the properties of the subunits. HLs significantly correlated with localization within the mitochondria, evolutionary origin, location of protein-encoding, and ubiquitination levels. These findings challenge the notion that all subunits in a complex turnover at comparable rates and suggest that there are common rules governing the differential proteolysis of RC protein subunits under divergent cellular conditions.

  3. The ROS production induced by a reverse-electron flux at respiratory-chain complex 1 is hampered by metformin.

    PubMed

    Batandier, Cécile; Guigas, Bruno; Detaille, Dominique; El-Mir, M-Yehia; Fontaine, Eric; Rigoulet, M; Leverve, Xavier M

    2006-02-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was investigated in mitochondria extracted from liver of rats treated with or without metformin, a mild inhibitor of respiratory chain complex 1 used in type 2 diabetes. A high rate of ROS production, fully suppressed by rotenone, was evidenced in non-phosphorylating mitochondria in the presence of succinate as a single complex 2 substrate. This ROS production was substantially lowered by metformin pretreatment and by any decrease in membrane potential (Delta Phi(m)), redox potential (NADH/NAD), or phosphate potential, as induced by malonate, 2,4-dinitrophenol, or ATP synthesis, respectively. ROS production in the presence of glutamate-malate plus succinate was lower than in the presence of succinate alone, but higher than in the presence of glutamate-malate. Moreover, while rotenone both increased and decreased ROS production at complex 1 depending on forward (glutamate-malate) or reverse (succinate) electron flux, no ROS overproduction was evidenced in the forward direction with metformin. Therefore, we propose that reverse electron flux through complex 1 is an alternative pathway, which leads to a specific metformin-sensitive ROS production.

  4. The CoQH2/CoQ Ratio Serves as a Sensor of Respiratory Chain Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Guarás, Adela; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Calvo, Enrique; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Loureiro-Lopez, Marta; Pujol, Claire; Martínez-Carrascoso, Isabel; Nuñez, Estefanía; García-Marqués, Fernando; Rodríguez-Hernández, María Angeles; Cortés, Ana; Diaz, Francisca; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Moraes, Carlos T; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Navas, Plácido; Vazquez, Jesús; Enríquez, Jose A

    2016-04-05

    Electrons feed into the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) from NAD- or FAD-dependent enzymes. A shift from glucose to fatty acids increases electron flux through FAD, which can saturate the oxidation capacity of the dedicated coenzyme Q (CoQ) pool and result in the generation of reactive oxygen species. To prevent this, the mETC superstructure can be reconfigured through the degradation of respiratory complex I, liberating associated complex III to increase electron flux via FAD at the expense of NAD. Here, we demonstrate that this adaptation is driven by the ratio of reduced to oxidized CoQ. Saturation of CoQ oxidation capacity induces reverse electron transport from reduced CoQ to complex I, and the resulting local generation of superoxide oxidizes specific complex I proteins, triggering their degradation and the disintegration of the complex. Thus, CoQ redox status acts as a metabolic sensor that fine-tunes mETC configuration in order to match the prevailing substrate profile.

  5. Inhibition of the respiratory chain reactions in denitrifying EBPR biomass under simultaneous presence of acetate and electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Zafiriadis, Ilias; Kapagiannidis, Anastasios G; Ntougias, Spyridon; Aivasidis, Alexander

    2017-05-25

    In this study, the deterioration of the typical EBPR (Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal) process due to the simultaneous presence of electron donor (external substrate) and electron acceptor (oxygen or nitrate) was investigated by using a PAOs (Polyphosphate Accumulating Organisms)-enriched biomass grown in a modified DEPHANOX system. Intracellular and extracellular constituents were monitored in batch tests under different electron donor and acceptor conditions and specific oxygen and nitrogen uptake rates were evaluated. Results showed that phosphorus uptake was inhibited during the simultaneous presence of electron donor (acetate) and acceptor (O2/NO3(-)) in the mixed liquor. In the presence of acetate, PHAs and glycogen were produced under both aerobic and anoxic conditions irrespectively to the PHAs amount already stored intracellularly. The Krebs cycle reactions and oxidative phosphorylation provided the reduced coenzymes and energy required for PHAs synthesis when biomass polyphosphate content was low. On the contrary, polyphosphate cleavage provided the ATP required for PHAs synthesis in the presence of high biomass polyphosphate content. Inhibition of the respiratory chain reactions was observed when biomass with high polyphosphate and low PHAs content was subjected to simultaneous presence of electron donor and acceptor. PHAs utilization rather than glycogen degradation appears to favor phosphate accumulation since no polyphosphate synthesis occurred in the absence of PHAs reserves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of High-Carbohydrate Diet on Plasma Metabolome in Mice with Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex III Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Jayasimman; Tomašić, Nikica; Kotarsky, Heike; Hansson, Eva; Velagapudi, Vidya; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Fellman, Vineta

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders cause energy failure and metabolic derangements. Metabolome profiling in patients and animal models may identify affected metabolic pathways and reveal new biomarkers of disease progression. Using liver metabolomics we have shown a starvation-like condition in a knock-in (Bcs1lc.232A>G) mouse model of GRACILE syndrome, a neonatal lethal respiratory chain complex III dysfunction with hepatopathy. Here, we hypothesized that a high-carbohydrate diet (HCD, 60% dextrose) will alleviate the hypoglycemia and promote survival of the sick mice. However, when fed HCD the homozygotes had shorter survival (mean ± SD, 29 ± 2.5 days, n = 21) than those on standard diet (33 ± 3.8 days, n = 30), and no improvement in hypoglycemia or liver glycogen depletion. We investigated the plasma metabolome of the HCD- and control diet-fed mice and found that several amino acids and urea cycle intermediates were increased, and arginine, carnitines, succinate, and purine catabolites decreased in the homozygotes. Despite reduced survival the increase in aromatic amino acids, an indicator of liver mitochondrial dysfunction, was normalized on HCD. Quantitative enrichment analysis revealed that glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism, and urea cycle were also partly normalized on HCD. This dietary intervention revealed an unexpected adverse effect of high-glucose diet in complex III deficiency, and suggests that plasma metabolomics is a valuable tool in evaluation of therapies in mitochondrial disorders. PMID:27809283

  7. Effect of High-Carbohydrate Diet on Plasma Metabolome in Mice with Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex III Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Jayasimman; Tomašić, Nikica; Kotarsky, Heike; Hansson, Eva; Velagapudi, Vidya; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Fellman, Vineta

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondrial disorders cause energy failure and metabolic derangements. Metabolome profiling in patients and animal models may identify affected metabolic pathways and reveal new biomarkers of disease progression. Using liver metabolomics we have shown a starvation-like condition in a knock-in (Bcs1l(c.232A>G)) mouse model of GRACILE syndrome, a neonatal lethal respiratory chain complex III dysfunction with hepatopathy. Here, we hypothesized that a high-carbohydrate diet (HCD, 60% dextrose) will alleviate the hypoglycemia and promote survival of the sick mice. However, when fed HCD the homozygotes had shorter survival (mean ± SD, 29 ± 2.5 days, n = 21) than those on standard diet (33 ± 3.8 days, n = 30), and no improvement in hypoglycemia or liver glycogen depletion. We investigated the plasma metabolome of the HCD- and control diet-fed mice and found that several amino acids and urea cycle intermediates were increased, and arginine, carnitines, succinate, and purine catabolites decreased in the homozygotes. Despite reduced survival the increase in aromatic amino acids, an indicator of liver mitochondrial dysfunction, was normalized on HCD. Quantitative enrichment analysis revealed that glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism, and urea cycle were also partly normalized on HCD. This dietary intervention revealed an unexpected adverse effect of high-glucose diet in complex III deficiency, and suggests that plasma metabolomics is a valuable tool in evaluation of therapies in mitochondrial disorders.

  8. Substituted benzimidazoles with nanomolar activity against respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Andries, Koen; Moeremans, Marc; Gevers, Tom; Willebrords, Rudy; Sommen, Cois; Lacrampe, Jean; Janssens, Frans; Wyde, Philip R

    2003-11-01

    A cell-based assay was used to discover compounds inhibiting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced fusion in HeLa/M cells. A lead compound was identified and subsequent synthesis of >300 analogues led to the identification of JNJ 2408068 (R170591), a low molecular weight (MW 395) benzimidazole derivative with an EC(50) (0.16 nM) against some lab strains almost 100,000 times better than that of ribavirin (15 microM). Antiviral activity was confirmed for subgroup A and B clinical isolates of human RSV and for a bovine RSV isolate. The compound did not inhibit the growth of representative viruses from other Paramyxovirus genera, i.e. HPIV2 and Mumps Virus (genus Rubulavirus), HPIV3 (genus Respirovirus), Measles virus (genus Morbillivirus) and hMPV. Efficacy in cytopathic effect inhibition assays correlated well with efficacy in virus yield reduction assays. A concentration of 10nM reduced RSV production 1000-fold in multi-cycle experiments, irrespective of the multiplicity of infection. Time of addition studies pointed to a dual mode of action: inhibition of virus-cell fusion early in the infection cycle and inhibition of cell-cell fusion at the end of the replication cycle. Two resistant mutants were raised and shown to have single point mutations in the F-gene (S398L and D486N). JNJ 2408068 was also shown to inhibit the release of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-8 and Rantes from RSV-infected A549 cells.

  9. Mitochondrial respiratory chain Complexes I and IV are impaired by β-amyloid via direct interaction and through Complex I-dependent ROS production, respectively.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Amadoro, G; Valenti, D; Corsetti, V; Lassandro, R; Atlante, A

    2013-07-01

    Here we investigate the effect of β-amyloid on mitochondrial respiratory function, i.e. mitochondrial oxygen consumption and membrane potential generation as well as the individual activities of both the mitochondrial Complexes I-IV, that compose mitochondrial electron transport chain, and the ATP synthase, by using homogenate from cerebellar granule cells, treated with low concentrations of β-amyloid, and Alzheimer synaptic-enriched brain samples. We found that β-amyloid caused both a selective defect in Complex I activity associated with an increase (5 fold) of intracellular reactive oxygen species and an impairment of Complex IV likely due to membrane lipid peroxidation. In addition, a 130% increase of the GSSG/GSH ratio was measured in Alzheimer brains with respect to age-matched controls. Knowing the mechanisms of action of β-amyloid could allow to mitigate or even to interrupt the toxic cascade that leads a cell to death. The results of this study represent an important innovation because they offer the possibility to act at mitochondrial level and on specific sites to protect cells, for example by preventing the interaction of β-amyloid with the identified targets, by stabilizing or by restoring mitochondrial function or by interfering with the energy metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

  10. Antifungal chromans inhibiting the mitochondrial respiratory chain of pea seeds and new xanthones from Calophyllum caledonicum.

    PubMed

    Hay, A-E; Guilet, D; Morel, C; Larcher, G; Macherel, D; Le Ray, A-M; Litaudon, M; Richomme, P

    2003-12-01

    Two new xanthones, caledonixanthone M 1 and caloxanthone L 2, and one new acid, caledonic acid 6 were isolated from the hexane-soluble extract of the stem bark of Calophyllum caledonicum. In the course of this phytochemical study, seven other known compounds - calothwaitesixanthone, calozeyloxanthone, allanxanthone, isoapetalic acid 3, calolongic acid 4, apetalic acid 5 and isocalolongic acid 7 - were isolated. Their antifungal activity against the growth of the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus was then investigated. The results indicated that the crude extract, calolongic acid 4 and isocalolongic acid 7 exhibited strong inhibitory effects with MIC (80) values of 8, 4, 2 microg/mL, respectively. Besides, calolongic acid 4, its lactone derivative 4a and isocalolongic acid 7 markedly reduced the respiration of pea seed mitochondria.

  11. Access to a polymerase chain reaction assay method targeting 13 respiratory viruses can reduce antibiotics: a randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral respiratory infections are common worldwide and range from completely benign disease to life-threatening illness. Symptoms can be unspecific, and an etiologic diagnosis is rarely established because of a lack of suitable diagnostic tools. Improper use of antibiotics is common in this setting, which is detrimental in light of the development of bacterial resistance. It has been suggested that the use of diagnostic tests could reduce antibiotic prescription rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether access to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay panel for etiologic diagnosis of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) would have an impact on antibiotic prescription rate in primary care clinical settings. Methods Adult patients with symptoms of ARTI were prospectively included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed by using a multiplex real-time PCR method targeting thirteen viruses and two bacteria. Patients were recruited at 12 outpatient units from October 2006 through April 2009, and samples were collected on the day of inclusion (initial visit) and after 10 days (follow-up visit). Patients were randomised in an open-label treatment protocol to receive a rapid or delayed result (on the following day or after eight to twelve days). The primary outcome measure was the antibiotic prescription rate at the initial visit, and the secondary outcome was the total antibiotic prescription rate during the study period. Results A total sample of 447 patients was randomised. Forty-one were excluded, leaving 406 patients for analysis. In the group of patients randomised for a rapid result, 4.5% (9 of 202) of patients received antibiotics at the initial visit, compared to 12.3% (25 of 204) (P = 0.005) of patients in the delayed result group. At follow-up, there was no significant difference between the groups: 13.9% (28 of 202) in the rapid result group and 17.2% (35 of 204) in the delayed result group (P = 0

  12. Spatiotemporal activity patterns during respiratory rhythmogenesis in the rat ventrolateral medulla.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jonathan A N; Marchenko, Vitaliy A; Yodh, Arjun G; Rogers, Robert F

    2006-03-01

    One of the most important brain rhythms is that which generates involuntary breathing movements. The lower brain stem contains neural circuitry for respiratory rhythm generation in mammals. To date, microsectioning and selective lesioning studies have revealed anatomical regions necessary for respiratory rhythmogenesis. Although respiratory neurons distributed within these regions can be identified by their firing patterns in different phases of the respiratory cycle, conventional electrophysiology techniques have limited the study of spatial organization within this network. Optical imaging techniques offer the potential for monitoring the spatiotemporal activity of large groups of neurons simultaneously. Using high-speed voltage-sensitive dye imaging and spatial correlation analysis in an arterially perfused in situ preparation of the juvenile rat, we determined the spatial distribution of respiratory neuronal activity in a region of the ventrolateral respiratory group containing the pre-Bötzinger complex (pBC) during spontaneous eupneic breathing. While distinctly pre- and postinspiratory-related responses were spatially localizable on length scales less than 100 microm, we found the studied area on whole exhibited a spatial mixture of phase-spanning and postinspiratory-related activity. Additionally, optical recordings revealed significant widespread hyperpolarization, suggesting inhibition in the same region during expiration. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that inhibitory neurons play a crucial role in the inspiration-expiration phase transition in the pBC. To our knowledge this is the first optical imaging of a near fully intact in situ preparation that exhibits both eupneic respiratory activity and functional reflexes.

  13. Redox-induced activation of the proton pump in the respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Belevich, Galina; Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Verkhovskaya, Marina L; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R I

    2015-09-15

    Complex I functions as a redox-linked proton pump in the respiratory chains of mitochondria and bacteria, driven by the reduction of quinone (Q) by NADH. Remarkably, the distance between the Q reduction site and the most distant proton channels extends nearly 200 Å. To elucidate the molecular origin of this long-range coupling, we apply a combination of large-scale molecular simulations and a site-directed mutagenesis experiment of a key residue. In hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we observe that reduction of Q is coupled to its local protonation by the His-38/Asp-139 ion pair and Tyr-87 of subunit Nqo4. Atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations further suggest that formation of quinol (QH2) triggers rapid dissociation of the anionic Asp-139 toward the membrane domain that couples to conformational changes in a network of conserved charged residues. Site-directed mutagenesis data confirm the importance of Asp-139; upon mutation to asparagine the Q reductase activity is inhibited by 75%. The current results, together with earlier biochemical data, suggest that the proton pumping in complex I is activated by a unique combination of electrostatic and conformational transitions.

  14. Redox-induced activation of the proton pump in the respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vivek; Belevich, Galina; Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P.; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Verkhovskaya, Marina L.; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R. I.

    2015-01-01

    Complex I functions as a redox-linked proton pump in the respiratory chains of mitochondria and bacteria, driven by the reduction of quinone (Q) by NADH. Remarkably, the distance between the Q reduction site and the most distant proton channels extends nearly 200 Å. To elucidate the molecular origin of this long-range coupling, we apply a combination of large-scale molecular simulations and a site-directed mutagenesis experiment of a key residue. In hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we observe that reduction of Q is coupled to its local protonation by the His-38/Asp-139 ion pair and Tyr-87 of subunit Nqo4. Atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations further suggest that formation of quinol (QH2) triggers rapid dissociation of the anionic Asp-139 toward the membrane domain that couples to conformational changes in a network of conserved charged residues. Site-directed mutagenesis data confirm the importance of Asp-139; upon mutation to asparagine the Q reductase activity is inhibited by 75%. The current results, together with earlier biochemical data, suggest that the proton pumping in complex I is activated by a unique combination of electrostatic and conformational transitions. PMID:26330610

  15. Purification of Active Respiratory Supercomplex from Bovine Heart Mitochondria Enables Functional Studies.

    PubMed

    Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Shimomura, Harunobu; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Shimada, Satoru; Takahashi, Ryoko; Oosaki, Marika; Ogura, Takashi; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2016-02-19

    To understand the roles of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes, methods for consistently separating and preparing supercomplexes must be established. To this end, we solubilized supercomplexes from bovine heart mitochondria with digitonin and then replaced digitonin with amphipol (A8-35), an amphiphilic polymer. Afterward, supercomplexes were separated from other complexes by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Twenty-six grams of bovine myocardium yielded 3.2 mg of amphipol-stabilized supercomplex. The purified supercomplexes were analyzed based on their absorption spectra as well as Q10 (ubiquinone with ten isoprene units) and lipid assays. The supercomplex sample did not contain cytochrome c but did contain complexes I, III, and IV at a ratio of 1:2:1, 6 molecules of Q10, and 623 atoms of phosphorus. When cytochrome c was added, the supercomplex exhibited KCN-sensitive NADH oxidation; thus, the purified supercomplex was active. Reduced complex IV absorbs at 444 nm, so we measured the resonance Raman spectrum of the reduced amphipol-solubilized supercomplex and the mixture of amphipol-solubilized complexes I1, III2, and IV1 using an excitation wavelength of 441.6 nm, allowing measurement precision comparable with that obtained for complex IV alone. Use of the purified active sample provides insights into the effects of supercomplex formation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Antineoplastic activity of didemnin congeners: nordidemnin and modified chain analogues.

    PubMed

    Jouin, P; Poncet, J; Dufour, M N; Aumelas, A; Pantaloni, A; Cros, S; François, G

    1991-02-01

    Nordidemnin (2), a natural analogue of the marine cyclodepsipeptide didemnin B (1b), showed cytotoxic activity against L1210 leukemia and antineoplastic activity against P388 leukemia as well as B16 melanoma; nordidemnin (2) was as active as didemnin B (1b). The influence of synthetic modifications in the linear peptidic chain on in vitro and in vivo activity was also studied. Replacement of the terminal lactyl residue by mandelyl and 3-(p-hydroxyphenyl)propionyl residues in compounds 3 and 4, respectively, did not affect the cytotoxic activity against L1210 leukemia (ID50 of 1.1 nM and 1.2 nM, respectively) or the in vivo activity against P388 leukemia. Unlike these aromatic substituants, the lipophilic palmityl residue induced a dramatic loss in cytotoxic activity. The inverted chirality of the MeLeu joining residue in compound 6 caused a marked reduction in the in vitro activity.

  17. Pharmacologic targeting of sirtuin and PPAR signaling improves longevity and mitochondrial physiology in respiratory chain complex I mutant Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Shana; Polyak, Erzsebet; Ostrovsky, Julian; Dingley, Stephen D; Rao, Meera; Kwon, Young Joon; Xiao, Rui; Zhang, Zhe; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Falk, Marni J

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) diseases are highly morbid multi-systemic conditions for which few effective therapies exist. Given the essential role of sirtuin and PPAR signaling in mediating both mitochondrial physiology and the cellular response to metabolic stress in RC complex I (CI) disease, we postulated that drugs that alter these signaling pathways either directly (resveratrol for sirtuin, rosiglitazone for PPARγ, fenofibrate for PPARα), or indirectly by increasing NAD(+) availability (nicotinic acid), might offer effective treatment strategies for primary RC disease. Integrated effects of targeting these cellular signaling pathways on animal lifespan and multi-dimensional in vivo parameters were studied in gas-1(fc21) relative to wild-type (N2 Bristol) worms. Specifically, animal lifespan, transcriptome profiles, mitochondrial oxidant burden, mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial content, amino acid profiles, stable isotope-based intermediary metabolic flux, and total nematode NADH and NAD(+) concentrations were compared. Shortened gas-1(fc21) mutant lifespan was rescued with either resveratrol or nicotinic acid, regardless of whether treatments were begun at the early larval stage or in young adulthood. Rosiglitazone administration beginning in young adult stage animals also rescued lifespan. All drug treatments reversed the most significant transcriptome alterations at the biochemical pathway level relative to untreated gas-1(fc21) animals. Interestingly, increased mitochondrial oxidant burden in gas-1(fc21) was reduced with nicotinic acid but exacerbated significantly by resveratrol and modestly by fenofibrate, with little change by rosiglitazone treatment. In contrast, the reduced mitochondrial membrane potential of mutant worms was further decreased by nicotinic acid but restored by either resveratrol, rosiglitazone, or fenofibrate. Using a novel HPLC assay, we discovered that gas-1(fc21) worms have significant deficiencies of NAD

  18. Pharmacologic targeting of sirtuin and PPAR signaling improves longevity and mitochondrial physiology in respiratory chain complex I mutant Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Shana; Polyak, Erzsebet; Ostrovsky, Julian; Dingley, Stephen D.; Rao, Meera; Kwon, Young Joon; Xiao, Rui; Zhang, Zhe; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Falk, Marni J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) diseases are highly morbid multi-systemic conditions for which few effective therapies exist. Given the essential role of sirtuin and PPAR signaling in mediating both mitochondrial physiology and the cellular response to metabolic stress in RC complex I (CI) disease, we postulated that drugs that alter these signaling pathways either directly (resveratrol for sirtuin, rosiglitazone for PPARγ, fenofibrate for PPARα), or indirectly by increasing NAD+ availability (nicotinic acid), might offer effective treatment strategies for primary RC disease. Integrated effects of targeting these cellular signaling pathways on animal lifespan and multi-dimensional in vivo parameters were studied in gas-1(fc21) relative to wild-type (N2 Bristol) worms. Specifically, animal lifespan, transcriptome profiles, mitochondrial oxidant burden, mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial content, amino acid profiles, stable isotope-based intermediary metabolic flux, and total nematode NADH and NAD+ concentrations were compared. Shortened gas-1(fc21) mutant lifespan was rescued with either resveratrol or nicotinic acid, regardless of whether treatments were begun at the early larval stage or in young adulthood. Rosiglitazone administration beginning in young adult stage animals also rescued lifespan. All drug treatments reversed the most significant transcriptome alterations at the biochemical pathway level relative to untreated gas-1(fc21) animals. Interestingly, increased mitochondrial oxidant burden in gas-1(fc21) was reduced with nicotinic acid but exacerbated significantly by resveratrol and modestly by fenofibrate, with little change by rosiglitazone treatment. In contrast, the reduced mitochondrial membrane potential of mutant worms was further decreased by nicotinic acid but restored by either resveratrol, rosiglitazone, or fenofibrate. Using a novel HPLC assay, we discovered that gas-1(fc21) worms have significant deficiencies of NAD+ and

  19. Tamoxifen does not inhibit the swell activated chloride channel in human neutrophils during the respiratory burst

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-10-31

    Effective functioning of neutrophils relies upon electron translocation through the NADPH oxidase (NOX). The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential in activated human neutrophils. Swelling activated chloride channels have been demonstrated in part to counteract the depolarisation generated by the NADPH oxidase I{sub e}. In the present study, the effects of inhibitors of swell activated chloride channels on ROS production and on the swelling activated chloride conductance was investigated in activated human neutrophils. Tamoxifen (10 {mu}M), a specific inhibitor for swell activated chloride channels in neutrophils, completely inhibited both the PMA and FMLP stimulated respiratory burst. This inhibition of the neutrophil respiratory burst was not due to the blocking effect of tamoxifen on the swelling activated chloride conductance in these cells. These results demonstrate that a tamoxifen insensitive swell activated chloride channel has important significance during the neutrophil respiratory burst.

  20. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  1. A Single Adaptable Cochaperone-Scaffold Complex Delivers Nascent Iron-Sulfur Clusters to Mammalian Respiratory Chain Complexes I-III.

    PubMed

    Maio, Nunziata; Kim, Ki Soon; Singh, Anamika; Rouault, Tracey A

    2017-04-04

    The iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster of the Rieske protein, UQCRFS1, is essential for Complex III (CIII) activity, though the mechanism for Fe-S cluster transfer has not previously been elucidated. Recent studies have shown that the co-chaperone HSC20, essential for Fe-S cluster biogenesis of SDHB, directly binds LYRM7, formerly described as a chaperone that stabilizes UQCRFS1 prior to its insertion into CIII. Here we report that a transient subcomplex involved in CIII assembly, composed of LYRM7 bound to UQCRFS1, interacts with components of an Fe-S transfer complex, consisting of HSC20, its cognate chaperone HSPA9, and the holo-scaffold ISCU. Binding of HSC20 to the LYR motif of LYRM7 in a pre-assembled UQCRFS1-LYRM7 intermediate in the mitochondrial matrix facilitates Fe-S cluster transfer to UQCRFS1. The five Fe-S cluster subunits of Complex I also interact with HSC20 to acquire their clusters, highlighting the crucial role of HSC20 in the assembly of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. BINDING OF THE RESPIRATORY CHAIN INHIBITOR ANTIMYCIN TO THE MITOCHONDRIAL bc1 COMPLEX: A NEW CRYSTAL STRUCTURE REVEALS AN ALTERED INTRAMOLECULAR HYDROGEN-BONDING PATTERN.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2006-01-01

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex. Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicylamide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28 Å resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the αA helix. PMID:16024040

  3. Design of an Active Ultrastable Single-chain Insulin Analog

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Qing-xin; Nakagawa, Satoe H.; Jia, Wenhua; Huang, Kun; Phillips, Nelson B.; Hu, Shi-quan; Weiss, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Single-chain insulin (SCI) analogs provide insight into the inter-relation of hormone structure, function, and dynamics. Although compatible with wild-type structure, short connecting segments (<3 residues) prevent induced fit upon receptor binding and so are essentially without biological activity. Substantial but incomplete activity can be regained with increasing linker length. Here, we describe the design, structure, and function of a single-chain insulin analog (SCI-57) containing a 6-residue linker (GGGPRR). Native receptor-binding affinity (130 ± 8% relative to the wild type) is achieved as hindrance by the linker is offset by favorable substitutions in the insulin moiety. The thermodynamic stability of SCI-57 is markedly increased (ΔΔGu = 0.7 ± 0.1 kcal/mol relative to the corresponding two-chain analog and 1.9 ± 0.1 kcal/mol relative to wild-type insulin). Analysis of inter-residue nuclear Overhauser effects demonstrates that a native-like fold is maintained in solution. Surprisingly, the glycine-rich connecting segment folds against the insulin moiety: its central Pro contacts ValA3 at the edge of the hydrophobic core, whereas the final Arg extends the A1-A8 α-helix. Comparison between SCI-57 and its parent two-chain analog reveals striking enhancement of multiple native-like nuclear Overhauser effects within the tethered protein. These contacts are consistent with wild-type crystal structures but are ordinarily attenuated in NMR spectra of two-chain analogs, presumably due to conformational fluctuations. Linker-specific damping of fluctuations provides evidence for the intrinsic flexibility of an insulin monomer. In addition to their biophysical interest, ultrastable SCIs may enhance the safety and efficacy of insulin replacement therapy in the developing world. PMID:18332129

  4. Epoxy-acetogenins and other polyketide epoxy derivatives as inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Tormo, J R; Zafra-Polo, M C; Serrano, A; Estornell, E; Cortes, D

    2000-05-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins (ACG), an extensive group of cytotoxic natural products, are antitumor agents whose main mode of action is inhibition of the mammalian mitochondrial complex I. Herein we describe the importance of the different chemical groups along the alkyl chain for optimal inhibitory potency, discussing the structurally relevant factors present in these compounds. For this purpose, a series of epoxide derivatives from alpha-linolenic acid were prepared and their activity compared with that of epoxy-acetogenins and tetrahydrofuranic (THF) acetogenins isolated from Rollinia membranacea.

