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Sample records for respiratory chain activity

  1. Hypoxia-Mediated Impairment of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Inhibits the Bactericidal Activity of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Melanie; Gerlach, Roman G.; Popp, Isabel; Matuszak, Jasmin; Mahapatro, Mousumi; Castiglione, Kirstin; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Willam, Carsten; Hensel, Michael; Bogdan, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In infected tissues oxygen tensions are low. As innate immune cells have to operate under these conditions, we analyzed the ability of macrophages (Mϕ) to kill Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus in a hypoxic microenvironment. Oxygen restriction did not promote intracellular bacterial growth but did impair the bactericidal activity of the host cells against both pathogens. This correlated with a decreased production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and reactive nitrogen intermediates. Experiments with phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX) and inducible NO synthase (NOS2) double-deficient Mϕ revealed that in E. coli- or S. aureus-infected cells the reduced antibacterial activity during hypoxia was either entirely or partially independent of the diminished PHOX and NOS2 activity. Hypoxia impaired the mitochondrial activity of infected Mϕ. Inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain activity during normoxia (using rotenone or antimycin A) completely or partially mimicked the defective antibacterial activity observed in hypoxic E. coli- or S. aureus-infected wild-type Mϕ, respectively. Accordingly, inhibition of the respiratory chain of S. aureus-infected, normoxic PHOX−/− NOS2−/− Mϕ further raised the bacterial burden of the cells, which reached the level measured in hypoxic PHOX−/− NOS2−/− Mϕ cultures. Our data demonstrate that the reduced killing of S. aureus or E. coli during hypoxia is not simply due to a lack of PHOX and NOS2 activity but partially or completely results from an impaired mitochondrial antibacterial effector function. Since pharmacological inhibition of the respiratory chain raised the generation of ROI but nevertheless phenocopied the effect of hypoxia, ROI can be excluded as the mechanism underlying the antimicrobial activity of mitochondria. PMID:22252868

  2. Exercise can induce temporary mitochondrial and contractile dysfunction linked to impaired respiratory chain complex activity.

    PubMed

    Schoepe, Maria; Schrepper, Andrea; Schwarzer, Michael; Osterholt, Moritz; Doenst, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Exercise is considered to elicit a physiological response of the heart. Previous studies investigated the influence of repetitive exercise only at the end of the training period. We assessed the impact of 2 exercise protocols, differing in their treadmill inclination, on cardiac and mitochondrial function at different times during the training period. Within 10 weeks, animals trained with 16% incline developed hypertrophy (left ventricular posterior wall thickness: 1.6 ± 0.1 vs 2.4 ± 0.1 mm; P < .05) with normal function (ejection fraction: 75.2% ± 2.5% vs 75.6% ± 2.1%). However, at 6 weeks, there was temporary impairment of contractile function (ejection fraction: 74.5% ± 1.67% vs 65.8% ± 2.3%; P < .05) associated with decreased mitochondrial respiratory capacity (state 3 respiration: 326 ± 71 vs 161 ± 22 natoms/[min mg protein]; P < .05) and a gene expression shift from the adult (α) to the fetal (β) myosin heavy chain isoform. Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α expression was normal, nuclear respiratory factors (NRFs)-1 and -2 were significantly reduced (NRF-1: 1.00 ± 0.16 vs 0.55 ± 0.09; NRF-2: 1.00 ± 0.11 vs 0.63 ± 0.07; P < .05) after 6 weeks. These findings were associated with a reduction of electron transport chain complexes I and IV activity (complex I: 1016 ± 67 vs 758 ± 71 nmol/[min mg protein]; complex IV: 18768 ± 1394 vs 14692 ± 960 nmol/[min mg protein]; P < .05). Messenger RNA expression of selected nuclear encoded subunits of the electron transport chain was unchanged at all investigated time points. In contrast, animals trained with 10% incline showed less hypertrophy and normal function in echocardiography, normal maximal respiratory capacity, and unchanged complex activities at all 3 time points. Repetitive exercise may cause contractile and mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by impaired respiratory chain complex activities. This activity reduction is temporary and intensity related.

  3. Differential inhibitory effects of methylmalonic acid on respiratory chain complex activities in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Pettenuzzo, Leticia F; Ferreira, Gustavo da C; Schmidt, Anna Laura; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wajner, Moacir

    2006-02-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia is an inherited metabolic disorder biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of methylmalonic acid (MMA) and clinically by progressive neurological deterioration and kidney failure, whose pathophysiology is so far poorly established. Previous studies have shown that MMA inhibits complex II of the respiratory chain in rat cerebral cortex, although no inhibition of complexes I-V was found in bovine heart. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the in vitro effect of 2.5mM MMA on the activity of complexes I-III, II, II-III and IV in striatum, hippocampus, heart, liver and kidney homogenates from young rats. We observed that MMA caused a significant inhibition of complex II activity in striatum and hippocampus (15-20%) at low concentrations of succinate in the medium, but not in the peripheral tissues. We also verified that the inhibitory property of MMA only occurred after exposing brain homogenates for at least 10 min with the acid, suggesting that this inhibition was mediated by indirect mechanisms. Simultaneous preincubation with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and catalase (CAT) plus superoxide dismutase (SOD) did not prevent MMA-induced inhibition of complex II, suggesting that common reactive oxygen (superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical) and nitric (nitric oxide) species were not involved in this effect. In addition, complex II-III (20-35%) was also inhibited by MMA in all tissues tested, and complex I-III only in the kidney (53%) and liver (38%). In contrast, complex IV activity was not changed by MMA in all tissues studied. These results indicate that MMA differentially affects the activity of the respiratory chain pending on the tissues studied, being striatum and hippocampus more vulnerable to its effect. In case our in vitro data are confirmed in vivo in tissues from methylmalonic acidemic patients, it is feasible that that the present findings may be

  4. Impairment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain activity in diethylnitrosamine-induced rat hepatomas: possible involvement of oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Boitier, E; Merad-Boudia, M; Guguen-Guillouzo, C; Defer, N; Ceballos-Picot, I; Leroux, J P; Marsac, C

    1995-07-15

    Alterations in the energy metabolism of cancer cells have been reported for many years. However, the deleterious mechanisms involved in these deficiencies have not yet been clearly proved. The main goal of this study was to decipher the harmful mechanisms responsible for the respiratory chain deficiencies in the course of diethylnitrosamine (DENA)-induced rat hepatocarcinogenesis, where mitochondrial DNA abnormalities had been previously reported. The respiratory activity of freshly isolated hepatoma mitochondria, assessed by oxygen consumption experiments and enzymatic assays, presented a severe complex I deficiency 19 months after DENA treatment, and later on, in addition, a defective complex III activity. Since respiratory complex subunits are encoded by both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, we checked whether the respiratory chain defects were due to impaired synthesis processes. The specific immunodetection of complex I failed to show any alterations in the steady-state levels of both nuclear and mitochondrial encoded subunits in the hepatomas. Moreover, in vitro protein synthesis experiments carried out on freshly isolated hepatoma mitochondria did not bring to light any modifications in the synthesis of the mitochondrial subunits of the respiratory complexes, whatever the degree of tumor progression. Finally, Southern blot analysis of mitochondrial DNA did not show any major mitochondrial DNA rearrangements in DENA-induced hepatomas. Because the synthetic processes of respiratory complexes did not seem to be implicated in the respiratory chain impairment, these deficiencies could be partly ascribed to a direct toxic impact of highly reactive molecules on these complexes, thus impairing their function. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is an important generator of noxious, reactive oxygen free radicals such as superoxide and H2O2, which are normally catabolized by powerful antioxidant scavengers. Nineteen months after DENA treatment, a general collapse of

  5. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders. PMID:26476839

  6. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders.

  7. The effect of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) extract on respiratory chain system activity in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Juzyszyn, Z; Czerny, B; Myśliwiec, Z; Pawlik, A; Droździk, M

    2010-06-01

    The effect of artichoke extract on mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) activity in isolated rat liver mitochondria (including reaction kinetics) was studied. The effect of the extract on the activity of isolated cytochrome oxidase was also studied. Extract in the range of 0.68-2.72 microg/ml demonstrated potent and concentration-dependent inhibitory activity. Concentrations > or =5.4 microg/ml entirely inhibited MRC activity. The succinate oxidase system (MRC complexes II-IV) was the most potently inhibited, its activity at an extract concentration of 1.36 microg/ml being reduced by 63.3% compared with the control (p < 0.05). The results suggest a complex inhibitory mechanism of the extract. Inhibition of the succinate oxidase system was competitive (K(i) = 0.23 microg/ml), whereas isolated cytochrome oxidase was inhibited noncompetitively (K(i) = 126 microg/ml). The results of this study suggest that the salubrious effects of artichoke extracts may rely in part on the effects of their active compounds on the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain system.

  8. Putative respiratory chain of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Meuric, Vincent; Rouillon, Astrid; Chandad, Fatiha; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine

    2010-05-01

    The electron transfer chain in Porphyromonas gingivalis, or periodontopathogens, has not yet been characterized. P. gingivalis, a strict anaerobic bacteria and the second colonizer of the oral cavity, is considered to be a major causal agent involved in periodontal diseases. Primary colonizers create a favorable environment for P. gingivalis growth by decreasing oxygen pressure. Oxygen does not appear to be the final electron acceptor of the respiratory chain. Fumarate and cytochrome b have been implicated as major components of the respiratory activity. However, the P. gingivalis genome shows many other enzymes that could be implicated in aerobic or nitrite respiration. Using bioinformatic tools and literature studies of respiratory pathways, the ATP synthesis mechanism from the sodium cycle and nutrients metabolism, the putative respirasome of P. gingivalis has been proposed.

  9. Activation of protein phosphatase 2A is responsible for increased content and inactivation of respiratory chain complex i induced by all-trans retinoic acid in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Papa, F; Sardaro, N; Lippolis, R; Panelli, D; Scacco, S

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on cell growth and respiratory chain complex I in human keratinocyte cultures. Keratinocyte treatment results in increased level of GRIM-19 and other subunits of complex I, in particular of their carbonylated forms, associated with inhibition of its enzymatic activity. The results show that in keratinocytes ATRA-promoted phosphatase activity controls the proteostasis and activity of complex I. PMID:27358125

  10. Structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Genova, Maria Luisa; Bianchi, Cristina; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    Two models exist of the mitochondrial respiratory chain: the model of a random organization of the individual respiratory enzyme complexes and that of a super-complex assembly formed by stable association between the individual complexes. Recently Schägger, using digitonin solubilization and Blue Native PAGE produced new evidence of preferential associations, in particular a Complex I monomer with a Complex III dimer, and suggested a model of the respiratory chain (the respirasome) based on direct electron channelling between complexes. Discrimination between the two models is amenable to kinetic testing using flux control analysis. Experimental evidence obtained in beef heart SMP, according to the extension of the Metabolic Control Theory for pathways with metabolic channelling, showed that enzyme associations involving Complex I and Complex III take place in the respiratory chain while Complex IV seems to be randomly distributed, with cytochrome c behaving as a mobile component. Flux control analysis at anyone of the respiratory complexes involved in aerobic succinate oxidation indicated that Complex II and III are not functionally associated in a stable supercomplex. A critical appraisal of the solid-state model of the mitochondrial respiratory chain requires its reconciliation with previous biophysical and kinetic evidence that CoQ behaves as a homogeneous diffusible pool between all reducing enzyme and all oxidizing enzymes: the hypothesis can be advanced that both models (CoQ pool and supercomplexes) are true, by postulating that supercomplexes physiologically exist in equilibrium with isolated complexes depending on metabolic conditions of the cell.

  11. Ambroxol inhibits neutrophil respiratory burst activated by alpha chain integrin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peroni, D G; Moser, S; Gallo, G; Pigozzi, R; Tenero, L; Zanoni, L; Boner, A L; Piacentini, G L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-oxidant effect(s) of Ambroxol on neutrophils activated by ligand-binding of the drug with membrane-associated adhesion integrin CD11a and to estimate dose-response changes in oxygen free radical production. The amount of free radical production by anti-CD11a- and anti-CD4-coated neutrophils stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and challenged with increasing concentration of Ambroxol, was evaluated within a time frame of 90 minutes. A significant dose-dependent effect response of Ambroxol on O2‾ production by cells coated with anti-CD11a antibody was observed. This preliminary study opens a new perspective on the therapeutic role of Ambroxol as an antioxidant drug and for its potential use in controlling oxidative stress, particularly in leukocyte-dependent inflammation.

  12. Ambroxol inhibits neutrophil respiratory burst activated by alpha chain integrin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peroni, D G; Moser, S; Gallo, G; Pigozzi, R; Tenero, L; Zanoni, L; Boner, A L; Piacentini, G L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-oxidant effect(s) of Ambroxol on neutrophils activated by ligand-binding of the drug with membrane-associated adhesion integrin CD11a and to estimate dose-response changes in oxygen free radical production. The amount of free radical production by anti-CD11a- and anti-CD4-coated neutrophils stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and challenged with increasing concentration of Ambroxol, was evaluated within a time frame of 90 minutes. A significant dose-dependent effect response of Ambroxol on O2‾ production by cells coated with anti-CD11a antibody was observed. This preliminary study opens a new perspective on the therapeutic role of Ambroxol as an antioxidant drug and for its potential use in controlling oxidative stress, particularly in leukocyte-dependent inflammation. PMID:24355223

  13. In vitro evidence that phytanic acid compromises Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and the electron flow through the respiratory chain in brain cortex from young rats.

    PubMed

    Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Moura, Alana Pimentel; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Grings, Mateus; Vargas, Carmen R; Wajner, Moacir

    2010-09-17

    Phytanic acid (Phyt) tissue concentrations are increased in Refsum disease and other peroxisomal disorders characterized by neurologic damage and brain abnormalities. The present work investigated the in vitro effects of Phyt, at concentrations found in these peroxisomal disorders, on important parameters of energy metabolism in brain cortex of young rats. The parameters analyzed were CO(2) production from labeled acetate and glucose, the activities of the citric acid cycle enzymes citrate synthase, aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, fumarase and malate dehydrogenase, as well as of the respiratory chain complexes I-IV, creatine kinase and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. Our results show that Phyt did not alter citric acid cycle enzyme activities, or CO(2) production from acetate, reflecting no impairment of the functionality of the citric acid cycle. In contrast, respiratory chain activities were reduced at complexes I, II, I-III, II-III and IV. Membrane synaptical Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity was also reduced by Phyt, with no alteration of creatine kinase activity. Considering the importance of the electron flow through the respiratory chain for brain energy metabolism (oxidative phosphorylation) and of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity for maintaining membrane potential necessary for neurotransmission, the data indicate that Phyt impairs brain bioenergetics at the level of energy formation, as well as neurotransmission. It is presumed that Phyt-induced impairment of these important systems may be involved at least in part in the neurological damage found in patients affected by disorders in which brain Phyt concentrations are increased.

  14. Biomarkers for mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders.

    PubMed

    Suomalainen, Anu

    2011-04-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies are a group of more than 100 disorders of adults and children, with highly variable phenotypes. Their diagnosis is a great challenge, in spite of the fact that knowledge on their molecular genetic background has increased considerably during the last 20 years. Muscle biopsy is the key diagnostic procedure, including histological and biochemical analysis of mitochondria. Less invasive, specific and sensitive diagnostic tools based on serum biomarkers are still lacking. Recent technological developments, especially in mass spectrometry, enable novel tools for identification of local and global molecular consequences of mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction in patient samples. Furthermore, emerging disease models, especially genetically modified mice, offer unique materials to tackle pathophysiology with modern transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic approaches. Identified molecular signals or metabolic fingerprints have the potential to be highly useful biomarkers for future diagnosis of mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders.

  15. The Respiratory Chain of Alkaliphilic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Ann Krulwich

    2008-01-29

    Alkaliphilic bacteria that grow at extremely high pH are confronted by particular bioenergetic problems in carrying out oxidative phosphorylation. This project focused on the properties and adaptations of the respiratory chain. The respiratory chain as a whole, the redox poises of its components and several individual complexes of the respiratory chain of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 have been characterized as part of this project and, importantly, this project has helped support the development of genetic tools that make B. pseudofirmus OF4 the most genetically tractable and, hence, most bioenergetically characterized extreme alkaliphile. Evidence has been obtained for a pivotal role of the cca3-type terminal oxidase in oxidative phosphorylation, especially at high pH and motifs that may be relevant to that special role have been identified.

  16. Administration of Harmine and Imipramine Alters Creatine Kinase and Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Activities in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Réus, Gislaine Z.; Stringari, Roberto B.; Gonçalves, Cinara L.; Scaini, Giselli; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Jeremias, Gabriela C.; Jeremias, Isabela C.; Ferreira, Gabriela K.; Streck, Emílio L.; Hallak, Jaime E.; Zuardi, Antônio W.; Crippa, José A.; Quevedo, João

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated mitochondrial respiratory chain and creatine kinase activities after administration of harmine (5, 10, and 15 mg/kg) and imipramine (10, 20, and 30 mg/kg) in rat brain. After acute treatment occurred an increase of creatine kinase in the prefrontal with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine in all doses, in the striatum with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine (5 and 10 mg/kg); harmine (15 mg/kg) decreased creatine kinase. In the chronic treatment occurred an increase of creatine kinase with imipramine (20 mg/kg), harmine (5 mg/kg) in the prefrontal with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine (5 and 10 mg/kg) in the striatum. In the acute treatment, the complex I increased in the prefrontal with harmine (15 mg/kg) and in the striatum with harmine (10 mg/kg); the complex II decreased with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) in the striatum; the complex IV increased with imipramine (30 mg/kg) in the striatum. In the chronic treatment, the complex I increased with harmine (5 mg/kg) in the prefrontal; the complex II increased with imipramine (20 mg/kg) in the prefrontal; the complex IV increased with harmine (5 mg/kg) in the striatum. Finally, these findings further support the hypothesis that harmine and imipramine could be involved in mitochondrial function. PMID:21969912

  17. Respiratory chain supercomplexes in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Eubel, Holger; Heinemeyer, Jesco; Sunderhaus, Stephanie; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2004-12-01

    Supercomplexes are defined associations of protein complexes, which are important for several cellular functions. This "quintenary" organization level of protein structure recently was also described for the respiratory chain of plant mitochondria. Except succinate dehydrogenase (complex II), all complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPOS) system (complexes I, III, IV and V) were found to form part of supercomplexes. Compositions of these supramolecular structures were systematically investigated using digitonin solubilizations of mitochondrial fractions and two-dimensional Blue-native (BN) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The most abundant supercomplex of plant mitochondria includes complexes I and III at a 1:2 ratio (I1 + III2 supercomplex). Furthermore, some supercomplexes of lower abundance could be described, which have I2 + III4, V2, III2 + IV(1-2), and I1 + III2 + IV(1-4) compositions. Supercomplexes consisting of complexes I plus III plus IV were proposed to be called "respirasome", because they autonomously can carry out respiration in the presence of ubiquinone and cytochrome c. Plant specific alternative oxidoreductases of the respiratory chain were not associated with supercomplexes under all experimental conditions tested. However, formation of supercomplexes possibly indirectly regulates alternative respiratory pathways in plant mitochondria on the basis of electron channeling. In this review, procedures to characterize the supermolecular organization of the plant respiratory chain and results concerning supercomplex structure and function are summarized and discussed.

  18. Marked inhibition of Na+, K(+)- ATPase activity and the respiratory chain by phytanic acid in cerebellum from young rats: possible underlying mechanisms of cerebellar ataxia in Refsum disease.

    PubMed

    Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Zanatta, Ângela; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Ribeiro, César Augusto João; Wajner, Moacir

    2013-02-01

    Refsum disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of peroxisomal metabolism biochemically characterized by highly elevated concentrations of phytanic acid (Phyt) in a variety of tissues including the cerebellum. Reduction of plasma Phyt levels by dietary restriction intake ameliorates ataxia, a common clinical manifestation of this disorder, suggesting a neurotoxic role for this branched-chain fatty acid. Therefore, considering that the underlying mechanisms of cerebellum damage in Refsum disease are poorly known, in the present study we tested the effects of Phyt on important parameters of bioenergetics, such as the activities of the respiratory chain complexes I to IV, creatine kinase and Na(+), K(+)- ATPase in cerebellum preparations from young rats. The activities of complexes I, II, I-III and II-III and Na(+), K(+)- ATPase were markedly inhibited (65-85%) in a dose-dependent manner by Phyt. In contrast, creatine kinase and complex IV activities were not altered by this fatty acid. Therefore, it is presumed that impairment of the electron flow through the respiratory chain and inhibition of Na(+), K(+)- ATPase that is crucial for synaptic function may be involved in the pathophysiology of the cerebellar abnormalities manifested as ataxia in Refsum disease and in other peroxisomal disorders in which brain Phyt accumulates.

  19. High Molecular Weight Forms of Mammalian Respiratory Chain Complex II

    PubMed Central

    Nůsková, Hana; Holzerová, Eliška; Vrbacký, Marek; Pecina, Petr; Hejzlarová, Kateřina; Kľučková, Katarína; Rohlena, Jakub; Neuzil, Jiri; Houštěk, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain is organised into supramolecular structures that can be preserved in mild detergent solubilisates and resolved by native electrophoretic systems. Supercomplexes of respiratory complexes I, III and IV as well as multimeric forms of ATP synthase are well established. However, the involvement of complex II, linking respiratory chain with tricarboxylic acid cycle, in mitochondrial supercomplexes is questionable. Here we show that digitonin-solubilised complex II quantitatively forms high molecular weight structures (CIIhmw) that can be resolved by clear native electrophoresis. CIIhmw structures are enzymatically active and differ in electrophoretic mobility between tissues (500 – over 1000 kDa) and cultured cells (400–670 kDa). While their formation is unaffected by isolated defects in other respiratory chain complexes, they are destabilised in mtDNA-depleted, rho0 cells. Molecular interactions responsible for the assembly of CIIhmw are rather weak with the complexes being more stable in tissues than in cultured cells. While electrophoretic studies and immunoprecipitation experiments of CIIhmw do not indicate specific interactions with the respiratory chain complexes I, III or IV or enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, they point out to a specific interaction between CII and ATP synthase. PMID:23967256

  20. Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst enhances activities of heart mitochondrial enzymes and respiratory chain complexes in the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Sudheesh, N P; Ajith, T A; Janardhanan, K K

    2009-10-01

    Aging is associated with increased oxidative damage at multiple cellular levels, decline in cellular energy production and enhanced free radical status. The effect of the medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum on the activities of tricarboxylic acid (Krebs) cycle enzymes and mitochondrial complexes I-IV of the electron transport chain in aged rats were investigated. The activity of Krebs cycle enzymes, isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase as well as mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and IV were determined in heart of aged male Wistar rats orally administrated with 70% ethanolic extract (50 and 250 mg/kg) of G. lucidum. DL-alpha-lipoic acid (100 mg/kg) was taken as the positive control. Administration of the G. lucidum, once daily for 15 days, was significantly (P < 0.05) effective to enhance the Krebs cycle dehydrogenases, and mitochondrial electron transport chain complex IV activities in aged rats. The profound activity of the extract can be correlated to the significant antioxidant property of G. lucidum. The results of the study revealed that G. lucidum is effective to ameliorate the age associated decline of cellular energy status. PMID:19123066

  1. Biogenesis of mitochondria in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) curds subjected to temperature stress and recovery involves regulation of the complexome, respiratory chain activity, organellar translation and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Rurek, Michal; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2015-01-01

    The biogenesis of the cauliflower curd mitochondrial proteome was investigated under cold, heat and the recovery. For the first time, two dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis was used to study the plant mitochondrial complexome in heat and heat recovery. Particularly, changes in the complex I and complex III subunits and import proteins, and the partial disintegration of matrix complexes were observed. The presence of unassembled subunits of ATP synthase was accompanied by impairment in mitochondrial translation of its subunit. In cold and heat, the transcription profiles of mitochondrial genes were uncorrelated. The in-gel activities of respiratory complexes were particularly affected after stress recovery. Despite a general stability of respiratory chain complexes in heat, functional studies showed that their activity and the ATP synthesis yield were affected. Contrary to cold stress, heat stress resulted in a reduced efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation likely due to changes in alternative oxidase (AOX) activity. Stress and stress recovery differently modulated the protein level and activity of AOX. Heat stress induced an increase in AOX activity and protein level, and AOX1a and AOX1d transcript level, while heat recovery reversed the AOX protein and activity changes. Conversely, cold stress led to a decrease in AOX activity (and protein level), which was reversed after cold recovery. Thus, cauliflower AOX is only induced by heat stress. In heat, contrary to the AOX activity, the activity of rotenone-insensitive internal NADH dehydrogenase was diminished. The relevance of various steps of plant mitochondrial biogenesis to temperature stress response and recovery is discussed.

  2. Respiratory active mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Peleato, Maria Luisa; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Enriquez, Jose Antonio

    2008-11-21

    The structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes as four big independently moving entities connected by the mobile carriers CoQ and cytochrome c has been challenged recently. Blue native gel electrophoresis reveals the presence of high-molecular-weight bands containing several respiratory complexes and suggesting an in vivo assembly status of these structures (respirasomes). However, no functional evidence of the activity of supercomplexes as true respirasomes has been provided yet. We have observed that (1) supercomplexes are not formed when one of their component complexes is absent; (2) there is a temporal gap between the formation of the individual complexes and that of the supercomplexes; (3) some putative respirasomes contain CoQ and cytochrome c; (4) isolated respirasomes can transfer electrons from NADH to O(2), that is, they respire. Therefore, we have demonstrated the existence of a functional respirasome and propose a structural organization model that accommodates these findings.

  3. Mitochondrial Cristae Shape Determines Respiratory Chain Supercomplexes Assembly and Respiratory Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cogliati, Sara; Frezza, Christian; Soriano, Maria Eugenia; Varanita, Tatiana; Quintana-Cabrera, Ruben; Corrado, Mauro; Cipolat, Sara; Costa, Veronica; Casarin, Alberto; Gomes, Ligia C.; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Salviati, Leonardo; Fernandez-Silva, Patricio; Enriquez, Jose A.; Scorrano, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Summary Respiratory chain complexes assemble into functional quaternary structures called supercomplexes (RCS) within the folds of the inner mitochondrial membrane, or cristae. Here, we investigate the relationship between respiratory function and mitochondrial ultrastructure and provide evidence that cristae shape determines the assembly and stability of RCS and hence mitochondrial respiratory efficiency. Genetic and apoptotic manipulations of cristae structure affect assembly and activity of RCS in vitro and in vivo, independently of changes to mitochondrial protein synthesis or apoptotic outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. We demonstrate that, accordingly, the efficiency of mitochondria-dependent cell growth depends on cristae shape. Thus, RCS assembly emerges as a link between membrane morphology and function. PMID:24055366

  4. Genetic bases of mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders.

    PubMed

    Rötig, Agnès

    2010-04-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation - ATP synthesis by the oxygen-consuming respiratory chain (RC) - supplies most organs and tissues with a readily usable energy source, and is already fully functioning at birth. This means that, in theory, RC deficiency can give rise to any symptom in any organ or tissue at any age and with any mode of inheritance, due to the two-fold genetic origin of RC components (nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA). It has long been erroneously believed that RC disorders originate from mutations of mtDNA as, for some time, only mutations or deletions of mtDNA could be identified. However, the number of disease-causing mutations in nuclear genes is now steadily growing. These genes not only encode the various subunits of each complex, but also the ancillary proteins involved in the different stages of holoenzyme biogenesis, including transcription, translation, chaperoning, addition of prosthetic groups and assembly of proteins, as well as the various enzymes involved in mtDNA metabolism.

  5. Genetics of mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Rötig, A

    2014-05-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation, i.e. ATP synthesis by the oxygen-consuming respiratory chain (RC), supplies most organs and tissues with a readily usable energy source, and is already fully functioning before birth. This means that, in theory, RC deficiency can give rise to any symptom in any organ or tissue at any age and with any mode of inheritance, due to the twofold genetic origin of RC components (nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA). It has long been erroneously believed that RC disorders originate from mutations of mtDNA as, for some time, only mutations or deletions of mtDNA could be identified. However, the number of disease-causing mutations in nuclear genes is now steadily growing. These genes not only encode the various subunits of each complex, but also the ancillary proteins involved in the different stages of holoenzyme biogenesis, including transcription, translation, chaperoning, addition of prosthetic groups and assembly of proteins, as well as the various enzymes involved in mtDNA metabolism.

  6. [Structure of mitochondria and activity of their respiratory chain in subsequent generations of yeast cells exposed to He-Ne laser light].

    PubMed

    Manteĭfel', V M; Karu, T I

    2005-01-01

    The data on the effect of He-Ne laser light (lambda = 632.8 nm) on mitochondria of yeasts in late log phase were reviewed. The qualitative analysis of the ultrathin sections of cells demonstrated a nonuniform thickness of the giant branched mitochondria typical for budding yeasts. Exposure to a dose of 460 J/m@2 accelerated cell proliferation, activated respiratory chain enzymes (cytochrome c oxidase and NADH dehydrogenase), and also changed the microstructure of the giant mitochondria--much of the narrow regions of the mitochondrial tube with sections < or = 0.06 microm2 were dilated (while no signs of organelle damage were observed). Relative surface area of the cristae increased in such mitochondria, which can be due to the activation of their respiration and ATP synthesis. The number of associations between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum increased in cells in early log phase, which reflects high capacity of mitochondria to absorb Ca2+. Altered giant mitochondria configuration can increase the efficiency of both energy transfer and Ca2+ distribution in the cytoplasm. PMID:16535977

  7. Supramolecular organization of the respiratory chain in Neurospora crassa mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Marques, Isabel; Dencher, Norbert A; Videira, Arnaldo; Krause, Frank

    2007-12-01

    The existence of specific respiratory supercomplexes in mitochondria of most organisms has gained much momentum. However, its functional significance is still poorly understood. The availability of many deletion mutants in complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) of Neurospora crassa, distinctly affected in the assembly process, offers unique opportunities to analyze the biogenesis of respiratory supercomplexes. Herein, we describe the role of complex I in assembly of respiratory complexes and supercomplexes as suggested by blue and colorless native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analyses of mildly solubilized mitochondria from the wild type and eight deletion mutants. As an important refinement of the fungal respirasome model, we found that the standard respiratory chain of N. crassa comprises putative complex I dimers in addition to I-III-IV and III-IV supercomplexes. Three Neurospora mutants able to assemble a complete complex I, lacking only the disrupted subunit, have respiratory supercomplexes, in particular I-III-IV supercomplexes and complex I dimers, like the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we were able to detect the I-III-IV supercomplexes in the nuo51 mutant with no overall enzymatic activity, representing the first example of inactive respirasomes. In addition, III-IV supercomplexes were also present in strains lacking an assembled complex I, namely, in four membrane arm subunit mutants as well as in the peripheral arm nuo30.4 mutant. In membrane arm mutants, high-molecular-mass species of the 30.4-kDa peripheral arm subunit comigrating with III-IV supercomplexes and/or the prohibitin complex were detected. The data presented herein suggest that the biogenesis of complex I is linked with its assembly into supercomplexes.

  8. Metformin-induced inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain increases FGF21 expression via ATF4 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kook Hwan; Jeong, Yeon Taek; Kim, Seong Hun; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Hae-Youn; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Metformin induces FGF21 expression in an AMPK independent manner. •Metformin enhances FGF21 expression by inhibiting mitochondrial complex I activity. •The PERK-eIF2α-ATF4 axis is required for metformin-induced FGF21 expression. •Metformin activates the ATF4-FGF21 axis in the liver of mouse. •Metformin increases serum FGF21 level in diabetic human subjects. -- Abstract: Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is an endocrine hormone that exhibits anti-obesity and anti-diabetes effects. Because metformin is widely used as a glucose-lowering agent in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), we investigated whether metformin modulates FGF21 expression in cell lines, and in mice or human subjects. We found that metformin increased the expression and release of FGF21 in a diverse set of cell types, including rat hepatoma FaO, primary mouse hepatocytes, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Intriguingly, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was dispensable for the induction of FGF21 by metformin. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), which are additional targets of metformin, were not involved in metformin-induced FGF21 expression. Importantly, inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity by metformin resulted in FGF21 induction through PKR-like ER kinase (PERK)-eukaryotic translation factor 2α (eIF2α)-activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). We showed that metformin activated ATF4 and increased FGF21 expression in the livers of mice, which led to increased serum levels of FGF21. We also found that serum FGF21 level was increased in human subjects with T2D after metformin therapy for 6 months. In conclusion, our results indicate that metformin induced expression of FGF21 through an ATF4-dependent mechanism by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration independently of AMPK. Therefore, FGF21 induction by metformin might explain a portion of the beneficial metabolic effects of metformin.

  9. Mitochondrial Protein Interaction Mapping Identifies Regulators of Respiratory Chain Function.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Brendan J; Wilkerson, Emily M; Veling, Mike T; Minogue, Catie E; Xia, Chuanwu; Beebe, Emily T; Wrobel, Russell L; Cho, Holly; Kremer, Laura S; Alston, Charlotte L; Gromek, Katarzyna A; Dolan, Brendan K; Ulbrich, Arne; Stefely, Jonathan A; Bohl, Sarah L; Werner, Kelly M; Jochem, Adam; Westphall, Michael S; Rensvold, Jarred W; Taylor, Robert W; Prokisch, Holger; Kim, Jung-Ja P; Coon, Joshua J; Pagliarini, David J

    2016-08-18

    Mitochondria are essential for numerous cellular processes, yet hundreds of their proteins lack robust functional annotation. To reveal functions for these proteins (termed MXPs), we assessed condition-specific protein-protein interactions for 50 select MXPs using affinity enrichment mass spectrometry. Our data connect MXPs to diverse mitochondrial processes, including multiple aspects of respiratory chain function. Building upon these observations, we validated C17orf89 as a complex I (CI) assembly factor. Disruption of C17orf89 markedly reduced CI activity, and its depletion is found in an unresolved case of CI deficiency. We likewise discovered that LYRM5 interacts with and deflavinates the electron-transferring flavoprotein that shuttles electrons to coenzyme Q (CoQ). Finally, we identified a dynamic human CoQ biosynthetic complex involving multiple MXPs whose topology we map using purified components. Collectively, our data lend mechanistic insight into respiratory chain-related activities and prioritize hundreds of additional interactions for further exploration of mitochondrial protein function. PMID:27499296

  10. Differential reconstitution of mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and plasma redox state by cysteine and ornithine in a model of cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Ushmorov, A; Hack, V; Dröge, W

    1999-07-15

    The mechanism of wasting, as it occurs in malignant diseases and various etiologically unrelated conditions, is still poorly understood. We have, therefore, studied putative cause/effect relationships in a murine model of cancer cachexia, C57BL/6 mice bearing the fibrosarcoma MCA-105. The plasma of these mice showed decreased albumin and increased glutamate levels, which are typically found in practically all catabolic conditions. Skeletal muscles from tumor-bearing mice were found to have an abnormally low mitochondrial respiratory chain activity (mito.RCA) and significantly decreased glutathione (GSH) levels. The decrease in mito.RCA was correlated with an increase in the i.m. GSH disulfide/GSH ratio, the plasma cystine/thiol ratio, and the GSH disulfide/GSH ratio in the bile. This is indicative of a generalized shift in the redox state extending through different body fluids. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice with ornithine, a precursor of the radical scavenger spermine, reversed both the decrease in mito.RCA and the change in the redox state, whereas treatment with cysteine, a GSH precursor, normalized only the redox state. Treatment of normal mice with difluoromethyl-ornithine, a specific inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase and spermine biosynthesis, inhibited the mito.RCA in the skeletal muscle tissue, thus illustrating the importance of the putrescine/spermine pathway in the maintenance of mito.RCA. Ornithine, cysteine, and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) also reconstituted the abnormally low concentrations of the GSH precursor glutamate in the skeletal muscle tissue of tumor-bearing mice. Higher doses, however, enhanced tumor growth and increased the plasma glucose level in normal mice. In the latter, cysteine and NAC also decreased i.m. catalase and GSH peroxidase activities. Taken together, our studies on the effects of ornithine, cysteine, and NAC illuminate some of the mechanistic pathways involved in cachexia and suggest targets for therapeutic intervention.

  11. The R22X mutation of the SDHD gene in hereditary paraganglioma abolishes the enzymatic activity of complex II in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and activates the hypoxia pathway.

    PubMed

    Gimenez-Roqueplo, A P; Favier, J; Rustin, P; Mourad, J J; Plouin, P F; Corvol, P; Rötig, A; Jeunemaitre, X

    2001-12-01

    Hereditary paragangliomas are usually benign tumors of the autonomic nervous system that are composed of cells derived from the primitive neural crest. Even though three genes (SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB), which encode three protein subunits of cytochrome b of complex II in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, have been identified, the molecular mechanisms leading to tumorigenesis are unknown. We studied a family in which the father and his eldest son had bilateral neck paragangliomas, whereas the second son had a left carotid-body paraganglioma and an ectopic mediastinal pheochromocytoma. A nonsense mutation (R22X) in the SDHD gene was found in these three affected subjects. Loss of heterozygosity was observed for the maternal chromosome 11q21-q25 within the tumor but not in peripheral leukocytes. Assessment of the activity of respiratory-chain enzymes showed a complete and selective loss of complex II enzymatic activity in the inherited pheochromocytoma, that was not detected in six sporadic pheochromocytomas. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry experiments showed a high level of expression of markers of the angiogenic pathway. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR measurements confirmed that vascular endothelial growth factor and endothelial PAS domain protein 1 mRNA levels were significantly higher (three- and sixfold, respectively) than those observed in three sporadic benign pheochromocytomas. Thus, inactivation of the SDHD gene in hereditary paraganglioma is associated with a complete loss of mitochondrial complex II activity and with a high expression of angiogenic factors. PMID:11605159

  12. The respiratory chain in yeast behaves as a single functional unit.

    PubMed

    Boumans, H; Grivell, L A; Berden, J A

    1998-02-27

    Inhibitor titrations using antimycin have been used to study the pool behavior of ubiquinone and cytochrome c in the respiratory chain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. If present in a homogeneous pool, these carriers should be able to diffuse freely through or along the membrane respectively and accept and subsequently donate electrons to an infinite number of the respective respiratory complex. However, we show that under physiological conditions neither ubiquinone nor cytochrome c exhibits pool behavior, implying that the respiratory chain in yeast is one functional unit. Pool behavior can be introduced for both small carriers by adding chaotropic agents to the reaction medium. We conclude that these agents disrupt the interaction between the respiratory complexes, thereby causing them to become randomly arranged in the membrane. In such a situation, ubiquinone and cytochrome c become mobile carriers, shuttling between the large respiratory complexes. Furthermore, we conclude from the respiratory activities found for different substrates that the respiratory units in yeast vary in composition with respect to the ubiquinone reducing enzyme. All units contain the cytochrome chain, supplemented with either succinate dehydrogenase or the internal or the external NADH dehydrogenase. This implies that when only one substrate is available, only a certain fraction of the cytochrome chain is used in respiration. The molecular organization of the respiratory chain in yeast is compared with that of higher eukaryotes and to the electron transfer systems of photosynthetic membranes. Differences between the organization of the respiratory chain of yeast and that of higher eukaryotes are discussed in terms of the ability of yeast to radically alter its metabolism in response to change of the available carbon source.

  13. Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes as sources and targets of thiol-based redox-regulation.

    PubMed

    Dröse, Stefan; Brandt, Ulrich; Wittig, Ilka

    2014-08-01

    The respiratory chain of the inner mitochondrial membrane is a unique assembly of protein complexes that transfers the electrons of reducing equivalents extracted from foodstuff to molecular oxygen to generate a proton-motive force as the primary energy source for cellular ATP-synthesis. Recent evidence indicates that redox reactions are also involved in regulating mitochondrial function via redox-modification of specific cysteine-thiol groups in subunits of respiratory chain complexes. Vice versa the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by respiratory chain complexes may have an impact on the mitochondrial redox balance through reversible and irreversible thiol-modification of specific target proteins involved in redox signaling, but also pathophysiological processes. Recent evidence indicates that thiol-based redox regulation of the respiratory chain activity and especially S-nitrosylation of complex I could be a strategy to prevent elevated ROS production, oxidative damage and tissue necrosis during ischemia-reperfusion injury. This review focuses on the thiol-based redox processes involving the respiratory chain as a source as well as a target, including a general overview on mitochondria as highly compartmentalized redox organelles and on methods to investigate the redox state of mitochondrial proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Thiol-Based Redox Processes.

  14. The Respiratory Chain of Chlorella protothecoides

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Neil G.; Hommersand, Max H.

    1974-01-01

    The respiration and cytochrome properties of “glucose-bleached” Chlorella protothecoides Krüger, Indiana strain 25, were studied. This organism, when grown heterotrophically with high glucose and a low organic nitrogen source, has no chlorophyll, little carotenoid, and diminished chloroplast structure—factors which make it suitable for respiration studies. Whole cell endogenous oxygen uptake rates are either stimulated or only slightly inhibited by cyanide, azide, CO, and antimycin. When these inhibitors are used with m-chlorobenz-hydroxamic acid (mCLAM), an inhibitor of higher plant mitochondrial alternate oxidase, O2 uptake is inhibited. There is little effect of mCLAM by itself on the rate of oxygen uptake. The inhibition by CO of O2 uptake in the presence of mCLAM is reversed by light. The cytochrome chain of C. protothecoides consists of cytochromes aa3, b, and c, as revealed by room temperature difference spectra. In common with mitochondria of higher plants, there is a further reduction of cytochrome b with dithionite. In the presence of antimycin, the cytochromes aa3 and c are oxidized and cytochrome b is reduced. Cyanide causes a partial reduction of cytochromes aa3 and c while cytochrome b remains oxidized. This general response is characteristic of higher plant mitochrondria having large amounts of cyanide-resistant respiration. Carbon monoxide spectra reveal one CO-combining pigment. The cytochrome b region differs from that of higher plants in that the typical complex spectrum does not appear at low temperature (−190 C). The concentration of cytochrome aa3 per cell volume was observed during the greening of “glucose-bleached” cells. The concentration of these cytochromes nearly tripled during the 24 hours of the initial stages of greening. PMID:16658836

  15. Respiratory Chain of Colorless Algae II. Cyanophyta

    PubMed Central

    Webster, D. A.; Hackett, D. P.

    1966-01-01

    Whole cell difference spectra of the blue-green algae, Saprospira grandis, Leucothrix mucor, and Vitreoscilla sp. have one, or at the most 2, broad α-bands near 560 mμ. At −190° these bands split to give 4 peaks in the α-region for b and c-type cytochromes, but no α-band for a-type cytochromes is visible. The NADH oxidase activity of these organisms was shown to be associated with particulate fractions of cell homogenates. The response of this activity to inhibitors differed from the responses of the NADH oxidase activities of particulate preparations from the green algae and higher plants to the same inhibitors, but is more typical of certain bacteria. No cytochrome oxidase activity was present in these preparations. The respiration of Saprospira and Vitreoscilla can be light-reversibly inhibited by CO, and all 3 organisms have a CO-binding pigment whose CO complex absorbs near 570, 535, and 417 mμ. The action spectrum for the light reversal of CO-inhibited Vitreoscilla respiration shows maxima at 568, 534, and 416 mμ. The results suggest that the terminal oxidase in these blue-greens is an o-type cytochrome. Images PMID:5932404

  16. Analysis of Escherichia coli mutants with a linear respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Steinsiek, Sonja; Stagge, Stefan; Bettenbrock, Katja

    2014-01-01

    The respiratory chain of E. coli is branched to allow the cells' flexibility to deal with changing environmental conditions. It consists of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductases NADH dehydrogenase I and II, as well as of three terminal oxidases. They differ with respect to energetic efficiency (proton translocation) and their affinity to the different quinone/quinol species and oxygen. In order to analyze the advantages of the branched electron transport chain over a linear one and to assess how usage of the different terminal oxidases determines growth behavior at varying oxygen concentrations, a set of isogenic mutant strains was created, which lack NADH dehydrogenase I as well as two of the terminal oxidases, resulting in strains with a linear respiratory chain. These strains were analyzed in glucose-limited chemostat experiments with defined oxygen supply, adjusting aerobic, anaerobic and different microaerobic conditions. In contrast to the wild-type strain MG1655, the mutant strains produced acetate even under aerobic conditions. Strain TBE032, lacking NADH dehydrogenase I and expressing cytochrome bd-II as sole terminal oxidase, showed the highest acetate formation rate under aerobic conditions. This supports the idea that cytochrome bd-II terminal oxidase is not able to catalyze the efficient oxidation of the quinol pool at higher oxygen conditions, but is functioning mainly under limiting oxygen conditions. Phosphorylation of ArcA, the regulator of the two-component system ArcBA, besides Fnr the main transcription factor for the response towards different oxygen concentrations, was studied. Its phosphorylation pattern was changed in the mutant strains. Dephosphorylation and therefore inactivation of ArcA started at lower aerobiosis levels than in the wild-type strain. Notably, not only the micro- and aerobic metabolism was affected by the mutations, but also the anaerobic metabolism, where the respiratory chain should not be important. PMID:24475268

  17. Methanol and ethanol oxidase respiratory chains of the methylotrophic acetic acid bacterium, Acetobacter methanolicus.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, K; Takahashi, K; Takahashi, M; Ameyama, M; Adachi, O

    1992-06-01

    Acetobacter methanolicus is a unique acetic acid bacterium which has a methanol oxidase respiratory chain, as seen in methylotrophs, in addition to its ethanol oxidase respiratory chain. In this study, the relationship between methanol and ethanol oxidase respiratory chains was investigated. The organism is able to grow by oxidizing several carbon sources, including methanol, glycerol, and glucose. Cells grown on methanol exhibited a high methanol-oxidizing activity and contained large amounts of methanol dehydrogenase and soluble cytochromes c. Cells grown on glycerol showed higher oxygen uptake rate and dehydrogenase activity with ethanol but little methanol-oxidizing activity. Furthermore, two different terminal oxidases, cytochrome c and ubiquinol oxidases, have been shown to be involved in the respiratory chain; cytochrome c oxidase predominates in cells grown on methanol while ubiquinol oxidase predominates in cells grown on glycerol. Both terminal oxidases could be solubilized from the membranes and separated from each other. The cytochrome c oxidase and the ubiquinol oxidase have been shown to be a cytochrome co and a cytochrome bo, respectively. Methanol-oxidizing activity was diminished by several treatments that disrupt the integrity of the cells. The activity of the intact cells was inhibited with NaCl and/or EDTA, which disturbed the interaction between methanol dehydrogenase and cytochrome c. Ethanol-oxidizing activity in the membranes was inhibited with 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, which inhibited ubiquinol oxidase but not cytochrome c oxidase. Alcohol dehydrogenase has been purified from the membranes of glycerol-grown cells and shown to reduce ubiquinone-10 as well as a short side-chain homologue in detergent solution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Deficiency of respiratory chain complex I in Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Franz A; Neureiter, Daniel; Feichtinger, René G; Trost, Andrea; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara; Mayr, Johannes A

    2016-01-01

    Oncocytic cells (OCs) are characterized by an accumulation of mitochondria and their occurrence in the thyroid gland of patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is well known. However, their properties and functional relevance are poorly understood. We investigated OC lesions (n=212) in the thyroid of 12 HT patients. Loss of complex I protein was observed in oncocytic lesions of each of the patients. In addition to isolated complex I deficiency, 25% of oncocytic lesions showed combined deficiency of complex I and IV. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time a defect of respiratory chain complex I in OCs of HT patients.

  19. Metabolic autopsy with postmortem cultured fibroblasts in sudden unexpected death in infancy: diagnosis of mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuma; Emoto, Yuko; Murayama, Kei; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kuriu, Yukiko; Ohtake, Akira; Matoba, Ryoji

    2012-08-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are the most common disorders among inherited metabolic disorders. However, there are few published reports regarding the relationship between mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders and sudden unexpected death in infancy. In the present study, we performed metabolic autopsy in 13 Japanese cases of sudden unexpected death in infancy. We performed fat staining of liver and postmortem acylcarnitine analysis. In addition, we analyzed mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activity in frozen organs as well as in postmortem cultured fibroblasts. In heart, 11 cases of complex I activity met the major criteria and one case of complex I activity met the minor criteria. In liver, three cases of complex I activity met the major criteria and four cases of complex I activity met the minor criteria. However, these specimens are susceptible to postmortem changes and, therefore, correct enzyme analysis is hard to be performed. In cultured fibroblasts, only one case of complex I activity met the major criteria and one case of complex I activity met the minor criteria. Cultured fibroblasts are not affected by postmortem changes and, therefore, reflect premortem information more accurately. These cases might not have been identified without postmortem cultured fibroblasts. In conclusion, we detected one probable case and one possible case of mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders among 13 Japanese cases of sudden unexpected death in infancy. Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are one of the important inherited metabolic disorders causing sudden unexpected death in infancy. We advocate metabolic autopsy with postmortem cultured fibroblasts in sudden unexpected death in infancy cases.

  20. Age-associated mosaic respiratory chain deficiency causes trans-neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Eric; Terzioglu, Mügen; Sterky, Fredrik Hansson; Sörensen, Lene; Galter, Dagmar; Olson, Lars; Wilbertz, Johannes; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2008-05-15

    Heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations (mutations present only in a subset of cellular mtDNA copies) arise de novo during the normal ageing process or may be maternally inherited in pedigrees with mitochondrial disease syndromes. A pathogenic mtDNA mutation causes respiratory chain deficiency only if the fraction of mutated mtDNA exceeds a certain threshold level. These mutations often undergo apparently random mitotic segregation and the levels of normal and mutated mtDNA can vary considerably between cells of the same tissue. In human ageing, segregation of somatic mtDNA mutations leads to mosaic respiratory chain deficiency in a variety of tissues, such as brain, heart and skeletal muscle. A similar pattern of mutation segregation with mosaic respiratory chain deficiency is seen in patients with mitochondrial disease syndromes caused by inherited pathogenic mtDNA mutations. We have experimentally addressed the role of mosaic respiratory chain deficiency in ageing and mitochondrial disease by creating mouse chimeras with a mixture of normal and respiratory chain-deficient neurons in cerebral cortex. We report here that a low proportion (>20%) of respiratory chain-deficient neurons in the forebrain are sufficient to cause symptoms, whereas premature death of the animal occurs only if the proportion is high (>60-80%). The presence of neurons with normal respiratory chain function does not only prevent mortality but also delays the age at which onset of disease symptoms occur. Unexpectedly, respiratory chain-deficient neurons have adverse effect on normal adjacent neurons and induce trans-neuronal degeneration. In summary, our study defines the minimal threshold level of respiratory chain-deficient neurons needed to cause symptoms and also demonstrate that neurons with normal respiratory chain function ameliorate disease progression. Finally, we show that respiratory chain-deficient neurons induce death of normal neurons by a trans-neuronal degeneration

  1. Respiratory chain deficiency in aged spinal motor neurons☆

    PubMed Central

    Rygiel, Karolina A.; Grady, John P.; Turnbull, Doug M.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia, muscle wasting, and strength decline with age, is an important cause of loss of mobility in the elderly individuals. The underlying mechanisms are uncertain but likely to involve defects of motor nerve, neuromuscular junction, and muscle. Loss of motor neurons with age and subsequent denervation of skeletal muscle has been recognized as one of the contributing factors. This study investigated aspects of mitochondrial biology in spinal motor neurons from elderly subjects. We found that protein components of complex I of mitochondrial respiratory chain were reduced or absent in a proportion of aged motor neurons–a phenomenon not observed in fetal tissue. Further investigation showed that complex I-deficient cells had reduced mitochondrial DNA content and smaller soma size. We propose that mitochondrial dysfunction in these motor neurons could lead to the cell loss and ultimately denervation of muscle fibers. PMID:24684792

  2. Effects of hydrogen sulfide exposure on lung mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Khan, A A; Schuler, M M; Prior, M G; Yong, S; Coppock, R W; Florence, L Z; Lillie, L E

    1990-05-01

    Fischer-344 rats were exposed for 4 hr to various concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas and killed either immediately or at 1, 24, or 48 hr after exposure. Mitochondrial fractions from lung tissues were assayed for the activities of respiratory chain enzymes. Exposure of rats to a low concentration (10 ppm) of H2S caused no significant changes in the activities of lung mitochondrial enzymes. However, exposure to sublethal concentrations of H2S (50-400 ppm) produced marked and highly significant depressions in the activities of cytochrome c oxidase and succinate oxidase complexes of the respiratory chain. The inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase activity in lungs was most severe (greater than 90%) in rats that died from acute exposure to greater than 500 ppm H2S. In rats exposed to 200 and 400 ppm H2S, a marked recovery in cytochrome c oxidase activity of lungs was observed at 24 and 48 hr postexposure. Studies in vitro with rat lung mitochondria showed that low concentrations of sulfide also caused a similar and selective inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase activity. This effect was reversed upon removal of sulfide either by washing or by oxidation with methemoglobin. The nature of sulfide inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase was noncompetitive with respect to ferrocytochrome c. Because the activities of NADH-cytochrome c reductase and succinate-cytochrome c reductase were not significantly altered by H2S exposure and in vitro treatments with low concentrations of sulfide, it is concluded that under physiological conditions H2S would block the respiratory chain primarily by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase. Such a biochemical impairment would lead to functional (histotoxic) hypoxia in the lung tissues.

  3. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed “lowest supercomplex” (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh’s disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  4. Supercomplexes in the respiratory chains of yeast and mammalian mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schägger, H; Pfeiffer, K

    2000-04-17

    Around 30-40 years after the first isolation of the five complexes of oxidative phosphorylation from mammalian mitochondria, we present data that fundamentally change the paradigm of how the yeast and mammalian system of oxidative phosphorylation is organized. The complexes are not randomly distributed within the inner mitochondrial membrane, but assemble into supramolecular structures. We show that all cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is bound to cytochrome c reductase (complex III), which exists in three forms: the free dimer, and two supercomplexes comprising an additional one or two complex IV monomers. The distribution between these forms varies with growth conditions. In mammalian mitochondria, almost all complex I is assembled into supercomplexes comprising complexes I and III and up to four copies of complex IV, which guided us to present a model for a network of respiratory chain complexes: a 'respirasome'. A fraction of total bovine ATP synthase (complex V) was isolated in dimeric form, suggesting that a dimeric state is not limited to S.cerevisiae, but also exists in mammalian mitochondria.

  5. Kinetics of electron transfer through the respiratory chain.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qusheng; Bethke, Craig M

    2002-01-01

    We show that the rate at which electrons pass through the respiratory chain in mitochondria and respiring prokaryotic cells is described by the product of three terms, one describing electron donation, one acceptance, and a third, the thermodynamic drive. We apply the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics in the context of the chemiosmotic model of proton translocation and energy conservation. This approach leads to a closed-form expression that predicts steady-state electron flux as a function of chemical conditions and the proton motive force across the mitochondrial inner membrane or prokaryotic cytoplasmic membrane. The rate expression, derived considering reverse and forward electron flow, is the first to account for both thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the respiration rate. The expression can be simplified under specific conditions to give rate laws of various forms familiar in cellular physiology and microbial ecology. The expression explains the nonlinear dependence of flux on electrical potential gradient, its hyperbolic dependence on substrate concentration, and the inhibiting effects of reaction products. It provides a theoretical basis for investigating life under unusual conditions, such as microbial respiration in alkaline waters. PMID:12324402

  6. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed "lowest supercomplex" (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh's disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  7. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Loublier, Sandrine; Bayot, Aurelien; Rak, Malgorzata; El-Khoury, Riyad; Benit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. {yields} Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. {yields} Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  8. Biochemical parameters for the diagnosis of mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency in humans, and their lack of age-related changes.

    PubMed Central

    Chretien, D; Gallego, J; Barrientos, A; Casademont, J; Cardellach, F; Munnich, A; Rötig, A; Rustin, P

    1998-01-01

    It is now widely acknowledged that a large number of human diseases originate from respiratory-chain dysfunctions. Because the molecular bases of these diseases are still poorly known, a biochemical approach has to be used in the screening procedures for the diagnoses of these conditions. Assessment of respiratory-chain function in human samples faces several problems: (i) the small size of available samples, (ii) the determination of discriminating parameters, and (iii) the interfering factors, such as age and physical activity. The present study focuses on isolated mitochondria prepared from a minute amount (100-200 mg) of skeletal-muscle biopsies from 201 patients between 0 and 65 years. Whereas 42 patients presented an isolated complex (C)I, CII, CIII or CIV deficiency, no respiratory-chain dysfunction or indirect evidence for a mitochondrial disorder could be attested in 159 of these patients. In this reference group, there was little correlation between enzyme activities and age, whatever the age class considered, 0-3 or 0-65 years of age. However, a confident handling of data points was largely hampered by the marked scattering of enzyme activities measured in the reference population. Activity ratios between the various respiratory-chain complexes presenting a much reduced scattering may be considered as diagnostic tools. As to the effect of age, no correlation with any of the enzyme-activity ratios could be shown. Use of age-matched controls for the diagnosis of respiratory-chain disorders may therefore be avoided, enzyme-activity ratios being highly discriminating and age-independent parameters. PMID:9425106

  9. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Huang, Cher X; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D; Stokes, Matthew P; Silva, Jeffrey C; Bell, George W; MacArthur, Daniel G; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-10-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells.

  10. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F.; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Huang, Cher X.; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D.; Stokes, Matthew P.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Bell, George W.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26438848

  11. Chain reconfiguration in active noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Nairhita; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi

    2016-05-01

    In a typical single molecule experiment, the dynamics of an unfolded protein is studied by determining the reconfiguration time using long-range Förster resonance energy transfer, where the reconfiguration time is the characteristic decay time of the position correlation between two residues of the protein. In this paper we theoretically calculate the reconfiguration time for a single flexible polymer in the presence of active noise. The study suggests that though the mean square displacement grows faster, the chain reconfiguration is always slower in the presence of long-lived active noise with exponential temporal correlation. Similar behavior is observed for a worm-like semi-flexible chain and a Zimm chain. However it is primarily the characteristic correlation time of the active noise and not the strength that controls the increase in the reconfiguration time. In brief, such active noise makes the polymer move faster but the correlation loss between the monomers becomes slow.

  12. Significance of respirasomes for the assembly/stability of human respiratory chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Schägger, Hermann; de Coo, René; Bauer, Matthias F; Hofmann, Sabine; Godinot, Catherine; Brandt, Ulrich

    2004-08-27

    We showed that the human respiratory chain is organized in supramolecular assemblies of respiratory chain complexes, the respirasomes. The mitochondrial complexes I (NADH dehydrogenase) and III (cytochrome c reductase) form a stable core respirasome to which complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) can also bind. An analysis of the state of respirasomes in patients with an isolated deficiency of single complexes provided evidence that the formation of respirasomes is essential for the assembly/stability of complex I, the major entry point of respiratory chain substrates. Genetic alterations leading to a loss of complex III prevented respirasome formation and led to the secondary loss of complex I. Therefore, primary complex III assembly deficiencies presented as combined complex III/I defects. This dependence of complex I assembly/stability on respirasome formation has important implications for the diagnosis of mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders.

  13. Caffeic acid attenuates rat liver reperfusion injury through sirtuin 3-dependent regulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Mu, Hong-Na; Li, Quan; Pan, Chun-Shui; Liu, Yu-Ying; Yan, Li; Hu, Bai-He; Sun, Kai; Chang, Xin; Zhao, Xin-Rong; Fan, Jing-Yu; Han, Jing-Yan

    2015-08-01

    Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) plays critical roles in regulating mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. However, whether Sirt3 is involved in liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury remains elusive. Caffeic acid (CA) is a natural antioxidant derived from Salvia miltiorrhiza. Whether CA protects against liver I/R injury through regulating Sirt3 and the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) is unclear. This study investigated the effect of CA on liver I/R injury, microcirculatory disturbance, and potential mechanisms, particularly focusing on Sirt3-dependent MRC. Liver I/R of male Sprague-Dawley rats was established by occlusion of portal area vessels for 30 min followed by 120 min of reperfusion. CA (15 mg/kg/h) was continuously infused via the femoral vein starting 30 min before ischemia. After I/R, Sirt3 expression, and MRC activity decreased, acetylation of NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] 1 alpha subcomplex subunit 9 and succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit A, flavoprotein variant provoked, and the liver microcirculatory disturbance and injury were observed. Treatment with CA attenuated liver injury, inhibited Sirt3 down-expression, and up-regulated MRC activity. CA attenuated rat liver microcirculatory disturbance and oxidative injury through regulation of Sirt3 and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. PMID:25960048

  14. Effects of mitochondrial complex III disruption in the respiratory chain of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Margarida; Videira, Arnaldo

    2009-04-01

    In mitochondria from most organisms, including Neurospora crassa, dimeric complex III was found associated with complex I. Additional association of complex IV with this core structure leads to the formation of a respirasome. It was recently described for bacteria and mammals that complex III is needed for the assembly/stability of complex I. To elucidate the role of complex III in the organization of the respiratory chain of N. crassa, we analysed strains devoid of either the Rieske iron-sulphur or the COREII polypeptide subunits. The mutants display reduced growth, are female sterile and lack active complex III. The supramolecular organization of the oxidative phosphorylation system was characterized by electrophoretic analyses and the efficiency of the respiratory chain analysed by oxygen consumption measurements. The results obtained indicate that absence of complex III activity is not associated with the absence of complex I or complex IV, and leads to the induction of alternative oxidase. Complex III mutant mitochondria are devoid of respirasomes but contain significant amounts of dimeric complex I (I(2)) and of the supercomplex I(1)IV(1). Moreso, for the first time the alternative oxidase was found associated with dimeric complex IV and with supercomplex I(1)IV(1).