  5. Influence of sodium chloride on the regulation of Krebs cycle intermediates and enzymes of respiratory chain in mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Saha, Papiya; Kunda, Pranamita; Biswas, Asok K

    2012-11-01

    The effect of common salt (NaCl) on ion contents, Krebs cycle intermediates and its regulatory enzymes was investigated in growing mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek, B 105) seedlings. Sodium and chloride ion contents increased in both root and shoot whereas potassium ion content decreased in shoot of test seedlings with increasing concentrations of NaCl. Organic acids like pyruvate and citrate levels increased whereas malate level decreased under stress in both roots and shoots. Salt stress also variedly affected the activities of different enzymes of respiratory chain. The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.2.4.1) decreased in 50 mM NaCl but increased in 100 mM and 150 mM concentrations, in both root and shoot samples. Succinate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.3.5.1) activity was reduced in root whereas stimulated in shoot under increasing concentrations of salt. The activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.41) and malate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.37) decreased in both root and shoot samples under salt stress. On the contrary, pretreatment of mungbean seeds with sublethal dose of NaCl was able to overcome the adverse effects of stress imposed by NaCl to variable extents with significant alterations of all the tested parameters, resulting in better growth and efficient respiration in mungbean seedlings. Thus, plants can acclimate to lethal level of salinity by pretreatment of seeds with sublethal level of NaCl, which serves to improve their health and production under saline condition, but the sublethal concentration of NaCl should be carefully chosen. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Generation of quinolone antimalarials targeting the Plasmodium falciparum mitochondrial respiratory chain for the treatment and prophylaxis of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Giancarlo A.; Fisher, Nicholas; Shone, Alison E.; Mubaraki, Murad A.; Srivastava, Abhishek; Hill, Alisdair; Antoine, Thomas; Warman, Ashley J.; Davies, Jill; Pidathala, Chandrakala; Amewu, Richard K.; Leung, Suet C.; Sharma, Raman; Gibbons, Peter; Hong, David W.; Pacorel, Bénédicte; Lawrenson, Alexandre S.; Charoensutthivarakul, Sitthivut; Taylor, Lee; Berger, Olivier; Mbekeani, Alison; Stocks, Paul A.; Nixon, Gemma L.; Chadwick, James; Hemingway, Janet; Delves, Michael J.; Sinden, Robert E.; Zeeman, Anne-Marie; Kocken, Clemens H. M.; Berry, Neil G.; O’Neill, Paul M.; Ward, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new antimalarial drugs with novel mechanisms of action to deliver effective control and eradication programs. Parasite resistance to all existing antimalarial classes, including the artemisinins, has been reported during their clinical use. A failure to generate new antimalarials with novel mechanisms of action that circumvent the current resistance challenges will contribute to a resurgence in the disease which would represent a global health emergency. Here we present a unique generation of quinolone lead antimalarials with a dual mechanism of action against two respiratory enzymes, NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Plasmodium falciparum NDH2) and cytochrome bc1. Inhibitor specificity for the two enzymes can be controlled subtly by manipulation of the privileged quinolone core at the 2 or 3 position. Inhibitors display potent (nanomolar) activity against both parasite enzymes and against multidrug-resistant P. falciparum parasites as evidenced by rapid and selective depolarization of the parasite mitochondrial membrane potential, leading to a disruption of pyrimidine metabolism and parasite death. Several analogs also display activity against liver-stage parasites (Plasmodium cynomolgi) as well as transmission-blocking properties. Lead optimized molecules also display potent oral antimalarial activity in the Plasmodium berghei mouse malaria model associated with favorable pharmacokinetic features that are aligned with a single-dose treatment. The ease and low cost of synthesis of these inhibitors fulfill the target product profile for the generation of a potent, safe, and inexpensive drug with the potential for eventual clinical deployment in the control and eradication of falciparum malaria. PMID:22566611

  7. EGFR activation suppresses respiratory virus-induced IRF1-dependent CXCL10 production.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, April; Ueki, Iris; Min-Oo, Gundula; Ballon-Landa, Eric; Knoff, David; Galen, Benjamin; Lanier, Lewis L; Nadel, Jay A; Koff, Jonathan L

    2014-07-15

    Airway epithelial cells are the primary cell type involved in respiratory viral infection. Upon infection, airway epithelium plays a critical role in host defense against viral infection by contributing to innate and adaptive immune responses. Influenza A virus, rhinovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) represent a broad range of human viral pathogens that cause viral pneumonia and induce exacerbations of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These respiratory viruses induce airway epithelial production of IL-8, which involves epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. EGFR activation involves an integrated signaling pathway that includes NADPH oxidase activation of metalloproteinase, and EGFR proligand release that activates EGFR. Because respiratory viruses have been shown to activate EGFR via this signaling pathway in airway epithelium, we investigated the effect of virus-induced EGFR activation on airway epithelial antiviral responses. CXCL10, a chemokine produced by airway epithelial cells in response to respiratory viral infection, contributes to the recruitment of lymphocytes to target and kill virus-infected cells. While respiratory viruses activate EGFR, the interaction between CXCL10 and EGFR signaling pathways is unclear, and the potential for EGFR signaling to suppress CXCL10 has not been explored. Here, we report that respiratory virus-induced EGFR activation suppresses CXCL10 production. We found that influenza virus-, rhinovirus-, and RSV-induced EGFR activation suppressed IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 1-dependent CXCL10 production. In addition, inhibition of EGFR during viral infection augmented IRF1 and CXCL10. These findings describe a novel mechanism that viruses use to suppress endogenous antiviral defenses, and provide potential targets for future therapies.

  8. EGFR activation suppresses respiratory virus-induced IRF1-dependent CXCL10 production

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowski, April; Ueki, Iris; Min-Oo, Gundula; Ballon-Landa, Eric; Knoff, David; Galen, Benjamin; Lanier, Lewis L.; Nadel, Jay A.

    2014-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells are the primary cell type involved in respiratory viral infection. Upon infection, airway epithelium plays a critical role in host defense against viral infection by contributing to innate and adaptive immune responses. Influenza A virus, rhinovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) represent a broad range of human viral pathogens that cause viral pneumonia and induce exacerbations of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These respiratory viruses induce airway epithelial production of IL-8, which involves epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. EGFR activation involves an integrated signaling pathway that includes NADPH oxidase activation of metalloproteinase, and EGFR proligand release that activates EGFR. Because respiratory viruses have been shown to activate EGFR via this signaling pathway in airway epithelium, we investigated the effect of virus-induced EGFR activation on airway epithelial antiviral responses. CXCL10, a chemokine produced by airway epithelial cells in response to respiratory viral infection, contributes to the recruitment of lymphocytes to target and kill virus-infected cells. While respiratory viruses activate EGFR, the interaction between CXCL10 and EGFR signaling pathways is unclear, and the potential for EGFR signaling to suppress CXCL10 has not been explored. Here, we report that respiratory virus-induced EGFR activation suppresses CXCL10 production. We found that influenza virus-, rhinovirus-, and RSV-induced EGFR activation suppressed IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 1-dependent CXCL10 production. In addition, inhibition of EGFR during viral infection augmented IRF1 and CXCL10. These findings describe a novel mechanism that viruses use to suppress endogenous antiviral defenses, and provide potential targets for future therapies. PMID:24838750

  9. Plasminogen activator inhibitor I 4G/5G polymorphism in neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Armangil, Didem; Yurdakök, Murat; Okur, Hamza; Gürgey, Aytemiz

    2011-08-01

    Fibrin monomers inhibit surfactant function. 4G/5G insertion/deletion polymorphism plays an important role in the regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) gene expression. To examine the genotype distribution of PAI-1 polymorphism in 60 infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and 53 controls, an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used. The proportion of 4G/4G, 4G/5G, and 5G/5G genotypes did not differ statistically between the RDS and control groups (P > .05). Having PAI-1 4G/4G genotype polymorphism appears to increase the risk of RDS (odds ratio [OR] =1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.5-4.3), although it was not statistically significant. No relation was found between the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphisms and RDS, but there was an increased risk associated with the 4G variant of the PAI-1 gene. We believe that our findings of increased 4G allele of the PAI-1 gene in infants with RDS would also help to clarify the pathogenesis of RDS.

  10. Chains, Rings, and Dendrites of Active Colloidal Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    In order to better understand active polymeric matter, colloidal polymers are imaged, in situ in real time, obtaining not only temporal and spatial information about each ``monomer'' in these living polymers but also about the time-dependent and orientation-dependent correlations between them. Our reversible colloidal polymer system is assembled from self-propelled monomeric Janus particles with dynamic ``plug and play'' self-assembly and programmed direction-specific interactions between the particles. Enabling this, AC voltage induces dipoles on the monomeric Janus particles that link them into chains while also generating active phoretic motility. Unique features of this system relative to conventional Brownian polymers are emphasized.

  11. A closed-loop model of the respiratory system: focus on hypercapnia and active expiration.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Park, Choongseok; Ben-Tal, Alona; Smith, Jeffrey C; Rubin, Jonathan E; Rybak, Ilya A

    2014-01-01

    Breathing is a vital process providing the exchange of gases between the lungs and atmosphere. During quiet breathing, pumping air from the lungs is mostly performed by contraction of the diaphragm during inspiration, and muscle contraction during expiration does not play a significant role in ventilation. In contrast, during intense exercise or severe hypercapnia forced or active expiration occurs in which the abdominal "expiratory" muscles become actively involved in breathing. The mechanisms of this transition remain unknown. To study these mechanisms, we developed a computational model of the closed-loop respiratory system that describes the brainstem respiratory network controlling the pulmonary subsystem representing lung biomechanics and gas (O2 and CO2) exchange and transport. The lung subsystem provides two types of feedback to the neural subsystem: a mechanical one from pulmonary stretch receptors and a chemical one from central chemoreceptors. The neural component of the model simulates the respiratory network that includes several interacting respiratory neuron types within the Bötzinger and pre-Bötzinger complexes, as well as the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG) representing the central chemoreception module targeted by chemical feedback. The RTN/pFRG compartment contains an independent neural generator that is activated at an increased CO2 level and controls the abdominal motor output. The lung volume is controlled by two pumps, a major one driven by the diaphragm and an additional one activated by abdominal muscles and involved in active expiration. The model represents the first attempt to model the transition from quiet breathing to breathing with active expiration. The model suggests that the closed-loop respiratory control system switches to active expiration via a quantal acceleration of expiratory activity, when increases in breathing rate and phrenic amplitude no longer provide sufficient ventilation. The model

  12. Mitochondrial free radical overproduction due to respiratory chain impairment in the brain of a mouse model of Rett syndrome: protective effect of CNF1.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Bianca; Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; De Rasmo, Domenico; Musto, Mattia; Fabbri, Alessia; Ricceri, Laura; Fiorentini, Carla; Laviola, Giovanni; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2015-06-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene associated with severe intellectual disability, movement disorders, and autistic-like behaviors. Its pathogenesis remains mostly not understood and no effective therapy is available. High circulating levels of oxidative stress markers in patients and the occurrence of oxidative brain damage in MeCP2-deficient mouse models suggest the involvement of oxidative stress in RTT pathogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism and the origin of the oxidative stress have not been elucidated. Here we demonstrate that a redox imbalance arises from aberrant mitochondrial functionality in the brain of MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, a condition that more closely recapitulates that of RTT patients. The marked increase in the rate of hydrogen peroxide generation in the brain of RTT mice seems mainly produced by the dysfunctional complex II of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In addition, both membrane potential generation and mitochondrial ATP synthesis are decreased in RTT mouse brains when succinate, the complex II respiratory substrate, is used as an energy source. Respiratory chain impairment is brain area specific, owing to a decrease in either cAMP-dependent phosphorylation or protein levels of specific complex subunits. Further, we investigated whether the treatment of RTT mice with the bacterial protein CNF1, previously reported to ameliorate the neurobehavioral phenotype and brain bioenergetic markers in an RTT mouse model, exerts specific effects on brain mitochondrial function and consequently on hydrogen peroxide production. In RTT brains treated with CNF1, we observed the reactivation of respiratory chain complexes, the rescue of mitochondrial functionality, and the prevention of brain hydrogen peroxide overproduction. These results provide definitive evidence of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species overproduction in RTT mouse brain and

  13. Hypoglossal Neuropathology and Respiratory Activity in Pompe Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Milapjit S.; Elmallah, Mai K.; Falk, Darin J.; Lane, Michael A.; Reier, Paul J.; Byrne, Barry J.; Fuller, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Pompe disease is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with systemic deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA). Respiratory-related problems in Pompe disease include hypoventilation and upper airway dysfunction. Although these problems have generally been attributed to muscular pathology, recent work has highlighted the potential role of central nervous system (CNS) neuropathology in Pompe motor deficiencies. We used a murine model of Pompe disease to test the hypothesis that systemic GAA deficiency is associated with hypoglossal (XII) motoneuron pathology and altered XII motor output during breathing. Brainstem tissue was harvested from adult Gaa−/− mice and the periodic acid Schiff method was used to examine neuronal glycogen accumulation. Semi-thin (2 μm) plastic sections showed widespread medullary neuropathology with extensive cytoplasmic glycogen accumulation in XII motoneuron soma. We next recorded efferent XII bursting in anesthetized and ventilated Gaa−/− and B6/129 mice both before and after bilateral vagotomy. The coefficient of variation of respiratory cycle duration was greater in Gaa−/− compared to B6/129 mice (p < 0.01). Vagotomy caused a robust increase in XII inspiratory burst amplitude in B6/129 mice (239 ± 44% baseline; p < 0.01) but had little impact on burst amplitude in Gaa−/− mice (130 ± 23% baseline; p > 0.05). We conclude that CNS GAA deficiency results in substantial glycogen accumulation in XII motoneuron cell bodies and altered XII motor output. Therapeutic strategies targeting the CNS may be required to fully correct respiratory-related deficits in Pompe disease. PMID:21747768

  14. Mitochondrial Respiration Chain Enzymatic Activities in the Human Brain: Methodological Implications for Tissue Sampling and Storage.

    PubMed

    Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Remor, Aline Pertile; Lopes, Mark William; Hohl, Alexandre; Troncoso, Iris H Z; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Boos, Gustavo Luchi; Kondageski, Charles; Nunes, Jean Costa; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Lin, Kátia; Latini, Alexandra Susana; Walz, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes enzymatic (MRCCE) activities were successfully evaluated in frozen brain samples. Epilepsy surgery offers an ethical opportunity to study human brain tissue surgically removed to treat drug resistant epilepsies. Epilepsy surgeries are done with hemodynamic and laboratory parameters to maintain physiology, but there are no studies analyzing the association among these parameters and MRCCE activities in the human brain tissue. We determined the intra-operative parameters independently associated with MRCCE activities in middle temporal neocortex (Cx), amygdala (AMY) and head of hippocampus (HIP) samples of patients (n = 23) who underwent temporal lobectomy using multiple linear regressions. MRCCE activities in Cx, AMY and HIP are differentially associated to trans-operative mean arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, hemoglobin, and anesthesia duration to time of tissue sampling. The time-course between the last seizure occurrence and tissue sampling as well as the sample storage to biochemical assessments were also associated with enzyme activities. Linear regression models including these variables explain 13-17 % of MRCCE activities and show a moderate to strong effect (r = 0.37-0.82). Intraoperative hemodynamic and laboratory parameters as well as the time from last seizure to tissue sampling and storage time are associated with MRCCE activities in human samples from the Cx, AMYG and HIP. Careful control of these parameters is required to minimize confounding biases in studies using human brain samples collected from elective neurosurgery.

  15. Quantitative assessment of oxygen availability: perceived aerobiosis and its effect on flux distribution in the respiratory chain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alexeeva, Svetlana; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Teixeira de Mattos, M Joost

    2002-03-01

    Despite a large number of studies on the role of oxygen in cellular processes, there is no consensus as to how oxygen availability to the cell should be defined, let alone how it should be quantified. Here, a quantitative definition for oxygen availability (perceived aerobiosis) is presented; the definition is based on a calibration with reference to the minimal oxygen supply rate needed for fully oxidative catabolism (i.e., complete conversion of the energy source to CO(2) and water for glucose-limited conditions). This quantitative method is used to show how steady-state electron fluxes through the alternative cytochrome oxidases of Escherichia coli are distributed as a function of the extent of aerobiosis of glucose-limited chemostat cultures. At low oxygen availability the electron flux is mainly via the high-affinity cytochrome bd oxidase, and, at higher oxygen availability, a similar phenomenon occurs but now via the low-affinity cytochrome bo oxidase. The main finding is that the catabolic activities of E. coli (and specifically its respiratory activity) are affected by the actual oxygen availability per unit of biomass rather than by the residual dissolved oxygen concentration of the culture.

  16. Variation of flux control coefficient of cytochrome c oxidase and of the other respiratory chain complexes at different values of protonmotive force occurs by a threshold mechanism.

    PubMed

    Quarato, Giovanni; Piccoli, Claudia; Scrima, Rosella; Capitanio, Nazzareno

    2011-09-01

    The metabolic control analysis was applied to digitonin-permeabilized HepG2 cell line to assess the flux control exerted by cytochrome c oxidase on the mitochondrial respiration. Experimental conditions eliciting different energy/respiratory states in mitochondria were settled. The results obtained show that the mitochondrial electrochemical potential accompanies a depressing effect on the control coefficient exhibited by the cytochrome c oxidase. Both the components of the protonmotive force, i.e. the voltage (ΔΨ(m)) and the proton (ΔpH(m)) gradient, displayed a similar effect. Quantitative estimation of the ΔΨ(m) unveiled that the voltage-dependent effect on the control coefficient of cytochrome c oxidase takes place sharply in a narrow range of membrane potential from 170-180 to 200-210mV consistent with the physiologic transition from state 3 to state 4 of respiration. Extension of the metabolic flux control analysis to the NADH dehydrogenase and bc(1) complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain resulted in a similar effect. A mechanistic model is put forward whereby the respiratory chain complexes are proposed to exist in a voltage-mediated threshold-controlled dynamic equilibrium between supercomplexed and isolated states. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mutations in NDUFB11, Encoding a Complex I Component of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain, Cause Microphthalmia with Linear Skin Defects Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    van Rahden, Vanessa A.; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Alawi, Malik; Brand, Kristina; Fellmann, Florence; Horn, Denise; Zeviani, Massimo; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is an X-linked male-lethal disorder also known as MIDAS (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea). Additional clinical features include neurological and cardiac abnormalities. MLS syndrome is genetically heterogeneous given that heterozygous mutations in HCCS or COX7B have been identified in MLS-affected females. Both genes encode proteins involved in the structure and function of complexes III and IV, which form the terminal segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). However, not all individuals with MLS syndrome carry a mutation in either HCCS or COX7B. The majority of MLS-affected females have severe skewing of X chromosome inactivation, suggesting that mutations in HCCS, COX7B, and other as-yet-unidentified X-linked gene(s) cause selective loss of cells in which the mutated X chromosome is active. By applying whole-exome sequencing and filtering for X-chromosomal variants, we identified a de novo nonsense mutation in NDUFB11 (Xp11.23) in one female individual and a heterozygous 1-bp deletion in a second individual, her asymptomatic mother, and an affected aborted fetus of the subject’s mother. NDUFB11 encodes one of 30 poorly characterized supernumerary subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, known as complex I (cI), the first and largest enzyme of the MRC. By shRNA-mediated NDUFB11 knockdown in HeLa cells, we demonstrate that NDUFB11 is essential for cI assembly and activity as well as cell growth and survival. These results demonstrate that X-linked genetic defects leading to the complete inactivation of complex I, III, or IV underlie MLS syndrome. Our data reveal an unexpected role of cI dysfunction in a developmental phenotype, further underscoring the existence of a group of mitochondrial diseases associated with neurocutaneous manifestations. PMID:25772934

  18. Ablation of Ceramide Synthase 2 Causes Chronic Oxidative Stress Due to Disruption of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain*

    PubMed Central

    Zigdon, Hila; Kogot-Levin, Aviram; Park, Joo-Won; Goldschmidt, Ruth; Kelly, Samuel; Merrill, Alfred H.; Scherz, Avigdor; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Saada, Ann; Futerman, Anthony H.

    2013-01-01

    Ceramide is a key intermediate in the pathway of sphingolipid biosynthesis and is an important intracellular messenger. We recently generated a ceramide synthase 2 (CerS2) null mouse that cannot synthesize very long acyl chain (C22-C24) ceramides. This mouse displays severe and progressive hepatopathy. Significant changes were observed in the sphingolipid profile of CerS2 null mouse liver, including elevated C16-ceramide and sphinganine levels in liver and in isolated mitochondrial fractions. Because ceramide may be involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, we examined whether ROS generation was affected in CerS2 null mice. Levels of a number of anti-oxidant enzymes were elevated, as were lipid peroxidation, protein nitrosylation, and ROS. ROS were generated from mitochondria due to impaired complex IV activity. C16-ceramide, sphingosine, and sphinganine directly inhibited complex IV activity in isolated mitochondria and in mitoplasts, whereas other ceramide species, sphingomyelin, and diacylglycerol were without effect. A fluorescent analog of sphinganine accumulated in mitochondria. Heart mitochondria did not display a substantial alteration in the sphingolipid profile or in complex IV activity. We suggest that C16-ceramide and/or sphinganine induce ROS formation through the modulation of mitochondrial complex IV activity, resulting in chronic oxidative stress. These results are of relevance for understanding modulation of ROS signaling by sphingolipids. PMID:23283968

  19. Patterns of brain activity in response to respiratory stimulation in patients with idiopathic hyperventilation (IHV).

    PubMed

    Jack, S; Kemp, G J; Bimson, W E; Calverley, P M A; Corfield, D R

    2010-01-01

    Dyspnoea, usually defined as an uncomfortable awareness of breathing, is one of the most frequent and distressing symptoms experienced by patients with lung disease. Idiopathic hyperventilation (IHV) has unknown aetiology and little is known about the mechanisms that cause the characteristic sustained hypocapnia and chronic dyspnoea. We have shown in IHV and other chronic respiratory disorders that air hunger is the dominant sensation during exercise, while resting breathlessness is characterised by an affective component. The increased drive to breathe in IHV, and indeed dyspnoea in all chronic respiratory disorders, might be better understood if the central mechanisms of dyspnoea were known. The aim of the present study was to characterise the cortical processing of respiratory-related sensory inputs in patients with IHV. Four patients with IHV were studied with ethical approval. Respiratory stimulation was produced using transient occlusion of inspiration (TIO) during spontaneous breathing (delivered in early inspiration with duration c. 300 ms; this is well tolerated) while BOLD fMRI was performed on a 3 Tesla Siemens Trio. TIO was associated with significant activation in sensorimotor and pre-motor cortical areas and the cerebellum, notably the anterior insula, an area previously associated with breathlessness in healthy volunteers. These preliminary observations on the pattern of brain activity in response to respiratory stimulation support the hypothesis that breathlessness in IHV may reflect inappropriate cortical processing of respiratory-related sensory inputs.

  20. An evaluation of three new-generation tetrazolium salts for the measurement of respiratory activity in activated sludge microorganisms.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, C; Quinn, J P; McGrath, J W

    2005-04-01

    XTT (3'-[1-[(phenylamino)-carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium]-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzenesulfonic acid hydrate), MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt), and WST-1 (4-(3-4-iodophenyl)-2-(4-nitrophenyl)-2H-5-tetrazolio)-1,3-benzenedisulfonate) are tetrazolium salts that have become commercially available only in relatively recent years; they differ from earlier such compounds in that their reduction gives rise to a formazan product that is water soluble. We have established the sites in the prokaryotic respiratory chain at which each of the dyes is reduced to its corresponding formazan and have evaluated the suitability of each for the colorimetric estimation of electron transport system activity in populations of activated sludge microorganisms. Reduction of all three tetrazolium salts was shown to be proportional to cell biomass and oxygen uptake and to be susceptible to low levels of the reference toxicant 3,5-dichlorophenol. XTT, which was not inhibitory at concentrations of up to 2 mM and was reduced by 91% of isolates from a sample of culturable activated sludge bacteria, was chosen for further assay development. XTT-formazan production was found to be stimulated by the availability of an exogenous carbon and energy source, and by the presence of the electron-coupling agent phenazine methosulfate. Less than 3% of XTT reduction by an activated sludge sample was abiotic. An assay based on this compound could be a valuable and simple tool for the routine monitoring of the performance of wastewater treatment systems.

  1. Impairment of Respiratory Chain under Nutrient Deficiency in Plants: Does it Play a Role in the Regulation of Iron and Sulfur Responsive Genes?

    PubMed

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Briat, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Plant production and plant product quality strongly depend on the availability of mineral nutrients. Among them, sulfur (S) and iron (Fe) play a central role, as they are needed for many proteins of the respiratory chain. Plant mitochondria play essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic functions as well as they have an important role in signaling processes into the cell. Here, by comparing several transcriptomic data sets from plants impaired in their respiratory function with the genes regulated under Fe or S deficiencies obtained from other data sets, nutrient-responsive genes potentially regulated by hypothetical mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway are evidenced. It leads us to hypothesize that plant mitochondria could be, therefore, required for regulating the expression of key genes involved both in Fe and S metabolisms.

  2. Impairment of Respiratory Chain under Nutrient Deficiency in Plants: Does it Play a Role in the Regulation of Iron and Sulfur Responsive Genes?