  15. Fluoride Increases Superoxide Production and Impairs the Respiratory Chain in ROS 17/2.8 Osteoblastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fina, Brenda Lorena; Lombarte, Mercedes; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    It is known that fluoride produces oxidative stress. Inflammation in bone tissue and an impairment of the respiratory chain of liver have been described in treatments with fluoride. Whether the impairment of the respiratory chain and oxidative stress are related is not known. The aim of this work was to study the effects of fluoride on the production of superoxide radical, the function of the respiratory chain and the increase in oxidative stress in ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic cells. We measured the effect of fluoride (100 µM) on superoxide production, oxygen consumption, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activities of cultured cells following the treatment with fluoride. Fluoride decreased oxygen consumption and increased superoxide production immediately after its addition. Furthermore, chronic treatment with fluoride increased oxidative stress status in osteoblastic cells. These results indicate that fluoride could damage bone tissue by inhibiting the respiratory chain, increasing the production of superoxide radicals and thus of the others reactive oxygen species. PMID:24964137

  16. Decoding Warburg's hypothesis: tumor-related mutations in the mitochondrial respiratory chain

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Heredia, Jose M.; Carnero, Amancio

    2015-01-01

    Otto Warburg observed that cancer cells derived their energy from aerobic glycolysis by converting glucose to lactate. This mechanism is in opposition to the higher energy requirements of cancer cells because oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) produces more ATP from glucose. Warburg hypothesized that this phenomenon occurs due to the malfunction of mitochondria in cancer cells. The rediscovery of Warburg's hypothesis coincided with the discovery of mitochondrial tumor suppressor genes that may conform to Warburg's hypothesis along with the demonstrated negative impact of HIF-1 on PDH activity and the activation of HIF-1 by oncogenic signals such as activated AKT. This work summarizes the alterations in mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins that have been identified and their involvement in cancer. Also discussed is the fact that most of the mitochondrial mutations have been found in homoplasmy, indicating a positive selection during tumor evolution, thereby supporting their causal role. PMID:26462158

  17. TEMPERATURE ACTIVATION OF CERTAIN RESPIRATORY ENZYMES OF STENOTHERMOPHILIC BACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Gaughran, Eugene R. L.

    1949-01-01

    The results of this study of the effect of temperature on the respiratory mechanism of five stenothermophilic bacteria may be summarized as follows:— 1. The respiratory mechanism and its various components of the stenothermophilic bacteria were found to function at temperatures below the minimum temperature for growth of these organisms. In every case the rates of the individual reactions involved in the respiratory chain increased exponentially with temperature until the temperature at which inactivation became apparent was reached. 2. The mean activation energies, calculated from the "best" value for the slope of the straight lines resulting from a plot of log rate against the reciprocal of the absolute temperature were: Dehydrogenases: 28,000 to 28,500 calories per gram molecule. Glucose, fructose, galactose, mannose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, lactose, sucrose, glycine, β-alanine, monosodium glutamate, (asparagine). 19,500 to 20,500 calories per gram molecule. Ethyl alcohol, succinate, pyruvate, lactate, acetate. 19,500 to 20,500 calories per gram molecule. Ethyl alcohol, succinate, pyruvate, lactate, acetate. 15,000 calories per gram molecule. Formate. Cytochrome oxidase and cytochrome b and c (substrate: p-phenylenediamine): 16,800 calories per gram molecule. Cytochrome oxidase and cytochrome c (substrate: hydroquinone): 20,200 calories per gram molecule. Catalase: 4,100 calories per gram molecule. Complete aerobic respiratory system (plus added glucose): 29,500 calories per gram molecule. 3. The identity of the energies of activation of the respiratory system and its enzymic components at temperatures above and below the minimum temperature for growth of the stenothermophilic bacteria was demonstrated. 4. An attempt has been made to indicate a relationship between the nature of the substrate and the activation energy by grouping substrates on the basis of common µ values obtained for their dehydrogenation by resting cell preparations of

  18. Injury and differentiation following inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV in rat oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ziabreva, Iryna; Campbell, Graham; Rist, Julia; Zambonin, Jessica; Rorbach, Joanna; Wydro, Mateusz M; Lassmann, Hans; Franklin, Robin J M; Mahad, Don

    2010-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage cells are susceptible to a variety of insults including hypoxia, excitotoxicity, and reactive oxygen species. Demyelination is a well-recognized feature of several CNS disorders including multiple sclerosis, white matter strokes, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, and disorders due to mitochondrial DNA mutations. Although mitochondria have been implicated in the demise of oligodendrocyte lineage cells, the consequences of mitochondrial respiratory chain defects have not been examined. We determine the in vitro impact of established inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV or cytochrome c oxidase on oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and mature oligodendrocytes as well as on differentiation capacity of OPCs from P0 rat. Injury to mature oligodendrocytes following complex IV inhibition was significantly greater than to OPCs, judged by cell detachment and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) changes, although viability of cells that remained attached was not compromised. Active mitochondria were abundant in processes of differentiated oligodendrocytes and MMP was significantly greater in differentiated oligodendrocytes than OPCs. MMP dissipated following complex IV inhibition in oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, complex IV inhibition impaired process formation within oligodendrocyte lineage cells. Injury to and impaired process formation of oligodendrocytes following complex IV inhibition has potentially important implications for the pathogenesis and repair of CNS myelin disorders. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20665559

  19. The respiratory chain provides salt stress tolerance by maintaining a low NADH/NAD+ ratio in Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Watakabe, Satoshi; Song, Wonjoon; Aikawa, Shizuho; Furukawa, Kensuke

    2015-12-01

    The respiratory chain of ethanol-producing Zymomonas mobilis shows an unusual physiological property in that it is not involved in energy conservation, even though this organism has a complete electron transport system. We reported previously that respiratory-deficient mutants (RDMs) of Z. mobilis exhibit higher growth rates and enhanced ethanol productivity under aerobic and high-temperature conditions. Here, we demonstrated that the salt tolerance of RDM strains was drastically decreased compared with the wild-type strain. We found that the NADH/NAD+ ratio was maintained at low levels in both the wild-type and the RDM strains under non-stress conditions. However, the ratio substantially increased in the RDM strains in response to salt stress. Complementation of the deficient respiratory-chain genes in the RDM strains resulted in a decrease in the NADH/NAD+ ratio and an increase in the growth rate. In contrast, expression of malate dehydrogenase, activity of which increases the supply of NADH, in the RDM strains led to an increased NADH/NAD+ ratio and resulted in poor growth. Taken together, these results suggest that the respiratory chain of Z. mobilis functions to maintain a low NADH/NAD+ ratio when the cells are exposed to environmental stresses, such as salinity. PMID:26432557

  20. Terretonins E and F, inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain from the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus insuetus (#).

    PubMed

    López-Gresa, M Pilar; Cabedo, Nuria; González-Mas, M Carmen; Ciavatta, Maria Letizia; Avila, Conxita; Primo, Jaime

    2009-07-01

    Two new meroterpenoids, terretonins E and F (1, 2), together with three known compounds, aurantiamine (3), linoleic acid, and uridine, were isolated as fermentation products of the marine-derived fungus Aspergillus insuetus, which was associated with the sponge Petrosia ficiformis. Structures of all isolates were elucidated employing spectroscopic methods, mainly by two-dimensional NMR techniques. Compounds 1-3 showed activity as inhibitors of the mammalian mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  1. Revealing various coupling of electron transfer and proton pumping in mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Zhou, Qiangjun; Pang, Xiaoyun; Xu, Yingzhi; Rao, Zihe

    2013-08-01

    Cellular respiration is the process that releases energy from food and supplies energy for life processes. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is the final and most important step for cellular respiration and is located on the inner membrane of mitochondrion and comprises four large trans-membrane protein complexes (respiratory chain Complexes I, II, III and IV) as well as ubiquinone between Complexes I/II and III and cytochrome c between Complexes III and IV. The function of mitochondrial respiratory chain is biological oxidation by transferring electrons from NADH and succinate to oxygen and then generating proton gradient across the inner membrane. Such proton gradient is utilized by ATP synthase (ATPase, also called as Complex V) to produce energy molecules ATP. Structural studies of mitochondrial respiratory membrane protein complexes are important to understand the mechanism of electron transfer and the redox-coupled proton translocation across the inner membrane. Here, according to the time line, we reviewed the great achievements on structural studies of mitochondrial respiratory complexes in the past twenty years as well as the recent research progresses on the structures of mitochondrial respiratory supra-complexes.

  2. Mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction variably increases oxidant stress in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dingley, Stephen; Polyak, Erzsebet; Lightfoot, Richard; Ostrovsky, Julian; Rao, Meera; Greco, Todd; Ischiropoulos, Harry; Falk, Marni J.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and associated oxidant stress have been linked with numerous complex diseases and aging largely by in vitro determination of mitochondria oxidant production and scavenging. We applied targeted in vivo fluorescence analyses of mitochondria-dense pharyngeal tissue in C. elegans to better understand relative mitochondrial effects, particularly on matrix oxidant burden, of respiratory chain complex, MnSOD, and insulin receptor mutants displaying variable longevity. The data demonstrate significantly elevated in vivo matrix oxidant burden in the short-lived complex I mutant, gas-1(fc21), which was associated with limited superoxide scavenging capacity despite robust MnSOD induction, as well as decreased mitochondria content and membrane potential. Significantly increased MnSOD activity was associated with in vivo matrix oxidant levels similar to wild-type in the long-lived respiratory chain complex III mutant, isp-1(qm150). Yet, despite greater superoxide scavenging capacity in the complex III mutant than in the significantly longer-lived insulin receptor mutant, daf-2(e1368), only the former showed modest oxidative stress sensitivity. Furthermore, increased longevity was seen in MnSOD knockout mutants (sod-2(ok1030) and sod-2(gk257)) that had decreased MnSOD scavenging capacity and increased in vivo matrix oxidant burden. Thus, factors beside oxidant stress must underlie RC mutant longevity in C. elegans. This work highlights the utility of the C. elegans model as a tractable means to non-invasively monitor multi-dimensional in vivo consequences of primary mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:19900588

  3. Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Occurrence of non-functioning components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in the presence of proteinase inhibitors: evidence for proteolytic control over assembly of the respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Galkin, A V; Tsoi, T V; Luzikov, V N

    1980-07-15

    Yeast was grown in glucose- or galactose-containing media without or with proteinase inhibitors, phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride and pepstatin. Culture growth was practically not affected by these compounds. Yeast growth on glucose in the presence of either phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride or pepstatin entails accumulation of cytochromes c, c1, b and aa3 to a 25--30% excess above the control by the stationary phase, while cell respiration is unaffected. During growth on galactose the maximal cytochrome content (per unit weight of biomass) is reached in the mid-exponential phase and then decreases by 30--40% towards the stationary phase, while cell respiration remains constant. Addition of phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride or pepstatin in the mid-exponential phase blocks the decrease in cytochrome levels and has no effect on cell respiration. Mitochondrial populations isolated from stationary-phase control and phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride-grown cells glucose cultures display identical succinate oxidase and partial-respiratory-chain activities, despite the differences in cytochrome contents. However, the activities of individual respiratory complexes measured after maximal activation are nearly proportional to the amounts of corresponding components. The same situation holds true for mitochondrial populations from mid-exponential-phase, stationary-phase control and stationary-phase inhibitor-grown cells of galactose cultures. The findings suggest that the 'surplus' respiratory-chain components do not participate in electron flow because of the lack of interaction with adjacent carriers.

  4. Modeling the respiratory chain complexes with biothermokinetic equations - the case of complex I.

    PubMed

    Heiske, Margit; Nazaret, Christine; Mazat, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain plays a crucial role in energy metabolism and its dysfunction is implicated in a wide range of human diseases. In order to understand the global expression of local mutations in the rate of oxygen consumption or in the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) it is useful to have a mathematical model in which the changes in a given respiratory complex are properly modeled. Our aim in this paper is to provide thermodynamics respecting and structurally simple equations to represent the kinetics of each isolated complexes which can, assembled in a dynamical system, also simulate the behavior of the respiratory chain, as a whole, under a large set of different physiological and pathological conditions. On the example of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-ubiquinol-oxidoreductase (complex I) we analyze the suitability of different types of rate equations. Based on our kinetic experiments we show that very simple rate laws, as those often used in many respiratory chain models, fail to describe the kinetic behavior when applied to a wide concentration range. This led us to adapt rate equations containing the essential parameters of enzyme kinetic, maximal velocities and Henri-Michaelis-Menten like-constants (KM and KI) to satisfactorily simulate these data. PMID:25064016

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction and respiratory chain defects in a rodent model of methotrexate-induced enteritis.

    PubMed

    Kolli, V K; Natarajan, K; Isaac, B; Selvakumar, D; Abraham, P

    2014-10-01

    The efficacy of methotrexate (MTX), a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, is limited by its gastrointestinal toxicity and the mechanism of which is not clear. The present study investigates the possible role of mitochondrial damage in MTX-induced enteritis. Small intestinal injury was induced in Wistar rats by the administration of 7 mg kg(-1) body wt. MTX intraperitoneally for 3 consecutive days. MTX administration resulted in severe small intestinal injury and extensive damage to enterocyte mitochondria. Respiratory control ratio, the single most useful and reliable test of mitochondrial function, and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yll)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction, a measure of cell viability were significantly reduced in all the fractions of MTX-treated rat enterocytes. A massive decrease (nearly 70%) in the activities of complexes II and IV was also observed. The results of the present study suggest that MTX-induced damage to enterocyte mitochondria may play a critical role in enteritis. MTX-induced alteration in mitochondrial structure may cause its dysfunction and decreases the activities of the electron chain complexes. MTX-induced mitochondrial damage can result in reduced adenosine triphosphate synthesis, thereby interfering with nutrient absorption and enterocyte renewal. This derangement may contribute to malabsorption of nutrients, diarrhea, and weight loss seen in patients on MTX chemotherapy.

  6. The respiratory chain supercomplex organization is independent of COX7a2l isoforms.

    PubMed

    Mourier, Arnaud; Matic, Stanka; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Milenkovic, Dusanka

    2014-12-01

    The organization of individual respiratory chain complexes into supercomplexes or respirasomes has attracted great interest because of the implications for cellular energy conversion. Recently, it was reported that commonly used mouse strains harbor a short COX7a2l (SCAFI) gene isoform that supposedly precludes the formation of complex IV-containing supercomplexes. This claim potentially has serious implications for numerous mouse studies addressing important topics in metabolism, including adaptation to space flights. Using several complementary experimental approaches, we show that mice with the short COX7a2l isoform have normal biogenesis and steady-state levels of complex IV-containing supercomplexes and consequently have normal respiratory chain function. Furthermore, we use a mouse knockout of Lrpprc and show that loss of complex IV compromises respirasome formation. We conclude that the presence of the short COX7a2l isoform in the commonly used C57BL/6 mouse strains does not prevent their use in metabolism research.

  7. A stopped-flow dual-wavelength spectrophotometer suitable for the study of respiratory chains.

    PubMed Central

    Garland, P B; Littleford, S J; Haddock, B A

    1976-01-01

    The requirements for a dual-wavelength stopped-flow spectrophotometer to be suitable for studying limited quantities of respiratory-chain preparations are described. They can be met by a design using mainly commercially available components. The constructed apparatus has a dead-time of approx. 2.6 ms, a mixing ratio of 17:1, and a minimal requirement for 0.5 ml of mixed reactants per flow. PMID:938452

  8. Phasic Motor Activity of Respiratory and Non-Respiratory Muscles in REM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Fraigne, Jimmy J.; Orem, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, we quantified the profiles of phasic activity in respiratory muscles (diaphragm, genioglossus and external intercostal) and non-respiratory muscles (neck and extensor digitorum) across REM sleep. We hypothesized that if there is a unique pontine structure that controls all REM sleep phasic events, the profiles of the phasic twitches of different muscle groups should be identical. Furthermore, we described how respiratory parameters (e.g., frequency, amplitude, and effort) vary across REM sleep to determine if phasic processes affect breathing. Methods: Electrodes were implanted in Wistar rats to record brain activity and muscle activity of neck, extensor digitorum, diaphragm, external intercostal, and genioglossal muscles. Ten rats were studied to obtain 313 REM periods over 73 recording days. Data were analyzed offline and REM sleep activity profiles were built for each muscle. In 6 animals, respiratory frequency, effort, amplitude, and inspiratory peak were also analyzed during 192 REM sleep periods. Results: Respiratory muscle phasic activity increased in the second part of the REM period. For example, genioglossal activity increased in the second part of the REM period by 63.8% compared to the average level during NREM sleep. This profile was consistent between animals and REM periods (η2 = 0.58). This increased activity seen in respiratory muscles appeared as irregular bursts and trains of activity that could affect rythmo-genesis. Indeed, the increased integrated activity seen in the second part of the REM period in the diaphragm was associated with an increase in the number (28.3%) and amplitude (30%) of breaths. Non-respiratory muscle phasic activity in REM sleep did not have a profile like the phasic activity of respiratory muscles. Time in REM sleep did not have an effect on nuchal activity (P = 0.59). Conclusion: We conclude that the concept of a common pontine center controlling all REM phasic events is not supported by our

  9. Respiratory chain of alkalophilic bacteria. Annual progress report, June 15, 1981-May 15, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Krulwich, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    In view of the increased energy cost of life at extremely alkaline pH, the extraordinary qualitative and quantitative array of respiratory chain components of alkalophilic bacteria, and the normal growth yields and O/sub 2/ consumption rates of such organisms, it has been proposed that the obligately alkalophilic bacteria possess structural/functional properties of the respiratory chain such that particularly efficient energy conservation is facilitated. The respiratory chain components of Bacillus alcalophilus have been studied in comparison with its non-alkalophilic mutant derivative; a similar study of Bacillus firmus RAB and non-alkalophilic RABN is now partially completed. The alkalophiles contain high quantities of many distinct redox carriers as compared to their derivative and other non-alkalophiles. Determinations of H/sup +/7O ratios are now in progress. A system for study of the regulation of cytochrome expression, as a function of pH, has been developed. Failure of obligate alkalophiles to grow at pH 7.0 now appears to relate to the low membrane potentials produced by respiration at that pH, rather than a failure of pH homeostasis. Since alkalophilic cells are found to be viable at pH 7.0, incubations can be conducted for study of functional and regulatory aspects of respiration.

  10. A Comprehensive Genomic Analysis Reveals the Genetic Landscape of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Masakazu; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Kishita, Yoshihito; Nyuzuki, Hiromi; Moriyama, Yohsuke; Mizuno, Yosuke; Hirata, Tomoko; Yatsuka, Yukiko; Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Kato, Hidemasa; Okuda, Akihiko; Tamaru, Shunsuke; Borna, Nurun Nahar; Banshoya, Kengo; Aigaki, Toshiro; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Ohnuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagao, Asuteka; Maehata, Hazuki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nagasaki, Masao; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fushimi, Takuya; Shimura, Masaru; Kaiho-Ichimoto, Keiko; Harashima, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Taro; Mori, Masato; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders have the highest incidence among congenital metabolic disorders characterized by biochemical respiratory chain complex deficiencies. It occurs at a rate of 1 in 5,000 births, and has phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in about 1,500 nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins may cause mitochondrial dysfunction of energy production and mitochondrial disorders. More than 250 genes that cause mitochondrial disorders have been reported to date. However exact genetic diagnosis for patients still remained largely unknown. To reveal this heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive genomic analyses for 142 patients with childhood-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies. The approach includes whole mtDNA and exome analyses using high-throughput sequencing, and chromosomal aberration analyses using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We identified 37 novel mutations in known mitochondrial disease genes and 3 mitochondria-related genes (MRPS23, QRSL1, and PNPLA4) as novel causative genes. We also identified 2 genes known to cause monogenic diseases (MECP2 and TNNI3) and 3 chromosomal aberrations (6q24.3-q25.1, 17p12, and 22q11.21) as causes in this cohort. Our approaches enhance the ability to identify pathogenic gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies in clinical settings. They also underscore clinical and genetic heterogeneity and will improve patient care of this complex disorder.

  11. Coenzyme Q biosynthesis and its role in the respiratory chain structure.

    PubMed

    Alcázar-Fabra, María; Navas, Plácido; Brea-Calvo, Gloria

    2016-08-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a unique electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which is synthesized on-site by a nuclear encoded multiprotein complex. CoQ receives electrons from different redox pathways, mainly NADH and FADH2 from tricarboxylic acid pathway, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that support key aspects of the metabolism. Here we explore some lines of evidence supporting the idea of the interaction of CoQ with the respiratory chain complexes, contributing to their superassembly, including respirasome, and its role in reactive oxygen species production in the mitochondrial inner membrane. We also review the current knowledge about the involvement of mitochondrial genome defects and electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase mutations in the induction of secondary CoQ deficiency. This mechanism would imply specific interactions coupling CoQ itself or the CoQ-biosynthetic apparatus with the respiratory chain components. These interactions would regulate mitochondrial CoQ steady-state levels and function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  12. A Comprehensive Genomic Analysis Reveals the Genetic Landscape of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Masakazu; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Kishita, Yoshihito; Nyuzuki, Hiromi; Moriyama, Yohsuke; Mizuno, Yosuke; Hirata, Tomoko; Yatsuka, Yukiko; Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Kato, Hidemasa; Okuda, Akihiko; Tamaru, Shunsuke; Borna, Nurun Nahar; Banshoya, Kengo; Aigaki, Toshiro; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Ohnuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagao, Asuteka; Maehata, Hazuki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nagasaki, Masao; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fushimi, Takuya; Shimura, Masaru; Kaiho-Ichimoto, Keiko; Harashima, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Taro; Mori, Masato; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders have the highest incidence among congenital metabolic disorders characterized by biochemical respiratory chain complex deficiencies. It occurs at a rate of 1 in 5,000 births, and has phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in about 1,500 nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins may cause mitochondrial dysfunction of energy production and mitochondrial disorders. More than 250 genes that cause mitochondrial disorders have been reported to date. However exact genetic diagnosis for patients still remained largely unknown. To reveal this heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive genomic analyses for 142 patients with childhood-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies. The approach includes whole mtDNA and exome analyses using high-throughput sequencing, and chromosomal aberration analyses using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We identified 37 novel mutations in known mitochondrial disease genes and 3 mitochondria-related genes (MRPS23, QRSL1, and PNPLA4) as novel causative genes. We also identified 2 genes known to cause monogenic diseases (MECP2 and TNNI3) and 3 chromosomal aberrations (6q24.3-q25.1, 17p12, and 22q11.21) as causes in this cohort. Our approaches enhance the ability to identify pathogenic gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies in clinical settings. They also underscore clinical and genetic heterogeneity and will improve patient care of this complex disorder. PMID:26741492

  13. Coenzyme Q biosynthesis and its role in the respiratory chain structure.

    PubMed

    Alcázar-Fabra, María; Navas, Plácido; Brea-Calvo, Gloria

    2016-08-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a unique electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which is synthesized on-site by a nuclear encoded multiprotein complex. CoQ receives electrons from different redox pathways, mainly NADH and FADH2 from tricarboxylic acid pathway, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that support key aspects of the metabolism. Here we explore some lines of evidence supporting the idea of the interaction of CoQ with the respiratory chain complexes, contributing to their superassembly, including respirasome, and its role in reactive oxygen species production in the mitochondrial inner membrane. We also review the current knowledge about the involvement of mitochondrial genome defects and electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase mutations in the induction of secondary CoQ deficiency. This mechanism would imply specific interactions coupling CoQ itself or the CoQ-biosynthetic apparatus with the respiratory chain components. These interactions would regulate mitochondrial CoQ steady-state levels and function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26970214

  14. A Comprehensive Genomic Analysis Reveals the Genetic Landscape of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Nyuzuki, Hiromi; Moriyama, Yohsuke; Mizuno, Yosuke; Hirata, Tomoko; Yatsuka, Yukiko; Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Kato, Hidemasa; Okuda, Akihiko; Tamaru, Shunsuke; Borna, Nurun Nahar; Banshoya, Kengo; Aigaki, Toshiro; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Ohnuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagao, Asuteka; Maehata, Hazuki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nagasaki, Masao; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fushimi, Takuya; Shimura, Masaru; Kaiho-Ichimoto, Keiko; Harashima, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Taro; Mori, Masato; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders have the highest incidence among congenital metabolic disorders characterized by biochemical respiratory chain complex deficiencies. It occurs at a rate of 1 in 5,000 births, and has phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in about 1,500 nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins may cause mitochondrial dysfunction of energy production and mitochondrial disorders. More than 250 genes that cause mitochondrial disorders have been reported to date. However exact genetic diagnosis for patients still remained largely unknown. To reveal this heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive genomic analyses for 142 patients with childhood-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies. The approach includes whole mtDNA and exome analyses using high-throughput sequencing, and chromosomal aberration analyses using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We identified 37 novel mutations in known mitochondrial disease genes and 3 mitochondria-related genes (MRPS23, QRSL1, and PNPLA4) as novel causative genes. We also identified 2 genes known to cause monogenic diseases (MECP2 and TNNI3) and 3 chromosomal aberrations (6q24.3-q25.1, 17p12, and 22q11.21) as causes in this cohort. Our approaches enhance the ability to identify pathogenic gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies in clinical settings. They also underscore clinical and genetic heterogeneity and will improve patient care of this complex disorder. PMID:26741492

  15. Specific requirements of nonbilayer phospholipids in mitochondrial respiratory chain function and formation

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Charli D.; Basu Ball, Writoban; Pryce, Erin N.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition affects mitochondrial function by influencing the assembly of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes into supercomplexes. For example, the loss of cardiolipin (CL), a signature non–bilayer-forming phospholipid of mitochondria, results in disruption of MRC supercomplexes. However, the functions of the most abundant mitochondrial phospholipids, bilayer-forming phosphatidylcholine (PC) and non–bilayer-forming phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), are not clearly defined. Using yeast mutants of PE and PC biosynthetic pathways, we show a specific requirement for mitochondrial PE in MRC complex III and IV activities but not for their formation, whereas loss of PC does not affect MRC function or formation. Unlike CL, mitochondrial PE or PC is not required for MRC supercomplex formation, emphasizing the specific requirement of CL in supercomplex assembly. Of interest, PE biosynthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can functionally substitute for the lack of mitochondrial PE biosynthesis, suggesting the existence of PE transport pathway from ER to mitochondria. To understand the mechanism of PE transport, we disrupted ER–mitochondrial contact sites formed by the ERMES complex and found that, although not essential for PE transport, ERMES facilitates the efficient rescue of mitochondrial PE deficiency. Our work highlights specific roles of non–bilayer-forming phospholipids in MRC function and formation. PMID:27226479

  16. Photothermal monitoring of respiratory chain redox state in single live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitry; Romanovskaya, Tat'yana; Gordiyko, Elena

    2002-06-01

    Due to the central role of respiratory chain (RC) in the metabolism of the cell, much attention has been directed at developing efficient techniques for diagnostics of RC at cell level. Proposed method of direct monitoring of the redox state of RC in single live cells is based on photothermal (PT) measurement of photo-induced thermal phenomena in mitochondrial hemoproteins. Thermal output of absorbed light energy depends upon their redox state (oxidized/reduced). PT microscopy method was applied for experimental studies of two in vitro models: (1) solutions of RC component - cytochrome c - and (2) for mice hepatocytes in suspension. Parameters of PT responses obtained from solution and from single cells after their irradiation with laser pulse (532 nm, 8 ns) were found to be different for oxidized and reduced forms for cytochrome c solutions and for KCN and Antimicine A treated cells in comparison to intact ones. This difference may be caused by alteration of the quantum yields of thermal (non-radiative) relaxation for light absorbing molecules - RC components - as they undergo redox state change under influence of RC inhibitors. Obtained results allow to suggest new approach for monitoring of functional activity of RC in single cell through the measurement of PT response at specific wavelengths.

  17. Respiratory control determines respiration and nitrogenase activity of Rhizobium leguminosarum bacteroids.

    PubMed

    Haaker, H; Szafran, M; Wassink, H; Klerk, H; Appels, M

    1996-08-01

    The relationship between the O2 input rate into a suspension of Rhizobium leguminosarum bacteroids, the cellular ATP and ADP pools, and the whole-cell nitrogenase activity during L-malate oxidation has been studied. It was observed that inhibition of nitrogenase by excess O2 coincided with an increase of the cellular ATP/ADP ratio. When under this condition the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was added, the cellular ATP/ADP ratio was lowered while nitrogenase regained activity. To explain these observations, the effects of nitrogenase activity and CCCP on the O2 consumption rate of R. leguminosarum bacteroids were determined. From 100 to 5 microM O2, a decline in the O2 consumption rate was observed to 50 to 70% of the maximal O2 consumption rate. A determination of the redox state of the cytochromes during an O2 consumption experiment indicated that at O2 concentrations above 5 microM, electron transport to the cytochromes was rate-limiting oxidation and not the reaction of reduced cytochromes with oxygen. The kinetic properties of the respiratory chain were determined from the deoxygenation of oxyglobins. In intact cells the maximal deoxygenation activity was stimulated by nitrogenase activity or CCCP. In isolated cytoplasmic membranes NADH oxidation was inhibited by respiratory control. The dehydrogenase activities of the respiratory chain were rate-limiting oxidation at O2 concentrations (if >300 nM. Below 300 nM the terminal oxidase system followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km of 45 +/- 8 nM). We conclude that (i) respiration in R. leguminosarum bacteroids takes place via a respiratory chain terminating at a high-affinity oxidase system, (ii) the activity of the respiratory chain is inhibited by the proton motive force, and (iii) ATP hydrolysis by nitrogenase can partly relieve the inhibition of respiration by the proton motive force and thus stimulate respiration at nanomolar concentrations of O2.

  18. Pioglitazone leads to an inactivation and disassembly of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thiazolidinediones are antidiabetic agents that increase insulin sensitivity but reduce glucose oxidation, state 3 respiration, and activity of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). The mechanisms of the latter effects are unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms by which pioglitazone (PGZ), a member of the thiazolidinedione class of antidiabetic agents, decreases the activity of the MRC. In isolated mitochondria from mouse liver, we measured the effects of PGZ treatment on MRC complex activities, fully-assembled complex I and its subunits, gene expression of complex I and III subunits, and [3H]PGZ binding to mitochondrial complexes. Results In vitro, PGZ decreased activity of complexes I and III of the MRC, but in vivo only complex I activity was decreased in mice treated for 12 weeks with 10 mg/kg/day of PGZ. In vitro treatment of isolated liver mitochondria with PGZ disassembled complex I, resulting in the formation of several subcomplexes. In mice treated with PGZ, fully assembled complex I was increased and two additional subcomplexes were found. Formation of supercomplexes CI+CIII2+CIVn and CI+CIII2 decreased in mouse liver mitochondria exposed to PGZ, while formation of these supercomplexes was increased in mice treated with PGZ. Two-dimensional analysis of complex I using blue native/sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN/SDS-PAGE) showed that in vitro PGZ induced the formation of four subcomplexes of 600 (B), 400 (C), 350 (D), and 250 (E) kDa, respectively. Subcomplexes B and C had NADH:dehydrogenase activity, while subcomplexes C and D contained subunits of complex I membrane arm. Autoradiography and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed [3H]PGZ binding to subunits NDUFA9, NDUFB6, and NDUFA6. Treatment with PGZ increased mitochondrial gene transcription in mice liver and HepG2 cells. In these cells, PGZ decreased intracellular ATP content and enhanced gene expression of specific

  19. Repairing oxidized proteins in the bacterial envelope using respiratory chain electrons.

    PubMed

    Gennaris, Alexandra; Ezraty, Benjamin; Henry, Camille; Agrebi, Rym; Vergnes, Alexandra; Oheix, Emmanuel; Bos, Julia; Leverrier, Pauline; Espinosa, Leon; Szewczyk, Joanna; Vertommen, Didier; Iranzo, Olga; Collet, Jean-François; Barras, Frédéric

    2015-12-17

    The reactive species of oxygen and chlorine damage cellular components, potentially leading to cell death. In proteins, the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine is converted to methionine sulfoxide, which can cause a loss of biological activity. To rescue proteins with methionine sulfoxide residues, living cells express methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) in most subcellular compartments, including the cytosol, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Here we report the identification of an enzymatic system, MsrPQ, repairing proteins containing methionine sulfoxide in the bacterial cell envelope, a compartment particularly exposed to the reactive species of oxygen and chlorine generated by the host defence mechanisms. MsrP, a molybdo-enzyme, and MsrQ, a haem-binding membrane protein, are widely conserved throughout Gram-negative bacteria, including major human pathogens. MsrPQ synthesis is induced by hypochlorous acid, a powerful antimicrobial released by neutrophils. Consistently, MsrPQ is essential for the maintenance of envelope integrity under bleach stress, rescuing a wide series of structurally unrelated periplasmic proteins from methionine oxidation, including the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA. For this activity, MsrPQ uses electrons from the respiratory chain, which represents a novel mechanism to import reducing equivalents into the bacterial cell envelope. A remarkable feature of MsrPQ is its capacity to reduce both rectus (R-) and sinister (S-) diastereoisomers of methionine sulfoxide, making this oxidoreductase complex functionally different from previously identified Msrs. The discovery that a large class of bacteria contain a single, non-stereospecific enzymatic complex fully protecting methionine residues from oxidation should prompt a search for similar systems in eukaryotic subcellular oxidizing compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum.

  20. Repairing oxidized proteins in the bacterial envelope using respiratory chain electrons

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Camille; Agrebi, Rym; Vergnes, Alexandra; Oheix, Emmanuel; Bos, Julia; Leverrier, Pauline; Espinosa, Leon; Szewczyk, Joanna; Vertommen, Didier; Iranzo, Olga; Collet, Jean-François; Barras, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The reactive species of oxygen (ROS) and chlorine (RCS) damage cellular components, potentially leading to cell death. In proteins, the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine (Met) is converted to methionine sulfoxide (Met-O), which can cause a loss of biological activity. To rescue proteins with Met-O residues, living cells express methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) in most subcellular compartments, including the cytosol, mitochondria and chloroplasts 1-3. Here, we report the identification of an enzymatic system, MsrPQ, repairing Met-O containing proteins in the bacterial cell envelope, a compartment particularly exposed to the ROS and RCS generated by the host defense mechanisms. MsrP, a molybdo-enzyme, and MsrQ, a heme-binding membrane protein, are widely conserved throughout Gram-negative bacteria, including major human pathogens. MsrPQ synthesis is induced by hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a powerful antimicrobial released by neutrophils. Consistently, MsrPQ is essential for the maintenance of envelope integrity under bleach stress, rescuing a wide series of structurally unrelated periplasmic proteins from Met oxidation, including the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA. For this activity, MsrPQ uses electrons from the respiratory chain, which represents a novel mechanism to import reducing equivalents into the bacterial cell envelope. A remarkable feature of MsrPQ is its capacity to reduce both R- and S- diastereoisomers of Met-O, making this oxidoreductase complex functionally different from previously identified Msrs. The discovery that a large class of bacteria contain a single, non-stereospecific enzymatic complex fully protecting Met residues from oxidation should prompt search for similar systems in eukaryotic subcellular oxidizing compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). PMID:26641313

  1. Coenzyme Q and the Respiratory Chain: Coenzyme Q Pool and Mitochondrial Supercomplexes

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez, José Antonio; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Two alternative models of organization of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) have been alternatively favored or questioned by the accumulation evidences of different sources, the solid model or the random collision model. Both agree in the number of respiratory complexes (I-IV) that participate in the mETC, but while the random collision model proposes that Complexes I-IV do not interact physically and that electrons are transferred between them by coenzyme Q and cytochrome c, the solid model proposes that all complexes super-assemble in the so-called respirasome. Recently, the plasticity model has been developed to incorporate the solid and the random collision model as extreme situations of a dynamic organization, allowing super-assembly free movement of the respiratory complexes. In this review, we evaluate the supporting evidences of each model and the implications of the super-assembly in the physiological role of coenzyme Q. PMID:25126045

  2. Coenzyme q and the respiratory chain: coenzyme q pool and mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, José Antonio; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    Two alternative models of organization of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) have been alternatively favored or questioned by the accumulation evidences of different sources, the solid model or the random collision model. Both agree in the number of respiratory complexes (I-IV) that participate in the mETC, but while the random collision model proposes that Complexes I-IV do not interact physically and that electrons are transferred between them by coenzyme Q and cytochrome c, the solid model proposes that all complexes super-assemble in the so-called respirasome. Recently, the plasticity model has been developed to incorporate the solid and the random collision model as extreme situations of a dynamic organization, allowing super-assembly free movement of the respiratory complexes. In this review, we evaluate the supporting evidences of each model and the implications of the super-assembly in the physiological role of coenzyme Q.

  3. The respiratory chains of four strains of the alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Abbrescia, A; Martino, P L; Panelli, D; Sardanelli, A M; Papa, S; Alifano, P; Palese, L L; Gaballo, A

    2014-01-01

    A comparative analysis of terminal respiratory enzymes has been performed on four strains of Bacillus clausii used for preparation of a European probiotic. These four strains originated most probably from a common ancestor through early selection of stable clones for industrial propagation. They exhibit a low level of intra-specific diversity and a high degree of genomic conservation, making them an attractive model to study the different bioenergetics behaviors of alkaliphilic bacilli. The analysis of the different bioenergetics responses has been carried out revealing striking differences among the strains. Two out of the four strains have shown a functional redundancy of the terminal part of the respiratory chain. The biochemical data correlate with the expression level of the mRNA of cytochrome c oxidase and quinol oxidase genes (heme-copper type). The consequences of these different bioenergetics behaviors are also discussed. PMID:25161879

  4. The respiratory chains of four strains of the alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii

    PubMed Central

    Abbrescia, A.; Martino, P.L.; Panelli, D.; Sardanelli, A.M.; Papa, S.; Alifano, P.; Palese, L.L.; Gaballo, A.

    2014-01-01

    A comparative analysis of terminal respiratory enzymes has been performed on four strains of Bacillus clausii used for preparation of a European probiotic. These four strains originated most probably from a common ancestor through early selection of stable clones for industrial propagation. They exhibit a low level of intra-specific diversity and a high degree of genomic conservation, making them an attractive model to study the different bioenergetics behaviors of alkaliphilic bacilli. The analysis of the different bioenergetics responses has been carried out revealing striking differences among the strains. Two out of the four strains have shown a functional redundancy of the terminal part of the respiratory chain. The biochemical data correlate with the expression level of the mRNA of cytochrome c oxidase and quinol oxidase genes (heme-copper type). The consequences of these different bioenergetics behaviors are also discussed. PMID:25161879

  5. C1orf163/RESA1 is a novel mitochondrial intermembrane space protein connected to respiratory chain assembly.

    PubMed

    Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Prell, Florian; Thiede, Bernd; Götz, Monika; Wosiek, Dominik; Ott, Christine; Rudel, Thomas

    2014-02-20

    Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in mitochondria takes place at the inner membrane, which folds into numerous cristae. The stability of cristae depends, among other things, on the mitochondrial intermembrane space bridging complex. Its components include inner mitochondrial membrane protein mitofilin and outer membrane protein Sam50. We identified a conserved, uncharacterized protein, C1orf163 [SEL1 repeat containing 1 protein (SELRC1)], as one of the proteins significantly reduced after the knockdown of Sam50 and mitofilin. We show that C1orf163 is a mitochondrial soluble intermembrane space protein. Sam50 depletion affects moderately the import and assembly of C1orf163 into two protein complexes of approximately 60kDa and 150kDa. We observe that the knockdown of C1orf163 leads to reduction of levels of proteins belonging to the OXPHOS complexes. The activity of complexes I and IV is reduced in C1orf163-depleted cells, and we observe the strongest defects in the assembly of complex IV. Therefore, we propose C1orf163 to be a novel factor important for the assembly of respiratory chain complexes in human mitochondria and suggest to name it RESA1 (for RESpiratory chain Assembly 1).

  6. [Characteristics of the respiratory chain and the oxidative phosphorylation system of mitochondria in the flavinogenic Eremothecium ashbyii strain].

    PubMed

    Zviagil'skaia, R A; Korosteleva, N L; Mironov, V A

    1976-01-01

    Tightly coupled mitochondria were isolated from cells of the flavinogenic strain of Eremothecium ashbyii collected during the logarithmic and stationary growth phases. The composition of the respiratory chain and characteristics of the energy coupling system are described. The mitochondria show a wide spectrum of metabolic activity and oxidize Krebs cycle compenents and exogenous NADH. The terminal segment of the respiratory chain is represented by a typical cytochrome system. The mitochondria of the ascomycete collected during the logarithmic growth phase are characterized by a relatively high content of cytochromes b and c, a high rate of oxidation of NAD-dependent substrates, the presence of lower homologues of ubiquinone, UQ6 and UQ7, and extremely high sensitivity of respiration to the action of antimycin A, low content of a component sensitive to rotenone, contrasting with the operation of all three sites of phosphorylation. Transition to the stationary growth phase is accompanied with a decrease in the rate of oxidation of all substrates studied and a declined effectiveness of oxidative phosphorylation. The data obtained are discussed in relation to the ability of the cells for "overproduction" of flavins. PMID:187903

  7. Quantitative analysis of cardiovascular modulation in respiratory neural activity.

    PubMed

    Dick, Thomas E; Morris, Kendall F

    2004-05-01

    We propose the 'delta(2)-statistic' for assessing the magnitude and statistical significance of arterial pulse-modulated activity of single neurones and present the results of applying this tool to medullary respiratory-modulated units. This analytical tool is a modification of the eta(2)-statistic and, consequently, based on the analysis of variance. The eta(2)-statistic reflects the consistency of respiratory-modulated activity on a cycle-by-cycle basis. However, directly applying this test to activity during the cardiac cycle proved ineffective because subjects-by-treatments matrices did not contain enough 'information'. We increased information by dividing the cardiac cycle into fewer bins, excluding cycles without activity and summing activity over multiple cycles. The analysed neuronal activity was an existing data set examining the neural control of respiration and cough. Neurones were recorded in the nuclei of the solitary tracts, and in the rostral and caudal ventral respiratory groups of decerebrate, neuromuscularly blocked, ventilated cats (n= 19). Two hundred of 246 spike trains were respiratory modulated; of these 53% were inspiratory (I), 36.5% expiratory (E), 6% IE phase spanning and 4.5% EI phase spanning and responsive to airway stimulation. Nearly half (n= 96/200) of the respiratory-modulated units were significantly pulse modulated and 13 were highly modulated with delta(2) values exceeding 0.3. In 10 of these highly modulated units, eta(2) values were greater than 0.3 and all 13 had, at least, a portion of their activity during expiration. We conclude that cardiorespiratory interaction is reciprocal; in addition to respiratory-modulated activity in a subset of neuronal activity patterns controlling the cardiovascular system, pulse-modulated activity exists in a subset of neuronal activity patterns controlling the respiratory system. Thus, cardio-ventilatory coupling apparent in respiratory motor output is evident and, perhaps, derived from the

  8. Comparison of proteomic and metabolomic profiles of mutants of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, PG; Higdon, R; Kolker, N; Bauman, AT; Ilkayeva, O; Newgard, CB; Kolker, E; Steele, LM; Sedensky, MM

    2014-01-01

    Single-gene mutations that disrupt mitochondrial respiratory chain function in C. elegans change patterns of protein expression and metabolites. Our goal was to develop useful molecular fingerprints employing adaptable techniques to recognize mitochondrial defects in the electron transport chain. We analyzed mutations affecting complex I, complex II, or ubiquinone synthesis and discovered overarching patterns in the response of C. elegans to mitochondrial dysfunction across all of the mutations studied. These patterns are in KEGG pathways conserved from C. elegans to mammals, verifying that the nematode can serve as a model for mammalian disease. In addition, specific differences exist between mutants that may be useful in diagnosing specific mitochondrial diseases in patients. PMID:25530493

  9. Possible role of mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects in aristolochic acid I-induced acute nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhenzhou Bao, Qingli Sun, Lixin Huang, Xin Wang, Tao Zhang, Shuang Li, Han Zhang, Luyong

    2013-01-15

    This report describes an investigation of the pathological mechanism of acute renal failure caused by toxic tubular necrosis after treatment with aristolochic acid I (AAI) in Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. The rats were gavaged with AAI at 0, 5, 20, or 80 mg/kg/day for 7 days. The pathologic examination of the kidneys showed severe acute tubular degenerative changes primarily affecting the proximal tubules. Supporting these results, we detected significantly increased concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in the rats treated with AAI, indicating damage to the kidneys. Ultrastructural examination showed that proximal tubular mitochondria were extremely enlarged and dysmorphic with loss and disorientation of their cristae. Mitochondrial function analysis revealed that the two indicators for mitochondrial energy metabolism, the respiratory control ratio (RCR) and ATP content, were reduced in a dose-dependent manner after AAI treatment. The RCR in the presence of substrates for complex I was reduced more significantly than in the presence of substrates for complex II. In additional experiments, the activity of respiratory complex I, which is partly encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), was more significantly impaired than that of respiratory complex II, which is completely encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). A real-time PCR assay revealed a marked reduction of mtDNA in the kidneys treated with AAI. Taken together, these results suggested that mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects play critical roles in the pathogenesis of kidney injury induced by AAI, and that the same processes might contribute to aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► AAI-induced acute renal failure in rats and the proximal tubule was the target. ► Tubular mitochondria were morphologically aberrant in ultrastructural examination. ► AAI impair mitochondrial bioenergetic function and mtDNA replication.

  10. Mutations in CYC1, Encoding Cytochrome c1 Subunit of Respiratory Chain Complex III, Cause Insulin-Responsive Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Gaignard, Pauline; Menezes, Minal; Schiff, Manuel; Bayot, Aurélien; Rak, Malgorzata; Ogier de Baulny, Hélène; Su, Chen-Hsien; Gilleron, Mylene; Lombes, Anne; Abida, Heni; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Riley, Lisa; Cooper, Sandra T.; Mina, Kym; Sivadorai, Padma; Davis, Mark R.; Allcock, Richard J.N.; Kresoje, Nina; Laing, Nigel G.; Thorburn, David R.; Slama, Abdelhamid; Christodoulou, John; Rustin, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Many individuals with abnormalities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex III remain genetically undefined. Here, we report mutations (c.288G>T [p.Trp96Cys] and c.643C>T [p.Leu215Phe]) in CYC1, encoding the cytochrome c1 subunit of complex III, in two unrelated children presenting with recurrent episodes of ketoacidosis and insulin-responsive hyperglycemia. Cytochrome c1, the heme-containing component of complex III, mediates the transfer of electrons from the Rieske iron-sulfur protein to cytochrome c. Cytochrome c1 is present at reduced levels in the skeletal muscle and skin fibroblasts of affected individuals. Moreover, studies on yeast mutants and affected individuals’ fibroblasts have shown that exogenous expression of wild-type CYC1 rescues complex III activity, demonstrating the deleterious effect of each mutation on cytochrome c1 stability and complex III activity. PMID:23910460

  11. Multiplex nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for respiratory viruses in acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Toshio; Monobe, Hiroko; Nomura, Yuka; Shinogami, Masanobu; Yano, Jun

    2003-03-01

    Because respiratory viruses play an important role in the causation and pathogenesis of acute otitis media (AOM), determining which virus has infected a child is important with respect to vaccines and antiviral drugs. In some instances, this information might be used to prevent the occurrence of AOM. We used a rapid, economical, and sensitive diagnostic system involving a multiplex nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay to detect various respiratory viruses in clinical specimens of middle ear fluid (MEF) from children with AOM in our hospital. Multiplex RT-PCR was completed on 40 MEF samples from 28 infants and children less than 6 years old with AOM. Viral RNA was detected in 17 MEF samples (43%). Respiratory syncytial virus type A was present in 12 samples, adenovirus in 3, rhinovirus in 2, and influenza A (H3N2) in 1. The multiplex RT-PCR assay is recommended to clinical laboratories that are considering adoption of a molecular technique for viral diagnosis.

  12. The Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization Is Independent of COX7a2l Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Mourier, Arnaud; Matic, Stanka; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Milenkovic, Dusanka

    2014-01-01

    Summary The organization of individual respiratory chain complexes into supercomplexes or respirasomes has attracted great interest because of the implications for cellular energy conversion. Recently, it was reported that commonly used mouse strains harbor a short COX7a2l (SCAFI) gene isoform that supposedly precludes the formation of complex IV-containing supercomplexes. This claim potentially has serious implications for numerous mouse studies addressing important topics in metabolism, including adaptation to space flights. Using several complementary experimental approaches, we show that mice with the short COX7a2l isoform have normal biogenesis and steady-state levels of complex IV-containing supercomplexes and consequently have normal respiratory chain function. Furthermore, we use a mouse knockout of Lrpprc and show that loss of complex IV compromises respirasome formation. We conclude that the presence of the short COX7a2l isoform in the commonly used C57BL/6 mouse strains does not prevent their use in metabolism research. PMID:25470551

  13. Respiratory chain of the alkalophilic bacterium Bacillus firmus RAB and its non-alkalophilic mutant derivative.

    PubMed

    Kitada, M; Lewis, R J; Krulwich, T A

    1983-04-01

    The membrane-bound respiratory chain components of alkalophilic Bacillus firmus RAB were studied by difference spectroscopy and oxidation-reduction potentiometric titrations. Cytochromes with the following midpoint potentials were identified at pH 9.0: a-type cytochromes, +110 and +210 mV; b-type cytochromes, +20, -120, -280, and -400 mV; and cytochrome c, +60 mV. Only the higher-potential cytochrome a showed an upward shift in midpoint potential when titrated at pH 7.0. Parallel studies of a non-alkalophilic mutant derivative of B. firmus RAB, strain RABN, revealed the presence of only one species each of a-, b-, and c-type cytochromes which exhibited midpoint potentials of +110, -150, and +160 mV, respectively, at pH 7.0. Membranes of both strains were found to contain menaquinone. At pH 9.0, NADH caused the reduction of essentially all of the cytochromes that were seen in fully reduced preparations of wild-type B. firmus RAB membranes. By contrast, at pH 7.0, NADH failed to appreciably reduce the b-type cytochromes. These findings may relate to our recent proposal that an inadequacy in energy transduction (production of a proton motive force) by the alkalophilic respiratory chain at pH 7.0 is what precludes the growth of B. firmus RAB at a neutral pH.

  14. Respiratory chain of the alkalophilic bacterium Bacillus firmus RAB and its non-alkalophilic mutant derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Kitada, M.; Lewis, R.J.; Krulwich, T.A.

    1983-04-01

    The membrane-bound respiratory chain components of alkalophilic Bacillus firmus RAB were studied by difference spectroscopy and oxidation-reduction potentiometric titrations. Cytochromes with the following midpoint potentials were identified at pH 9.0: a-type cytochromes, +110 and +210 mV; b-type cytochromes, +20, -120, -280, and -400 mV; and cytochrome c, +60 mV. Only the higher-potential cytochrome a showed an upward shift in midpoint potential when titrated at pH 7.0. Parallel studies of a non-alkalophilic mutant derivate of B. firmus RAB, strain RABN, revealed the presence of only one species each of a-, b-, and c-type cytochromes which exhibited midpoint potentials of +110, -150, and +160 mV, respectively, at pH 7.0. Membranes of both strains were found to contain menaquinone. At pH 9.0, NADH caused the reduction of essentially all of the cytochromes that were seen in fully reduced preparations of wild-type B. firmus RAB membranes. By contrast, at pH 7.0, NADH failed to appreciably reduce the b-type cytochromes. These findings may relate to our recent proposal that an inadequacy in energy transduction (production of a proton motive force) by the alkalophilic respiratory chain at pH 7.0 is what precludes the growth of B. firmus RAB at a neutral pH. 13 references, 7 figures.

  15. Structure of the Zymomonas mobilis respiratory chain: oxygen affinity of electron transport and the role of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Balodite, Elina; Strazdina, Inese; Galinina, Nina; McLean, Samantha; Rutkis, Reinis; Poole, Robert K; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2014-09-01

    The genome of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis encodes a bd-type terminal oxidase, cytochrome bc1 complex and several c-type cytochromes, yet lacks sequences homologous to any of the known bacterial cytochrome c oxidase genes. Recently, it was suggested that a putative respiratory cytochrome c peroxidase, receiving electrons from the cytochrome bc1 complex via cytochrome c552, might function as a peroxidase and/or an alternative oxidase. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis, by construction of a cytochrome c peroxidase mutant (Zm6-perC), and comparison of its properties with those of a mutant defective in the cytochrome b subunit of the bc1 complex (Zm6-cytB). Disruption of the cytochrome c peroxidase gene (ZZ60192) caused a decrease of the membrane NADH peroxidase activity, impaired the resistance of growing culture to exogenous hydrogen peroxide and hampered aerobic growth. However, this mutation did not affect the activity or oxygen affinity of the respiratory chain, or the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction. Furthermore, the peroxide resistance and membrane NADH peroxidase activity of strain Zm6-cytB had not decreased, but both the oxygen affinity of electron transport and the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction were affected. It is therefore concluded that the cytochrome c peroxidase does not terminate the cytochrome bc1 branch of Z. mobilis, and that it is functioning as a quinol peroxidase.

  16. Multistationary and Oscillatory Modes of Free Radicals Generation by the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Revealed by a Bifurcation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Selivanov, Vitaly A.; Cascante, Marta; Friedman, Mark; Schumaker, Mark F.; Trucco, Massimo; Votyakova, Tatyana V.

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain transforms energy satisfying cellular demand and generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that act as metabolic signals or destructive factors. Therefore, knowledge of the possible modes and bifurcations of electron transport that affect ROS signaling provides insight into the interrelationship of mitochondrial respiration with cellular metabolism. Here, a bifurcation analysis of a sequence of the electron transport chain models of increasing complexity was used to analyze the contribution of individual components to the modes of respiratory chain behavior. Our algorithm constructed models as large systems of ordinary differential equations describing the time evolution of the distribution of redox states of the respiratory complexes. The most complete model of the respiratory chain and linked metabolic reactions predicted that condensed mitochondria produce more ROS at low succinate concentration and less ROS at high succinate levels than swelled mitochondria. This prediction was validated by measuring ROS production under various swelling conditions. A numerical bifurcation analysis revealed qualitatively different types of multistationary behavior and sustained oscillations in the parameter space near a region that was previously found to describe the behavior of isolated mitochondria. The oscillations in transmembrane potential and ROS generation, observed in living cells were reproduced in the model that includes interaction of respiratory complexes with the reactions of TCA cycle. Whereas multistationarity is an internal characteristic of the respiratory chain, the functional link of respiration with central metabolism creates oscillations, which can be understood as a means of auto-regulation of cell metabolism. PMID:23028295

  17. Stomatin-Like Protein 2 Is Required for In Vivo Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Formation and Optimal Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Chang, Yu-Han; Wai, Timothy; König, Tim; Dunn, Stanley D.; Langer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2) is a mainly mitochondrial protein that is widely expressed and is highly conserved across evolution. We have previously shown that SLP-2 binds the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin and interacts with prohibitin-1 and -2 to form specialized membrane microdomains in the mitochondrial inner membrane, which are associated with optimal mitochondrial respiration. To determine how SLP-2 functions, we performed bioenergetic analysis of primary T cells from T cell-selective Slp-2 knockout mice under conditions that forced energy production to come almost exclusively from oxidative phosphorylation. These cells had a phenotype characterized by increased uncoupled mitochondrial respiration and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Since formation of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes (RCS) may correlate with more efficient electron transfer during oxidative phosphorylation, we hypothesized that the defect in mitochondrial respiration in SLP-2-deficient T cells was due to deficient RCS formation. We found that in the absence of SLP-2, T cells had decreased levels and activities of complex I-III2 and I-III2-IV1-3 RCS but no defects in assembly of individual respiratory complexes. Impaired RCS formation in SLP-2-deficient T cells correlated with significantly delayed T cell proliferation in response to activation under conditions of limiting glycolysis. Altogether, our findings identify SLP-2 as a key regulator of the formation of RCS in vivo and show that these supercomplexes are required for optimal cell function. PMID:25776552

  18. Myopathy with abnormal mitochondria, transient low electron transport capacity in the respiratory chain, and absence of energy transduction at sites 1 and 2 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Trockel, U; Scholte, H R; Toyka, K V; Busch, H F; Luyt-Houwen, I E; Berden, J A

    1986-01-01

    A male adult with exercise-related myalgia and weakness from the age of 17 years, developed contractions after moderate exertion which were electrically silent. Triglyceride loading or prolonged fasting provoked excessive ketosis. His isolated muscle mitochondria had severe blockade of the respiratory chain, particularly of NADH-CoQ reductase. After 1.5 years a second biopsy was performed. The electron transport capacity of the respiratory chain was much improved, but now a lesion was observed in energy transduction of sites 1 and 2 of the respiratory chain. The unexpected abolishment of respiratory chain blockade was paralleled by only mild clinical improvement. PMID:3016196

  19. Insect cells respiratory activity in bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Soraia Athie Calil; Santos, Mariza Gerdulo; Yokomizo, Adriana Yurie; Pereira, Carlos Augusto; Tonso, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    Specific respiration rate ( \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document}$$ Q_{{{\\text{O}}_{2} }} $$\\end{document}) is a key parameter to understand cell metabolism and physiological state, providing useful information for process supervision and control. In this work, we cultivated different insect cells in a very controlled environment, being able to measure \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document}$$ Q_{{{\\text{O}}_{2} }} $$\\end{document}. Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells have been used through virus infection as host for foreign protein expression and bioinsecticide production. Transfected Drosophila melanogaster (S2) cells can be used to produce different proteins. The objective of this work is to investigate respiratory activity and oxygen transfer during the growth of different insect cells lines as Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9), Drosophila melanogaster (S2) wild and transfected for the expression of GPV and EGFP. All experiments were performed in a well-controlled 1-L bioreactor, with SF900II serum free medium. Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells reached 10.7 × 106 cells/mL and maximum specific respiration rate (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document}$$ Q_{{{\\text{O}}_{2} \\max }} $$\\end{document}) of 7.3 × 10−17 molO2/cell s. Drosophila melanogaster (S2) cells achieved 51.2 × 106 cells/mL and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage

  20. Nitric oxide inhibits specific enzymes in the Krebs cycle and the respiratory chain of rat hepatocyte mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, J.; Billiar, T.R.; Curran, R.D.; Kim, R.; Simmons, R.L. )

    1990-02-26

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly-reactive molecule produced from L-arginine as recently described. In macrophages and tumor cells, NO inhibits specific mitochondrial enzymes presumably by attacking their intrinsic 4Fe-4S centers. The susceptible enzymes include aconitase of the Krebs cycle and oxidoreductase (complex II) of the electron transport chain. The authors have recently demonstrated that hepatocytes (HC) produce NO in large amounts in response to endotoxin and inflammatory cytokines. To determine whether HC suffer a similar enzyme inhibition, the authors exposed rat HC to increasing concentrations of NO solutions for 5 minutes. The activity of aconitase, complex 1, complex 2, and complex 4 (cytochrome oxidase) was determined by measuring O{sub 2} consumption after addition of enzyme-specific substrates. An NO concentration-dependent inhibition of aconitase, complex 1, and complex 2 was measured. After exposure to 0.6 mM solution, the activity of aconitase was blocked to non-measurable values while complex 1 was reduced to 11 + 8%, and complex 2 to 36 + 2% of the activity of control HC. Complex 4 of the respiratory chain remained intact at 100 + 8%. These data indicate that HC, like other cell types, are susceptible to inhibition of important steps of energy production by NO. As NO is produced in response to septic stimuli, this mechanism may play a role in the metabolic dysfunction of HC in sepsis.

  1. The vitamin D receptor inhibits the respiratory chain, contributing to the metabolic switch that is essential for cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Consiglio, Marco; Destefanis, Michele; Morena, Deborah; Foglizzo, Valentina; Forneris, Mattia; Pescarmona, Gianpiero; Silvagno, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    We recently described the mitochondrial localization and import of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in actively proliferating HaCaT cells for the first time, but its role in the organelle remains unknown. Many metabolic intermediates that support cell growth are provided by the mitochondria; consequently, the identification of proteins that regulate mitochondrial metabolic pathways is of great interest, and we sought to understand whether VDR may modulate these pathways. We genetically silenced VDR in HaCaT cells and studied the effects on cell growth, mitochondrial metabolism and biosynthetic pathways. VDR knockdown resulted in robust growth inhibition, with accumulation in the G0G1 phase of the cell cycle and decreased accumulation in the M phase. The effects of VDR silencing on proliferation were confirmed in several human cancer cell lines. Decreased VDR expression was consistently observed in two different models of cell differentiation. The impairment of silenced HaCaT cell growth was accompanied by sharp increases in the mitochondrial membrane potential, which sensitized the cells to oxidative stress. We found that transcription of the subunits II and IV of cytochrome c oxidase was significantly increased upon VDR silencing. Accordingly, treatment of HaCaT cells with vitamin D downregulated both subunits, suggesting that VDR may inhibit the respiratory chain and redirect TCA intermediates toward biosynthesis, thus contributing to the metabolic switch that is typical of cancer cells. In order to explore this hypothesis, we examined various acetyl-CoA-dependent biosynthetic pathways, such as the mevalonate pathway (measured as cholesterol biosynthesis and prenylation of small GTPases), and histone acetylation levels; all of these pathways were inhibited by VDR silencing. These data provide evidence of the role of VDR as a gatekeeper of mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and a facilitator of the diversion of acetyl-CoA from the energy-producing TCA cycle

  2. Electrode assemblies composed of redox cascades from microbial respiratory electron transfer chains

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Andrew J.; Marritt, Sophie; Bradley, Justin; Shi, Liang; McMillan, Duncan G.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Richardson, David; Butt, Julea N.

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory and photosynthetic electron transfer chains are dependent on vectorial electron transfer through a series of redox proteins. Examples include electron transfer from NapC to NapAB nitrate reductase in Paracoccus denitrificans and from CymA to Fcc3 (flavocytochrome c3) fumarate reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In the present article, we demonstrate that graphite electrodes can serve as surfaces for the stepwise adsorption of NapC and NapAB, and the stepwise adsorption of CymA and Fcc3. Aspects of the catalytic properties of these assemblies are different from those of NapAB and Fcc3 adsorbed in isolation. We propose that this is due to the formation of NapC-NapAB and of CymA-Fcc3 complexes that are capable of supporting vectorial electron transfer.

  3. Post-translational decrease in respiratory chain proteins in the Polg mutator mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hauser, David N; Dillman, Allissa A; Ding, Jinhui; Li, Yan; Cookson, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA damage is thought to be a causal contributor to aging as mice with inactivating mutations in polymerase gamma (Polg) develop a progeroid phenotype. To further understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenotype, we used iTRAQ and RNA-Seq to determine differences in protein and mRNA abundance respectively in the brains of one year old Polg mutator mice compared to control animals. We found that mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins are specifically decreased in abundance in the brains of the mutator mice, including several nuclear encoded mitochondrial components. However, we found no evidence that the changes we observed in protein levels were the result of decreases in mRNA expression. These results show that there are post-translational effects associated with mutations in Polg.