    PubMed Central

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Briat, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Plant production and plant product quality strongly depend on the availability of mineral nutrients. Among them, sulfur (S) and iron (Fe) play a central role, as they are needed for many proteins of the respiratory chain. Plant mitochondria play essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic functions as well as they have an important role in signaling processes into the cell. Here, by comparing several transcriptomic data sets from plants impaired in their respiratory function with the genes regulated under Fe or S deficiencies obtained from other data sets, nutrient-responsive genes potentially regulated by hypothetical mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway are evidenced. It leads us to hypothesize that plant mitochondria could be, therefore, required for regulating the expression of key genes involved both in Fe and S metabolisms. PMID:26779219

  3. A new high-speed droplet-real-time polymerase chain reaction method can detect bovine respiratory syncytial virus in less than 10 min.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masayuki; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Honda, Takayuki

    2014-03-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been widely used for diagnosis of infectious diseases of domestic animals. Rapid detection of respiratory pathogens of cattle is useful for making therapeutic decisions. Therefore, we developed a new genetic-based method called droplet-real-time PCR, which can detect bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) within 10 min. Our droplet-real-time PCR markedly reduced the reaction time of reverse transcription-PCR while maintaining the same sensitivity as conventional real-time PCR, and it can be used as a rapid assay for detection of BRSV. Furthermore, our method is potentially applicable for rapid diagnosis of almost all infectious diseases, including highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

  4. Mechanisms Underlying Adaptation of Respiratory Network Activity to Modulatory Stimuli in the Mouse Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Marc; De Sa, Rafaël; Cardoit, Laura; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Breathing is a rhythmic behavior that requires organized contractions of respiratory effector muscles. This behavior must adapt to constantly changing conditions in order to ensure homeostasis, proper body oxygenation, and CO2/pH regulation. Respiratory rhythmogenesis is controlled by neural networks located in the brainstem. One area considered to be essential for generating the inspiratory phase of the respiratory rhythm is the preBötzinger complex (preBötC). Rhythmogenesis emerges from this network through the interplay between the activation of intrinsic cellular properties (pacemaker properties) and intercellular synaptic connections. Respiratory activity continuously changes under the impact of numerous modulatory substances depending on organismal needs and environmental conditions. The preBötC network has been shown to become active during the last third of gestation. But only little is known regarding the modulation of inspiratory rhythmicity at embryonic stages and even less on a possible role of pacemaker neurons in this functional flexibility during the prenatal period. By combining electrophysiology and calcium imaging performed on embryonic brainstem slice preparations, we provide evidence showing that embryonic inspiratory pacemaker neurons are already intrinsically sensitive to neuromodulation and external conditions (i.e., temperature) affecting respiratory network activity, suggesting a potential role of pacemaker neurons in mediating rhythm adaptation to modulatory stimuli in the embryo. PMID:27239348

  5. The association between farming activities and respiratory health in rural school age children.

    PubMed

    Farthing, Pamela; Rennie, Donna; Pahwa, Punam; Janzen, Bonnie; Dosman, James

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of asthma in Canadian children living on and off farms and the risk of asthma and respiratory symptoms of children exposed to certain farming activities. A cross-sectional survey was sent to parents of school children ages 6 to 13 living in an agricultural community in rural Saskatchewan. History of asthma and respiratory symptoms (cough, phlegm, or wheeze), location of home, and exposure to farming activities including haying, harvesting, moving, or playing with hay bales, feeding livestock, cleaning or playing in barns, cleaning pens, and emptying or filling grain bins were assessed. The response rate was 90.6% (n = 553). The prevalence of asthma and respiratory symptoms were 18.8% and 39.8%, respectively, and did not differ by home location (farm/nonfarm). In the adjusted multivariable models conducted with each farming activity separately, children who were exposed to emptying and filling of grain bins had a higher odds of asthma (odds [OR] = 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-4.62]. Reports of playing on or near hay bales (OR = 1.89, 95% CI:1.19-3.01), (OR = 2.08, 95% CI:1.07-4.06), and cleaning pens (OR = 2.70, 95% CI:1.05-6.97) were associated with increased respiratory symptoms. Certain farming activities associated with dust and animals appear to be risk factors for asthma and respiratory symptoms in this study population and should be avoided.

  6. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  7. Activation of cytokines and NF-kappa B in corneal epithelial cells infected by respiratory syncytial virus: potential relevance in ocular inflammation and respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    Bitko, Vira; Garmon, Nicolle E; Cao, Tin; Estrada, Benjamin; Oakes, John E; Lausch, Robert N; Barik, Sailen

    2004-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infection, claiming millions of lives annually. The virus infects various cells of the respiratory tract as well as resident inflammatory cells such as macrophages. Infection activates a variety of cellular factors such as cytokines and the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NF-kappa B, all of which are important players in the respiratory disease. However, the exact natural route of RSV infection and its etiology remain relatively unknown. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that human corneal epithelial cells, which constitute the outermost layer of the cornea, can be infected with RSV, and that the infection leads to the activation of proinflammatory macromolecules. Results Corneal swabs obtained from pediatric patients with acute respiratory disease were found to contain RSV at a high frequency (43 positive out of 72 samples, i.e., 60%). Primary corneal epithelial cells in tissue culture supported robust infection and productive growth of RSV. Infection resulted in the activation of TNF-α, IL-6 and sixteen chemokines as well as NF-κB. Three proinflammatory CXC chemokines (MIG, I-TAC, IP-10) underwent the greatest activation. Conclusions The ocular epithelium is readily infected by RSV. The pro-inflammatory cytokines are likely to play critical roles in the etiology of inflammation and conjunctivitis commonly seen in pediatric patients with respiratory infections. RSV-eye interactions have important implications in RSV transmission, immunopathology of RSV disease, and in the management of conjunctivitis. PMID:15256003

  8. RAFT microemulsion polymerization with surface-active chain transfer agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hedok, Ibrahim Adnan

    The work described in this dissertation focuses on enhancing the polymer nanoparticle synthesis using RAFT (reversible-addition fragmentation chain transfer) in microemulsion polymerization in order to achieve predetermined molecular weight with narrow molecular weight polydispersity. The hypothesis is that the use of an amphiphilic chain transfer agent (surface-active CTA) will confine the CTA to the surface of the particle and thermodynamically favor partitioning of the CTA between micelles and particles throughout the polymerization. Thus, the CTA diffusion from micelles to polymer particles would be minimized and the breadth of the CTA per particle distribution would remain low. We report the successful improved synthesis of poly(butyl acrylate), poly(ethyl acrylate), and poly(styrene) nanoparticles using the RAFT microemulsion polymerization with surface-active CTA. The polymerization kinetics, polymer characteristics and latex size experimental data are presented. The data analysis indicates that the CTA remains partitioned between the micelles and particles by the end of the polymerization, as expected. We also report the synthesis of well-defined core/shell poly(styrene)/poly(butyl acrylate) nanoparticle, having polydispersity index value of 1.1, using semi-continuous microemulsion polymerization with the surface-active CTA. The surface-active CTA restricts the polymerization growth to the surface of the particle, which facilitates the formation of a shell block co-polymers with each subsequent second monomer addition instead of discrete homopolymers. This synthesis method can be used to create a wide range of core/shell polymer nanoparticles with well-defined morphology, given the right feeding conditions.

  9. Association of the chloroplastic respiratory and photosynthetic electron transport chains of Chlamydomonas reinhardii with photoreduction and the oxyhydrogen reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Maione, T.E.; Gibbs, M.

    1986-02-01

    The hydrogenase-dependent processes, photoreduction and the dark oxyhydrogen reaction, both of which can support CO/sub 2/ assimilation, were compared with aerobic photosynthesis and respiration for their sensitivity to electron transport inhibitors in cells and intact chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardii 11-32/6. Photoreduction but no photosynthesis was inhibited in chloroplasts and the oxyhydrogen reaction detected only in cells was inhibited up to 75 and 90%, respectively, by 150 micromolar rotenone, indicating the involvement of a NAD(P)H-plastoquinone oxidoreductase in the hydrogen utilizing pathways. The oxyhydrogen reaction coupled to CO/sub 2/ fixation was inhibited more than 95% by 10 micromolar 2,5 - dibromo - 3 - methyl - 6 - isopropyl - p - benzoquinone (DBMIB), a concentration which did not affect respiratory activity. In cells, both photoreduction and the oxyhydrogen reaction exhibited a similar sensitivity to salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) showing approximately 90% inhibition by 7 millimolar concentration. Photosynthesis was inhibited only 30% by the same concentration of SHAM. Antimycin A (18 micromolar, 10 micrograms per milliliter) inhibited both photoreduction (80%) and the oxyhydrogen reaction (92%) in cells with the oxyhydrogen reaction being approximately 10 times more sensitive to lower concentrations of the inhibitor. Antimycin A at 18 micromolar concentration did not inhibit photosynthetic CO/sub 2/ fixation unless the cells were adapted to an atmosphere of N/sub 2/ and the reaction conducted anaerobically. Photosynthesis, photoreduction, and the oxyhydrogen reaction coupled to CO/sub 2/ fixation were all inhibited greater than 90% by 10 micromolar carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone. ATP added to chloroplasts adapted to an atmosphere of H/sub 2/ could support CO/sub 2/ uptake in the dark.

  10. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of proteolytic enzymes in cultures of human respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Baginski, Leonie; Tachon, Gaëlle; Falson, Françoise; Patton, John S; Bakowsky, Udo; Ehrhardt, Carsten

    2011-04-01

    Pancreatic proteolytic digestive enzymes are a major extracellular barrier to the sucessful systemic delivery of biopharmaceuticals via the oral route, whereas in health in the lungs these powerful proteases are virtually absent from the extracellular fluids. Despite this, the absorption of some (but not all) natural peptides and proteins from the lungs may be poor, and one has to acknowledge that information on the activity and spatial distribution of proteolytic enzymes in the human lung is scarce. Here, we investigated expression patterns of a series of proteolytic enzymes in several human respiratory cell types on mRNA level in an attempt to better understand the fate of inhaled biopharmaceuticals. The mRNA expression of proteolytic enzymes (i.e., carboxypeptidases: CPA1, CPA2, CPB, CPM; gamma-glutamyltransferases: GGT1, GGT2; angiotensin-converting enzymes: ACE, ACE2; aminopeptidases: APA, APB, APN, APP1, APP2, APP3; endopeptidases: 24.11 (neprilysin), 24.15 (thimet oligopeptidase), 24.18 (meprin A); enteropeptidase; trypsin 1, trypsin 2; neutrophilic elastase; dipeptidyl peptidase 4; gamma-glutamylhydrolase) was investigated by semiquantitative RT-PCR in human bronchial (hBEpC, Calu-3, 16HBE14o-) and alveolar (A549) epithelial cells, respectively. Gastrointestinal Caco-2 cells were used as comparison. Obvious differences were observed in proteinases' expression pattern between the investigated cell types. Although considered to be of bronchial epithelial phenotype, neither Calu-3 nor 16HBE14o- cells matched the mRNA expression pattern of hBEpC in primary culture. Of all investigated cell lines, Caco-2 expresses the highest number of proteases and peptidases. Although mRNA expression does not necessarily signify enzyme functionality, our results provide the first comprehensive analysis of peptidase and protease expression and distribution in human lung epithelial cells and are the basis for further investigations.

  11. Respiratory Muscle Training Improves Diaphragm Citrate Synthase Activity and Hemodynamic Function in Rats with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Jaenisch, Rodrigo Boemo; Bertagnolli, Mariane; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Arena, Ross; Lago, Pedro Dal

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced respiratory muscle strength in patients with heart failure positively alters the clinical trajectory of heart failure. In an experimental model, respiratory muscle training in rats with heart failure has been shown to improve cardiopulmonary function through mechanisms yet to be entirely elucidated. The present report aimed to evaluate the respiratory muscle training effects in diaphragm citrate synthase activity and hemodynamic function in rats with heart failure. Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: sedentary sham (Sed-Sham, n=8), trained sham (RMT-Sham, n=8), sedentary heart failure (Sed-HF, n=7) and trained heart failure (RMT-HF, n=7). The animals were submitted to a RMT protocol performed 30 minutes a day, 5 days/week, for 6 weeks. In rats with heart failure, respiratory muscle training decreased pulmonary congestion and right ventricular hypertrophy. Deleterious alterations in left ventricular pressures, as well as left ventricular contractility and relaxation, were assuaged by respiratory muscle training in heart failure rats. Citrate synthase activity, which was significantly reduced in heart failure rats, was preserved by respiratory muscle training. Additionally, a negative correlation was found between citrate synthase and left ventricular end diastolic pressure and positive correlation was found between citrate synthase and left ventricular systolic pressure. Respiratory muscle training produces beneficial adaptations in the diaphragmatic musculature, which is linked to improvements in left ventricular hemodynamics and blood pressure in heart failure rats. The RMT-induced improvements in cardiac architecture and the oxidative capacity of the diaphragm may improve the clinical trajectory of patients with heart failure.

  12. Respiratory pattern in awake rats: effects of motor activity and of alerting stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Muammar M; Beig, Mirza I; Baumert, Mathias; Trombini, Mimosa; Mastorci, Francesca; Sgoifo, Andrea; Walker, Frederick R; Day, Trevor A; Nalivaiko, Eugene

    2010-08-04

    Our aim was to assess the impact of motor activity and of arousing stimuli on respiratory rate in the awake rats. The study was performed in male adult Sprague-Dawley (SD, n=5) and Hooded Wistar (HW, n=5) rats instrumented for ECG telemetry. Respiratory rate was recorded using whole-body plethysmograph, with a piezoelectric sensor attached for the simultaneous assessment of motor activity. All motor activity was found to be associated with an immediate increase in respiratory rate that remained elevated for the whole duration of movement; this was reflected by: i) bimodal distribution of respiratory intervals (modes for slow peak: 336+/-19 and 532+/-80 ms for HW and SD, p<0.05; modes for fast peak 128+/-6 and 132+/-7 ms for HW and SD, NS); and ii) a tight correlation between total movement time and total time of tachypnoea, with an R(2) ranging 0.96-0.99 (n=10, p<0001). The extent of motor-related tachypnoea was significantly correlated with the intensity of associated movement. Mild alerting stimuli produced stereotyped tachypnoeic responses, without affecting heart rate: tapping the chamber raised respiratory rate from 117+/-7 to 430+/-15 cpm; sudden side move--from 134+/-13 to 487+/-16 cpm, and turning on lights--from 136+/-12 to 507+/-14 cpm (n=10; p<0.01 for all; no inter-strain differences). We conclude that: i) sniffing is an integral part of the generalized arousal response and does not depend on the modality of sensory stimuli; ii) tachypnoea is a sensitive index of arousal; and iii) respiratory rate is tightly correlated with motor activity.

  13. Recessive Mutations in TRMT10C Cause Defects in Mitochondrial RNA Processing and Multiple Respiratory Chain Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Metodiev, Metodi D; Thompson, Kyle; Alston, Charlotte L; Morris, Andrew A M; He, Langping; Assouline, Zarah; Rio, Marlène; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Pyle, Angela; Griffin, Helen; Siira, Stefan; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Munnich, Arnold; Chinnery, Patrick F; McFarland, Robert; Rötig, Agnès; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-05-05

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinically and genetically diverse, with mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear genes able to cause defects in mitochondrial gene expression. Recently, mutations in several genes encoding factors involved in mt-tRNA processing have been identified to cause mitochondrial disease. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified mutations in TRMT10C (encoding the mitochondrial RNase P protein 1 [MRPP1]) in two unrelated individuals who presented at birth with lactic acidosis, hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and deafness. Both individuals died at 5 months after respiratory failure. MRPP1, along with MRPP2 and MRPP3, form the mitochondrial ribonuclease P (mt-RNase P) complex that cleaves the 5' ends of mt-tRNAs from polycistronic precursor transcripts. Additionally, a stable complex of MRPP1 and MRPP2 has m(1)R9 methyltransferase activity, which methylates mt-tRNAs at position 9 and is vital for folding mt-tRNAs into their correct tertiary structures. Analyses of fibroblasts from affected individuals harboring TRMT10C missense variants revealed decreased protein levels of MRPP1 and an increase in mt-RNA precursors indicative of impaired mt-RNA processing and defective mitochondrial protein synthesis. The pathogenicity of the detected variants-compound heterozygous c.542G>T (p.Arg181Leu) and c.814A>G (p.Thr272Ala) changes in subject 1 and a homozygous c.542G>T (p.Arg181Leu) variant in subject 2-was validated by the functional rescue of mt-RNA processing and mitochondrial protein synthesis defects after lentiviral transduction of wild-type TRMT10C. Our study suggests that these variants affect MRPP1 protein stability and mt-tRNA processing without affecting m(1)R9 methyltransferase activity, identifying mutations in TRMT10C as a cause of mitochondrial disease and highlighting the importance of RNA processing for correct mitochondrial function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of idebenone (CV-2619) and its metabolites on respiratory activity and lipid peroxidation in brain mitochondria from rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Fujita, T; Matsumoto, M; Okamoto, K; Imada, I

    1985-12-01

    The effects of idebenone (CV-2619) and its metabolites on respiratory activity and lipid peroxidation in isolated brain mitochondria from rats and dogs were studied. CV-2619 was easily reduced by canine brain mitochondria in the presence of respiratory substrates. Reduced CV-2619 (2H-CV-2619) was rapidly oxidized through the cytochrome b chain, indicating that the compound functioned simply as an electron carrier of mitochondrial respiratory system. Both nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)- and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent lipid peroxidations were examined in canine brain mitochondria in the presence of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and Fe3+. NADH-cytochrome c reductase activity was sensitive to NADPH-dependent lipid peroxidation. CV-2619 (10(-5)M) strongly inhibited both types of the lipid peroxidation reactions and protected the resultant inactivation of the NADH-cytochrome c reductase activity. Activities of succinate oxidase in rat and canine brain mitochondria were virtually unaffected by CV-2619 and its metabolites (10(-5)-10(-6) M). On the other hand, CV-2619 markedly suppressed the state 3 respiration in glutamate oxidation in a dose dependent manner without any effect on the state 4 respiration and the ADP/O ratio in intact rat brain mitochondria. The inhibitory effect of CV-2619 was also observed in NADH-cytochrome c reductase, but not in NADH-2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP) and NADH-ubiquinone reductases in canine brain mitochondria. These facts and results of inhibitor analysis suggest that the action site of CV-2619 is NADH-linked complex I in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and is different from that of inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation such as rotenone, oligomycin and 2,4-dinitrophenol. Finally, the above findings suggest that CV-2619 acts as an electron carrier in respiratory chains and functions as an antioxidant against membrane damage caused by lipid peroxidation in brain mitochondria. It appears

  15. Nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 utilize similar glutamine-containing clusters of hydrophobic residues to activate transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Gugneja, S; Virbasius, C M; Scarpulla, R C

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF-1 and NRF-2) are ubiquitous transcription factors that have been implicated in the control of nuclear genes required for respiration, heme biosynthesis, and mitochondrial DNA transcription and replication. Recently, both factors have been found to be major transcriptional determinants for a subset of these genes that define a class of simple promoters involved in respiratory chain expression. Here, functional domains required for transactivation by NRF-1 have been defined. An atypical nuclear localization signal resides in a conserved amino-terminal region adjacent to the DNA binding domain and consists of functionally redundant clusters of basic residues. A second domain in the carboxy-terminal half of the molecule is necessary for transcriptional activation. The activation domains of both NRF-1 and NRF-2 were extensively characterized by both deletion and alanine substitution mutagenesis. The results show that these domains do not fall into known classes defined by a preponderance of amino acid residues, including glutamines, prolines, or isoleucines, as found in other eukaryotic activators. Rather, in both factors, a series of tandemly arranged clusters of hydrophobic amino acids were required for activation. Although all of the functional clusters contain glutamines, the glutamines differ from the hydrophobic residues in that they are inconsequential for activation. Unlike the NRF-2 domain, which contains its essential hydrophobic motifs within 40 residues, the NRF-1 domain spans about 40% of the molecule and appears to have a bipartite structure. The findings indicate that NRF-1 and NRF-2 utilize similar hydrophobic structural motifs for activating transcription. PMID:8816484

  16. Postnatal developmental changes in activation profiles of the respiratory neuronal network in the rat ventral medulla

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Yoshitaka; Masumiya, Haruko; Okada, Yasumasa

    2007-01-01

    Two putative respiratory rhythm generators (RRGs), the para-facial respiratory group (pFRG) and the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC), have been identified in the neonatal rodent brainstem. To elucidate their functional roles during the neonatal period, we evaluated developmental changes of these RRGs by optical imaging using a voltage-sensitive dye. Optical signals, recorded from the ventral medulla of brainstem–spinal cord preparations of neonatal (P0–P4) rats (n = 44), were analysed by a cross correlation method. With development during the first few postnatal days, the respiratory-related activity in the pFRG reduced and shifted from a preinspiratory (P0–P1) to an inspiratory (P2–P4) pattern, whereas preBötC activity remained unchanged. The μ-opioid agonist [d-Ala(2),N-Me-Phe(4),Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) augmented preinspiratory activity in the pFRG, while the μ-opioid antagonist naloxone induced changes in spatiotemporal activation profiles that closely mimicked the developmental changes. These results are consistent with the recently proposed hypothesis by Janczewski and Feldman that the pFRG is activated to compensate for the depression of the preBötC by perinatal opiate surge. We conclude that significant reorganization of the respiratory neuronal network, characterized by a reduction of preinspiratory activity in the pFRG, occurs at P1–P2 in rats. The changes in spatiotemporal activation profiles of the pFRG neurones may reflect changes in the mode of coupling of the two respiratory rhythm generators. PMID:17884928

  17. Isolated respiratory chain enzyme deficiency in patients with a mitochondrial (encephalo-) myopathy: Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial complex and IV genes

    SciTech Connect

    Vries, D. de; Coo, I. de; Buddiger, P.

    1994-09-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain consists of four enzyme complexes. Deficiencies of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) are frequently found in muscle biopsies from patients with a mitochondrial (encephalo-)myopathy. Mutations in the mitochondrial-encoded subunits have been observed in a number of different mitochondrial (encephalo-)myophathies. We screened eight mitochondrial (encephalo-)myopathy patients with an isolated complex I deficiency for mutations in the ND genes by direct sequencing. No abnormality was detected. We also studied 9 mitochondrial (encephalo-)myopathy patients and an isolated complex IV deficiency. In the muscle biopsy of one patient a novel heteroplasmic mutation (T {r_arrow} C) at nucleotide position 6681 was found in the mitochondrial COX I gene. This mutation led to the substitution of a conserved Tyr for His. As this mutation changed the secondary structure of the protein and was not found in the healthy mother, we consider it likely that this mutation is pathological. In the other patients no abnormality was detected. Therefore, mutations in the mitochondrially-encoded subunits are not a frequent cause of isolated respiratory chain enzyme deficiency.

  18. Respiratory Membrane endo-Hydrogenase Activity in the Microaerophile Azorhizobium caulinodans Is Bidirectional

    PubMed Central

    Sprecher, Brittany N.; Gittings, Margo E.; Ludwig, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background The microaerophilic bacterium Azorhizobium caulinodans, when fixing N2 both in pure cultures held at 20 µM dissolved O2 tension and as endosymbiont of Sesbania rostrata legume nodules, employs a novel, respiratory-membrane endo-hydrogenase to oxidize and recycle endogenous H2 produced by soluble Mo-dinitrogenase activity at the expense of O2. Methods and Findings From a bioinformatic analysis, this endo-hydrogenase is a core (6 subunit) version of (14 subunit) NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (respiratory complex I). In pure A. caulinodans liquid cultures, when O2 levels are lowered to <1 µM dissolved O2 tension (true microaerobic physiology), in vivo endo-hydrogenase activity reverses and continuously evolves H2 at high rates. In essence, H+ ions then supplement scarce O2 as respiratory-membrane electron acceptor. Paradoxically, from thermodynamic considerations, such hydrogenic respiratory-membrane electron transfer need largely uncouple oxidative phosphorylation, required for growth of non-phototrophic aerobic bacteria, A. caulinodans included. Conclusions A. caulinodans in vivo endo-hydrogenase catalytic activity is bidirectional. To our knowledge, this study is the first demonstration of hydrogenic respiratory-membrane electron transfer among aerobic (non-fermentative) bacteria. When compared with O2 tolerant hydrogenases in other organisms, A. caulinodans in vivo endo-hydrogenase mediated H2 production rates (50,000 pmol 109·cells−1 min−1) are at least one-thousandfold higher. Conceivably, A. caulinodans respiratory-membrane hydrogenesis might initiate H2 crossfeeding among spatially organized bacterial populations whose individual cells adopt distinct metabolic states in response to variant O2 availability. Such organized, physiologically heterogeneous cell populations might benefit from augmented energy transduction and growth rates of the populations, considered as a whole. PMID:22662125

  19. A longitudinal study of poor performance and subclinical respiratory viral activity in Standardbred trotters

    PubMed Central

    Back, Helena; Penell, Johanna; Pringle, John; Isaksson, Mats; Ronéus, Nils; Treiberg Berndtsson, Louise; Ståhl, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While clinical respiratory disease is considered a main cause of poor performance in horses, the role of subclinical respiratory virus infections is less clear and needs further investigation. Aims and objectives In this descriptive longitudinal study the relationship of markers of subclinical respiratory viral activity to occurrence of poor performance in racing Standardbred trotters was investigated. Material and methods 66 elite Standardbred trotters were followed for 13 months by nasal swabs analysed with qPCR for equine influenza virus, equine arteritis virus, equine rhinitis B virus (ERBV), equine herpesvirus type 1(EHV-1) and equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) and serology to equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV), ERBV, EHV-1 and EHV-4, as well as the acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA). Findings on lab analyses were subsequently assessed for possible correlations to workload performance and trainer opinion measures of poor performance. Results Despite occurrence of poor performance and subclinical viral activity the authors were unable to detect association neither between subclinical viral activity and poor performance, nor between SAA elevations and either viral activity or poor performance. Conclusions Consistent with earlier study results, antibody titres to ERBV remained high for at least a year and few horses two years or older were seronegative to either ERAV or ERBV. In absence of clinical signs, serology to common respiratory viruses appears to have little diagnostic benefit in evaluation of poor performance in young athletic horses. PMID:26392904

  20. Changes in respiratory activity induced by mastication during oral breathing in humans.

    PubMed

    Daimon, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Kazunori

    2014-06-01

    We examined the effect of oral breathing on respiratory movements, including the number of respirations and the movement of the thoracic wall at rest and while chewing gum. Forty normal nose breathers were selected by detecting expiratory airflow from the mouth using a CO2 sensor. Chest measurements were recorded using a Piezo respiratory belt transducer, and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the masseter and trapezius muscles were recorded at rest and while chewing gum during nasal or oral breathing. Oral breathing was introduced by completely occluding the nostrils with a nose clip. During oral breathing, the respiration rate was significantly lower while chewing gum than while at rest (P < 0.05). While chewing gum, the respiration rate was significantly lower during oral breathing than during nasal breathing (P < 0.05). During oral breathing, thoracic movement was significantly higher while chewing gum than while at rest (P < 0.05). Thoracic movement was significantly greater during oral breathing than during nasal breathing (P < 0.05). The trapezius muscle exhibited significant EMG activity when chewing gum during oral breathing. The activity of the trapezius muscle coincided with increased movement of the thoracic wall. Chewing food while breathing through the mouth interferes with and decreases the respiratory cycle and promotes unusual respiratory movement of the thoracic wall, which is directed by the activity of accessory muscles of respiration.

  1. Pyrazinoic acid decreases the proton motive force, respiratory ATP synthesis activity, and cellular ATP levels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Haagsma, Anna C; Pham, Hoang; Maaskant, Janneke J; Mol, Selena; Lill, Holger; Bald, Dirk

    2011-11-01

    Pyrazinoic acid, the active form of the first-line antituberculosis drug pyrazinamide, decreased the proton motive force and respiratory ATP synthesis rates in subcellular mycobacterial membrane assays. Pyrazinoic acid also significantly lowered cellular ATP levels in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. These results indicate that the predominant mechanism of killing by this drug may operate by depletion of cellular ATP reserves.

  2. Effects of forward head posture on forced vital capacity and respiratory muscles activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Jintae; Park, Soojin; Kim, Youngju; Choi, Yeonsung; Lyu, Hyeonnam

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of forward head posture on forced vital capacity and deep breathing. [Subjects] Twenty-six subjects, divided into the two groups (normal and forward head posture groups), participated in this study. [Methods] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were measured using respiratory function instrumentation that met the American Thoracic Society's recommendation for diagnostic spirometry. Accessory respiratory muscle activity during deep breathing was measured by electromyography. A Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the measure variables between the normal and forward head posture group. [Results] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were significantly lower in the forward head posture group than in the normal group. Accessory respiratory muscle activity was also lower in the forward head posture group than in the normal group. In particular, the sternocleidomastoid and pectoralis major activity of the forward head posture group was significantly lower than that of normal group. Activities of the other muscles were generally decreased with forward head posture, but were not significantly different between the two groups. [Conclusion] These results indicate that forward head posture could reduce vital capacity, possibly because of weakness or disharmony of the accessory respiratory muscles.

  3. Respiratory activity and sleep--wakefulness in the deafferented, paralyzed cat.

    PubMed

    Netick, A; Foutz, A S

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the role, if any, that peripheral feedback plays in the distinct respiratory patterns which are characteristic of the various states of consciousness. Those states include wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Eight adult cats, implanted with electrodes and skull bolts for sleep recordings and head restraint, sustained extensive deafferentations (bilateral vagotomy and pneumothorax, spinal transection at T-1 level, bilateral section of the phrenic nerves), were paralyzed with gallamine, artificially ventilated (ensuring stable blood gases), and held at a constant temperature. Central respiratory activity was determined by phrenic nerve recordings. During NREM sleep, respiratory activity slowed as in intact cats. During REM sleep without phasic events, phrenic activity did not differ from that in NREM sleep. During REM sleep with phasic phenomena, fast and irregular "breathing" was observed. It is concluded that states of consciousness have a direct effect on central respiratory activity. Possible mechanisms for this effect are discussed.

  4. Medullary respiratory neural activity during hypoxia in NREM and REM sleep in the cat.

    PubMed

    Lovering, Andrew T; Fraigne, Jimmy J; Dunin-Barkowski, Witali L; Vidruk, Edward H; Orem, John M

    2006-02-01

    Intact unanesthetized cats hyperventilate in response to hypocapnic hypoxia in both wakefulness and sleep. This hyperventilation is caused by increases in diaphragmatic activity during inspiration and expiration. In this study, we recorded 120 medullary respiratory neurons during sleep in hypoxia. Our goal was to understand how these neurons change their activity to increase breathing efforts and frequency in response to hypoxia. We found that the response of medullary respiratory neurons to hypoxia was variable. While the activity of a small majority of inspiratory (58%) and expiratory (56%) neurons was increased in response to hypoxia, the activity of a small majority of preinspiratory (57%) neurons was decreased. Cells that were more active in hypoxia had discharge rates that averaged 183% (inspiratory decrementing), 154% (inspiratory augmenting), 155% (inspiratory), 230% (expiratory decrementing), 191% (expiratory augmenting), and 136% (expiratory) of the rates in normoxia. The response to hypoxia was similar in non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) and REM sleep. Additionally, changes in the profile of activity were observed in all cell types examined. These changes included advanced, prolonged, and abbreviated patterns of activity in response to hypoxia; for example, some inspiratory neurons prolonged their discharge into expiration during the postinspiratory period in hypoxia but not in normoxia. Although changes in activity of the inspiratory neurons could account for the increased breathing efforts and activity of the diaphragm observed during hypoxia, the mechanisms responsible for the change in respiratory rate were not revealed by our data.

  5. Amyloidosis involving the respiratory system: 5-year's experience of a multi-disciplinary group's activity

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Raffaele; Maccari, Uberto; Madioni, Chiara; Venezia, Duccio; La Magra, Lidia Calogera

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis may involve the respiratory system with different clinical-radiological-functional patterns which are not always easy to be recognized. A good level of knowledge of the disease, an active integration of the pulmonologist within a multidisciplinary setting and a high level of clinical suspicion are necessary for an early diagnosis of respiratory amyloidosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the number and the patterns of amyloidosis involving the respiratory system. We searched the cases of amyloidosis among patients attending the multidisciplinary rare and diffuse lung disease outpatients' clinic of Pulmonology Unit of the Hospital of Arezzo from 2007 to 2012. Among the 298 patients evaluated during the study period, we identified three cases of amyloidosis with involvement of the respiratory system, associated or not with other extra-thoracic localizations, whose diagnosis was histo-pathologically confirmed after the pulmonologist, the radiologist, and the pathologist evaluation. Our experience of a multidisciplinary team confirms that intra-thoracic amyloidosis is an uncommon disorder, representing 1.0% of the cases of rare and diffuse lung diseases referred to our center. The diagnosis of the disease is not always easy and quick as the amyloidosis may involve different parts of the respiratory system (airways, pleura, parenchyma). It is therefore recommended to remind this orphan disease in the differential diagnosis of the wide clinical scenarios the pulmonologist may intercept in clinical practice. PMID:26229565

  6. A prospective study of respiratory infections in 12-year-old children actively engaged in sports.

    PubMed

    Osterback, L; Qvarnberg, Y

    1987-11-01

    Data on the incidence of respiratory tract infections, antimicrobial treatment, days with fever and absence from school on account of these infections were studied in children participating in extracurricular sports activities with regular supervised training and competitive events. Swimmers, ice-hockey players and apparatus gymnasts were compared to a control group of children. Their mean age was 12.7 years at the end of the one year study. The children were examined three times during the year. More information was collected by a nurse who contacted the mothers of the children every two months. The girls had contracted more respiratory tract infections than the boys during the study. This difference was only seen regarding common colds, not regarding major bacterial respiratory infections, i.e. otitis media, tonsillitis, sinusitis and pneumonia. Because of this difference the results were analysed separately for the sexes. No differences between the sports and the control groups were seen in any respect regarding respiratory infections. Contrary to general opinion, sports participation does not seem to have a preventive effect on the occurrence of respiratory infections in children.

  7. Amyloidosis involving the respiratory system: 5-year's experience of a multi-disciplinary group's activity.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele; Maccari, Uberto; Madioni, Chiara; Venezia, Duccio; La Magra, Lidia Calogera

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis may involve the respiratory system with different clinical-radiological-functional patterns which are not always easy to be recognized. A good level of knowledge of the disease, an active integration of the pulmonologist within a multidisciplinary setting and a high level of clinical suspicion are necessary for an early diagnosis of respiratory amyloidosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the number and the patterns of amyloidosis involving the respiratory system. We searched the cases of amyloidosis among patients attending the multidisciplinary rare and diffuse lung disease outpatients' clinic of Pulmonology Unit of the Hospital of Arezzo from 2007 to 2012. Among the 298 patients evaluated during the study period, we identified three cases of amyloidosis with involvement of the respiratory system, associated or not with other extra-thoracic localizations, whose diagnosis was histo-pathologically confirmed after the pulmonologist, the radiologist, and the pathologist evaluation. Our experience of a multidisciplinary team confirms that intra-thoracic amyloidosis is an uncommon disorder, representing 1.0% of the cases of rare and diffuse lung diseases referred to our center. The diagnosis of the disease is not always easy and quick as the amyloidosis may involve different parts of the respiratory system (airways, pleura, parenchyma). It is therefore recommended to remind this orphan disease in the differential diagnosis of the wide clinical scenarios the pulmonologist may intercept in clinical practice.

  8. Effect of mitochondrial genome rearrangement on respiratory activity, photosynthesis, photorespiration and energy status of MSC16 cucumber (Cucumis sativus) mutant.

    PubMed

    Juszczuk, Izabela M; Flexas, Jaume; Szal, Bozena; Dabrowska, Zofia; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel; Rychter, Anna M

    2007-12-01

    The effects of changes in mitochondrial DNA in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) mosaic mutant (MSC16) on respiration, photosynthesis and photorespiration were analyzed under non-stressed conditions. Decreased respiratory capacity of complex I in MSC16 mitochondria was indicated by lower respiration rates of intact mitochondria with malate and by rotenone-inhibited NADH or malate oxidation in the presence of alamethicin. Moreover, blue native PAGE indicated decreased intensity of protein bands of respiratory chain complex I in MSC16 leaves. Concerning the redox state, complex I impairment could be compensated to some extent by increased external NADH dehydrogenases (ND(ex)NADH) and alternative oxidase (AOX) capacity, the latter presenting differential expression in the light and in the dark. Although MSC16 mitochondria have a higher AOX protein level and an increased capacity, the AOX activity measured in the dark conditions by oxygen discrimination technique is similar to that in wild-type (WT) plants. Photosynthesis induction by light followed different patterns in WT and MSC16, suggesting changes in feedback chloroplast DeltapH caused by different adenylate levels. At steady-state, net photosynthesis was only slightly impaired in MSC16 mutants, while photorespiration rate (PR) was significantly increased. This was the result of large decreases in both stomatal and mesophyll conductance to CO2, which resulted in a lower CO2 concentration in the chloroplasts. The observed changes on CO2 diffusion caused by mitochondrial mutations open a whole new view of interaction between organelle metabolism and whole tissue physiology. The sum of all the described changes in photosynthetic and respiratory metabolism resulted in a lower ATP availability and a slower plant growth.

  9. Utilization of the respiratory virus multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction test for adult patients at a Korean tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Mi Young; Choi, Seong-Ho; Chung, Jin-Won; Kim, Hye Ryoun

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory viruses (RVs) are considered to be important respiratory pathogens in adult patients, and the multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test is used frequently in adult patients with respiratory infections. However, clinical data regarding utilization of the multiplex RT-PCR test for RVs are lacking. We investigated the utilization of the multiplex RT-PCR test for RVs at Chung-Ang University Hospital in Seoul, Korea, between January 2012 and April 2013. During the study period, the multiplex RT-PCR test was performed for 291 adult patients. The test frequency was 4.9% of rapid influenza antigen detection tests and 0.8% of respiratory bacterial culture studies. A turnaround time of < 48 hours was observed in 25.9% of positive tests. Most of the tests were performed for admitted patients (97.9%) with a community-acquired infection (84.2%) during the flu season (82.5%). RVs were detected in 81 of 291 cases (27.8%). The RV positivity rates for community- and hospital-acquired infections did not differ (28.6% vs. 23.9%, p = 0.52). Of 166 patients with pneumonia, 44 (26.5%) had a viral infection. Among the patients with RV-associated pneumonia, an RV other than influenza was detected in 20 patients (45.4%). The multiplex RT-PCR test for RVs was infrequently performed at a tertiary care center, and the test results were often reported late. The test was most often performed for admitted adult patients with community-acquired infections during the flu season. The utilization of multiplex RT-PCR testing for RVs in current clinical practice should be improved.

  10. [Physical activity and respiratory tract diseases asthma and allergy].

    PubMed

    Carlsen, K H

    2000-11-10

    This article presents a review of the relationship between physical training and airways diseases: the relationship between physical activity and the development of airways diseases, and the effect of physical training in rehabilitation after airways diseases. The article is a systematic review of exercise-induced asthma (EIA), the effect of physical training upon bronchial hyperresponsiveness and the development of asthma; how chronic lung diseases affect the ability to participate in physical activity; and the use of physical training in rehabilitation after airways diseases. Physical training may provoke EIA in asthmatic patients. Furthermore, heavy regular training over long periods of time may contribute to the development of asthma. Mastering EIA is an important goal in the management of asthma, especially in children and adolescents, in order to foster normal physical and mental development. Physical training improves fitness and the mastering of asthma, but not of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma activity. In other airways disorders like cystic fibrosis or chronic obstructive lung disease, a reduced lung function may limit the ability to participate in physical activity. Training is an important tool in the rehabilitation of patients with pulmonary disorders as it improves physical fitness and quality of life.

  11. Respiratory Tract Infections and the Role of Biologically Active Polysaccharides in Their Management and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Jesenak, Milos; Urbancikova, Ingrid; Banovcin, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are the most common form of infections in every age category. Recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs), a specific form of RTIs, represent a typical and common problem associated with early childhood, causing high indirect and direct costs on the healthcare system. They are usually the consequence of immature immunity in children and high exposure to various respiratory pathogens. Their rational management should aim at excluding other severe chronic diseases associated with increased morbidity (e.g., primary immunodeficiency syndromes, cystic fibrosis, and ciliary dyskinesia) and at supporting maturity of the mucosal immune system. However, RRTIs can also be observed in adults (e.g., during exhausting and stressful periods, chronic inflammatory diseases, secondary immunodeficiencies, or in elite athletes) and require greater attention. Biologically active polysaccharides (e.g., β-glucans) are one of the most studied natural immunomodulators with a pluripotent mode of action and biological activity. According to many studies, they possess immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, and anti-infectious activities and therefore could be suggested as an effective part of treating and preventing RTIs. Based on published studies, the application of β-glucans was proven as a possible therapeutic and preventive approach in managing and preventing recurrent respiratory tract infections in children (especially β-glucans from Pleurotus ostreatus), adults (mostly the studies with yeast-derived β-glucans), and in elite athletes (studies with β-glucans from Pleurotus ostreatus or yeast). PMID:28726737

  12. ADP stimulates the respiratory burst without activation of ERK and AKT in rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gozal, E; Forman, H J; Torres, M

    2001-09-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are the first line of defense against infection in the lungs. We previously showed that the production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, i.e., the respiratory burst, is stimulated by adenine nucleotides (ADP > ATP) in rat AM through signaling pathways involving calcium and protein kinase C. Here, we further show that ADP induces a rapid increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins that was reduced by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, which also inhibited the respiratory burst. Interestingly, ADP did not trigger the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1 and ERK2, or that of protein kinase B/AKT, a downstream target of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. This is in contrast to another stimulus of the respiratory burst, zymosan-activated serum (ZAS), which activates both the ERK and PI3K pathways. Thus, this study demonstrates that the receptor for ADP in rat AM is not coupled to the ERK and AKT pathways and, that neither the ERK pathway nor AKT is essential to induce the activation of the NAPDH oxidase by ADP in rat AM while tyrosine kinases appeared to be required. The rate and amount of hydrogen peroxide released by the ADP-stimulated respiratory burst was similar to that produced by ZAS stimulation. The absence of ERK activation after ADP stimulation therefore suggests that hydrogen peroxide is not sufficient to activate the ERK pathway in rat AM. Nonetheless, as hydrogen peroxide was necessary for ERK activation by ZAS, this indicates that, in contrast to ADP, ZAS stimulates a pathway that is targeted by hydrogen peroxide and leads to ERK activation.

  13. Calcium imaging of neuronal activity in the most rostral parafacial respiratory group of the newborn rat.

    PubMed

    Onimaru, Hiroshi; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The parafacial respiratory group (pFRG) is thought to be involved in respiratory rhythm generation in neonates. This subgroup expresses the transcription factor, Phox2b, and contains intrinsically CO(2) sensitive neurons. Calcium imaging has been widely used for analysis of neuronal activity at the cellular and network level. In the present study, we applied calcium imaging to analyze neuronal activity of the most-rostral pFRG in an in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparation from neonatal rats. We detected strong pre-inspiratory neuron activity in the most rostral pFRG, suggesting that significant numbers of pre-inspiratory neurons are localized in the ventrolateral medulla near the rostral end of the medulla. We show that usage of calcium imaging would be very useful for analysis of neuronal activity over different time scales, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this method.

  14. PKCepsilon activation augments cardiac mitochondrial respiratory post-anoxic reserve--a putative mechanism in PKCepsilon cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Joy; McLeod, Christopher J; Minners, Jan; Essop, M Faadiel; Ping, Peipei; Sack, Michael N

    2005-04-01

    Modest cardiac-overexpression of constitutively active PKCepsilon (aPKCepsilon) in transgenic mice evokes cardioprotection against ischemia. As aPKCepsilon interacts with mitochondrial respiratory-chain proteins we hypothesized that aPKCepsilon modulates respiration to induce cardioprotection. Using isolated cardiac mitochondria wild-type and aPKCepsilon mice display similar basal mitochondrial respiration, rate of ATP synthesis and adenosine nucleotide translocase (ANT) functional content. Conversely, the aPKCepsilon mitochondria exhibit modest hyperpolarization of their inner mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) compared to wild-type mitochondrial by flow cytometry. To assess whether this hyperpolarization engenders resilience to simulated ischemia, anoxia-reoxygenation experiments were performed. Mitochondria were exposed to 45 min anoxia followed by reoxygenation. At reoxygenation, aPKCepsilon mitochondria recovered ADP-dependent respiration to 44 +/- 3% of baseline compared to 28 +/- 2% in WT controls (P = 0.03) in parallel with enhanced ATP synthesis. This preservation in oxidative phosphorylation is coupled to greater ANT functional content [42% > concentration of atractyloside for inhibition in the aPKCepsilon mitochondria vs. WT control (P < 0.0001)], retention of mitochondrial cytochrome c and conservation of DeltaPsi(m). These data demonstrate that mitochondria from PKCepsilon activated mice are intrinsically resilient to anoxia-reoxygenation compared to WT controls. This resilience is in part due to enhanced recovery of oxidative phosphorylation coupled to maintained ANT activity. As maintenance of ATP is a prerequisite for cellular viability we conclude that PKCepsilon activation augmented mitochondrial respiratory capacity in response to anoxia-reoxygenation may contribute to the PKCepsilon cardioprotective program.

  15. [Activity of an ampicillin/sulbactam combination in respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, P; Manara, G; Grassi, G; Gialdroni Grassi, G

    1989-01-01

    The combination of sulbactam (S) plus ampicillin (A) extends the activity of ampicillin (Amp) against beta-lactamase producing strains. This combination is therefore useful in many clinical situations including LRTI. A clinical trial was carried out to evaluate the clinical and bacteriological efficacy of S-Amp in LRTI in comparison with Amp alone. Concerning clinical outcome the results were satisfactory in 83.3% of cases for S-Amp group and 82.3% of cases for Amp group. Pathogen eradication was achieved in 87.5% and 70.5% of cases respectively for the S-Amp and Amp group.

  16. Smart helmet: Monitoring brain, cardiac and respiratory activity.

    PubMed

    von Rosenberg, Wilhelm; Chanwimalueang, Theerasak; Goverdovsky, Valentin; Mandic, Danilo P

    2015-01-01

    The timing of the assessment of the injuries following a road-traffic accident involving motorcyclists is absolutely crucial, particularly in the events with head trauma. Standard apparatus for monitoring cardiac activity is usually attached to the limbs or the torso, while the brain function is routinely measured with a separate unit connected to the head-mounted sensors. In stark contrast to these, we propose an integrated system which incorporates the two functionalities inside an ordinary motorcycle helmet. Multiple fabric electrodes were mounted inside the helmet at positions featuring good contact with the skin at different sections of the head. The experimental results demonstrate that the R-peaks (and therefore the heart rate) can be reliably extracted from potentials measured with electrodes on the mastoids and the lower jaw, while the electrodes on the forehead enable the observation of neural signals. We conclude that various vital sings and brain activity can be readily recorded from the inside of a helmet in a comfortable and inconspicuous way, requiring only a negligible setup effort.

  17. Cycle-by-cycle assembly of respiratory network activity is dynamic and stochastic

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Rhythmically active networks are typically composed of neurons that can be classified as silent, tonic spiking, or rhythmic bursting based on their intrinsic activity patterns. Within these networks, neurons are thought to discharge in distinct phase relationships with their overall network output, and it has been hypothesized that bursting pacemaker neurons may lead and potentially trigger cycle onsets. We used multielectrode recording from 72 experiments to test these ideas in rhythmically active slices containing the pre-Bötzinger complex, a region critical for breathing. Following synaptic blockade, respiratory neurons exhibited a gradient of intrinsic spiking to rhythmic bursting activities and thus defied an easy classification into bursting pacemaker and nonbursting categories. Features of their firing activity within the functional network were analyzed for correlation with subsequent rhythmic bursting in synaptic isolation. Higher firing rates through all phases of fictive respiration statistically predicted bursting pacemaker behavior. However, a cycle-by-cycle analysis indicated that respiratory neurons were stochastically activated with each burst. Intrinsically bursting pacemakers led some population bursts and followed others. This variability was not reproduced in traditional fully interconnected computational models, while sparsely connected network models reproduced these results both qualitatively and quantitatively. We hypothesize that pacemaker neurons do not act as clock-like drivers of the respiratory rhythm but rather play a flexible and dynamic role in the initiation and stabilization of each burst. Thus, at the behavioral level, each breath can be thought of as de novo assembly of a stochastic collaboration of network topology and intrinsic properties. PMID:22993257

  18. Active Multienzyme Assemblies for Long-Chain Olefinic Hydrocarbon Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Christenson, James K; Jensen, Matthew R; Goblirsch, Brandon R; Mohamed, Fatuma; Zhang, Wei; Wilmot, Carrie M; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2017-05-01

    Bacteria from different phyla produce long-chain olefinic hydrocarbons derived from an OleA-catalyzed Claisen condensation of two fatty acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) substrates, followed by reduction and oxygen elimination reactions catalyzed by the proteins OleB, OleC, and OleD. In this report, OleA, OleB, OleC, and OleD were individually purified as soluble proteins, and all were found to be essential for reconstituting hydrocarbon biosynthesis. Recombinant coexpression of tagged OleABCD proteins from Xanthomonas campestris in Escherichia coli and purification over His6 and FLAG columns resulted in OleA separating, while OleBCD purified together, irrespective of which of the four Ole proteins were tagged. Hydrocarbon biosynthetic activity of copurified OleBCD assemblies could be reconstituted by adding separately purified OleA. Immunoblots of nondenaturing gels using anti-OleC reacted with X. campestris crude protein lysate indicated the presence of a large protein assembly containing OleC in the native host. Negative-stain electron microscopy of recombinant OleBCD revealed distinct large structures with diameters primarily between 24 and 40 nm. Assembling OleB, OleC, and OleD into a complex may be important to maintain stereochemical integrity of intermediates, facilitate the movement of hydrophobic metabolites between enzyme active sites, and protect the cell against the highly reactive β-lactone intermediate produced by the OleC-catalyzed reaction.IMPORTANCE Bacteria biosynthesize hydrophobic molecules to maintain a membrane, store carbon, and for antibiotics that help them survive in their niche. The hydrophobic compounds are often synthesized by a multidomain protein or by large multienzyme assemblies. The present study reports on the discovery that long-chain olefinic hydrocarbons made by bacteria from different phyla are produced by multienzyme assemblies in X. campestris The OleBCD multienzyme assemblies are thought to compartmentalize and sequester olefin

  19. HCN channels contribute to serotonergic modulation of ventral surface chemosensitive neurons and respiratory activity

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Virginia E.; Hawryluk, Joanna M.; Takakura, Ana C.; Tzingounis, Anastasios V.; Moreira, Thiago S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemosensitive neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) provide a CO2/H+-dependent drive to breathe and function as an integration center for the respiratory network, including serotonergic raphe neurons. We recently showed that serotonergic modulation of RTN chemoreceptors involved inhibition of KCNQ channels and activation of an unknown inward current. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are the molecular correlate of the hyperpolarization-activated inward current (Ih) and have a high propensity for modulation by serotonin. To investigate whether HCN channels contribute to basal activity and serotonergic modulation of RTN chemoreceptors, we characterize resting activity and the effects of serotonin on RTN chemoreceptors in vitro and on respiratory activity of anesthetized rats in the presence or absence of blockers of KCNQ (XE991) and/or HCN (ZD7288, Cs+) channels. We found in vivo that bilateral RTN injections of ZD7288 increased respiratory activity and in vitro HCN channel blockade increased activity of RTN chemoreceptors under control conditions, but this was blunted by KCNQ channel inhibition. Furthermore, in vivo unilateral RTN injection of XE991 plus ZD7288 eliminated the serotonin response, and in vitro serotonin sensitivity was eliminated by application of XE991 and ZD7288 or SQ22536 (adenylate cyclase blocker). Serotonin-mediated activation of RTN chemoreceptors was blocked by a 5-HT7-receptor blocker and mimicked by a 5-HT7-receptor agonist. In addition, serotonin caused a depolarizing shift in the voltage-dependent activation of Ih. These results suggest that HCN channels contribute to resting chemoreceptor activity and that serotonin activates RTN chemoreceptors and breathing in part by a 5-HT7 receptor-dependent mechanism and downstream activation of Ih. PMID:25429115

  20. Real-time detection of respiratory activity using an inertial measurement unit.

    PubMed

    Gollee, Henrik; Chen, Wei

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the use of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to measure respiratory activity is presented. Movement of the abdomen was recorded by an IMU attached to a belt around the abdomen. The resulting signal was compared with reference measurements of the airflow at the mouth. The results of experimental evaluation show that the method can correctly detect the number of breaths together with the timing of the onsets of expiration and inspiration in real-time. They also indicate that the signal can be used to differentiate between different breathing situations. This novel method could therefore be suitable for use in automatic abdominal stimulation systems to support respiratory activity in tetraplegia where the stimulation is applied depending on the respirator activity of the subject.

  1. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  2. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain gene expression by activated blood monocytes precedes the expression of the PDGF A-chain gene

    SciTech Connect

    Martinet, Y.; Jaffe, H.A.; Yamauchi, K.; Betsholtz, C.; Westermark, B.; Heldin, C.H.; Crystal, R.G.

    1987-05-01

    When activated, normal human blood monocytes are known to express the c-sis proto-oncogene coding for PDGF B-chain. Since normal human platelet PDGF molecules are dimers of A and B chains and platelets and monocytes are derived from the same marrow precursors, activated blood monocytes were simultaneously evaluated for their expression of PDGF A and B chain genes. Human blood monocytes were purified by adherence, cultured with or without activation by lipopolysaccharide and poly(A)+ RNA evaluated using Northern analysis and /sup 32/P-labeled A-chain and B-chain (human c-sis) probes. Unstimulated blood monocytes did not express either A-chain or B-chain genes. In contrast, activated monocytes expressed a 4.2 kb mRNA B-chain transcript at 4 hr, but the B-chain mRNA levels declined significantly over the next 18 hr. In comparison, activated monocytes expressed very little A-chain mRNA at 4 hr, but at 12 hr 1.9, 2.3, and 2.8 kb transcripts were observed and persisted through 24 hr. Thus, activation of blood monocytes is followed by PDGF B-chain gene expression preceding PDGF A-chain gene expression, suggesting a difference in the regulation of the expression of the genes for these two chains by these cells.

  3. Complete amino acid sequence of globin chains and biological activity of fragmented crocodile hemoglobin (Crocodylus siamensis).

    PubMed

    Srihongthong, Saowaluck; Pakdeesuwan, Anawat; Daduang, Sakda; Araki, Tomohiro; Dhiravisit, Apisak; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2012-08-01

    Hemoglobin, α-chain, β-chain and fragmented hemoglobin of Crocodylus siamensis demonstrated both antibacterial and antioxidant activities. Antibacterial and antioxidant properties of the hemoglobin did not depend on the heme structure but could result from the compositions of amino acid residues and structures present in their primary structure. Furthermore, thirteen purified active peptides were obtained by RP-HPLC analyses, corresponding to fragments in the α-globin chain and the β-globin chain which are mostly located at the N-terminal and C-terminal parts. These active peptides operate on the bacterial cell membrane. The globin chains of Crocodylus siamensis showed similar amino acids to the sequences of Crocodylus niloticus. The novel amino acid substitutions of α-chain and β-chain are not associated with the heme binding site or the bicarbonate ion binding site, but could be important through their interactions with membranes of bacteria.

  4. [Role of the medial region of the hypothalamus in regulating the activity of the respiratory neurons of the medulla oblongata].

    PubMed

    Baklavadzhian, O G; Nersesian, L B

    1976-10-01

    The influence of high frequency stimulation of postero- and anteromedial hypothalamic regions on the activity of single neurons of the bulbar respiratory center was studied in anesthetized cats with normal respiration. No strictly localized facilitatory or inhibitory points were found in these regions. Excitatory as well as inhibitory descending pathways were activated by the hypothalamic stimulation. The effect was mainly facilitating. The excitatory and inhibitory influences of the medial hypothalamus modulated spike activity of both inspiratory and expiratory neurons of the bulbar respiratory center. Some functional aspects of the mechanism for hypothalamic regulation of the activity of bulbar respiratory neurons are discussed.