  4. The aerobic respiratory chain of the acidophilic archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum: A membrane-bound complex oxidizing ferrous iron.

    PubMed

    Castelle, Cindy J; Roger, Magali; Bauzan, Marielle; Brugna, Myriam; Lignon, Sabrina; Nimtz, Manfred; Golyshina, Olga V; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Guiral, Marianne

    2015-08-01

    The extremely acidophilic archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum is found in iron-rich biomining environments and is an important micro-organism in naturally occurring microbial communities in acid mine drainage. F. acidiphilum is an iron oxidizer that belongs to the order Thermoplasmatales (Euryarchaeota), which harbors the most extremely acidophilic micro-organisms known so far. At present, little is known about the nature or the structural and functional organization of the proteins in F. acidiphilum that impact the iron biogeochemical cycle. We combine here biochemical and biophysical techniques such as enzyme purification, activity measurements, proteomics and spectroscopy to characterize the iron oxidation pathway(s) in F. acidiphilum. We isolated two respiratory membrane protein complexes: a 850 kDa complex containing an aa3-type cytochrome oxidase and a blue copper protein, which directly oxidizes ferrous iron and reduces molecular oxygen, and a 150 kDa cytochrome ba complex likely composed of a di-heme cytochrome and a Rieske protein. We tentatively propose that both of these complexes are involved in iron oxidation respiratory chains, functioning in the so-called uphill and downhill electron flow pathways, consistent with autotrophic life. The cytochrome ba complex could possibly play a role in regenerating reducing equivalents by a reverse ('uphill') electron flow. This study constitutes the first detailed biochemical investigation of the metalloproteins that are potentially directly involved in iron-mediated energy conservation in a member of the acidophilic archaea of the genus Ferroplasma.

  5. Supramolecular organization of bacterial aerobic respiratory chains: From cells and back.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ana M P; Teixeira, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic respiratory chains from all life kingdoms are composed by several complexes that have been deeply characterized in their isolated form. These membranous complexes link the oxidation of reducing substrates to the reduction of molecular oxygen, in a process that conserves energy by ion translocation between both sides of the mitochondrial or prokaryotic cytoplasmatic membranes. In recent years there has been increasing evidence that those complexes are organized as supramolecular structures, the so-called supercomplexes and respirasomes, being available for eukaryotes strong data namely obtained by electron microscopy and single particle analysis. A parallel study has been developed for prokaryotes, based on blue native gels and mass spectrometry analysis, showing that in these more simple unicellular organisms such supercomplexes also exist, involving not only typical aerobic-respiration associated complexes, but also anaerobic-linked enzymes. After a short overview of the data on eukaryotic supercomplexes, we will analyse comprehensively the different types of prokaryotic aerobic respiratory supercomplexes that have been thus far suggested, in both bacteria and archaea. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26546715

  6. Comprehensive measurement of respiratory activity in permeabilized cells using extracellular flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salabei, Joshua K.; Gibb, Andrew A.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular flux (XF) analysis has become a mainstream method to measure bioenergetic function in cells and tissues. While this technique is commonly used to measure energetics in intact cells, we outline here a detailed XF protocol for measuring respiration in permeabilized cells. Cells are permeabilized using saponin, digitonin, or recombinant perfringolysin O (XF PMP reagent) and provided with specific substrates to measure complex I- or II-mediated respiratory activity, Complex III+IV respiratory activity, or Complex IV activity. Medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines or glutamine may also be provided for measuring fatty acid oxidation or glutamine oxidation, respectively. This protocol allows for such measurements using a minimal number of cells compared with other protocols, without the need for mitochondrial isolation. The results are highly reproducible, and mitochondria remain well coupled. Collectively, this protocol provides comprehensive and detailed information regarding mitochondrial activity and efficiency, and, following preparative steps, takes approximately 6 hours to complete. PMID:24457333

  7. Kinetic evidence against partitioning of the ubiquinone pool and the catalytic relevance of respiratory-chain supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Blaza, James N; Serreli, Riccardo; Jones, Andrew J Y; Mohammed, Khairunnisa; Hirst, Judy

    2014-11-01

    In mitochondria, four respiratory-chain complexes drive oxidative phosphorylation by sustaining a proton-motive force across the inner membrane that is used to synthesize ATP. The question of how the densely packed proteins of the inner membrane are organized to optimize structure and function has returned to prominence with the characterization of respiratory-chain supercomplexes. Supercomplexes are increasingly accepted structural entities, but their functional and catalytic advantages are disputed. Notably, substrate "channeling" between the enzymes in supercomplexes has been proposed to confer a kinetic advantage, relative to the rate provided by a freely accessible, common substrate pool. Here, we focus on the mitochondrial ubiquinone/ubiquinol pool. We formulate and test three conceptually simple predictions of the behavior of the mammalian respiratory chain that depend on whether channeling in supercomplexes is kinetically important, and on whether the ubiquinone pool is partitioned between pathways. Our spectroscopic and kinetic experiments demonstrate how the metabolic pathways for NADH and succinate oxidation communicate and catalyze via a single, universally accessible ubiquinone/ubiquinol pool that is not partitioned or channeled. We reevaluate the major piece of contrary evidence from flux control analysis and find that the conclusion of substrate channeling arises from the particular behavior of a single inhibitor; we explain why different inhibitors behave differently and show that a robust flux control analysis provides no evidence for channeling. Finally, we discuss how the formation of respiratory-chain supercomplexes may confer alternative advantages on energy-converting membranes.

  8. Kinetic evidence against partitioning of the ubiquinone pool and the catalytic relevance of respiratory-chain supercomplexes

    PubMed Central

    Blaza, James N.; Serreli, Riccardo; Jones, Andrew J. Y.; Mohammed, Khairunnisa; Hirst, Judy

    2014-01-01

    In mitochondria, four respiratory-chain complexes drive oxidative phosphorylation by sustaining a proton-motive force across the inner membrane that is used to synthesize ATP. The question of how the densely packed proteins of the inner membrane are organized to optimize structure and function has returned to prominence with the characterization of respiratory-chain supercomplexes. Supercomplexes are increasingly accepted structural entities, but their functional and catalytic advantages are disputed. Notably, substrate “channeling” between the enzymes in supercomplexes has been proposed to confer a kinetic advantage, relative to the rate provided by a freely accessible, common substrate pool. Here, we focus on the mitochondrial ubiquinone/ubiquinol pool. We formulate and test three conceptually simple predictions of the behavior of the mammalian respiratory chain that depend on whether channeling in supercomplexes is kinetically important, and on whether the ubiquinone pool is partitioned between pathways. Our spectroscopic and kinetic experiments demonstrate how the metabolic pathways for NADH and succinate oxidation communicate and catalyze via a single, universally accessible ubiquinone/ubiquinol pool that is not partitioned or channeled. We reevaluate the major piece of contrary evidence from flux control analysis and find that the conclusion of substrate channeling arises from the particular behavior of a single inhibitor; we explain why different inhibitors behave differently and show that a robust flux control analysis provides no evidence for channeling. Finally, we discuss how the formation of respiratory-chain supercomplexes may confer alternative advantages on energy-converting membranes. PMID:25331896

  9. Evaluation of a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Scala, Alessia; Tagliabue, Claudia; Zampiero, Alberto; Bianchini, Sonia; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal swabs from 424 children were used to compare the performances of the new multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) RIDA®GENE Flu & RSV kit and monospecific RT-PCR assays in detecting respiratory syncytial and influenza viruses. The easy-to-use kit was highly sensitive and specific and is recommended for routine practice.

  10. Neuropathologic Characterization of Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia Type 6 Associated With Cardiomyopathy and Hydrops Fetalis and Severe Multisystem Respiratory Chain Deficiency due to Novel RARS2 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Lax, Nichola Z; Alston, Charlotte L; Schon, Katherine; Park, Soo-Mi; Krishnakumar, Deepa; He, Langping; Falkous, Gavin; Ogilvy-Stuart, Amanda; Lees, Christoph; King, Rosalind H; Hargreaves, Iain P; Brown, Garry K; McFarland, Robert; Dean, Andrew F; Taylor, Robert W

    2015-07-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in the RARS2 gene encoding the mitochondrial arginyl-transfer RNA synthetase cause infantile-onset myoencephalopathy pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 (PCH6). We describe 2 sisters with novel compound heterozygous RARS2 mutations who presented perinatally with neurologic features typical of PCH6 but with additional features including cardiomyopathy, hydrops, and pulmonary hypoplasia and who died at 1 day and 14 days of age. Magnetic resonance imaging findings included marked cerebellar hypoplasia, gyral immaturity, punctate lesions in cerebral white matter, and unfused deep cerebral grey matter. Enzyme histochemistry of postmortem tissues revealed a near-global cytochrome c oxidase-deficiency; assessment of respiratory chain enzyme activities confirmed severe deficiencies involving complexes I, III, and IV. Molecular genetic studies revealed 2 RARS2 gene mutations: a c.1A>G, p.? variant predicted to abolish the initiator methionine, and a deep intronic c.613-3927C>T variant causing skipping of exons 6-8 in the mature RARS2 transcript. Neuropathologic investigation included low brain weights, small brainstem and cerebellum, deep cerebral white matter pathology, pontine nucleus neuron loss (in 1 sibling), and peripheral nerve pathology. Mitochondrial respiratory chain immunohistochemistry in brain tissues confirmed an absence of complexes I and IV immunoreactivity with sparing of mitochondrial numbers. These cases expand the clinical spectrum of RARS2 mutations, including antenatal features and widespread mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies in postmortem brain tissues.

  11. Neuropathologic Characterization of Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia Type 6 Associated With Cardiomyopathy and Hydrops Fetalis and Severe Multisystem Respiratory Chain Deficiency due to Novel RARS2 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Lax, Nichola Z; Alston, Charlotte L; Schon, Katherine; Park, Soo-Mi; Krishnakumar, Deepa; He, Langping; Falkous, Gavin; Ogilvy-Stuart, Amanda; Lees, Christoph; King, Rosalind H; Hargreaves, Iain P; Brown, Garry K; McFarland, Robert; Dean, Andrew F; Taylor, Robert W

    2015-07-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in the RARS2 gene encoding the mitochondrial arginyl-transfer RNA synthetase cause infantile-onset myoencephalopathy pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 (PCH6). We describe 2 sisters with novel compound heterozygous RARS2 mutations who presented perinatally with neurologic features typical of PCH6 but with additional features including cardiomyopathy, hydrops, and pulmonary hypoplasia and who died at 1 day and 14 days of age. Magnetic resonance imaging findings included marked cerebellar hypoplasia, gyral immaturity, punctate lesions in cerebral white matter, and unfused deep cerebral grey matter. Enzyme histochemistry of postmortem tissues revealed a near-global cytochrome c oxidase-deficiency; assessment of respiratory chain enzyme activities confirmed severe deficiencies involving complexes I, III, and IV. Molecular genetic studies revealed 2 RARS2 gene mutations: a c.1A>G, p.? variant predicted to abolish the initiator methionine, and a deep intronic c.613-3927C>T variant causing skipping of exons 6-8 in the mature RARS2 transcript. Neuropathologic investigation included low brain weights, small brainstem and cerebellum, deep cerebral white matter pathology, pontine nucleus neuron loss (in 1 sibling), and peripheral nerve pathology. Mitochondrial respiratory chain immunohistochemistry in brain tissues confirmed an absence of complexes I and IV immunoreactivity with sparing of mitochondrial numbers. These cases expand the clinical spectrum of RARS2 mutations, including antenatal features and widespread mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies in postmortem brain tissues. PMID:26083569

  12. An Impaired Respiratory Electron Chain Triggers Down-regulation of the Energy Metabolism and De-ubiquitination of Solute Carrier Amino Acid Transporters.

    PubMed

    Aretz, Ina; Hardt, Christopher; Wittig, Ilka; Meierhofer, David

    2016-05-01

    Hundreds of genes have been associated with respiratory chain disease (RCD), the most common inborn error of metabolism so far. Elimination of the respiratory electron chain by depleting the entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, ρ(0) cells) has therefore one of the most severe impacts on the energy metabolism in eukaryotic cells. In this study, proteomic data sets including the post-translational modifications (PTMs) phosphorylation and ubiquitination were integrated with metabolomic data sets and selected enzyme activities in the osteosarcoma cell line 143B.TK(-) A shotgun based SILAC LC-MS proteomics and a targeted metabolomics approach was applied to elucidate the consequences of the ρ(0) state. Pathway and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analyses revealed a nonuniform down-regulation of the respiratory electron chain, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and the pyruvate metabolism in ρ(0) cells. Metabolites of the TCA cycle were dysregulated, such as a reduction of citric acid and cis-aconitic acid (six and 2.5-fold), and an increase of lactic acid, oxalacetic acid (both twofold), and succinic acid (fivefold) in ρ(0) cells. Signaling pathways such as GPCR, EGFR, G12/13 alpha, and Rho GTPases were up-regulated in ρ(0) cells, which could be indicative for the mitochondrial retrograde response, a pathway of communication from mitochondria to the nucleus. This was supported by our phosphoproteome data, which revealed two main processes, GTPase-related signal transduction and cytoskeleton organization. Furthermore, a general de-ubiquitination in ρ(0) cells was observed, for example, 80S ribosomal proteins were in average threefold and SLC amino acid transporters fivefold de-ubiquitinated. The latter might cause the observed significant increase of amino acid levels in ρ(0) cells. We conclude that an elimination of the respiratory electron chain, e.g. mtDNA depletion, not only leads to an uneven down-regulation of mitochondrial energy pathways, but also

  13. Mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction modulates metalloproteases -1, -3 and -13 in human normal chondrocytes in culture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondrion has an important role in the osteoarthritis (OA) pathology. We have previously demonstrated that the alteration of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) contributes to the inflammatory response of the chondrocyte. However its implication in the process of cartilage destruction is not well understood yet. In this study we have investigated the relationship between the MRC dysfunction and the regulation of metalloproteases (MMPs) in human normal chondrocytes in culture. Methods Human normal chondrocytes were isolated from human knees obtained form autopsies of donors without previous history of rheumatic disease. Rotenone, 3-Nitropropionic acid (NPA), Antimycin A (AA), Sodium azide and Oligomycin were used to inhibit the activity of the mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, IV and V respectively. The mRNA expression of MMPs -1, -3 and -13 was studied by real time PCR. The intracellular presence of MMP proteins was evaluated by western blot. The liberation of these proteins to the extracellular media was evaluated by ELISA. The presence of proteoglycans in tissue was performed with tolouidin blue and safranin/fast green. Immunohistochemistry was used for evaluating MMPs on tissue. Results Firstly, cells were treated with the inhibitors of the MRC for 24 hours and mRNA expression was evaluated. An up regulation of MMP-1 and -3 mRNA levels was observed after the treatment with Oligomycin 5 and 100 μg/ml (inhibitor of the complex V) for 24 hours. MMP-13 mRNA expression was reduced after the incubation with AA 20 and 60 μg/ml (inhibitor of complex III) and Oligomycin. Results were validated at protein level observing an increase in the intracellular levels of MMP-1 and -3 after Oligomycin 25 μg/ml stimulation [(15.20±8.46 and 4.59±1.83 vs. basal=1, respectively (n=4; *P<0.05)]. However, AA and Oligomycin reduced the intracellular levels of the MMP-13 protein (0.70±0.16 and 0.3±0.24, respectively vs. basal=1). In order to know whether the

  14. Evaluation of the In Vivo and In Vitro Effects of Fructose on Respiratory Chain Complexes in Tissues of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macongonde, Ernesto António; Vilela, Thais Ceresér; Scaini, Giselli; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Ferreira, Bruna Klippel; Costa, Naithan Ludian Fernandes; de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; Avila Junior, Silvio; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by fructose and fructose-1-phosphate accumulation in tissues and biological fluids of patients. This disease results from a deficiency of aldolase B, which metabolizes fructose in the liver, kidney, and small intestine. We here investigated the effect of acute fructose administration on the activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) in cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle of male 30-day-old Wistar rats. The rats received subcutaneous injection of sodium chloride (0.9%; control group) or fructose solution (5 μmol/g; treated group). One hour later, the animals were euthanized and the cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle were isolated and homogenized for the investigations. Acute fructose administration increased complex I-III activity in liver. On the other hand, decreased complexes II and II-III activities in skeletal muscle and MDH in kidney were found. Interestingly, none of these parameters were affected in vitro. Our present data indicate that fructose administration elicits impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of the HFI patients.

  15. Evaluation of the In Vivo and In Vitro Effects of Fructose on Respiratory Chain Complexes in Tissues of Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Macongonde, Ernesto António; Vilela, Thais Ceresér; Scaini, Giselli; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Ferreira, Bruna Klippel; Costa, Naithan Ludian Fernandes; de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; Avila, Silvio; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by fructose and fructose-1-phosphate accumulation in tissues and biological fluids of patients. This disease results from a deficiency of aldolase B, which metabolizes fructose in the liver, kidney, and small intestine. We here investigated the effect of acute fructose administration on the activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) in cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle of male 30-day-old Wistar rats. The rats received subcutaneous injection of sodium chloride (0.9%; control group) or fructose solution (5 μmol/g; treated group). One hour later, the animals were euthanized and the cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle were isolated and homogenized for the investigations. Acute fructose administration increased complex I-III activity in liver. On the other hand, decreased complexes II and II-III activities in skeletal muscle and MDH in kidney were found. Interestingly, none of these parameters were affected in vitro. Our present data indicate that fructose administration elicits impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of the HFI patients. PMID:26770008

  16. Pontine respiratory activity involved in inspiratory/expiratory phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Mörschel, Michael; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Control of the timing of the inspiratory/expiratory (IE) phase transition is a hallmark of respiratory pattern formation. In principle, sensory feedback from pulmonary stretch receptors (Breuer–Hering reflex, BHR) is seen as the major controller for the IE phase transition, while pontine-based control of IE phase transition by both the pontine Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF) and parabrachial complex is seen as a secondary or backup mechanism. However, previous studies have shown that the BHR can habituate in vivo. Thus, habituation reduces sensory feedback, so the role of the pons, and specifically the KF, for IE phase transition may increase dramatically. Pontine-mediated control of the IE phase transition is not completely understood. In the present review, we discuss existing models for ponto-medullary interaction that may be involved in the control of inspiratory duration and IE transition. We also present intracellular recordings of pontine respiratory units derived from an in situ intra-arterially perfused brainstem preparation of rats. With the absence of lung inflation, this preparation generates a normal respiratory pattern and many of the recorded pontine units demonstrated phasic respiratory-related activity. The analysis of changes in membrane potentials of pontine respiratory neurons has allowed us to propose a number of pontine-medullary interactions not considered before. The involvement of these putative interactions in pontine-mediated control of IE phase transitions is discussed. PMID:19651653

  17. Alternative oxidase: a respiratory electron transport chain pathway essential for maintaining photosynthetic performance during drought stress.

    PubMed

    Vanlerberghe, Greg C; Martyn, Greg D; Dahal, Keshav

    2016-07-01

    Photosynthesis and respiration are the hubs of energy metabolism in plants. Drought strongly perturbs photosynthesis as a result of both diffusive limitations resulting from stomatal closure, and in some cases biochemical limitations that are associated with a reduced abundance of key photosynthetic components. The effects of drought on respiration, particularly respiration in the light (RL ), are less understood. The plant mitochondrial electron transport chain includes a non-energy conserving terminal oxidase called alternative oxidase (AOX). Several studies have shown that drought increases AOX transcript, protein and maximum capacity. Here we review recent studies comparing wild-type (WT) tobacco to transgenic lines with altered AOX protein amount. Specifically during drought, RL was compromised in AOX knockdown plants and enhanced in AOX overexpression plants, compared with WT. Significantly, these differences in RL were accompanied by dramatic differences in photosynthetic performance. Knockdown of AOX increased the susceptibility of photosynthesis to drought-induced biochemical limitations, while overexpression of AOX delayed the development of such biochemical limitations, compared with WT. Overall, the results indicate that AOX is essential to maintaining RL during drought, and that this non-energy conserving respiration maintains photosynthesis during drought by promoting energy balance in the chloroplast. This review also outlines several areas for future research, including the possibility that enhancement of non-energy conserving respiratory electron sinks may be a useful biotechnological approach to increase plant performance during stress.

  18. Unique quadruple immunofluorescence assay demonstrates mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction in osteoblasts of aged and PolgA(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Philip F; Rocha, Mariana C; Grady, John P; Chrysostomou, Alexia; Hipps, Daniel; Watson, Sharon; Greaves, Laura C; Deehan, David J; Turnbull, Doug M

    2016-01-01

    Fragility fractures caused by osteoporosis affect millions of people worldwide every year with significant levels of associated morbidity, mortality and costs to the healthcare economy. The pathogenesis of declining bone mineral density is poorly understood but it is inherently related to increasing age. Growing evidence in recent years, especially that provided by mouse models, suggest that accumulating somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations may cause the phenotypic changes associated with the ageing process including osteoporosis. Methods to study mitochondrial abnormalities in individual osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteocytes are limited and impair our ability to assess the changes seen with age and in animal models of ageing. To enable the assessment of mitochondrial protein levels, we have developed a quadruple immunofluorescence method to accurately quantify the presence of mitochondrial respiratory chain components within individual bone cells. We have applied this technique to a well-established mouse model of ageing and osteoporosis and show respiratory chain deficiency. PMID:27553587

  19. Unique quadruple immunofluorescence assay demonstrates mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction in osteoblasts of aged and PolgA−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Philip F.; Rocha, Mariana C.; Grady, John P.; Chrysostomou, Alexia; Hipps, Daniel; Watson, Sharon; Greaves, Laura C.; Deehan, David J.; Turnbull, Doug M.

    2016-01-01

    Fragility fractures caused by osteoporosis affect millions of people worldwide every year with significant levels of associated morbidity, mortality and costs to the healthcare economy. The pathogenesis of declining bone mineral density is poorly understood but it is inherently related to increasing age. Growing evidence in recent years, especially that provided by mouse models, suggest that accumulating somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations may cause the phenotypic changes associated with the ageing process including osteoporosis. Methods to study mitochondrial abnormalities in individual osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteocytes are limited and impair our ability to assess the changes seen with age and in animal models of ageing. To enable the assessment of mitochondrial protein levels, we have developed a quadruple immunofluorescence method to accurately quantify the presence of mitochondrial respiratory chain components within individual bone cells. We have applied this technique to a well-established mouse model of ageing and osteoporosis and show respiratory chain deficiency. PMID:27553587

  20. Effect of structured physical activity on respiratory outcomes in sedentary elderly adults with mobility limitations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of structured physical activity on respiratory outcomes in community dwelling elderly adults with mobility limitations. DESIGN: Multicenter, randomized trial of physical activity vs health education, with respiratory variables prespecified as tertiary outcomes over...

  1. Autism associated to a deficiency of complexes III and IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Campos, José; González-Guevara, Lucía; Briones, Paz; López-Gallardo, Ester; Bulán, Nuria; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Ramnarine, Denisse; Montoya, Julio

    2010-09-01

    Autism is the prototype of generalized developmental disorders or what today are called autism spectrum disorders. In most cases it is impossible to detect a specific etiology. It is estimated that a causative diagnosis may be shown in approximately 10-37% of the cases, including, congenital rubella, tuberous sclerosis, chromosome abnormalities such as fragile X syndrome and 22q13.3 deletion syndrome, Angelman, Williams, Smith-Magenis, Sotos, Cornelia de Lange, Möbius, Joubert and Goldenhar syndromes, Ito's hypomelanosis, as well as certain cerebral malformations and several inherited metabolic disorders. The case of a 3-year old girl is described, who was considered as autistic according to the criteria established by the DSM-IV manual for psychiatric disorders. She showed a delay in psychomotor development since she was 18 months old; she pronounces very few words (10), points to some objects, does not look up and it is hard to establish eye contact with her. She has paradoxical deafness and therefore, does not respond when called or when she is given orders, she is beginning to walk. She has not convulsions. Laboratory tests showed an anion gap of 31.6 mEq/L, lactate: 2.55: mmol/L, pyruvate: 0.06 mmol/L, and elevated lactate to/pyruvate ratio: 42.5. Under optical microscopy a muscular biopsy showed a reduction of the diameter of muscular fibers. The study of energy metabolism showed a partial deficiency of complexes III and IV of the respiratory chain, which allowed us to conclude that this was a mitochondrial dysfunction with an autistic clinical spectrum. PMID:21302592

  2. Investigation of polymerase chain reaction assays to improve detection of bacterial involvement in bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Bell, Colin J; Blackburn, Paul; Elliott, Mark; Patterson, Tony I A P; Ellison, Sean; Lahuerta-Marin, Angela; Ball, Hywel J

    2014-09-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) causes severe economic losses to the cattle farming industry worldwide. The major bacterial organisms contributing to the BRD complex are Mannheimia haemolytica, Histophilus somni, Mycoplasma bovis, Pasteurella multocida, and Trueperella pyogenes. The postmortem detection of these organisms in pneumonic lung tissue is generally conducted using standard culture-based techniques where the presence of therapeutic antibiotics in the tissue can inhibit bacterial isolation. In the current study, conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were used to assess the prevalence of these 5 organisms in grossly pneumonic lung samples from 150 animals submitted for postmortem examination, and the results were compared with those obtained using culture techniques. Mannheimia haemolytica was detected in 51 cases (34%) by PCR and in 33 cases (22%) by culture, H. somni was detected in 35 cases (23.3%) by PCR and in 6 cases (4%) by culture, Myc. bovis was detected in 53 cases (35.3%) by PCR and in 29 cases (19.3%) by culture, P. multocida was detected in 50 cases (33.3%) by PCR and in 31 cases (20.7%) by culture, and T. pyogenes was detected in 42 cases (28%) by PCR and in 31 cases (20.7%) by culture, with all differences being statistically significant. The PCR assays indicated positive results for 111 cases (74%) whereas 82 cases (54.6%) were culture positive. The PCR assays have demonstrated a significantly higher rate of detection of all 5 organisms in cases of pneumonia in cattle in Northern Ireland than was detected by current standard procedures.

  3. Micromachined polymerase chain reaction system for multiple DNA amplification of upper respiratory tract infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chia-Sheng; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chang, Chih-Ching; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Huang, Fu-Chun; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2005-01-15

    This paper presents a micro polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for the DNA-based diagnosis of microorganism genes and the detection of their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The micro PCR chip comprises cheap biocompatible soda-lime glass substrates with integrated thin-film platinum resistors as heating/sensing elements, and is fabricated using micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) techniques in a reliable batch-fabrication process. The heating and temperature sensing elements are made of the same material and are located inside the reaction chamber in order to ensure a uniform temperature distribution. This study performs the detection of several genes associated with upper respiratory tract infection microorganisms, i.e. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemopilus influenze, Staphylococcu aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Neisseria meningitides, together with their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The lower thermal inertia of the proposed micro PCR chip relative to conventional bench-top PCR systems enables a more rapid detection operation with reduced sample and reagent consumption. The experimental data reveal that the high heating and cooling rates of the system (20 and 10 degrees C/s, respectively) permit successful DNA amplification within 15 min. The micro PCR chip is also capable of performing multiple DNA amplification, i.e. the simultaneous duplication of multiple genes under different conditions in separate reaction wells. Compared with the large-scale PCR system, it is greatly advantageous for fast diagnosis of multiple infectious diseases. Multiplex PCR amplification of two DNA segments in the same well is also feasible using the proposed micro device. The developed micro PCR chip provides a crucial tool for genetic analysis, molecular biology, infectious disease detection, and many other biomedical applications. PMID:15590288

  4. Respiratory activity and growth of human skin derma fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Papa, F; Scacco, S; Vergari, R; Bucaria, V; Dioguardi, D; Papa, S

    1998-09-01

    A study has been made on the speed of growth and respiratory activity of fibroblast cultures from control derma, cheloid (hypertrophic) scar and stabilized scar taken from human skin. The speed of growth and the efficiency of plaque formation of fibroblasts from cheloid scar were greater in comparison with those of fibroblasts from stabilized scar and were stimulated by the addition to the culture medium of the exudate from post-traumatic ulcer. Measurement of the contents of cytochromes showed a decrease in the content of cytochromes b562 and c + c1 in the fibroblast culture from both cheloid and stabilized scar as compared to the fibroblast culture from control derma. Cytochrome aa3 content did not show significant difference among the three types of fibroblast cultures. The respiratory activities supported by pyruvate plus malate, succinate or ascorbate plus N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine did not show, however, significant difference among the three fibroblast cultures. These observations show that the speed of growth of skin fibroblasts does not depend on the overall respiratory capacity. The exudate stimulated the activity of cytochrome c oxidase in fibroblasts from control derma, and cheloid scar. This effect and the accompanying stimulation of fibroblast growth might be correlated with the balance of oxygen free radicals.

  5. Defect of mitochondrial respiratory chain is a mechanism of ROS overproduction in a rat model of alcoholic liver disease: role of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Wenliang; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2016-02-01

    Morphological and functional alterations of hepatic mitochondria have been documented in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Our recent study demonstrated that zinc level was decreased in whole liver and mitochondria by chronic alcohol feeding. The present study was undertaken to determine whether zinc deficiency mediates alcohol-induced mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) defect and whether defective ETC function may lead to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Male Wistar rats were pair fed with the Lieber-DeCarli control or ethanol diet for 5 mo. Chronic alcohol exposure increased hepatic triglyceride, free fatty acid, and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) levels; meanwhile hepatic mitochondrial 4HNE level was also increased. Moreover, hepatic mitochondrial respiratory complexes I, III, IV, and V and hepatic ATP production were decreased by chronic alcohol exposure. Chronic alcohol feeding decreased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1-alpha (PGC1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and mitochondrial DNA. HepG2 cells were treated with N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN) for 6 h. Zinc deficiency significantly decreased mitochondrial respiratory complexes I, III, and IV. In addition, PGC1α, NRF1, and TFAM levels as well as mitochondrial DNA were significantly decreased by TPEN treatment. Knockdown of mitochondrial respiratory complexes I, III, or IV by shRNA caused a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in ROS production. These results suggest that alcohol-induced hepatic zinc deficiency could inactivate mitochondrial biogenesis pathway and decrease mitochondrial DNA replication, which, in turn, decreases mitochondrial complex protein expression. The defect of mitochondrial respiratory complexes may worsen alcohol-induced ROS production.

  6. Immunolocalization of an alternative respiratory chain in Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae spores: mitosomes retain their role in microsporidial energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dolgikh, Viacheslav V; Senderskiy, Igor V; Pavlova, Olga A; Naumov, Anton M; Beznoussenko, Galina V

    2011-04-01

    Microsporidia are a group of fungus-related intracellular parasites with severely reduced metabolic machinery. They lack canonical mitochondria, a Krebs cycle, and a respiratory chain but possess genes encoding glycolysis enzymes, a glycerol phosphate shuttle, and ATP/ADP carriers to import host ATP. The recent finding of alternative oxidase genes in two clades suggests that microsporidial mitosomes may retain an alternative respiratory pathway. We expressed the fragments of mitochondrial chaperone Hsp70 (mitHsp70), mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mitG3PDH), and alternative oxidase (AOX) from the microsporidium Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae in Escherichia coli. Immunoblotting with antibodies against recombinant polypeptides demonstrated specific accumulation of both metabolic enzymes in A. locustae spores. At the same time comparable amounts of mitochondrial Hsp70 were found in spores and in stages of intracellular development as well. Immunoelectron microscopy of ultrathin cryosections of spores confirmed mitosomal localization of the studied proteins. Small amounts of enzymes of an alternative respiratory chain in merogonial and early sporogonial stages, alongside their accumulation in mature spores, suggest conspicuous changes in components and functions of mitosomes during the life cycle of microsporidia and the important role of these organelles in parasite energy metabolism, at least at the final stages of sporogenesis.

  7. Biochemical studies of Klebsiella pneumoniae NifL reduction using reconstituted partial anaerobic respiratory chains of Wolinella succinogenes.

    PubMed

    Thummer, Robert; Klimmek, Oliver; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2007-04-27

    In the diazotroph Klebsiella pneumoniae the flavoprotein NifL inhibits the activity of the nif-specific transcriptional activator NifA in response to molecular oxygen and combined nitrogen. Sequestration of reduced NifL to the cytoplasmic membrane under anaerobic and nitrogen-limited conditions impairs inhibition of cytoplasmic NifA by NifL. To analyze whether NifL is reduced by electrons directly derived from the reduced menaquinone pool, we studied NifL reduction using artificial membrane systems containing purified components of the anaerobic respiratory chain of Wolinella succinogenes. In this in vitro assay using proteoliposomes containing purified formate dehydrogenase and purified menaquinone (MK(6)) or 8-methylmenaquinone (MMK(6)) from W. succinogenes, reduction of purified NifL was achieved by formate oxidation. Furthermore, the respective reduction rates, which were determined using equal amounts of NifL, have been shown to be directly dependent on the concentration of both formate dehydrogenase and menaquinones incorporated into the proteoliposomes, demonstrating a direct electron transfer from menaquinone to NifL. When purified hydrogenase and MK(6) from W. succinogenes were inserted into the proteoliposomes, NifL was reduced with nearly the same rate by hydrogen oxidation. In both cases reduced NifL was found to be highly associated to the proteoliposomes, which is in accordance with our previous findings in vivo. On the bases of these experiments, we propose that the redox state of the menaquinone pool is the redox signal for nif regulation in K. pneumoniae by directly transferring electrons onto NifL under anaerobic conditions.

  8. The purification and properties of the respiratory-chain reduced nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase of Torulopsis utilis

    PubMed Central

    Tottmar, S. O. C.; Ragan, C. I.

    1971-01-01

    1. An NADH–ferricyanide reductase activity has been isolated from the respiratory chain of Torulopsis utilis by using detergents. The isolated enzyme contains non-haem iron, acid-labile sulphide and FMN in the molar proportions 27.5:28.4:1. The preparation is free of FAD and largely free of cytochrome. 2. The enzyme catalyses ferricyanide reduction by NADPH at about 1% of the rate with NADH, and reacts poorly with acceptors other than ferricyanide. The rates of reduction of some acceptors are, as percentages of the rate with ferricyanide: menadione, 0.35%; lipoate, 0.01%; cytochrome c, 0.065%; dichlorophenolindophenol, 0.35%; ubiquinone-1, 0.08%. 3. Several properties of submitochondrial particles of T. utilis (non-haem iron, acid-labile sulphide, FMN and an NADH-reducible electron-paramagnetic-resonance signal) were found to co-purify with the NADH–ferricyanide reductase activity. Thus about 70% of the FMN and, within the limits of accuracy of the experiments, 100% of the non-haem iron and acid-labile sulphide of submitochondrial particles derived from T. utilis cells grown under conditions of glycerol limitation (but relatively low iron availability) can be attributed to the NADH–ferricyanide reductase. 4. It was also shown that the component of submitochondrial particles specifically bleached at 460nm by NADH [species 1 of Ragan & Garland (1971)] co-purifies with the NADH–ferricyanide reductase. 5. This successful purification of an NADH dehydrogenase from T. utilis forms a starting point for investigating the molecular properties of phenotypically modified mitochondrial NADH oxidation pathways that lack energy conservation between NADH and the cytochromes. PMID:4399788

  9. Interactions between cardiac, respiratory, and brain activity in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musizza, Bojan; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2005-05-01

    The electrical activity of the heart (ECG), respiratory function and electric activity of the brain (EEG) were simultaneously recorded in conscious, healthy humans. Instantaneous frequencies of the heart beat, respiration and α-waves were then determined from 30-minutes recordings. The instantaneous cardiac frequency was defined as the inverse value of the time interval between two consecutive R-peaks. The instantaneous respiratory frequency was obtained from recordings of the excursions of thorax by application of the Hilbert transform. To obtain the instantaneous frequency of α-waves, the EEG signal recorded from the forehead was first analysed using the wavelet transform. Then the frequency band corresponding to α-waves was extracted and the Hilbert transform applied. Synchronization analysis was performed and the direction of coupling was ascertained, using pairs of instantaneous frequencies in each case. It is shown that the systems are weakly bidirectionally coupled. It was confirmed that, in conscious healthy humans, respiration drives cardiac activity. We also demonstrate from these analyses that α-activity drives both respiration and cardiac activity.

  10. Use of polyurethane foam deformation sensor to record respiratory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredov, V. I.; Baranov, V. S.

    1980-05-01

    The sensor developed has some substantial advantages over other known types. It is highly sensitive over a wide range of strain loads. The level of the output signal is linearly related to the force exerted on it, and it is sufficient for direct recording without using amplifiers of electric signals. The sensor is based on elastic, spongy material, polyurethane foam (porolon) with current-conducting material on the pore surface, current-conducting carbon black or electrode paste. The elastic properties of the sensor are built in the actual base of the strain-sensitive element, which simplifies the construction substantially and increases the reliability of the unit. In order to test the possibility of using this sensor to examine respiratory function, human pneumograms were recorded with the subject in a calm state along with the respiratory activity of experimental animals (dogs). Samples of the respiratory curve are shown. The simplicity of design of the sensor makes it possible to use it in various physiological experiments.

  11. Rapid toxicity testing based on mitochondrial respiratory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haubenstricker, M.E. ); Holodnick, S.E.; Mancy, K.H. ); Brabec, M.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The need exists for rapid and inexpensive methods to determine the health effects of environmental contaminants on biological systems. One of the current research approaches for assessing cytotoxicity is to monitor the respiratory activity of the mitochondrion, a sensitive, nonspecific subcellular target site. Detected changes in mitochondrial function after the addition of a test chemical could be correlated to toxic effects. Mitochondrial respiration can be characterized by three indices: state 3 and state 4 respiratory rates, and the respiratory control ratio (RCR). State 4, the idle or resting state, results when coupled mitochondrial respire in a medium containing inorganic phosphate and a Kreb's cycle substrate in the absence of a phosphate acceptor such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP). In the presence of ADP the respiration rate increases to a maximum (state 3), accompanied by phosphorylation of ADP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The ratio of state 3 to state 4, or RCR, indicates how tightly the oxidative phosphorylation process is coupled. The synthesis of ATP by mitochondria is influenced by a number of compounds, most of which are either uncouplers or inhibitors.

  12. Viral detection using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based assay in outpatients with upper respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Leekha, Surbhi; Irish, Cole L; Schneider, Susan K; Fernholz, Emily C; Espy, Mark J; Cunningham, Scott A; Patel, Robin; Juhn, Young J; Pritt, Bobbi; Smith, Thomas F; Sampathkumar, Priya

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated a commercial multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay in a cross-sectional study among 81 adult and pediatric outpatients-40 cases with upper respiratory infection symptoms and 41 asymptomatic controls-from February to April 2008. Two specimens (throat swab and nasal swab) from each participant were tested using the EraGen MultiCode-PLx Respiratory Virus Panel that detects 17 viral targets. Throat swabs were also tested for Group A Streptococcus (GAS) by PCR. Respiratory viruses were detected in 22/40 (55%) cases and in 3/41 (7%) controls (P < 0.001). GAS was detected in 10 (25%) cases; GAS and respiratory virus co-infection was found in 4 (10%). Agreement between nasal and throat swabs for viral detection was 69% in cases and 95% in controls. Of 22 cases with a detectable virus, 12 (54%) were picked up by only 1 (throat or nasal) specimen, and the detection rate was increased by combining results of nasal and throat swab testing. PMID:23182565

  13. Cardiorespiratory Coupling: Common Rhythms in Cardiac, Sympathetic, and Respiratory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Thomas E.; Hsieh, Yee-Hsee; Dhingra, Rishi R.; Baekey, David M.; Galán, Roberto F.; Wehrwein, Erica; Morris, Kendall F.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory coupling is an encompassing term describing more than the well-recognized influences of respiration on heart rate and blood pressure. Our data indicate that cardiorespiratory coupling reflects a reciprocal interaction between autonomic and respiratory control systems, and the cardiovascular system modulates the ventilatory pattern as well. For example, cardioventilatory coupling refers to the influence of heart beats and arterial pulse pressure on respiration and is the tendency for the next inspiration to start at a preferred latency after the last heart beat in expiration. Multiple complementary, well-described mechanisms mediate respiration’s influence on cardiovascular function, whereas mechanisms mediating the cardiovascular system’s influence on respiration may only be through the baroreceptors but are just being identified. Our review will describe a differential effect of conditioning rats with either chronic intermittent or sustained hypoxia on sympathetic nerve activity but also on ventilatory pattern variability. Both intermittent and sustained hypoxia increase sympathetic nerve activity after 2 weeks but affect sympatho-respiratory coupling differentially. Intermittent hypoxia enhances sympatho-respiratory coupling, which is associated with low variability in the ventilatory pattern. In contrast, after constant hypobaric hypoxia, 1-to-1 coupling between bursts of sympathetic and phrenic nerve activity is replaced by 2-to-3 coupling. This change in coupling pattern is associated with increased variability of the ventilatory pattern. After baro-denervating hypobaric hypoxic-conditioned rats, splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity becomes tonic (distinct bursts are absent) with decreases during phrenic nerve bursts and ventilatory pattern becomes regular. Thus, conditioning rats to either intermittent or sustained hypoxia accentuates the reciprocal nature of cardiorespiratory coupling. Finally, identifying a compelling physiologic

  14. Activation of Complement by Cells Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Thomas F.; Mcintosh, Kenneth; Fishaut, Mark; Henson, Peter M.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected HEp-2 cells in culture to activate complement was investigated. After incubation of cells with various complement sources and buffer, binding of C3b to surfaces of infected cells was demonstrated by immunofluorescence with a double-staining technique. Nonsyncytial and syncytial (i.e., fused, multinucleated) cells were separately enumerated. Also, lysis of RSV-infected cells was assessed by lactic dehydrogenase release. In this system only RSV-infected cells stained for C3b, and they did so only after incubation with functionally active complement. Blocking of classical pathway activation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid diminished the number of infected nonsyncytial cells positively stained for C3b, but had no effect on staining of syncytial cells. Blocking of alternative pathway activation with either zymosan incubation or heat treatment decreased the number of both syncytial and nonsyncytial cells stained for C3b. Decreasing immunoglobulin concentration of the serum used as the complement source also decreased numbers of both cell types stained for C3b. Eliminating specific anti-RSV antibody diminished numbers of both cell types stained for C3b, but staining was not eliminated. Lastly, incubation with functionally active complement markedly increased lactic dehydrogenase release from infected cells. This study demonstrated that RSV-infected nonsyncytial and syncytial cells are able to activate complement by both classical and alternative pathways. Activation of complement by syncytial cells appears to be less dependent on the classical pathway than is activation by nonsyncytial cells, and activation by syncytial cells may require immunoglobulin but not specific antibody. These experiments suggest the possibility of complement activation during respiratory tract infection by RSV. Implications of this are discussed. Images PMID:7263071

  15. Mitochondrial respiratory-chain adaptations in macrophages contribute to antibacterial host defense.

    PubMed

    Garaude, Johan; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Martínez-Cano, Sarai; Enamorado, Michel; Ugolini, Matteo; Nistal-Villán, Estanislao; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Pelegrín, Pablo; Sander, Leif E; Enríquez, José A; Sancho, David

    2016-09-01

    Macrophages tightly scale their core metabolism after being activated, but the precise regulation of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain (ETC) and its functional implications are currently unknown. Here we found that recognition of live bacteria by macrophages transiently decreased assembly of the ETC complex I (CI) and CI-containing super-complexes and switched the relative contributions of CI and CII to mitochondrial respiration. This was mediated by phagosomal NADPH oxidase and the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent tyrosine kinase Fgr. It required Toll-like receptor signaling and the NLRP3 inflammasome, which were both connected to bacterial viability-specific immune responses. Inhibition of CII during infection with Escherichia coli normalized serum concentrations of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and IL-10 to those in mice treated with dead bacteria and impaired control of bacteria. We have thus identified ETC adaptations as an early immunological-metabolic checkpoint that adjusts innate immune responses to bacterial infection.

  16. Cannabinoid-Induced Changes in the Activity of Electron Transport Chain Complexes of Brain Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the activity of individual mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, II/III, IV) and citrate synthase induced by pharmacologically different cannabinoids. In vitro effects of selected cannabinoids on mitochondrial enzymes were measured in crude mitochondrial fraction isolated from pig brain. Both cannabinoid receptor agonists, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, anandamide, and R-(+)-WIN55,212-2, and antagonist/inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptors, AM251, and cannabidiol were examined in pig brain mitochondria. Different effects of these cannabinoids on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and citrate synthase were found. Citrate synthase activity was decreased only by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and AM251. Significant increase in the complex I activity was induced by anandamide. At micromolar concentration, all the tested cannabinoids inhibited the activity of electron transport chain complexes II/III and IV. Stimulatory effect of anandamide on activity of complex I may participate on distinct physiological effects of endocannabinoids compared to phytocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoids. Common inhibitory effect of cannabinoids on activity of complex II/III and IV confirmed a non-receptor-mediated mechanism of cannabinoid action on individual components of system of oxidative phosphorylation.

  17. Respiratory muscle strength in the physically active elderly.

    PubMed

    Summerhill, Eleanor M; Angov, Nadia; Garber, Carol; McCool, F Dennis

    2007-12-01

    Advancing age is associated with a decline in the strength of the skeletal muscles, including those of respiration. Respiratory muscles can be strengthened with nonrespiratory activities. We therefore hypothesized that regular exercise in the elderly would attenuate this age-related decline in respiratory muscle strength. Twenty-four healthy subjects older than 65 years were recruited (11 males and 13 females). A comprehensive physical activity survey was administered, and subjects were categorized as active (n = 12) or inactive (n = 12). Each subject underwent testing of maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PI(max) and PE(max)). Diaphragmatic thickness (tdi) was measured via two-dimensional B-mode ultrasound. There were no significant differences between the active and inactive groups with respect to age (75 vs. 73 years) or body weight (69.1vs. 69.9 kg). There were more women (9) than men (3) in the inactive group. Diaphragm thickness was greater in the active group (0.31 +/- 0.06 cm vs. 0.25 +/- 0.04 cm; p = 0.011). PE(max) and PI(max) were also greater in the active group (130 +/- 44 cm H(2)O vs. 80 +/- 24 cm H(2)O; p = 0.002; and 99 +/- 32 cm H(2)O vs. 75 +/- 14 cm H(2)O; p = 0.03). There was a positive association between PI(max )and tdi (r = 0.43, p = 0.03). Regular exercise was positively associated with diaphragm muscle thickness in this cohort. As PE(max) was higher in the active group, we postulate that recruitment of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles during nonrespiratory activities may be the source of this training effect. PMID:17917778

  18. Activated mouse eosinophils protect against lethal respiratory virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Ochkur, Sergei I.; Luo, Janice L.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Lee, James J.; Lee, Nancy A.; Domachowske, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are recruited to the airways as a prominent feature of the asthmatic inflammatory response where they are broadly perceived as promoting pathophysiology. Respiratory virus infections exacerbate established asthma; however, the role of eosinophils and the nature of their interactions with respiratory viruses remain uncertain. To explore these questions, we established acute infection with the rodent pneumovirus, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), in 3 distinct mouse models of Th2 cytokine–driven asthmatic inflammation. We found that eosinophils recruited to the airways of otherwise naïve mice in response to Aspergillus fumigatus, but not ovalbumin sensitization and challenge, are activated by and degranulate specifically in response to PVM infection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated eosinophils from both Aspergillus antigen and cytokine-driven asthma models are profoundly antiviral and promote survival in response to an otherwise lethal PVM infection. Thus, although activated eosinophils within a Th2-polarized inflammatory response may have pathophysiologic features, they are also efficient and effective mediators of antiviral host defense. PMID:24297871

  19. Mitochondrial respiratory pathways inhibition in Rhizopus oryzae potentiates activity of posaconazole and itraconazole via apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of mucormycosis has increased drastically in immunocompromised patients. Also the array of targets whose inhibition results in Mucorales death is limited. Recently, researchers identified mitochondria as important regulators of detoxification and virulence mechanisms in fungi. In this context, targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain may provide a new platform for antifungal development. We hypothesized that targeting respiratory pathways potentiates triazoles activity via apoptosis. We found that simultaneous administration of antimycin A (AA) and benzohydroxamate (BHAM), inhibitors of classical and alternative mitochondrial pathways respectively, resulted in potent activity of posaconazole (PCZ) and itraconazole (ICZ) against Rhizopus oryzae. We observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in R. oryzae cells treated with PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM. The fungicidal activity of this combination against R. oryzae was correlated with intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS), phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and increased caspase like activity. DNA fragmentation and condensation assays also revealed apoptosis of R. oryzae cells. These apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM makes R. oryzae exquisitely sensitive to treatment with triazoles via apoptosis. This strategy may serve as a new model for the development of improved or novel antifungal agents. PMID:23696824

  20. Mitochondrial Respiratory Pathways Inhibition in Rhizopus oryzae Potentiates Activity of Posaconazole and Itraconazole via Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of mucormycosis has increased drastically in immunocompromised patients. Also the array of targets whose inhibition results in Mucorales death is limited. Recently, researchers identified mitochondria as important regulators of detoxification and virulence mechanisms in fungi. In this context, targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain may provide a new platform for antifungal development. We hypothesized that targeting respiratory pathways potentiates triazoles activity via apoptosis. We found that simultaneous administration of antimycin A (AA) and benzohydroxamate (BHAM), inhibitors of classical and alternative mitochondrial pathways respectively, resulted in potent activity of posaconazole (PCZ) and itraconazole (ICZ) against Rhizopus oryzae. We observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in R. oryzae cells treated with PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM. The fungicidal activity of this combination against R. oryzae was correlated with intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS), phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and increased caspase like activity. DNA fragmentation and condensation assays also revealed apoptosis of R. oryzae cells. These apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM makes R. oryzae exquisitely sensitive to treatment with triazoles via apoptosis. This strategy may serve as a new model for the development of improved or novel antifungal agents. PMID:23696824

  1. Antitussive activity and respiratory system effects of levodropropizine in man.

    PubMed

    Bossi, R; Braga, P C; Centanni, S; Legnani, D; Moavero, N E; Allegra, L

    1988-08-01

    Antitussive activity of the new antitussive drug, levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526), was evaluated in healthy volunteers by the classical method of citric acid-induced coughing. Levodropropizine dose-dependently reduced cough frequency. Maximal inhibition was observed at 6 h after administration. Cough intensity was also reduced, as shown by the analysis of cough noise. Levodropropizine, at the dosage of 60 mg t.i.d., had no adverse effects on respiratory function nor on airway clearance mechanisms: in fact, it did not affect spirometric parameters. Levodropropizine had no effects on the rheological properties of mucus nor on ciliary activity of airway epithelium.

  2. Respiratory Activity of the Mycelium of Eremothecium ashbyii.

    PubMed

    Fraile, E R; Zurita, V E

    1967-11-01

    The respiratory activity of the mycelium of Eremothecium ashbyii from submerged cultures was manometrically determined at different stages of its development and the results were statistically analyzed. The experiments were performed in a manner designed to diminish the endogenous respiration without affecting the response to the addition of an exogenous substrate. Lactose was the carbohydrate tested that produced the lowest oxygen consumption. The oxidation of maltose, which was high at 24 hr, decreased by more than 50% at 48 and 55 hr. Glucose and sucrose were actively oxidized by mycelium of three ages. From the intermediates of carbohydrate metabolism, 24-hr mycelium did not produce oxygen consumption with malate, lactate, citrate, fumarate, and alpha-ketoglutarate. At 48 hr, mycelium did not oxidize either lactate or citrate; 55-hr mycelium showed oxygen consumption with all intermediates tested. Acetate and pyruvate always produced high oxygen consumption. Ethyl alcohol produced high oxygen consumption with mycelium of all tested ages. PMID:16349733

  3. Respiratory Activity of the Mycelium of Eremothecium ashbyii

    PubMed Central

    Fraile, Elda R.; Zurita, Victoria E.

    1967-01-01

    The respiratory activity of the mycelium of Eremothecium ashbyii from submerged cultures was manometrically determined at different stages of its development and the results were statistically analyzed. The experiments were performed in a manner designed to diminish the endogenous respiration without affecting the response to the addition of an exogenous substrate. Lactose was the carbohydrate tested that produced the lowest oxygen consumption. The oxidation of maltose, which was high at 24 hr, decreased by more than 50% at 48 and 55 hr. Glucose and sucrose were actively oxidized by mycelium of three ages. From the intermediates of carbohydrate metabolism, 24-hr mycelium did not produce oxygen consumption with malate, lactate, citrate, fumarate, and α-ketoglutarate. At 48 hr, mycelium did not oxidize either lactate or citrate; 55-hr mycelium showed oxygen consumption with all intermediates tested. Acetate and pyruvate always produced high oxygen consumption. Ethyl alcohol produced high oxygen consumption with mycelium of all tested ages. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16349733

  4. Antitussive activity and respiratory system effects of levodropropizine in man.

    PubMed

    Bossi, R; Braga, P C; Centanni, S; Legnani, D; Moavero, N E; Allegra, L

    1988-08-01

    Antitussive activity of the new antitussive drug, levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526), was evaluated in healthy volunteers by the classical method of citric acid-induced coughing. Levodropropizine dose-dependently reduced cough frequency. Maximal inhibition was observed at 6 h after administration. Cough intensity was also reduced, as shown by the analysis of cough noise. Levodropropizine, at the dosage of 60 mg t.i.d., had no adverse effects on respiratory function nor on airway clearance mechanisms: in fact, it did not affect spirometric parameters. Levodropropizine had no effects on the rheological properties of mucus nor on ciliary activity of airway epithelium. PMID:3196411

  5. Effect of nitric oxide on mitochondrial respiratory activity of human articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Maneiro, E; Lopez-Armada, M; de Andres, M C; Carames, B; Martin, M; Bonilla, A; del Hoyo, P; Galdo, F; Arenas, J; Blanco, F

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial activity and its relation with the apoptosis of human articular chondrocytes. Materials and methods: Mitochondrial function was evaluated by analysing respiratory chain enzyme complexes, citrate synthase (CS) activities, and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). The activities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes (complex I: NADH CoQ1 reductase, complex II: succinate dehydrogenase, complex III: ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase, complex IV: cytochrome c oxidase) and CS were measured in human articular chondrocytes isolated from normal cartilage. The Δψm was measured by 5,5',6,6'-tetracholoro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazole carbocyanide iodide (JC-1) using flow cytometry. Apoptosis was analysed by flow cytometry. The mRNA expression of caspases was analysed by ribonuclease protection analysis and the detection of protein synthesis by western blotting. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was used as an NO compound donor. Results: SNP at concentrations higher than 0.5 mmol/l for 24 hours induced cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis. SNP elicited mRNA expression of caspase-3 and caspase-7 and down regulated bcl-2 synthesis in a dose and time dependent manner. Furthermore, 0.5 mM SNP induced depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane at 5, 12, and 24 hours. Analysis of the MRC showed that at 5 hours, 0.5 mM SNP reduced the activity of complex IV by 33%. The individual inhibition of mitochondrial complex IV with azide modified the Δψm and induced apoptosis. Conclusions: This study suggests that the effect of NO on chondrocyte survival is mediated by its effect on complex IV of the MRC. PMID:15708893

  6. Partial comparison of the NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel Assay with the Luminex xTAG Respiratory Panel Fast Assay V2 and singleplex real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Scala, Alessia; Bianchini, Sonia; Presicce, Maria Lory; Mori, Alessandro; Sciarrabba, Calogero Sathya; Fior, Giulia; Principi, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    In this study, 185 nasopharyngeal swabs were tested to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the Luminex NxTAG (NxTAG) Respiratory Pathogen Panel (RPP) Assay with those of the Luminex Respiratory Virus Panel (RVP) Fast Assay v2 and singleplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The NxTAG Assay identified at least one infectious agent in 164 (88.7%) of the swabs. In 91 (6.2%) tests with negative results with the RVP Fast Assay v2, a virus was identified by the NxTAG (P < 0.001). With the NxTAG Assay, the detection rates were significantly higher for respiratory syncytial virus (P = 0.003), human metapneumovirus (P < 0.001), human rhinovirus/human enterovirus (P = 0.009) and human adenovirus (P < 0.001). Finally, the NxTAG Assay identified M. pneumoniae in 32 of 44 (72.7%) PCR-positive samples. However, the concordance with real-time PCR results was low for both assays. In conclusion, the results indicate that the NxTAG Assay overcomes some of the limitations of previous Luminex assays, although further studies are needed for a more complete evaluation of the new assay.

  7. Partial comparison of the NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel Assay with the Luminex xTAG Respiratory Panel Fast Assay V2 and singleplex real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Scala, Alessia; Bianchini, Sonia; Presicce, Maria Lory; Mori, Alessandro; Sciarrabba, Calogero Sathya; Fior, Giulia; Principi, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    In this study, 185 nasopharyngeal swabs were tested to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the Luminex NxTAG (NxTAG) Respiratory Pathogen Panel (RPP) Assay with those of the Luminex Respiratory Virus Panel (RVP) Fast Assay v2 and singleplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The NxTAG Assay identified at least one infectious agent in 164 (88.7%) of the swabs. In 91 (6.2%) tests with negative results with the RVP Fast Assay v2, a virus was identified by the NxTAG (P < 0.001). With the NxTAG Assay, the detection rates were significantly higher for respiratory syncytial virus (P = 0.003), human metapneumovirus (P < 0.001), human rhinovirus/human enterovirus (P = 0.009) and human adenovirus (P < 0.001). Finally, the NxTAG Assay identified M. pneumoniae in 32 of 44 (72.7%) PCR-positive samples. However, the concordance with real-time PCR results was low for both assays. In conclusion, the results indicate that the NxTAG Assay overcomes some of the limitations of previous Luminex assays, although further studies are needed for a more complete evaluation of the new assay. PMID:27401400

  8. Evidence that the flux control coefficient of the respiratory chain is high during gluconeogenesis from lactate in hepatocytes from starved rats. Implications for the hormonal control of gluconeogenesis and action of hypoglycaemic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, H J; Smyth, J E; Quinlan, P T; Halestrap, A P

    1987-01-01

    1. Increasing concentrations of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), a mild respiratory-chain inhibitor [Halestrap (1987) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 927, 280-290], caused progressive inhibition of glucose production from lactate + pyruvate by hepatocytes from starved rats incubated in the presence or absence of oleate and gluconeogenic hormones. 2. No significant changes in tissue ATP content were observed, but there were concomitant decreases in ketone-body output and cytochrome c reduction and increases in NADH fluorescence and the ratios of [lactate]/[pyruvate] and [beta-hydroxybutyrate]/[acetoacetate]. 3. The inhibition by DCMU of palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by isolated liver mitochondria was used to calculate a flux control coefficient of the respiratory chain towards gluconeogenesis. In the presence of 1 mM-oleate, the calculated values were 0.61, 0.39 and 0.25 in the absence of hormone and in the presence of glucagon or phenylephrine respectively, consistent with activation of the respiratory chain in situ as previously suggested [Quinlan & Halestrap (1986) Biochem. J. 236, 789-800]. 4. Cytoplasmic oxaloacetate concentrations were shown to decrease under these conditions, implying inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase. 5. Inhibition of gluconeogenesis from fructose and dihydroxyacetone was also observed with DCMU and was accompanied by an increased output of lactate + pyruvate, suggesting that activation of pyruvate kinase was occurring. With the latter substrate, measurements of tissue ADP and ATP contents showed that DCMU caused a small fall in [ATP]/[ADP] ratio. 6. Two inhibitors of fatty acid oxidation, pent-4-enoate and 2-tetradecylglycidate, were shown to abolish and to decrease respectively the effects of hormones, but not valinomycin, on gluconeogenesis from lactate + pyruvate, without changing tissue ATP content. 7. It is concluded that the hormonal increase in mitochondrial matrix volume stimulates fatty acid oxidation and respiratory-chain

  9. Active and passive immunisation against respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Zambon, M

    1999-01-01

    RSV is a major cause of respiratory illness in infants under 2 years of age. Evidence is accumulating that it is also underestimated as a cause of respiratory infection in adults, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Active interventions to control the impact of RSV infection have been hampered by a lack of understanding of the immune response to RSV in different age groups. A number of different strategies for developing RSV vaccines have been pursued, including live attenuated vaccines, genetically engineered live and subunit vaccines and peptide vaccines with varying degrees of success. The target populations for RSV vaccines include infants, the elderly and women of childbearing age, but the efficacy of different vaccines may differ according to age. Desirable immune responses and immune correlates of protection to RSV in humans remain uncertain and determining these is critical for introduction of any vaccines. Prophylaxis and treatment of RSV in infants using human immunoglobulin containing high titres of RSV specific neutralising antibody (RSV-Ig) has shown limited success in different infant populations. Prophylaxis of premature infants with RSV-Ig, particularly those with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, has demonstrated limited clinical efficacy against RSV. In contrast, there are significant safety concerns for use of this preparation for prophylaxis in infants with congenital heart disease and no demonstrable efficacy in treatment of RSV disease in healthy infants. The cost of the preparation will limit use to highly selected infant groups. Production of humanized monoclonal antibodies to RSV offers another potential passive immunotherapy intervention for RSV, with increased specific activity and reduced side effects, although its use remains experimental. PMID:10578118

  10. Glucose modulates respiratory complex I activity in response to acute mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cannino, Giuseppe; El-Khoury, Riyad; Pirinen, Marja; Hutz, Bettina; Rustin, Pierre; Jacobs, Howard T; Dufour, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Proper coordination between glycolysis and respiration is essential, yet the regulatory mechanisms involved in sensing respiratory chain defects and modifying mitochondrial functions accordingly are unclear. To investigate the nature of this regulation, we introduced respiratory bypass enzymes into cultured human (HEK293T) cells and studied mitochondrial responses to respiratory chain inhibition. In the absence of respiratory chain inhibitors, the expression of alternative respiratory enzymes did not detectably alter cell physiology or mitochondrial function. However, in permeabilized cells NDI1 (alternative NADH dehydrogenase) bypassed complex I inhibition, whereas alternative oxidase (AOX) bypassed complex III or IV inhibition. In contrast, in intact cells the effects of the AOX bypass were suppressed by growth on glucose, whereas those produced by NDI1 were unaffected. Moreover, NDI1 abolished the glucose suppression of AOX-driven respiration, implicating complex I as the target of this regulation. Rapid Complex I down-regulation was partly released upon prolonged respiratory inhibition, suggesting that it provides an "emergency shutdown" system to regulate metabolism in response to dysfunctions of the oxidative phosphorylation. This system was independent of HIF1, mitochondrial superoxide, or ATP synthase regulation. Our findings reveal a novel pathway for adaptation to mitochondrial dysfunction and could provide new opportunities for combatting diseases.