  5. Time well spent? Assessing nursing-supply chain activities.

    PubMed

    Ferenc, Jeff

    2010-02-01

    The amount of time nurses spend providing direct patient care seems to be continually eroding. So it's little wonder a survey conducted last year of critical care, OR nurses and nurse executives found that half of the 1600 respondents feel they spend too much time on supply chain duties. Most also said their supply chain duties impact patient safe ty and their ability to provide bedside care. Experts interviewed for this report believe it's time for supply chain leaders and nurses to develop a closer working partnership. Included are their recommendations to improve performance.

  6. Effect of Structured Physical Activity on Respiratory Outcomes in Sedentary Elders With Mobility Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Anton, Stephen D.; Liu, Christine K.; McDermott, Mary M.; Newman, Anne B.; Pahor, Marco; Stafford, Randall S.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the effect of structured physical activity on respiratory outcomes in community-dwelling elders with mobility limitations. DESIGN Multicenter, randomized trial of physical activity versus health education, with respiratory variables pre-specified as tertiary outcomes over an intervention period of 24–42 months. Physical activity included walking (goal of 150 minutes/week) and strength, flexibility, and balance training. Health education included workshops on topics relevant to older adults and upper extremity stretching exercises. SETTING Lifestyle Interventions and Independence in Elder (LIFE) Study. PARTICIPANTS 1635 community-dwelling persons, aged 70–89, with Short Physical Performance Battery scores <10. MEASUREMENTS Dyspnea severity (defined as moderate-to-severe by a Borg index >2, immediately after a 400-m walk), forced expiratory volume in 1-second (FEV1) (respiratory muscle weakness) were assessed at baseline and 6, 18, and 30 months. In addition, hospitalization for exacerbation of obstructive airways disease (EOAD) and pneumonia were ascertained over the 42-month follow-up period. RESULTS The randomized groups were similar on baseline demographics, including mean age (79 years) and sex (67% female). Relative to health education, physical activity had no effect on dyspnea severity, FEV1, or MIP, but was associated with a higher likelihood of hospitalization, significantly for EOAD (hazard ratio 2.34 (1.19, 4.61), p=.01) and marginally for pneumonia (hazard ratio 1.54 (0.98, 2.42), p=.06). CONCLUSION Among older persons with mobility limitations, physical activity was associated with a higher likelihood of respiratory hospitalization, relative to health education, but this effect was not accompanied by differences in dyspnea severity, FEV1, or MIP — raising the possibility that higher hospital utilization could be

  7. Probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection and typing of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Canada.

    PubMed

    Eschbaumer, Michael; Li, Wansi May; Wernike, Kerstin; Marshall, Frank; Czub, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has tremendous impact on the pork industry in North America. The molecular diagnosis of infection with PRRS virus (PRRSV) is hampered by its considerable strain diversity. In this study, 43 previously published or newly developed primers for probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were evaluated on their sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and repeatability, using a diverse panel of 36 PRRSV strains as well as other arteriviruses and unrelated porcine viruses. Three primer pairs had excellent diagnostic and analytical sensitivity on par with a probe-based reference assay, absolute specificity to virus genotype and species, as well as over 95% reproducibility and repeatability across a wide dynamic range.

  8. Sympathetic network drive during water deprivation does not increase respiratory or cardiac rhythmic sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Holbein, Walter W; Toney, Glenn M

    2013-06-15

    Effects of water deprivation on rhythmic bursting of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) were investigated in anesthetized, bilaterally vagotomized, euhydrated (control) and 48-h water-deprived (WD) rats (n = 8/group). Control and WD rats had similar baseline values of mean arterial pressure, heart rate, end-tidal CO2, and central respiratory drive. Although integrated splanchnic SNA (sSNA) was greater in WD rats than controls (P < 0.01), analysis of respiratory rhythmic bursting of sSNA revealed that inspiratory rhythmic burst amplitude was actually smaller (P < 0.005) in WD rats (+68 ± 6%) than controls (+208 ± 20%), and amplitudes of the early expiratory (postinspiratory) trough and late expiratory burst of sSNA were not different between groups. Further analysis revealed that water deprivation had no effect on either the amplitude or periodicity of the cardiac rhythmic oscillation of sSNA. Collectively, these data indicate that the increase of sSNA produced by water deprivation is not attributable to either increased respiratory or cardiac rhythmic burst discharge. Thus the sympathetic network response to acute water deprivation appears to differ from that of chronic sympathoexcitation in neurogenic forms of arterial hypertension, where increased respiratory rhythmic bursting of SNA and baroreflex adaptations have been reported.

  9. The fluorescence intensity of the lipophilic probe N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine responds to the oxidation-reduction state of the respiratory chain in everted membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, E G; Bragg, P D

    1987-06-22

    N-Phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN), a reagent which has been used previously to probe the fluidity or microviscosity of the membrane lipids of intact cells of Escherichia coli, was found to respond to metabolic changes in everted inner membrane vesicles from this organism. NPN was bound to the vesicles to produce a steady-state level of fluorescence intensity. Addition of substrate or ATP did not alter the fluorescence. However, following complete removal of oxygen from the medium by oxidation of substrate through the respiratory chain, there was an increase in the fluorescence of NPN. Reoxidation of the components of the respiratory chain by the addition of oxygen, ferricyanide, fumarate or nitrate decreased fluorescence to the steady-state level until the oxidant had been completely reduced. The fluorescence changes were insensitive to the state of energization of the membrane. It is proposed that NPN responds to the state of reduction of components of the respiratory chain either directly by reacting with a component of the chain or indirectly through an effect transmitted to the membrane by a change in the conformation of respiratory chain components.

  10. Activation of the granzyme pathway in children with severe respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bem, Reinout A; Bos, Albert P; Bots, Michael; Wolbink, Angela M; van Ham, S Marieke; Medema, Jan Paul; Lutter, Rene; van Woensel, Job B M

    2008-06-01

    Granzymes (Grs), serine proteases present in granules of effector lymphocytes, are involved in several host immune responses, including the activation of cell death and inflammatory pathways. The main goal of this study was to determine whether the local cell-mediated Gr pathway is activated during severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI) in children. Tracheal aspirates (TA) from 23 children with RSV-LRTI and 12 controls without pulmonary disease were analyzed for Gr A and B. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples from seven children with RSV-LRTI were analyzed for cellular expression of GrB. Levels of GrA and GrB in TA were significantly increased in RSV patients compared with controls and both Grs showed preserved activity. Gr levels correlated with the total leukocyte counts and IL-8 levels in the airways at several time points. However, no correlation between Gr levels and release of caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 was found. There was evidence for marked expression of GrB by both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells and natural killer cells in the respiratory tract. These findings suggest activation of the cell-mediated Gr pathway during severe RSV-LRTI in children.

  11. Acadian variant of Fanconi syndrome is caused by mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I deficiency due to a non-coding mutation in complex I assembly factor NDUFAF6.

    PubMed

    Hartmannová, Hana; Piherová, Lenka; Tauchmannová, Kateřina; Kidd, Kendrah; Acott, Philip D; Crocker, John F S; Oussedik, Youcef; Mallet, Marcel; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Stránecký, Viktor; Přistoupilová, Anna; Barešová, Veronika; Jedličková, Ivana; Živná, Martina; Sovová, Jana; Hůlková, Helena; Robins, Vicki; Vrbacký, Marek; Pecina, Petr; Kaplanová, Vilma; Houštěk, Josef; Mráček, Tomáš; Thibeault, Yves; Bleyer, Anthony J; Kmoch, Stanislav

    2016-09-15

    The Acadian variant of Fanconi Syndrome refers to a specific condition characterized by generalized proximal tubular dysfunction from birth, slowly progressive chronic kidney disease and pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. This condition occurs only in Acadians, a founder population in Nova Scotia, Canada. The genetic and molecular basis of this disease is unknown. We carried out whole exome and genome sequencing and found that nine affected individuals were homozygous for the ultra-rare non-coding variant chr8:96046914 T > C; rs575462405, whereas 13 healthy siblings were either heterozygotes or lacked the mutant allele. This variant is located in intron 2 of NDUFAF6 (NM_152416.3; c.298-768 T > C), 37 base pairs upstream from an alternative splicing variant in NDUFAF6 chr8:96046951 A > G; rs74395342 (c.298-731 A > G). NDUFAF6 encodes NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex assembly factor 6, also known as C8ORF38. We found that rs575462405-either alone or in combination with rs74395342-affects splicing and synthesis of NDUFAF6 isoforms. Affected kidney and lung showed specific loss of the mitochondria-located NDUFAF6 isoform and ultrastructural characteristics of mitochondrial dysfunction. Accordingly, affected tissues had defects in mitochondrial respiration and complex I biogenesis that were corrected with NDUFAF6 cDNA transfection. Our results demonstrate that the Acadian variant of Fanconi Syndrome results from mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I deficiency. This information may be used in the diagnosis and prevention of this disease in individuals and families of Acadian descent and broadens the spectrum of the clinical presentation of mitochondrial diseases, respiratory chain defects and defects of complex I specifically.

  12. TRMT5 Mutations Cause a Defect in Post-transcriptional Modification of Mitochondrial tRNA Associated with Multiple Respiratory-Chain Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Christopher A.; Kopajtich, Robert; D’Souza, Aaron R.; Rorbach, Joanna; Kremer, Laura S.; Husain, Ralf A.; Dallabona, Cristina; Donnini, Claudia; Alston, Charlotte L.; Griffin, Helen; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Schottmann, Gudrun; Schuelke, Markus; Romain, Nadine; Haller, Ronald G.; Ferrero, Ileana; Haack, Tobias B.; Taylor, Robert W.; Prokisch, Holger; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Deficiencies in respiratory-chain complexes lead to a variety of clinical phenotypes resulting from inadequate energy production by the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system. Defective expression of mtDNA-encoded genes, caused by mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genome, represents a rapidly growing group of human disorders. By whole-exome sequencing, we identified two unrelated individuals carrying compound heterozygous variants in TRMT5 (tRNA methyltransferase 5). TRMT5 encodes a mitochondrial protein with strong homology to members of the class I-like methyltransferase superfamily. Both affected individuals presented with lactic acidosis and evidence of multiple mitochondrial respiratory-chain-complex deficiencies in skeletal muscle, although the clinical presentation of the two affected subjects was remarkably different; one presented in childhood with failure to thrive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and the other was an adult with a life-long history of exercise intolerance. Mutations in TRMT5 were associated with the hypomodification of a guanosine residue at position 37 (G37) of mitochondrial tRNA; this hypomodification was particularly prominent in skeletal muscle. Deficiency of the G37 modification was also detected in human cells subjected to TRMT5 RNAi. The pathogenicity of the detected variants was further confirmed in a heterologous yeast model and by the rescue of the molecular phenotype after re-expression of wild-type TRMT5 cDNA in cells derived from the affected individuals. Our study highlights the importance of post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs for faithful mitochondrial function. PMID:26189817

  13. Administration of CoQ10 analogue ameliorates dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, Katrina J; Nalbandian, Angèle; Gomez, Arianna; Wei, Don; Walker, Naomi; Kimonis, Virginia E

    2015-04-01

    Genetic defects in the UBE3A gene, which encodes for the imprinted E6-AP ubiquitin E3 ligase (UBE3A), is responsible for the occurrence of Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodegenerative disorder which arises in 1 out of every 12,000-20,000 births. Classical symptoms of AS include delayed development, impaired speech, and epileptic seizures with characteristic electroencephalography (EEG) readings. We have previously reported impaired mitochondrial structure and reduced complex III in the hippocampus and cerebellum in the Ube3a(m-/p+) mice. CoQ10 supplementation restores the electron flow to the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) to ultimately increase mitochondrial antioxidant capacity. A number of recent studies with CoQ10 analogues seem promising in providing therapeutic benefit to patients with a variety of disorders. CoQ10 therapy has been reported to be safe and relatively well-tolerated at doses as high as 3000mg/day in patients with disorders of CoQ10 biosynthesis and MRC disorders. Herein, we report administration of idebenone, a potent CoQ10 analogue, to the Ube3a(m-/p+) mouse model corrects motor coordination and anxiety levels, and also improves the expression of complexes III and IV in hippocampus CA1 and CA2 neurons and cerebellum in these Ube3a(m-/p+) mice. However, treatment with idebenone illustrated no beneficial effects in the reduction of oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to suggest an improvement in mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction via bioenergetics modulation with a CoQ10 analogue. These findings may further elucidate possible cellular and molecular mechanism(s) and ultimately a clinical therapeutic approach/benefit for patients with Angelman syndrome.

  14. Non-invasive detection of respiratory muscles activity during assisted ventilation.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Laurent; Baconnier, Pierre F; Eberhard, André; Biot, Loïc; Viale, Jean-Paul; Perdrix, Jean-Pierre; Carry, Pierre-Yves

    2002-04-01

    The instantaneous pressure applied by the respiratory muscles [Pmus(t)] of a patient under ventilatory support may be continuously assessed with the help of a model of the passive respiratory system updated cycle by cycle. Inspiratory activity (IA) is considered present when Pmus goes below a given threshold. In six patients, we compared IA with (i) inspiratory activity (IAref) obtained from esophageal pressure and diaphragmatic EMG and (ii) that (IAvent) detected by the ventilator. In any case, a ventilator support onset coincides with an IA onset but the opposite is not true. IA onset is always later than IAref beginning ((0.21 +/- 0.10 s) and IA end always precedes IAref end (0.46 +/- 0.16 s). These results clearly deteriorate when the model is not updated.

  15. Automated graphic assessment of respiratory activity is superior to pulse oximetry and visual assessment for the detection of early respiratory depression during therapeutic upper endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Vargo, John J; Zuccaro, Gregory; Dumot, John A; Conwell, Darwin L; Morrow, J Brad; Shay, Steven S

    2002-06-01

    Recommendations from the American Society of Anesthesiologists suggest that monitoring for apnea using the detection of exhaled carbon dioxide (capnography) is a useful adjunct in the assessment of ventilatory status of patients undergoing sedation and analgesia. There are no data on the utility of capnography in GI endoscopy, nor is the frequency of abnormal ventilatory activity during endoscopy known. The aims of this study were to determine the following: (1) the frequency of abnormal ventilatory activity during therapeutic upper endoscopy, (2) the sensitivity of observation and pulse oximetry in the detection of apnea or disordered respiration, and (3) whether capnography provides an improvement over accepted monitoring techniques. Forty-nine patients undergoing therapeutic upper endoscopy were monitored with standard methods including pulse oximetry, automated blood pressure measurement, and visual assessment. In addition, graphic assessment of respiratory activity with sidestream capnography was performed in all patients. Endoscopy personnel were blinded to capnography data. Episodes of apnea or disordered respiration detected by capnography were documented and compared with the occurrence of hypoxemia, hypercapnea, hypotension, and the recognition of abnormal respiratory activity by endoscopy personnel. Comparison of simultaneous respiratory rate measurements obtained by capnography and by auscultation with a pretracheal stethoscope verified that capnography was an excellent indicator of respiratory rate when compared with the reference standard (auscultation) (r = 0.967, p < 0.001). Fifty-four episodes of apnea or disordered respiration occurred in 28 patients (mean duration 70.8 seconds). Only 50% of apnea or disordered respiration episodes were eventually detected by pulse oximetry. None were detected by visual assessment (p < 0.0010). Apnea/disordered respiration occurs commonly during therapeutic upper endoscopy and frequently precedes the development

  16. Population calcium imaging of spontaneous respiratory and novel motor activity in the facial nucleus and ventral brainstem in newborn mice

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Karin; Rekling, Jens C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The brainstem contains rhythm and pattern forming circuits, which drive cranial and spinal motor pools to produce respiratory and other motor patterns. Here we used calcium imaging combined with nerve recordings in newborn mice to reveal spontaneous population activity in the ventral brainstem and in the facial nucleus. In Fluo-8 AM loaded brainstem–spinal cord preparations, respiratory activity on cervical nerves was synchronized with calcium signals at the ventrolateral brainstem surface. Individual ventrolateral neurons at the level of the parafacial respiratory group showed perfect or partial synchrony with respiratory nerve bursts. In brainstem–spinal cord preparations, cut at the level of the mid-facial nucleus, calcium signals were recorded in the dorsal, lateral and medial facial subnuclei during respiratory activity. Strong activity initiated in the dorsal subnucleus, followed by activity in lateral and medial subnuclei. Whole-cell recordings from facial motoneurons showed weak respiratory drives, and electrical field potential recordings confirmed respiratory drive to particularly the dorsal and lateral subnuclei. Putative facial premotoneurons showed respiratory-related calcium signals, and were predominantly located dorsomedial to the facial nucleus. A novel motor activity on facial, cervical and thoracic nerves was synchronized with calcium signals at the ventromedial brainstem extending from the level of the facial nucleus to the medulla–spinal cord border. Cervical dorsal root stimulation induced similar ventromedial activity. The medial facial subnucleus showed calcium signals synchronized with this novel motor activity on cervical nerves, and cervical dorsal root stimulation induced similar medial facial subnucleus activity. In conclusion, the dorsal and lateral facial subnuclei are strongly respiratory-modulated, and the brainstem contains a novel pattern forming circuit that drives the medial facial subnucleus and cervical motor

  17. Plasticity and Activation of Spared Intraspinal Respiratory Circuits Following Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    progress lend considerable initial strength to the potential therapeutic value of closed-loop ISMS activation of respiratory circuits caudal to SCI . 15...insufficiency) is one of the more devastating and potentially life- threatening consequences of spinal cord injury ( SCI ) at mid- to upper-neck (i.e., cervical...with motor complete SCIs . The most common strategy involves epidural stimulation in which an electrical current is delivered to an electrode array

  18. Absence of detectable influenza RNA transmitted via aerosol during various human respiratory activities--experiments from Singapore and Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Tang, Julian W; Gao, Caroline X; Cowling, Benjamin J; Koh, Gerald C; Chu, Daniel; Heilbronn, Cherie; Lloyd, Belinda; Pantelic, Jovan; Nicolle, Andre D; Klettner, Christian A; Peiris, J S Malik; Sekhar, Chandra; Cheong, David K W; Tham, Kwok Wai; Koay, Evelyn S C; Tsui, Wendy; Kwong, Alfred; Chan, Kitty; Li, Yuguo

    2014-01-01

    Two independent studies by two separate research teams (from Hong Kong and Singapore) failed to detect any influenza RNA landing on, or inhaled by, a life-like, human manikin target, after exposure to naturally influenza-infected volunteers. For the Hong Kong experiments, 9 influenza-infected volunteers were recruited to breathe, talk/count and cough, from 0.1 m and 0.5 m distance, onto a mouth-breathing manikin. Aerosolised droplets exhaled from the volunteers and entering the manikin's mouth were collected with PTFE filters and an aerosol sampler, in separate experiments. Virus detection was performed using an in-house influenza RNA reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. No influenza RNA was detected from any of the PTFE filters or air samples. For the Singapore experiments, 6 influenza-infected volunteers were asked to breathe (nasal/mouth breathing), talk (counting in English/second language), cough (from 1 m/0.1 m away) and laugh, onto a thermal, breathing manikin. The manikin's face was swabbed at specific points (around both eyes, the nostrils and the mouth) before and after exposure to each of these respiratory activities, and was cleaned between each activity with medical grade alcohol swabs. Shadowgraph imaging was used to record the generation of these respiratory aerosols from the infected volunteers and their impact onto the target manikin. No influenza RNA was detected from any of these swabs with either team's in-house diagnostic influenza assays. All the influenza-infected volunteers had diagnostic swabs taken at recruitment that confirmed influenza (A/H1, A/H3 or B) infection with high viral loads, ranging from 10(5)-10(8) copies/mL (Hong Kong volunteers/assay) and 10(4)-10(7) copies/mL influenza viral RNA (Singapore volunteers/assay). These findings suggest that influenza RNA may not be readily transmitted from naturally-infected human source to susceptible recipients via these natural respiratory activities, within these

  19. Granule Exocytosis Contributes to Priming and Activation of the Human Neutrophil Respiratory Burst

    PubMed Central

    Uriarte, Silvia M.; Rane, Madhavi J.; Luerman, Gregory C.; Barati, Michelle T.; Ward, Richard A.; Nauseef, William M.; McLeish, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    The role of exocytosis in the human neutrophil respiratory burst was determined using a fusion protein (TAT–SNAP-23) containing the HIV transactivator of transcription (TAT) cell-penetrating sequence and the N-terminal SNARE domain of synaptosome-associated protein-23 (SNAP-23). This agent inhibited stimulated exocytosis of secretory vesicles and gelatinase and specific granules but not azurophil granules. GST pulldown showed that TAT–SNAP-23 bound to the combination of vesicle-associated membrane protein-2 and syntaxin-4 but not to either individually. TAT–SNAP-23 reduced phagocytosis-stimulated hydrogen peroxide production by 60% without affecting phagocytosis or generation of HOCl within phagosomes. TAT–SNAP-23 had no effect on fMLF-stimulated superoxide release but significantly inhibited priming of this response by TNF-α and platelet-activating factor. Pretreatment with TAT–SNAP-23 inhibited the increase in plasma membrane expression of gp91phox in TNF-α–primed neutrophils, whereas TNF-α activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK was not affected. The data demonstrate that neutrophil granule exocytosis contributes to phagocytosis-induced respiratory burst activity and plays a critical role in priming of the respiratory burst by increasing expression of membrane components of the NADPH oxidase. PMID:21642540

  20. Longevity of U cells of differentiated yeast colonies grown on respiratory medium depends on active glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Čáp, Michal; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2015-01-01

    Colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains pass through specific developmental phases when growing on solid respiratory medium. During entry into the so-called alkali phase, in which ammonia signaling is initiated, 2 prominent cell types are formed within the colonies: U cells in upper colony regions, which have a longevity phenotype and activate the expression of a large number of metabolic genes, and L cells in lower regions, which die more quickly and exhibit a starvation phenotype. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of the activities of enzymes of central carbon metabolism in lysates of both cell types and determined several fermentation end products, showing that previously reported expression differences are reflected in the different enzymatic capabilities of each cell type. Hence, U cells, despite being grown on respiratory medium, behave as fermenting cells, whereas L cells rely on respiratory metabolism and possess active gluconeogenesis. Using a spectrum of different inhibitors, we showed that glycolysis is essential for the formation, and particularly, the survival of U cells. We also showed that β-1,3-glucans that are released from the cell walls of L cells are the most likely source of carbohydrates for U cells.

  1. Respiratory modulation of the activity in sympathetic neurones supplying muscle, skin and pelvic organs in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Boczek-Funcke, A; Häbler, H J; Jänig, W; Michaelis, M

    1992-01-01

    1. The respiratory-related modulation of activity in neurones of the lumbar sympathetic outflow to skeletal muscle, skin and pelvic organs was investigated in anaesthetized, paralysed and artificially ventilated cats, using single- and multi-unit recordings. The activity of the neurones was analysed with respect to the phrenic nerve discharge under various experimental conditions. 2. Neurones tentatively classified as muscle vasoconstrictor and visceral vasoconstrictor neurones exhibited two activity peaks, one caused by baroreceptor unloading during the declining phase of the second order blood pressure waves and a respiratory drive-dependent peak in parallel with inspiration. The two peaks were separated by depressions of activity in early inspiration and post-inspiration. After cutting vagus and buffer nerves the activity peak during inspiration remained and was followed and sometimes preceded by a depression of activity. 3. The majority of the neurones tentatively classified as cutaneous vasoconstrictor neurones exhibited no respiratory modulation in their activity. Others exhibited an activity peak in expiration, an activity peak in inspiration, or a respiratory profile similar to that in muscle vasoconstrictor neurones. During increased respiratory drive (induced by hypercapnia) some neurones with unmodulated activity changed to an inspiratory or an expiratory pattern. Neurones discharging predominantly in inspiration projected preferentially to hairless skin. 4. Neurones which were tentatively classified as sudomotor neurones discharged predominantly in early expiration. 5. Some preganglionic neurones which were tentatively classified as motility-regulating neurones discharged during expiration. The majority of these neurones disclosed no respiratory modulation of their activity. 6. The study shows that different types of neurone of the lumbar sympathetic system exhibit distinct patterns of respiratory modulation in their activity. We conclude that the type

  2. Respiratory modulation of the activity in sympathetic neurones supplying muscle, skin and pelvic organs in the cat.

    PubMed

    Boczek-Funcke, A; Häbler, H J; Jänig, W; Michaelis, M

    1992-04-01

    1. The respiratory-related modulation of activity in neurones of the lumbar sympathetic outflow to skeletal muscle, skin and pelvic organs was investigated in anaesthetized, paralysed and artificially ventilated cats, using single- and multi-unit recordings. The activity of the neurones was analysed with respect to the phrenic nerve discharge under various experimental conditions. 2. Neurones tentatively classified as muscle vasoconstrictor and visceral vasoconstrictor neurones exhibited two activity peaks, one caused by baroreceptor unloading during the declining phase of the second order blood pressure waves and a respiratory drive-dependent peak in parallel with inspiration. The two peaks were separated by depressions of activity in early inspiration and post-inspiration. After cutting vagus and buffer nerves the activity peak during inspiration remained and was followed and sometimes preceded by a depression of activity. 3. The majority of the neurones tentatively classified as cutaneous vasoconstrictor neurones exhibited no respiratory modulation in their activity. Others exhibited an activity peak in expiration, an activity peak in inspiration, or a respiratory profile similar to that in muscle vasoconstrictor neurones. During increased respiratory drive (induced by hypercapnia) some neurones with unmodulated activity changed to an inspiratory or an expiratory pattern. Neurones discharging predominantly in inspiration projected preferentially to hairless skin. 4. Neurones which were tentatively classified as sudomotor neurones discharged predominantly in early expiration. 5. Some preganglionic neurones which were tentatively classified as motility-regulating neurones discharged during expiration. The majority of these neurones disclosed no respiratory modulation of their activity. 6. The study shows that different types of neurone of the lumbar sympathetic system exhibit distinct patterns of respiratory modulation in their activity. We conclude that the type

  3. The labile respiratory activity of ribcage muscles of the rat during sleep.

    PubMed

    Megirian, D; Pollard, M J; Sherrey, J H

    1987-08-01

    1. Sleep-waking states of chronically implanted rats were identified polygraphically while recording the integrated electromyogram (e.m.g.) of extrinsic (scalenus medius and levator costae) and intrinsic (external and internal interosseous intercostal and parasternal) muscles of the thoracic cage. Rats breathed air, air enriched in CO2 (5%) or air deficient in O2 (10% O2 in N2) and were free to adopt any desired posture. 2. In non-rapid eye movement (non-r.e.m.) sleep, the scalenus medius and intercostal muscles of the cephalic spaces were always inspiratory; intercostal muscles of the mid-thoracic spaces were commonly expiratory while the more caudal ones were only occasionally expiratory. Expiratory activity, when present in quiet wakefulness, extended for a variable period of time into non-r.e.m. sleep and always disappeared in r.e.m. sleep regardless of the ribcage muscle under study. 3. Inspiratory activity, when present in non-r.e.m. sleep, was unaffected, partially attenuated or abolished at entry into r.e.m. sleep. The peak integrated e.m.g. activity of ribcage muscles was measured as a function of posture, gas mixture breathed and ribcage site: (a) the greater the degree of curled-up posture, the greater the respiratory activity of scalenus medius, an effect augmented by CO2 but depressed by hypoxia, and (b) the more caudally placed ribcage muscles exhibited respiratory activity which was essentially unaffected by posture and gas mixture inspired. 4. The presence or absence of tonic activity in ribcage respiratory muscles during non-r.e.m. sleep was unrelated to posture. When tonic activity was present, it always disappeared in r.e.m. sleep. When expiratory activity was present in non-r.e.m. sleep, it too always disappeared in r.e.m. sleep. Inspiratory activity present in non-r.e.m. sleep was variably affected at entry into r.e.m. sleep; it was unchanged, partially attenuated or abolished. 5. It is concluded that thoracic cage muscles exhibit marked

  4. The labile respiratory activity of ribcage muscles of the rat during sleep.

    PubMed Central

    Megirian, D; Pollard, M J; Sherrey, J H

    1987-01-01

    1. Sleep-waking states of chronically implanted rats were identified polygraphically while recording the integrated electromyogram (e.m.g.) of extrinsic (scalenus medius and levator costae) and intrinsic (external and internal interosseous intercostal and parasternal) muscles of the thoracic cage. Rats breathed air, air enriched in CO2 (5%) or air deficient in O2 (10% O2 in N2) and were free to adopt any desired posture. 2. In non-rapid eye movement (non-r.e.m.) sleep, the scalenus medius and intercostal muscles of the cephalic spaces were always inspiratory; intercostal muscles of the mid-thoracic spaces were commonly expiratory while the more caudal ones were only occasionally expiratory. Expiratory activity, when present in quiet wakefulness, extended for a variable period of time into non-r.e.m. sleep and always disappeared in r.e.m. sleep regardless of the ribcage muscle under study. 3. Inspiratory activity, when present in non-r.e.m. sleep, was unaffected, partially attenuated or abolished at entry into r.e.m. sleep. The peak integrated e.m.g. activity of ribcage muscles was measured as a function of posture, gas mixture breathed and ribcage site: (a) the greater the degree of curled-up posture, the greater the respiratory activity of scalenus medius, an effect augmented by CO2 but depressed by hypoxia, and (b) the more caudally placed ribcage muscles exhibited respiratory activity which was essentially unaffected by posture and gas mixture inspired. 4. The presence or absence of tonic activity in ribcage respiratory muscles during non-r.e.m. sleep was unrelated to posture. When tonic activity was present, it always disappeared in r.e.m. sleep. When expiratory activity was present in non-r.e.m. sleep, it too always disappeared in r.e.m. sleep. Inspiratory activity present in non-r.e.m. sleep was variably affected at entry into r.e.m. sleep; it was unchanged, partially attenuated or abolished. 5. It is concluded that thoracic cage muscles exhibit marked

  5. Central respiratory effects on motor nerve activities after organophosphate exposure in a working heart brainstem preparation of the rat.