  11. Glucose modulates respiratory complex I activity in response to acute mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cannino, Giuseppe; El-Khoury, Riyad; Pirinen, Marja; Hutz, Bettina; Rustin, Pierre; Jacobs, Howard T; Dufour, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Proper coordination between glycolysis and respiration is essential, yet the regulatory mechanisms involved in sensing respiratory chain defects and modifying mitochondrial functions accordingly are unclear. To investigate the nature of this regulation, we introduced respiratory bypass enzymes into cultured human (HEK293T) cells and studied mitochondrial responses to respiratory chain inhibition. In the absence of respiratory chain inhibitors, the expression of alternative respiratory enzymes did not detectably alter cell physiology or mitochondrial function. However, in permeabilized cells NDI1 (alternative NADH dehydrogenase) bypassed complex I inhibition, whereas alternative oxidase (AOX) bypassed complex III or IV inhibition. In contrast, in intact cells the effects of the AOX bypass were suppressed by growth on glucose, whereas those produced by NDI1 were unaffected. Moreover, NDI1 abolished the glucose suppression of AOX-driven respiration, implicating complex I as the target of this regulation. Rapid Complex I down-regulation was partly released upon prolonged respiratory inhibition, suggesting that it provides an "emergency shutdown" system to regulate metabolism in response to dysfunctions of the oxidative phosphorylation. This system was independent of HIF1, mitochondrial superoxide, or ATP synthase regulation. Our findings reveal a novel pathway for adaptation to mitochondrial dysfunction and could provide new opportunities for combatting diseases. PMID:23007390

  12. How does a flexible chain of active particles swell?

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andreas; Babel, Sonja; ten Hagen, Borge; von Ferber, Christian; Löwen, Hartmut

    2015-03-28

    We study the swelling of a flexible linear chain composed of active particles by analytical theory and computer simulation. Three different situations are considered: a free chain, a chain confined to an external harmonic trap, and a chain dragged at one end. First, we consider an ideal chain with harmonic springs and no excluded volume between the monomers. The Rouse model of polymers is generalized to the case of self-propelled monomers and solved analytically. The swelling, as characterized by the spatial extension of the chain, scales with the monomer number defining a Flory exponent ν which is ν = 1/2, 0, 1 in the three different situations. As a result, we find that activity does not change the Flory exponent but affects the prefactor of the scaling law. This can be quantitatively understood by mapping the system onto an equilibrium chain with a higher effective temperature such that the chain swells under an increase of the self-propulsion strength. We then use computer simulations to study the effect of self-avoidance on active polymer swelling. In the three different situations, the Flory exponent is now ν = 3/4, 1/4, 1 and again unchanged under self-propulsion. However, the chain extension behaves non-monotonic in the self-propulsion strength.

  13. Effects of prolonged fasting on AMPK signaling, gene expression, and mitochondrial respiratory chain content in skeletal muscle from lean and obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Wijngaarden, Marjolein A; van der Zon, Gerard C; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Pijl, Hanno; Guigas, Bruno

    2013-05-01

    Obesity in humans is often associated with metabolic inflexibility, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate how adaptation to prolonged fasting affects energy/nutrient-sensing pathways and metabolic gene expression in skeletal muscle from lean and obese individuals. Twelve lean and 14 nondiabetic obese subjects were fasted for 48 h. Whole body glucose/lipid oxidation rates were determined by indirect calorimetry, and blood and skeletal muscle biopsies were collected and analyzed. In response to fasting, body weight loss was similar in both groups, but the decrease in plasma insulin and leptin and the concomitant increase in growth hormone were significantly attenuated in obese subjects. The fasting-induced shift from glucose toward lipid oxidation was also severely blunted. At the molecular level, the expression of insulin receptor-β (IRβ) was lower in skeletal muscle from obese subjects at baseline, whereas the fasting-induced reductions in insulin signaling were similar in both groups. The protein expression of mitochondrial respiratory chain components, although not modified by fasting, was significantly reduced in obese subjects. Some minor differences in metabolic gene expression were observed at baseline and in response to fasting. Surprisingly, fasting reduced AMPK activity in lean but not in obese subjects, whereas the expression of AMPK subunits was not affected. We conclude that whole body metabolic inflexibility in response to prolonged fasting in obese humans is associated with lower skeletal muscle IRβ and mitochondrial respiratory chain content as well as a blunted decline of AMPK activity. PMID:23512807

  14. Riboflavin-Responsive and -Non-responsive Mutations in FAD Synthase Cause Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase and Combined Respiratory-Chain Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Rikke K J; Koňaříková, Eliška; Giancaspero, Teresa A; Mosegaard, Signe; Boczonadi, Veronika; Mataković, Lavinija; Veauville-Merllié, Alice; Terrile, Caterina; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Haack, Tobias B; Auranen, Mari; Leone, Piero; Galluccio, Michele; Imbard, Apolline; Gutierrez-Rios, Purificacion; Palmfeldt, Johan; Graf, Elisabeth; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Oppenheim, Marcus; Schiff, Manuel; Pichard, Samia; Rigal, Odile; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Möslinger, Dorothea; Feichtinger, René G; Talim, Beril; Topaloglu, Haluk; Coskun, Turgay; Gucer, Safak; Botta, Annalisa; Pegoraro, Elena; Malena, Adriana; Vergani, Lodovica; Mazzà, Daniela; Zollino, Marcella; Ghezzi, Daniele; Acquaviva, Cecile; Tyni, Tiina; Boneh, Avihu; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Gregersen, Niels; Mayr, Johannes A; Horvath, Rita; Barile, Maria; Prokisch, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies (MADDs) are a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders with combined respiratory-chain deficiency and a neuromuscular phenotype. Despite recent advances in understanding the genetic basis of MADD, a number of cases remain unexplained. Here, we report clinically relevant variants in FLAD1, which encodes FAD synthase (FADS), as the cause of MADD and respiratory-chain dysfunction in nine individuals recruited from metabolic centers in six countries. In most individuals, we identified biallelic frameshift variants in the molybdopterin binding (MPTb) domain, located upstream of the FADS domain. Inasmuch as FADS is essential for cellular supply of FAD cofactors, the finding of biallelic frameshift variants was unexpected. Using RNA sequencing analysis combined with protein mass spectrometry, we discovered FLAD1 isoforms, which only encode the FADS domain. The existence of these isoforms might explain why affected individuals with biallelic FLAD1 frameshift variants still harbor substantial FADS activity. Another group of individuals with a milder phenotype responsive to riboflavin were shown to have single amino acid changes in the FADS domain. When produced in E. coli, these mutant FADS proteins resulted in impaired but detectable FADS activity; for one of the variant proteins, the addition of FAD significantly improved protein stability, arguing for a chaperone-like action similar to what has been reported in other riboflavin-responsive inborn errors of metabolism. In conclusion, our studies identify FLAD1 variants as a cause of potentially treatable inborn errors of metabolism manifesting with MADD and shed light on the mechanisms by which FADS ensures cellular FAD homeostasis. PMID:27259049

  15. [Tiron as a spin-trap for superoxide radicals produced by the respiratory chain of submitochondrial particles].

    PubMed

    Grigolava, I V; Ksenzenko, M Iu; Konstantinob, A A; Tikhonov, A N; Kerimov, T M

    1980-01-01

    Tiron can be used as a spin-trap for O2 radicals generated by the respiratory chain of submitochondrial particles (SMP). Using this sensitive method, it was shown that the O2 (radical) production by the succinate-oxidizing SMP can be reduced by antimycin or 4-nonyl-2-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, the effects of both antibiotics being abolished and prevented by cyanide. It is suggested tht the O2 radicals are produced due to autooxidation of ubisemiquinone which is formed as an intermediate upon one-electron oxidation of CoQH2 by cytochrome c1. The effects of antimycin, 2-nonyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide and cyanide on the O2 (radical) generation correlate with the effects of these inhibitors on a steady-state concentration of ubisemiquinone predicted by the Mitchell's Q-cycle hypothesis.

  16. Supramolecular organization of cytochrome c oxidase- and alternative oxidase-dependent respiratory chains in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed

    Krause, Frank; Scheckhuber, Christian Q; Werner, Alexandra; Rexroth, Sascha; Reifschneider, Nicole H; Dencher, Norbert A; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2004-06-18

    To elucidate the molecular basis of the link between respiration and longevity, we have studied the organization of the respiratory chain of a wild-type strain and of two long-lived mutants of the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. This established aging model is able to respire by either the standard or the alternative pathway. In the latter pathway, electrons are directly transferred from ubiquinol to the alternative oxidase and thus bypass complexes III and IV. We show that the cytochrome c oxidase pathway is organized according to the mammalian "respirasome" model (Schägger, H., and Pfeiffer, K. (2000) EMBO J. 19, 1777-1783). In contrast, the alternative pathway is composed of distinct supercomplexes of complexes I and III (i.e. I(2) and I(2)III(2)), which have not been described so far. Enzymatic analysis reveals distinct functional properties of complexes I and III belonging to either cytochrome c oxidase- or alternative oxidase-dependent pathways. By a gentle colorless-native PAGE, almost all of the ATP synthases from mitochondria respiring by either pathway were preserved in the dimeric state. Our data are of significance for the understanding of both respiratory pathways as well as lifespan control and aging.

  17. Respiratory chain protein turnover rates in mice are highly heterogeneous but strikingly conserved across tissues, ages, and treatments

    PubMed Central

    Karunadharma, Pabalu P.; Basisty, Nathan; Chiao, Ying Ann; Dai, Dao-Fu; Drake, Rachel; Levy, Nick; Koh, William J.; Emond, Mary J.; Kruse, Shane; Marcinek, David; Maccoss, Michael J.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) produces most of the cellular ATP and requires strict quality-control mechanisms. To examine RC subunit proteostasis in vivo, we measured RC protein half-lives (HLs) in mice by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with metabolic [2H3]-leucine heavy isotope labeling under divergent conditions. We studied 7 tissues/fractions of young and old mice on control diet or one of 2 diet regimens (caloric restriction or rapamycin) that altered protein turnover (42 conditions in total). We observed a 6.5-fold difference in mean HL across tissues and an 11.5-fold difference across all conditions. Normalization to the mean HL of each condition showed that relative HLs were conserved across conditions (Spearman’s ρ = 0.57; P < 10–4), but were highly heterogeneous between subunits, with a 7.3-fold mean range overall, and a 2.2- to 4.6-fold range within each complex. To identify factors regulating this conserved distribution, we performed statistical analyses to study the correlation of HLs to the properties of the subunits. HLs significantly correlated with localization within the mitochondria, evolutionary origin, location of protein-encoding, and ubiquitination levels. These findings challenge the notion that all subunits in a complex turnover at comparable rates and suggest that there are common rules governing the differential proteolysis of RC protein subunits under divergent cellular conditions.—Karunadharma, P. P., Basisty, N., Chiao, Y. A., Dai, D.-F., Drake, R., Levy, N., Koh, W. J., Emond, M. J., Kruse, S., Marcinek, D., Maccoss, M. J., Rabinovitch, P. S. Respiratory chain protein turnover rates in mice are highly heterogeneous but strikingly conserved across tissues, ages, and treatments. PMID:25977255

  18. The Multicenter Aerobic Iron Respiratory Chain of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Functions as an Ensemble with a Single Macroscopic Rate Constant*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting-Feng; Painter, Richard G.; Ban, Bhupal; Blake, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions among three prominent colored proteins in intact cells of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans were monitored using an integrating cavity absorption meter that permitted the acquisition of accurate absorbance data in suspensions of cells that scattered light. The concentrations of proteins in the periplasmic space were estimated to be 350 and 25 mg/ml for rusticyanin and cytochrome c, respectively; cytochrome a was present as one molecule for every 91 nm2 in the cytoplasmic membrane. All three proteins were rapidly reduced to the same relative extent when suspensions of live bacteria were mixed with different concentrations of ferrous ions at pH 1.5. The subsequent molecular oxygen-dependent oxidation of the multicenter respiratory chain occurred with a single macroscopic rate constant, regardless of the proteins' in vitro redox potentials or their putative positions in the aerobic iron respiratory chain. The crowded electron transport proteins in the periplasm of the organism constituted an electron conductive medium where the network of protein interactions functioned in a concerted fashion as a single ensemble with a standard reduction potential of 650 mV. The appearance of product ferric ions was correlated with the reduction levels of the periplasmic electron transfer proteins; the limiting first-order catalytic rate constant for aerobic respiration on iron was 7,400 s−1. The ability to conduct direct spectrophotometric studies under noninvasive physiological conditions represents a new and powerful approach to examine the extent and rates of biological events in situ without disrupting the complexity of the live cellular environment. PMID:26041781

  19. The Multicenter Aerobic Iron Respiratory Chain of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Functions as an Ensemble with a Single Macroscopic Rate Constant.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting-Feng; Painter, Richard G; Ban, Bhupal; Blake, Robert C

    2015-07-24

    Electron transfer reactions among three prominent colored proteins in intact cells of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans were monitored using an integrating cavity absorption meter that permitted the acquisition of accurate absorbance data in suspensions of cells that scattered light. The concentrations of proteins in the periplasmic space were estimated to be 350 and 25 mg/ml for rusticyanin and cytochrome c, respectively; cytochrome a was present as one molecule for every 91 nm(2) in the cytoplasmic membrane. All three proteins were rapidly reduced to the same relative extent when suspensions of live bacteria were mixed with different concentrations of ferrous ions at pH 1.5. The subsequent molecular oxygen-dependent oxidation of the multicenter respiratory chain occurred with a single macroscopic rate constant, regardless of the proteins' in vitro redox potentials or their putative positions in the aerobic iron respiratory chain. The crowded electron transport proteins in the periplasm of the organism constituted an electron conductive medium where the network of protein interactions functioned in a concerted fashion as a single ensemble with a standard reduction potential of 650 mV. The appearance of product ferric ions was correlated with the reduction levels of the periplasmic electron transfer proteins; the limiting first-order catalytic rate constant for aerobic respiration on iron was 7,400 s(-1). The ability to conduct direct spectrophotometric studies under noninvasive physiological conditions represents a new and powerful approach to examine the extent and rates of biological events in situ without disrupting the complexity of the live cellular environment.

  20. Ionizable Side Chains at Catalytic Active Sites of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1072 Å3. The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes. PMID:22484856

  1. Amyloid-beta leads to impaired cellular respiration, energy production and mitochondrial electron chain complex activities in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rhein, V; Baysang, G; Rao, S; Meier, F; Bonert, A; Müller-Spahn, F; Eckert, A

    2009-09-01

    Evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it has been recently proposed that mitochondria are involved in the biochemical pathway by which Abeta can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we investigated the specific effects of Abeta on mitochondrial function under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory functions and energy metabolism were analyzed in control and in human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Mitochondrial respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in vital cells was measured with a high-resolution respirometry system (Oxygraph-2k). In addition, we determined the individual activities of mitochondrial complexes I-IV that compose ETC and ATP cellular levels. While the activities of complexes I and II did not change between cell types, complex IV activity was significantly reduced in APP cells. In contrast, activity of complex III was significantly enhanced in APP cells, as compensatory response in order to balance the defect of complex IV. However, this compensatory mechanism could not prevent the strong impairment of total respiration in vital APP cells. As a result, the respiratory control ratio (state3/state4) together with ATP production decreased in the APP cells in comparison with the control cells. Chronic exposure to soluble Abeta protein may result in an impairment of energy homeostasis due to a decreased respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain which, in turn, may accelerate neurons demise.

  2. Emergency department syndromic surveillance providing early warning of seasonal respiratory activity in England.

    PubMed

    Hughes, H E; Morbey, R; Hughes, T C; Locker, T E; Pebody, R; Green, H K; Ellis, J; Smith, G E; Elliot, A J

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal respiratory infections place an increased burden on health services annually. We used a sentinel emergency department syndromic surveillance system to understand the factors driving respiratory attendances at emergency departments (EDs) in England. Trends in different respiratory indicators were observed to peak at different points during winter, with further variation observed in the distribution of attendances by age. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed acute respiratory infection and bronchitis/bronchiolitis ED attendances in patients aged 1-4 years were particularly sensitive indicators for increasing respiratory syncytial virus activity. Using near real-time surveillance of respiratory ED attendances may provide early warning of increased winter pressures in EDs, particularly driven by seasonal pathogens. This surveillance may provide additional intelligence about different categories of attendance, highlighting pressures in particular age groups, thereby aiding planning and preparation to respond to acute changes in EDs, and thus the health service in general.

  3. Improved Angiostatic Activity of Dasatinib by Modulation with Hydrophobic Chains

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dasatinib is an orally active nonselective tyrosine kinase inhibitor used to treat certain types of adult leukemia. By inhibiting PDGFR-β and SFKs in both tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells, dasatinib inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. Herein, dasatinib derivatives modified with hydrophobic chains were prepared and evaluated for their in vitro antiproliferative selectivity and their in vivo antiangiogenic activity. For one of the derivatives, modified with a long perfluorinated chain, a significant enhancement in antiangiogenic activity was observed. Combined, these results suggest a possible generic route to modulate the angiostatic activity of drugs. PMID:25815152

  4. Do changes in the coupling between respiratory and sympathetic activities contribute to neurogenic hypertension?

    PubMed

    Zoccal, Daniel B; Paton, Julian F R; Machado, Benedito H

    2009-12-01

    1. It is well known that respiration markedly modulates the sympathetic nervous system. Interactions between pontine and medullary neurons involved in the control of sympathetic and respiratory functions are the main mechanism underlying the respiratory related oscillations in sympathetic nerve activity. 2. Recently, in rats treated with chronic intermittent hypoxia, we demonstrated that alterations in respiratory pattern may drive increased sympathetic outflow and hence the development of systemic hypertension. These experiments, performed in the in situ working heart-brain stem preparation, raise the possibility that enhanced central coupling between respiratory and sympathetic activities could be a potential mechanism underpinning the development and/or the maintenance of neurogenic hypertension. 3. In the present review, we discuss the neural basis of the enhanced entrainment between respiratory and sympathetic neurons in the brain stem that can be induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia and the possible implications of these mechanisms in the genesis of sympathetic overactivity and, consequently, hypertension. PMID:19413588

  5. Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) supply chain collaboration development methodology

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.; CHAPMAN,LEON D.

    2000-03-15

    The Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project during the last five years of work with the U.S. Integrated Textile Complex (retail, apparel, textile, and fiber sectors) has developed an inter-enterprise supply chain collaboration development methodology. The goal of this methodology is to enable a supply chain to work more efficiently and competitively. The outcomes of this methodology include: (1) A definitive description and evaluation of the role of business cultures and supporting business organizational structures in either inhibiting or fostering change to a more competitive supply chain; (2) ``As-Is'' and proposed ``To-Be'' supply chain business process models focusing on information flows and decision-making; and (3) Software tools that enable and support a transition to a more competitive supply chain, which results form a business driven rather than technologically driven approach to software design. This methodology development will continue in FY00 as DAMA engages companies in the soft goods industry in supply chain research and implementation of supply chain collaboration.

  6. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes.

    PubMed

    Luz, Anthony L; Rooney, John P; Kubik, Laura L; Gonzalez, Claudia P; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes. PMID:26106885

  7. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes.

    PubMed

    Luz, Anthony L; Rooney, John P; Kubik, Laura L; Gonzalez, Claudia P; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes.

  8. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Anthony L.; Rooney, John P.; Kubik, Laura L.; Gonzalez, Claudia P.; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes. PMID:26106885

  9. Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) model for supply chain collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    CHAPMAN,LEON D.; PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.

    2000-03-13

    The Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project during the last five years of work with the U.S. Integrated Textile Complex (retail, apparel, textile, and fiber sectors) has developed an inter-enterprise architecture and collaborative model for supply chains. This model will enable improved collaborative business across any supply chain. The DAMA Model for Supply Chain Collaboration is a high-level model for collaboration to achieve Demand Activated Manufacturing. The five major elements of the architecture to support collaboration are (1) activity or process, (2) information, (3) application, (4) data, and (5) infrastructure. These five elements are tied to the application of the DAMA architecture to three phases of collaboration - prepare, pilot, and scale. There are six collaborative activities that may be employed in this model: (1) Develop Business Planning Agreements, (2) Define Products, (3) Forecast and Plan Capacity Commitments, (4) Schedule Product and Product Delivery, (5) Expedite Production and Delivery Exceptions, and (6) Populate Supply Chain Utility. The Supply Chain Utility is a set of applications implemented to support collaborative product definition, forecast visibility, planning, scheduling, and execution. The DAMA architecture and model will be presented along with the process for implementing this DAMA model.

  10. The CoQH2/CoQ Ratio Serves as a Sensor of Respiratory Chain Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Guarás, Adela; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Calvo, Enrique; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Loureiro-Lopez, Marta; Pujol, Claire; Martínez-Carrascoso, Isabel; Nuñez, Estefanía; García-Marqués, Fernando; Rodríguez-Hernández, María Angeles; Cortés, Ana; Diaz, Francisca; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Moraes, Carlos T; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Navas, Plácido; Vazquez, Jesús; Enríquez, Jose A

    2016-04-01

    Electrons feed into the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) from NAD- or FAD-dependent enzymes. A shift from glucose to fatty acids increases electron flux through FAD, which can saturate the oxidation capacity of the dedicated coenzyme Q (CoQ) pool and result in the generation of reactive oxygen species. To prevent this, the mETC superstructure can be reconfigured through the degradation of respiratory complex I, liberating associated complex III to increase electron flux via FAD at the expense of NAD. Here, we demonstrate that this adaptation is driven by the ratio of reduced to oxidized CoQ. Saturation of CoQ oxidation capacity induces reverse electron transport from reduced CoQ to complex I, and the resulting local generation of superoxide oxidizes specific complex I proteins, triggering their degradation and the disintegration of the complex. Thus, CoQ redox status acts as a metabolic sensor that fine-tunes mETC configuration in order to match the prevailing substrate profile. PMID:27052170

  11. Molecular characterization and mutational analysis of the human B17 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Smeitink, J; Loeffen, J; Smeets, R; Triepels, R; Ruitenbeek, W; Trijbels, F; van den Heuvel, L

    1998-08-01

    Bovine NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex 1) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain consists of about 36 nuclear-encoded subunits. We review the current knowledge of the 15 human complex I subunits cloned so far, and report the 598-bp cDNA sequence, the chromosomal localization and the tissue expression of an additional subunit, the B17 subunit. The cDNA open reading frame of B17 comprises 387 bp and encodes a protein of 128 amino acids (calculated Mr 15.5 kDa). There is 82.7% and 78.1% homology, respectively, at the cDNA and amino acid level with the bovine counterpart. The gene of the B17 subunit has been mapped to chromosome 2. Multiple-tissue dot-blots showed ubiquitous expression of the mRNA with relatively higher expression in tissues known for their high energy demand. Of these, kidney showed the highest expression. Mutational analysis of the subunit revealed no mutations or polymorphisms in 20 patients with isolated enzymatic complex I deficiency in cultured skin fibroblasts. PMID:9760212

  12. The CoQH2/CoQ Ratio Serves as a Sensor of Respiratory Chain Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Guarás, Adela; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Calvo, Enrique; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Loureiro-Lopez, Marta; Pujol, Claire; Martínez-Carrascoso, Isabel; Nuñez, Estefanía; García-Marqués, Fernando; Rodríguez-Hernández, María Angeles; Cortés, Ana; Diaz, Francisca; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Moraes, Carlos T; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Navas, Plácido; Vazquez, Jesús; Enríquez, Jose A

    2016-04-01

    Electrons feed into the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) from NAD- or FAD-dependent enzymes. A shift from glucose to fatty acids increases electron flux through FAD, which can saturate the oxidation capacity of the dedicated coenzyme Q (CoQ) pool and result in the generation of reactive oxygen species. To prevent this, the mETC superstructure can be reconfigured through the degradation of respiratory complex I, liberating associated complex III to increase electron flux via FAD at the expense of NAD. Here, we demonstrate that this adaptation is driven by the ratio of reduced to oxidized CoQ. Saturation of CoQ oxidation capacity induces reverse electron transport from reduced CoQ to complex I, and the resulting local generation of superoxide oxidizes specific complex I proteins, triggering their degradation and the disintegration of the complex. Thus, CoQ redox status acts as a metabolic sensor that fine-tunes mETC configuration in order to match the prevailing substrate profile.

  13. Detection of Haemophilus influenzae in respiratory secretions from pneumonia patients by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Abdeldaim, Guma M K; Strålin, Kristoffer; Kirsebom, Leif A; Olcén, Per; Blomberg, Jonas; Herrmann, Björn

    2009-08-01

    A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the omp P6 gene was developed to detect Haemophilus influenzae. Its specificity was determined by analysis of 29 strains of 11 different Haemophilus spp. and was compared with PCR assays having other target genes: rnpB, 16S rRNA, and bexA. The method was evaluated on nasopharyngeal aspirates from 166 adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia. When 10(4) DNA copies/mL was used as cutoff limit for the method, P6 PCR had a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 96.0% compared with the culture. Of 20 culture-negative but P6 PCR-positive cases, 18 were confirmed by fucK PCR as H. influenzae. Five (5.9%) of 84 nasopharyngeal aspirates from adult controls tested PCR positive. We conclude that the P6 real-time PCR is both sensitive and specific for identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions. Quantification facilitates discrimination between disease-causing H. influenzae strains and commensal colonization. PMID:19446978

  14. Molecular characterization and mutational analysis of the human B17 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Smeitink, J; Loeffen, J; Smeets, R; Triepels, R; Ruitenbeek, W; Trijbels, F; van den Heuvel, L

    1998-08-01

    Bovine NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex 1) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain consists of about 36 nuclear-encoded subunits. We review the current knowledge of the 15 human complex I subunits cloned so far, and report the 598-bp cDNA sequence, the chromosomal localization and the tissue expression of an additional subunit, the B17 subunit. The cDNA open reading frame of B17 comprises 387 bp and encodes a protein of 128 amino acids (calculated Mr 15.5 kDa). There is 82.7% and 78.1% homology, respectively, at the cDNA and amino acid level with the bovine counterpart. The gene of the B17 subunit has been mapped to chromosome 2. Multiple-tissue dot-blots showed ubiquitous expression of the mRNA with relatively higher expression in tissues known for their high energy demand. Of these, kidney showed the highest expression. Mutational analysis of the subunit revealed no mutations or polymorphisms in 20 patients with isolated enzymatic complex I deficiency in cultured skin fibroblasts.

  15. [Peculiarities of the Structural-Functional State of the Cytochrome Part of Liver Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain under Conditions of Acetaminophen-induced Hepatitis against the Background of Alimentary Deprivation of Protein].

    PubMed

    Voloshchuk, O N; Kopylchuk, G P

    2015-01-01

    Activity of the key enzyme of the cytochrome part of the respiratory chain--cytochrome oxidase, quantitative redistribution of mitochondrial cytochromes b, c1, c and aa3, activity of the key enzymes of cytochromes' heme metabolism--delta-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase under conditions of acetaminophen-induced hepatitis against the background of alimentary deprivation of protein were studied. It was found out, that under conditions of acetaminophen-induced hepatitis against the background of alimentary deprivation of protein, an inhibition of cytochrome oxidase activity and a decrease in the quantitative content of mitochondrial cytochromes against the background of the increase in the delta-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase activity are observed. In animals with toxic liver injury, maintained under conditions of alimentary deprivation of protein, a progressive decrease in the quantitative content of mitochondrial cytochromes b, c1, c and aa3 against the background. of the increase in heme oxygenase activity and preservation of delta-aminolevulinate synthase activity on the control level is identified. The conclusion was made, that alimentary deprivation of protein is a critical factor for the development of the disturbances of structural-functional integrity of the cytochromic part of the respiratory chain. The identified changes may be considered as one of the possible mechanisms of energy biotransformation system disturbances under conditions of alimentary deprivation of protein.

  16. Purification of Active Respiratory Supercomplex from Bovine Heart Mitochondria Enables Functional Studies.

    PubMed

    Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Shimomura, Harunobu; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Shimada, Satoru; Takahashi, Ryoko; Oosaki, Marika; Ogura, Takashi; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2016-02-19

    To understand the roles of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes, methods for consistently separating and preparing supercomplexes must be established. To this end, we solubilized supercomplexes from bovine heart mitochondria with digitonin and then replaced digitonin with amphipol (A8-35), an amphiphilic polymer. Afterward, supercomplexes were separated from other complexes by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Twenty-six grams of bovine myocardium yielded 3.2 mg of amphipol-stabilized supercomplex. The purified supercomplexes were analyzed based on their absorption spectra as well as Q10 (ubiquinone with ten isoprene units) and lipid assays. The supercomplex sample did not contain cytochrome c but did contain complexes I, III, and IV at a ratio of 1:2:1, 6 molecules of Q10, and 623 atoms of phosphorus. When cytochrome c was added, the supercomplex exhibited KCN-sensitive NADH oxidation; thus, the purified supercomplex was active. Reduced complex IV absorbs at 444 nm, so we measured the resonance Raman spectrum of the reduced amphipol-solubilized supercomplex and the mixture of amphipol-solubilized complexes I1, III2, and IV1 using an excitation wavelength of 441.6 nm, allowing measurement precision comparable with that obtained for complex IV alone. Use of the purified active sample provides insights into the effects of supercomplex formation. PMID:26698328

  17. Purification of Active Respiratory Supercomplex from Bovine Heart Mitochondria Enables Functional Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Shimomura, Harunobu; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Shimada, Satoru; Takahashi, Ryoko; Oosaki, Marika; Ogura, Takashi; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2016-01-01

    To understand the roles of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes, methods for consistently separating and preparing supercomplexes must be established. To this end, we solubilized supercomplexes from bovine heart mitochondria with digitonin and then replaced digitonin with amphipol (A8–35), an amphiphilic polymer. Afterward, supercomplexes were separated from other complexes by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Twenty-six grams of bovine myocardium yielded 3.2 mg of amphipol-stabilized supercomplex. The purified supercomplexes were analyzed based on their absorption spectra as well as Q10 (ubiquinone with ten isoprene units) and lipid assays. The supercomplex sample did not contain cytochrome c but did contain complexes I, III, and IV at a ratio of 1:2:1, 6 molecules of Q10, and 623 atoms of phosphorus. When cytochrome c was added, the supercomplex exhibited KCN-sensitive NADH oxidation; thus, the purified supercomplex was active. Reduced complex IV absorbs at 444 nm, so we measured the resonance Raman spectrum of the reduced amphipol-solubilized supercomplex and the mixture of amphipol-solubilized complexes I1, III2, and IV1 using an excitation wavelength of 441.6 nm, allowing measurement precision comparable with that obtained for complex IV alone. Use of the purified active sample provides insights into the effects of supercomplex formation. PMID:26698328

  18. Redox-induced activation of the proton pump in the respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vivek; Belevich, Galina; Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P.; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Verkhovskaya, Marina L.; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R. I.

    2015-01-01

    Complex I functions as a redox-linked proton pump in the respiratory chains of mitochondria and bacteria, driven by the reduction of quinone (Q) by NADH. Remarkably, the distance between the Q reduction site and the most distant proton channels extends nearly 200 Å. To elucidate the molecular origin of this long-range coupling, we apply a combination of large-scale molecular simulations and a site-directed mutagenesis experiment of a key residue. In hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we observe that reduction of Q is coupled to its local protonation by the His-38/Asp-139 ion pair and Tyr-87 of subunit Nqo4. Atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations further suggest that formation of quinol (QH2) triggers rapid dissociation of the anionic Asp-139 toward the membrane domain that couples to conformational changes in a network of conserved charged residues. Site-directed mutagenesis data confirm the importance of Asp-139; upon mutation to asparagine the Q reductase activity is inhibited by 75%. The current results, together with earlier biochemical data, suggest that the proton pumping in complex I is activated by a unique combination of electrostatic and conformational transitions. PMID:26330610

  19. Electron transport chain inhibitors induce microglia activation through enhancing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Ye, Junli; Jiang, Zhongxin; Chen, Xuehong; Liu, Mengyang; Li, Jing; Liu, Na

    2016-01-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to be mediators of excessive microglial activation, yet the resources and mechanism are not fully understood. Here we stimulated murine microglial BV-2 cells and primary microglial cells with different inhibitors of electron transport chain (ETC), rotenone, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), antimycin A, and NaN3 to induce mitochondrial ROS production and we observed the role of mitochondrial ROS in microglial activation. Our results showed that ETC inhibitors resulted in significant changes in cell viability, microglial morphology, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial ROS production in a dose-dependent manner in both primary cultural microglia and BV-2 cell lines. Moreover, ETC inhibitors, especially rotenone and antimycin A stimulated secretion of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) by microglia with marked activation of mitogen-activated proteinkinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which could be blocked by specific inhibitors of MAPK and NF-κB and mitochondrial antioxidants, Mito-TEMPO. Taken together, our results demonstrated that inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain in microglia led to production of mitochondrial ROS and therefore may activate MAPK/NF-кB dependent inflammatory cytokines release in microglia, which indicated that mitochondrial-derived ROS were contributed to microglial activation.

  20. A novel mutation in the thiamine responsive megaloblastic anaemia gene SLC19A2 in a patient with deficiency of respiratory chain complex I

    PubMed Central

    Scharfe, C.; Hauschild, M.; Klopstock, T.; Janssen, A.; Heidemann, P.; Meitinger, T.; Jaksch, M.

    2000-01-01

    The thiamine transporter gene SLC19A2 was recently found to be mutated in thiamine responsive megaloblastic anaemia with diabetes and deafness (TRMA, Rogers syndrome), an early onset autosomal recessive disorder. We now report a novel G1074A transition mutation in exon 4 of the SLC19A2 gene, predicting a Trp358 to ter change, in a girl with consanguineous parents. In addition to the typical triad of Rogers syndrome, the girl presented with short stature, hepatosplenomegaly, retinal degeneration, and a brain MRI lesion. Both muscle and skin biopsies were obtained before high dose thiamine supplementation. While no mitochondrial abnormalities were seen on morphological examination of muscle, biochemical analysis showed a severe deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase and complex I of the respiratory chain. In the patient's fibroblasts, the supplementation with high doses of thiamine resulted in restoration of complex I activity. In conclusion, we provide evidence that thiamine deficiency affects complex I activity. The clinical features of TRMA, resembling in part those found in typical mitochondrial disorders with complex I deficiency, may be caused by a secondary defect in mitochondrial energy production.


Keywords: TRMA syndrome; SLC19A2 gene; complex I deficiency PMID:10978358

  1. Mitochondrial respiratory chain Complexes I and IV are impaired by β-amyloid via direct interaction and through Complex I-dependent ROS production, respectively.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Amadoro, G; Valenti, D; Corsetti, V; Lassandro, R; Atlante, A

    2013-07-01

    Here we investigate the effect of β-amyloid on mitochondrial respiratory function, i.e. mitochondrial oxygen consumption and membrane potential generation as well as the individual activities of both the mitochondrial Complexes I-IV, that compose mitochondrial electron transport chain, and the ATP synthase, by using homogenate from cerebellar granule cells, treated with low concentrations of β-amyloid, and Alzheimer synaptic-enriched brain samples. We found that β-amyloid caused both a selective defect in Complex I activity associated with an increase (5 fold) of intracellular reactive oxygen species and an impairment of Complex IV likely due to membrane lipid peroxidation. In addition, a 130% increase of the GSSG/GSH ratio was measured in Alzheimer brains with respect to age-matched controls. Knowing the mechanisms of action of β-amyloid could allow to mitigate or even to interrupt the toxic cascade that leads a cell to death. The results of this study represent an important innovation because they offer the possibility to act at mitochondrial level and on specific sites to protect cells, for example by preventing the interaction of β-amyloid with the identified targets, by stabilizing or by restoring mitochondrial function or by interfering with the energy metabolism. PMID:23562762

  2. Tamoxifen does not inhibit the swell activated chloride channel in human neutrophils during the respiratory burst

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-10-31

    Effective functioning of neutrophils relies upon electron translocation through the NADPH oxidase (NOX). The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential in activated human neutrophils. Swelling activated chloride channels have been demonstrated in part to counteract the depolarisation generated by the NADPH oxidase I{sub e}. In the present study, the effects of inhibitors of swell activated chloride channels on ROS production and on the swelling activated chloride conductance was investigated in activated human neutrophils. Tamoxifen (10 {mu}M), a specific inhibitor for swell activated chloride channels in neutrophils, completely inhibited both the PMA and FMLP stimulated respiratory burst. This inhibition of the neutrophil respiratory burst was not due to the blocking effect of tamoxifen on the swelling activated chloride conductance in these cells. These results demonstrate that a tamoxifen insensitive swell activated chloride channel has important significance during the neutrophil respiratory burst.

  3. Inability of tumour cells to elicit the respiratory burst in cytotoxic, activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, S M; Hill, H R

    1982-01-01

    Activated macrophages from Corynebacterium parvum-treated mice are cytotoxic to non-antibody-coated tumour cells and have an augmented respiratory burst potential when compared to resident macrophages. We have investigated the possible involvement of the respiratory burst as an effector mechanism in this type of tumour killing. Scavengers of toxic metabolites of oxygen such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate, ethanol, and cytochrome c did not inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity in this system. To investigate whether or not neoplastic cells stimulate the macrophage respiratory burst, we exposed activated macrophages to viable tumour cells and monitored macrophage superoxide anion production, chemiluminescence, and hexose monophosphate shunt activity. None of these indicators of the macrophage respiratory burst was stimulated by the tumour cells towards which the macrophages were cytotoxic. The data suggest that the macrophages burst is not utilized as an effector mechanism in the non-antibody-mediated macrophage tumour cytotoxicity reaction. PMID:6277777

  4. Antifungal chromans inhibiting the mitochondrial respiratory chain of pea seeds and new xanthones from Calophyllum caledonicum.

    PubMed

    Hay, A-E; Guilet, D; Morel, C; Larcher, G; Macherel, D; Le Ray, A-M; Litaudon, M; Richomme, P

    2003-12-01

    Two new xanthones, caledonixanthone M 1 and caloxanthone L 2, and one new acid, caledonic acid 6 were isolated from the hexane-soluble extract of the stem bark of Calophyllum caledonicum. In the course of this phytochemical study, seven other known compounds - calothwaitesixanthone, calozeyloxanthone, allanxanthone, isoapetalic acid 3, calolongic acid 4, apetalic acid 5 and isocalolongic acid 7 - were isolated. Their antifungal activity against the growth of the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus was then investigated. The results indicated that the crude extract, calolongic acid 4 and isocalolongic acid 7 exhibited strong inhibitory effects with MIC (80) values of 8, 4, 2 microg/mL, respectively. Besides, calolongic acid 4, its lactone derivative 4a and isocalolongic acid 7 markedly reduced the respiration of pea seed mitochondria.

  5. Access to a polymerase chain reaction assay method targeting 13 respiratory viruses can reduce antibiotics: a randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral respiratory infections are common worldwide and range from completely benign disease to life-threatening illness. Symptoms can be unspecific, and an etiologic diagnosis is rarely established because of a lack of suitable diagnostic tools. Improper use of antibiotics is common in this setting, which is detrimental in light of the development of bacterial resistance. It has been suggested that the use of diagnostic tests could reduce antibiotic prescription rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether access to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay panel for etiologic diagnosis of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) would have an impact on antibiotic prescription rate in primary care clinical settings. Methods Adult patients with symptoms of ARTI were prospectively included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed by using a multiplex real-time PCR method targeting thirteen viruses and two bacteria. Patients were recruited at 12 outpatient units from October 2006 through April 2009, and samples were collected on the day of inclusion (initial visit) and after 10 days (follow-up visit). Patients were randomised in an open-label treatment protocol to receive a rapid or delayed result (on the following day or after eight to twelve days). The primary outcome measure was the antibiotic prescription rate at the initial visit, and the secondary outcome was the total antibiotic prescription rate during the study period. Results A total sample of 447 patients was randomised. Forty-one were excluded, leaving 406 patients for analysis. In the group of patients randomised for a rapid result, 4.5% (9 of 202) of patients received antibiotics at the initial visit, compared to 12.3% (25 of 204) (P = 0.005) of patients in the delayed result group. At follow-up, there was no significant difference between the groups: 13.9% (28 of 202) in the rapid result group and 17.2% (35 of 204) in the delayed result group (P = 0

  6. EGFR activation suppresses respiratory virus-induced IRF1-dependent CXCL10 production.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, April; Ueki, Iris; Min-Oo, Gundula; Ballon-Landa, Eric; Knoff, David; Galen, Benjamin; Lanier, Lewis L; Nadel, Jay A; Koff, Jonathan L

    2014-07-15

    Airway epithelial cells are the primary cell type involved in respiratory viral infection. Upon infection, airway epithelium plays a critical role in host defense against viral infection by contributing to innate and adaptive immune responses. Influenza A virus, rhinovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) represent a broad range of human viral pathogens that cause viral pneumonia and induce exacerbations of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These respiratory viruses induce airway epithelial production of IL-8, which involves epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. EGFR activation involves an integrated signaling pathway that includes NADPH oxidase activation of metalloproteinase, and EGFR proligand release that activates EGFR. Because respiratory viruses have been shown to activate EGFR via this signaling pathway in airway epithelium, we investigated the effect of virus-induced EGFR activation on airway epithelial antiviral responses. CXCL10, a chemokine produced by airway epithelial cells in response to respiratory viral infection, contributes to the recruitment of lymphocytes to target and kill virus-infected cells. While respiratory viruses activate EGFR, the interaction between CXCL10 and EGFR signaling pathways is unclear, and the potential for EGFR signaling to suppress CXCL10 has not been explored. Here, we report that respiratory virus-induced EGFR activation suppresses CXCL10 production. We found that influenza virus-, rhinovirus-, and RSV-induced EGFR activation suppressed IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 1-dependent CXCL10 production. In addition, inhibition of EGFR during viral infection augmented IRF1 and CXCL10. These findings describe a novel mechanism that viruses use to suppress endogenous antiviral defenses, and provide potential targets for future therapies.

  7. [Respiratory activity of the lungs as a sign of exacerbation of a lung tuberculoma].

    PubMed

    Gudz, E A

    1989-01-01

    From the clinical and roentgenological data of 82 patients with tuberculoma (progressing 55, stationary 27) the roentgenopneumopolygraphic semiotics of regional and generalized ventilation disorders is derived. In a non-active tuberculoma lung tissue often shows a regional hyperfunction. In the progress of the tuberculous process the symptoms of "surrounding hypoventilation" near the tuberculoma is seen. After ulceration of the tuberculoma sub- and segmentary zones of reduced respiratory function appear together with biomechanic respiration disorder, indicated by reduced planimetric and amplimetric respiratory parameters. A complex evaluation of respiratory parameters can serve as an objective criterion for the early detection of a reactivation of lung tuberculosis.

  8. Roles of Oxa1-related inner membrane translocases in assembly of respiratory chain complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Fiumera, Heather L.; Dujardin, Geneviève; Fox, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Conclusions The wide phylogenetic distribution of Oxa1-related proteins appears to reflect both the central role of assembling energy-transducing membrane complexes, and the range of roles in their assembly that Oxa1-related protein scan be adapted to. In different species, Oxa1 and its isoforms appear to assist in the assembly of several different substrate proteins. Recent work on the bacterial protein YidC strongly indicates that it is capable of functioning alone as a translocase for hydrophilic domains and an insertase for TM domains. Thus it is highly likely that the eukaryotic members of this family found in mitochondria and chloroplasts directly catalyze these reactions in a co- and/or posttranslational way. It is presently unclear how Oxa1 recognizes its substrates and whether additional factors assist in this, beyond its direct interaction with mitochondrial ribosomes, demonstrated in S. cerevisiae. Given the apparent co-translational nature of in vivo Oxa1 dependent translocation of the Cox2 N-terminal domain, a detailed mechanistic study of this most criticalOxa1 function will need to await the development of a true in vitro translation system derived from the mitochondrial matrix and inner membrane. However, Oxa1is also capable of assisting post-translational insertion and translocation in isolated mitochondria and Cox18 may post-translationally translocate both in vivo and in vitro its only known substrate, the Cox2 C-terminal domain. Thus, biochemical analysis of some of these functions in proteoliposomes may already be possible, taking advantage of the wide variety of mutant forms of S. cerevisiae Oxa1, to examine distinct activities of the protein. It is clear that interpretation of all genetic and biochemical data on Oxa1 and Cox18 will be far more robust when the structure of both proteins in the membrane will be determined. PMID:18522806

  9. A closed-loop model of the respiratory system: focus on hypercapnia and active expiration.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Park, Choongseok; Ben-Tal, Alona; Smith, Jeffrey C; Rubin, Jonathan E; Rybak, Ilya A

    2014-01-01

    Breathing is a vital process providing the exchange of gases between the lungs and atmosphere. During quiet breathing, pumping air from the lungs is mostly performed by contraction of the diaphragm during inspiration, and muscle contraction during expiration does not play a significant role in ventilation. In contrast, during intense exercise or severe hypercapnia forced or active expiration occurs in which the abdominal "expiratory" muscles become actively involved in breathing. The mechanisms of this transition remain unknown. To study these mechanisms, we developed a computational model of the closed-loop respiratory system that describes the brainstem respiratory network controlling the pulmonary subsystem representing lung biomechanics and gas (O2 and CO2) exchange and transport. The lung subsystem provides two types of feedback to the neural subsystem: a mechanical one from pulmonary stretch receptors and a chemical one from central chemoreceptors. The neural component of the model simulates the respiratory network that includes several interacting respiratory neuron types within the Bötzinger and pre-Bötzinger complexes, as well as the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG) representing the central chemoreception module targeted by chemical feedback. The RTN/pFRG compartment contains an independent neural generator that is activated at an increased CO2 level and controls the abdominal motor output. The lung volume is controlled by two pumps, a major one driven by the diaphragm and an additional one activated by abdominal muscles and involved in active expiration. The model represents the first attempt to model the transition from quiet breathing to breathing with active expiration. The model suggests that the closed-loop respiratory control system switches to active expiration via a quantal acceleration of expiratory activity, when increases in breathing rate and phrenic amplitude no longer provide sufficient ventilation. The model

  10. BINDING OF THE RESPIRATORY CHAIN INHIBITOR ANTIMYCIN TO THE MITOCHONDRIAL bc1 COMPLEX: A NEW CRYSTAL STRUCTURE REVEALS AN ALTERED INTRAMOLECULAR HYDROGEN-BONDING PATTERN.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2006-01-01

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex. Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicylamide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28 Å resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the αA helix. PMID:16024040

  11. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  12. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia as an Index of Vagal Activity during Stress in Infants: Respiratory Influences and Their Control

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Thomas; Bosquet Enlow, Michelle; Schulz, Stefan M.; Kitts, Robert; Staudenmayer, John; Wright, Rosalind J.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is related to cardiac vagal outflow and the respiratory pattern. Prior infant studies have not systematically examined respiration rate and tidal volume influences on infant RSA or the extent to which infants' breathing is too fast to extract a valid RSA. We therefore monitored cardiac activity, respiration, and physical activity in 23 six-month old infants during a standardized laboratory stressor protocol. On average, 12.6% (range 0–58.2%) of analyzed breaths were too short for RSA extraction. Higher respiration rate was associated with lower RSA amplitude in most infants, and lower tidal volume was associated with lower RSA amplitude in some infants. RSA amplitude corrected for respiration rate and tidal volume influences showed theoretically expected strong reductions during stress, whereas performance of uncorrected RSA was less consistent. We conclude that stress-induced changes of peak-valley RSA and effects of variations in breathing patterns on RSA can be determined for a representative percentage of infant breaths. As expected, breathing substantially affects infant RSA and needs to be considered in studies of infant psychophysiology. PMID:23300753

  13. Mitochondrial genes for heme-dependent respiratory chain complexes are up-regulated after depletion of Wolbachia from filarial nematodes.

    PubMed

    Strübing, Uta; Lucius, Richard; Hoerauf, Achim; Pfarr, Kenneth M

    2010-08-15

    The filarial nematodes Brugia malayi, Wuchereria bancrofti and Onchocerca volvulus cause elephantiasis or dermatitis and blindness resulting in severe morbidity. Annually, 1.3 billion people are at risk of infection. Targeting the essential Wolbachia endobacteria of filarial nematodes with doxycycline has proven to be an effective therapy resulting in a block in embryogenesis, worm development and macrofilaricidal effects. However, doxycycline is contraindicated for a large portion of the at risk population. To identify new targets for anti-wolbachial therapy, understanding the molecular basis of the Wolbachia-filaria symbiosis is required. Using the B. malayi microarray we identified differentially expressed genes in the rodent filaria Litomosoides sigmodontis after depletion of Wolbachia which might have a role in symbiosis. The microarray data were filtered for regulated genes with a false discovery rate <5% and a > or = 2-fold-change. Most of the genes were differentially expressed at day 36 of tetracycline treatment, when 99.8% of Wolbachia were depleted. Several classes of genes were affected, including genes for translation, transcription, folding/sorting of proteins, motility, structure and metabolic and signalling pathways. Quantitative PCR validated 60% of the genes found to be regulated in the microarray. A nuclear encoded heme-binding protein of the globin family was up-regulated upon loss of Wolbachia. Interestingly, mitochondrial encoded subunits of respiratory chain complexes containing heme and riboflavin were also up-regulated. No change in the expression of these genes was seen in tetracycline treated Wolbachia-free Acanthocheilonema viteae. As Wolbachia synthesise heme and filaria do not, we hypothesise that without the endosymbionts no functional heme-containing enzymes can be formed, leading to loss of energy metabolism which then results in up-regulation of the mitochondrial encoded subunits in an attempt to correct the deviation from

  14. Hypoglossal Neuropathology and Respiratory Activity in Pompe Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Milapjit S.; Elmallah, Mai K.; Falk, Darin J.; Lane, Michael A.; Reier, Paul J.; Byrne, Barry J.; Fuller, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Pompe disease is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with systemic deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA). Respiratory-related problems in Pompe disease include hypoventilation and upper airway dysfunction. Although these problems have generally been attributed to muscular pathology, recent work has highlighted the potential role of central nervous system (CNS) neuropathology in Pompe motor deficiencies. We used a murine model of Pompe disease to test the hypothesis that systemic GAA deficiency is associated with hypoglossal (XII) motoneuron pathology and altered XII motor output during breathing. Brainstem tissue was harvested from adult Gaa−/− mice and the periodic acid Schiff method was used to examine neuronal glycogen accumulation. Semi-thin (2 μm) plastic sections showed widespread medullary neuropathology with extensive cytoplasmic glycogen accumulation in XII motoneuron soma. We next recorded efferent XII bursting in anesthetized and ventilated Gaa−/− and B6/129 mice both before and after bilateral vagotomy. The coefficient of variation of respiratory cycle duration was greater in Gaa−/− compared to B6/129 mice (p < 0.01). Vagotomy caused a robust increase in XII inspiratory burst amplitude in B6/129 mice (239 ± 44% baseline; p < 0.01) but had little impact on burst amplitude in Gaa−/− mice (130 ± 23% baseline; p > 0.05). We conclude that CNS GAA deficiency results in substantial glycogen accumulation in XII motoneuron cell bodies and altered XII motor output. Therapeutic strategies targeting the CNS may be required to fully correct respiratory-related deficits in Pompe disease. PMID:21747768

  15. Influence of sodium chloride on the regulation of Krebs cycle intermediates and enzymes of respiratory chain in mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Saha, Papiya; Kunda, Pranamita; Biswas, Asok K

    2012-11-01

    The effect of common salt (NaCl) on ion contents, Krebs cycle intermediates and its regulatory enzymes was investigated in growing mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek, B 105) seedlings. Sodium and chloride ion contents increased in both root and shoot whereas potassium ion content decreased in shoot of test seedlings with increasing concentrations of NaCl. Organic acids like pyruvate and citrate levels increased whereas malate level decreased under stress in both roots and shoots. Salt stress also variedly affected the activities of different enzymes of respiratory chain. The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.2.4.1) decreased in 50 mM NaCl but increased in 100 mM and 150 mM concentrations, in both root and shoot samples. Succinate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.3.5.1) activity was reduced in root whereas stimulated in shoot under increasing concentrations of salt. The activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.41) and malate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.37) decreased in both root and shoot samples under salt stress. On the contrary, pretreatment of mungbean seeds with sublethal dose of NaCl was able to overcome the adverse effects of stress imposed by NaCl to variable extents with significant alterations of all the tested parameters, resulting in better growth and efficient respiration in mungbean seedlings. Thus, plants can acclimate to lethal level of salinity by pretreatment of seeds with sublethal level of NaCl, which serves to improve their health and production under saline condition, but the sublethal concentration of NaCl should be carefully chosen.

  16. Mitochondrial free radical overproduction due to respiratory chain impairment in the brain of a mouse model of Rett syndrome: protective effect of CNF1.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Bianca; Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; De Rasmo, Domenico; Musto, Mattia; Fabbri, Alessia; Ricceri, Laura; Fiorentini, Carla; Laviola, Giovanni; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2015-06-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene associated with severe intellectual disability, movement disorders, and autistic-like behaviors. Its pathogenesis remains mostly not understood and no effective therapy is available. High circulating levels of oxidative stress markers in patients and the occurrence of oxidative brain damage in MeCP2-deficient mouse models suggest the involvement of oxidative stress in RTT pathogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism and the origin of the oxidative stress have not been elucidated. Here we demonstrate that a redox imbalance arises from aberrant mitochondrial functionality in the brain of MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, a condition that more closely recapitulates that of RTT patients. The marked increase in the rate of hydrogen peroxide generation in the brain of RTT mice seems mainly produced by the dysfunctional complex II of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In addition, both membrane potential generation and mitochondrial ATP synthesis are decreased in RTT mouse brains when succinate, the complex II respiratory substrate, is used as an energy source. Respiratory chain impairment is brain area specific, owing to a decrease in either cAMP-dependent phosphorylation or protein levels of specific complex subunits. Further, we investigated whether the treatment of RTT mice with the bacterial protein CNF1, previously reported to ameliorate the neurobehavioral phenotype and brain bioenergetic markers in an RTT mouse model, exerts specific effects on brain mitochondrial function and consequently on hydrogen peroxide production. In RTT brains treated with CNF1, we observed the reactivation of respiratory chain complexes, the rescue of mitochondrial functionality, and the prevention of brain hydrogen peroxide overproduction. These results provide definitive evidence of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species overproduction in RTT mouse brain and

  17. Mechanisms Underlying Adaptation of Respiratory Network Activity to Modulatory Stimuli in the Mouse Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Marc; De Sa, Rafaël; Cardoit, Laura; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Breathing is a rhythmic behavior that requires organized contractions of respiratory effector muscles. This behavior must adapt to constantly changing conditions in order to ensure homeostasis, proper body oxygenation, and CO2/pH regulation. Respiratory rhythmogenesis is controlled by neural networks located in the brainstem. One area considered to be essential for generating the inspiratory phase of the respiratory rhythm is the preBötzinger complex (preBötC). Rhythmogenesis emerges from this network through the interplay between the activation of intrinsic cellular properties (pacemaker properties) and intercellular synaptic connections. Respiratory activity continuously changes under the impact of numerous modulatory substances depending on organismal needs and environmental conditions. The preBötC network has been shown to become active during the last third of gestation. But only little is known regarding the modulation of inspiratory rhythmicity at embryonic stages and even less on a possible role of pacemaker neurons in this functional flexibility during the prenatal period. By combining electrophysiology and calcium imaging performed on embryonic brainstem slice preparations, we provide evidence showing that embryonic inspiratory pacemaker neurons are already intrinsically sensitive to neuromodulation and external conditions (i.e., temperature) affecting respiratory network activity, suggesting a potential role of pacemaker neurons in mediating rhythm adaptation to modulatory stimuli in the embryo. PMID:27239348

  18. Respiratory-related discharge pattern of sympathetic nerve activity in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed Central

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Trzebski, A

    1990-01-01

    1. Synchronization of spontaneous sympathetic discharge during the respiratory cycle was studied in the cervical and renal nerves of vagotomized, normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and age-matched spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Phrenic nerve discharge was used as an index of central inspiratory activity. 2. In normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats depression of sympathetic activity appeared at the onset of inspiration reaching a minimum at mid-inspiration. Peak maximal sympathetic discharge corresponded to postinspiratory phase; a second increase sometimes appeared in late expiration. Variations of respiratory frequency over wide range of experimental conditions by hypoxia, hyperoxia, hyper- or hypocapnia and transection of carotid sinus nerves did not affect this pattern. 3. In SHRs the respiratory-phase-related timing of sympathetic discharge was variable. In normoxia, the maximal sympathetic activity occurred in late inspiration, preceded by short depression at early inspiration and followed by postinspiratory depression. A second increase in sympathetic activity was observed in mid-expiration. 4. The pattern of respiratory phase modulated sympathetic activity in SHRs was altered by hypoxic stimulation of the peripheral chemoreceptors. The early inspiratory depression of sympathetic activity was substantially prolonged and the maximal sympathetic discharge was shifted from inspiration to early expiration. This effect was abolished after carotid sinus nerves had been cut. 5. Hypercapnic stimulation of central chemoreceptors in SHRs with carotid sinus nerves cut did not influence the timing of the sympathetic activity in relation to the respiratory phase, though the magnitude of rhythmical sympathetic discharges was increased. 6. We discuss the possibility that altered synchronization between central respiratory drive and sympathetic neuronal system may contribute to the neurogenic mechanisms of arterial hypertension in SHRs. PMID:2231403

  19. An evaluation of three new-generation tetrazolium salts for the measurement of respiratory activity in activated sludge microorganisms.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, C; Quinn, J P; McGrath, J W

    2005-04-01

    XTT (3'-[1-[(phenylamino)-carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium]-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzenesulfonic acid hydrate), MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt), and WST-1 (4-(3-4-iodophenyl)-2-(4-nitrophenyl)-2H-5-tetrazolio)-1,3-benzenedisulfonate) are tetrazolium salts that have become commercially available only in relatively recent years; they differ from earlier such compounds in that their reduction gives rise to a formazan product that is water soluble. We have established the sites in the prokaryotic respiratory chain at which each of the dyes is reduced to its corresponding formazan and have evaluated the suitability of each for the colorimetric estimation of electron transport system activity in populations of activated sludge microorganisms. Reduction of all three tetrazolium salts was shown to be proportional to cell biomass and oxygen uptake and to be susceptible to low levels of the reference toxicant 3,5-dichlorophenol. XTT, which was not inhibitory at concentrations of up to 2 mM and was reduced by 91% of isolates from a sample of culturable activated sludge bacteria, was chosen for further assay development. XTT-formazan production was found to be stimulated by the availability of an exogenous carbon and energy source, and by the presence of the electron-coupling agent phenazine methosulfate. Less than 3% of XTT reduction by an activated sludge sample was abiotic. An assay based on this compound could be a valuable and simple tool for the routine monitoring of the performance of wastewater treatment systems.

  20. Mitochondrial Respiration Chain Enzymatic Activities in the Human Brain: Methodological Implications for Tissue Sampling and Storage.

    PubMed

    Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Remor, Aline Pertile; Lopes, Mark William; Hohl, Alexandre; Troncoso, Iris H Z; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Boos, Gustavo Luchi; Kondageski, Charles; Nunes, Jean Costa; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Lin, Kátia; Latini, Alexandra Susana; Walz, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes enzymatic (MRCCE) activities were successfully evaluated in frozen brain samples. Epilepsy surgery offers an ethical opportunity to study human brain tissue surgically removed to treat drug resistant epilepsies. Epilepsy surgeries are done with hemodynamic and laboratory parameters to maintain physiology, but there are no studies analyzing the association among these parameters and MRCCE activities in the human brain tissue. We determined the intra-operative parameters independently associated with MRCCE activities in middle temporal neocortex (Cx), amygdala (AMY) and head of hippocampus (HIP) samples of patients (n = 23) who underwent temporal lobectomy using multiple linear regressions. MRCCE activities in Cx, AMY and HIP are differentially associated to trans-operative mean arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, hemoglobin, and anesthesia duration to time of tissue sampling. The time-course between the last seizure occurrence and tissue sampling as well as the sample storage to biochemical assessments were also associated with enzyme activities. Linear regression models including these variables explain 13-17 % of MRCCE activities and show a moderate to strong effect (r = 0.37-0.82). Intraoperative hemodynamic and laboratory parameters as well as the time from last seizure to tissue sampling and storage time are associated with MRCCE activities in human samples from the Cx, AMYG and HIP. Careful control of these parameters is required to minimize confounding biases in studies using human brain samples collected from elective neurosurgery. PMID:26586405

  1. Improved poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) production in Escherichia coli by inactivation of cytochrome bd-II oxidase or/and NDH-II dehydrogenase in low efficient respiratory chains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiaojie; Lin, Zhenquan; Zhang, Yan; Li, Yifan; Wang, Zhiwen; Chen, Tao

    2014-12-20

    In order to redirect more carbon flux from TCA cycle into poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) biosynthesis pathway via increasing respiratory efficiency, appB and ndh genes encoding cytochrome bd-II oxidase and NDH-II dehydrogenase were inactivated in Escherichia coli JM109/pBHR68. All appB or/and ndh knockout strains exhibited significantly increased PHB accumulation accompanying with increased NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio and intracellular acetyl-CoA pool. Among them, the Δndh strain could accumulate up to 6.16g/L PHB from 20g/L glucose and 3.5g/L PHB from 20g/L xylose, respectively, a 1.76-fold and 3.43-fold increase compared to the wild-type control. The PHB production of this strain reached 28.23g/L in a 5-L fermentor study, which was 2.70-fold as much as that of the wild-type control. These results indicated that inactivating the cytochrome bd-II oxidase or/and NDH-II dehydrogenase of the aerobic respiratory chain is a simple and effective strategy to improve PHB biosynthesis in E. coli. To date, this is the first time to improve PHB production by inactivation of cytochrome bd-II oxidase or/and NDH-II dehydrogenase in low efficient respiratory chains.

  2. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  3. Mutations in NDUFB11, Encoding a Complex I Component of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain, Cause Microphthalmia with Linear Skin Defects Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    van Rahden, Vanessa A.; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Alawi, Malik; Brand, Kristina; Fellmann, Florence; Horn, Denise; Zeviani, Massimo; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is an X-linked male-lethal disorder also known as MIDAS (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea). Additional clinical features include neurological and cardiac abnormalities. MLS syndrome is genetically heterogeneous given that heterozygous mutations in HCCS or COX7B have been identified in MLS-affected females. Both genes encode proteins involved in the structure and function of complexes III and IV, which form the terminal segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). However, not all individuals with MLS syndrome carry a mutation in either HCCS or COX7B. The majority of MLS-affected females have severe skewing of X chromosome inactivation, suggesting that mutations in HCCS, COX7B, and other as-yet-unidentified X-linked gene(s) cause selective loss of cells in which the mutated X chromosome is active. By applying whole-exome sequencing and filtering for X-chromosomal variants, we identified a de novo nonsense mutation in NDUFB11 (Xp11.23) in one female individual and a heterozygous 1-bp deletion in a second individual, her asymptomatic mother, and an affected aborted fetus of the subject’s mother. NDUFB11 encodes one of 30 poorly characterized supernumerary subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, known as complex I (cI), the first and largest enzyme of the MRC. By shRNA-mediated NDUFB11 knockdown in HeLa cells, we demonstrate that NDUFB11 is essential for cI assembly and activity as well as cell growth and survival. These results demonstrate that X-linked genetic defects leading to the complete inactivation of complex I, III, or IV underlie MLS syndrome. Our data reveal an unexpected role of cI dysfunction in a developmental phenotype, further underscoring the existence of a group of mitochondrial diseases associated with neurocutaneous manifestations. PMID:25772934

  4. Mutations in NDUFB11, encoding a complex I component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cause microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Rahden, Vanessa A; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Alawi, Malik; Brand, Kristina; Fellmann, Florence; Horn, Denise; Zeviani, Massimo; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is an X-linked male-lethal disorder also known as MIDAS (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea). Additional clinical features include neurological and cardiac abnormalities. MLS syndrome is genetically heterogeneous given that heterozygous mutations in HCCS or COX7B have been identified in MLS-affected females. Both genes encode proteins involved in the structure and function of complexes III and IV, which form the terminal segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). However, not all individuals with MLS syndrome carry a mutation in either HCCS or COX7B. The majority of MLS-affected females have severe skewing of X chromosome inactivation, suggesting that mutations in HCCS, COX7B, and other as-yet-unidentified X-linked gene(s) cause selective loss of cells in which the mutated X chromosome is active. By applying whole-exome sequencing and filtering for X-chromosomal variants, we identified a de novo nonsense mutation in NDUFB11 (Xp11.23) in one female individual and a heterozygous 1-bp deletion in a second individual, her asymptomatic mother, and an affected aborted fetus of the subject's mother. NDUFB11 encodes one of 30 poorly characterized supernumerary subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, known as complex I (cI), the first and largest enzyme of the MRC. By shRNA-mediated NDUFB11 knockdown in HeLa cells, we demonstrate that NDUFB11 is essential for cI assembly and activity as well as cell growth and survival. These results demonstrate that X-linked genetic defects leading to the complete inactivation of complex I, III, or IV underlie MLS syndrome. Our data reveal an unexpected role of cI dysfunction in a developmental phenotype, further underscoring the existence of a group of mitochondrial diseases associated with neurocutaneous manifestations.

  5. Mutations in NDUFB11, encoding a complex I component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cause microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Rahden, Vanessa A; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Alawi, Malik; Brand, Kristina; Fellmann, Florence; Horn, Denise; Zeviani, Massimo; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is an X-linked male-lethal disorder also known as MIDAS (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea). Additional clinical features include neurological and cardiac abnormalities. MLS syndrome is genetically heterogeneous given that heterozygous mutations in HCCS or COX7B have been identified in MLS-affected females. Both genes encode proteins involved in the structure and function of complexes III and IV, which form the terminal segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). However, not all individuals with MLS syndrome carry a mutation in either HCCS or COX7B. The majority of MLS-affected females have severe skewing of X chromosome inactivation, suggesting that mutations in HCCS, COX7B, and other as-yet-unidentified X-linked gene(s) cause selective loss of cells in which the mutated X chromosome is active. By applying whole-exome sequencing and filtering for X-chromosomal variants, we identified a de novo nonsense mutation in NDUFB11 (Xp11.23) in one female individual and a heterozygous 1-bp deletion in a second individual, her asymptomatic mother, and an affected aborted fetus of the subject's mother. NDUFB11 encodes one of 30 poorly characterized supernumerary subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, known as complex I (cI), the first and largest enzyme of the MRC. By shRNA-mediated NDUFB11 knockdown in HeLa cells, we demonstrate that NDUFB11 is essential for cI assembly and activity as well as cell growth and survival. These results demonstrate that X-linked genetic defects leading to the complete inactivation of complex I, III, or IV underlie MLS syndrome. Our data reveal an unexpected role of cI dysfunction in a developmental phenotype, further underscoring the existence of a group of mitochondrial diseases associated with neurocutaneous manifestations. PMID:25772934

  6. Inhibition of protein kinase G activity protects neonatal mouse respiratory network from hyperthermic and hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gary A B; López-Guerrero, Juan J; Dawson-Scully, Ken; Peña, Fernando; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2010-01-22

    In spite of considerable research attention focused on clarifying the mechanisms by which the mammalian respiratory rhythm is generated, little attention has been given to examining how this neuronal circuit can be protected from heat stress. Hyperthermia has a profound effect on neuronal circuits including the circuit that generates breathing in mammals. As temperature of the brainstem increases, respiratory frequency concomitantly rises. If temperature continues to increase respiratory arrest (apnea) and death can occur. Previous research has implicated protein kinase G (PKG) activity in regulating neuronal thermosensitivity of neuronal circuits in invertebrates. Here we examine if pharmacological manipulation of PKG activity in a brainstem slice preparation could alter the thermosensitivity of the fictive neonatal mouse respiratory rhythm. We report a striking effect following alteration of PKG activity in the brainstem such that slices treated with the PKG inhibitor KT5823 recovered fictive respiratory rhythm generation significantly faster than control slices and slices treated with a PKG activator (8-Br-cGMP). Furthermore, slices treated with 8-Br-cGMP arrested fictive respiration at a significantly lower temperature than all other treatment groups. In a separate set of experiments we examined if altered PKG activity could regulate the response of slices to hypoxia by altering the protective switch to fictive gasping. Slices treated with 8-Br-cGMP did not switch to the fictive gasp-like pattern following exposure to hypoxia whereas slices treated with KT5823 did display fictive gasping. We propose that PKG activity inversely regulates the amount of stress the neonatal mammalian respiratory rhythm can endure. PMID:19945442

  7. Impairment of Respiratory Chain under Nutrient Deficiency in Plants: Does it Play a Role in the Regulation of Iron and Sulfur Responsive Genes?

    PubMed Central

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Briat, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Plant production and plant product quality strongly depend on the availability of mineral nutrients. Among them, sulfur (S) and iron (Fe) play a central role, as they are needed for many proteins of the respiratory chain. Plant mitochondria play essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic functions as well as they have an important role in signaling processes into the cell. Here, by comparing several transcriptomic data sets from plants impaired in their respiratory function with the genes regulated under Fe or S deficiencies obtained from other data sets, nutrient-responsive genes potentially regulated by hypothetical mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway are evidenced. It leads us to hypothesize that plant mitochondria could be, therefore, required for regulating the expression of key genes involved both in Fe and S metabolisms. PMID:26779219

  8. Assembly of the mitochondrial membrane system. Cytoplasmic mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with lesions in enzymes of the respiratory chain and in the mitochondrial ATPase.

    PubMed

    Tzagoloff, A; Akai, A; Needleman, R B; Zulch, G

    1975-10-25

    Mutants of Saccharomyces cervisiae with defects in enzymes of the electron transfer chain and in the rutamycin-sensitive ATPase have been isolated. Some of the mutants are specifically affected in either cytochrome oxidase, coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase or ATPase. Other strains are deficient in both cytochrome oxidase and coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase but still have rutamycin-sensitive ATPase. All the mutants reported in this study fail to be complemented by a rho0 tester derived from a respiratory competent strain. The meiotic spore progeny obtained by mating the mutants to a respiratory competent haploid yeast, when scored for growth on glycerol, show a non-Mendelian segregation of the phenotype. These two genetic tests indicate the mutations to be cytoplasmically inherited. PMID:171256

  9. Recessive Mutations in TRMT10C Cause Defects in Mitochondrial RNA Processing and Multiple Respiratory Chain Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Metodiev, Metodi D; Thompson, Kyle; Alston, Charlotte L; Morris, Andrew A M; He, Langping; Assouline, Zarah; Rio, Marlène; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Pyle, Angela; Griffin, Helen; Siira, Stefan; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Munnich, Arnold; Chinnery, Patrick F; McFarland, Robert; Rötig, Agnès; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinically and genetically diverse, with mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear genes able to cause defects in mitochondrial gene expression. Recently, mutations in several genes encoding factors involved in mt-tRNA processing have been identified to cause mitochondrial disease. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified mutations in TRMT10C (encoding the mitochondrial RNase P protein 1 [MRPP1]) in two unrelated individuals who presented at birth with lactic acidosis, hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and deafness. Both individuals died at 5 months after respiratory failure. MRPP1, along with MRPP2 and MRPP3, form the mitochondrial ribonuclease P (mt-RNase P) complex that cleaves the 5' ends of mt-tRNAs from polycistronic precursor transcripts. Additionally, a stable complex of MRPP1 and MRPP2 has m(1)R9 methyltransferase activity, which methylates mt-tRNAs at position 9 and is vital for folding mt-tRNAs into their correct tertiary structures. Analyses of fibroblasts from affected individuals harboring TRMT10C missense variants revealed decreased protein levels of MRPP1 and an increase in mt-RNA precursors indicative of impaired mt-RNA processing and defective mitochondrial protein synthesis. The pathogenicity of the detected variants-compound heterozygous c.542G>T (p.Arg181Leu) and c.814A>G (p.Thr272Ala) changes in subject 1 and a homozygous c.542G>T (p.Arg181Leu) variant in subject 2-was validated by the functional rescue of mt-RNA processing and mitochondrial protein synthesis defects after lentiviral transduction of wild-type TRMT10C. Our study suggests that these variants affect MRPP1 protein stability and mt-tRNA processing without affecting m(1)R9 methyltransferase activity, identifying mutations in TRMT10C as a cause of mitochondrial disease and highlighting the importance of RNA processing for correct mitochondrial function.

  10. Brief report: respiratory syncytial virus activity--United States, 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    2006-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) (e.g., bronchiolitis and pneumonia) among young children in the United States. RSV also causes severe respiratory disease and a substantial number of deaths among older adults and persons with compromised respiratory, cardiac, or immune systems. RSV is transmitted person to person through close contact or inhalation of large droplets from a sneeze or cough; infection also can occur through contact with fomites (i.e., contaminated surfaces or objects). In temperate climates, peak RSV activity typically occurs during the winter. This report presents preliminary data on RSV activity reported to the National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) for the weeks ending July 8-November 18, 2006, indicating the onset of the 2006-2007 RSV season, and summarizes RSV trends during July 2005-June 2006. Health-care providers should consider RSV in the differential diagnosis for persons of all ages with LRTIs and implement appropriate isolation precautions to prevent nosocomial transmission from RSV-infected patients. Immune prophylaxis should be considered for certain infants and young children at high risk for complications from RSV infection (e.g., certain premature infants or infants and children with chronic lung and heart disease). PMID:17136023

  11. Brief report: respiratory syncytial virus activity--United States, 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    2006-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) (e.g., bronchiolitis and pneumonia) among young children in the United States. RSV also causes severe respiratory disease and a substantial number of deaths among older adults and persons with compromised respiratory, cardiac, or immune systems. RSV is transmitted person to person through close contact or inhalation of large droplets from a sneeze or cough; infection also can occur through contact with fomites (i.e., contaminated surfaces or objects). In temperate climates, peak RSV activity typically occurs during the winter. This report presents preliminary data on RSV activity reported to the National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) for the weeks ending July 8-November 18, 2006, indicating the onset of the 2006-2007 RSV season, and summarizes RSV trends during July 2005-June 2006. Health-care providers should consider RSV in the differential diagnosis for persons of all ages with LRTIs and implement appropriate isolation precautions to prevent nosocomial transmission from RSV-infected patients. Immune prophylaxis should be considered for certain infants and young children at high risk for complications from RSV infection (e.g., certain premature infants or infants and children with chronic lung and heart disease).

  12. Postnatal developmental changes in activation profiles of the respiratory neuronal network in the rat ventral medulla

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Yoshitaka; Masumiya, Haruko; Okada, Yasumasa

    2007-01-01

    Two putative respiratory rhythm generators (RRGs), the para-facial respiratory group (pFRG) and the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC), have been identified in the neonatal rodent brainstem. To elucidate their functional roles during the neonatal period, we evaluated developmental changes of these RRGs by optical imaging using a voltage-sensitive dye. Optical signals, recorded from the ventral medulla of brainstem–spinal cord preparations of neonatal (P0–P4) rats (n = 44), were analysed by a cross correlation method. With development during the first few postnatal days, the respiratory-related activity in the pFRG reduced and shifted from a preinspiratory (P0–P1) to an inspiratory (P2–P4) pattern, whereas preBötC activity remained unchanged. The μ-opioid agonist [d-Ala(2),N-Me-Phe(4),Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) augmented preinspiratory activity in the pFRG, while the μ-opioid antagonist naloxone induced changes in spatiotemporal activation profiles that closely mimicked the developmental changes. These results are consistent with the recently proposed hypothesis by Janczewski and Feldman that the pFRG is activated to compensate for the depression of the preBötC by perinatal opiate surge. We conclude that significant reorganization of the respiratory neuronal network, characterized by a reduction of preinspiratory activity in the pFRG, occurs at P1–P2 in rats. The changes in spatiotemporal activation profiles of the pFRG neurones may reflect changes in the mode of coupling of the two respiratory rhythm generators. PMID:17884928

  13. Endocrine disruptor activity of multiple environmental food chain contaminants.

    PubMed

    Wielogórska, E; Elliott, C T; Danaher, M; Connolly, L

    2015-02-01

    Industrial chemicals, antimicrobials, drugs and personal care products have been reported as global pollutants which enter the food chain. Some of them have also been classified as endocrine disruptors based on results of various studies employing a number of in vitro/vivo tests. The present study employed a mammalian reporter gene assay to assess the effects of known and emerging contaminants on estrogen nuclear receptor transactivation. Out of fifty-nine compounds assessed, estrogen receptor agonistic activity was observed for parabens( n = 3), UV filters (n = 6), phthalates (n = 4) and a metabolite, pyrethroids (n = 9) and their metabolites (n = 3). Two compounds were estrogen receptor antagonists while some of the agonists enhanced 17b-estradiol mediated response.This study reports five new compounds (pyrethroids and their metabolites) possessing estrogen agonist activity and highlights for the first time that pyrethroid metabolites are of particular concern showing much greater estrogenic activity than their parent compounds.

  14. Effects of forward head posture on forced vital capacity and respiratory muscles activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Jintae; Park, Soojin; Kim, Youngju; Choi, Yeonsung; Lyu, Hyeonnam

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of forward head posture on forced vital capacity and deep breathing. [Subjects] Twenty-six subjects, divided into the two groups (normal and forward head posture groups), participated in this study. [Methods] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were measured using respiratory function instrumentation that met the American Thoracic Society's recommendation for diagnostic spirometry. Accessory respiratory muscle activity during deep breathing was measured by electromyography. A Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the measure variables between the normal and forward head posture group. [Results] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were significantly lower in the forward head posture group than in the normal group. Accessory respiratory muscle activity was also lower in the forward head posture group than in the normal group. In particular, the sternocleidomastoid and pectoralis major activity of the forward head posture group was significantly lower than that of normal group. Activities of the other muscles were generally decreased with forward head posture, but were not significantly different between the two groups. [Conclusion] These results indicate that forward head posture could reduce vital capacity, possibly because of weakness or disharmony of the accessory respiratory muscles.

  15. Respiratory activity in the facial nucleus in an in vitro brainstem of tadpole, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed Central

    Liao G-S; Kubin, L; Galante, R J; Fishman, A P; Pack, A I

    1996-01-01

    1. In studies of the central neural control of breathing, little advantage has been taken of comparative approaches. We have developed an in vitro brainstem preparation using larval Rana catesbeiana which generates two rhythmic neural activities characteristic of lung and gill ventilation. Based on the pattern of the facial (VII) nerve activity both lung and gill rhythm-related respiratory cycles were divided into three distinct phases. The purpose of this study was to characterize and classify membrane potential trajectories of respiratory motoneurons in the VII nucleus at intermediate stages (XII-XVII) of development. 2. Seventy-five respiratory-modulated neurons were recorded intracellularly within the facial motor nucleus region. Their resting membrane potential was between -40 and -80 mV. Sixty of them were identified as VII motoneurons and fifteen were non-antidromically activated. Membrane potentials of fifty-six of the seventy-five neurons were modulated with both lung (5-27 mV) and gill rhythms (3-15 mV) and the remaining nineteen neurons had only a modulation with lung rhythmicity (6-23 mV). No cells with gill modulation alone were observed. 3. All of the cells modulated with lung rhythmicity had only phase-bound depolarizing or hyperpolarizing membrane potential swings which could be categorized into four distinct patterns. In contrast, of the fifty-six cells modulated with gill rhythmicity, thirty-two were phasically depolarized during distinct phases of the gill cycle (four patterns were distinguished), whereas the remaining twenty-four were phase spanning with two distinct patterns. The magnitudes of lung and gill modulations were proportionally related to each other in the cells modulated with both rhythms. 4. In all sixteen neurons studied, a reduction or a reversal of phasic inhibitory inputs during a portion of the lung or gill respiratory cycle was observed following a negative current or chloride ion (Cl-) injection. The phasic membrane

  16. Respiratory activity in the facial nucleus in an in vitro brainstem of tadpole, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Liao G-S; Kubin, L; Galante, R J; Fishman, A P; Pack, A I

    1996-04-15

    1. In studies of the central neural control of breathing, little advantage has been taken of comparative approaches. We have developed an in vitro brainstem preparation using larval Rana catesbeiana which generates two rhythmic neural activities characteristic of lung and gill ventilation. Based on the pattern of the facial (VII) nerve activity both lung and gill rhythm-related respiratory cycles were divided into three distinct phases. The purpose of this study was to characterize and classify membrane potential trajectories of respiratory motoneurons in the VII nucleus at intermediate stages (XII-XVII) of development. 2. Seventy-five respiratory-modulated neurons were recorded intracellularly within the facial motor nucleus region. Their resting membrane potential was between -40 and -80 mV. Sixty of them were identified as VII motoneurons and fifteen were non-antidromically activated. Membrane potentials of fifty-six of the seventy-five neurons were modulated with both lung (5-27 mV) and gill rhythms (3-15 mV) and the remaining nineteen neurons had only a modulation with lung rhythmicity (6-23 mV). No cells with gill modulation alone were observed. 3. All of the cells modulated with lung rhythmicity had only phase-bound depolarizing or hyperpolarizing membrane potential swings which could be categorized into four distinct patterns. In contrast, of the fifty-six cells modulated with gill rhythmicity, thirty-two were phasically depolarized during distinct phases of the gill cycle (four patterns were distinguished), whereas the remaining twenty-four were phase spanning with two distinct patterns. The magnitudes of lung and gill modulations were proportionally related to each other in the cells modulated with both rhythms. 4. In all sixteen neurons studied, a reduction or a reversal of phasic inhibitory inputs during a portion of the lung or gill respiratory cycle was observed following a negative current or chloride ion (Cl-) injection. The phasic membrane

  17. Medullary respiratory neural activity during hypoxia in NREM and REM sleep in the cat.

    PubMed

    Lovering, Andrew T; Fraigne, Jimmy J; Dunin-Barkowski, Witali L; Vidruk, Edward H; Orem, John M

    2006-02-01

    Intact unanesthetized cats hyperventilate in response to hypocapnic hypoxia in both wakefulness and sleep. This hyperventilation is caused by increases in diaphragmatic activity during inspiration and expiration. In this study, we recorded 120 medullary respiratory neurons during sleep in hypoxia. Our goal was to understand how these neurons change their activity to increase breathing efforts and frequency in response to hypoxia. We found that the response of medullary respiratory neurons to hypoxia was variable. While the activity of a small majority of inspiratory (58%) and expiratory (56%) neurons was increased in response to hypoxia, the activity of a small majority of preinspiratory (57%) neurons was decreased. Cells that were more active in hypoxia had discharge rates that averaged 183% (inspiratory decrementing), 154% (inspiratory augmenting), 155% (inspiratory), 230% (expiratory decrementing), 191% (expiratory augmenting), and 136% (expiratory) of the rates in normoxia. The response to hypoxia was similar in non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) and REM sleep. Additionally, changes in the profile of activity were observed in all cell types examined. These changes included advanced, prolonged, and abbreviated patterns of activity in response to hypoxia; for example, some inspiratory neurons prolonged their discharge into expiration during the postinspiratory period in hypoxia but not in normoxia. Although changes in activity of the inspiratory neurons could account for the increased breathing efforts and activity of the diaphragm observed during hypoxia, the mechanisms responsible for the change in respiratory rate were not revealed by our data.

  18. Synaptic origin of the respiratory-modulated activity of laryngeal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Ono, K; Shiba, K; Nakazawa, K; Shimoyama, I

    2006-07-01

    To determine the synaptic source of the respiratory-related activity of laryngeal motoneurons, spike-triggered averaging of the membrane potentials of laryngeal motoneurons was conducted using spikes of respiratory neurons located between the Bötzinger complex and the rostral ventral respiratory group as triggers in decerebrate, paralyzed cats. We identified one excitatory and two inhibitory sources for inspiratory laryngeal motoneurons, and two inhibitory sources for expiratory laryngeal motoneurons. In inspiratory laryngeal motoneurons, monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials were evoked by spikes of inspiratory neurons with augmenting firing patterns, and monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) were evoked by spikes of expiratory neurons with decrementing firing patterns and by spikes of inspiratory neurons with decrementing firing patterns. In expiratory laryngeal motoneurons, monosynaptic IPSPs were evoked by spikes of inspiratory neurons with decrementing firing patterns and by spikes of expiratory neurons with augmenting firing patterns. We conclude that various synaptic inputs from respiratory neurons contribute to shaping the respiratory-related trajectory of membrane potential of laryngeal motoneurons.

  19. Amyloidosis involving the respiratory system: 5-year's experience of a multi-disciplinary group's activity.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele; Maccari, Uberto; Madioni, Chiara; Venezia, Duccio; La Magra, Lidia Calogera

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis may involve the respiratory system with different clinical-radiological-functional patterns which are not always easy to be recognized. A good level of knowledge of the disease, an active integration of the pulmonologist within a multidisciplinary setting and a high level of clinical suspicion are necessary for an early diagnosis of respiratory amyloidosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the number and the patterns of amyloidosis involving the respiratory system. We searched the cases of amyloidosis among patients attending the multidisciplinary rare and diffuse lung disease outpatients' clinic of Pulmonology Unit of the Hospital of Arezzo from 2007 to 2012. Among the 298 patients evaluated during the study period, we identified three cases of amyloidosis with involvement of the respiratory system, associated or not with other extra-thoracic localizations, whose diagnosis was histo-pathologically confirmed after the pulmonologist, the radiologist, and the pathologist evaluation. Our experience of a multidisciplinary team confirms that intra-thoracic amyloidosis is an uncommon disorder, representing 1.0% of the cases of rare and diffuse lung diseases referred to our center. The diagnosis of the disease is not always easy and quick as the amyloidosis may involve different parts of the respiratory system (airways, pleura, parenchyma). It is therefore recommended to remind this orphan disease in the differential diagnosis of the wide clinical scenarios the pulmonologist may intercept in clinical practice.

  20. Effect of dietary administration of Porphyridium cruentum on the respiratory burst activity of sole, Solea senegalensis (Kaup), phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rosales, P; Chabrillón, M; Abdala, R T; Figueroa, F L; Balebona, M C; Moriñigo, M A

    2008-07-01

    The stimulatory effect of the red microalga Porphyridium cruentum on respiratory burst activity of sole phagocytes was evaluated in vivo. Oral administration of a diet supplemented with lyophilized P. cruentum cells (10 g kg(-1)) stimulated respiratory burst activity after 4 weeks feeding in sole vaccinated with Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida bacterin.

  1. [The change in the structural and functional organization of the Guerin's carcinoma cytochrome part of respiratory chain in tumor carriers in the conditions of preliminary low-level irradiation].

    PubMed

    Voloshchuk, O N; Marchenko, M M; Mudrak, M S

    2012-01-01

    The effect of low-level irradiation of tumor-bearing rats on the structural and functional organization of the cytochrome part of respiratory chain of mitochondria isolated from Guerin's carcinoma has been investigated. The maximal reduction in the mitochondrial cytochromes a, b and c content was observed at the terminal stage of Guerin's carcinoma. A low-level irradiation during initial stages of oncogenesis produced opposite changes in the mitochondrial cytochrome content. The possible mechanism of mitochondrial haem-containing cytochromes content reduction may be attributed to impairment in their formation caused by inhibition of the key enzyme of haem synthesis, 5-aminolevulinate synthase. The determined changes of the mitochondrial cytochromes quantitative content were accompanied by decreased activity of cytochrome oxidase. The preliminary low-level irradiation of the tumor-bearing animals produced further reduction in the cytochrome oxidase activity observed in all experimental periods.

  2. RAFT microemulsion polymerization with surface-active chain transfer agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hedok, Ibrahim Adnan

    The work described in this dissertation focuses on enhancing the polymer nanoparticle synthesis using RAFT (reversible-addition fragmentation chain transfer) in microemulsion polymerization in order to achieve predetermined molecular weight with narrow molecular weight polydispersity. The hypothesis is that the use of an amphiphilic chain transfer agent (surface-active CTA) will confine the CTA to the surface of the particle and thermodynamically favor partitioning of the CTA between micelles and particles throughout the polymerization. Thus, the CTA diffusion from micelles to polymer particles would be minimized and the breadth of the CTA per particle distribution would remain low. We report the successful improved synthesis of poly(butyl acrylate), poly(ethyl acrylate), and poly(styrene) nanoparticles using the RAFT microemulsion polymerization with surface-active CTA. The polymerization kinetics, polymer characteristics and latex size experimental data are presented. The data analysis indicates that the CTA remains partitioned between the micelles and particles by the end of the polymerization, as expected. We also report the synthesis of well-defined core/shell poly(styrene)/poly(butyl acrylate) nanoparticle, having polydispersity index value of 1.1, using semi-continuous microemulsion polymerization with the surface-active CTA. The surface-active CTA restricts the polymerization growth to the surface of the particle, which facilitates the formation of a shell block co-polymers with each subsequent second monomer addition instead of discrete homopolymers. This synthesis method can be used to create a wide range of core/shell polymer nanoparticles with well-defined morphology, given the right feeding conditions.

  3. Isolated respiratory chain enzyme deficiency in patients with a mitochondrial (encephalo-) myopathy: Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial complex and IV genes

    SciTech Connect

    Vries, D. de; Coo, I. de; Buddiger, P.

    1994-09-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain consists of four enzyme complexes. Deficiencies of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) are frequently found in muscle biopsies from patients with a mitochondrial (encephalo-)myopathy. Mutations in the mitochondrial-encoded subunits have been observed in a number of different mitochondrial (encephalo-)myophathies. We screened eight mitochondrial (encephalo-)myopathy patients with an isolated complex I deficiency for mutations in the ND genes by direct sequencing. No abnormality was detected. We also studied 9 mitochondrial (encephalo-)myopathy patients and an isolated complex IV deficiency. In the muscle biopsy of one patient a novel heteroplasmic mutation (T {r_arrow} C) at nucleotide position 6681 was found in the mitochondrial COX I gene. This mutation led to the substitution of a conserved Tyr for His. As this mutation changed the secondary structure of the protein and was not found in the healthy mother, we consider it likely that this mutation is pathological. In the other patients no abnormality was detected. Therefore, mutations in the mitochondrially-encoded subunits are not a frequent cause of isolated respiratory chain enzyme deficiency.

  4. Central effects of 5-HT on respiratory and hypoglossal activities in the adult cat.

    PubMed

    Rose, D; Khater-Boidin, J; Toussaint, P; Duron, B

    1995-07-01

    The activities of the diaphragmatic, internal intercostal and hypoglossal-innervated muscles were studied in adult decerebrate cats in response to 5-HT and related agents (8-OH-DPAT and DOI). The drugs were placed on the floor of the IVth ventricle. The mean respiratory frequency (Fi) increased (124-193% of the control value) within 3 min of the 5-HT application, and decreased thereafter (30-90%). The mean Ti and Te changed similarly, but opposite to Fi. With some delay, the hypoglossal-innervated muscles were tonically activated or exhibited increased activities. Methysergide pretreatment completely blocked the effect of 5-HT on all the respiratory parameters and the hypoglossal-innervated muscles activities. The responses to 8-OH-DPAT and DOI indicate that 5-HT modulates the respiratory frequency via activation of both 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 receptors. Nevertheless, the effect of 5-HT on both the expiratory and hypoglossal-innervated muscles seems to depend on 5-HT2 receptors activation only.

  5. Smart helmet: Monitoring brain, cardiac and respiratory activity.

    PubMed

    von Rosenberg, Wilhelm; Chanwimalueang, Theerasak; Goverdovsky, Valentin; Mandic, Danilo P

    2015-01-01

    The timing of the assessment of the injuries following a road-traffic accident involving motorcyclists is absolutely crucial, particularly in the events with head trauma. Standard apparatus for monitoring cardiac activity is usually attached to the limbs or the torso, while the brain function is routinely measured with a separate unit connected to the head-mounted sensors. In stark contrast to these, we propose an integrated system which incorporates the two functionalities inside an ordinary motorcycle helmet. Multiple fabric electrodes were mounted inside the helmet at positions featuring good contact with the skin at different sections of the head. The experimental results demonstrate that the R-peaks (and therefore the heart rate) can be reliably extracted from potentials measured with electrodes on the mastoids and the lower jaw, while the electrodes on the forehead enable the observation of neural signals. We conclude that various vital sings and brain activity can be readily recorded from the inside of a helmet in a comfortable and inconspicuous way, requiring only a negligible setup effort. PMID:26736636

  6. HCN channels contribute to serotonergic modulation of ventral surface chemosensitive neurons and respiratory activity

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Virginia E.; Hawryluk, Joanna M.; Takakura, Ana C.; Tzingounis, Anastasios V.; Moreira, Thiago S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemosensitive neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) provide a CO2/H+-dependent drive to breathe and function as an integration center for the respiratory network, including serotonergic raphe neurons. We recently showed that serotonergic modulation of RTN chemoreceptors involved inhibition of KCNQ channels and activation of an unknown inward current. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are the molecular correlate of the hyperpolarization-activated inward current (Ih) and have a high propensity for modulation by serotonin. To investigate whether HCN channels contribute to basal activity and serotonergic modulation of RTN chemoreceptors, we characterize resting activity and the effects of serotonin on RTN chemoreceptors in vitro and on respiratory activity of anesthetized rats in the presence or absence of blockers of KCNQ (XE991) and/or HCN (ZD7288, Cs+) channels. We found in vivo that bilateral RTN injections of ZD7288 increased respiratory activity and in vitro HCN channel blockade increased activity of RTN chemoreceptors under control conditions, but this was blunted by KCNQ channel inhibition. Furthermore, in vivo unilateral RTN injection of XE991 plus ZD7288 eliminated the serotonin response, and in vitro serotonin sensitivity was eliminated by application of XE991 and ZD7288 or SQ22536 (adenylate cyclase blocker). Serotonin-mediated activation of RTN chemoreceptors was blocked by a 5-HT7-receptor blocker and mimicked by a 5-HT7-receptor agonist. In addition, serotonin caused a depolarizing shift in the voltage-dependent activation of Ih. These results suggest that HCN channels contribute to resting chemoreceptor activity and that serotonin activates RTN chemoreceptors and breathing in part by a 5-HT7 receptor-dependent mechanism and downstream activation of Ih. PMID:25429115

  7. HCN channels contribute to serotonergic modulation of ventral surface chemosensitive neurons and respiratory activity.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Virginia E; Hawryluk, Joanna M; Takakura, Ana C; Tzingounis, Anastasios V; Moreira, Thiago S; Mulkey, Daniel K

    2015-02-15

    Chemosensitive neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) provide a CO2/H(+)-dependent drive to breathe and function as an integration center for the respiratory network, including serotonergic raphe neurons. We recently showed that serotonergic modulation of RTN chemoreceptors involved inhibition of KCNQ channels and activation of an unknown inward current. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are the molecular correlate of the hyperpolarization-activated inward current (Ih) and have a high propensity for modulation by serotonin. To investigate whether HCN channels contribute to basal activity and serotonergic modulation of RTN chemoreceptors, we characterize resting activity and the effects of serotonin on RTN chemoreceptors in vitro and on respiratory activity of anesthetized rats in the presence or absence of blockers of KCNQ (XE991) and/or HCN (ZD7288, Cs(+)) channels. We found in vivo that bilateral RTN injections of ZD7288 increased respiratory activity and in vitro HCN channel blockade increased activity of RTN chemoreceptors under control conditions, but this was blunted by KCNQ channel inhibition. Furthermore, in vivo unilateral RTN injection of XE991 plus ZD7288 eliminated the serotonin response, and in vitro serotonin sensitivity was eliminated by application of XE991 and ZD7288 or SQ22536 (adenylate cyclase blocker). Serotonin-mediated activation of RTN chemoreceptors was blocked by a 5-HT7-receptor blocker and mimicked by a 5-HT7-receptor agonist. In addition, serotonin caused a depolarizing shift in the voltage-dependent activation of Ih. These results suggest that HCN channels contribute to resting chemoreceptor activity and that serotonin activates RTN chemoreceptors and breathing in part by a 5-HT7 receptor-dependent mechanism and downstream activation of Ih.

  8. Effect of cardiopulmonary C fibre activation on the firing activity of ventral respiratory group neurones in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C G; Bonham, A C

    1997-01-01

    1. Cardiopulmonary C fibre receptor stimulation elicits apnoea and rapid shallow breathing, but the effects on the firing activity of central respiratory neurones are not well understood. This study examined the responses of ventral respiratory group neurones: decrementing expiratory (Edec), augmenting expiratory (Eaug), and inspiratory (I) neurones during cardiopulmonary C fibre receptor-evoked apnoea and rapid shallow breathing. 2. Extracellular neuronal activity, phrenic nerve activity and arterial pressure were recorded in urethane-anaesthetized rats. Cardiopulmonary C fibre receptors were stimulated by right atrial injections of phenylbiguanide. Neurones were tested for antidromic activation from the contra- and ipsilateral ventral respiratory group (VRG), spinal cord and cervical vagus nerve. 3. Edec neurones discharged tonically during cardiopulmonary C fibre-evoked apnoea and rapid shallow breathing, displaying increased burst durations, number of impulses per burst, and mean impulse frequencies. Edec neurones recovered either with the phrenic nerve activity (25 s) or much later (3 min). 4. By contrast, the firing activity of Eaug and most I neurones was decreased, featuring decreased burst durations and number of impulses per burst and increased interburst intervals. Eaug activity recovered in approximately 3 min and inspiratory activity in approximately 1 min. 5. The results indicate that cardiopulmonary C fibre receptor stimulation causes tonic firing of Edec neurones and decreases in Eaug and I neuronal activity coincident with apnoea or rapid shallow breathing. PMID:9365917

  9. Population calcium imaging of spontaneous respiratory and novel motor activity in the facial nucleus and ventral brainstem in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Persson, Karin; Rekling, Jens C

    2011-05-15

    The brainstem contains rhythm and pattern forming circuits, which drive cranial and spinal motor pools to produce respiratory and other motor patterns. Here we used calcium imaging combined with nerve recordings in newborn mice to reveal spontaneous population activity in the ventral brainstem and in the facial nucleus. In Fluo-8AM loaded brainstem-spinal cord preparations, respiratory activity on cervical nerves was synchronized with calcium signals at the ventrolateral brainstem surface. Individual ventrolateral neurons at the level of the parafacial respiratory group showed perfect or partial synchrony with respiratory nerve bursts. In brainstem-spinal cord preparations, cut at the level of the mid-facial nucleus, calcium signals were recorded in the dorsal, lateral and medial facial subnuclei during respiratory activity. Strong activity initiated in the dorsal subnucleus, followed by activity in lateral and medial subnuclei. Whole-cell recordings from facial motoneurons showed weak respiratory drives, and electrical field potential recordings confirmed respiratory drive to particularly the dorsal and lateral subnuclei. Putative facial premotoneurons showed respiratory-related calcium signals, and were predominantly located dorsomedial to the facial nucleus. A novel motor activity on facial, cervical and thoracic nerves was synchronized with calcium signals at the ventromedial brainstem extending from the level of the facial nucleus to the medulla–spinal cord border. Cervical dorsal root stimulation induced similar ventromedial activity. The medial facial subnucleus showed calcium signals synchronized with this novel motor activity on cervical nerves, and cervical dorsal root stimulation induced similar medial facial subnucleus activity. In conclusion, the dorsal and lateral facial subnuclei are strongly respiratory-modulated, and the brainstem contains a novel pattern forming circuit that drives the medial facial subnucleus and cervical motor pools.

  10. Longevity of U cells of differentiated yeast colonies grown on respiratory medium depends on active glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Čáp, Michal; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2015-01-01

    Colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains pass through specific developmental phases when growing on solid respiratory medium. During entry into the so-called alkali phase, in which ammonia signaling is initiated, 2 prominent cell types are formed within the colonies: U cells in upper colony regions, which have a longevity phenotype and activate the expression of a large number of metabolic genes, and L cells in lower regions, which die more quickly and exhibit a starvation phenotype. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of the activities of enzymes of central carbon metabolism in lysates of both cell types and determined several fermentation end products, showing that previously reported expression differences are reflected in the different enzymatic capabilities of each cell type. Hence, U cells, despite being grown on respiratory medium, behave as fermenting cells, whereas L cells rely on respiratory metabolism and possess active gluconeogenesis. Using a spectrum of different inhibitors, we showed that glycolysis is essential for the formation, and particularly, the survival of U cells. We also showed that β-1,3-glucans that are released from the cell walls of L cells are the most likely source of carbohydrates for U cells.

  11. Phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of haemocytes from the ivory snail, Babylonia areolata.

    PubMed

    Di, Guilan; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Ke, Caihuan

    2013-08-01

    Haemocytes from the ivory snail, Babylonia areolata phagocytized Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus after 30 min. Haemocytes phagocytized V. parahaemolyticus at a greater rate than they phagocytized S. cerevisiae. The phagocytic rate (PP) of V. parahaemolyticus by granulocytes to was a little higher than that of S. cerevisiae. The phagocytic index (PI) of V. parahaemolyticus by granulocytes was significantly higher than that of S. cerevisiae. The same was true of hyalinocytes. The PP of granulocytes was significantly higher than that of hyalinocytes for each pathogen. No difference in PI was observed in granulocytes and hyalinocytes. Two defense mechanisms of B. areolata were quantified using flow cytometry. Haemocyte phagocytosis was quantified using fluorescent microbeads and respiratory burst activity was measured using H2O2 increases detected by 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. Both phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of the haemocytes increased over time. After 90 min the phagocytic rate no longer increased. In the case of respiratory burst, the greatest increase in fluorescence occurred between 30 and 120 min, no further increase was seen after 120 min. These results showed unequivocally that a native (unstimulated) haemocyte oxidative burst was active in B. areolata. The aim of this study was to further the knowledge of immunology in gastropods.

  12. Absence of Detectable Influenza RNA Transmitted via Aerosol during Various Human Respiratory Activities – Experiments from Singapore and Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Benjamin J.; Koh, Gerald C.; Chu, Daniel; Heilbronn, Cherie; Lloyd, Belinda; Pantelic, Jovan; Nicolle, Andre D.; Klettner, Christian A.; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Sekhar, Chandra; Cheong, David K. W.; Tham, Kwok Wai; Koay, Evelyn S. C.; Tsui, Wendy; Kwong, Alfred; Chan, Kitty; Li, Yuguo

    2014-01-01

    Two independent studies by two separate research teams (from Hong Kong and Singapore) failed to detect any influenza RNA landing on, or inhaled by, a life-like, human manikin target, after exposure to naturally influenza-infected volunteers. For the Hong Kong experiments, 9 influenza-infected volunteers were recruited to breathe, talk/count and cough, from 0.1 m and 0.5 m distance, onto a mouth-breathing manikin. Aerosolised droplets exhaled from the volunteers and entering the manikin’s mouth were collected with PTFE filters and an aerosol sampler, in separate experiments. Virus detection was performed using an in-house influenza RNA reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. No influenza RNA was detected from any of the PTFE filters or air samples. For the Singapore experiments, 6 influenza-infected volunteers were asked to breathe (nasal/mouth breathing), talk (counting in English/second language), cough (from 1 m/0.1 m away) and laugh, onto a thermal, breathing manikin. The manikin’s face was swabbed at specific points (around both eyes, the nostrils and the mouth) before and after exposure to each of these respiratory activities, and was cleaned between each activity with medical grade alcohol swabs. Shadowgraph imaging was used to record the generation of these respiratory aerosols from the infected volunteers and their impact onto the target manikin. No influenza RNA was detected from any of these swabs with either team’s in-house diagnostic influenza assays. All the influenza-infected volunteers had diagnostic swabs taken at recruitment that confirmed influenza (A/H1, A/H3 or B) infection with high viral loads, ranging from 105-108 copies/mL (Hong Kong volunteers/assay) and 104–107 copies/mL influenza viral RNA (Singapore volunteers/assay). These findings suggest that influenza RNA may not be readily transmitted from naturally-infected human source to susceptible recipients via these natural respiratory activities, within these

  13. Absence of detectable influenza RNA transmitted via aerosol during various human respiratory activities--experiments from Singapore and Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Tang, Julian W; Gao, Caroline X; Cowling, Benjamin J; Koh, Gerald C; Chu, Daniel; Heilbronn, Cherie; Lloyd, Belinda; Pantelic, Jovan; Nicolle, Andre D; Klettner, Christian A; Peiris, J S Malik; Sekhar, Chandra; Cheong, David K W; Tham, Kwok Wai; Koay, Evelyn S C; Tsui, Wendy; Kwong, Alfred; Chan, Kitty; Li, Yuguo

    2014-01-01

    Two independent studies by two separate research teams (from Hong Kong and Singapore) failed to detect any influenza RNA landing on, or inhaled by, a life-like, human manikin target, after exposure to naturally influenza-infected volunteers. For the Hong Kong experiments, 9 influenza-infected volunteers were recruited to breathe, talk/count and cough, from 0.1 m and 0.5 m distance, onto a mouth-breathing manikin. Aerosolised droplets exhaled from the volunteers and entering the manikin's mouth were collected with PTFE filters and an aerosol sampler, in separate experiments. Virus detection was performed using an in-house influenza RNA reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. No influenza RNA was detected from any of the PTFE filters or air samples. For the Singapore experiments, 6 influenza-infected volunteers were asked to breathe (nasal/mouth breathing), talk (counting in English/second language), cough (from 1 m/0.1 m away) and laugh, onto a thermal, breathing manikin. The manikin's face was swabbed at specific points (around both eyes, the nostrils and the mouth) before and after exposure to each of these respiratory activities, and was cleaned between each activity with medical grade alcohol swabs. Shadowgraph imaging was used to record the generation of these respiratory aerosols from the infected volunteers and their impact onto the target manikin. No influenza RNA was detected from any of these swabs with either team's in-house diagnostic influenza assays. All the influenza-infected volunteers had diagnostic swabs taken at recruitment that confirmed influenza (A/H1, A/H3 or B) infection with high viral loads, ranging from 10(5)-10(8) copies/mL (Hong Kong volunteers/assay) and 10(4)-10(7) copies/mL influenza viral RNA (Singapore volunteers/assay). These findings suggest that influenza RNA may not be readily transmitted from naturally-infected human source to susceptible recipients via these natural respiratory activities, within these

  14. [Influence of different combination of mental activity and respiratory cycle on heart rate variability].

    PubMed

    Sun, F L; Li, D M; Li, G Y

    1996-03-01

    By means of spectral analysis of P-R interval, different characteristics of heart rate variability in different form of respiratory exercise was observed. The results of observation on 32 volunteers showed that mental activity that affected respiration can influence the function of autonomic nerve system in a different way. When the mind was concentrated at the inspiration, the function of autonomic nerve system was kept in balance, and both the sympathetic and the vagal activities enhanced significantly and while mind concentrated at the expiration could induce a reduction of vagal activity so as to produce marked change in the sympathovagal balance.

  15. Central respiratory effects on motor nerve activities after organophosphate exposure in a working heart brainstem preparation of the rat.

    PubMed

    Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Seeger, Thomas; Dutschmann, Mathias; Worek, Franz; Mörschel, Michael

    2011-09-25

    The impact of organophosphorus compound (OP) intoxication on the activity of central respiratory circuitry, causing acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition and accumulation of acetylcholine in the respiratory brainstem circuits, is not understood. We investigated the central effect of the OP Crotylsarin (CRS) on respiratory network activity using the working heart brainstem preparation, which specifically allows for the analysis of central drug effects without changes in brainstem oxygenation possibly caused by drug effects on peripheral cardio-respiratory activity. Respiratory network activity was determined from phrenic and hypoglossal or vagal nerve activities (PNA, HNA, VNA). To investigate combined central and peripheral CRS effects hypo-perfusion was used mimicking additional peripheral cardiovascular collapse. Systemic CRS application induced a brief central apnea and complete AChE-inhibition in the brainstem. Subsequently, respiration was characterised by highly significant reduced PNA minute activity, while HNA showed expiratory related extra bursting indicative for activation of un-specified oro-pharyngeal behaviour. During hypo-perfusion CRS induced significantly prolonged apnoea. In all experiments respiratory activity fully recovered after 1h. We conclude that CRS mediated AChE inhibition causes only transient central breathing disturbance. Apparently intrinsic brainstem mechanisms can compensate for cholinergic over activation. Nevertheless, combination of hypo-perfusion and CRS exposure evoke the characteristic breathing arrests associated with OP poisoning.

  16. Relation Between Prefrontal Cortex Activity and Respiratory Rate During Mental Stress Tasks: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuta; Hu, Lizhen; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    In order to clarify the central mechanism controlling respiratory rate during mental stress, we examined the relation between prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity and respiratory rate during mental arithmetic (MA) tasks. Employing two-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), we measured hemoglobin (Hb) concentration changes in the bilateral PFC during MA tasks in normal adults. To evaluate asymmetry of the PFC activity, we calculated the laterality index (LI); (R-L)/(R + L) of oxy-Hb concentration changes (R = right, L = left); positive LI scores indicate right-dominant activity, while negative scores indicate left-dominant activity. For measurements of respiratory rate, we employed a Kinect motion sensor (Microsoft). The MA tasks increased both oxy-Hb in the bilateral PFC and respiratory rate (p < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant correlation between LI and respiratory rate (r = 0.582, p < 0.02). These results indicate that the MA-induced activity in the right PFC was greater than that in the left PFC in subjects with large increases of respiratory rate, suggesting that the right PFC has a greater role in cerebral regulation of respiratory rate during mental stress. PMID:27526145

  17. Probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection and typing of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Eschbaumer, Michael; Li, Wansi (May); Wernike, Kerstin; Marshall, Frank; Czub, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has tremendous impact on the pork industry in North America. The molecular diagnosis of infection with PRRS virus (PRRSV) is hampered by its considerable strain diversity. In this study, 43 previously published or newly developed primers for probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were evaluated on their sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and repeatability, using a diverse panel of 36 PRRSV strains as well as other arteriviruses and unrelated porcine viruses. Three primer pairs had excellent diagnostic and analytical sensitivity on par with a probe-based reference assay, absolute specificity to virus genotype and species, as well as over 95% reproducibility and repeatability across a wide dynamic range. PMID:26130848

  18. Probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection and typing of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Canada.

    PubMed

    Eschbaumer, Michael; Li, Wansi May; Wernike, Kerstin; Marshall, Frank; Czub, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has tremendous impact on the pork industry in North America. The molecular diagnosis of infection with PRRS virus (PRRSV) is hampered by its considerable strain diversity. In this study, 43 previously published or newly developed primers for probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were evaluated on their sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and repeatability, using a diverse panel of 36 PRRSV strains as well as other arteriviruses and unrelated porcine viruses. Three primer pairs had excellent diagnostic and analytical sensitivity on par with a probe-based reference assay, absolute specificity to virus genotype and species, as well as over 95% reproducibility and repeatability across a wide dynamic range.

  19. Simultaneous detection of porcine circovirus type 2, classical swine fever virus, porcine parvovirus and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in pigs by multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yonghou; Shang, Hanwu; Xu, Hui; Zhu, Liangjun; Chen, Weijie; Zhao, Lingyan; Fang, Li

    2010-02-01

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was designed for the simultaneous detection of four viruses involved in reproductive and respiratory failure in pigs: porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV-2), porcine parvovirus (PPV), classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Each of the four pairs of oligonucleotide primers exclusively amplified the targeted fragment of the specific viruses. The sensitivity of the multiplex PCR using purified plasmid constructs containing the specific viral target fragments was 2.58x10(7), 2.64x10(5), 2.66x10(7) and 2.73x10(5) copies for PRRSV, PCV-2, CSFV and PPV, respectively. Using the multiplex PCR, co-infections with these four viruses were identified in 26/76 (34.2%) piglets born from sows with reproductive failure in China. This method is a rapid, sensitive and cost-effective diagnostic tool for the routine surveillance of viral infections in pigs.

  20. TRMT5 Mutations Cause a Defect in Post-transcriptional Modification of Mitochondrial tRNA Associated with Multiple Respiratory-Chain Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Christopher A.; Kopajtich, Robert; D’Souza, Aaron R.; Rorbach, Joanna; Kremer, Laura S.; Husain, Ralf A.; Dallabona, Cristina; Donnini, Claudia; Alston, Charlotte L.; Griffin, Helen; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Schottmann, Gudrun; Schuelke, Markus; Romain, Nadine; Haller, Ronald G.; Ferrero, Ileana; Haack, Tobias B.; Taylor, Robert W.; Prokisch, Holger; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Deficiencies in respiratory-chain complexes lead to a variety of clinical phenotypes resulting from inadequate energy production by the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system. Defective expression of mtDNA-encoded genes, caused by mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genome, represents a rapidly growing group of human disorders. By whole-exome sequencing, we identified two unrelated individuals carrying compound heterozygous variants in TRMT5 (tRNA methyltransferase 5). TRMT5 encodes a mitochondrial protein with strong homology to members of the class I-like methyltransferase superfamily. Both affected individuals presented with lactic acidosis and evidence of multiple mitochondrial respiratory-chain-complex deficiencies in skeletal muscle, although the clinical presentation of the two affected subjects was remarkably different; one presented in childhood with failure to thrive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and the other was an adult with a life-long history of exercise intolerance. Mutations in TRMT5 were associated with the hypomodification of a guanosine residue at position 37 (G37) of mitochondrial tRNA; this hypomodification was particularly prominent in skeletal muscle. Deficiency of the G37 modification was also detected in human cells subjected to TRMT5 RNAi. The pathogenicity of the detected variants was further confirmed in a heterologous yeast model and by the rescue of the molecular phenotype after re-expression of wild-type TRMT5 cDNA in cells derived from the affected individuals. Our study highlights the importance of post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs for faithful mitochondrial function. PMID:26189817

  1. Administration of CoQ10 analogue ameliorates dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, Katrina J; Nalbandian, Angèle; Gomez, Arianna; Wei, Don; Walker, Naomi; Kimonis, Virginia E

    2015-04-01

    Genetic defects in the UBE3A gene, which encodes for the imprinted E6-AP ubiquitin E3 ligase (UBE3A), is responsible for the occurrence of Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodegenerative disorder which arises in 1 out of every 12,000-20,000 births. Classical symptoms of AS include delayed development, impaired speech, and epileptic seizures with characteristic electroencephalography (EEG) readings. We have previously reported impaired mitochondrial structure and reduced complex III in the hippocampus and cerebellum in the Ube3a(m-/p+) mice. CoQ10 supplementation restores the electron flow to the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) to ultimately increase mitochondrial antioxidant capacity. A number of recent studies with CoQ10 analogues seem promising in providing therapeutic benefit to patients with a variety of disorders. CoQ10 therapy has been reported to be safe and relatively well-tolerated at doses as high as 3000mg/day in patients with disorders of CoQ10 biosynthesis and MRC disorders. Herein, we report administration of idebenone, a potent CoQ10 analogue, to the Ube3a(m-/p+) mouse model corrects motor coordination and anxiety levels, and also improves the expression of complexes III and IV in hippocampus CA1 and CA2 neurons and cerebellum in these Ube3a(m-/p+) mice. However, treatment with idebenone illustrated no beneficial effects in the reduction of oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to suggest an improvement in mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction via bioenergetics modulation with a CoQ10 analogue. These findings may further elucidate possible cellular and molecular mechanism(s) and ultimately a clinical therapeutic approach/benefit for patients with Angelman syndrome. PMID:25684537

  2. Preventing severe respiratory syncytial virus disease: passive, active immunisation and new antivirals.

    PubMed

    Murray, Joanna; Saxena, Sonia; Sharland, Mike

    2014-05-01

    In most high-income countries palivizumab prophylaxis is considered safe, efficacious and cost-effective for preventing respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospital admissions among specific subgroups of infants born preterm, with chronic lung disease or with congenital heart disease. Virtually all babies acquire RSV during infancy and previously healthy babies are not eligible to receive palivizumab. Emerging evidence suggests some benefit of palivizumab use in reducing recurrent wheeze among infants born preterm. Better longitudinal studies are needed to examine its clinical and cost-effectiveness on recurrent and chronic respiratory illness and associated healthcare burden on resources in the community and hospitals. Since 99% of child deaths attributed to RSV occur in resource poor countries where expensive prophylaxis is not available or affordable, palivizumab has limited potential to impact on the current global burden of RSV lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). A range of candidate vaccines for active immunisation against RSV are now in clinical trials. Two promising new antivirals are also currently in phase I/II trials to test their effectiveness in preventing severe RSV LRTI. These agents may be effective in preventing severe disease and phase III studies are in development. In the absence of effective active immunisation against RSV infection, population level approaches to prevent severe RSV LRTI should continue to focus on reducing prenatal and environmental risk factors including prematurity, smoking and improving hygiene practices. PMID:24464977

  3. Phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity in lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus L.) leucocytes analysed by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Haugland, Gyri T; Jakobsen, Ragnhild Aakre; Vestvik, Nils; Ulven, Kristian; Stokka, Lene; Wergeland, Heidrun I

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we have isolated leucocytes from peripheral blood, head kidney and spleen from lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus L.), and performed functional studies like phagocytosis and respiratory burst, as well as morphological and cytochemical analyses. Different leucocytes were identified, such as lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells with bean shaped or bilobed nuclei. In addition, cells with similar morphology as described for dendritic cells in trout were abundant among the isolated leucocytes. Flow cytometry was successfully used for measuring phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity. The phagocytic capacity and ability were very high, and cells with different morphology in all three leucocyte preparations phagocytised beads rapidly. Due to lack of available cell markers, the identity of the phagocytic cells could not be determined. The potent non-specific phagocytosis was in accordance with a high number of cells positive for myeloperoxidase, an enzyme involved in oxygen-dependent killing mechanism present in phagocytic cells. Further, high respiratory burst activity was present in the leucocytes samples, verifying a potent oxygen- dependent degradation. At present, the specific antibody immune response could not be measured, as immunoglobulin or B-cells have not yet been isolated. Therefore, analyses of the specific immune response in this fish species await further clarification. The present study presents the first analyses of lumpsucker immunity and also the first within the order Scopaeniformes.

  4. Phasic respiratory activity in the fetal lamb during late gestation and labour.

    PubMed

    Berger, P J; Walker, A M; Horne, R; Brodecky, V; Wilkinson, M H; Wilson, F; Maloney, J E

    1986-07-01

    We quantified the respiratory activity of 9 fetal lambs using computer-analysis of the diaphragmatic electromyogram (EMG) obtained during 2 h recording sessions interspersed over the last 13 days of gestation. The fetuses delivered unassisted at an average gestational age of 145 days (term = 147 days). During the last 2 h of labour the number of phasic EMG bursts (breaths) averaged 3% of the peak recorded earlier in the study. This decline in breathing began at least 2 days before labour and resulted predominantly from the fetus spending an increasing proportion of time in apnoea. Respiratory rate within epochs of breathing also fell significantly 1 day before labour, and the proportion of time spent in the low voltage electrocortical state declined once labour commenced. No significant change occurred in arterial PO2, PCO2 or pH over the study period. We conclude that fetal respiratory activity falls well before the onset of labour, largely as a result of increased apnoea, and that the decline does not result from the development of a progressive hypoxaemia associated with labour.

  5. Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and Inspiratory Muscle Training.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Folsom, Ian A; Gaz, Dan V; Kakuk, Alynn C; Mack, Jessica L; Ver Mulm, Jacyln A

    2015-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) strengthens the muscles of respiration, improves breathing efficiency, and increases fitness. The IMT is generally performed independently of aerobic exercise; however, it is not clear whether there is added benefit of performing the IMT while simultaneously performing aerobic exercise in terms of activating and strengthening inspiratory muscles. The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of IMT on respiratory muscle electromyography (EMG) activity during stationary cycling in the upright and drops postures as compared with that when the IMT was performed alone. Diaphragm and sternocleidomastoid EMG activity was measured under different resting and cycling postures, with and without the use of the IMT at 40% maximal inspiratory pressure (n = 10; mean age 37). Cycling in an upright posture while simultaneously performing the IMT resulted in a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than while performing the IMT at rest in upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Cycling in drops postures while performing the IMT had a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than when performing the IMT at rest in either upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Sternocleidomastoid muscle activity increased with both cycling and IMT, although posture had little effect. These results support our hypothesis in that the IMT while cycling increases respiratory EMG activity to a significantly greater extent than when performing the IMT solely at rest, suggesting that the combination of IMT and cycling may provide an additive training effect. PMID:26584054

  6. Respiratory processes in non-photosynthetic plastids

    PubMed Central

    Renato, Marta; Boronat, Albert; Azcón-Bieto, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Chlororespiration is a respiratory process located in chloroplast thylakoids which consists in an electron transport chain from NAD(P)H to oxygen. This respiratory chain involves the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex, the plastoquinone pool and the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX), and it probably acts as a safety valve to prevent the over-reduction of the photosynthetic machinery in stress conditions. The existence of a similar respiratory activity in non-photosynthetic plastids has been less studied. Recently, it has been reported that tomato fruit chromoplasts present an oxygen consumption activity linked to ATP synthesis. Etioplasts and amyloplasts contain several electron carriers and some subunits of the ATP synthase, so they could harbor a similar respiratory process. This review provides an update on the study about respiratory processes in chromoplasts, identifying the major gaps that need to be addressed in future research. It also reviews the proteomic data of etioplasts and amyloplasts, which suggest the presence of a respiratory electron transport chain in these plastids. PMID:26236317

  7. Respiratory processes in non-photosynthetic plastids.

    PubMed

    Renato, Marta; Boronat, Albert; Azcón-Bieto, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Chlororespiration is a respiratory process located in chloroplast thylakoids which consists in an electron transport chain from NAD(P)H to oxygen. This respiratory chain involves the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex, the plastoquinone pool and the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX), and it probably acts as a safety valve to prevent the over-reduction of the photosynthetic machinery in stress conditions. The existence of a similar respiratory activity in non-photosynthetic plastids has been less studied. Recently, it has been reported that tomato fruit chromoplasts present an oxygen consumption activity linked to ATP synthesis. Etioplasts and amyloplasts contain several electron carriers and some subunits of the ATP synthase, so they could harbor a similar respiratory process. This review provides an update on the study about respiratory processes in chromoplasts, identifying the major gaps that need to be addressed in future research. It also reviews the proteomic data of etioplasts and amyloplasts, which suggest the presence of a respiratory electron transport chain in these plastids.

  8. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  9. Complement activation during OKT3 treatment: a possible explanation for respiratory side effects.

    PubMed

    Raasveld, M H; Bemelman, F J; Schellekens, P T; van Diepen, F N; van Dongen, A; van Royen, E A; Hack, C E; ten Berge, I J

    1993-05-01

    Respiratory side effects that sometimes occur during treatment with anti-CD3 MAb OKT3 might result from pulmonary sequestration of activated neutrophils. Therefore, we studied complement activation in relation to activation and pulmonary sequestration of neutrophils during antirejection treatment with OKT3. In each of nine patients studied, plasma C3a-desarg and C4b/c levels increased compared with pretreatment values already in the first sample taken 15 minutes after the first dose of OKT3 (P < 0.05), with peak values at 15 and 30 minutes, respectively. Levels of neutrophil degranulation product elastase (complexed to alpha 1-antitrypsin) also increased already at 15 minutes after the first dose of OKT3 (P < 0.05), which is before elevated levels of the cytokines TNF alpha, IL-6 or IL-8 were detectable. In contrast, upon subsequent OKT3 administrations or in the control group treated with methylprednisolone, neither complement activation, cytokine release nor neutrophil degranulation occurred. In five studied patients treated with OKT3, pulmonary sequestration of radiolabeled granulocytes was observed from 3 until 15 minutes after the first dose of OKT3, together with peripheral blood granulocytopenia, which lasted at least 30 minutes. In conclusion, we demonstrate a simultaneous activation of complement and pulmonary sequestration of activated granulocytes immediately following the first dose of OKT3. These phenomena may be involved in the development of respiratory side effects complicating this therapy.