    PubMed

    Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Seeger, Thomas; Dutschmann, Mathias; Worek, Franz; Mörschel, Michael

    2011-09-25

    The impact of organophosphorus compound (OP) intoxication on the activity of central respiratory circuitry, causing acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition and accumulation of acetylcholine in the respiratory brainstem circuits, is not understood. We investigated the central effect of the OP Crotylsarin (CRS) on respiratory network activity using the working heart brainstem preparation, which specifically allows for the analysis of central drug effects without changes in brainstem oxygenation possibly caused by drug effects on peripheral cardio-respiratory activity. Respiratory network activity was determined from phrenic and hypoglossal or vagal nerve activities (PNA, HNA, VNA). To investigate combined central and peripheral CRS effects hypo-perfusion was used mimicking additional peripheral cardiovascular collapse. Systemic CRS application induced a brief central apnea and complete AChE-inhibition in the brainstem. Subsequently, respiration was characterised by highly significant reduced PNA minute activity, while HNA showed expiratory related extra bursting indicative for activation of un-specified oro-pharyngeal behaviour. During hypo-perfusion CRS induced significantly prolonged apnoea. In all experiments respiratory activity fully recovered after 1h. We conclude that CRS mediated AChE inhibition causes only transient central breathing disturbance. Apparently intrinsic brainstem mechanisms can compensate for cholinergic over activation. Nevertheless, combination of hypo-perfusion and CRS exposure evoke the characteristic breathing arrests associated with OP poisoning.

  6. Relation Between Prefrontal Cortex Activity and Respiratory Rate During Mental Stress Tasks: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuta; Hu, Lizhen; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    In order to clarify the central mechanism controlling respiratory rate during mental stress, we examined the relation between prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity and respiratory rate during mental arithmetic (MA) tasks. Employing two-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), we measured hemoglobin (Hb) concentration changes in the bilateral PFC during MA tasks in normal adults. To evaluate asymmetry of the PFC activity, we calculated the laterality index (LI); (R-L)/(R + L) of oxy-Hb concentration changes (R = right, L = left); positive LI scores indicate right-dominant activity, while negative scores indicate left-dominant activity. For measurements of respiratory rate, we employed a Kinect motion sensor (Microsoft). The MA tasks increased both oxy-Hb in the bilateral PFC and respiratory rate (p < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant correlation between LI and respiratory rate (r = 0.582, p < 0.02). These results indicate that the MA-induced activity in the right PFC was greater than that in the left PFC in subjects with large increases of respiratory rate, suggesting that the right PFC has a greater role in cerebral regulation of respiratory rate during mental stress.

  7. Solubilization of the O2(-)-forming activity responsible for the respiratory burst in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G; Kipnes, R S; Babior, B M

    1978-10-10

    On exposure to suitable activating agents, neutrophils sharply alter their oxygen metabolism, showing large increases in oxygen uptake, O2 and H2O2 production, and glucose consumption via the hexose monophosphate shunt. These metabolic alterations, which together are designated the "respiratory burst," are due to the activation of a system which catalyzes the reaction: 2O2 + NADPH leads to 2O2(-) + NADP. This O2(-)-forming system is found in a particulate fraction isolated from neutrophils which had been activated with opsonized zymosan. When these particles were treated with detergent under suitable conditions, the O2(-)-forming activity was released in a form which passed through a membrane filter capable of retaining species of Mr greater than 3000,000. Soluble O2(-)-forming activity was obtained from normal activated neutrophils, but not from normal resting neutrophils or from activated neutrophils obtained from patients with chronic granulomatous disease, an inherited condition in which the respiratory burst is defective. O2(-)production by the soluble system required a reduced pyridine nucleotide as electron donor, and showed a quadratic dependence on the concentration of the solubilized preparation.

  8. Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and Inspiratory Muscle Training.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Folsom, Ian A; Gaz, Dan V; Kakuk, Alynn C; Mack, Jessica L; Ver Mulm, Jacyln A

    2015-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) strengthens the muscles of respiration, improves breathing efficiency, and increases fitness. The IMT is generally performed independently of aerobic exercise; however, it is not clear whether there is added benefit of performing the IMT while simultaneously performing aerobic exercise in terms of activating and strengthening inspiratory muscles. The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of IMT on respiratory muscle electromyography (EMG) activity during stationary cycling in the upright and drops postures as compared with that when the IMT was performed alone. Diaphragm and sternocleidomastoid EMG activity was measured under different resting and cycling postures, with and without the use of the IMT at 40% maximal inspiratory pressure (n = 10; mean age 37). Cycling in an upright posture while simultaneously performing the IMT resulted in a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than while performing the IMT at rest in upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Cycling in drops postures while performing the IMT had a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than when performing the IMT at rest in either upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Sternocleidomastoid muscle activity increased with both cycling and IMT, although posture had little effect. These results support our hypothesis in that the IMT while cycling increases respiratory EMG activity to a significantly greater extent than when performing the IMT solely at rest, suggesting that the combination of IMT and cycling may provide an additive training effect.

  9. Phagocytosis and Respiratory Burst Activity in Lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus L.) Leucocytes Analysed by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Haugland, Gyri T.; Jakobsen, Ragnhild Aakre; Vestvik, Nils; Ulven, Kristian; Stokka, Lene; Wergeland, Heidrun I.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we have isolated leucocytes from peripheral blood, head kidney and spleen from lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus L.), and performed functional studies like phagocytosis and respiratory burst, as well as morphological and cytochemical analyses. Different leucocytes were identified, such as lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells with bean shaped or bilobed nuclei. In addition, cells with similar morphology as described for dendritic cells in trout were abundant among the isolated leucocytes. Flow cytometry was successfully used for measuring phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity. The phagocytic capacity and ability were very high, and cells with different morphology in all three leucocyte preparations phagocytised beads rapidly. Due to lack of available cell markers, the identity of the phagocytic cells could not be determined. The potent non-specific phagocytosis was in accordance with a high number of cells positive for myeloperoxidase, an enzyme involved in oxygen-dependent killing mechanism present in phagocytic cells. Further, high respiratory burst activity was present in the leucocytes samples, verifying a potent oxygen- dependent degradation. At present, the specific antibody immune response could not be measured, as immunoglobulin or B-cells have not yet been isolated. Therefore, analyses of the specific immune response in this fish species await further clarification. The present study presents the first analyses of lumpsucker immunity and also the first within the order Scopaeniformes. PMID:23112870

  10. Comparison of respiratory muscles activity and exercise capacity in patients with idiopathic scoliosis and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Pirayeh; Akbari, Mohammad; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Moradi, Zahra

    2014-11-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis causes respiratory muscles weakness and reduced exercise capacity. However, the mechanism of these symptoms is still unknown. The main objective of this study was to determine the intensity of respiratory muscle activity and exercise capacity in patients with idiopathic scoliosis in comparison with healthy people. In this study, 20 female patients with adult idiopathic scoliosis (10 mild and 10 moderate) as well as 10 healthy matched individuals with characteristics of the patients were selected. The subjects were fatigued through a maximal incremental cycle ergometry protocol. Meanwhile, the electromyography values of the external intercostal muscles and diaphragm were recorded bilaterally, and fatigue duration was determined. The root mean square of concave external intercostal muscles and concave diaphragm in patients with idiopathic scoliosis was significantly reduced during the fatiguing exercise protocol compared with healthy individuals. The median frequencies of the two sides differed significantly and were lower in patients with moderate scoliosis than healthy subjects. Fatigue duration (minutes) also was lower in patients with moderate scoliosis than healthy subjects. Scoliosis causes respiratory muscle weakness and reduced fatigue duration in response to mild physical activity compared with healthy subjects and these dysfunctions appear to be related to the severity of scoliosis curvature (moderate > mild).

  11. Phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity in lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus L.) leucocytes analysed by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Haugland, Gyri T; Jakobsen, Ragnhild Aakre; Vestvik, Nils; Ulven, Kristian; Stokka, Lene; Wergeland, Heidrun I

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we have isolated leucocytes from peripheral blood, head kidney and spleen from lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus L.), and performed functional studies like phagocytosis and respiratory burst, as well as morphological and cytochemical analyses. Different leucocytes were identified, such as lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells with bean shaped or bilobed nuclei. In addition, cells with similar morphology as described for dendritic cells in trout were abundant among the isolated leucocytes. Flow cytometry was successfully used for measuring phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity. The phagocytic capacity and ability were very high, and cells with different morphology in all three leucocyte preparations phagocytised beads rapidly. Due to lack of available cell markers, the identity of the phagocytic cells could not be determined. The potent non-specific phagocytosis was in accordance with a high number of cells positive for myeloperoxidase, an enzyme involved in oxygen-dependent killing mechanism present in phagocytic cells. Further, high respiratory burst activity was present in the leucocytes samples, verifying a potent oxygen- dependent degradation. At present, the specific antibody immune response could not be measured, as immunoglobulin or B-cells have not yet been isolated. Therefore, analyses of the specific immune response in this fish species await further clarification. The present study presents the first analyses of lumpsucker immunity and also the first within the order Scopaeniformes.

  12. Temporal relationships between colds, upper respiratory viruses detected by polymerase chain reaction, and otitis media in young children followed through a typical cold season.

    PubMed

    Winther, Birgit; Alper, Cuneyt M; Mandel, Ellen M; Doyle, William J; Hendley, J Owen

    2007-06-01

    Otitis media is a frequent complication of a viral upper respiratory tract infection, and the reported co-incidence of those diseases increases with assay sensitivity and sampling density. We determined the incidence of otitis-media complications in young children when referenced to cold-like illnesses and to concurrent virus recovery from the nasopharynx. A total of 60 children from 24 families were followed from October 2003 through April 30, 2004, by daily parental recording of illness signs, weekly pneumatic otoscopic examinations, and periodic polymerase chain reaction assay of collected nasal fluids for common viruses. One hundred ninety-nine cold-like illnesses were observed, but a sample for virus assay was not collected concurrent with 71 episodes. Of the remainder, 73% of cold-like illnesses were temporally related to recovery of 1 or a combination of the assayed viruses, with rhinovirus predominating. For non-cold-like illness periods, 54 (18%) of 297 assays were positive for virus, and the virus frequency distribution was similar to that for cold-like illnesses. There were 93 diagnosed otitis-media episodes; 65 (70%) of these occurred during a cold-like illness. For the 79 otitis-media episodes with available nasal samples, 61 (77%) were associated with a positive virus result. In this population, the otitis-media complication rate for a cold-like illness was 33%. A cold-like illness was not a prerequisite for polymerase chain reaction detection of viruses in the nose and nasopharynx of young children. Viral detection by polymerase chain reaction in the absence of a cold-like illness is associated with complications in some subjects. Otitis media is a complication of viral infection both with and without concurrent cold-like illnesses, thus downwardly biasing coincidence estimates that use cold-based illnesses as the denominator.

  13. Respiratory processes in non-photosynthetic plastids

    PubMed Central

    Renato, Marta; Boronat, Albert; Azcón-Bieto, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Chlororespiration is a respiratory process located in chloroplast thylakoids which consists in an electron transport chain from NAD(P)H to oxygen. This respiratory chain involves the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex, the plastoquinone pool and the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX), and it probably acts as a safety valve to prevent the over-reduction of the photosynthetic machinery in stress conditions. The existence of a similar respiratory activity in non-photosynthetic plastids has been less studied. Recently, it has been reported that tomato fruit chromoplasts present an oxygen consumption activity linked to ATP synthesis. Etioplasts and amyloplasts contain several electron carriers and some subunits of the ATP synthase, so they could harbor a similar respiratory process. This review provides an update on the study about respiratory processes in chromoplasts, identifying the major gaps that need to be addressed in future research. It also reviews the proteomic data of etioplasts and amyloplasts, which suggest the presence of a respiratory electron transport chain in these plastids. PMID:26236317

  14. Cardio-respiratory and daily activity monitor based on FMCW Doppler radar embedded in a wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Postolache, Octavian; Girão, Pedro Silva; Postolache, Gabriela; Gabriel, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Unobtrusive monitoring of the cardio-respiratory and daily activity for wheelchair users became nowadays an important challenge, considering population aging phenomena and the increasing of the elderly with chronic diseases that affect their motion capabilities. This work reports the utilization of FMCW (frequency modulated continuous wave) Doppler radar sensors embedded in a manual wheelchair to measure the cardiac and respiratory activities and the physical activity of the wheelchair user. Another radar sensor is included in the system in order to quantify the motor activity through the wheelchair traveled distance, when the user performs the manual operation of the wheelchair. A conditioning circuit including active filters and a microcontroller based primary processing module was designed and implemented to deliver the information through Bluetooth communication protocol to an Android OS tablet computer. The main capabilities of the software developed using Android SDK and Java were the signal processing of Doppler radar measurement channel signals, graphical user interface, data storage and Wi-Fi data synchronization with remote physiological and physical activity database.

  15. Functional biomimetic models for the active site in the respiratory enzyme cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Collman, James P; Decréau, Richard A

    2008-11-07

    A functional analog of the active site in the respiratory enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) reproduces every feature in CcO's active site: a myoglobin-like heme (heme a3), a distal tridentate imidazole copper complex (Cu(B)), a phenol (Tyr244), and a proximal imidazole. When covalently attached to a liquid-crystalline SAM film on an Au electrode, this functional model continuously catalyzes the selective four-electron reduction of dioxygen at physiological potential and pH, under rate-limiting electron flux (as occurs in CcO).

  16. Supply Chain Management: Are You Maximizing Your Procurement Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbin, James; Jenkins, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Today's purchasing professionals recognize the need to reduce non-value-added procedures (clerical functions) while emphasizing strategic planning. Results-oriented supply-chain managers need superb communication, negotiation, and leadership skills to achieve long-term value and resist the lowest, first- cost bids. (Contains 13 references.) (MLH)

  17. Supply Chain Management: Are You Maximizing Your Procurement Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbin, James; Jenkins, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Today's purchasing professionals recognize the need to reduce non-value-added procedures (clerical functions) while emphasizing strategic planning. Results-oriented supply-chain managers need superb communication, negotiation, and leadership skills to achieve long-term value and resist the lowest, first- cost bids. (Contains 13 references.) (MLH)

  18. From Human Activity to Conceptual Understanding of the Chain Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jojo, Zingiswa Mybert Monica; Maharaj, Aneshkumar; Brijlall, Deonarain

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a study which investigated first year university engineering students' construction of the definition of the concept of the chain rule in differential calculus at a University of Technology in South Africa. An APOS (Action-Process-Objects-Schema) approach was used to explore conceptual understanding displayed by students in…

  19. Tracking protons from respiratory chain complexes to ATP synthase c-subunit: The critical role of serine and threonine residues.

    PubMed

    Panfoli, Isabella; Ponassi, Marco; Ravera, Silvia; Calzia, Daniela; Beitia, Maider; Morelli, Alessandro; Rosano, Camillo

    2017-01-22

    F1Fo-ATP synthase is a multisubunit enzyme responsible for the synthesis of ATP. Among its multiple subunits (8 in E. coli, 17 in yeast S. cerevisiae, 16 in vertebrates), two subunits a and c are known to play a central role controlling the H(+) flow through the inner mitochondrial membrane which allows the subsequent synthesis of ATP, but the pathway followed by H(+) within the two proteins is still a matter of debate. In fact, even though the structure of ATP synthase is now well defined, the molecular mechanisms determining the function of both F1 and FO domains are still largely unknown. In this study, we propose a pathway for proton migration along the ATP synthase by hydrogen-bonded chain mechanism, with a key role of serine and threonine residues, by X-ray diffraction data on the subunit a of E. coli Fo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Newcastle disease virus infection on the binding, phagocytic, and bactericidal activities of respiratory macrophages of the turkey.

    PubMed

    Ficken, M D; Edwards, J F; Lay, J C

    1987-01-01

    Effects of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) infection on the binding, phagocytic, and bactericidal activities of turkey respiratory macrophages were studied. Respiratory macrophages of the turkey demonstrated the presence of immunoglobulin (Ig) G and complement receptors but lacked IgM receptors. Respiratory macrophages from NDV-infected turkeys showed little or no depression of binding of sheep erythrocyte-IgG complexes and sheep erythrocyte-IgM-complement complexes to their appropriate membrane receptors. In contrast, respiratory macrophages from NDV-infected turkeys showed significant (P less than or equal to 0.05) depression of phagocytosis of similar complexes. Bacterial killing by respiratory macrophages from NDV-infected turkeys was significantly (P less than or equal to 0.05) inhibited.

  1. Inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus replication and virus-induced p38 kinase activity by berberine.

    PubMed

    Shin, Han-Bo; Choi, Myung-Soo; Yi, Chae-Min; Lee, Jun; Kim, Nam-Jung; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe lower respiratory tract infection and poses a major public health threat worldwide. No effective vaccines or therapeutics are currently available; berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid from various medicinal plants, has been shown to exert antiviral and several other biological effects. Recent studies have shown that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity is implicated in infection by and replication of viruses such as RSV and the influenza virus. Because berberine has previously been implicated in modulating the activity of p38 MAPK, its effects on RSV infection and RSV-mediated p38 MAPK activation were examined. Replication of RSV in epithelial cells was significantly reduced by treatment with berberine. Berberine treatment caused decrease in viral protein and mRNA syntheses. Similar to previously reported findings, RSV infection caused phosphorylation of p38 MAPK at a very early time point of infection, and phosphorylation was dramatically reduced by berberine treatment. In addition, production of interleukin-6 mRNA upon RSV infection was significantly suppressed by treatment with berberine, suggesting the anti-inflammatory role of berberine during RSV infection. Taken together, we showed that berberine, a natural compound already proven to be safe for human consumption, suppresses the replication of RSV. In addition, the current study suggests that inhibition of RSV-mediated early p38 MAPK activation, which has been implicated as an early step in viral infection, as a potential molecular mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Postural- and respiratory-related activities of abdominal muscles during post-exercise hyperventilation.

    PubMed

    David, Pascal; Terrien, Jérémy; Petitjean, Michel

    2015-05-01

    The present study focuses on the role of superficial abdominal muscles revealed by electromyographic recordings during the maintenance of a bipedal stance perturbed by post-exercise hyperventilation. Twelve healthy subjects performed six 30-s postural tests: one pre-exercise test while breathing quietly, then one test every minute for the 5 min immediately following a maximum-intensity, incremental cycling exercise test. Displacement of the centre of pressure in the sagittal plane was monitored over time. Myoelectric activities of the obliquus externus (OE), obliquus internus (OI) and rectus abdominis (RA) muscles were recorded by surface electromyography (EMG). Metabolic parameters were measured with a portable telemetric device. The change in ventilatory drive induced by exercise was accompanied by a significant increase in both postural sway parameters and EMG activities. For OE and OI, the increased EMG activities were prominent during expiration, whereas OI was silent during inspiration. OE and RA were activated during both expiration and inspiration. It is concluded that the compensation of respiratory disturbances of the erect posture appears to be less effective when minute ventilation increases. The patterns of muscle activity suggest that abdominal muscles are controlled differentially and that their functional coordination is dependent on the respiratory demand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Patterns of laryngeal electromyography and the activity of the respiratory system during spontaneous laughter.

    PubMed

    Luschei, Erich S; Ramig, Lorraine O; Finnegan, Eileen M; Baker, Kristen K; Smith, Marshall E

    2006-07-01

    Laryngeal muscle electromyography (EMG) and measures of the behavior of the respiratory system have been made during spontaneous laughter in two groups of subjects. The smaller group also had a direct measure of tracheal pressure during this behavior. Laryngeal adductors such as the thyroarytenoid (TA) and lateral cricoarytenoid (LCA) exhibited brief high-amplitude bursts of activity, at a rate of approximately 5 Hz, which were usually associated on a 1 : 1 basis with the sound bursts (ha ha ha) of laughter. The laryngeal abductor, posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA), also showed bursts of activity that were out of phase with TA and LCA. The cricothyroid (CT) was only weakly, if at all, modulated during the bursting activity of the other laryngeal muscles. Tracheal pressure usually exhibited positive pressure pulses during laughter that were often, but not always, temporally correlated to the bursts of laryngeal adductor EMG activity. Such pressure modulations appeared to precisely determine when-and if-phonation was produced during the laugh. During laughter, laryngeal EMG is highly stereotyped both within and between subjects. In most instances, this activity appears to be supported by coordinated pulses of tracheal pressure. The periaqueductal gray (PAG) has been shown in animal studies to produce emotionally indicative vocalizations, in which the laryngeal and respiratory system are coordinated. Therefore, it is suggested that the PAG is involved with the production of laughter.

  4. Different NF-κB activation characteristics of human respiratory syncytial virus subgroups A and B.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weining; Macdonald, Andrew; Hiscox, Julian A; Barr, John N

    2012-03-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a member of the family Paramyxoviridae, and is responsible for serious respiratory illness in infants, the elderly and the immunocompromised. HRSV exists as two distinct lineages known as subgroups A and B, which represent two lines of divergent evolution with extensive genetic and serologic differences. While both subgroup A and B viruses contribute to overall HRSV disease, subgroup A isolates are associated with both increased frequency and morbidity of infections, and reasons for this are unclear. HRSV disease is characterized by virus-mediated cell destruction in combination with extensive inflammatory and immune modulatory responses, and for HRSV subgroup A isolates, several of these signaling pathways are regulated through activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. In contrast, the NF-κB activation characteristics of HRSV subgroup B infection remain untested. Here, we performed a quantitative and comparative analysis of NF-κB activation in response to infection of both continuous and primary cell cultures with HRSV subgroup A and B isolates. Our results showed the model HRSV subgroup A isolate consistently induced increased NF-κB activation compared to its HRSV subgroup B counterpart. The differential NF-κB activation characteristics of HRSV subgroup A and B viruses may contribute to differences in their pathogenesis.

  5. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Envelope Protein Ion Channel Activity Promotes Virus Fitness and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M.; Regla-Nava, Jose A.; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M.; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  6. Global alliance against chronic respiratory diseases in Italy (GARD-Italy): strategy and activities.

    PubMed

    Laurendi, Giovanna; Mele, Sonia; Centanni, Stefano; Donner, Claudio F; Falcone, Franco; Frateiacci, Sandra; Lazzeri, Marta; Mangiacavallo, Antonino; Indinnimeo, Luciana; Viegi, Giovanni; Pisanti, Paola; Filippetti, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The steady increase in incidence of chronic respiratory disease (CRD) now constitutes a serious public health problem. CRDs are often underdiagnosed and many patients are not diagnosed until the CRD is too severe to prevent normal daily activities. The prevention of CRDs and reducing their social and individual impacts means modifying environmental and social factors and improving diagnosis and treatment. Prevention of risk factors (tobacco smoke, allergens, occupational agents, indoor/outdoor air pollution) will significantly impact on morbidity and mortality. The Italian Ministry of Health (MoH) has made respiratory disease prevention a top priority and is implementing a comprehensive strategy with policies against tobacco smoking, indoor/outdoor pollution, obesity, and communicable diseases. Presently these actions are not well coordinated. The Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD), set up by the World Health Organization, envisages national bodies; the GARD initiative in Italy, launched 11/6/2009, represents a great opportunity for the MoH. Its main objective is to promote the development of a coordinated CRD program in Italy. Effective prevention implies setting up a health policy with the support of healthcare professionals and citizen associations at national, regional, and district levels. What is required is a true inter-institutional synergy: respiratory diseases prevention cannot and should not be the responsibility of doctors alone, but must involve politicians/policymakers, as well as the media, local institutions, and schools, etc. GARD could be a significant experience and a great opportunity for Italy to share the GARD vision of a world where all people can breathe freely.

  7. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae possesses an antiviral activity against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Cynthia; Provost, Chantale; Labrie, Josée; Hernandez Reyes, Yenney; Burciaga Nava, Jorge A; Gagnon, Carl A; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Pigs are often colonized by more than one bacterial and/or viral species during respiratory tract infections. This phenomenon is known as the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are pathogens that are frequently involved in PRDC. The main objective of this project was to study the in vitro interactions between these two pathogens and the host cells in the context of mixed infections. To fulfill this objective, PRRSV permissive cell lines such as MARC-145, SJPL, and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) were used. A pre-infection with PRRSV was performed at 0.5 multiplicity of infection (MOI) followed by an infection with App at 10 MOI. Bacterial adherence and cell death were compared. Results showed that PRRSV pre-infection did not affect bacterial adherence to the cells. PRRSV and App co-infection produced an additive cytotoxicity effect. Interestingly, a pre-infection of SJPL and PAM cells with App blocked completely PRRSV infection. Incubation of SJPL and PAM cells with an App cell-free culture supernatant is also sufficient to significantly block PRRSV infection. This antiviral activity is not due to LPS but rather by small molecular weight, heat-resistant App metabolites (<1 kDa). The antiviral activity was also observed in SJPL cells infected with swine influenza virus but to a much lower extent compared to PRRSV. More importantly, the PRRSV antiviral activity of App was also seen with PAM, the cells targeted by the virus in vivo during infection in pigs. The antiviral activity might be due, at least in part, to the production of interferon γ. The use of in vitro experimental models to study viral and bacterial co-infections will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between pathogens and their host cells, and could allow the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic tools.