  10. Cardio-respiratory and daily activity monitor based on FMCW Doppler radar embedded in a wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Postolache, Octavian; Girão, Pedro Silva; Postolache, Gabriela; Gabriel, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Unobtrusive monitoring of the cardio-respiratory and daily activity for wheelchair users became nowadays an important challenge, considering population aging phenomena and the increasing of the elderly with chronic diseases that affect their motion capabilities. This work reports the utilization of FMCW (frequency modulated continuous wave) Doppler radar sensors embedded in a manual wheelchair to measure the cardiac and respiratory activities and the physical activity of the wheelchair user. Another radar sensor is included in the system in order to quantify the motor activity through the wheelchair traveled distance, when the user performs the manual operation of the wheelchair. A conditioning circuit including active filters and a microcontroller based primary processing module was designed and implemented to deliver the information through Bluetooth communication protocol to an Android OS tablet computer. The main capabilities of the software developed using Android SDK and Java were the signal processing of Doppler radar measurement channel signals, graphical user interface, data storage and Wi-Fi data synchronization with remote physiological and physical activity database. PMID:22254706

  11. Radon decay products in realistic living rooms and their activity distributions in human respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Mohery, M; Abdallah, A M; Baz, S S; Al-Amoudi, Z M

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the individual activity concentrations of attached short-lived radon decay products ((218)Po, (214)Pb and (214)Po) in aerosol particles were measured in ten poorly ventilated realistic living rooms. Using standard methodologies, the samples were collected using a filter holder technique connected with alpha-spectrometric. The mean value of air activity concentration of these radionuclides was found to be 5.3±0.8, 4.5±0.5 and 3.9±0.4 Bq m(-3), respectively. Based on the physical properties of the attached decay products and physiological parameters of light work activity for an adult human male recommended by ICRP 66 and considering the parameters of activity size distribution (AMD = 0.25 μm and σ(g) = 2.5) given by NRC, the total and regional deposition fractions in each airway generation could be evaluated. Moreover, the total and regional equivalent doses in the human respiratory tract could be estimated. In addition, the surface activity distribution per generation is calculated for the bronchial region (BB) and the bronchiolar region (bb) of the respiratory system. The maximum values of these activities were found in the upper bronchial airway generations.

  12. Cardio-respiratory and daily activity monitor based on FMCW Doppler radar embedded in a wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Postolache, Octavian; Girão, Pedro Silva; Postolache, Gabriela; Gabriel, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Unobtrusive monitoring of the cardio-respiratory and daily activity for wheelchair users became nowadays an important challenge, considering population aging phenomena and the increasing of the elderly with chronic diseases that affect their motion capabilities. This work reports the utilization of FMCW (frequency modulated continuous wave) Doppler radar sensors embedded in a manual wheelchair to measure the cardiac and respiratory activities and the physical activity of the wheelchair user. Another radar sensor is included in the system in order to quantify the motor activity through the wheelchair traveled distance, when the user performs the manual operation of the wheelchair. A conditioning circuit including active filters and a microcontroller based primary processing module was designed and implemented to deliver the information through Bluetooth communication protocol to an Android OS tablet computer. The main capabilities of the software developed using Android SDK and Java were the signal processing of Doppler radar measurement channel signals, graphical user interface, data storage and Wi-Fi data synchronization with remote physiological and physical activity database.

  13. Genetic variability of respiratory complex abundance, organization, and activity in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Kari J.; Walter, Nicole A.R.; Denmark, Deaunne L.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in the etiology and pathogenesis of numerous human disorders involving tissues with high energy demand. Murine models are widely used to elucidate genetic determinants of phenotypes relevant to human disease, with recent studies of C57BL/6J (B6), DBA/2J (D2) and B6xD2 populations implicating naturally occurring genetic variation in mitochondrial function/dysfunction. Using blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblots, and in-gel activity analyses of complexes I, II, IV and V, our studies are the first to assess abundance, organization, and catalytic activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes and supercomplexes in mouse brain. Remarkable strain differences in supercomplex assembly and associated activity are evident, without differences in individual complexes I, II, III, or IV. Supercomplexes I1III2IV2-3 exhibit robust complex III immunoreactivity and complex I and IV activities in D2, but with little detected in B6 for I1III2IV2, and I1III2IV3 is not detected in B6. I1III2IV1 and I1III2 are abundant and catalytically active in both strains, but significantly more so in B6. Furthermore, while supercomplex III2IV1 is abundant in D2, none is detected in B6. In aggregate, these results indicate a shift toward more highly assembled supercomplexes in D2. Respiratory supercomplexes are thought to increase electron flow efficiency and individual complex stability, and to reduce electron leak and generation of reactive oxygen species. Our results provide a framework to begin assessing the role of respiratory complex suprastructure in genetic vulnerability and treatment for a wide variety of mitochondrial-related disorders. PMID:24164700

  14. Time well spent? Assessing nursing-supply chain activities.

    PubMed

    Ferenc, Jeff

    2010-02-01

    The amount of time nurses spend providing direct patient care seems to be continually eroding. So it's little wonder a survey conducted last year of critical care, OR nurses and nurse executives found that half of the 1600 respondents feel they spend too much time on supply chain duties. Most also said their supply chain duties impact patient safe ty and their ability to provide bedside care. Experts interviewed for this report believe it's time for supply chain leaders and nurses to develop a closer working partnership. Included are their recommendations to improve performance.

  15. Postural- and respiratory-related activities of abdominal muscles during post-exercise hyperventilation.

    PubMed

    David, Pascal; Terrien, Jérémy; Petitjean, Michel

    2015-05-01

    The present study focuses on the role of superficial abdominal muscles revealed by electromyographic recordings during the maintenance of a bipedal stance perturbed by post-exercise hyperventilation. Twelve healthy subjects performed six 30-s postural tests: one pre-exercise test while breathing quietly, then one test every minute for the 5 min immediately following a maximum-intensity, incremental cycling exercise test. Displacement of the centre of pressure in the sagittal plane was monitored over time. Myoelectric activities of the obliquus externus (OE), obliquus internus (OI) and rectus abdominis (RA) muscles were recorded by surface electromyography (EMG). Metabolic parameters were measured with a portable telemetric device. The change in ventilatory drive induced by exercise was accompanied by a significant increase in both postural sway parameters and EMG activities. For OE and OI, the increased EMG activities were prominent during expiration, whereas OI was silent during inspiration. OE and RA were activated during both expiration and inspiration. It is concluded that the compensation of respiratory disturbances of the erect posture appears to be less effective when minute ventilation increases. The patterns of muscle activity suggest that abdominal muscles are controlled differentially and that their functional coordination is dependent on the respiratory demand.

  16. Inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus replication and virus-induced p38 kinase activity by berberine.

    PubMed

    Shin, Han-Bo; Choi, Myung-Soo; Yi, Chae-Min; Lee, Jun; Kim, Nam-Jung; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe lower respiratory tract infection and poses a major public health threat worldwide. No effective vaccines or therapeutics are currently available; berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid from various medicinal plants, has been shown to exert antiviral and several other biological effects. Recent studies have shown that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity is implicated in infection by and replication of viruses such as RSV and the influenza virus. Because berberine has previously been implicated in modulating the activity of p38 MAPK, its effects on RSV infection and RSV-mediated p38 MAPK activation were examined. Replication of RSV in epithelial cells was significantly reduced by treatment with berberine. Berberine treatment caused decrease in viral protein and mRNA syntheses. Similar to previously reported findings, RSV infection caused phosphorylation of p38 MAPK at a very early time point of infection, and phosphorylation was dramatically reduced by berberine treatment. In addition, production of interleukin-6 mRNA upon RSV infection was significantly suppressed by treatment with berberine, suggesting the anti-inflammatory role of berberine during RSV infection. Taken together, we showed that berberine, a natural compound already proven to be safe for human consumption, suppresses the replication of RSV. In addition, the current study suggests that inhibition of RSV-mediated early p38 MAPK activation, which has been implicated as an early step in viral infection, as a potential molecular mechanism.

  17. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus envelope protein ion channel activity promotes virus fitness and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L; DeDiego, Marta L; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  18. Global alliance against chronic respiratory diseases in Italy (GARD-Italy): strategy and activities.

    PubMed

    Laurendi, Giovanna; Mele, Sonia; Centanni, Stefano; Donner, Claudio F; Falcone, Franco; Frateiacci, Sandra; Lazzeri, Marta; Mangiacavallo, Antonino; Indinnimeo, Luciana; Viegi, Giovanni; Pisanti, Paola; Filippetti, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The steady increase in incidence of chronic respiratory disease (CRD) now constitutes a serious public health problem. CRDs are often underdiagnosed and many patients are not diagnosed until the CRD is too severe to prevent normal daily activities. The prevention of CRDs and reducing their social and individual impacts means modifying environmental and social factors and improving diagnosis and treatment. Prevention of risk factors (tobacco smoke, allergens, occupational agents, indoor/outdoor air pollution) will significantly impact on morbidity and mortality. The Italian Ministry of Health (MoH) has made respiratory disease prevention a top priority and is implementing a comprehensive strategy with policies against tobacco smoking, indoor/outdoor pollution, obesity, and communicable diseases. Presently these actions are not well coordinated. The Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD), set up by the World Health Organization, envisages national bodies; the GARD initiative in Italy, launched 11/6/2009, represents a great opportunity for the MoH. Its main objective is to promote the development of a coordinated CRD program in Italy. Effective prevention implies setting up a health policy with the support of healthcare professionals and citizen associations at national, regional, and district levels. What is required is a true inter-institutional synergy: respiratory diseases prevention cannot and should not be the responsibility of doctors alone, but must involve politicians/policymakers, as well as the media, local institutions, and schools, etc. GARD could be a significant experience and a great opportunity for Italy to share the GARD vision of a world where all people can breathe freely.

  19. Cardio-respiratory effects of systemic neurotensin injection are mediated through activation of neurotensin NTS₁ receptors.

    PubMed

    Kaczyńska, Katarzyna; Szereda-Przestaszewska, Małgorzata

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of our study was to determine the cardio-respiratory pattern exerted by the systemic injection of neurotensin, contribution of neurotensin NTS(1) receptors and the neural pathways mediating the responses. The effects of an intravenous injection (i.v.) of neurotensin were investigated in anaesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats in following experimental schemes: (i) control animals before and after midcervical vagotomy; (ii) in three separate subgroups of rats: neurally intact, vagotomized at supranodosal level and initially midcervically vagotomized exposed to section of the carotid sinus nerves (CSNs); (iii) in the intact rats 2 minutes after blockade of neurotensin NTS(1) receptors with SR 142948. Intravenous injection of 10 μg/kg of neurotensin in the intact rats evoked prompt increase in the respiratory rate followed by a prolonged slowing down coupled with augmented tidal volume. Midcervical vagotomy precluded the effects of neurotensin on the frequency of breathing, while CSNs section reduced the increase in tidal volume. In all the neural states neurotensin caused significant fall in mean arterial blood pressure preceded by prompt hypertensive response. The cardio-respiratory effects of neurotensin were blocked by pre-treatment with NTS(1) receptor antagonist. The results of this study showed that neurotensin acting through NTS(1) receptors augments the tidal component of the breathing pattern in a large portion via carotid body afferentation whereas the respiratory timing response to neurotensin depends entirely on the intact midcervical vagi. Blood pressure effects evoked by an intravenous neurotensin occur outside vagal and CSNs pathways and might result from activation of the peripheral vascular NTS(1) receptors.

  20. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Possesses an Antiviral Activity against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Labrie, Josée; Hernandez Reyes, Yenney; Burciaga Nava, Jorge A.; Gagnon, Carl A.; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Pigs are often colonized by more than one bacterial and/or viral species during respiratory tract infections. This phenomenon is known as the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are pathogens that are frequently involved in PRDC. The main objective of this project was to study the in vitro interactions between these two pathogens and the host cells in the context of mixed infections. To fulfill this objective, PRRSV permissive cell lines such as MARC-145, SJPL, and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) were used. A pre-infection with PRRSV was performed at 0.5 multiplicity of infection (MOI) followed by an infection with App at 10 MOI. Bacterial adherence and cell death were compared. Results showed that PRRSV pre-infection did not affect bacterial adherence to the cells. PRRSV and App co-infection produced an additive cytotoxicity effect. Interestingly, a pre-infection of SJPL and PAM cells with App blocked completely PRRSV infection. Incubation of SJPL and PAM cells with an App cell-free culture supernatant is also sufficient to significantly block PRRSV infection. This antiviral activity is not due to LPS but rather by small molecular weight, heat-resistant App metabolites (<1 kDa). The antiviral activity was also observed in SJPL cells infected with swine influenza virus but to a much lower extent compared to PRRSV. More importantly, the PRRSV antiviral activity of App was also seen with PAM, the cells targeted by the virus in vivo during infection in pigs. The antiviral activity might be due, at least in part, to the production of interferon γ. The use of in vitro experimental models to study viral and bacterial co-infections will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between pathogens and their host cells, and could allow the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic tools. PMID:24878741

  1. Antiadhesive and antibiofilm activity of hyaluronic acid against bacteria responsible for respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Drago, Lorenzo; Cappelletti, Laura; De Vecchi, Elena; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Torretta, Sara; Mattina, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    To address the problem of limited efficacy of existing antibiotics in the treatment of bacterial biofilm, it is necessary to find alternative remedies. One candidate could be hyaluronic acid; this study therefore aimed to evaluate the in vitro antiadhesive and antibiofilm activity of hyaluronic acid toward bacterial species commonly isolated from respiratory infections. Interference exerted on bacterial adhesion was evaluated by using Hep-2 cells, while the antibiofilm activity was assessed by means of spectrophotometry after incubation of biofilm with hyaluronic acid and staining with crystal violet. Our data suggest that hyaluronic acid is able to interfere with bacterial adhesion to a cellular substrate in a concentration-dependent manner, being notably active when assessed as pure substance. Moreover, we found that Staphylococcus aureus biofilm was more sensitive to the action of hyaluronic acid than biofilm produced by Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. In conclusion, hyaluronic acid is characterized by notable antiadhesive properties, while it shows a moderate activity against bacterial biofilm. As bacterial adhesion to oral cells is the first step for colonization, these results further sustain the role of hyaluronic acid in prevention of respiratory infections. PMID:24698341

  2. A novel peptide with potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activities against multiple respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hanjun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Ke; Chu, Hin; Liu, Dabin; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Leung, Ho-Chuen; Fai, Ng; Lin, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Anna Jin-Xia; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    A safe, potent and broad-spectrum antiviral is urgently needed to combat emerging respiratory viruses. In light of the broad antiviral activity of β-defensins, we tested the antiviral activity of 11 peptides derived from mouse β-defensin-4 and found that a short peptide, P9, exhibited potent and broad-spectrum antiviral effects against multiple respiratory viruses in vitro and in vivo, including influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The antiviral activity of P9 was attributed to its high-affinity binding to viral glycoproteins, as well as the abundance of basic amino acids in its composition. After binding viral particles through viral surface glycoproteins, P9 entered into cells together with the viruses via endocytosis and prevented endosomal acidification, which blocked membrane fusion and subsequent viral RNA release. This study has paved the avenue for developing new prophylactic and therapeutic agents with broad-spectrum antiviral activities. PMID:26911565

  3. A novel peptide with potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activities against multiple respiratory viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hanjun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Ke; Chu, Hin; Liu, Dabin; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Leung, Ho-Chuen; Fai, Ng; Lin, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Anna Jin-Xia; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    A safe, potent and broad-spectrum antiviral is urgently needed to combat emerging respiratory viruses. In light of the broad antiviral activity of β-defensins, we tested the antiviral activity of 11 peptides derived from mouse β-defensin-4 and found that a short peptide, P9, exhibited potent and broad-spectrum antiviral effects against multiple respiratory viruses in vitro and in vivo, including influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The antiviral activity of P9 was attributed to its high-affinity binding to viral glycoproteins, as well as the abundance of basic amino acids in its composition. After binding viral particles through viral surface glycoproteins, P9 entered into cells together with the viruses via endocytosis and prevented endosomal acidification, which blocked membrane fusion and subsequent viral RNA release. This study has paved the avenue for developing new prophylactic and therapeutic agents with broad-spectrum antiviral activities. PMID:26911565

  4. Respiratory activity of posterior cricoarytenoid muscle and vocal cords in humans.

    PubMed

    Brancatisano, T P; Dodd, D S; Engel, L A

    1984-10-01

    We examined the respiratory activity of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle (PCA) simultaneously with the movements of the vocal cords during tidal breathing and panting in four normal seated subjects. A bipolar electrode was constructed to record the surface electromyogram (EMG) of the PCA. The glottis was visualized with a fiberoptic bronchoscope, and the glottic image was recorded simultaneously with tidal volume and a digital time marker on video tape. During quiet breathing the integrated EMG signal (EPCA) showed consistent phasic variations in each subject. The inspiratory onset of EPCA in the four subjects preceded inspiratory flow by 170 +/- 80, 650 +/- 310, 130 +/- 80, and 130 +/- 90 ms (mean +/- SD), respectively. This lead time of the PCA was similar to that between the onset of glottic widening and inspiration in each subject. The proportion of each cycle during which EPCA increased (the duty cycle) was 31 +/- 3% (mean +/- SE), whereas the inspiratory portion of the respiratory cycle constituted 37 +/- 2% (mean +/- SE), respectively. The duty cycle of the PCA remained relatively constant in the same subject on different days. During panting at functional residual capacity, the EPCA increased to 142 +/- 11% of the peak activity recorded during the preceding control breaths. This was accompanied by a sustained increase in the glottic width to 91 +/- 9% of the peak value in the preceding breaths. These results confirm the role of the PCA as a principal abductor of the vocal cords and indicate a temporal relationship between PCA activation and the inspiratory phase of the respiratory cycle during tidal breathing in humans.

  5. Distribution and Respiratory Activity of Mycobacteria in Household Water System of Healthy Volunteers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Tomoaki; Izumi, Yoko; Nakamoto, Sayuri; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2014-01-01

    The primary infectious source of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), which are known as opportunistic pathogens, appears to be environmental exposure, and it is important to reduce the frequency of exposure from environmental sources for preventing NTM infections. In order to achieve this, the distribution and respiratory activity of NTM in the environments must be clarified. In this study, we determined the abundance of mycobacteria and respiratory active mycobacteria in the household water system of healthy volunteers using quantitative PCR and a fluorescent staining method, because household water has been considered as one of the possible infectious sources. We chose healthy volunteer households in order to lessen the effect of possible residential contamination from an infected patient. We evaluated whether each sampling site (bathroom drain, kitchen drain, bath heater pipe and showerhead) have the potential to be the sources of NTM infections. Our results indicated that drains in the bathroom and kitchen sink are the niche for Mycobacterium spp. and M. avium cells were only detected in the bathtub inlet. Both physicochemical and biologic selective pressures may affect the preferred habitat of Mycobacterium spp. Regional differences also appear to exist as demonstrated by the presence (US) or absence (Japan) of Mycobacterium spp. on showerheads. Understanding of the country specific human activities and water usage will help to elucidate the infectious source and route of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. PMID:25350137

  6. Cervical spinal demyelination with ethidium bromide impairs respiratory (phrenic) activity and forelimb motor behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Nichols, N L; Punzo, A M; Duncan, I D; Mitchell, G S; Johnson, R A

    2013-01-15

    Although respiratory complications are a major cause of morbidity/mortality in many neural injuries or diseases, little is known concerning mechanisms whereby deficient myelin impairs breathing, or how patients compensate for such changes. Here, we tested the hypothesis that respiratory and forelimb motor functions are impaired in a rat model of focal dorsolateral spinal demyelination (ethidium bromide, EB). Ventilation, phrenic nerve activity and horizontal ladder walking were performed 7-14 days post-C2 injection of EB or vehicle (SHAM). EB caused dorsolateral demyelination at C2-C3 followed by significant spontaneous remyelination at 14 days post-EB. Although ventilation did not differ between groups, ipsilateral integrated phrenic nerve burst amplitude was significantly reduced versus SHAM during chemoreceptor activation at 7 days post-EB but recovered by 14 days. The ratio of ipsi- to contralateral phrenic nerve amplitude correlated with cross-sectional lesion area. This ratio was significantly reduced 7 days post-EB versus SHAM during baseline conditions, and versus SHAM and 14-day groups during chemoreceptor activation. Limb function ipsilateral to EB was impaired 7 days post-EB and partially recovered by 14 days post-EB. EB provides a reversible model of focal, spinal demyelination, and may be a useful model to study mechanisms of functional impairment and recovery via motor plasticity, or the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions to reduce severity or duration of disease. PMID:23159317

  7. Control of pathogenic effector T-cell activities in situ by PD-L1 expression on respiratory inflammatory dendritic cells during respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yao, S; Jiang, L; Moser, EK; Jewett, LB; Wright, J; Du, J; Zhou, B; Davis, SD; Krupp, NL; Braciale, TJ; Sun, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract illness in young infants, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. We demonstrate here that the co-inhibitory molecule programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is selectively upregulated on T cells within the respiratory tract during both murine and human RSV infection. Importantly, the interaction of PD-1 with its ligand PD-L1 is vital to restrict the pro-inflammatory activities of lung effector T cells in situ, thereby inhibiting the development of excessive pulmonary inflammation and injury during RSV infection. We further identify that PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells is critical to suppress inflammatory T-cell activities, and an interferon–STAT1–IRF1 axis is responsible for increased PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells. Our findings suggest a potentially critical role of PD-L1 and PD-1 interactions in the lung for controlling host inflammatory responses and disease progression in clinical RSV infection. PMID:25465101

  8. Infants fed formula with added long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids have reduced incidence of respiratory illnesses and diarrhea during the first year of life

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) may influence the immune system. Our objective was to compare the frequency of common illnesses in infants who received formula with or without added LCPUFAs. Methods In this observational, multi-center, prospective study, infants consumed formula with 17 mg DHA and 34 mg ARA/100 kcal (n = 233) or with no added DHA or ARA (n = 92). Pediatricians recorded respiratory illnesses, otitis media, eczema, and diarrhea through 1 year of age. Results Infants who consumed formula with DHA/ARA had lower incidence of bronchitis/bronchiolitis (P = 0.004), croup (P = 0.044), nasal congestion (P = 0.001), cough (P = 0.014), and diarrhea requiring medical attention (P = 0.034). The odds ratio (OR) of having at least one episode of bronchitis/bronchiolitis (0.41, 95% CI 0.24, 0.70; P = 0.001), croup (0.23, 95% CI 0.05, 0.97; P = 0.045), nasal congestion (0.37, 95% CI 0.20, 0.66; P = 0.001), cough (0.52, 95% CI 0.32, 0.86; P = 0.011), and diarrhea requiring medical attention (0.51, 95% CI 0.28, 0.92; P = 0.026) was lower in infants fed DHA/ARA. The OR of an increased number of episodes of bronchitis/bronchiolitis, croup, nasal congestion, cough, and diarrhea, as well as the hazard ratio for shorter time to first episode of bronchitis/bronchiolitis, nasal congestion, cough, and diarrhea were also significantly lower in the DHA/ARA group. Conclusions In healthy infants, formula with DHA/ARA was associated with lower incidence of common respiratory symptoms and illnesses, as well as diarrhea. PMID:24989353

  9. Mitochondrial Respiratory Defect Causes Dysfunctional Lactate Turnover via AMP-activated Protein Kinase Activation in Human-induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Im, Ilkyun; Jang, Mi-Jin; Park, Seung Ju; Lee, Sang-Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook; Kim, Seyun; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2015-12-01

    A defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (DMRC) causes various metabolic disorders in humans. However, the pathophysiology of DMRC in the liver remains unclear. To understand DMRC pathophysiology in vitro, DMRC-induced pluripotent stem cells were generated from dermal fibroblasts of a DMRC patient who had a homoplasmic mutation (m.3398T→C) in the mitochondrion-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (MTND1) gene and that differentiated into hepatocytes (DMRC hepatocytes) in vitro. DMRC hepatocytes showed abnormalities in mitochondrial characteristics, the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, the glycogen storage level, the lactate turnover rate, and AMPK activity. Intriguingly, low glycogen storage and transcription of lactate turnover-related genes in DMRC hepatocytes were recovered by inhibition of AMPK activity. Thus, AMPK activation led to metabolic changes in terms of glycogen storage and lactate turnover in DMRC hepatocytes. These data demonstrate for the first time that energy depletion may lead to lactic acidosis in the DMRC patient by reduction of lactate uptake via AMPK in liver. PMID:26491018

  10. From Human Activity to Conceptual Understanding of the Chain Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jojo, Zingiswa Mybert Monica; Maharaj, Aneshkumar; Brijlall, Deonarain

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a study which investigated first year university engineering students' construction of the definition of the concept of the chain rule in differential calculus at a University of Technology in South Africa. An APOS (Action-Process-Objects-Schema) approach was used to explore conceptual understanding displayed by students in…

  11. Supply Chain Management: Are You Maximizing Your Procurement Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbin, James; Jenkins, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Today's purchasing professionals recognize the need to reduce non-value-added procedures (clerical functions) while emphasizing strategic planning. Results-oriented supply-chain managers need superb communication, negotiation, and leadership skills to achieve long-term value and resist the lowest, first- cost bids. (Contains 13 references.) (MLH)

  12. Characterization of three bioenergetically active respiratory terminal oxidases in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Pils, D; Schmetterer, G

    2001-09-25

    Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 contains three respiratory terminal oxidases (RTOs): cytochrome c oxidase (Cox), quinol oxidase (Cyd), and alternate RTO (ARTO). Mutants lacking combinations of the RTOs were used to characterize these key enzymes of respiration. Pentachlorophenol and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline-N-oxide inhibited Cyd completely, but had little effect on electron transport to the other RTOs. KCN inhibited all three RTOs but the in vivo K(I) for Cox and Cyd was quite different (7 vs. 27 microM), as was their affinity for oxygen (K(M) 1.0 vs. 0.35 microM). ARTO has a very low respiratory activity. However, when uptake of 3-O-methylglucose, an active H+ co-transport, was used to monitor energization of the cytoplasmic membrane, ARTO was similarly effective as the other RTOs. As removal of the gene for cytochrome c(553) had the same effects as removal of ARTO genes, we propose that the ARTO might be a second Cox. The possible functions, localization and regulation of the RTOs are discussed.

  13. Effect of selenite on the morphology and respiratory activity of Phanerochaete chrysosporium biofilms.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Ortiz, Erika J; Pechaud, Yoan; Lauchnor, Ellen; Rene, Eldon R; Gerlach, Robin; Peyton, Brent M; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-06-01

    The temporal and spatial effects of selenite (SeO3(2-)) on the physical properties and respiratory activity of Phanerochaete chrysosporium biofilms, grown in flow-cell reactors, were investigated using oxygen microsensors and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) imaging. Exposure of the biofilm to a SeO3(2-) load of 1.67mgSeL(-1)h(-1) (10mgSeL(-1) influent concentration), for 24h, resulted in a 20% reduction of the O2 flux, followed by a ∼10% decrease in the glucose consumption rate. Long-term exposure (4days) to SeO3(2-) influenced the architecture of the biofilm by creating a more compact and dense hyphal arrangement resulting in a decrease of biofilm thickness compared to fungal biofilms grown without SeO3(2-). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the effect of SeO3(2-) on the aerobic respiratory activity on fungal biofilms is described. PMID:26935326

  14. Constraining the Lateral Helix of Respiratory Complex I by Cross-linking Does Not Impair Enzyme Activity or Proton Translocation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shaotong; Vik, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is a multisubunit, membrane-bound enzyme of the respiratory chain. The energy from NADH oxidation in the peripheral region of the enzyme is used to drive proton translocation across the membrane. One of the integral membrane subunits, nuoL in Escherichia coli, has an unusual lateral helix of ∼75 residues that lies parallel to the membrane surface and has been proposed to play a mechanical role as a piston during proton translocation (Efremov, R. G., Baradaran, R., and Sazanov, L. A. (2010) Nature 465, 441–445). To test this hypothesis we have introduced 11 pairs of cysteine residues into Complex I; in each pair one is in the lateral helix, and the other is in a nearby region of subunit N, M, or L. The double mutants were treated with Cu2+ ions or with bi-functional methanethiosulfonate reagents to catalyze cross-link formation in membrane vesicles. The yields of cross-linked products were typically 50–90%, as judged by immunoblotting, but in no case did the activity of Complex I decrease by >10–20%, as indicated by deamino-NADH oxidase activity or rates of proton translocation. In contrast, several pairs of cysteine residues introduced at other interfaces of N:M and M:L subunits led to significant loss of activity, in particular, in the region of residue Glu-144 of subunit M. The results do not support the hypothesis that the lateral helix of subunit L functions like a piston, but rather, they suggest that conformational changes might be transmitted more directly through the functional residues of the proton translocation apparatus. PMID:26134569

  15. Respiratory-related control of palatoglossus and levator palatini muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Tangel, D J; Mezzanotte, W S; White, D P

    1995-02-01

    Route of respiration [nasal (NR) vs. oral (OR)] is determined by the position of the soft palate. Despite this, little is known about the respiratory-related activity of palatal muscles. We investigated the activity of two palatal muscles: palatoglossus (PG) and levator palatini (LP). Eight normal male subjects were studied during wakefulness with intramuscular electrodes placed in the PG and LP. The electromyograms (EMGs) of the PG and LP were measured during both NR and OR under 1) quiet basal respiration, 2) inspiratory resistive loading (25 cmH2O.l-1.s), and 3) progressive hypercapnia. The PG consistently demonstrated inspiratory phasic activity during NR with greater inspiratory and expiratory EMGs (P < 0.05) during basal NR compared with basal OR [3.3 +/- 0.2 (SE), 1.1 +/- 0.1, 2.3 +/- 0.4, and 1.0 +/- 0.2 arbitrary units for PG nasal inspiratory, PG oral inspiratory, PG nasal expiratory, and PG oral expiratory, respectively]. During OR, the LP was inspiratory phasic in 4 subjects and expiratory phasic in 4 subjects, with greater inspiratory and expiratory EMGs during basal OR compared with basal NR (5.5 +/- 1.1, 2.1 +/- 0.4, 6.8 +/- 1.5, and 1.8 +/- 0.4 arbitrary units for LP oral inspiratory, LP nasal inspiratory, PG oral expiratory, and PG nasal expiratory, respectively). Both muscles demonstrated significantly increased activity during both inspiratory resistive loading and hypercapnia. However, their route-specific activation pattern continued during such stimulated breathing. We conclude that 1) the route of respiration is influenced by the complex interaction of the PG and LP and 2) the response of these muscles to respiratory stimuli is dependent on the route of respiration.

  16. Pulmonary C-fiber activation attenuates respiratory-related tongue movements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun-Ze; Fuller, David D; Hwang, Ji-Chuu

    2012-11-01

    The functional impact of pulmonary C-fiber activation on upper airway biomechanics has not been evaluated. Here, we tested the hypothesis that pulmonary C-fiber activation alters the respiratory-related control of tongue movements. The force produced by tongue movements was quantified in spontaneously breathing, anesthetized adult rats before and after stimulation of pulmonary C fibers via intrajugular delivery of capsaicin (0.625 and 1.25 μg/kg). Brief occlusion of the trachea was used to increase the respiratory drive to the tongue muscles, and hypoglossal (XII) nerve branches were selectively sectioned to denervate the protrusive and retrusive tongue musculature. Tracheal occlusion triggered inspiratory-related tongue retrusion in rats with XII nerves intact or following section of the medial XII nerve branch, which innervates the genioglossus muscle. Inspiratory-related tongue protrusion was only observed after section of the lateral XII branch, which innervates the primary tongue retrusor muscles. The tension produced by inspiratory-related tongue movement was significantly attenuated by capsaicin, but tongue movements remained retrusive, unless the medial XII branch was sectioned. Capsaicin also significantly delayed the onset of tongue movements such that tongue forces could not be detected until after onset of the inspiratory diaphragm activity. We conclude that altered neural drive to the tongue muscles following pulmonary C-fiber activation has a functionally significant effect on tongue movements. The diminished tongue force and delay in the onset of tongue movements following pulmonary C-fiber activation are potentially unfavorable for upper airway patency. PMID:22936725

  17. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus NS4b Protein Inhibits Host RNase L Activation

    PubMed Central

    Thornbrough, Joshua M.; Jha, Babal K.; Yount, Boyd; Goldstein, Stephen A.; Li, Yize; Elliott, Ruth; Sims, Amy C.; Baric, Ralph S.; Silverman, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is the first highly pathogenic human coronavirus to emerge since severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2002. Like many coronaviruses, MERS-CoV carries genes that encode multiple accessory proteins that are not required for replication of the genome but are likely involved in pathogenesis. Evasion of host innate immunity through interferon (IFN) antagonism is a critical component of viral pathogenesis. The IFN-inducible oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS)-RNase L pathway activates upon sensing of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Activated RNase L cleaves viral and host single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), which leads to translational arrest and subsequent cell death, preventing viral replication and spread. Here we report that MERS-CoV, a lineage C Betacoronavirus, and related bat CoV NS4b accessory proteins have phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity and antagonize OAS-RNase L by enzymatically degrading 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A), activators of RNase L. This is a novel function for NS4b, which has previously been reported to antagonize IFN signaling. NS4b proteins are distinct from lineage A Betacoronavirus PDEs and rotavirus gene-encoded PDEs, in having an amino-terminal nuclear localization signal (NLS) and are localized mostly to the nucleus. However, the expression level of cytoplasmic MERS-CoV NS4b protein is sufficient to prevent activation of RNase L. Finally, this is the first report of an RNase L antagonist expressed by a human or bat coronavirus and provides a specific mechanism by which this occurs. Our findings provide a potential mechanism for evasion of innate immunity by MERS-CoV while also identifying a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27025250

  18. An official European Respiratory Society statement on physical activity in COPD.

    PubMed

    Watz, Henrik; Pitta, Fabio; Rochester, Carolyn L; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; ZuWallack, Richard; Troosters, Thierry; Vaes, Anouk W; Puhan, Milo A; Jehn, Melissa; Polkey, Michael I; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Clini, Enrico M; Toth, Michael; Gimeno-Santos, Elena; Waschki, Benjamin; Esteban, Cristobal; Hayot, Maurice; Casaburi, Richard; Porszasz, Janos; McAuley, Edward; Singh, Sally J; Langer, Daniel; Wouters, Emiel F M; Magnussen, Helgo; Spruit, Martijn A

    2014-12-01

    This European Respiratory Society (ERS) statement provides a comprehensive overview on physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A multidisciplinary Task Force of experts representing the ERS Scientific Group 01.02 "Rehabilitation and Chronic Care" determined the overall scope of this statement through consensus. Focused literature reviews were conducted in key topic areas and the final content of this Statement was agreed upon by all members. The current knowledge regarding physical activity in COPD is presented, including the definition of physical activity, the consequences of physical inactivity on lung function decline and COPD incidence, physical activity assessment, prevalence of physical inactivity in COPD, clinical correlates of physical activity, effects of physical inactivity on hospitalisations and mortality, and treatment strategies to improve physical activity in patients with COPD. This Task Force identified multiple major areas of research that need to be addressed further in the coming years. These include, but are not limited to, the disease-modifying potential of increased physical activity, and to further understand how improvements in exercise capacity, dyspnoea and self-efficacy following interventions may translate into increased physical activity. The Task Force recommends that this ERS statement should be reviewed periodically (e.g. every 5-8 years).

  19. Relative Activities and Characteristics of Some Oxidative Respiratory Enzymes from Conidia of Verticillium albo-atrum

    PubMed Central

    Throneberry, G. O.

    1967-01-01

    Conidia of Verticillium albo-atrum Reinke and Berthold, collected from shake cultures grown in Czapek broth, were sonified for 4 or 8 minutes or ground frozen in a mortar to obtain cell-free homogenates. These were assayed for certain enzymes associated with respiratory pathways. Malic dehydrogenase was the most active, glucose-6-P and NADH dehydrogenase were less active, NADH-cytochrome c reductase, NADPH dehydrogenase, and cytochrome oxidase were low in activity, and succinic dehydrogenase and succinic cytochrome c reductase were very low to negligible in activity. No NADH oxidase activity was detected. With the exception of NADH-cytochrome c reductase and possibly succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome c reductase, there was no evident increase in specific activity of the enzymes during germination. Some NADH-cytochrome c reductase and a small amount of succinic-dehydrogenase and cytochrome c reductase were associated with the particulate fraction from 105,000 × g centrifugation. The other enzymes, including cytochrome oxidase, almost completely remained in the supernatant fraction. Menadione and vitamin K-S(II) markedly stimulated NADH-cytochrome c reductase activity in the supernatant fraction but had much less effect on NADPH-cytochrome c reductase in this fraction or on either of these enzyme systems in the particulate fraction. Electron transport inhibitors affected particulate NADH- and NADPH-cytochrome c reductase activity but had no effect on these in the supernatant fraction. PMID:16656681

  20. MSFC Respiratory Protection Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    CoVan, James P.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the Marshall Space Flight Center Respiratory Protection program is provided in this poster display. Respiratory protection personnel, building, facilities, equipment, customers, maintenance and operational activities, and Dynatech fit testing details are described and illustrated.

  1. Activation of the lipoxygenase pathway in the methionine enkephalin induced respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, J.T.; Foris, G.; Fulop, T. Jr.; Paragh, G.; Plotnikoff, N.P.

    1988-01-01

    In comparative studies of f-met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) and methionine enkephalin (ME) induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) stimulation the following results were obtained: (i) both FMLP and ME increased the intracellular killing (IK) capability of human PMNLs probably through NADPH oxidase activation, (ii) the ME-induced respiratory burst (RB) differed from the chemotactic peptide FMLP-triggered superoxide generation because the former was not accompanied by the activation of the glutathione system and the duration of the superoxide production was prolonged. The reaction was dependent on lipoxygenation, was potentiated by indomethacin (IM) and was inhibited by nordihidro-guairetic acid (NDGA), (iii) both /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid release and leukotriene B/sub 4/ (LTB/sub 4/) synthesis of ME-treated PMNLs were elevated as compared to those of FMLP triggered cells. Their results suggest that lipoxygenation and even an increased LTB/sub 4/ synthesis are involved in the ME-induced RB of leukocytes.

  2. Fine-Tuning of CD8(+) T Cell Mitochondrial Metabolism by the Respiratory Chain Repressor MCJ Dictates Protection to Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Devin P; Hatle, Ketki M; Fortner, Karen A; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Thornton, Tina M; Yang, Rui; Torralba, Daniel; Tomás-Cortázar, Julen; Jun, Yong Woong; Ahn, Kyo Han; Hansen, Kirk C; Haynes, Laura; Anguita, Juan; Rincon, Mercedes

    2016-06-21

    Mitochondrial respiration is regulated in CD8(+) T cells during the transition from naive to effector and memory cells, but mechanisms controlling this process have not been defined. Here we show that MCJ (methylation-controlled J protein) acted as an endogenous break for mitochondrial respiration in CD8(+) T cells by interfering with the formation of electron transport chain respiratory supercomplexes. Metabolic profiling revealed enhanced mitochondrial metabolism in MCJ-deficient CD8(+) T cells. Increased oxidative phosphorylation and subcellular ATP accumulation caused by MCJ deficiency selectively increased the secretion, but not expression, of interferon-γ. MCJ also adapted effector CD8(+) T cell metabolism during the contraction phase. Consequently, memory CD8(+) T cells lacking MCJ provided superior protection against influenza virus infection. Thus, MCJ offers a mechanism for fine-tuning CD8(+) T cell mitochondrial metabolism as an alternative to modulating mitochondrial mass, an energetically expensive process. MCJ could be a therapeutic target to enhance CD8(+) T cell responses. PMID:27234056

  3. Bactericidal activity of tracheal antimicrobial peptide against respiratory pathogens of cattle.

    PubMed

    Taha-Abdelaziz, Khaled; Perez-Casal, José; Schott, Courtney; Hsiao, Jason; Attah-Poku, Samuel; Slavić, Durđa; Caswell, Jeff L

    2013-04-15

    Tracheal antimicrobial peptide (TAP) is a β-defensin produced by mucosal epithelial cells of cattle. Although effective against several human pathogens, the activity of this bovine peptide against the bacterial pathogens that cause bovine respiratory disease have not been reported. This study compared the antibacterial effects of synthetic TAP against Mannheimia haemolytica, Histophilus somni, Pasteurella multocida, and Mycoplasma bovis. Bactericidal activity against M. bovis was not detected. In contrast, the Pasteurellaceae bacteria showed similar levels of susceptibility to that of Escherichia coli, with 0.125μg TAP inhibiting growth in a radial diffusion assay and minimum inhibitory concentrations of 1.56-6.25μg/ml in a bactericidal assay. Significant differences among isolates were not observed. Sequencing of exon 2 of the TAP gene from 23 cattle revealed a prevalent non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) A137G, encoding either serine or asparagine at residue 20 of the mature peptide. The functional effect of this SNP was tested against M. haemolytica using synthetic peptides. The bactericidal effect of the asparagine-containing peptide was consistently higher than the serine-containing peptide. Bactericidal activities were similar for an acapsular mutant of M. haemolytica compared to the wild type. These findings indicate that the Pasteurellaceae bacteria that cause bovine respiratory disease are susceptible to killing by bovine TAP and appear not to have evolved resistance, whereas M. bovis appears to be resistant. A non-synonymous SNP was identified in the coding region of the TAP gene, and the corresponding peptides vary in their bactericidal activity against M. haemolytica.

  4. Prevalence and Impact of Active and Passive Cigarette Smoking in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, S. Jean; Zhuo, Hanjing; Benowitz, Neal L.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Liu, Kathleen D.; Matthay, Michael A.; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cigarette smoke exposure has recently been found to be associated with increased susceptibility to trauma- and transfusion-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We sought to determine 1) the prevalence of cigarette smoke exposure in a diverse multi-center sample of ARDS patients, and 2) whether cigarette smoke exposure is associated with severity of lung injury and mortality in ARDS. Design Analysis of the Albuterol for the Treatment of ALI (ALTA) and Omega ARDS Network studies. Setting Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network hospitals. Patients Three hundred eighty one patients with ARDS. Interventions None. Measurements NNAL (4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol), a validated tobacco-specific marker, was measured in urine samples from subjects enrolled in two NHLBI ARDS Network randomized controlled trials. Main Results Urine NNAL levels were consistent with active smoking in 36% of ARDS patients and with passive smoking in 41% of nonsmokers (vs 20% and 40% in general population, respectively). Patients with NNAL levels in the active smoking range were younger and had a higher prevalence of alcohol misuse, fewer comorbidities, lower severity of illness, and less septic shock at enrollment compared to patients with undetectable NNAL levels. Despite this lower severity of illness, the severity of lung injury did not significantly differ based on biomarker-determined smoking status. Cigarette smoke exposure was not significantly associated with death after adjusting for differences in age, alcohol use, comorbidities, and severity of illness. Conclusions In this first multicenter study of biomarker-determined cigarette smoke exposure in ARDS patients, we found that active cigarette smoke exposure was significantly more prevalent among ARDS patients compared to population averages. Despite their younger age, better overall health, and lower severity of illness, smokers by NNAL had similar severity of lung injury as patients with

  5. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-09-16

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3'-5' exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5'-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  6. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities

    PubMed Central

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C.; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3′-5′ exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5′-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  7. Structure-activity relationship of synthetic branched-chain distearoylglycerol (distearin) as protein kinase C activators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qingzhong; Raynor, R.L.; Wood, M.G. Jr.; Menger, F.M.; Kuo, J.F. )

    1988-09-20

    Several representative branched-chain analogues of distearin (DS) were synthesized and tested for their abilities to activate protein kinase C (PKC) and to compete for the binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) to the enzyme. Substitutions of stearoyl moieties at sn-1 and sn-2 with 8-methylstearate decreased activities on these parameters, relative to those of the parental diacylglycerol DS, a weak PKC activator. Substitutions with 8-butyl, 4-butyl, or 8-phenyl derivatives, on the other hand, increased activities of the resulting analogues to levels comparable to those seen for diolein (DO), a diacylglycerol prototype shown to be a potent PKC activator. Kinetic analysis indicated that 8-methyldistearin (8-MeDS) acted by decreasing, whereas 8-butyldistearin (8-BuDS) and 8-phenyldistearin (8-PhDS) acted by increasing, the affinities of PKC for phosphatidylserine (PS, a phospholipid cofactor) and Ca{sup 2+} compared to the values seen in the absence or presence of DS. The stimulatory effect of 8-BuDS and 8-PhDS on PKC, as DO, was additive to that of 1,2-(8-butyl)distearoylphosphatidylcholine (1,2(8-Bu)DSPC) and, moreover, they abolished the marked inhibition of the enzyme activity caused by high concentrations of 1,2(8-Bu)DSPC. The present findings demonstrated a structure-activity relationship of the branched-chain DS analogues in the regulation of PKC, perhaps related to their abilities to specifically modify interactions of PKC with PS and/or Ca{sup 2+} critically involved in enzyme activation/inactivation.

  8. Respiratory-related activity of cricothyroid muscle in awake normal humans.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, J R; Brancatisano, A; Engel, L A

    1991-05-01

    The role of the cricothyroid muscle (CT) in respiration is unclear. To examine the respiratory-related electrical activity of the CT, we measured its electromyogram (EMG) and compared it with that of the alae nasi (AN) in eight healthy subjects. During quiet breathing the CT EMG phasing was inspiratory in seven subjects. This pattern was similar to the AN with respect to phasing and shape of the integrated EMG. The onset of phasic CT and AN activity related to inspiration preceded flow by 173 +/- 39 and 570 +/- 76 (SE) ms, respectively (P less than 0.01). We measured the duration from onset of phasic activity to peak of the EMG (TA) and the total cycle duration (TT). TA/TT of the CT was 0.29 +/- 0.02, similar to that of the AN (0.28 +/- 0.03). Inspiratory resistive loading, panting, and voluntary hyperventilation increased CT activity above the peak level seen during tidal breathing. Voluntary glottic closure increased CT activity to a level above tonic but below peak tidal activity. The findings suggest that the phasic electrical activity of the CT simulates predominantly that of an upper airway dilator. PMID:1864803

  9. Expanding Voluntary Active-learning Opportunities for Pharmacy Students in a Respiratory Physiology Module

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Hardy; Colthorpe, Kay

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To expand voluntary active-learning opportunities for bachelor of pharmacy students enrolled in a third-year human physiology and pharmacology course and determine whether the additional course components improved learning outcomes. Design Additional voluntary active-learning opportunities including a large-class tutorial, additional formative assessment, and an online discussion were added to the Respiratory Physiology Module of the course. Examination scores were compared with those from previous years. A questionnaire was administered to assess students' perception of the active-learning components. Assessment Mean examination scores increased from 69.3% ± 24.4% in 2003 to 88.9% ± 13.4% in 2004 and 86.9% ± 17.6% in 2005, after the addition of the active-learning components. Students' overall perception of the value of the active-learning activities was positive. Summary The addition of voluntary active-learning course components to a required pharmacy course resulted in improved student examination scores, and decreased failure rate, and were accomplished at low cost and with little additional staff time. PMID:18483596

  10. Evidence for chloroplastic succinate dehydrogenase participating in the chloroplastic respiratory and photosynthetic electron transport chains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Willeford, K.O.; Gombos, Z.; Gibbs, M. )

    1989-07-01

    A method for isolating intact chloroplasts from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 was developed from the Klein, Chen, Gibbs, Platt-Aloia procedure. Protoplasts, generated by treatment with autolysine, were lysed with a solution of digitonin and fractionated on Percoll step gradients. The chloroplasts were assessed to be 90% intact (ferricyanide assay) and free from cytoplasmic contamination (NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase activity) and to range from 2 to 5% in mitochondrial contamination (cytochrome c oxidase activity). About 25% of the cellular succinate dehydrogenase activity (21.6 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour, as determined enzymically) was placed within the chloroplast. Chloroplastic succinate dehydrogenase had a K{sub m} for succinate of 0.55 millimolar and was associated with the thylakoidal material derived from the intact chloroplasts. This same thylakoidal material, with an enzymic assay of 21.6 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour was able to initiate a light-dependent uptake of oxygen at a rate of 16.4 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour when supplied with succinate and methyl viologen. Malonate was an apparent competitive inhibitor of this reaction. The succinate dehydrogenase activity present in the chloroplast was sufficient to account for the photoanaerobic rate of acetate dissimilation in H{sub 2} adapted Chlamydomonas.

  11. Environmental factors, immune changes and respiratory diseases in troops during military activities.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Chciałowski, Andrzej; Korsak, Jolanta

    2013-06-01

    Combat operations in contemporary theaters of war, as well as combat training, are carried out in all parts of the world, typically in a harsh environment. Specific environmental conditions, such as heat, cold, high-altitudes, desert climates, as well as chemical and biological pollution of both the atmosphere and soil, together with over-exertion, food restrictions, sleep deprivation, and psychological stress can all result in changes in the immune system and the occurrence of associated diseases. Respiratory diseases are one of the most common health problems among military personnel participating in combat training or deployed to operations in areas characterized by difficult climatic and sanitary conditions. They are, therefore, one of the main reasons for military personnel requiring ambulant and hospital treatment. The aim of the study was to discuss the influence of environmental factors and the conditions in which active duty is performed on changes in the immune system and the occurrence of respiratory tract diseases in a military environment. PMID:23403385

  12. Sirtuin 1 Regulates Dendritic Cell Activation and Autophagy during Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Induced Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Owczarczyk, Anna B; Schaller, Matthew A; Reed, Michelle; Rasky, Andrew J; Lombard, David B; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2015-08-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children worldwide. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, has been associated with the induction of autophagy and the regulation of inflammatory mediators. We found that Sirt1 was upregulated in mouse lung after RSV infection. Infected animals that received EX-527, a selective SIRT1 inhibitor, displayed exacerbated lung pathology, with increased mucus production, elevated viral load, and enhanced Th2 cytokine production. Gene expression analysis of isolated cell populations revealed that Sirt1 was most highly upregulated in RSV-treated dendritic cells (DCs). Upon RSV infection, EX-527-treated DCs, Sirt1 small interfering RNA-treated DCs, or DCs from conditional knockout (Sirt1(f/f)-CD11c-Cre(+)) mice showed downregulated inflammatory cytokine gene expression and attenuated autophagy. Finally, RSV infection of Sirt1(f/f)-CD11c-Cre(+) mice resulted in altered lung and lymph node cytokine responses, leading to exacerbated pathology. These data indicate that SIRT1 promotes DC activation associated with autophagy-mediated processes during RSV infection, thereby directing efficient antiviral immune responses. PMID:26157176

  13. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for weak acid respiratory uncouplers to Vibrio fisheri

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.W.; Cronin, M.T.D.

    1997-02-01

    Acute toxicity values of 16 organic compounds thought to elicit their response via the weak acid respiratory uncoupling mechanism of toxic action were secured from the literature. Regression analysis of toxicities revealed that a measured 5-min V. fisheri potency value can be used as a surrogate for the 30-min value. Regression analysis of toxicity versus hydrophobicity, measured as the 1-octanol/water partition coefficient (log K{sub ow}), was used to formulate a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR). The equation log pT{sub 30}{sup {minus}1} = 0.489(log K{sub ow}) + 0.126 was found to be a highly predictive model. This V. fisheri QSAR is statistically similar to QSARs generated from weak acid uncoupler potency data for Pimephales promelas survivability and Tetrahymena pyriformis population growth impairment. This work, therefore, suggests that the weak acid respiratory uncoupling mechanism of toxic action is present in V. fisheri, and as such is not restricted to mitochondria-containing organisms.

  14. Influence of respiratory motor neurone activity on human autonomic and haemodynamic rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonschorek, A. S.; Lu, L. L.; Halliwill, J. R.; Beightol, L. A.; Taylor, J. A.; Painter, J. A.; Warzel, H.; Eckberg, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Although humans hold great advantages over other species as subjects for biomedical research, they also bring major disadvantages. One is that among the many rhythmic physiological signals that can be recorded, there is no sure way to know which individual change precedes another, or which change represents cause and which represents effect. In an attempt to deal with the inherent complexity of research conducted in intact human subjects, we developed and used a structural equation model to analyse responses of healthy young men to pharmacological changes of arterial pressure and graded inspiratory resistance, before and after vagomimetic atropine. Our model yielded a good fit of the experimental data, with a system weighted R2 of 0.77, and suggested that our treatments exerted both direct and indirect influences on the variables we measured. Thus, infusions of nitroprusside and phenylephrine exerted all of their direct effects by lowering and raising arterial pressure; the changes of R-R intervals, respiratory sinus arrhythmia and arterial pressure fluctuations that these drugs provoked, were indirect consequences of arterial pressure changes. The only direct effect of increased inspiratory resistance was augmentation of arterial pressure fluctuations. These results may provide a new way to disentangle and understand responses of intact human subjects to experimental forcings. The principal new insight we derived from our modelling is that respiratory gating of vagal-cardiac motor neurone firing is nearly maximal at usual levels of arterial pressure and inspiratory motor neurone activity.

  15. Effects of hypercapnia and inspiratory flow-resistive loading on respiratory activity in chronic airways obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Altose, M D; McCauley, W C; Kelsen, S G; Cherniack, N S

    1977-01-01

    The respiratory responses to hypercapnia alone and to hypercapnia and flow-resistive loading during inspiration were studied in normal individuals and in eucapnic and hypercapnic patients with chronic airways obstruction. Responses were assessed in terms of minute ventilation and occlusion pressure (mouth pressure during airway occlusion 100 ms after the onset of inspiration). Ventilatory responses to CO2 (deltaV/deltaPCO2) were distinctly subnormal in both groups of patients with airways obstruction. The two groups of patients, however, showed different occlusion pressure responses to CO2 (deltaP100/deltaPCO2): deltaP100/deltaPCO2 was normal in the eucapnic patients but subnormal in the hypercapnic patients. Flow-resistive loading during inspiration reduced deltaV/deltaPCO2 both in normal subjects and in patients with airways obstruction. The occlusion pressure response to CO2 increased in normal subjects during flow-resistive loading but remained unchanged in both groups of patients with chronic airways obstruction. These results indicate that while chemosensitivity as determined by deltaP100/deltaPCO2 is impaired only in hypercapnic patients with chronic airways obstruction, an acute increase in flow resistance elicits a subnormal increase in respiratory efferent activity in both eucapnic and hypercapnic patients. PMID:838862

  16. Sirtuin 1 Regulates Dendritic Cell Activation and Autophagy during Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Induced Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Owczarczyk, Anna B; Schaller, Matthew A; Reed, Michelle; Rasky, Andrew J; Lombard, David B; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2015-08-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children worldwide. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, has been associated with the induction of autophagy and the regulation of inflammatory mediators. We found that Sirt1 was upregulated in mouse lung after RSV infection. Infected animals that received EX-527, a selective SIRT1 inhibitor, displayed exacerbated lung pathology, with increased mucus production, elevated viral load, and enhanced Th2 cytokine production. Gene expression analysis of isolated cell populations revealed that Sirt1 was most highly upregulated in RSV-treated dendritic cells (DCs). Upon RSV infection, EX-527-treated DCs, Sirt1 small interfering RNA-treated DCs, or DCs from conditional knockout (Sirt1(f/f)-CD11c-Cre(+)) mice showed downregulated inflammatory cytokine gene expression and attenuated autophagy. Finally, RSV infection of Sirt1(f/f)-CD11c-Cre(+) mice resulted in altered lung and lymph node cytokine responses, leading to exacerbated pathology. These data indicate that SIRT1 promotes DC activation associated with autophagy-mediated processes during RSV infection, thereby directing efficient antiviral immune responses.

  17. Anesthetic activation of central respiratory chemoreceptor neurons involves inhibition of a THIK-1-like background K(+) current.

    PubMed

    Lazarenko, Roman M; Fortuna, Michal G; Shi, Yingtang; Mulkey, Daniel K; Takakura, Ana C; Moreira, Thiago S; Guyenet, Patrice G; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2010-07-01

    At surgical depths of anesthesia, inhalational anesthetics cause a loss of motor response to painful stimuli (i.e., immobilization) that is characterized by profound inhibition of spinal motor circuits. Yet, although clearly depressed, the respiratory motor system continues to provide adequate ventilation under these same conditions. Here, we show that isoflurane causes robust activation of CO(2)/pH-sensitive, Phox2b-expressing neurons located in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) of the rodent brainstem, in vitro and in vivo. In brainstem slices from Phox2b-eGFP mice, the firing of pH-sensitive RTN neurons was strongly increased by isoflurane, independent of prevailing pH conditions. At least two ionic mechanisms contributed to anesthetic activation of RTN neurons: activation of an Na(+)-dependent cationic current and inhibition of a background K(+) current. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis of dissociated green fluorescent protein-labeled RTN neurons revealed expression of THIK-1 (TWIK-related halothane-inhibited K(+) channel, K(2P)13.1), a channel that shares key properties with the native RTN current (i.e., suppression by inhalational anesthetics, weak rectification, inhibition by extracellular Na(+), and pH-insensitivity). Isoflurane also increased firing rate of RTN chemosensitive neurons in urethane-anesthetized rats, again independent of CO(2) levels. In these animals, isoflurane transiently enhanced activity of the respiratory system, an effect that was most prominent at low levels of respiratory drive and mediated primarily by an increase in respiratory frequency. These data indicate that inhalational anesthetics cause activation of RTN neurons, which serve an important integrative role in respiratory control; the increased drive provided by enhanced RTN neuronal activity may contribute, in part, to maintaining respiratory motor activity under immobilizing anesthetic conditions. PMID:20610767

  18. The Activity Chain Safety and Liveness Specification of Composite Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Huang, Xiaomei

    Web service composition is most impressing method for development and deployment of e-business. Description and modeling the behavior requirements of composite Web services for users and verifying composite Web service compliance to specific requirements is an important key in design of services. But most work does not address the issue of how to model the requirements that the BPEL4WS processes are supposed to satisfy. The specifications in verification works are general temporal relation based on activity or scenario in essence. Distinguish with these work, we propose a novel concept of behavior specification based on activity chain in which granularity is between activity and scenario. Chain existence mode, chain absence mode are designed to express such behavioral requirements based on activity chain that is similar with safety or liveness specification based on activity respectively. Encode them on Labeled Transition System LTS and then give them exact operation semantics. Finally, an example is illustrated.

  19. Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Brain Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Dysfunction and Increases Oxidative Stress: A Potential Mechanism Involved in Cannabis-Related Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Valérie; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Rouyer, Olivier; Charles, Anne-Laure; Singh, François; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Marescaux, Christian; Raul, Jean-Sébastien; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities Vmax (complexes I, III, and IV activities), Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities), Vtmpd (complex IV activity), together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0), were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased Vmax (−71%; P < 0.0001), Vsucc (−65%; P < 0.0001), and Vtmpd (−3.5%; P < 0.001). Mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0) was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P < 0.001). Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P < 0.05) and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P < 0.001). Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient's vulnerability to stroke. PMID:25654095

  20. Mammal-derived respiratory lipocalin allergens do not exhibit dendritic cell-activating capacity.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, S; Kinnunen, T; Rytkönen-Nissinen, M; Nieminen, A; Liukko, A; Virtanen, T

    2013-03-01

    Most mammal-derived respiratory allergens belong to the lipocalin family of proteins. Determinants of their allergenic capacity are still unknown. Innate immune cells, in particular dendritic cells, have been shown to be involved in the allergenicity of some proteins. As recognition by dendritic cells is one of the few plausible mechanisms for the allergenicity of proteins, we wanted to investigate their role in the allergenicity of lipocalin allergens. Therefore, we first incubated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells with immunologically functional recombinant allergens mouse Mus m 1, dog Can f 1 and 2, cow Bos d 2, horse Equ c 1 and natural Bos d 2. Then, the surface marker expression and cytokine production of dendritic cells and their capacity to promote T cell proliferation and Th2 immune deviation in naïve CD4(+) T cells were examined in vitro. We found that near to endotoxin-free lipocalin allergens had no effect on the activation, allostimulatory capacity or cytokine production of dendritic cells. The dendritic cells could not induce immune deviation in naïve CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, lipopolysaccharide activated the dendritic cells efficiently. However, lipocalin allergens were not able to modify the lipopolysaccharide-induced responses. We conclude that an important group of mammal-derived respiratory allergens, lipocalins, appear not to be able to activate dendritic cells, a major component involved in the allergenicity of some proteins. It is conceivable that this incapacity of lipocalin allergens to arouse innate immunity may be associated with their poor capacity to induce a strong T cell response, verified in several studies.

  1. Epidemic activity of respiratory syncytial virus is related to temperature and rainfall in equatorial tropical countries.

    PubMed

    Gamba-Sanchez, N; Rodriguez-Martinez, C E; Sossa-Briceño, M P

    2016-07-01

    Although viral acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) are a major public health problem in tropical low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and there is growing evidence showing their relationship with meteorological parameters, studies performed in these countries are scarce. In an analytical cross-sectional study, we determined which of the main meteorological parameters (temperature, absolute humidity, rainfall, wind speed, and solar radiation) predicted respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) activity in a population of hospitalized children with ALRI during a 5-year period, from January 2009 to December 2013. Out of a total of 4559 children included in the study (mean age 9·2 ± 8·5 months), 2953 (64·8%) presented RSV infection during the 3-month period from March to May. In the multivariate analysis, after controlling for absolute humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation, temperature [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 2·25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·11-4·53, P = 0·024], and rainfall (IRR 1·01, 95% CI 1·00-1·02, P = 0·044) were independently associated with the monthly number of RSV infections. In conclusion, in Bogota, the capital of a tropical LMIC lying slightly above the equator, RSV activity peaks in the 3-month period from March to May, the main rainy period of the year in the city. In addition, rainfall and temperature are the two most important meteorological parameters that are independently associated with RSV activity in hospitalized children with ALRI in the city. PMID:26888544

  2. Inspiratory activation is not required for episodic hypoxia-induced respiratory long-term facilitation in postnatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Tadjalli, Arash; Duffin, James; Li, Yan Mei; Hong, Hyunwook; Peever, John

    2007-01-01

    Episodic hypoxia causes repetitive inspiratory activation that induces a form of respiratory plasticity termed long-term facilitation (LTF). While LTF is a function of the hypoxic exposures and inspiratory activation, their relative importance in evoking LTF is unknown. The aims of this study were to: (1) dissociate the relative roles played by episodic hypoxia and respiratory activation in LTF; and (2) determine whether the magnitude of LTF varies as a function of hypoxic intensity. We did this by examining the effects of episodic hypoxia in postnatal rats (15–25 days old), which unlike adult rats exhibit a prominent hypoxia-induced respiratory depression. We quantified inspiratory phrenic nerve activity generated by the in situ working-heart brainstem before, during and for 60 min after episodic hypoxia. We demonstrate that episodic hypoxia evokes LTF despite the fact that it potently suppresses inspiratory activity during individual hypoxic exposures (P < 0.05). Specifically, we show that after episodic hypoxia (three 5 min periods of 10% O2) respiratory frequency increased to 40 ± 3.3% above baseline values over the next 60 min (P < 0.001). Continuous hypoxia (15 min of 10% O2) had no lasting effects on respiratory frequency (P > 0.05). To determine if LTF magnitude was affected by hypoxic intensity, the episodic hypoxia protocol was repeated under three different O2 tensions. We demonstrate that the magnitude and time course of LTF depend on hypoxic severity, with more intense hypoxia inducing a more potent degree of LTF. We conclude that inspiratory activation is not required for LTF induction, and that hypoxia per se is the physiological stimulus for eliciting hypoxia-induced respiratory LTF. PMID:17932158

  3. Brush in the bath of active particles: Anomalous stretching of chains and distribution of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-shu; Zhang, Bo-kai; Li, Jian; Tian, Wen-de; Chen, Kang

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between polymer brush and colloidal particles has been intensively studied in the last two decades. Here, we consider a flat chain-grafted substrate immersed in a bath of active particles. Simulations show that an increase in the self-propelling force causes an increase in the number of particles that penetrate into the brush. Anomalously, the particle density inside the main body of the brush eventually becomes higher than that outside the brush at very large self-propelling force. The grafted chains are further stretched due to the steric repulsion from the intruded particles. Upon the increase of the self-propelling force, distinct stretching behaviors of the chains were observed for low and high grafting densities. Surprisingly, we find a weak descent of the average end-to-end distance of chains at high grafting density and very large force which is reminiscent of the compression effect of a chain in the active bath.

  4. Brush in the bath of active particles: Anomalous stretching of chains and distribution of particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-shu; Zhang, Bo-kai; Li, Jian; Tian, Wen-de; Chen, Kang

    2015-12-14

    The interaction between polymer brush and colloidal particles has been intensively studied in the last two decades. Here, we consider a flat chain-grafted substrate immersed in a bath of active particles. Simulations show that an increase in the self-propelling force causes an increase in the number of particles that penetrate into the brush. Anomalously, the particle density inside the main body of the brush eventually becomes higher than that outside the brush at very large self-propelling force. The grafted chains are further stretched due to the steric repulsion from the intruded particles. Upon the increase of the self-propelling force, distinct stretching behaviors of the chains were observed for low and high grafting densities. Surprisingly, we find a weak descent of the average end-to-end distance of chains at high grafting density and very large force which is reminiscent of the compression effect of a chain in the active bath. PMID:26671400

  5. Higher respiratory activity decreases mitochondrial reactive oxygen release and increases life span in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Barros, Mario H; Bandy, Brian; Tahara, Erich B; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2004-11-26

    Increased replicative longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because of calorie restriction has been linked to enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity. Here we have further investigated how mitochondrial respiration affects yeast life span. We found that calorie restriction by growth in low glucose increased respiration but decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production relative to oxygen consumption. Calorie restriction also enhanced chronological life span. The beneficial effects of calorie restriction on mitochondrial respiration, reactive oxygen species release, and replicative and chronological life span could be mimicked by uncoupling agents such as dinitrophenol. Conversely, chronological life span decreased in cells treated with antimycin (which strongly increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation) or in yeast mutants null for mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (which removes superoxide radicals) and for RTG2 (which participates in retrograde feedback signaling between mitochondria and the nucleus). These results suggest that yeast aging is linked to changes in mitochondrial metabolism and oxidative stress and that mild mitochondrial uncoupling can increase both chronological and replicative life span.

  6. Initiation of Electron Transport Chain Activity in the Embryonic Heart Coincides with the Activation of Mitochondrial Complex 1 and the Formation of Supercomplexes

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, Gisela; Eliseev, Roman A.; Porter, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria provide energy in form of ATP in eukaryotic cells. However, it is not known when, during embryonic cardiac development, mitochondria become able to fulfill this function. To assess this, we measured mitochondrial oxygen consumption and the activity of the complexes (Cx) 1 and 2 of the electron transport chain (ETC) and used immunoprecipitation to follow the generation of mitochondrial supercomplexes. We show that in the heart of mouse embryos at embryonic day (E) 9.5, mitochondrial ETC activity and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are not coupled, even though the complexes are present. We show that Cx-1 of the ETC is able to accept electrons from the Krebs cycle, but enzyme assays that specifically measure electron flow to ubiquinone or Cx-3 show no activity at this early embryonic stage. At E11.5, mitochondria appear functionally more mature; ETC activity and OXPHOS are coupled and respond to ETC inhibitors. In addition, the assembly of highly efficient respiratory supercomplexes containing Cx-1, -3, and -4, ubiquinone, and cytochrome c begins at E11.5, the exact time when Cx-1 becomes functional activated. At E13.5, ETC activity and OXPHOS of embryonic heart mitochondria are indistinguishable from adult mitochondria. In summary, our data suggest that between E9.5 and E11.5 dramatic changes occur in the mitochondria of the embryonic heart, which result in an increase in OXPHOS due to the activation of complex 1 and the formation of supercomplexes. PMID:25427064

  7. Silver coordination polymers for prevention of implant infection: thiol interaction, impact on respiratory chain enzymes, and hydroxyl radical induction.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Oliver; Vig Slenters, Tünde; Brunetto, Priscilla S; Villaruz, Amer E; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Otto, Michael; Landmann, Regine; Fromm, Katharina M

    2010-10-01

    Prosthetic joint replacements are used increasingly to alleviate pain and improve mobility of the progressively older and more obese population. Implant infection occurs in about 5% of patients and entails significant morbidity and high social costs. It is most often caused by staphylococci, which are introduced perioperatively. They are a source of prolonged seeding and difficult to treat due to antibiotic resistance; therefore, infection prevention by prosthesis coating with nonantibiotic-type anti-infective substances is indicated. A renewed interest in topically used silver has fostered development of silver nanoparticles, which, however, present a potential health hazard. Here we present new silver coordination polymer networks with tailored physical and chemical properties as nanostructured coatings on metallic implant substrates. These compounds exhibited strong biofilm sugar-independent bactericidal activity on in vitro-grown biofilms and prevented murine Staphylococcus epidermidis implant infection in vivo with slow release of silver ions and limited transient leukocyte cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we describe the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of silver ion action by gene screening and by targeting cell metabolism of S. epidermidis at different levels. We demonstrate that silver ions inactivate enzymes by binding sulfhydryl (thiol) groups in amino acids and promote the release of iron with subsequent hydroxyl radical formation by an indirect mechanism likely mediated by reactive oxygen species. This is the first report investigating the global metabolic effects of silver in the context of a therapeutic application. We anticipate that the compounds presented here open a new treatment field with a high medical impact.

  8. Activation energy of aggregation-disaggregation self-oscillation of polymer chain.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yusuke; Jahan, Rumana A

    2012-12-03

    In this paper, we investigated the activation energies of the aggregation−disaggregation self-oscillation induced by the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction by utilizing the nonthermoresponsive polymer chain in a wide temperature range. This is because the conventional type self-oscillating polymer chain, with thermoresponsive poly(Nisopropylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAAm) main-chain covalently bonded to the ruthenium catalyst (Ru(bpy)(3)) of the BZ reaction, cannot evaluate the activation energy over the lower critical solution temperature (LCST). The nonthermoresponsive self-oscillating polymer chain is composed of a poly-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP) main-chain with the ruthenium catalyst (Ru(bpy)(3)). As a result, we clarified that the activation energy of the aggregation−disaggregation self-oscillation of the polymer chain is hardly affected by the concentrations of the BZ substrates. In addition, the activation energy of the nonthermoresponsive self-oscillating polymer chain was found to be almost the same value as normal BZ reaction, i.e., not including the self-oscillating polymer system with Ru moiety.

  9. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus E protein transports calcium ions and activates the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M; Enjuanes, Luis

    2015-11-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) protein is a viroporin involved in virulence. E protein ion channel (IC) activity is specifically correlated with enhanced pulmonary damage, edema accumulation and death. IL-1β driven proinflammation is associated with those pathological signatures, however its link to IC activity remains unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that SARS-CoV E protein forms protein-lipid channels in ERGIC/Golgi membranes that are permeable to calcium ions, a highly relevant feature never reported before. Calcium ions together with pH modulated E protein pore charge and selectivity. Interestingly, E protein IC activity boosted the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, leading to IL-1β overproduction. Calcium transport through the E protein IC was the main trigger of this process. These findings strikingly link SARS-CoV E protein IC induced ionic disturbances at the cell level to immunopathological consequences and disease worsening in the infected organism.

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus M2-1 protein induces the activation of nuclear factor kappa B

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, Kerstin . E-mail: reimers.kerstin@mh-hannover.de; Buchholz, Katja; Werchau, Hermann

    2005-01-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induces the production of a number of cytokines and chemokines by activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). The activation of NF-{kappa}B has been shown to depend on viral replication in the infected cells. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of RSV M2-1 protein, a transcriptional processivity and anti-termination factor, is sufficient to activate NF-{kappa}B in A549 cells. Electromobility shift assays show increased NF-{kappa}B complexes in the nuclei of M2-1-expressing cells. M2-1 protein is found in nuclei of M2-1-expressing cells and in RSV-infected cells. Co-immunoprecipitations of nuclear extracts of M2-1-expressing cells and of RSV-infected cells revealed an association of M2-1 with Rel A protein. Furthermore, the activation of NF-{kappa}B depends on the C-terminus of the RSV M2-1 protein, as shown by NF-{kappa}B-induced gene expression of a reporter gene construct.

  11. Creatine and creatine pyruvate reduce hypoxia-induced effects on phrenic nerve activity in the juvenile mouse respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Monika; Bischoff, Anna M; Kruzliak, Peter; Opatrilova, Radka; Bovell, Douglas; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2016-08-01

    Adequate concentrations of ATP are required to preserve physiological cell functions and protect tissue from hypoxic damage. Decreased oxygen concentration results in ATP synthesis relying increasingly on the presence of phosphocreatine. The lack of ATP through hypoxic insult to neurons that generate or regulate respiratory function, would lead to the cessation of breathing (apnea). It is not clear whether creatine plays a role in maintaining respiratory phrenic nerve (PN) activity during hypoxic challenge. The aim of the study was to test the effects of exogenously applied creatine or creatine pyruvate in maintaining PN induced respiratory rhythm against the deleterious effects of severe hypoxic insult using Working Heart-Brainstem (WHB) preparations of juvenile Swiss type mice. WHB's were perfused with control perfusate or perfusate containing either creatine [100μM] or creatine pyruvate [100μM] prior to hypoxic challenge and PN activity recorded throughout. Results showed that severe hypoxic challenge resulted in an initial transient increase in PN activity, followed by a reduction in that activity leading to respiratory apnea. The results demonstrated that perfusing the WHB preparation with creatine or creatine pyruvate, significantly reduced the onset of apnea compared to control conditions, with creatine pyruvate being the more effective substance. Overall, creatine and creatine pyruvate each produced time-dependent degrees of protection against severe hypoxic-induced disturbances of PN activity. The underlying protective mechanisms are unknown and need further investigations. PMID:27450651

  12. Spinal Activation of the cAMP-PKA Pathway Induces Respiratory Motor Recovery Following High Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kajana, S.; Goshgarian, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated the involvement of the adenosine 3’5’-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathway in the activation of the crossed phrenic pathways after left C2 spinal cord hemisection. Experiments were conducted on left C2 spinal cord hemisected, anesthetized, vagotomized, pancuronium paralyzed, and artificially ventilated male Sprague-Dawley rats. One week post-injury, the ipsilateral phrenic nerve exhibited no respiratory-related activity indicating a functionally complete hemisection. Intrathecal spinal cord administration of the cAMP analog, 8-Br-cAMP at the level of the phrenic nucleus resulted in an enhancement of contralateral phrenic nerve output and a restoration of respiratory-related activity in the phrenic nerve ipsilateral to the hemisection. Furthermore, pretreatment with Rp-8-Br-cAMP, a PKA inhibitor, abolished the effects of 8-Br-cAMP. These results suggest that PKA activation is necessary for the cAMP-mediated respiratory recovery following high cervical spinal cord injury and that activation of intracellular signaling cascades may represent an important strategy for improving respiratory function after spinal cord injury. PMID:18656458

  13. Creatine and creatine pyruvate reduce hypoxia-induced effects on phrenic nerve activity in the juvenile mouse respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Monika; Bischoff, Anna M; Kruzliak, Peter; Opatrilova, Radka; Bovell, Douglas; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2016-08-01

    Adequate concentrations of ATP are required to preserve physiological cell functions and protect tissue from hypoxic damage. Decreased oxygen concentration results in ATP synthesis relying increasingly on the presence of phosphocreatine. The lack of ATP through hypoxic insult to neurons that generate or regulate respiratory function, would lead to the cessation of breathing (apnea). It is not clear whether creatine plays a role in maintaining respiratory phrenic nerve (PN) activity during hypoxic challenge. The aim of the study was to test the effects of exogenously applied creatine or creatine pyruvate in maintaining PN induced respiratory rhythm against the deleterious effects of severe hypoxic insult using Working Heart-Brainstem (WHB) preparations of juvenile Swiss type mice. WHB's were perfused with control perfusate or perfusate containing either creatine [100μM] or creatine pyruvate [100μM] prior to hypoxic challenge and PN activity recorded throughout. Results showed that severe hypoxic challenge resulted in an initial transient increase in PN activity, followed by a reduction in that activity leading to respiratory apnea. The results demonstrated that perfusing the WHB preparation with creatine or creatine pyruvate, significantly reduced the onset of apnea compared to control conditions, with creatine pyruvate being the more effective substance. Overall, creatine and creatine pyruvate each produced time-dependent degrees of protection against severe hypoxic-induced disturbances of PN activity. The underlying protective mechanisms are unknown and need further investigations.

  14. Prevalence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus detection in aborted fetuses, mummified fetuses and stillborn piglets using quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    OLANRATMANEE, Em-on; WONGYANIN, Piya; THANAWONGNUWECH, Roongroje; TUMMARUK, Padet

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus detection in aborted fetuses (n=32), mummified fetuses (n=30) and stillborn piglets (n=27) from 10 swine herds in Thailand using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Pooled organs and umbilical cord from each fetus/piglet were homogenized and subjected to RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis. The qPCR was carried out on the ORF7 of the PRRS viral genome using fluorogenic probes for amplified product detection. The results revealed that 67.4% (60/89) of the specimens contained PRRS virus. The virus was found in 65.6% (21/32) of aborted fetuses, 63.3% (19/30) of mummified fetuses and 74.1% (20/27) of stillborn piglets (P=0.664). Genotype 1, genotype 2 and mixed genotypes of PRRS virus were detected in 19.1% (17/89), 25.8% (23/89) and 22.5% (20/89) of the specimens, respectively (P=0.316). PRRS virus antigen was retrieved from both non-PRRS-vaccinated herds (68.2%, 45/66) and PRRS-vaccinated herds (65.2%, 15/23) (P=0.794). These findings indicated that these specimens are important sources of the PRRS viral load and the viral shedding within the herd. Thus, intensive care on the routine management of dead fetuses and stillborn piglets in PRRS virus-positive herds should be emphasized. PMID:25866409

  15. SERCA, complex I of the respiratory chain and ATP-synthase inhibition are involved in pleiotropic effects of NS1619 on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Łukasiak, Agnieszka; Skup, Agata; Chlopicki, Stefan; Łomnicka, Magdalena; Kaczara, Patrycja; Proniewski, Bartosz; Szewczyk, Adam; Wrzosek, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    A large conductance potassium (BKCa) channel opener, NS1619 (1,3-dihydro-1- [2-hydroxy-5-(trifluoromethyl) phenyl]-5-(trifluoromethyl)-2H-benzimidazole-2-one), is well known for its protective effects against ischemia-reperfusion injury; however, the exact mode of its action remains unclear. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of NS1619 on endothelial cells. The endothelial cell line EA.hy926, guinea pig hearts and submitochondrial particles isolated from the heart were used. In the isolated guinea pig hearts, which were perfused using the Langendorff technique, NS1619 caused a dose-dependent increase in coronary flow that was inhibited by L-NAME. In EA.hy926 cells, NS1619 also caused a dose-dependent increase in the intracellular calcium ion concentration [Ca(2+)]i, as measured using the FURA-2 fluorescent probe. Moreover, NS1619 decreased the oxygen consumption rate in EA.hy926 cells, as assessed using a Clark-type oxygen electrode. However, when NS1619 was applied in the presence of oligomycin, the oxygen consumption increased. NS1619 also decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, as measured using a JC-1 fluorescent probe in the presence and absence of oligomycin. Additionally, the application of NS1619 to submitochondrial particles inhibited ATP synthase. In summary, NS1619 has pleiotropic actions on EA.hy926 cells and acts not only as an opener of the BKCa channel in EA.hy926 cells but also as an inhibitor of the respiratory chain component, sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase, which leads to the release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, NS1619 has the oligomycin-like property of inhibiting mitochondrial ATP synthase. PMID:27262382

  16. Activity against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mexican plants used to treat respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Arellanes, Adelina; Meckes, Mariana; Ramirez, Raquel; Torres, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2003-09-01

    The increase of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) demands the search for alternative antimycobacterial drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate plants used in Mexican traditional medicine to treat respiratory diseases for activity against MDR-TB. A group of 22 plants was screened for activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and Mycobacterium avium at concentrations from 50 to 200 microg/mL. The antimycobacterial effect was determined by a microcolorimetric assay with Alamar blue dye. None of the aqueous extracts had antimycobacterial activity. Hexane extracts from Artemisia ludoviciana, Chamaedora tepejilote, Lantana hispida, Juniperus communis and Malva parviflora, and methanol extracts from Artemisia ludoviciana and Juniperus communis inhibited the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium avium was inhibited by Juniperus communis hexane extract and by Malva parviflora methanol extract. The active extracts were tested against monoresistant variants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin and ethambutol resistant) and the hexane extract of Lantana hispida showed the best activity. Lantana hispida hexane extract was also active against a group of MDR-TB clinical isolates. In contrast, it did not inhibit the growth of non-tuberculous mycobacteria. The hexane extract of Lantana hispida was fractionated by column chromatography and one of its fractions (FVI) inhibited the growth of all the MDR-TB clinical isolates at concentrations up to 25 microg/mL. This study supports the fact that selecting plants by ethnobotanical criteria enhances the probability of finding species with activity against mycobacteria, and our results point to Lantana hispida as an important source of potential compounds against MDR-TB.

  17. Assessment of microbial respiratory activity of a manufactured gas plant soil after remediation using sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zongqiang; Alef, Kassem; Wilke, Berndt-Michael; Mai, Maike; Li, Peijun

    2005-09-30

    Microbial activity of a manufactured gas plant (MGP) soil, as well as remaining oil degradability, before and after remediation using sunflower oil was assessed. A sandy soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was collected from an MGP site in Berlin, Germany. Column solubilizations of PAHs from the field-moist soil and air-dried soil using sunflower oil as an extractant at an oil/soil ratio of 2:1 (v/m) were carried out to compare PAH removals from the soil under these two conditions. After column solubilizations, portions of untreated soil (UTS), solubilized field-moist soil (SFMS), and solubilized air-dried soil (SADS) were amended with nutrients. Both nutrient amended and unamended soil samples were subjected to soil respiratory measurement. Soil respiration parameters, such as basal respiration rate, nutrient-induced respiration rate, lag time, exponential growth rate, respiratory activation quotient, peak maximum time, and cumulative CO2 evolution were calculated from the soil respiration curves. The parameters were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and least-significance difference (LSD). Results showed that the impact of soil moisture on the PAH removals was quite significant, with the SADS showing higher PAH removals and the SFMS showing lower ones. There were significant differences between the respiration parameters with respect to the UTS, SFMS, and SADS. Basal respiration rate, nutrient-induced respiration rate, and exponential growth rate were lower for the SFMS and SADS relative to the UTS. Lag time and peak maximum time were higher for the SFMS and SADS relative to the UTS. Exponential growth rate was higher for the SFMS relative to the SADS. These parameters demonstrated that soil microbial activity was reduced at the onset of the test, because a lot of bioavailable materials for microbial growth were removed by sunflower oil. On the other hand, cumulative CO2 evolutions in the SFMS and SADS were higher than that in

  18. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Kim, Nan-Soo

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing.

  19. Abdominal expiratory activity in the rat brainstem-spinal cord in situ: patterns, origins and implications for respiratory rhythm generation.

    PubMed

    Abdala, A P L; Rybak, I A; Smith, J C; Paton, J F R

    2009-07-15

    We studied respiratory neural activity generated during expiration. Motoneuronal activity was recorded simultaneously from abdominal (AbN), phrenic (PN), hypoglossal (HN) and central vagus nerves from neonatal and juvenile rats in situ. During eupnoeic activity, low-amplitude post-inspiratory (post-I) discharge was only present in AbN motor outflow. Expression of AbN late-expiratory (late-E) activity, preceding PN bursts, occurred during hypercapnia. Biphasic expiratory (biphasic-E) activity with pre-inspiratory (pre-I) and post-I discharges occurred only during eucapnic anoxia or hypercapnic anoxia. Late-E activity generated during hypercapnia (7-10% CO(2)) was abolished with pontine transections or chemical suppression of retrotrapezoid nucleus/ventrolateral parafacial (RTN/vlPF). AbN late-E activity during hypercapnia is coupled with augmented pre-I discharge in HN, truncated PN burst, and was quiescent during inspiration. Our data suggest that the pons provides a necessary excitatory drive to an additional neural oscillatory mechanism that is only activated under conditions of high respiratory drive to generate late-E activity destined for AbN motoneurones. This mechanism may arise from neurons located in the RTN/vlPF or the latter may relay late-E activity generated elsewhere. We hypothesize that this oscillatory mechanism is not a necessary component of the respiratory central pattern generator but constitutes a defensive mechanism activated under critical metabolic conditions to provide forced expiration and reduced upper airway resistance simultaneously. Possible interactions of this oscillator with components of the brainstem respiratory network are discussed.

  20. 76 FR 44372 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Respiratory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... published in the Federal Register on March 14, 2011 (76 FR 13668). Interested parties are encouraged to send...; Respiratory Protection Standard ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) is submitting the..., ``Respiratory Protection Standard,'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval...

  1. C-Terminus of the B-Chain of Relaxin-3 Is Important for Receptor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Bathgate, Ross A. D.

    2013-01-01

    Human relaxin-3 is a neuropeptide that is structurally similar to human insulin with two chains (A and B) connected by three disulfide bonds. It is expressed primarily in the brain and has modulatory roles in stress and anxiety, feeding and metabolism, and arousal and behavioural activation. Structure-activity relationship studies have shown that relaxin-3 interacts with its cognate receptor RXFP3 primarily through its B-chain and that its A-chain does not have any functional role. In this study, we have investigated the effect of modification of the B-chain C-terminus on the binding and activity of the peptide. We have chemically synthesised and characterized H3 relaxin as C-termini acid (both A and B chains having free C-termini; native form) and amide forms (both chains’ C-termini were amidated). We have confirmed that the acid form of the peptide is more potent than its amide form at both RXFP3 and RXFP4 receptors. We further investigated the effects of amidation at the C-terminus of individual chains. We report here for the first time that amidation at the C-terminus of the B-chain of H3 relaxin leads to significant drop in the binding and activity of the peptide at RXFP3/RXFP4 receptors. However, modification of the A-chain C-terminus does not have any effect on the activity. We have confirmed using circular dichroism spectroscopy that there is no secondary structural change between the acid and amide form of the peptide, and it is likely that it is the local C-terminal carboxyl group orientation that is crucial for interacting with the receptors. PMID:24349312

  2. The Effects of Plantago major on the Activation of the Neutrophil Respiratory Burst.

    PubMed

    Reina, Elaine; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Allam, Eman; Gregson, Karen S; Kowolik, Michael; Windsor, L Jack

    2013-10-01

    Plantago major is a common plant that grows worldwide in temperate zones and is found in fields, lawns, and on the roadsides. Its leaves and seeds have been used in almost all parts of the world for centuries as a wound healer, analgesic, antioxidant, and antibiotic, as well as an immune system modulator, antiviral, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory agent. Baicalein and aucubin are the two most biologically active components of P. major, and both have been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Neutrophils have a pivotal role in wound healing and inflammation. Their principal mechanism of host defense is the killing of pathogens via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro effects of P. major extract, baicalein, and aucubin on human neutrophil respiratory burst activity. The cytotoxicity of the agents was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. A standard luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) assay was utilized to monitor the respiratory burst of the neutrophils after exposure to P. major extract and its two active ingredients, baicalein and aucubin. Three replicates per group were included in each of the three runs of the experiments and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. P. major and baicalein were not toxic to the cells at any of the concentrations examined. Aucubin was toxic to the cells only at the highest concentration tested (P = 0.0081). However, genistein was toxic to the cells at all of the concentrations examined except for the lowest concentration of 16.9 μg/ml (P = 0.985). P. major (-0.10 ± 0.11), aucubin (0.06 ± 0.16), baicalein (-0.10 ± 0.11), and genistein (-0.18 ± 0.07) all significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited ROS production from the neutrophils. P. major extract inhibited neutrophil ROS production, as did aucubin and baicalein. Therefore, these components should be investigated further with relation to

  3. The Effects of Plantago major on the Activation of the Neutrophil Respiratory Burst

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Elaine; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Allam, Eman; Gregson, Karen S.; Kowolik, Michael; Windsor, L. Jack

    2013-01-01

    Plantago major is a common plant that grows worldwide in temperate zones and is found in fields, lawns, and on the roadsides. Its leaves and seeds have been used in almost all parts of the world for centuries as a wound healer, analgesic, antioxidant, and antibiotic, as well as an immune system modulator, antiviral, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory agent. Baicalein and aucubin are the two most biologically active components of P. major, and both have been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Neutrophils have a pivotal role in wound healing and inflammation. Their principal mechanism of host defense is the killing of pathogens via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro effects of P. major extract, baicalein, and aucubin on human neutrophil respiratory burst activity. The cytotoxicity of the agents was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. A standard luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) assay was utilized to monitor the respiratory burst of the neutrophils after exposure to P. major extract and its two active ingredients, baicalein and aucubin. Three replicates per group were included in each of the three runs of the experiments and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. P. major and baicalein were not toxic to the cells at any of the concentrations examined. Aucubin was toxic to the cells only at the highest concentration tested (P = 0.0081). However, genistein was toxic to the cells at all of the concentrations examined except for the lowest concentration of 16.9 μg/ml (P = 0.985). P. major (−0.10 ± 0.11), aucubin (0.06 ± 0.16), baicalein (−0.10 ± 0.11), and genistein (−0.18 ± 0.07) all significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited ROS production from the neutrophils. P. major extract inhibited neutrophil ROS production, as did aucubin and baicalein. Therefore, these components should be investigated further with

  4. The Effects of Plantago major on the Activation of the Neutrophil Respiratory Burst.

    PubMed

    Reina, Elaine; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Allam, Eman; Gregson, Karen S; Kowolik, Michael; Windsor, L Jack

    2013-10-01

    Plantago major is a common plant that grows worldwide in temperate zones and is found in fields, lawns, and on the roadsides. Its leaves and seeds have been used in almost all parts of the world for centuries as a wound healer, analgesic, antioxidant, and antibiotic, as well as an immune system modulator, antiviral, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory agent. Baicalein and aucubin are the two most biologically active components of P. major, and both have been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Neutrophils have a pivotal role in wound healing and inflammation. Their principal mechanism of host defense is the killing of pathogens via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro effects of P. major extract, baicalein, and aucubin on human neutrophil respiratory burst activity. The cytotoxicity of the agents was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. A standard luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) assay was utilized to monitor the respiratory burst of the neutrophils after exposure to P. major extract and its two active ingredients, baicalein and aucubin. Three replicates per group were included in each of the three runs of the experiments and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. P. major and baicalein were not toxic to the cells at any of the concentrations examined. Aucubin was toxic to the cells only at the highest concentration tested (P = 0.0081). However, genistein was toxic to the cells at all of the concentrations examined except for the lowest concentration of 16.9 μg/ml (P = 0.985). P. major (-0.10 ± 0.11), aucubin (0.06 ± 0.16), baicalein (-0.10 ± 0.11), and genistein (-0.18 ± 0.07) all significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited ROS production from the neutrophils. P. major extract inhibited neutrophil ROS production, as did aucubin and baicalein. Therefore, these components should be investigated further with relation to

  5. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  6. Interplay of magnetic interactions and active movements in the formation of magnetosome chains.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Stefan; Faivre, Damien

    2012-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria assemble chains of magnetosomes, organelles that contain magnetic nano-crystals. A number of genetic factors involved in the controlled biomineralization of these crystals and the assembly of magnetosome chains have been identified in recent years, but how the specific biological regulation is coordinated with general physical processes such as diffusion and magnetic interactions remains unresolved. Here, these questions are addressed by simulations of different scenarios for magnetosome chain formation, in which various physical processes and interactions are either switched on or off. The simulation results indicate that purely physical processes of magnetosome diffusion, guided by their magnetic interactions, are not sufficient for the robust chain formation observed experimentally and suggest that biologically encoded active movements of magnetosomes may be required. Not surprisingly, the chain pattern is most resembling experimental results when both magnetic interactions and active movement are coordinated. We estimate that the force such active transport has to generate is compatible with forces generated by the polymerization or depolymerization of cytoskeletal filaments. The simulations suggest that the pleiotropic phenotypes of mamK deletion strains may be due to a defect in active motility of magnetosomes and that crystal formation in magneteosome vesicles is coupled to the activation of their active motility in M. gryphiswaldense, but not in M. magneticum.

  7. Acute inhibition of glial cells in the NTS does not affect respiratory and sympathetic activities in rats exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Costa, Kauê M; Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H

    2013-02-16

    Recent studies suggest that neuron-glia interactions are involved in multiple aspects of neuronal activity regulation. In the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neuron-glia interactions are thought to participate in the integration of autonomic responses to physiological challenges. However, it remains to be shown whether NTS glial cells might influence breathing and cardiovascular control, and also if they could be integral to the autonomic and respiratory responses to hypoxic challenges. Here, we investigated whether NTS glia play a tonic role in the modulation of central respiratory and sympathetic activities as well as in the changes in respiratory-sympathetic coupling induced by exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a model of central autonomic and respiratory plasticity. We show that bilateral microinjections of fluorocitrate (FCt), a glial cell inhibitor, into the caudal and intermediate subnuclei of the NTS did not alter baseline respiratory and sympathetic parameters in in situ preparations of juvenile rats. Similar results were observed in rats previously exposed to CIH. Likewise, CIH-induced changes in respiratory-sympathetic coupling were unaffected by FCt-mediated inhibition. However, microinjection of FCt into the ventral medulla produced changes in respiratory frequency. Our results show that acute glial inhibition in the NTS does not affect baseline respiratory and sympathetic control. Additionally, we conclude that NTS glial cells may not be necessary for the continuous manifestation of sympathetic and respiratory adaptations to CIH. Our work provides evidence that neuron-glia interactions in the NTS do not participate in baseline respiratory and sympathetic control.

  8. A novel preterm respiratory mechanics active simulator to test the performances of neonatal pulmonary ventilators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, Paolo; Sciuto, Salvatore Andrea; Silvestri, Sergio

    2002-06-01

    A patient active simulator is proposed which is capable of reproducing values of the parameters of pulmonary mechanics of healthy newborns and preterm pathological infants. The implemented prototype is able to: (a) let the operator choose the respiratory pattern, times of apnea, episodes of cough, sobs, etc., (b) continuously regulate and control the parameters characterizing the pulmonary system; and, finally, (c) reproduce the attempt of breathing of a preterm infant. Taking into account both the limitation due to the chosen application field and the preliminary autocalibration phase automatically carried out by the proposed device, accuracy and reliability on the order of 1% is estimated. The previously indicated value has to be considered satisfactory in light of the field of application and the small values of the simulated parameters. Finally, the achieved metrological characteristics allow the described neonatal simulator to be adopted as a reference device to test performances of neonatal ventilators and, more specifically, to measure the time elapsed between the occurrence of a potentially dangerous condition to the patient and the activation of the corresponding alarm of the tested ventilator.

  9. Synthesis and activity of 2-oxoamides containing long chain beta-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Constantinou-Kokotou, Violetta; Peristeraki, Anna; Kokotos, Christoforos G; Six, David A; Dennis, Edward A

    2005-07-01

    2-Oxoamides based on long chain beta-amino acids were synthesized. 1-Benzyl substituted long chain amines, needed for such synthesis, were synthesized starting from Boc-phenylalaninol. The oxidative conversion of a phenyl group to a carboxyl group was used as the key transformation synthetic step. The compounds synthesized were studied for their activity against GIVA PLA(2), and were proven to be weak inhibitors. PMID:15635664

  10. Substance P modulation of TRPC3/7 channels improves respiratory rhythm regularity and ICAN-dependent pacemaker activity.

    PubMed

    Ben-Mabrouk, Faiza; Tryba, Andrew K

    2010-04-01

    Neuromodulators, such as substance P (SubP), play an important role in modulating many rhythmic activities driven by central pattern generators (e.g. locomotion, respiration). However, the mechanism by which SubP enhances breathing regularity has not been determined. Here, we used mouse brainstem slices containing the pre-Bötzinger complex to demonstrate, for the first time, that SubP activates transient receptor protein canonical (TRPC) channels to enhance respiratory rhythm regularity. Moreover, SubP enhancement of network regularity is accomplished via selective enhancement of ICAN (inward non-specific cation current)-dependent intrinsic bursting properties. In contrast to INaP (persistent sodium current)-dependent pacemakers, ICAN-dependent pacemaker bursting activity is TRPC-dependent. Western Blots reveal TRPC3 and TRPC7 channels are expressed in rhythmically active ventral respiratory group island preparations. Taken together, these data suggest that SubP-mediated activation of TRPC3/7 channels underlies rhythmic ICAN-dependent pacemaker activity and enhances the regularity of respiratory rhythm activity.

  11. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Inhibitor AZ-27 Differentially Inhibits Different Polymerase Activities at the Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Noton, Sarah L.; Nagendra, Kartikeya; Dunn, Ewan F.; Mawhorter, Michael E.; Yu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of pediatric respiratory disease. RSV has an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that transcribes and replicates the viral negative-sense RNA genome. The large polymerase subunit (L) has multiple enzymatic activities, having the capability to synthesize RNA and add and methylate a cap on each of the viral mRNAs. Previous studies (H. Xiong et al., Bioorg Med Chem Lett, 23:6789–6793, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2013.10.018; C. L. Tiong-Yip et al., Antimicrob Agents Chemother, 58:3867–3873, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.02540-14) had identified a small-molecule inhibitor, AZ-27, that targets the L protein. In this study, we examined the effect of AZ-27 on different aspects of RSV polymerase activity. AZ-27 was found to inhibit equally both mRNA transcription and genome replication in cell-based minigenome assays, indicating that it inhibits a step common to both of these RNA synthesis processes. Analysis in an in vitro transcription run-on assay, containing RSV nucleocapsids, showed that AZ-27 inhibits synthesis of transcripts from the 3′ end of the genome to a greater extent than those from the 5′ end, indicating that it inhibits transcription initiation. Consistent with this finding, experiments that assayed polymerase activity on the promoter showed that AZ-27 inhibited transcription and replication initiation. The RSV polymerase also can utilize the promoter sequence to perform a back-priming reaction. Interestingly, addition of AZ-27 had no effect on the addition of up to three nucleotides by back-priming but inhibited further extension of the back-primed RNA. These data provide new information regarding the mechanism of inhibition by AZ-27. They also suggest that the RSV polymerase adopts different conformations to perform its different activities at the promoter. IMPORTANCE Currently, there are no effective antiviral drugs to treat RSV infection. The RSV polymerase is an

  12. Activity-based cost management. Part II: Applied to a respiratory protection program.

    PubMed

    Brandt, M T; Levine, S P; Smith, D G; Ettinger, H J; Gallimore, B F

    1998-05-01

    To demonstrate the relevance of activity-based cost management (ABCM) for the occupational and environmental health community, the investigators used data generated by an ABCM model of a respiratory protection program (RPP) to develop options for solving a business problem. The RPP manager in this hypothetical but realistic business scenario is faced with a 25% budget cut and a 10% increase in demand for RPP services. The manager's dilemma is to maintain the integrity of the RPP while absorbing a significant budget cut. Various cost savings options are developed, and the assumptions under which these options operate are presented. It is emphasized that the RPP manager's primary responsibility is to assure worker health and safety by first understanding the technical issues, merits, and implications of any cost-cutting option that may be considered. It is argued that only then should the manager consider the financial merits of the possible solutions to this business problem. In this way worker health and safety, and environmental protection goals, can continue to be achieved in an economic climate of cost cutting and downsizing. PMID:9622907

  13. Clock-genes and mitochondrial respiratory activity: Evidence of a reciprocal interplay.

    PubMed

    Scrima, Rosella; Cela, Olga; Merla, Giuseppe; Augello, Bartolomeo; Rubino, Rosa; Quarato, Giovanni; Fugetto, Sabino; Menga, Marta; Fuhr, Luise; Relógio, Angela; Piccoli, Claudia; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Capitanio, Nazzareno

    2016-08-01

    In the past few years mounting evidences have highlighted the tight correlation between circadian rhythms and metabolism. Although at the organismal level the central timekeeper is constituted by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei practically all the peripheral tissues are equipped with autonomous oscillators made up by common molecular clockworks represented by circuits of gene expression that are organized in interconnected positive and negative feed-back loops. In this study we exploited a well-established in vitro synchronization model to investigate specifically the linkage between clock gene expression and the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). Here we show that synchronized cells exhibit an autonomous ultradian mitochondrial respiratory activity which is abrogated by silencing the master clock gene ARNTL/BMAL1. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of the mitochondrial OxPhos system resulted in dramatic deregulation of the rhythmic clock-gene expression and a similar result was attained with mtDNA depleted cells (Rho0). Our findings provide a novel level of complexity in the interlocked feedback loop controlling the interplay between cellular bioenergetics and the molecular clockwork. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060253

  14. Antiviral activity and underlying molecular mechanisms of Matrine against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Cai-Hong; Li, E; He, Jun-Ping; Wang, Shao-Yu; Hu, Yuan-Liang; Lei, Hai-Min; Li, Hong-Quan

    2014-04-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), caused by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), is an acute infectious disease. The prevalence of PRRS has made swine industry suffered huge financial losses. Matrine, a natural compound, has been demonstrated to possess anti-PRRSV activity in Marc-145 cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms were still unknown. The main objective of our study was to discuss the effect of Matrine on PRRSV N protein expression and PRRSV induced apoptosis. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blot were used to assess the effect of Matrine on N protein expression. Apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence staining. In addition, the effect of Matrine on caspase-3 activation was investigated by Western blot. Indirect immunofluorescence assay and Western blot analysis demonstrated that Matrine could inhibit N protein expression in Marc-145 cells. And Matrine was found to be able to impair PRRSV-induced apoptosis by inhibiting caspase-3 activation.

  15. Nitric oxide changes its role as a modulator of respiratory motor activity during development in the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana).

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Michael S; Chen, Anna K; Jessop, Kristy L

    2005-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a unique chemical messenger that has been shown to play a role in the modulation of breathing in amphibians and other vertebrates. In the post-metamorphic tadpole and adult amphibian brainstem, NO, acting via the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), is excitatory to the generation of lung burst activity. In this study, we examine the modulation of breathing by NO during development of the amphibian brainstem. Isolated brainstem preparations from pre-metamorphic and late-stage post-metamorphic tadpoles (Rana catesbeiana) were used to determine the role of NO in modulating central respiratory neural activity. Respiratory neural activity was monitored with suction electrodes recording extracellular activity of cranial nerve rootlets that innervate respiratory musculature. Brainstems were superfused with an artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) at 20-22 degrees C containing l-nitroarginine (l-NA; 1-10 mM), a non-selective NOS inhibitor. In pre-metamorphic tadpoles, l-NA increased fictive gill ventilation frequency and amplitude, and increased lung burst frequency. By contrast, l-NA applied to the post-metamorphic tadpole brainstem had little effect on fictive buccal activity, but significantly decreased lung burst frequency and the frequency of lung burst episodes. These data indicate that early in development, NO provides a tonic inhibitory input to gill and lung burst activity, but as development progresses, NO provides an excitatory input to lung ventilation. This changing role for NO coincides with the shift in importance in the different respiratory modes during development in amphibians; that is, pre-metamorphic tadpoles rely predominantly on gill ventilation whereas post-metamorphic tadpoles have lost the gills and are obligate air-breathers primarily using lungs for gas exchange. We hypothesize that NO provides a tonic input to the respiratory CPG during development and this changing role reflects the modulatory influence of NO

  16. Respiration and respiratory enzyme activity in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, T. T.; Garfield, P. C.; Martinez, R.

    1983-03-01

    Oxygen consumption, nitrate reduction, respiratory electron transport activity, and nitrate reductase activity were measured in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus. The respiratory electron transport activity was closely correlated with oxygen consumption ( r = 0.98) in aerobic cultures and nearly as well correlated with nitrate reductase activity ( r = 0.91) and nitrate reduction ( r = 0.85) in anaerobic cultures. It was also well correlated with biomass in both aerobic ( r = 0.99) and anaerobic ( r = 0.94) cultures supporting the use of tetrazolium reduction as an index of living biomass. Time courses of nitrate and nitrate in the anaerobic cultures demonstrated that at nitrate concentrations above 1 mM, denitrification proceeds stepwise. Time courses of pH in anaerobic cultures revealed a rise from 7 to 8.5 during nitrite reduction indicating net proton utilization. This proton utilization is predicted by the stoichiometry of denitrification. Although the experiments were not under 'simulated in situ' conditions, the results are relevant to studies of denitrification, to bacterial ATP production, and to the respiratory activity of marine plankton in the ocean.

  17. Hydrocarbon stapled B chain analogues of relaxin-3 retain biological activity.

    PubMed

    Jayakody, Tharindunee; Marwari, Subhi; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Tan, Francis Chee Kuan; Johannes, Charles William; Dymock, Brian William; Poulsen, Anders; Herr, Deron Raymond; Dawe, Gavin Stewart

    2016-10-01

    Relaxin-3 or insulin-like peptide 7 (INSL7) is the most recently discovered relaxin/insulin-like family peptide. Mature relaxin-3 consists of an A chain and a B chain held by disulphide bonds. According to structure activity relationship studies, the relaxin-3 B chain is more important in binding and activating the receptor. RXFP3 (also known as Relaxin-3 receptor 1, GPCR 135, somatostatin- and angiotensin- like peptide receptor or SALPR) was identified as the cognate receptor for relaxin-3 by expression profiles and binding studies. Recent studies imply roles of this system in mediating stress and anxiety, feeding, metabolism and cognition. Stapling of peptides is a technique used to develop peptide drugs for otherwise undruggable targets. The main advantages of stapling include, increased activity due to reduced proteolysis, increased affinity to receptors and increased cell permeability. Stable agonists and antagonists of RXFP3 are crucial for understanding the physiological significance of this system. So far, agonists and antagonists of RXFP3 are peptides. In this study, for the first time, we have introduced stapling of the relaxin-3 B chain at 14th and 18th positions (14s18) and 18th and 22nd position (18s22). These stapled peptides showed greater helicity than the unstapled relaxin-3 B chain in circular dichroism analysis. Both stapled peptides bound RXFP3 and activated RXFP3 as observed in an inhibition of forskolin-induced cAMP assay and a ERK1/2 activation assay, although with different potencies. Therefore, we conclude that stapling of the relaxin3 B chain does not compromise its ability to activate RXFP3 and is a promising method for developing stable peptide agonists and antagonists of RXFP3 to aid relaxin-3/RXFP3 research. PMID:27498038

  18. Flagellar dynamics of a connected chain of active, polar, Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Chelakkot, Raghunath; Gopinath, Arvind; Mahadevan, L; Hagan, Michael F

    2014-03-01

    We show that active, self-propelled particles that are connected together to form a single chain that is anchored at one end can produce the graceful beating motions of flagella. Changing the boundary condition from a clamp to a pivot at the anchor leads to steadily rotating tight coils. Strong noise in the system disrupts the regularity of the oscillations. We use a combination of detailed numerical simulations, mean-field scaling analysis and first passage time theory to characterize the phase diagram as a function of the filament length, passive elasticity, propulsion force and noise. Our study suggests minimal experimental tests for the onset of oscillations in an active polar chain.

  19. Toll-Like Receptor 4-Mediated Activation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Is a Determinant of Respiratory Virus Entry and Tropism▿

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, David; Singhera, Gurpreet K.; Utokaparch, Soraya; Hackett, Tillie L.; Boyd, John H.; Luo, Zongshu; Si, Xiaoning; Dorscheid, Delbert R.; McManus, Bruce M.; Hegele, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory viruses exert a heavy toll of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite this burden there are few specific treatments available for respiratory virus infections. Since many viruses utilize host cell enzymatic machinery such as protein kinases for replication, we determined whether pharmacological inhibition of kinases could, in principle, be used as a broad antiviral strategy for common human respiratory virus infections. A panel of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing recombinant respiratory viruses, including an isolate of H1N1 influenza virus (H1N1/Weiss/43), was used to represent a broad range of virus families responsible for common respiratory infections (Adenoviridae, Paramyxoviridae, Picornaviridae, and Orthomyxoviridae). Kinase inhibitors were screened in a high-throughput assay that detected virus infection in human airway epithelial cells (1HAEo-) using a fluorescent plate reader. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling was able to significantly inhibit replication by all viruses tested. Therefore, the pathways involved in virus-mediated p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK activation were investigated using bronchial epithelial cells and primary fibroblasts derived from MyD88 knockout mouse lungs. Influenza virus, which activated p38 MAPK to approximately 10-fold-greater levels than did respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in 1HAEo- cells, was internalized about 8-fold faster and more completely than RSV. We show for the first time that p38 MAPK is a determinant of virus infection that is dependent upon MyD88 expression and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligation. Imaging of virus-TLR4 interactions showed significant clustering of TLR4 at the site of virus-cell interaction, triggering phosphorylation of downstream targets of p38 MAPK, suggesting the need for a signaling receptor to activate virus internalization. PMID:20702616

  20. Structure–Activity Relationships for Side Chain Oxysterol Agonists of the Hedgehog Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Oxysterols (OHCs) are byproducts of cholesterol oxidation that are known to activate the Hedeghog (Hh) signaling pathway. While OHCs that incorporate hydroxyl groups throughout the scaffold are known, those that act as agonists of Hh signaling primarily contain a single hydroxyl on the alkyl side chain. We sought to further explore how side chain hydroxylation patterns affect oxysterol-mediated Hh activation, by performing a structure–activity relationship study on a series of synthetic OHCs. The most active analogue, 23(R)-OHC (35), demonstrated potent activation of Hh signaling in two Hh-dependent cell lines (EC50 values 0.54–0.65 μM). In addition, OHC 35 was approximately 3-fold selective for the Hh pathway as compared to the liver X receptor, a nuclear receptor that is also activated by endogenous OHCs. Finally, 35 induced osteogenic differentiation and osteoblast formation in cultured cells, indicating functional agonism of the Hh pathway. PMID:24900386

  1. Adsorption characteristics of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) for toluene: application in respiratory protection.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Bartolucci, Alfred A; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) is currently the standard adsorbent in respirators against several gases and vapors because of its efficiency, low cost, and available technology. However, a drawback of GAC due to its granular form is its need for containment, adding weight and bulkiness to respirators. This makes respirators uncomfortable to wear, resulting in poor compliance in their use. Activated carbon fibers (ACF) are considered viable alternative adsorbent materials for developing thinner, light-weight, and efficient respirators because of their larger surface area, lighter weight, and fabric form. This study aims to determine the critical bed depth and adsorption capacity of different types of commercially available ACFs for toluene to understand how thin a respirator can be and the service life of the adsorbents, respectively. ACF in cloth (ACFC) and felt (ACFF) forms with three different surface areas per form were tested. Each ACF type was challenged with six concentrations of toluene (50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 ppm) at constant air temperature (23°C), relative humidity (50%), and airflow (16 LPM) at different adsorbent weights and bed depths. Breakthrough data were obtained for each adsorbent using gas chromatography with flame ionization detector. The ACFs' surface areas were measured by an automatic physisorption analyzer. The results showed that ACFC has a lower critical bed depth and higher adsorption capacity compared to ACFF with similar surface area for each toluene concentration. Among the ACF types, ACFC2000 (cloth with the highest measured surface area of 1614 ± 5 m(2)/g) has one of the lowest critical bed depths (ranging from 0.11-0.22 cm) and has the highest adsorption capacity (ranging from 595-878 mg/g). Based on these studied adsorption characteristics, it is concluded that ACF has great potential for application in respiratory protection against toluene, particularly the ACFC2000, which is the best candidate for developing thinner and

  2. Short- and medium-chain fatty acids exhibit antimicrobial activity for oral microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chifu B.; Altimova, Yelena; Myers, Taylor M.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed the antibacterial activity of short-, medium-, and long-chain fatty acids against various oral microorganisms. Methods The short-chain fatty acids [formic acid (C1), acetic acid (C2), propionic acid (C3), butyric acid (C4), isobutyric acid (C4), isovaleric acid (C5), hexanoic acid (C6)], medium-chain fatty acids [octanoic acid (C8), capric acid (C10), lauric acid (12)], and long-chain fatty acids [myristic acid (C14), palmitic acid (C16)], were investigated for antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, S. gordonii, S. sanguis, Candida albicans, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Results The data demonstrated that the fatty acids exhibited patterns of inhibition against oral bacteria with some specificity that appeared related more to the bacterial species that the general structural characteristics of the microorganism. As a group the fatty acids were much less effective against C. albicans than the oral bacteria, with effectiveness limited to hexanoic, octanoic, and lauric acids. Formic acid, capric, and lauric acids were broadly inhibitory for the bacteria. Interestingly, fatty acids that are produced at metabolic end-products by a number of these bacteria, were specifically inactive against the producing species, while substantially inhibiting the growth of other oral microorganisms. Conclusions The results indicate that the antimicrobial activity of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs), long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) could influence the microbial ecology in the oral cavity via at least 2 potential pathways. First, the agents delivered exogenously as therapeutic adjuncts could be packaged to enhance a microbial-regulatory environment in the subgingival sulcus. Second, it would be the intrinsic nature of these fatty acid inhibitors in contributing to the characteristics of the microbial biofilms, their evolution, and emergence of

  3. Enhanced allergic responsiveness after early childhood infection with respiratory viruses: Are long-lived alternatively activated macrophages the missing link?

    PubMed

    Keegan, Achsah D; Shirey, Kari Ann; Bagdure, Dayanand; Blanco, Jorge; Viscardi, Rose M; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2016-07-01

    Early childhood infection with respiratory viruses, including human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza, is associated with an increased risk of allergic asthma and severe exacerbation of ongoing disease. Despite the long recognition of this relationship, the mechanism linking viral infection and later susceptibility to allergic lung inflammation is still poorly understood. We discuss the literature and provide new evidence demonstrating that these viruses induce the alternative activation of macrophages. Alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) induced by RSV or influenza infection persisted in the lungs of mice up to 90 days after initial viral infection. Several studies suggest that AAM contribute to allergic inflammatory responses, although their mechanism of action is unclear. In this commentary, we propose that virus-induced AAM provide a link between viral infection and enhanced responses to inhaled allergens. PMID:27178560

  4. Breakthrough curves for toluene adsorption on different types of activated carbon fibers: application in respiratory protection.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Floyd, Evan L; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2015-05-01

    Activated carbon fibers (ACF) are considered viable alternative adsorbent materials in respirators because of their larger surface area, lighter weight, and fabric form. The purpose of this study was to characterize the breakthrough curves of toluene for different types of commercially available ACFs to understand their potential service lives in respirators. Two forms of ACF, cloth (AC) and felt (AF), with three surface areas each were tested. ACFs were challenged with six toluene concentrations (50-500 p.p.m.) at constant air temperature (23°C), relative humidity (50%), and air flow (16 l min-1) at different bed depths. Breakthrough data were obtained using continuous monitoring by gas chromatography using a gas sampling valve. The ACF specific surface areas were measured by an automatic physisorption analyzer. Results showed unique shapes of breakthrough curves for each ACF form: AC demonstrated a gradual increase in breakthrough concentration, whereas AF showed abrupt increase in concentration from the breakpoint, which was attributed to the difference in fiber density between the forms. AF has steeper breakthrough curves compared with AC with similar specific surface area. AC exhibits higher 10% breakthrough times for a given bed depth due to higher mass per bed depth compared with AF, indicating more adsorption per bed depth with AC. ACF in respirators may be appropriate for use as protection in environments with toluene concentration at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limit, or during emergency escape for higher toluene concentrations. ACF has shown great potential for application in respiratory protection against toluene and in the development of thinner, lighter, and more efficient respirators. PMID:25528579

  5. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

  6. Breakthrough curves for toluene adsorption on different types of activated carbon fibers: application in respiratory protection.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Floyd, Evan L; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2015-05-01

    Activated carbon fibers (ACF) are considered viable alternative adsorbent materials in respirators because of their larger surface area, lighter weight, and fabric form. The purpose of this study was to characterize the breakthrough curves of toluene for different types of commercially available ACFs to understand their potential service lives in respirators. Two forms of ACF, cloth (AC) and felt (AF), with three surface areas each were tested. ACFs were challenged with six toluene concentrations (50-500 p.p.m.) at constant air temperature (23°C), relative humidity (50%), and air flow (16 l min-1) at different bed depths. Breakthrough data were obtained using continuous monitoring by gas chromatography using a gas sampling valve. The ACF specific surface areas were measured by an automatic physisorption analyzer. Results showed unique shapes of breakthrough curves for each ACF form: AC demonstrated a gradual increase in breakthrough concentration, whereas AF showed abrupt increase in concentration from the breakpoint, which was attributed to the difference in fiber density between the forms. AF has steeper breakthrough curves compared with AC with similar specific surface area. AC exhibits higher 10% breakthrough times for a given bed depth due to higher mass per bed depth compared with AF, indicating more adsorption per bed depth with AC. ACF in respirators may be appropriate for use as protection in environments with toluene concentration at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limit, or during emergency escape for higher toluene concentrations. ACF has shown great potential for application in respiratory protection against toluene and in the development of thinner, lighter, and more efficient respirators.

  7. Effects of bovine colostrum supplementation on upper respiratory illness in active males.

    PubMed

    Jones, Arwel W; Cameron, Simon J S; Thatcher, Rhys; Beecroft, Marikka S; Mur, Luis A J; Davison, Glen

    2014-07-01

    Bovine colostrum (COL) has been advocated as a nutritional countermeasure to exercise-induced immune dysfunction and increased risk of upper respiratory illness (URI) in athletic populations, however, the mechanisms remain unclear. During winter months, under double-blind procedures, 53 males (mean training load±SD, 50.5±28.9 MET-hweek(-1)) were randomized to daily supplementation of 20g of COL (N=25) or an isoenergetic/isomacronutrient placebo (PLA) (N=28) for 12weeks. Venous blood was collected at baseline and at 12weeks and unstimulated saliva samples at 4 weeks intervals. There was a significantly lower proportion of URI days and number of URI episodes with COL compared to PLA over the 12weeks (p<0.05). There was no effect of COL on in vitro neutrophil oxidative burst, salivary secretory IgA or salivary antimicrobial peptides (p>0.05), which does not support previously suggested mechanisms. In a subset of participants (COL=14, PLA=17), real-time quantitative PCR, targeting the 16S rRNA gene showed there was an increase in salivary bacterial load over the 12 weeks period with PLA (p<0.05) which was not as evident with COL. Discriminant function analysis of outputs received from serum metabolomics showed changes across time but not between groups. This is the first study to demonstrate that COL limits the increased salivary bacterial load in physically active males during the winter months which may provide a novel mechanism of immune-modulation with COL and a relevant marker of in vivo (innate) immunity and risk of URI. PMID:24200515

  8. New Respiratory Inductive Plethysmography (RIP) Method for Evaluating Ventilatory Adaptation during Mild Physical Activities

    PubMed Central

    Retory, Yann; Niedzialkowski, Pauline; de Picciotto, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The pneumotachometer is currently the most accepted device to measure tidal breathing, however, it requires the use of a mouthpiece and thus alteration of spontaneous ventilation is implied. Respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP), which includes two belts, one thoracic and one abdominal, is able to determine spontaneous tidal breathing without the use of a facemask or mouthpiece, however, there are a number of as yet unresolved issues. In this study we aimed to describe and validate a new RIP method, relying on a combination of thoracic RIP and nasal pressure signals taking into account that exercise-induced body movements can easily contaminate RIP thoracic signals by generating tissue motion artifacts. A custom-made time domain algorithm that relies on the elimination of low amplitude artifacts was applied to the raw thoracic RIP signal. Determining this tidal ventilation allowed comparisons between the RIP signal and simultaneously-recorded airflow signals from a calibrated pneumotachometer (PT). We assessed 206 comparisons from 30 volunteers who were asked to breathe spontaneously at rest and during walking on the spot. Comparisons between RIP signals processed by our algorithm and PT showed highly significant correlations for tidal volume (Vt), inspiratory (Ti) and expiratory times (Te). Moreover, bias calculated using the Bland and Altman method were reasonably low for Vt and Ti (0.04 L and 0.02 s, respectively), and acceptable for Te (<0.1 s) and the intercept from regression relationships (0.01 L, 0.06 s, 0.17 s respectively). The Ti/Ttot and Vt/Ti ratios obtained with the two methods were also statistically correlated. We conclude that our methodology (filtering by our algorithm and calibrating with our calibration procedure) for thoracic RIP renders this technique sufficiently accurate to evaluate tidal ventilation variation at rest and during mild to moderate physical activity. PMID:27008313

  9. Surfactant chemical composition and biophysical activity in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, T J; Longmore, W J; Moxley, M A; Whitsett, J A; Reed, C R; Fowler, A A; Hudson, L D; Maunder, R J; Crim, C; Hyers, T M

    1991-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by lung injury and damage to the alveolar type II cells. This study sought to determine if endogenous surfactant is altered in ARDS. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in patients at-risk to develop ARDS (AR, n = 20), with ARDS (A, n = 66) and in normal subjects (N, n = 29). The crude surfactant pellet was analyzed for total phospholipids (PL), individual phospholipids, SP-A, SP-B, and minimum surface tension (STmin). PL was decreased in both AR and A (3.48 +/- 0.61 and 2.47 +/- 0.40 mumol/ml, respectively) compared to N (7.99 +/- 0.60 mumol/ml). Phosphatidylcholine was decreased in A (62.64 +/- 2.20% PL) compared to N (76.27 +/- 2.05% PL). Phosphatidylglycerol was 11.58 +/- 1.21% PL in N and was decreased to 6.48 +/- 1.43% PL in A. SP-A was 123.64 +/- 20.66 micrograms/ml in N and was decreased to 49.28 +/- 21.68 micrograms/ml in AR and to 29.88 +/- 8.49 micrograms/ml in A. SP-B was 1.28 +/- 0.33 micrograms/ml in N and was decreased to 0.57 +/- 0.24 micrograms/ml in A. STmin was increased in AR (15.1 +/- 2.53 dyn/cm) and A (29.04 +/- 2.05 dyn/cm) compared to N (7.44 +/- 1.61 dyn/cm). These data demonstrate that the chemical composition and functional activity of surfactant is altered in ARDS. Several of these alterations also occur in AR, suggesting that these abnormalities occur early in the disease process. PMID:1752956

  10. Flow cytometry analyses of phagocytic and respiratory burst activities and cytochemical characterization of leucocytes isolated from wrasse (Labrus bergylta A.).

    PubMed

    Haugland, Gyri T; Rønneseth, Anita; Wergeland, Heidrun I

    2014-07-01

    We have isolated leucocytes from peripheral blood (PBL), head kidney (HKL) and spleen (SL) of wrasse (Labrus bergylta A.) and studied the innate immune responses phagocytosis and respiratory burst using flow cytometry. Further, we have characterized the phenotypic properties of the leucocytes by cytochemical staining. We could differentiate between several subsets of leucocytes; lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils and small leucocytes that might be precursor or immature cells. One striking observation was the eosinophils which were present among HKL, PBL and SL. The neutrophils had rounded, bean shaped or bi-lobed nuclei and resembled neutrophils in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) and lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus L.), but were different from the polymorphonucleated neutrophils in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) and humans. Basophils were observed, but they were rare. Phagocytosis and respiratory burst activities were detected among different cell types. Highest phagocytic activity was observed among monocytes/macrophages and small leucocytes. Several different subtypes had ability to perform an oxygen-dependent degradation of microbes, measured as respiratory burst activity. Knowledge of the basic properties of wrasse's leucocytes and innate immunology can benefit further studies on its adaptive immune responses.