  8. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Possesses an Antiviral Activity against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Labrie, Josée; Hernandez Reyes, Yenney; Burciaga Nava, Jorge A.; Gagnon, Carl A.; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Pigs are often colonized by more than one bacterial and/or viral species during respiratory tract infections. This phenomenon is known as the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are pathogens that are frequently involved in PRDC. The main objective of this project was to study the in vitro interactions between these two pathogens and the host cells in the context of mixed infections. To fulfill this objective, PRRSV permissive cell lines such as MARC-145, SJPL, and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) were used. A pre-infection with PRRSV was performed at 0.5 multiplicity of infection (MOI) followed by an infection with App at 10 MOI. Bacterial adherence and cell death were compared. Results showed that PRRSV pre-infection did not affect bacterial adherence to the cells. PRRSV and App co-infection produced an additive cytotoxicity effect. Interestingly, a pre-infection of SJPL and PAM cells with App blocked completely PRRSV infection. Incubation of SJPL and PAM cells with an App cell-free culture supernatant is also sufficient to significantly block PRRSV infection. This antiviral activity is not due to LPS but rather by small molecular weight, heat-resistant App metabolites (<1 kDa). The antiviral activity was also observed in SJPL cells infected with swine influenza virus but to a much lower extent compared to PRRSV. More importantly, the PRRSV antiviral activity of App was also seen with PAM, the cells targeted by the virus in vivo during infection in pigs. The antiviral activity might be due, at least in part, to the production of interferon γ. The use of in vitro experimental models to study viral and bacterial co-infections will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between pathogens and their host cells, and could allow the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic tools. PMID:24878741

  9. Noninvasive assessment of respiratory muscle strength and activity in Myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Morgana de Araújo; Dias, Fernando Augusto Lavezzo; Dourado Júnior, Mário Emílio Teixeira; do Nascimento, George Carlos; Gualdi, Lucien Peroni; Aliverti, Andrea; Resqueti, Vanessa; Fregonezi, Guilherme Augusto de Freitas

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate sensitivity/specificity of the maximum relaxation rate (MRR) of inspiratory muscles, amplitude of electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), scalene (SCA), parasternal (2ndIS) and rectus abdominis (RA) muscles; lung function and respiratory muscle strength in subjects with Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) compared with healthy subjects. Design and methods Quasi-experimental observational study with control group. MRR of inspiratory muscles, lung function and amplitude of the electromyographic activity of SCM, SCA, 2ndIS and RA muscles during maximum inspiratory pressure (PImax), maximum expiratory pressure (PEmax) and sniff nasal inspiratory pressure (SNIP) tests were assessed in eighteen DM1 subjects and eleven healthy. Results MRR was lower in DM1 group compared to healthy (P = 0.001) and was considered sensitive and specific to identify disease in DM1 and discard it in controls, as well as SNIP% (P = 0.0026), PImax% (P = 0.0077) and PEmax% (P = 0.0002). Contraction time of SCM and SCA was higher in DM1 compared to controls, respectively, during PImax (P = 0.023 and P = 0.017) and SNIP (P = 0.015 and P = .0004). The DM1 group showed lower PImax (P = .0006), PEmax (P = 0.0002), SNIP (P = 0.0014), and higher electromyographic activity of the SCM (P = 0.002) and SCA (P = 0.004) at rest; of 2ndIS (P = 0.003) during PEmax and of SCM (P = 0.02) and SCA (P = 0.03) during SNIP test. Conclusions MD1 subjects presented restrictive pattern, reduced respiratory muscle strength, muscular electrical activity and MRR when compared to higher compared to controls. In addition, the lower MRR found in MD1 subjects showed to be reliable to sensitivity and specificity in identifying the delayed relaxation of respiratory muscles. PMID:28594857

  10. Noninvasive assessment of respiratory muscle strength and activity in Myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Morgana de Araújo; Dias, Fernando Augusto Lavezzo; Dourado Júnior, Mário Emílio Teixeira; do Nascimento, George Carlos; Sarmento, Antonio; Gualdi, Lucien Peroni; Aliverti, Andrea; Resqueti, Vanessa; Fregonezi, Guilherme Augusto de Freitas

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate sensitivity/specificity of the maximum relaxation rate (MRR) of inspiratory muscles, amplitude of electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), scalene (SCA), parasternal (2ndIS) and rectus abdominis (RA) muscles; lung function and respiratory muscle strength in subjects with Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) compared with healthy subjects. Quasi-experimental observational study with control group. MRR of inspiratory muscles, lung function and amplitude of the electromyographic activity of SCM, SCA, 2ndIS and RA muscles during maximum inspiratory pressure (PImax), maximum expiratory pressure (PEmax) and sniff nasal inspiratory pressure (SNIP) tests were assessed in eighteen DM1 subjects and eleven healthy. MRR was lower in DM1 group compared to healthy (P = 0.001) and was considered sensitive and specific to identify disease in DM1 and discard it in controls, as well as SNIP% (P = 0.0026), PImax% (P = 0.0077) and PEmax% (P = 0.0002). Contraction time of SCM and SCA was higher in DM1 compared to controls, respectively, during PImax (P = 0.023 and P = 0.017) and SNIP (P = 0.015 and P = .0004). The DM1 group showed lower PImax (P = .0006), PEmax (P = 0.0002), SNIP (P = 0.0014), and higher electromyographic activity of the SCM (P = 0.002) and SCA (P = 0.004) at rest; of 2ndIS (P = 0.003) during PEmax and of SCM (P = 0.02) and SCA (P = 0.03) during SNIP test. MD1 subjects presented restrictive pattern, reduced respiratory muscle strength, muscular electrical activity and MRR when compared to higher compared to controls. In addition, the lower MRR found in MD1 subjects showed to be reliable to sensitivity and specificity in identifying the delayed relaxation of respiratory muscles.

  11. The sample of choice for detecting Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in asymptomatic dromedary camels using real-time reversetranscription polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Mohran, K A; Farag, E A B; Reusken, C B E; Raj, V S; Lamers, M M; Pas, S D; Voermans, J; Smits, S L; Alhajri, M M; Alhajri, F; Al-Romaihi, H E; Ghobashy, H; El-Maghraby, M M; Al Dhahiry, S H S; Al-Mawlawi, N; El-Sayed, A M; Al-Thani, M; Al-Marri, S A; Haagmans, B L; Koopmans, M P G

    2016-12-01

    The newly identified Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), which causes severe respiratory disease, particularly in people with comorbidities, requires further investigation. Studies in Qatar and elsewhere have provided evidence that dromedary camels are a reservoir for the virus, but the exact modes of transmission of MERS-CoV to humans remain unclear. In February 2014, an assessment was made of the suitability and sensitivity of different types of sample for the detection of MERSCoV by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for three gene targets: UpE (upstream of the E gene), the N (nucleocapsid) gene and open reading frame (ORF) 1a. Fifty-three animals presented for slaughter were sampled. A high percentage of the sampled camels (79% [95% confidence interval 66.9-91.5%, standard error 0.0625]; 42 out of 53) were shown to be shedding MERS-CoV at the time of slaughter, yet all the animals were apparently healthy. Among the virus-positive animals, nasal swabs were most often positive (97.6%). Oral swabs were the second most frequently positive (35.7%), followed by rectal swabs (28.5%). In addition, the highest viral load, expressed as a cycle threshold (Ct) value of 11.27, was obtained from a nasal swab. These findings lead to the conclusion that nasal swabs are the candidate sample of choice for detecting MERS-CoV using RT-PCR technology in apparently healthy camels.

  12. Infants fed formula with added long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids have reduced incidence of respiratory illnesses and diarrhea during the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Lapillonne, Alexandre; Pastor, Nitida; Zhuang, Weihong; Scalabrin, Deolinda M F

    2014-07-02

    Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) may influence the immune system. Our objective was to compare the frequency of common illnesses in infants who received formula with or without added LCPUFAs. In this observational, multi-center, prospective study, infants consumed formula with 17 mg DHA and 34 mg ARA/100 kcal (n = 233) or with no added DHA or ARA (n = 92). Pediatricians recorded respiratory illnesses, otitis media, eczema, and diarrhea through 1 year of age. Infants who consumed formula with DHA/ARA had lower incidence of bronchitis/bronchiolitis (P = 0.004), croup (P = 0.044), nasal congestion (P = 0.001), cough (P = 0.014), and diarrhea requiring medical attention (P = 0.034). The odds ratio (OR) of having at least one episode of bronchitis/bronchiolitis (0.41, 95% CI 0.24, 0.70; P = 0.001), croup (0.23, 95% CI 0.05, 0.97; P = 0.045), nasal congestion (0.37, 95% CI 0.20, 0.66; P = 0.001), cough (0.52, 95% CI 0.32, 0.86; P = 0.011), and diarrhea requiring medical attention (0.51, 95% CI 0.28, 0.92; P = 0.026) was lower in infants fed DHA/ARA. The OR of an increased number of episodes of bronchitis/bronchiolitis, croup, nasal congestion, cough, and diarrhea, as well as the hazard ratio for shorter time to first episode of bronchitis/bronchiolitis, nasal congestion, cough, and diarrhea were also significantly lower in the DHA/ARA group. In healthy infants, formula with DHA/ARA was associated with lower incidence of common respiratory symptoms and illnesses, as well as diarrhea.

  13. Activity of Tachykinin1-Expressing Pet1 Raphe Neurons Modulates the Respiratory Chemoreflex.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Morgan L; Corcoran, Andrea E; Brust, Rachael D; Chang, YoonJeung; Nattie, Eugene E; Dymecki, Susan M

    2017-02-15

    Homeostatic control of breathing, heart rate, and body temperature relies on circuits within the brainstem modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT). Mounting evidence points to specialized neuronal subtypes within the serotonergic neuronal system, borne out in functional studies, for the modulation of distinct facets of homeostasis. Such functional differences, read out at the organismal level, are likely subserved by differences among 5-HT neuron subtypes at the cellular and molecular levels, including differences in the capacity to coexpress other neurotransmitters such as glutamate, GABA, thyrotropin releasing hormone, and substance P encoded by the Tachykinin-1 (Tac1) gene. Here, we characterize in mice a 5-HT neuron subtype identified by expression of Tac1 and the serotonergic transcription factor gene Pet1, referred to as the Tac1-Pet1 neuron subtype. Transgenic cell labeling showed Tac1-Pet1 soma resident largely in the caudal medulla. Chemogenetic [clozapine-N-oxide (CNO)-hM4Di] perturbation of Tac1-Pet1 neuron activity blunted the ventilatory response of the respiratory CO2 chemoreflex, which normally augments ventilation in response to hypercapnic acidosis to restore normal pH and PCO2Tac1-Pet1 axonal boutons were found localized to brainstem areas implicated in respiratory modulation, with highest density in motor regions. These findings demonstrate that the activity of a Pet1 neuron subtype with the potential to release both 5-HT and substance P is necessary for normal respiratory dynamics, perhaps via motor outputs that engage muscles of respiration and maintain airway patency. These Tac1-Pet1 neurons may act downstream of Egr2-Pet1 serotonergic neurons, which were previously established in respiratory chemoreception, but do not innervate respiratory motor nuclei.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Serotonin (5-HT) neurons modulate physiological processes and behaviors as diverse as body temperature, respiration, aggression, and mood. Using genetic tools

  14. New Insights into the Respiratory Chain of Plant Mitochondria. Supercomplexes and a Unique Composition of Complex II1

    PubMed Central

    Eubel, Holger; Jänsch, Lothar; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2003-01-01

    A project to systematically investigate respiratory supercomplexes in plant mitochondria was initiated. Mitochondrial fractions from Arabidopsis, potato (Solanum tuberosum), bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), and barley (Hordeum vulgare) were carefully treated with various concentrations of the nonionic detergents dodecylmaltoside, Triton X-100, or digitonin, and proteins were subsequently separated by (a) Blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), (b) two-dimensional Blue-native/sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE, and (c) two-dimensional Blue-native/Blue-native PAGE. Three high molecular mass complexes of 1,100, 1,500, and 3,000 kD are visible on one-dimensional Blue native gels, which were identified by separations on second gel dimensions and protein analyses by mass spectrometry. The 1,100-kD complex represents dimeric ATP synthase and is only stable under very low concentrations of detergents. In contrast, the 1,500-kD complex is stable at medium and even high concentrations of detergents and includes the complexes I and III2. Depending on the investigated organism, 50% to 90% of complex I forms part of this supercomplex if solubilized with digitonin. The 3,000-kD complex, which also includes the complexes I and III, is of low abundance and most likely has a III4I2 structure. The complexes IV, II, and the alternative oxidase were not part of supercomplexes under all conditions applied. Digitonin proved to be the ideal detergent for supercomplex stabilization and also allows optimal visualization of the complexes II and IV on Blue-native gels. Complex II unexpectedly was found to be composed of seven subunits, and complex IV is present in two different forms on the Blue-native gels, the larger of which comprises additional subunits including a 32-kD protein resembling COX VIb from other organisms. We speculate that supercomplex formation between the complexes I and III limits access of alternative oxidase to its substrate ubiquinol and possibly regulates

  15. Antiadhesive and antibiofilm activity of hyaluronic acid against bacteria responsible for respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Drago, Lorenzo; Cappelletti, Laura; De Vecchi, Elena; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Torretta, Sara; Mattina, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    To address the problem of limited efficacy of existing antibiotics in the treatment of bacterial biofilm, it is necessary to find alternative remedies. One candidate could be hyaluronic acid; this study therefore aimed to evaluate the in vitro antiadhesive and antibiofilm activity of hyaluronic acid toward bacterial species commonly isolated from respiratory infections. Interference exerted on bacterial adhesion was evaluated by using Hep-2 cells, while the antibiofilm activity was assessed by means of spectrophotometry after incubation of biofilm with hyaluronic acid and staining with crystal violet. Our data suggest that hyaluronic acid is able to interfere with bacterial adhesion to a cellular substrate in a concentration-dependent manner, being notably active when assessed as pure substance. Moreover, we found that Staphylococcus aureus biofilm was more sensitive to the action of hyaluronic acid than biofilm produced by Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. In conclusion, hyaluronic acid is characterized by notable antiadhesive properties, while it shows a moderate activity against bacterial biofilm. As bacterial adhesion to oral cells is the first step for colonization, these results further sustain the role of hyaluronic acid in prevention of respiratory infections.

  16. In vitro activity of ABT-773 versus macrolides and quinolones against resistant respiratory tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Dubois, J; St -Pierre, C

    2001-01-01

    ABT-773, a novel ketolide, was compared to erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, and gemifloxacin against antibiotic-resistant strains recently isolated from patients with respiratory tract infections. MICs were determined by agar dilution using standard NCCLS methodology. ABT-773 (MIC(90) 0.06 mg/L) was more active than the macrolides (MIC(90) > or = 2 mg/L) and fluoroquinolones (MIC(90) > or = 0.5 mg/L) against penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. The fluoroquinolones were the most active agents tested against beta-lactamase-positive Haemophilus influenzae (MIC(90) < or = 0.01-0.06 mg/L), against which ABT-773 (MIC(90) 4 mg/L) was comparable to azithromycin and two- and four-fold more active than erythromycin and clarithromycin, respectively. Against beta-lactamase positive Moraxella catarrhalis, the activity of ABT-773 (MIC(90) 0.06 mg/L) was comparable to gemifloxacin, trovafloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin (MIC(90) 0.03-0.06 mg/L) and 4- to eightfold greater than that of clarithromycin, gatifloxacin, and erythromycin. These data suggest ABT-773 could be a valuable compound for the treatment of respiratory tract infections, including those resistant to usual oral therapy.

  17. A novel peptide with potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activities against multiple respiratory viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hanjun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Ke; Chu, Hin; Liu, Dabin; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Leung, Ho-Chuen; Fai, Ng; Lin, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Anna Jin-Xia; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    A safe, potent and broad-spectrum antiviral is urgently needed to combat emerging respiratory viruses. In light of the broad antiviral activity of β-defensins, we tested the antiviral activity of 11 peptides derived from mouse β-defensin-4 and found that a short peptide, P9, exhibited potent and broad-spectrum antiviral effects against multiple respiratory viruses in vitro and in vivo, including influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The antiviral activity of P9 was attributed to its high-affinity binding to viral glycoproteins, as well as the abundance of basic amino acids in its composition. After binding viral particles through viral surface glycoproteins, P9 entered into cells together with the viruses via endocytosis and prevented endosomal acidification, which blocked membrane fusion and subsequent viral RNA release. This study has paved the avenue for developing new prophylactic and therapeutic agents with broad-spectrum antiviral activities. PMID:26911565

  18. cAMP/PKA signaling balances respiratory activity with mitochondria dependent apoptosis via transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Leadsham, Jane E; Gourlay, Campbell W

    2010-11-25

    Appropriate control of mitochondrial function, morphology and biogenesis are crucial determinants of the general health of eukaryotic cells. It is therefore imperative that we understand the mechanisms that co-ordinate mitochondrial function with environmental signaling systems. The regulation of yeast mitochondrial function in response to nutritional change can be modulated by PKA activity. Unregulated PKA activity can lead to the production of mitochondria that are prone to the production of ROS, and an apoptotic form of cell death. We present evidence that mitochondria are sensitive to the level of cAMP/PKA signaling and can respond by modulating levels of respiratory activity or committing to self execution. The inappropriate activation of one of the yeast PKA catalytic subunits, Tpk3p, is sufficient to commit cells to an apoptotic death through transcriptional changes that promote the production of dysfunctional, ROS producing mitochondria. Our data implies that cAMP/PKA regulation of mitochondrial function that promotes apoptosis engages the function of multiple transcription factors, including HAP4, SOK2 and SCO1. We propose that in yeast, as is the case in mammalian cells, mitochondrial function and biogenesis are controlled in response to environmental change by the concerted regulation of multiple transcription factors. The visualization of cAMP/TPK3 induced cell death within yeast colonies supports a model that PKA regulation plays a physiological role in coordinating respiratory function and cell death with nutritional status in budding yeast.

  19. Chapter 11 Supercomplex organization of the yeast respiratory chain complexes and the ADP/ATP carrier proteins.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Rosemary A

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes involved in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are coassembled into higher ordered supercomplexes within the mitochondrial inner membrane. The cytochrome bc(1)-cytochrome c oxidase (COX) supercomplex is formed by the coassociation of the two electron transport chain complexes, the cytochrome bc(1) (cytochrome c reductase) and the COX complex. Recent evidence indicates that a diversity in the populations of the cytochrome bc(1)-COX supercomplexes exists within the mitochondria, because different subpopulations of this supercomplex have been shown to further interact with distinct partner complexes (e.g., the TIM23 machinery and also the Shy1/Cox14 proteins). By use of native gel electrophoresis and affinity purification approaches, the abundant ADP/ATP carrier protein (AAC) isoform in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Aac2 isoform, has recently been found to also exist in physical association with the cytochrome bc(1)-COX supercomplex and its associated TIM23 machinery. The AAC proteins play a central role in cellular metabolism, because they facilitate the exchange of ADP and ATP across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The method used to analyze the cytochrome bc(1)-COX-AAC supercomplex and to affinity purify the Aac2 isoform and its associating proteins from S. cerevisiae mitochondria will be outlined in this chapter.

  20. Muscle Transcriptional Profile Based on Muscle Fiber, Mitochondrial Respiratory Activity, and Metabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Du, Yang; Trakooljul, Nares; Brand, Bodo; Muráni, Eduard; Krischek, Carsten; Wicke, Michael; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly metabolically active tissue that both stores and consumes energy. Important biological pathways that affect energy metabolism and metabolic fiber type in muscle cells may be identified through transcriptomic profiling of the muscle, especially ante mortem. Here, gene expression was investigated in malignant hyperthermia syndrome (MHS)-negative Duroc and Pietrian (PiNN) pigs significantly differing for the muscle fiber types slow-twitch-oxidative fiber (STO) and fast-twitch-oxidative fiber (FTO) as well as mitochondrial activity (succinate-dependent state 3 respiration rate). Longissimus muscle samples were obtained 24 h before slaughter and profiled using cDNA microarrays. Differential gene expression between Duroc and PiNN muscle samples were associated with protein ubiquitination, stem cell pluripotency, amyloid processing, and 3-phosphoinositide biosynthesis and degradation pathways. In addition, weighted gene co-expression network analysis within both breeds identified several co-expression modules that were associated with the proportion of different fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and ATP metabolism. In particular, Duroc results revealed strong correlations between mitochondrion-associated co-expression modules and STO (r = 0.78), fast-twitch glycolytic fiber (r = -0.98), complex I (r=0.72) and COX activity (r = 0.86). Other pathways in the protein-kinase-activity enriched module were positively correlated with STO (r=0.93), while negatively correlated with FTO (r = -0.72). In contrast to PiNN, co-expression modules enriched in macromolecule catabolic process, actin cytoskeleton, and transcription activator activity were associated with fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and metabolic enzyme activities. Our results highlight the importance of mitochondria for the oxidative capacity of porcine muscle and for breed-dependent molecular pathways in muscle cell fibers. PMID:26681915

  1. Synthesis, surface-active properties, and antimicrobial activities of new double-chain gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Murguía, Marcelo C; Vaillard, Victoria A; Sánchez, Victoria G; Conza, José Di; Grau, Ricardo J

    2008-01-01

    A novel series of neutral and cationic dimeric surfactants were prepared involving ketalization reaction, Williamson etherification, and regioselective oxirane ring opening with primary and tertiary alkyl amines. The critical micelle concentration (CMC), effectiveness of surface tension reduction (gamma(CMC)), surface excess concentration (Gamma), and area per molecule at the interface (A) were determined and values indicate that the cationic series is characterized by good surface-active and self-aggregation properties. For the first time, we reported the antimicrobial activities against representative bacteria and fungi for dimeric compounds. The antimicrobial activity was found to be dependent on the target microorganism (Gram-positive bacteria > fungi > Gram-negative bacteria), as well as both the neutral or ionic nature (cationic > neutral) and alkyl chain length (di-C(12) > di-C(18) > di-C(8)) of the compounds. The cationic di-C(12) derivative was found to have equipotent activity to that of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) used as standard.

  2. Structure-activity relationship of synthetic branched-chain distearoylglycerol (distearin) as protein kinase C activators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qingzhong; Raynor, R.L.; Wood, M.G. Jr.; Menger, F.M.; Kuo, J.F. )

    1988-09-20

    Several representative branched-chain analogues of distearin (DS) were synthesized and tested for their abilities to activate protein kinase C (PKC) and to compete for the binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) to the enzyme. Substitutions of stearoyl moieties at sn-1 and sn-2 with 8-methylstearate decreased activities on these parameters, relative to those of the parental diacylglycerol DS, a weak PKC activator. Substitutions with 8-butyl, 4-butyl, or 8-phenyl derivatives, on the other hand, increased activities of the resulting analogues to levels comparable to those seen for diolein (DO), a diacylglycerol prototype shown to be a potent PKC activator. Kinetic analysis indicated that 8-methyldistearin (8-MeDS) acted by decreasing, whereas 8-butyldistearin (8-BuDS) and 8-phenyldistearin (8-PhDS) acted by increasing, the affinities of PKC for phosphatidylserine (PS, a phospholipid cofactor) and Ca{sup 2+} compared to the values seen in the absence or presence of DS. The stimulatory effect of 8-BuDS and 8-PhDS on PKC, as DO, was additive to that of 1,2-(8-butyl)distearoylphosphatidylcholine (1,2(8-Bu)DSPC) and, moreover, they abolished the marked inhibition of the enzyme activity caused by high concentrations of 1,2(8-Bu)DSPC. The present findings demonstrated a structure-activity relationship of the branched-chain DS analogues in the regulation of PKC, perhaps related to their abilities to specifically modify interactions of PKC with PS and/or Ca{sup 2+} critically involved in enzyme activation/inactivation.

  3. Late-Expiratory Activity: Emergence and Interactions With the Respiratory CPG

    PubMed Central

    Molkov, Yaroslav I.; Abdala, Ana P. L.; Bacak, Bartholomew J.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Paton, Julian F. R.

    2010-01-01

    The respiratory rhythm and motor pattern are hypothesized to be generated by a brain stem respiratory network with a rhythmogenic core consisting of neural populations interacting within and between the pre-Bötzinger (pre-BötC) and Bötzinger (BötC) complexes and controlled by drives from other brain stem compartments. Our previous large-scale computational model reproduced the behavior of this network under many different conditions but did not consider neural oscillations that were proposed to emerge within the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG) and drive preinspiratory (or late-expiratory, late-E) discharges in the abdominal motor output. Here we extend the analysis of our previously published data and consider new data on the generation of abdominal late-E activity as the basis for extending our computational model. The extended model incorporates an additional late-E population in RTN/pFRG, representing a source of late-E oscillatory activity. In the proposed model, under normal metabolic conditions, this RTN/pFRG oscillator is inhibited by BötC/pre-BötC circuits, and the late-E oscillations can be released by either hypercapnia-evoked activation of RTN/pFRG or by hypoxia-dependent suppression of RTN/pFRG inhibition by BötC/pre-BötC. The proposed interactions between BötC/pre-BötC and RTN/pFRG allow the model to reproduce several experimentally observed behaviors, including quantal acceleration of abdominal late-E oscillations with progressive hypercapnia and quantal slowing of phrenic activity with progressive suppression of pre-BötC excitability, as well as to predict a release of late-E oscillations by disinhibition of RTN/pFRG under normal conditions. The extended model proposes mechanistic explanations for the emergence of RTN/pFRG oscillations and their interaction with the brain stem respiratory network. PMID:20884764

  4. Mitochondrial Respiratory Defect Causes Dysfunctional Lactate Turnover via AMP-activated Protein Kinase Activation in Human-induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Hepatocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Im, Ilkyun; Jang, Mi-jin; Park, Seung Ju; Lee, Sang-Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook; Kim, Seyun; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2015-01-01

    A defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (DMRC) causes various metabolic disorders in humans. However, the pathophysiology of DMRC in the liver remains unclear. To understand DMRC pathophysiology in vitro, DMRC-induced pluripotent stem cells were generated from dermal fibroblasts of a DMRC patient who had a homoplasmic mutation (m.3398T→C) in the mitochondrion-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (MTND1) gene and that differentiated into hepatocytes (DMRC hepatocytes) in vitro. DMRC hepatocytes showed abnormalities in mitochondrial characteristics, the NAD+/NADH ratio, the glycogen storage level, the lactate turnover rate, and AMPK activity. Intriguingly, low glycogen storage and transcription of lactate turnover-related genes in DMRC hepatocytes were recovered by inhibition of AMPK activity. Thus, AMPK activation led to metabolic changes in terms of glycogen storage and lactate turnover in DMRC hepatocytes. These data demonstrate for the first time that energy depletion may lead to lactic acidosis in the DMRC patient by reduction of lactate uptake via AMPK in liver. PMID:26491018

  5. The Activity Chain Safety and Liveness Specification of Composite Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Huang, Xiaomei

    Web service composition is most impressing method for development and deployment of e-business. Description and modeling the behavior requirements of composite Web services for users and verifying composite Web service compliance to specific requirements is an important key in design of services. But most work does not address the issue of how to model the requirements that the BPEL4WS processes are supposed to satisfy. The specifications in verification works are general temporal relation based on activity or scenario in essence. Distinguish with these work, we propose a novel concept of behavior specification based on activity chain in which granularity is between activity and scenario. Chain existence mode, chain absence mode are designed to express such behavioral requirements based on activity chain that is similar with safety or liveness specification based on activity respectively. Encode them on Labeled Transition System LTS and then give them exact operation semantics. Finally, an example is illustrated.

  6. Epidemic activity of respiratory syncytial virus is related to temperature and rainfall in equatorial tropical countries.

    PubMed

    Gamba-Sanchez, N; Rodriguez-Martinez, C E; Sossa-Briceño, M P

    2016-07-01

    Although viral acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) are a major public health problem in tropical low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and there is growing evidence showing their relationship with meteorological parameters, studies performed in these countries are scarce. In an analytical cross-sectional study, we determined which of the main meteorological parameters (temperature, absolute humidity, rainfall, wind speed, and solar radiation) predicted respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) activity in a population of hospitalized children with ALRI during a 5-year period, from January 2009 to December 2013. Out of a total of 4559 children included in the study (mean age 9·2 ± 8·5 months), 2953 (64·8%) presented RSV infection during the 3-month period from March to May. In the multivariate analysis, after controlling for absolute humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation, temperature [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 2·25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·11-4·53, P = 0·024], and rainfall (IRR 1·01, 95% CI 1·00-1·02, P = 0·044) were independently associated with the monthly number of RSV infections. In conclusion, in Bogota, the capital of a tropical LMIC lying slightly above the equator, RSV activity peaks in the 3-month period from March to May, the main rainy period of the year in the city. In addition, rainfall and temperature are the two most important meteorological parameters that are independently associated with RSV activity in hospitalized children with ALRI in the city.

  7. Distribution and respiratory activity of mycobacteria in household water system of healthy volunteers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ichijo, Tomoaki; Izumi, Yoko; Nakamoto, Sayuri; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2014-01-01

    The primary infectious source of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), which are known as opportunistic pathogens, appears to be environmental exposure, and it is important to reduce the frequency of exposure from environmental sources for preventing NTM infections. In order to achieve this, the distribution and respiratory activity of NTM in the environments must be clarified. In this study, we determined the abundance of mycobacteria and respiratory active mycobacteria in the household water system of healthy volunteers using quantitative PCR and a fluorescent staining method, because household water has been considered as one of the possible infectious sources. We chose healthy volunteer households in order to lessen the effect of possible residential contamination from an infected patient. We evaluated whether each sampling site (bathroom drain, kitchen drain, bath heater pipe and showerhead) have the potential to be the sources of NTM infections. Our results indicated that drains in the bathroom and kitchen sink are the niche for Mycobacterium spp. and M. avium cells were only detected in the bathtub inlet. Both physicochemical and biologic selective pressures may affect the preferred habitat of Mycobacterium spp. Regional differences also appear to exist as demonstrated by the presence (US) or absence (Japan) of Mycobacterium spp. on showerheads. Understanding of the country specific human activities and water usage will help to elucidate the infectious source and route of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease.

  8. [Effect of change in activity level of catecholaminergic systems on motor, respiratory, and cardiac activities in rat embryos].

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, O P; Vdovichenko, N D; Kuznetsov, S V

    2012-01-01

    Parameters of motor, respiratory and cardiac activities were studied in rat embryos (E17-20) after changes in activity level of catecholaminergic systems. To produce conditions for excessive level of catecholamines, the animal were administered individually with preparation of L-DOPA at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg. Also studied was action of L-DOPA after blockade of D1-(antagonist - SCH-23390, 0.1 mg/kg), D2-(antagonist - sulpiride, 50 mg/kg) dopaminic, and beta2-(antagonist - propranolol, 1 mg/kg) adrenergic receptors. It was found out in E17-18 that the DOPA administration regardless of dose, while in E19-20 dose-dependently produces continuous generalized activity. Between E18 and E19, ontogenetically new is the appearance in 92 % of embryos of stereotypical head movements (circular movements, lateral and dorso-ventral flexions) following in the nearsecond rhythm. Injection of DOPA to rat embryos increased 2-6 times the number of respiratory movements by the gasping type in E17-20 and decreased the amount of episodes of continuous rhythmical respiration in E19-20. No significant heart rate changes were observed after introduction of DOPA to E17-20. There was noted a tendency for a weak acceleration of the heart rate. The changes in activities of the motor and respiratory systems due to a rise of catecholamine level are not connected with activation of the dopamine system, as they are not reduced by blockade of dopamine receptors.

  9. In vitro activity and rodent efficacy of clinafloxacin for bovine and swine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Michael T; Quesnell, Rebecca; Tiwari, Raksha; Lemay, Mary; Watts, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    Clinafloxacin is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone that was originally developed and subsequently abandoned in the late 1990s as a human health antibiotic for respiratory diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of clinafloxacin as a possible treatment for respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommended procedures with recent strains from the Zoetis culture collection. Rodent efficacy was determined in CD-1 mice infected systemically or intranasally with bovine Mannheimia haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida, or swine Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and administered clinafloxacin for determination of ED50 (efficacious dose-50%) values. The MIC90 values for clinafloxacin against bovine P. multocida, M. haemolytica, Histophilus somni, and M. bovis were 0.125, 0.5, 0.125, and 1 μg/ml, respectively, and the MIC90 values against swine P. multocida, A. pleuropneumoniae, S. suis, and M. hyopneumoniae were í0.03, í0.03, 0.125, and í0.008 μg/ml, respectively. Efficacy in mouse models showed average ED50 values of 0.019 mg/kg/dose in the bovine M. haemolytica systemic infection model, 0.55 mg/kg in the bovine P. multocida intranasal lung challenge model, 0.08 mg/kg/dose in the bovine P. multocida systemic infection model, and 0.7 mg/kg/dose in the swine A. pleuropneumoniae systemic infection model. Clinafloxacin shows good in vitro activity and efficacy in mouse models and may be a novel treatment alternative for the treatment of respiratory disease in cattle and pigs.

  10. In vitro activity and rodent efficacy of clinafloxacin for bovine and swine respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Michael T.; Quesnell, Rebecca; Tiwari, Raksha; LeMay, Mary; Watts, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinafloxacin is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone that was originally developed and subsequently abandoned in the late 1990s as a human health antibiotic for respiratory diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of clinafloxacin as a possible treatment for respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommended procedures with recent strains from the Zoetis culture collection. Rodent efficacy was determined in CD-1 mice infected systemically or intranasally with bovine Mannheimia haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida, or swine Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and administered clinafloxacin for determination of ED50 (efficacious dose-50%) values. The MIC90 values for clinafloxacin against bovine P. multocida, M. haemolytica, Histophilus somni, and M. bovis were 0.125, 0.5, 0.125, and 1 μg/ml, respectively, and the MIC90 values against swine P. multocida, A. pleuropneumoniae, S. suis, and M. hyopneumoniae were í0.03, í0.03, 0.125, and í0.008 μg/ml, respectively. Efficacy in mouse models showed average ED50 values of 0.019 mg/kg/dose in the bovine M. haemolytica systemic infection model, 0.55 mg/kg in the bovine P. multocida intranasal lung challenge model, 0.08 mg/kg/dose in the bovine P. multocida systemic infection model, and 0.7 mg/kg/dose in the swine A. pleuropneumoniae systemic infection model. Clinafloxacin shows good in vitro activity and efficacy in mouse models and may be a novel treatment alternative for the treatment of respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. PMID:23785362

  11. Evidence for chloroplastic succinate dehydrogenase participating in the chloroplastic respiratory and photosynthetic electron transport chains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Willeford, K.O.; Gombos, Z.; Gibbs, M. )

    1989-07-01

    A method for isolating intact chloroplasts from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 was developed from the Klein, Chen, Gibbs, Platt-Aloia procedure. Protoplasts, generated by treatment with autolysine, were lysed with a solution of digitonin and fractionated on Percoll step gradients. The chloroplasts were assessed to be 90% intact (ferricyanide assay) and free from cytoplasmic contamination (NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase activity) and to range from 2 to 5% in mitochondrial contamination (cytochrome c oxidase activity). About 25% of the cellular succinate dehydrogenase activity (21.6 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour, as determined enzymically) was placed within the chloroplast. Chloroplastic succinate dehydrogenase had a K{sub m} for succinate of 0.55 millimolar and was associated with the thylakoidal material derived from the intact chloroplasts. This same thylakoidal material, with an enzymic assay of 21.6 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour was able to initiate a light-dependent uptake of oxygen at a rate of 16.4 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour when supplied with succinate and methyl viologen. Malonate was an apparent competitive inhibitor of this reaction. The succinate dehydrogenase activity present in the chloroplast was sufficient to account for the photoanaerobic rate of acetate dissimilation in H{sub 2} adapted Chlamydomonas.

  12. Evaluation of Flinders Technology Associates cards for collection and transport of samples for detection of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Daniel C L; Rovira, Albert; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2012-03-01

    Blood, tissue and oral fluid samples collected from experimentally infected animals and field cases were used to evaluate the safety, diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of Flinders Technology Associates (FTA) cards for Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) diagnostics. The analytical sensitivity of PRRSV RT-PCR from serum and oral fluids in FTA cards was reduced, although the virus could still be detected at concentrations of 10(1) and 10(3) TCID/ml, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of PRRSV RT-PCR detection from serum, blood, and tissue samples in cards collected from experimentally infected animals were 100%. Sensitivity for oral fluids was 45% (95% CI: 19.97-73.01) compared to fresh. For field samples, sensitivity was 89% (95% CI: 77.35-95.63) and 100% (95% CI: 80.00-100) for serum and lung samples, respectively. The sensitivity was the same for samples stored in cards at room temperature or at 4ºC, and tested overnight or after 14 days. Cards inoculated with PRRSV-positive samples did not yield replicating virus after cell culture. In conclusion, FTA cards proved to be a safe, simple, and sensitive alternative method to transport serum, blood, and tissue samples for PRRSV RT-PCR diagnostics; however, a significant decrease in RT-PCR sensitivity should be expected from oral fluid samples.

  13. Electrochemistry of cytochrome c1, cytochrome c552, and CuA from the respiratory chain of Thermus thermophilus immobilized on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Thomas; Gross, Julien; Blanck, Christian; Schmutz, Marc; Ludwig, Bernd; Hellwig, Petra; Melin, Frederic

    2011-06-02

    The electrochemical behavior of three proteins fragments from the respiratory chain of the extremophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus , namely, cytochrome c(1) (Cyt-c(1)), cytochrome c(552) (Cyt-c(552)), and Cu(A), immobilized on three-dimensional gold nanoparticles electrodes was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The gold nanoparticles were modified by either dithiobissuccinimidyl propionate (DTSP) or a mixed self-assembled monolayer of 6-mercaptohexan-1-ol and hexanethiol, depending on the surface of the protein. High surface coverages with enzymes and good electron transfer rates were achieved in the case of Cyt-c(1) immobilized on DTSP-modified gold nanoparticles and Cyt-c(552) or Cu(A) immobilized on mixed SAMs-modified gold nanoparticles. Interestingly, high surface coverages with Cu(A) were also observed on DTSP-modified gold nanoparticles, but a slower electron transfer rate was determined in this case. The gold nanoparticle/protein assemblies were characterized by surface-enhanced IR spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: interlaboratory ring trial to evaluate real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction detection methods.

    PubMed

    Wernike, Kerstin; Bonilauri, Paolo; Dauber, Malte; Errington, Jane; LeBlanc, Neil; Revilla-Fernández, Sandra; Hjulsager, Charlotte; Isaksson, Mats; Stadejek, Tomasz; Beer, Martin; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2012-09-01

    To compare the real-time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays used for the diagnosis of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a Europe-wide interlaboratory ring trial was conducted. A variety of PRRSV strains including North American (NA) and European (EU) genotype isolates were analyzed by the participants. Great differences regarding qualitative diagnostics as well as analytical sensitivity were observed between the individual RT-qPCR systems, especially when investigating strains from the EU genotype. None of the assays or commercial kits used in the ring trial could identify all different PRRSV strains with an optimal analytical and diagnostic sensitivity. The genetic variability of the PRRSV strains, which is supposed to hinder the diagnostic of the RT-PCR because of mutations at the primer binding sites, was also confirmed by sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. In summary, a major problem in PRRSV diagnostics by RT-qPCR is false-negative results. To achieve maximum safety in the molecular diagnosis of PRRSV, the combined usage of different assays or kits is highly recommended.

  15. Effect of maternal fasting on ovine fetal and maternal branched-chain amino acid transaminase activities.

    PubMed

    Liechty, E A; Barone, S; Nutt, M

    1987-01-01

    Activities of branched-chain amino acid transaminase were assayed in maternal skeletal muscle, liver and fetal skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, liver, kidney and placenta obtained from fed and 5-day-fasted late gestation ewes. Very high activities were found in placenta; fetal skeletal muscle also had high activity. Fetal brain had intermediate activity, followed by cardiac muscle and kidney. Fetal liver possessed negligible activity. Activities were low in both maternal liver and skeletal muscle. Trends were seen for fasting to increase activities in fetal placenta, skeletal muscle, brain, kidney, heart and maternal liver, but these changes were statistically significant only for fetal brain and placental tissue. Fetal skeletal muscle activity was 100 times that of maternal skeletal muscle. These data imply differences in the metabolism of the branched-chain amino acids by fetal and adult ruminants and expand the thesis that branched-chain amino acids are important to the metabolism of the ovine fetus.

  16. Judging disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis by serum free kappa and lambda light chain levels.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yun; Li, Su-Liang; Xie, Ming; Jiang, Ping; Liu, Kai-Ge; Li, Ya-Jun

    2013-10-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the levels of serum free kappa (κ) and lambda (λ) light chains in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as well as exploring the association between serum free κ and λ light chains and activity of RA. For this purpose, healthy individuals and patients with active RA and RA in remission were enrolled, and their serum levels of free κ and λ light chains were measured using rate nephelometry. The diagnostic accuracy of serum free κ and λ light chains was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic curves and 95% confidence intervals for areas under the curve (AUC). The results obtained indicated that the levels of serum free κ and λ light chains in patients with active RA were significantly higher than those of patients in remission and of healthy controls (p < 0.05). Further, the AUC values in patients with active RA were 0.871 for free κ light chain and 0.781 for free λ light chain. When the optimal cut-off point for serum κ light chain was 8.02 g/L, the maximum sensitivity and specificity were 82.5% and 82.5%, respectively, and when the optimal cut-off point for serum λ light chain was 3.57 g/L, the maximum sensitivity and specificity were 80% and 82.5%, respectively. It was thus found that serum levels of free κ and λ light chains were positively correlated with disease activity in RA, the Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28), and values for C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), platelet count (PLT), rheumatoid factor (RF), and anticitrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) (p < 0.05). In conclusion, high serum levels of free κ and λ light chains in patients with active RA are closely correlated with disease activity parameters including DAS28, CRP, ESR, PLT, RF, and ACPA. Thus, the above-mentioned levels of serum free κ and λ light chains may be used as important indicators of activity of RA.

  17. Structure-activity relationship of novel menaquinone-4 analogues: modification of the side chain affects their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Suhara, Yoshitomo; Hanada, Norika; Okitsu, Takashi; Sakai, Miho; Watanabe, Masato; Nakagawa, Kimie; Wada, Akimori; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Okano, Toshio

    2012-02-23

    We synthesized new vitamin K analogues with demethylation or reduction of the double bonds of the side chain of menaquinone-4 (MK-4) and evaluated their SXR-mediated transcriptional activity as well as the extent of their conversion to MK-4. The results indicated that the analogue with the methyl group deleted at the 7' site of the side chain part affected conversion activity to MK-4. In contrast, a decrease in the number of the double bonds in the side chain moiety appeared to decrease the SXR-mediated transcriptional activity.

  18. Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Brain Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Dysfunction and Increases Oxidative Stress: A Potential Mechanism Involved in Cannabis-Related Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Valérie; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Rouyer, Olivier; Charles, Anne-Laure; Singh, François; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Marescaux, Christian; Raul, Jean-Sébastien; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities Vmax (complexes I, III, and IV activities), Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities), Vtmpd (complex IV activity), together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0), were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased Vmax (−71%; P < 0.0001), Vsucc (−65%; P < 0.0001), and Vtmpd (−3.5%; P < 0.001). Mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0) was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P < 0.001). Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P < 0.05) and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P < 0.001). Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient's vulnerability to stroke. PMID:25654095

  19. Tetrahydrocannabinol induces brain mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction and increases oxidative stress: a potential mechanism involved in cannabis-related stroke.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Valérie; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Rouyer, Olivier; Charles, Anne-Laure; Singh, François; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Marescaux, Christian; Raul, Jean-Sébastien; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities V max (complexes I, III, and IV activities), V succ (complexes II, III, and IV activities), V tmpd (complex IV activity), together with mitochondrial coupling (V max/V 0), were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased V max (-71%; P < 0.0001), V succ (-65%; P < 0.0001), and V tmpd (-3.5%; P < 0.001). Mitochondrial coupling (V max/V 0) was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P < 0.001). Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P < 0.05) and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P < 0.001). Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient's vulnerability to stroke.

  20. Activation Energy of Aggregation-Disaggregation Self-Oscillation of Polymer Chain

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Yusuke; Jahan, Rumana A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the activation energies of the aggregation–disaggregation self-oscillation induced by the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction by utilizing the nonthermoresponsive polymer chain in a wide temperature range. This is because the conventional type self-oscillating polymer chain, with thermoresponsive poly(Nisopropylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAAm) main-chain covalently bonded to the ruthenium catalyst (Ru(bpy)3) of the BZ reaction, cannot evaluate the activation energy over the lower critical solution temperature (LCST). The nonthermoresponsive self-oscillating polymer chain is composed of a poly-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP) main-chain with the ruthenium catalyst (Ru(bpy)3). As a result, we clarified that the activation energy of the aggregation–disaggregation self-oscillation of the polymer chain is hardly affected by the concentrations of the BZ substrates. In addition, the activation energy of the nonthermoresponsive self-oscillating polymer chain was found to be almost the same value as normal BZ reaction, i.e., not including the self-oscillating polymer system with Ru moiety. PMID:23208370

  1. Activation energy of aggregation-disaggregation self-oscillation of polymer chain.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yusuke; Jahan, Rumana A

    2012-12-03

    In this paper, we investigated the activation energies of the aggregation−disaggregation self-oscillation induced by the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction by utilizing the nonthermoresponsive polymer chain in a wide temperature range. This is because the conventional type self-oscillating polymer chain, with thermoresponsive poly(Nisopropylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAAm) main-chain covalently bonded to the ruthenium catalyst (Ru(bpy)(3)) of the BZ reaction, cannot evaluate the activation energy over the lower critical solution temperature (LCST). The nonthermoresponsive self-oscillating polymer chain is composed of a poly-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP) main-chain with the ruthenium catalyst (Ru(bpy)(3)). As a result, we clarified that the activation energy of the aggregation−disaggregation self-oscillation of the polymer chain is hardly affected by the concentrations of the BZ substrates. In addition, the activation energy of the nonthermoresponsive self-oscillating polymer chain was found to be almost the same value as normal BZ reaction, i.e., not including the self-oscillating polymer system with Ru moiety.

  2. Pulmonary C-fiber activation attenuates respiratory-related tongue movements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun-Ze; Fuller, David D; Hwang, Ji-Chuu

    2012-11-01

    The functional impact of pulmonary C-fiber activation on upper airway biomechanics has not been evaluated. Here, we tested the hypothesis that pulmonary C-fiber activation alters the respiratory-related control of tongue movements. The force produced by tongue movements was quantified in spontaneously breathing, anesthetized adult rats before and after stimulation of pulmonary C fibers via intrajugular delivery of capsaicin (0.625 and 1.25 μg/kg). Brief occlusion of the trachea was used to increase the respiratory drive to the tongue muscles, and hypoglossal (XII) nerve branches were selectively sectioned to denervate the protrusive and retrusive tongue musculature. Tracheal occlusion triggered inspiratory-related tongue retrusion in rats with XII nerves intact or following section of the medial XII nerve branch, which innervates the genioglossus muscle. Inspiratory-related tongue protrusion was only observed after section of the lateral XII branch, which innervates the primary tongue retrusor muscles. The tension produced by inspiratory-related tongue movement was significantly attenuated by capsaicin, but tongue movements remained retrusive, unless the medial XII branch was sectioned. Capsaicin also significantly delayed the onset of tongue movements such that tongue forces could not be detected until after onset of the inspiratory diaphragm activity. We conclude that altered neural drive to the tongue muscles following pulmonary C-fiber activation has a functionally significant effect on tongue movements. The diminished tongue force and delay in the onset of tongue movements following pulmonary C-fiber activation are potentially unfavorable for upper airway patency.

  3. Pulmonary C-fiber activation attenuates respiratory-related tongue movements

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, David D.; Hwang, Ji-Chuu

    2012-01-01

    The functional impact of pulmonary C-fiber activation on upper airway biomechanics has not been evaluated. Here, we tested the hypothesis that pulmonary C-fiber activation alters the respiratory-related control of tongue movements. The force produced by tongue movements was quantified in spontaneously breathing, anesthetized adult rats before and after stimulation of pulmonary C fibers via intrajugular delivery of capsaicin (0.625 and 1.25 μg/kg). Brief occlusion of the trachea was used to increase the respiratory drive to the tongue muscles, and hypoglossal (XII) nerve branches were selectively sectioned to denervate the protrusive and retrusive tongue musculature. Tracheal occlusion triggered inspiratory-related tongue retrusion in rats with XII nerves intact or following section of the medial XII nerve branch, which innervates the genioglossus muscle. Inspiratory-related tongue protrusion was only observed after section of the lateral XII branch, which innervates the primary tongue retrusor muscles. The tension produced by inspiratory-related tongue movement was significantly attenuated by capsaicin, but tongue movements remained retrusive, unless the medial XII branch was sectioned. Capsaicin also significantly delayed the onset of tongue movements such that tongue forces could not be detected until after onset of the inspiratory diaphragm activity. We conclude that altered neural drive to the tongue muscles following pulmonary C-fiber activation has a functionally significant effect on tongue movements. The diminished tongue force and delay in the onset of tongue movements following pulmonary C-fiber activation are potentially unfavorable for upper airway patency. PMID:22936725

  4. Regulation of branched-chain amino acid catabolism: nutritional and hormonal regulation of activity and expression of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase kinase.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Y; Obayashi, M; Murakami, T; Harris, R A

    2001-09-01

    Branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase kinase is responsible for the inactivation and phosphorylation of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, the enzyme that catalyses the committed step of branched-chain amino acid catabolism. The activity of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex is inversely correlated with kinase activity, suggesting that the relative activity of the kinase is the primary regulator of the activity of the complex. It has been shown that kinase activity and expression are affected by nutritional states imposed by low-protein diet feeding, starvation, diabetes, and exercise. Evidence has also been presented that certain hormones, particularly insulin, glucocorticoid, thyroid hormone and female sex hormones, affect the activity and expression of the kinase. The findings indicate that nutritional and hormonal control of the activity and expression of branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase kinase provides an important means of control of the activity of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, with inactivation serving to conserve branched-chain amino acids for protein synthesis in some situations and activation serving to provide carbon for gluconeogenesis in others.

  5. Disability in valued life activities among individuals with COPD and other respiratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Katz, Patricia P; Gregorich, Steven; Eisner, Mark; Julian, Laura; Chen, Hubert; Yelin, Edward; Blanc, Paul D

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the effect of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on a broad range of valued life activities (VLAs) and make comparisons to effects of other airways conditions. We used cross-sectional data from a population-based, longitudinal study of US adults with airways disease. Data were collected by telephone interview. VLA disability was compared among 3 groups defined by reported physician diagnoses: COPD/emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and asthma. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to identify independent predictors of VLA disability. About half of individuals with COPD were unable to perform at least 1 VLA; almost all reported at least 1 VLA affected. The impact among individuals with chronic bronchitis and asthma was less but still notable: 74%-84% reported at least 1 activity affected, and about 15% were unable to perform at least 1 activity. In general, obligatory activities were the least affected. Symptom measures and functional limitations were the strongest predictors of disability, independent of respiratory condition. VLA disability is common among individuals with COPD. Obligatory activities are less affected than committed and discretionary activities. A focus on obligatory activities, as is common in disability studies, would miss a great deal of the impact of these conditions. Because individuals are often referred to pulmonary rehabilitation as a result of dissatisfaction with ability to perform daily activities, VLA disability may be an especially relevant outcome for rehabilitation.

  6. The effects of breathing exercise types on respiratory muscle activity and body function in patients with mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong-Il; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Choi, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Fragmentary studies on characteristics of respiratory muscles are being done to increase respiratory capacity by classifying exercises into voluntary respiratory exercise which relieves symptoms and prevents COPD and exercise using breathing exercise equipment. But this study found changes on respiratory pattern through changes on the activity pattern of agonist and synergist respiratory muscles and studied what effect they can have on body function improvement. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects in experimental group I that respiratory exercise of diaphragm and 15 subjects in experimental group II that feedback respiratory exercise were randomly selected among COPD patients to find the effective intervention method for COPD patients. And intervention program was conducted for 5 weeks, three times a week, once a day and 30 minutes a session. They were measured with BODE index using respiratory muscle activity, pulmonary function, the six-minute walking test, dyspnea criteria and BMI Then the results obtained were compared and analyzed. [Results] There was a significant difference in sternocleidomastoid muscle and scalene muscle and in 6-minute walk and BODE index for body function. Thus the group performing feedback respiratory had more effective results for mild COPD patients. [Conclusion] Therefore, the improvement was significant regarding the activity of respiratory muscles synergists when breathing before doing breathing exercise. Although, it is valuable to reduce too much mobilization of respiratory muscles synergists through the proper intervention it is necessary to study body function regarding improvement of respiratory function for patients with COPD.

  7. Interactive effects of social adversity and respiratory sinus arrhythmia activity on reactive and proactive aggression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal parasympathetic nervous system (PNS)-related cardiac activity has been linked to aggression. However, little is known about how it interacts with psychosocial adversity in predisposing to reactive-proactive aggression. In the current study, 84 male and female college students self-reported reactive and proactive aggression, and were assessed for respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a measure of PNS-related cardiac activity, during rest and when they contemplated an emotion-evoking decision-making task. Regression analyses showed that (a) resting RSA was positively linked to reactive aggression in conditions of high social adversity, and (b) RSA reactivity was positively associated with reactive but negatively associated with proactive aggression, in conditions of low social adversity. Main effects were not found for psychophysiological functioning or psychosocial adversity, suggesting the importance of their interaction. Findings support a biosocial basis for aggression and add additional support for the distinctions between reactive and proactive aggression.

  8. Activation of the lipoxygenase pathway in the methionine enkephalin induced respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, J.T.; Foris, G.; Fulop, T. Jr.; Paragh, G.; Plotnikoff, N.P.

    1988-01-01

    In comparative studies of f-met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) and methionine enkephalin (ME) induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) stimulation the following results were obtained: (i) both FMLP and ME increased the intracellular killing (IK) capability of human PMNLs probably through NADPH oxidase activation, (ii) the ME-induced respiratory burst (RB) differed from the chemotactic peptide FMLP-triggered superoxide generation because the former was not accompanied by the activation of the glutathione system and the duration of the superoxide production was prolonged. The reaction was dependent on lipoxygenation, was potentiated by indomethacin (IM) and was inhibited by nordihidro-guairetic acid (NDGA), (iii) both /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid release and leukotriene B/sub 4/ (LTB/sub 4/) synthesis of ME-treated PMNLs were elevated as compared to those of FMLP triggered cells. Their results suggest that lipoxygenation and even an increased LTB/sub 4/ synthesis are involved in the ME-induced RB of leukocytes.