  11. Respiratory Viral Infection in Neonatal Piglets Causes Marked Microglia Activation in the Hippocampus and Deficits in Spatial Learning

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Monica R. P.; Burton, Michael D.; Conrad, Matthew S.; Rytych, Jennifer L.; Van Alstine, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental insults during sensitive periods can affect hippocampal development and function, but little is known about peripheral infection, especially in humans and other animals whose brain is gyrencephalic and experiences major perinatal growth. Using a piglet model, the present study showed that inoculation on postnatal day 7 with the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) caused microglial activation within the hippocampus with 82% and 43% of isolated microglia being MHC II+ 13 and 20 d after inoculation, respectively. In control piglets, <5% of microglia isolated from the hippocampus were MHC II+. PRRSV piglets were febrile (p < 0.0001), anorectic (p < 0.0001), and weighed less at the end of the study (p = 0.002) compared with control piglets. Increased inflammatory gene expression (e.g., IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) was seen across multiple brain regions, including the hippocampus, whereas reductions in CD200, NGF, and MBP were evident. In a test of spatial learning, PRRSV piglets took longer to acquire the task, had a longer latency to choice, and had a higher total distance moved. Overall, these data demonstrate that viral respiratory infection is associated with a marked increase in activated microglia in the hippocampus, neuroinflammation, and impaired performance in a spatial cognitive task. As respiratory infections are common in human neonates and infants, approaches to regulate microglial cell activity are likely to be important. PMID:24501353

  12. Sink or Swim: Learning by Doing in a Supply Chain Integration Activity*

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnowo, Akhadian S.; Calhoun, Mikelle A.; Monteiro, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that supply chain integration (SCI) is important to organizations. This article describes an activity that places students in the middle of an SCI scenario. The highly interactive hands-on simulation requires only 50 to 60 minutes of classroom time, may be used with 18 to about 36 students, and involves minimal instructor preparation.…

  13. 5-HT1A receptor-responsive pedunculopontine tegmental neurons suppress REM sleep and respiratory motor activity.

    PubMed

    Grace, Kevin P; Liu, Hattie; Horner, Richard L

    2012-02-01

    Serotonin type 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor-responsive neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTn) become maximally active immediately before and during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. A prevailing model of REM sleep generation indicates that activation of such neurons contributes significantly to the generation of REM sleep, and if correct then inactivation of such neurons ought to suppress REM sleep. We test this hypothesis using bilateral microperfusion of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 10 μm) into the PPTn; this tool has been shown to selectively silence REM sleep-active PPTn neurons while the activity of wake/REM sleep-active PPTn neurons is unaffected. Contrary to the prevailing model, bilateral microperfusion of 8-OH-DPAT into the PPTn (n = 23 rats) significantly increased REM sleep both as a percentage of the total recording time and sleep time, compared with both within-animal vehicle controls and between-animal time-controls. This increased REM sleep resulted from an increased frequency of REM sleep bouts but not their duration, indicating an effect on mechanisms of REM sleep initiation but not maintenance. Furthermore, an increased proportion of the REM sleep bouts stemmed from periods of low REM sleep drive quantified electrographically. Targeted suppression of 5-HT(1A) receptor-responsive PPTn neurons also increased respiratory rate and respiratory-related genioglossus activity, and increased the frequency and amplitude of the sporadic genioglossus activations occurring during REM sleep. These data indicate that 5-HT(1A) receptor-responsive PPTn neurons normally function to restrain REM sleep by elevating the drive threshold for REM sleep induction, and restrain the expression of respiratory rate and motor activities.

  14. The human respiratory gate

    PubMed Central

    Eckberg, Dwain L

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this ‘respiratory gating’ is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R–R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R–R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms. PMID:12626671

  15. The human respiratory gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this 'respiratory gating' is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R-R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R-R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms.

  16. Activated-sludge nitrification in the presence of linear and branched-chain alkyl benzene sulfonates.

    PubMed

    Baillod, C R; Boyle, W C

    1968-01-01

    The effects of biodegradable linear alkyl benzene sulfonate and branched-chain alkyl benzene sulfonate detergents on activated-sludge nitrification were investigated by administering a synthetic waste containing up to 23 mg of each detergent per liter to eight bench-scale, batch, activated-sludge units. It was found that both detergents tended to promote complete oxidation of ammonia to nitrate, whereas control units produced approximately equal amounts of nitrite and nitrate. Various hypotheses are offered to explain the phenomenon.

  17. Physical Activity, Cardio-Respiratory Fitness, and Metabolic Traits in Rural Mexican Tarahumara

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Dirk Lund; Alcalá-Sánchez, Imelda; Leal-Berumen, Irene; Conchas-Ramirez, Miguel; Brage, Soren

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To study the association between physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) and cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF) with key metabolic traits and anthropometric measures in the Tarahumara of Mexico. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in five rural communities in Chihuahua, México including 64 adult Tarahumara, mean (SD) age 40.7 (12.9) years. Using a combined accelerometer and heart rate sensor, PAEE was measured over three consecutive days and nights and a sub-maximal step test was carried out in order to (1) calibrate heart rate at the individual level and (2) to estimate CRF. Random blood glucose level and resting blood pressure (BP) were measured with standard anthropometrics. Results Mean (SD) PAEE was 71.2 (30.3) kJ kg−1 day−1 and CRF was 36.6 (6.5) mlO2 min−1 kg−1. Mean (SD) glucose was 127.9 (32.4) mg/dl, with 3.3% having diabetes. Mean (SD) systolic and diastolic BP was 122 (20.8) and 82 (14.8) mm Hg, respectively, with 28.1% having hypertension. Mean body mass index was 27.5 (4.2) kg m−2, with 71.9% being overweight. Following adjustment for age and sex, weak inverse associations were observed between PAEE and systolic BP (β = −0.20, P = 0.27) and diastolic BP (β = −0.16, P = 0.23); and between CRF and systolic BP (β = −0.51, P = 0.14) and diastolic BP (β = −0.53, P = 0.06). The inverse associations with glucose were also weak and not statistically significant for neither PAEE (β = −0.01, P = 0.63) nor CRF (β = −0.05, P = 0.27). Conclusions This study suggests high levels of overweight and hypertension in the Tarahumara, and points to fitness and physical activity as potential intervention targets although findings should be confirmed in larger samples. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22308165

  18. Biological and surface-active properties of double-chain cationic amino acid-based surfactants.

    PubMed

    Greber, Katarzyna E; Dawgul, Małgorzata; Kamysz, Wojciech; Sawicki, Wiesław; Łukasiak, Jerzy

    2014-08-01

    Cationic amino acid-based surfactants were synthesized via solid phase peptide synthesis and terminal acylation of their α and ε positions with saturated fatty acids. Five new lipopeptides, N-α-acyl-N-ε-acyl lysine analogues, were obtained. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal (fungicidal) concentration were determined on reference strains of bacteria and fungi to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the lipopeptides. Toxicity to eukaryotic cells was examined via determination of the haemolytic activities. The surface-active properties of these compounds were evaluated by measuring the surface tension and formation of micelles as a function of concentration in aqueous solution. The cationic surfactants demonstrated diverse antibacterial activities dependent on the length of the fatty acid chain. Gram-negative bacteria and fungi showed a higher resistance than Gram-positive bacterial strains. It was found that the haemolytic activities were also chain length-dependent values. The surface-active properties showed a linear correlation between the alkyl chain length and the critical micelle concentration.

  19. Air contaminants associated with potential respiratory effects from unconventional resource development activities.

    PubMed

    McCawley, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Unconventional natural gas development uses horizontal drilling in conjunction with hydraulic fracturing to gain access to natural gas deposits which may be tightly held in shale deposits and unavailable to conventional vertical drilling operations. The intensive work required to extract this source of energy results in higher than usual numbers of vehicles involved, potential release of emissions from those vehicles in congested zones surrounding the drill site, and release of other contaminants from materials drawn back out of the borehole after fracturing of the shale. Typical contaminants would be diesel exhaust particulate and gases, volatile organic compounds and other hydrocarbons both from diesels and the drilling process, crystalline silica, used as part of the hydraulic fracturing process in kiloton quantities, and methane escaping from the borehole and piping. A rise in respiratory disease with proximity to the process has been reported in nearby communities and both silica and diesel exposures at the worksite are recognized respiratory hazards. Because of the relatively short time this process has been used to the extent it is currently being used, it is not possible to draw detailed conclusions about the respiratory hazards that may be posed. However, based on the traffic volume associated with each drill site and the number of drill sites in any locale, it is possible at least to compare the effects to that of large traffic volume highways which are known to produce some respiratory effects in surrounding areas. PMID:26024346

  20. Respiratory burst activity of intestinal macrophages in normal and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mahida, Y R; Wu, K C; Jewell, D P

    1989-01-01

    Macrophages isolated from normal mucosa (greater than 5 cm from tumour) and inflamed mucosa (from patients with inflammatory bowel disease) of colon and ileum were studied for their ability to undergo a respiratory burst as assessed by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium to formazan. Using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonised zymosan as triggers, only a minority (median: 8% for zymosan and 9% for PMA) of macrophages isolated from normal colonic mucosa demonstrated release of oxygen radicals. In contrast, a significantly greater (median: 17% for zymosan and 45% for PMA) proportion of macrophages isolated from inflamed colonic mucosa were able to undergo respiratory burst. Studies with normal and inflamed ileum showed similar results. Stimulation of macrophages isolated from normal colon with interferon-gamma produced only a small increase in the proportion of cells showing release of oxygen radicals. We conclude that the respiratory burst capacity of majority of macrophages isolated from normal colon and ileum is downregulated and a greater proportion of macrophages isolated from inflamed colon and ileum are able to undergo a respiratory burst. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2511088

  1. Learning within the Confines of a Continuing Professional Education Activity: Perspectives from Respiratory Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittnebel, Leonard D.

    2013-01-01

    Continuing professional education (CPE) for respiratory therapists (RTs) represent both a mandate and a desired characteristic of a profession poised to assume a more prominent role in the healthcare landscape. While it is acknowledged that education beyond the professional degree and a lifetime approach to learning is inherent due to the nature…

  2. [The effect of a photo-developing solution on respiratory and cardiac activities in rats when orally administered].

    PubMed

    Peti, A; Domahidi, J

    1999-01-01

    The development of cinema art brought about the increase in the number of laboratories which prepare photosensitive materials. In case of laboratories not complying with rules regarding the preparation and handling of the solutions for processing photos, these solutions can penetrate in the organism trough the skin and be accidentally digested. The goal of the experiment is to study the effects of developing solution for white/black Azomureş photographic paper on respiratory and cardiac activity of the Wistar rat (weight = 180-200 g) through oral administration. Three experimental groups (lots) of animals were formed (8 animals/group). The control group was given 1 ml of distilled water; the first (I) group was given 1 ml of 1/10 diluted photo-processing solution and the second (II) group was given 1 ml of the same solution, but 1/4 diluted. The administration of it was made in a single dose with a gastric drill. The respiratory and cardiac (ECG) frequencies were monitored during a 4 hours period, from the onset of administration. When 1/10 diluted developing solution was administrated a decrease in the respiratory frequency was recorded after one hour, but the effect vanished at the end of the experiment (4 hours). Fifteen minutes after 1/4 diluted solution was administered, a decrease in respiratory frequency per minute was determined, this result also disappeared at the end of 4 hours. However, these differences failed to reach significance (p = 0, 54). The effect of developing solution on cardiac activity shows a decrease of cardiac frequency in both experimental (I, II) groups. However, there is a difference in the effect of the diluted solution on the rats. The 1/10 diluted solution decrease the cardiac frequency over an approximate period of 1 hour and a half, but the 1/4 diluted solution showed a decrease in cardiac frequency up until the end of the ECG reading.

  3. Comparative analysis of signature genes in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells at differential activation statuses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activation statuses of monocytic cells, e.g. monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are critically important for antiviral immunity. In particular, some devastating viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are capable of directly infecting these cell...

  4. Control of abdominal and expiratory intercostal muscle activity during vomiting - Role of ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Tan, L. K.; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1987-01-01

    The role of ventral respiratory group (VRG) expiratory (E) neurons in the control of abdominal and internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting was investigated in cats. Two series of experiments were performed: in one, the activity of VRG E neurons was recorded during fictive vomiting in cats that were decerebrated, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated; in the second, the abdominal muscle activity during vomiting was compared before and after sectioning the axons of descending VRG E neurons in decerebrate spontaneously breathing cats. The results show that about two-thirds of VRG E neurons that project at least as far caudally as the lower thoracic cord contribute to internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting. The remaining VRG E neurons contribute to abdominal muscle activation. As shown by severing the axons of the VRG E neurons, other, as yet unidenified, inputs (either descending from the brain stem or arising from spinal reflexes) can also produce abdominal muscle activation.

  5. Induction of alternatively activated macrophages enhances pathogenesis during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Page, Carly; Goicochea, Lindsay; Matthews, Krystal; Zhang, Yong; Klover, Peter; Holtzman, Michael J; Hennighausen, Lothar; Frieman, Matthew

    2012-12-01

    Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) causes acute lung injury (ALI) that often leads to severe lung disease. A mouse model of acute SARS-CoV infection has been helpful in understanding the host response to infection; however, there are still unanswered questions concerning SARS-CoV pathogenesis. We have shown that STAT1 plays an important role in the severity of SARS-CoV pathogenesis and that it is independent of the role of STAT1 in interferon signaling. Mice lacking STAT1 have greater weight loss, severe lung pathology with pre-pulmonary-fibrosis-like lesions, and an altered immune response following infection with SARS-CoV. We hypothesized that STAT1 plays a role in the polarization of the immune response, specifically in macrophages, resulting in a worsened outcome. To test this, we created bone marrow chimeras and cell-type-specific knockouts of STAT1 to identify which cell type(s) is critical to protection from severe lung disease after SARS-CoV infection. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that hematopoietic cells are responsible for the pathogenesis in STAT1(-/-) mice, and because of an induction of alternatively activated (AA) macrophages after infection, we hypothesized that the AA macrophages were critical for disease severity. Mice with STAT1 in either monocytes and macrophages (LysM/STAT1) or ciliated lung epithelial cells (FoxJ1/STAT1) deleted were created. Following infection, LysM/STAT1 mice display severe lung pathology, while FoxJ1/STAT1 mice display normal lung pathology. We hypothesized that AA macrophages were responsible for this STAT1-dependent pathology and therefore created STAT1/STAT6(-/-) double-knockout mice. STAT6 is essential for the development of AA macrophages. Infection of the double-knockout mice displayed a lack of lung disease and prefibrotic lesions, suggesting that AA macrophage production may be the cause of STAT1-dependent lung disease. We propose that the control of AA

  6. Biological activities of the homologous loop regions in the laminin α chain LG modules.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Fumihiko; Hara, Toshihiro; Yamada, Yuji; Urushibata, Shunsuke; Hozumi, Kentaro; Kikkawa, Yamato; Nomizu, Motoyoshi

    2014-06-10

    Each laminin α chain (α1-α5 chains) has chain-specific diverse biological functions. The C-terminal globular domain of the α chain consists of five laminin-like globular (LG1-5) modules and plays a critical role in biological activities. The LG modules consist of a 14-stranded β-sheet (A-N) sandwich structure. Previously, we described the chain-specific biological activities of the loop regions between the E and F strands in the LG4 modules using five homologous peptides (G4EF1-G4EF5). Here, we further analyze the biological activities of the E-F strands loop regions in the rest of LG modules. We designed 20 homologous peptides (approximately 20 amino acid length), and 17 soluble peptides were used for the cell attachment assay. Thirteen peptides promoted cell attachment activity with different cell morphologies. Cell attachment to peptides G1EF1, G1EF2, G2EF1, G3EF4, and G5EF4 was inhibited by heparin, and peptides G1EF1, G1EF2, and G2EF1 specifically bound to syndecan-overexpressing cells. Cell attachment to peptides G2EF3, G3EF1, G3EF3, G5EF1, G5EF3, and G5EF5 was inhibited EDTA. Further, cell attachment to peptides G3EF3, G5EF1, and G5EF5 was inhibited by both anti-integrin α2 and β1 antibodies, whereas cell attachment to peptide G5EF3 was inhibited by only anti-integrin β1 antibody. Cell attachment to peptides G1EF4, G3EF4, and G5EF4 was inhibited by both heparin and EDTA and was not inhibited by anti-integrin antibodies. The active peptide sequence alignments suggest that the syndecan-binding peptides contain a "basic amino acid (BAA)-Gly-BAA" motif in the middle of the molecule and that the integrin-binding peptides contain an "acidic amino acid (AAA)"-Gly-BAA motif. Core-switched peptide analyses suggested that the "BAA-Gly-BAA" motif is critical for binding to syndecans and that the "AAA-Gly-BAA" motif has potential to recognize integrins. These findings are useful for understanding chain-specific biological activities of laminins and to evaluate

  7. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas.

  8. Respiratory papillomas.

    PubMed

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas.

  9. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas. PMID:27625447

  10. Human 20S proteasome activity towards fluorogenic peptides of various chain lengths.

    PubMed

    Rut, Wioletta; Drag, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    The proteasome is a multicatalytic protease responsible for the degradation of misfolded proteins. We have synthesized fluorogenic substrates in which the peptide chain was systematically elongated from two to six amino acids and evaluated the effect of peptide length on all three catalytic activities of human 20S proteasome. In the cases of five- and six-membered peptides, we have also synthesized libraries of fluorogenic substrates. Kinetic analysis revealed that six-amino-acid substrates are significantly better for chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activity than shorter peptidic substrates. In the case of trypsin-like activity, a five-amino-acid substrate was optimal. PMID:27176742

  11. [Core muscle chains activation during core exercises determined by EMG-a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Rogan, Slavko; Riesen, Jan; Taeymans, Jan

    2014-10-15

    Good core muscles strength is essential for daily life and sports activities. However, the mechanism how core muscles may be effectively triggered by exercises is not yet precisely described in the literature. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the rate of activation as measured by electromyography of the ventral, lateral and dorsal core muscle chains during core (trunk) muscle exercises. A total of 16 studies were included. Exercises with a vertical starting position, such as the deadlift or squat activated significantly more core muscles than exercises in the horizontal initial position. PMID:25305118

  12. Human 20S proteasome activity towards fluorogenic peptides of various chain lengths.

    PubMed

    Rut, Wioletta; Drag, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    The proteasome is a multicatalytic protease responsible for the degradation of misfolded proteins. We have synthesized fluorogenic substrates in which the peptide chain was systematically elongated from two to six amino acids and evaluated the effect of peptide length on all three catalytic activities of human 20S proteasome. In the cases of five- and six-membered peptides, we have also synthesized libraries of fluorogenic substrates. Kinetic analysis revealed that six-amino-acid substrates are significantly better for chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activity than shorter peptidic substrates. In the case of trypsin-like activity, a five-amino-acid substrate was optimal.

  13. Evidence-based risk assessment and recommendations for physical activity clearance: respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Eves, Neil D; Davidson, Warren J

    2011-07-01

    The 2 most common respiratory diseases are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Growing evidence supports the benefits of exercise for all patients with these diseases. Due to the etiology of COPD and the pathophysiology of asthma, there may be some additional risks of exercise for these patients, and hence accurate risk assessment and clearance is needed before patients start exercising. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the available literature regarding the risks of exercise for patients with respiratory disease and provide evidence-based recommendations to guide the screening process. A systematic review of 4 databases was performed. The literature was searched to identify adverse events specific to exercise. For COPD, 102 randomized controlled trials that involved an exercise intervention were included (n = 6938). No study directly assessed the risk of exercise, and only 15 commented on exercise-related adverse events. For asthma, 30 studies of mixed methodologies were included (n = 1278). One study directly assessed the risk of exercise, and 15 commented on exercise-related adverse events. No exercise-related fatalities were reported. The majority of adverse events in COPD patients were musculoskeletal or cardiovascular in nature. In asthma patients, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and (or) asthma symptoms were the primary adverse events. There is no direct evidence regarding the risk of exercise for patients with COPD or asthma. However, based on the available literature, it would appear that with adequate screening and optimal medical therapy, the risk of exercise for these respiratory patients is low. PMID:21800949

  14. Evidence-based risk assessment and recommendations for physical activity clearance: respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Eves, Neil D; Davidson, Warren J

    2011-07-01

    The 2 most common respiratory diseases are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Growing evidence supports the benefits of exercise for all patients with these diseases. Due to the etiology of COPD and the pathophysiology of asthma, there may be some additional risks of exercise for these patients, and hence accurate risk assessment and clearance is needed before patients start exercising. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the available literature regarding the risks of exercise for patients with respiratory disease and provide evidence-based recommendations to guide the screening process. A systematic review of 4 databases was performed. The literature was searched to identify adverse events specific to exercise. For COPD, 102 randomized controlled trials that involved an exercise intervention were included (n = 6938). No study directly assessed the risk of exercise, and only 15 commented on exercise-related adverse events. For asthma, 30 studies of mixed methodologies were included (n = 1278). One study directly assessed the risk of exercise, and 15 commented on exercise-related adverse events. No exercise-related fatalities were reported. The majority of adverse events in COPD patients were musculoskeletal or cardiovascular in nature. In asthma patients, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and (or) asthma symptoms were the primary adverse events. There is no direct evidence regarding the risk of exercise for patients with COPD or asthma. However, based on the available literature, it would appear that with adequate screening and optimal medical therapy, the risk of exercise for these respiratory patients is low.

  15. Inhibiting TGF-β activity improves respiratory function in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Carol A; Hunter, R Bridge; Quigley, Lindsay A; Girgenrath, Stefan; Weber, William D; McCullough, Jennifer A; Dinardo, Carol J; Keefe, Kelly A; Ceci, Lorena; Clayton, Nicholas P; McVie-Wylie, Alison; Cheng, Seng H; Leonard, John P; Wentworth, Bruce M

    2011-06-01

    Respiratory function is the main cause of mortality in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Elevated levels of TGF-β play a key role in the pathophysiology of DMD. To determine whether therapeutic attenuation of TGF-β signaling improves respiratory function, mdx mice were treated from 2 weeks of age to 2 months or 9 months of age with either 1D11 (a neutralizing antibody to all three isoforms of TGF-β), losartan (an angiotensin receptor antagonist), or a combination of the two agents. Respiratory function was measured in nonanesthetized mice by plethysmography. The 9-month-old mdx mice had elevated Penh values and decreased breathing frequency, due primarily to decreased inspiratory flow rate. All treatments normalized Penh values and increased peak inspiratory flow, leading to decreased inspiration times and breathing frequency. Additionally, forelimb grip strength was improved after 1D11 treatment at both 2 and 9 months of age, whereas, losartan improved grip strength only at 2 months. Decreased serum creatine kinase levels (significant improvement for all groups), increased diaphragm muscle fiber density, and decreased hydroxyproline levels (significant improvement for 1D11 only) also suggested improved muscle function after treatment. For all endpoints, 1D11 was equivalent or superior to losartan; coadministration of the two agents was not superior to 1D11 alone. In conclusion, TGF-β antagonism may be a useful therapeutic approach for treating DMD patients. PMID:21641384

  16. Flagellar dynamics of a connected chain of active, polar, Brownian particles

    PubMed Central

    Chelakkot, Raghunath; Gopinath, Arvind; Mahadevan, L.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    We show that active, self-propelled particles that are connected together to form a single chain that is anchored at one end can produce the graceful beating motions of flagella. Changing the boundary condition from a clamp to a pivot at the anchor leads to steadily rotating tight coils. Strong noise in the system disrupts the regularity of the oscillations. We use a combination of detailed numerical simulations, mean-field scaling analysis and first passage time theory to characterize the phase diagram as a function of the filament length, passive elasticity, propulsion force and noise. Our study suggests minimal experimental tests for the onset of oscillations in an active polar chain. PMID:24352670

  17. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  18. Respiratory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  19. Metabotropic glutamate receptors activate dendritic calcium waves and TRPM channels which drive rhythmic respiratory patterns in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mironov, S L

    2008-01-01

    Respiration in vertebrates is generated by a compact network which is located in the lower brainstem but cellular mechanisms which underlie persistent oscillatory activity of the respiratory network are yet unknown. Using two-photon imaging and patch-clamp recordings in functional brainstem preparations of mice containing pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC), we examined the actions of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1/5) on the respiratory patterns. The agonist DHPG potentiated and antagonist LY367385 depressed respiration-related activities. In the inspiratory neurons, we observed rhythmic activation of non-selective channels which had a conductance of 24 pS. Their activity was enhanced with membrane depolarization and after elevation of calcium from the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. They were activated by a non-hydrolysable PIP2 analogue and blocked by flufenamate, ATP4− and Gd3+. All these properties correspond well to those of TRPM4 channels. Calcium imaging of functional slices revealed rhythmic transients in small clusters of neurons present in a network. Calcium transients in the soma were preceded by the waves in dendrites which were dependent on mGluR activation. Initiation and propagation of waves required calcium influx and calcium release from internal stores. Calcium waves activated TPRM4-like channels in the soma and promoted generation of inspiratory bursts. Simulations of activity of neurons communicated via dendritic calcium waves showed emerging activity within neuronal clusters and its synchronization between the clusters. The experimental and theoretical data provide a subcellular basis for a recently proposed group-pacemaker hypothesis and describe a novel mechanism of rhythm generation in neuronal networks. PMID:18308826

  20. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis: correlation with respiratory atopy.

    PubMed

    Sawai, T; Ikai, K; Uehara, M

    1998-05-01

    We determined the cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from 100 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) aged 13-57 years (mean +/- SD, 29.8 +/- 17.7 years). The correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and clinical parameters such as the severity of eczema and a personal or family predisposition to atopic respiratory diseases (ARD) (asthma or allergic rhinitis) was examined. Although the enzymic activity varied from normal to very high in the AD patients, cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.005) elevated in AD patients (42.1 +/- 22.0 units) as compared with the normal controls (12.4 +/- 5.6) and clinical control subjects (13.4 +/- 9.5). In contrast, we found no correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and the severity of eczema when AD patients were classified into four categories (remission, mild, moderate and severe) according to the extent of their skin involvement. Furthermore, we found that systemic corticosteroid therapy in severe AD patients did not alter the cAMP-PDE activity. cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in those AD patients who had a personal history of ARD (47.2 +/- 11.2) than in AD patients with a family history of ARD (37.2 +/- 17.4) and those without a personal or family history ('pure' AD) (34.4 +/- 19.8). Nevertheless, the cAMP-PDE activity was significantly higher even in 'pure' AD patients than in the controls. These results suggest that an elevation of cAMP-PDE activity is closely related to a predisposition to respiratory atopy, and does not follow inflammation in AD patients. PMID:9666832

  1. Magnetic and electric field alignments of cellulose chains for electro-active paper actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sungryul; Chen, Yi; Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Jaehwan; Kim, Heung Soo

    2008-03-01

    To improve the piezoelectricity of cellulose electro-active paper (EAPap), electrical field and magnetic field alignments were investigated. EAPap is made with cellulose by dissolving cotton pulp and regenerating cellulose with aligned cellulose fibers. EAPap made with cellulose has piezoelectric property due to its structural crystallinity. Noncentro-symmetric crystal structure of EAPap, which is mostly cellulose II, can exhibit piezoelectricity. However, EAPap has ordered crystal parts as well as disordered parts of cellulose. Thus, well alignment of cellulose chains in EAPap is important to improve its piezoelectricity. In this paper, uniaxial alignments of cellulose chains were investigated by applying electric field and magnetic field. As exposing different fields to EAPap samples, the changed characteristics were analyzed by X-Ray diffractometer (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Finally, the piezoelectricity of EAPap samples was evaluated by comparing their piezoelectric charge constant [d 31]. As increasing applied electric field up to 40V/mm, d 31 value was gradually improved due to increased cellulose crystallinity as well as alignment of cellulose chains. Also the alignment of cellulose chains was improved with increasing the exposing time to magnetic field (5.3T) and well alignment was achieved by exposing EAPap sample on the magnetic field for 180min.

  2. Embryo as an active granular fluid: stress-coordinated cellular constriction chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guo-Jie Jason; Holcomb, Michael C.; Thomas, Jeffrey H.; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2016-10-01

    Mechanical stress plays an intricate role in gene expression in individual cells and sculpting of developing tissues. However, systematic methods of studying how mechanical stress and feedback help to harmonize cellular activities within a tissue have yet to be developed. Motivated by our observation of the cellular constriction chains (CCCs) during the initial phase of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, we propose an active granular fluid (AGF) model that provides valuable insights into cellular coordination in the apical constriction process. In our model, cells are treated as circular particles connected by a predefined force network, and they undergo a random constriction process in which the particle constriction probability P is a function of the stress exerted on the particle by its neighbors. We find that when P favors tensile stress, constricted particles tend to form chain-like structures. In contrast, constricted particles tend to form compact clusters when P favors compression. A remarkable similarity of constricted-particle chains and CCCs observed in vivo provides indirect evidence that tensile-stress feedback coordinates the apical constriction activity. Our particle-based AGF model will be useful in analyzing mechanical feedback effects in a wide variety of morphogenesis and organogenesis phenomena.

  3. Embryo as an active granular fluid: stress-coordinated cellular constriction chains.

    PubMed

    Jason Gao, Guo-Jie; Holcomb, Michael C; Thomas, Jeffrey H; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2016-10-19

    Mechanical stress plays an intricate role in gene expression in individual cells and sculpting of developing tissues. However, systematic methods of studying how mechanical stress and feedback help to harmonize cellular activities within a tissue have yet to be developed. Motivated by our observation of the cellular constriction chains (CCCs) during the initial phase of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, we propose an active granular fluid (AGF) model that provides valuable insights into cellular coordination in the apical constriction process. In our model, cells are treated as circular particles connected by a predefined force network, and they undergo a random constriction process in which the particle constriction probability P is a function of the stress exerted on the particle by its neighbors. We find that when P favors tensile stress, constricted particles tend to form chain-like structures. In contrast, constricted particles tend to form compact clusters when P favors compression. A remarkable similarity of constricted-particle chains and CCCs observed in vivo provides indirect evidence that tensile-stress feedback coordinates the apical constriction activity. Our particle-based AGF model will be useful in analyzing mechanical feedback effects in a wide variety of morphogenesis and organogenesis phenomena. PMID:27545101

  4. Microbial water relations. Effects of solute concentration on the respiratory activity of sugar-tolerant and non-tolerant yeasts.

    PubMed

    Brown, A D

    1975-02-01

    The respiratory activity of the sugar-tolerant (osmophilic) yeast, Saccharomyces rouxii, and the non-tolerant species, Sacchromyces cerevisiae, were compared after growth in a complex basal medium, the medium supplemented with polyethylene glycol (mol. wt 200) to give a water activity of 0-95, and the medium supplemented with glucose (24 and 36%, w/v). The properties compared were Qo2 (glucose), NADH oxidase activity of isolated mitochondrial fractions, and cytochrome content. When grown in the basal medium S. cerevisiae was somewhat more active than S. rouxii by all criteria. Growth in the media supplemented were high glucose concentrations produced catabolite repression of respiration in S. cerevisiae but not in S. rouxii. The implications of this difference for polyol biosynthesis and the water relations of the sugar-tolerant species are discussed.

  5. Blocking of Exchange Proteins Directly Activated by cAMP Leads to Reduced Replication of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xinrong; Mei, Feng; Agrawal, Anurodh; Peters, Clarence J.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    The outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections and diseases represents a potential threat for worldwide spread and requires development of effective therapeutic strategies. In this study, we revealed a novel positive function of an exchange protein directly activated by cyclic AMP 1 (cAMP-1; Epac-1) on MERS-CoV replication. Specifically, we have shown that Epac-specific inhibitor treatment or silencing Epac-1 gene expression rendered cells resistant to viral infection. We believe Epac-1 inhibitors deserve further study as potential therapeutic agents for MERS-CoV infection. PMID:24453361

  6. Side Chain Degradable Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers with Tunable Hydrophobicity Show in Vivo Activity.

    PubMed

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Samaddar, Sandip; Hoque, Jiaul; Konai, Mohini M; Krishnamoorthy, Paramanandham; Shome, Bibek R; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-09-12

    Cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with optimal amphiphilicity generally target the bacterial membranes instead of mammalian membranes. To date, this balance has been achieved by varying the cationic charge or side chain hydrophobicity in a variety of cationic-amphiphilic polymers. Optimal hydrophobicity of cationic-amphiphilic polymers has been considered as the governing factor for potent antibacterial activity yet minimal mammalian cell toxicity. However, the concomitant role of hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity with constant cationic charge in the interactions of antibacterial polymers with bacterial membranes is not understood. Also, degradable polymers that result in nontoxic degradation byproducts offer promise as safe antibacterial agents. Here we show that amide- and ester (degradable)-bearing cationic-amphiphilic polymers with tunable side chain hydrophobicity can modulate antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity. Our results suggest that an amide polymer can be a potent antibacterial agent with lower hydrophobicity whereas the corresponding ester polymer needs a relatively higher hydrophobicity to be as effective as its amide counterpart. Our studies reveal that at higher hydrophobicities both amide and ester polymers have similar profiles of membrane-active antibacterial activity and mammalian cell toxicity. On the contrary, at lower hydrophobicities, amide and ester polymers are less cytotoxic, but the former have potent antibacterial and membrane activity compared to the latter. Incorporation of amide and ester moieties made these polymers side chain degradable, with amide polymers being more stable than the ester polymers. Further, the polymers are less toxic, and their degradation byproducts are nontoxic to mice. More importantly, the optimized amide polymer reduces the bacterial burden of burn wound infections in mice models. Our design introduces a new strategy of interplay between the hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions

  7. Synthesis and antibacterial activities of acylide derivatives bearing an aryl-tetrazolyl chain

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Ling-Xing; Sun, Ping-Hua; Guo, Bao-Qin; Xu, Xing-Jun; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Sun, Jia-Zhi; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Chen, Wei-Min

    2014-01-01

    Seventeen acylides bearing an aryl-tetrazolyl alkyl-substituted side chain were synthesized, starting from clarithromycin, via several reactions including hydrolysis, acetylating, esterification, carbamylation, and Michael addition. The structures of all new compounds were confirmed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. All these synthesized acylides were evaluated for in vitro antimicrobial activities against gram-positive pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis) and gram-negative pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli), using the broth microdilution method. Results showed that compounds 10e, 10f, 10g, 10 h, 10o have good antibacterial activities. PMID:25284984

  8. Calmodulin and calmodulin kinase II mediate emergent bursting activity in the brainstem respiratory network (preBötzinger complex).

    PubMed

    Mironov, S L

    2013-04-01

    Emergence of persistent activity in networks can be controlled by intracellular signalling pathways but the mechanisms involved and their role are not yet fully explored. Using calcium imaging and patch-clamp we examined the rhythmic activity in the preBötzinger complex (preBötC) in the lower brainstem that generates the respiratory motor output. In functionally intact acute slices brief hypoxia, electrical stimulation and activation of AMPA receptors transiently depressed bursting activity which then recovered with augmentation. The effects were abrogated after chelation of intracellular calcium, blockade of L-type calcium channels and inhibition of calmodulin (CaM) and CaM kinase (CaMKII). Rhythmic calcium transients and synaptic drive currents in preBötC neurons in the organotypic slices showed similar CaM- and CaMKII-dependent responses. The stimuli increased the amplitude of spontaneous and miniature excitatory synaptic currents indicating postsynaptic changes at glutamatergic synapses. In the acute and organotypic slices, CaM stimulated and ADP inhibited calcium-dependent TRPM4 channels and CaMKII augmented synaptic drive currents. Experimental data and simulations show the role of ADP and CaMKII in the control of bursting activity and its relation to intracellular signalling. I propose that CaMKII-mediated facilitation of glutamatergic transmission strengthens emergent synchronous activity within preBötC that is then maintained by periodic surges of calcium during the bursts. This may find implications in restoration and consolidation of autonomous activity in the respiratory disorders. PMID:23207595

  9. Dexmedetomidine and clonidine induce long-lasting activation of the respiratory rhythm generator of neonatal mice: possible implication for critical care.

    PubMed

    Voituron, Nicolas; Hilaire, Gérard; Quintin, Luc

    2012-01-15

    Dexmedetomidine and clonidine are alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists increasingly used in the critical care unit as sedative agents for their benzodiazepine-sparing effects and their limited depressing effect on breathing. However adverse effects on breathing have been also reported with alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists and their central effects on the respiratory rhythm generator are poorly known. We therefore examined the effects of dexmedetomidine, clonidine, the alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine and the benzodiazepine midazolam on the activity of the isolated respiratory rhythm generator of neonatal mice using medullary preparations where the respiratory rhythm generator continued to function in vitro. For the first time, we showed that 5min bath applications of dexmedetomidine or clonidine activated the respiratory rhythm generator for periods over than 30min. Second, we showed that the long-lasting effect of dexmedetomidine implicated receptors other than alpha-2 adrenoceptors as it persisted after their blockade with yohimbine. Third, we reported that 5min bath applications of the benzodiazepine midazolam significantly depressed the respiratory rhythm generator, and that this depression was prevented by pre-treatment with either dexmedetomidine or clonidine. Although further experiments are still required to identify the mechanisms through which dexmedetomidine and clonidine activate the respiratory rhythm generator, our current in vitro results in neonatal mice support the use of dexmedetomidine and clonidine in the critical care unit.

  10. Kinesin's light chains inhibit the head- and microtubule-binding activity of its tail.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yao Liang; Rice, Sarah E

    2010-06-29

    Kinesin-1 is a microtubule-based motor comprising two heavy chains (KHCs) and two light chains (KLCs). Motor activity is precisely regulated to avoid futile ATP consumption and to ensure proper intracellular localization of kinesin-1 and its cargoes. The KHC tail inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the enzymatic KHC heads, and the tail also binds microtubules. Here, we present a role for the KLCs in regulating both the head- and microtubule-binding activities of the kinesin-1 tail. We show that KLCs reduce the affinity of the head-tail interaction over tenfold and concomitantly repress the tail's regulatory activity. We also show that KLCs inhibit tail-microtubule binding by a separate mechanism. Inhibition of head-tail binding requires steric and electrostatic factors. Inhibition of tail-microtubule binding is largely electrostatic, pH dependent, and mediated partly by a highly negatively charged linker region between the KHC-interacting and cargo-binding domains of the KLCs. Our data support a model wherein KLCs promote activation of kinesin-1 for cargo transport by simultaneously suppressing tail-head and tail-microtubule interactions. KLC-mediated inhibition of tail-microtubule binding may also influence diffusional movement of kinesin-1 on microtubules, and kinesin-1's role in microtubule transport/sliding. PMID:20547877

  11. Sensitive electrochemical assaying of DNA methyltransferase activity based on mimic-hybridization chain reaction amplified strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linqun; Liu, Yuanjian; Li, Ying; Zhao, Yuewu; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2016-08-24

    A mimic-hybridization chain reaction (mimic-HCR) amplified strategy was proposed for sensitive electrochemically detection of DNA methylation and methyltransferase (MTase) activity In the presence of methylated DNA, DNA-gold nanoparticles (DNA-AuNPs) were captured on the electrode by sandwich-type assembly. It then triggered mimic-HCR of two hairpin probes to produce many long double-helix chains for numerous hexaammineruthenium (III) chloride ([Ru(NH3)6](3+), RuHex) inserting. As a result, the signal for electrochemically detection of DNA MTase activity could be amplified. If DNA was non-methylated, however, the sandwich-type assembly would not form because the short double-stranded DNAs (dsDNA) on the Au electrode could be cleaved and digested by restriction endonuclease HpaII (HapII) and exonuclease III (Exo III), resulting in the signal decrement. Based on this, an electrochemical approach for detection of M.SssI MTase activity with high sensitivity was developed. The linear range for M.SssI MTase activity was from 0.05 U mL(-1) to 10 U mL(-1), with a detection limit down to 0.03 U mL(-1). Moreover, this detecting strategy held great promise as an easy-to-use and highly sensitive method for other MTase activity and inhibition detection by exchanging the corresponding DNA sequence.

  12. Mass dependence of the activation enthalpy and entropy of unentangled linear alkane chains.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Cheol; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-10-14

    The mass scaling of the self-diffusion coefficient D of polymers in the liquid state, D ∼ M(β), is one of the most basic characteristics of these complex fluids. Although traditional theories such as the Rouse and reptation models of unentangled and entangled polymer melts, respectively, predict that β is constant, this exponent for alkanes has been estimated experimentally to vary from -1.8 to -2.7 upon cooling. Significantly, β changes with temperature T under conditions where the chains are not entangled and at temperatures far above the glass transition temperature Tg where dynamic heterogeneity does not complicate the description of the liquid dynamics. Based on atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on unentangled linear alkanes in the melt, we find that the variation of β with T can be directly attributed to the dependence of the enthalpy ΔHa and entropy ΔSa of activation on the number of alkane backbone carbon atoms, n. In addition, we find a sharp change in the melt dynamics near a "critical" chain length, n ≈ 17. A close examination of this phenomenon indicates that a "buckling transition" from rod-like to coiled chain configurations occurs at this characteristic chain length and distinct entropy-enthalpy compensation relations, ΔSa ∝ ΔHa, hold on either side of this polymer conformational transition. We conclude that the activation free energy parameters exert a significant influence on the dynamics of polymer melts that is not anticipated by either the Rouse and reptation models. In addition to changes of ΔHa and ΔSa with M, we expect changes in these free energy parameters to be crucial for understanding the dynamics of polymer blends, nanocomposites, and confined polymers because of changes of the fluid free energy by interfacial interactions and geometrical confinement.

  13. Mass dependence of the activation enthalpy and entropy of unentangled linear alkane chains

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Cheol; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-10-14

    The mass scaling of the self-diffusion coefficient D of polymers in the liquid state, D ∼ M{sup β}, is one of the most basic characteristics of these complex fluids. Although traditional theories such as the Rouse and reptation models of unentangled and entangled polymer melts, respectively, predict that β is constant, this exponent for alkanes has been estimated experimentally to vary from −1.8 to −2.7 upon cooling. Significantly, β changes with temperature T under conditions where the chains are not entangled and at temperatures far above the glass transition temperature T{sub g} where dynamic heterogeneity does not complicate the description of the liquid dynamics. Based on atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on unentangled linear alkanes in the melt, we find that the variation of β with T can be directly attributed to the dependence of the enthalpy ΔH{sub a} and entropy ΔS{sub a} of activation on the number of alkane backbone carbon atoms, n. In addition, we find a sharp change in the melt dynamics near a “critical” chain length, n ≈ 17. A close examination of this phenomenon indicates that a “buckling transition” from rod-like to coiled chain configurations occurs at this characteristic chain length and distinct entropy-enthalpy compensation relations, ΔS{sub a} ∝ ΔH{sub a}, hold on either side of this polymer conformational transition. We conclude that the activation free energy parameters exert a significant influence on the dynamics of polymer melts that is not anticipated by either the Rouse and reptation models. In addition to changes of ΔH{sub a} and ΔS{sub a} with M, we expect changes in these free energy parameters to be crucial for understanding the dynamics of polymer blends, nanocomposites, and confined polymers because of changes of the fluid free energy by interfacial interactions and geometrical confinement.

  14. Expression of the Bovine NK-Lysin Gene Family and Activity against Respiratory Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junfeng; Yang, Chingyuan; Tizioto, Polyana C.; Huang, Huan; Lee, Mi O. K.; Payne, Harold R.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Womack, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the genomes of many mammals that have a single NK-lysin gene, the cattle genome contains a family of four genes, one of which is expressed preferentially in the lung. In this study, we compared the expression of the four bovine NK-lysin genes in healthy animals to animals challenged with pathogens known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). The expression of several NK-lysins, especially NK2C, was elevated in challenged relative to control animals. The effects of synthetic peptides corresponding to functional region helices 2 and 3 of each gene product were tested on both model membranes and bio-membranes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that these peptides adopted a more helical secondary structure upon binding to an anionic model membrane and liposome leakage assays suggested that these peptides disrupt membranes. Bacterial killing assays further confirmed the antimicrobial effects of these peptides on BRD-associated bacteria, including both Pasteurella multocida and Mannhemia haemolytica and an ultrastructural examination of NK-lysin-treated P. multocida cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the lysis of target membranes. These studies demonstrate that the expanded bovine NK-lysin gene family is potentially important in host defense against pathogens involved in bovine respiratory disease. PMID:27409794

  15. Defensive activation to (un)predictable interoceptive threat: The NPU respiratory threat test (NPUr).

    PubMed

    Schroijen, Mathias; Fantoni, Simona; Rivera, Carmen; Vervliet, Bram; Schruers, Koen; van den Bergh, Omer; van Diest, Ilse

    2016-06-01

    Potentially life-threatening interoceptive sensations easily engage the behavioral defensive system. Resulting fear and anxiety toward interoceptive threat are functionally distinct states that are hypothesized to play a prominent role in the etiology of panic disorder. The present study aimed to investigate whether fear- and anxiety-potentiated startle responses occur to predictable and unpredictable interoceptive threat, respectively. Therefore, we modified the NPU threat test (Schmitz & Grillon, ) and replaced the aversive electrocutaneous stimulus with an aversive interoceptive stimulus (a breathing occlusion, making it briefly impossible to breathe). Healthy participants (N = 48) underwent three instructed conditions. A visual cue signaled the occlusion in the predictable condition (P), whereas another cue was unrelated to the occurrence of the occlusion in the unpredictable condition (U). The safe condition (N) also had a visual cue, but no occlusion. Both fear- and anxiety-potentiated startle blink responses were observed in response to predictable and unpredictable respiratory threat, respectively. The current study presents and validates the NPU respiratory threat test (NPUr) as an ecologically valid paradigm to study both anxiety and fear in response to a panic-relevant interoceptive threat. The paradigm allows future testing of contextual generalization, investigation of different clinical groups, and more explicit comparisons of defensive responding to interoceptive versus exteroceptive threats.

  16. Defensive activation to (un)predictable interoceptive threat: The NPU respiratory threat test (NPUr).

    PubMed

    Schroijen, Mathias; Fantoni, Simona; Rivera, Carmen; Vervliet, Bram; Schruers, Koen; van den Bergh, Omer; van Diest, Ilse

    2016-06-01

    Potentially life-threatening interoceptive sensations easily engage the behavioral defensive system. Resulting fear and anxiety toward interoceptive threat are functionally distinct states that are hypothesized to play a prominent role in the etiology of panic disorder. The present study aimed to investigate whether fear- and anxiety-potentiated startle responses occur to predictable and unpredictable interoceptive threat, respectively. Therefore, we modified the NPU threat test (Schmitz & Grillon, ) and replaced the aversive electrocutaneous stimulus with an aversive interoceptive stimulus (a breathing occlusion, making it briefly impossible to breathe). Healthy participants (N = 48) underwent three instructed conditions. A visual cue signaled the occlusion in the predictable condition (P), whereas another cue was unrelated to the occurrence of the occlusion in the unpredictable condition (U). The safe condition (N) also had a visual cue, but no occlusion. Both fear- and anxiety-potentiated startle blink responses were observed in response to predictable and unpredictable respiratory threat, respectively. The current study presents and validates the NPU respiratory threat test (NPUr) as an ecologically valid paradigm to study both anxiety and fear in response to a panic-relevant interoceptive threat. The paradigm allows future testing of contextual generalization, investigation of different clinical groups, and more explicit comparisons of defensive responding to interoceptive versus exteroceptive threats. PMID:26879710

  17. Expression of the Bovine NK-Lysin Gene Family and Activity against Respiratory Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junfeng; Yang, Chingyuan; Tizioto, Polyana C; Huang, Huan; Lee, Mi O K; Payne, Harold R; Lawhon, Sara D; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Taylor, Jeremy F; Womack, James E

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the genomes of many mammals that have a single NK-lysin gene, the cattle genome contains a family of four genes, one of which is expressed preferentially in the lung. In this study, we compared the expression of the four bovine NK-lysin genes in healthy animals to animals challenged with pathogens known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). The expression of several NK-lysins, especially NK2C, was elevated in challenged relative to control animals. The effects of synthetic peptides corresponding to functional region helices 2 and 3 of each gene product were tested on both model membranes and bio-membranes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that these peptides adopted a more helical secondary structure upon binding to an anionic model membrane and liposome leakage assays suggested that these peptides disrupt membranes. Bacterial killing assays further confirmed the antimicrobial effects of these peptides on BRD-associated bacteria, including both Pasteurella multocida and Mannhemia haemolytica and an ultrastructural examination of NK-lysin-treated P. multocida cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the lysis of target membranes. These studies demonstrate that the expanded bovine NK-lysin gene family is potentially important in host defense against pathogens involved in bovine respiratory disease. PMID:27409794

  18. Piezotolerance of the respiratory terminal oxidase activity of the piezophilic Shewanella violacea DSS12 as compared with non-piezophilic Shewanella species.

    PubMed

    Tamegai, Hideyuki; Ota, Yuuya; Haga, Minami; Fujimori, Hiroki; Kato, Chiaki; Nogi, Yuichi; Kawamoto, Jun; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    The facultative piezophile Shewanella violacea DSS12 is known to alter its respiratory components under the influence of hydrostatic pressure during growth, suggesting that it has a respiratory system that functions in adaptation to high pressure. We investigated the pressure- and temperature-dependencies of the respiratory terminal oxidase activity of the membrane of S. violacea relative to non-piezophilic Shewanella species. We observed that the activity in the membrane of S. violacea was more resistant to high pressure than those of non-piezophilic Shewanella even though DSS12 was cultured under atmospheric pressure. On the other hand, the temperature dependency of this activity was almost the same for all of the tested strain regardless of optimal growth temperature. Both high pressure and low temperature are expected to lower protein flexibility, causing a decrease in enzyme activity, but the results of this study suggest that the mechanism maintaining enzyme activity under high hydrostatic pressure is different from that at low temperature. Additionally, the responses of the activity to the pressure- and temperature-changes were independent of membrane lipid composition. Therefore, the piezotolerance of the respiratory terminal oxidases of S. violacea is perhaps dependent on the properties of the protein itself and not on the lipid composition of the membrane. Our observations suggest that S. violacea constitutively express piezotolerant respiratory terminal oxidases that serve adaptation to the deep-sea environment. PMID:21597190

  19. Piezotolerance of the respiratory terminal oxidase activity of the piezophilic Shewanella violacea DSS12 as compared with non-piezophilic Shewanella species.

    PubMed

    Tamegai, Hideyuki; Ota, Yuuya; Haga, Minami; Fujimori, Hiroki; Kato, Chiaki; Nogi, Yuichi; Kawamoto, Jun; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    The facultative piezophile Shewanella violacea DSS12 is known to alter its respiratory components under the influence of hydrostatic pressure during growth, suggesting that it has a respiratory system that functions in adaptation to high pressure. We investigated the pressure- and temperature-dependencies of the respiratory terminal oxidase activity of the membrane of S. violacea relative to non-piezophilic Shewanella species. We observed that the activity in the membrane of S. violacea was more resistant to high pressure than those of non-piezophilic Shewanella even though DSS12 was cultured under atmospheric pressure. On the other hand, the temperature dependency of this activity was almost the same for all of the tested strain regardless of optimal growth temperature. Both high pressure and low temperature are expected to lower protein flexibility, causing a decrease in enzyme activity, but the results of this study suggest that the mechanism maintaining enzyme activity under high hydrostatic pressure is different from that at low temperature. Additionally, the responses of the activity to the pressure- and temperature-changes were independent of membrane lipid composition. Therefore, the piezotolerance of the respiratory terminal oxidases of S. violacea is perhaps dependent on the properties of the protein itself and not on the lipid composition of the membrane. Our observations suggest that S. violacea constitutively express piezotolerant respiratory terminal oxidases that serve adaptation to the deep-sea environment.

  20. Anti-cardiolipin/beta-2 glycoprotein activities co-exist on human anti-DNA antibody light chains.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Nagl, Sylvia; Kalsi, J K; Ravirajan, C T; Athwal, Dee; Latchman, David S; Pearl, Laurence H; Isenberg, David A

    2003-12-01

    We have recently shown that the human anti-DNA antibodies B3 and 33H11 also bind cardiolipin and that the anti-autoantigen activity resides predominantly on their lambda light chains. We now show that the two auto-antibodies possess strong reactivity to the plasma-protein 2-Glycoprotein I (beta2-GPI) also. Utilizing chain shuffling experiments involving an unrelated anti-p185 antibody 4D5 with insignificant reactivity to cardiolipin or to beta2-GPI, we now demonstrate that hybrid Fabs with constituent light chain, but not the heavy chain, of B3 or 33H11, exhibit anti-cardiolipin activity. Furthermore, the constructs possessing the auto-antibody-derived light chain also exhibited significant reactivity to beta2-GPI. The results suggest that anti-DNA, anti-cardiolipin and anti-beta2-GPI activities co-exist on the light chains of the antibodies studied and, importantly, these activities could be transferred to antibody constructs by their light chains alone. Computer-generated models of the three-dimensional structures of the auto-antibodies and their hybrids, suggest predominant interaction of their light chains with domain IV of beta2-GPI.

  1. Activation of Akt is essential for the propagation of mitochondrial respiratory stress signaling and activation of the transcriptional coactivator heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2.

    PubMed

    Guha, Manti; Fang, Ji-Kang; Monks, Robert; Birnbaum, Morris J; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2010-10-15

    Mitochondrial respiratory stress (also called mitochondrial retrograde signaling) activates a Ca(2+)/calcineurin-mediated signal that culminates in transcription activation/repression of a large number of nuclear genes. This signal is propagated through activation of the regulatory proteins NFκB c-Rel/p50, C/EBPδ, CREB, and NFAT. Additionally, the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNPA2) functions as a coactivator in up-regulating the transcription of Cathepsin L, RyR1, and Glut-4, the target genes of stress signaling. Activation of IGF1R, which causes a metabolic switch to glycolysis, cell invasiveness, and resistance to apoptosis, is a phenotypic hallmark of C2C12 myoblasts subjected to mitochondrial stress. In this study, we report that mitochondrial stress leads to increased expression, activation, and nuclear localization of Akt1. Mitochondrial respiratory stress also activates Akt1-gene expression, which involves hnRNPA2 as a coactivator, indicating a complex interdependency of these two factors. Using Akt1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts and Akt1 mRNA-silenced C2C12 cells, we show that Akt1-mediated phosphorylation is crucial for the activation and recruitment of hnRNPA2 to the enhanceosome complex. Akt1 mRNA silencing in mtDNA-depleted cells resulted in reversal of the invasive phenotype, accompanied by sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli. These results show that Akt1 is an important regulator of the nuclear transcriptional response to mitochondrial stress.

  2. Effect of decaglycerol monooleate on phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of human neutrophils: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Suzuki, K; Kudo, S; Yamada, M; Kowatari, K; Umeda, T; Nakaji, S; Sugawara, K

    2000-05-01

    Decaglycerol monooleate (DGMO), a type of polyglycerol esters of fatty acids (PGEF), was evaluated for its in vitro effect on phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of isolated human neutrophils using flow cytometric assay. Opsonized zymosan particles labelled with FITC (FITC-OZ) were employed as an indicator of phagocytosis. Fluorescence of FITC-OZ attached on to the surface of neutrophils was quenched by addition of trypan blue solution. After 10 minutes of incubation with DGMO up to a concentration of 10 mg/ml, neutrophil phagocytosis was not affected markedly. At the same time, the DGMO emulsion left little influence on complement receptor type three (CR3) that is associated with phagocytosis. On the other hand, oxidation of hydroethidine, which was used as an indicator of intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (mainly for superoxide anion), was significantly inhibited by DGMO over 1 mg/ml. However, this phenomenon was not seen in DGMO-treated neutrophils when DGMO was removed after incubation. The present data suggest that DGMO does not affect phagocytosis of human neutrophils but down-regulates respiratory burst activity.

  3. Tissue-specific mtDNA abundance from exome data and its correlation with mitochondrial transcription, mass and respiratory activity.

    PubMed

    D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Atlante, Anna; Gadaleta, Gemma; Pavesi, Giulio; Chiara, Matteo; De Virgilio, Caterina; Manzari, Caterina; Mastropasqua, Francesca; Prazzoli, Gian Marco; Picardi, Ernesto; Gissi, Carmela; Horner, David; Reyes, Aurelio; Sbisà, Elisabetta; Tullo, Apollonia; Pesole, Graziano

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain a population of mitochondria, variable in number and shape, which in turn contain multiple copies of a tiny compact genome (mtDNA) whose expression and function is strictly coordinated with the nuclear one. mtDNA copy number varies between different cell or tissues types, both in response to overall metabolic and bioenergetics demands and as a consequence or cause of specific pathological conditions. Here we present a novel and reliable methodology to assess the effective mtDNA copy number per diploid genome by investigating off-target reads obtained by whole-exome sequencing (WES) experiments. We also investigate whether and how mtDNA copy number correlates with mitochondrial mass, respiratory activity and expression levels. Analyzing six different tissues from three age- and sex-matched human individuals, we found a highly significant linear correlation between mtDNA copy number estimated by qPCR and the frequency of mtDNA off target WES reads. Furthermore, mtDNA copy number showed highly significant correlation with mitochondrial gene expression levels as measured by RNA-Seq as well as with mitochondrial mass and respiratory activity. Our methodology makes thus feasible, at a large scale, the investigation of mtDNA copy number in diverse cell-types, tissues and pathological conditions or in response to specific treatments. PMID:25446395

  4. East Coast Fever Caused by Theileria parva Is Characterized by Macrophage Activation Associated with Vasculitis and Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David A.; Frevert, Charles W.; Nelson, Danielle D.; Morrison, W. Ivan; Knowles, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infected cattle revealed large numbers of CD3- and CD20-negative intralesional mononuclear cells. Due to this finding, we hypothesized that macrophages play an important role in Theileria parva disease pathogenesis. Data presented here demonstrates that terminal ECF in both Holstein and Boran cattle is largely due to multisystemic histiocytic responses and resultant tissue damage. Furthermore, the combination of these histologic changes with the clinical findings, including lymphadenopathy, prolonged pyrexia, multi-lineage leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia is consistent with macrophage activation syndrome. All animals that succumbed to infection exhibited lymphohistiocytic vasculitis of small to medium caliber blood and lymphatic vessels. In pulmonary, lymphoid, splenic and hepatic tissues from Holstein cattle, the majority of intralesional macrophages were positive for CD163, and often expressed large amounts of IL-17. These data define a terminal ECF pathogenesis in which parasite-driven lymphoproliferation leads to secondary systemic macrophage activation syndrome, mononuclear vasculitis, pulmonary edema, respiratory failure and death. The accompanying macrophage phenotype defined by CD163 and IL-17 is presented in the context of this pathogenesis. PMID:27195791

  5. East Coast Fever Caused by Theileria parva Is Characterized by Macrophage Activation Associated with Vasculitis and Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Fry, Lindsay M; Schneider, David A; Frevert, Charles W; Nelson, Danielle D; Morrison, W Ivan; Knowles, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infected cattle revealed large numbers of CD3- and CD20-negative intralesional mononuclear cells. Due to this finding, we hypothesized that macrophages play an important role in Theileria parva disease pathogenesis. Data presented here demonstrates that terminal ECF in both Holstein and Boran cattle is largely due to multisystemic histiocytic responses and resultant tissue damage. Furthermore, the combination of these histologic changes with the clinical findings, including lymphadenopathy, prolonged pyrexia, multi-lineage leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia is consistent with macrophage activation syndrome. All animals that succumbed to infection exhibited lymphohistiocytic vasculitis of small to medium caliber blood and lymphatic vessels. In pulmonary, lymphoid, splenic and hepatic tissues from Holstein cattle, the majority of intralesional macrophages were positive for CD163, and often expressed large amounts of IL-17. These data define a terminal ECF pathogenesis in which parasite-driven lymphoproliferation leads to secondary systemic macrophage activation syndrome, mononuclear vasculitis, pulmonary edema, respiratory failure and death. The accompanying macrophage phenotype defined by CD163 and IL-17 is presented in the context of this pathogenesis. PMID:27195791

  6. Activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Src family kinase is required for respiratory burst in rat neutrophils stimulated with artocarpol A.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Ruey-Hseng; Lin, Hui-Yi; Huang, Li-Jiau; Tsai, Chi-Ren; Tsao, Lo-Ti; Lin, Chun-Nan; Chang, Ling-Chu; Wang, Jih-Pyang

    2006-06-14

    Artocarpol A (ART), a natural product isolated from Artocarpus rigida, stimulated superoxide anion (O2*-) generation, which was inhibited by 2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (LY 294002), a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, in rat neutrophils. ART stimulated phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) on both T308 and S473 residues, and LY 294002 inhibited these effects. Rat neutrophils expressed both class IA PI3K subunits (p85, p110alpha, p110beta, and p110delta) and a class IB PI3K subunit (p110gamma) as assessed by a combination of Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) approaches. Stimulation of neutrophils with ART evoked phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) formation, which reached a maximal level at 2 min and was attenuated by LY 294002, as evidenced by immunofluorescence microscopy and by flow cytometry. Detectable membrane-association of class IA PI3Ks, class IB PI3K and Ras was seen as early as 1.5, 0.5 and 1.5 min, respectively, after stimulation with ART. The kinetics of ART-induced Ras activation paralleled the kinetics of class IA PI3Ks recruitment to membrane caused by ART, and the p85 and p110gamma immunoprecipitates contain Ras. ART stimulated Src family kinase activation, which was detectable within 1.5 min of incubation with ART. Both Src kinase activity and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 formation in ART-stimulated neutrophils were inhibited by 4-amino-1-tert-butyl-3-(1'-naphthyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP1 analog). PP1 analog also attenuated the ART-stimulated O2*- generation in rat neutrophils. These results indicate that the stimulation of respiratory burst by ART in neutrophils implicates PI3K signaling.

  7. Characterization of a transport activity for long-chain peptides in barley mesophyll vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Magali Schnell; Abele, Rupert; Nagy, Réka; Grotemeyer, Marianne Suter; Tampé, Robert; Rentsch, Doris; Martinoia, Enrico

    2011-04-01

    The plant vacuole is the largest compartment in a fully expanded plant cell. While only very limited metabolic activity can be observed within the vacuole, the majority of the hydrolytic activities, including proteolytic activities reside in this organelle. Since it is assumed that protein degradation by the proteasome results in the production of peptides with a size of 3-30 amino acids, we were interested to show whether the tonoplast exhibits a transport activity, which could deliver these peptides into the vacuole for final degradation. It is shown here that isolated barley mesophyll vacuoles take up peptides of 9-27 amino acids in a strictly ATP-dependent manner. Uptake is inhibited by vanadate, but not by NH(+)(4), while GTP could partially substitute for ATP. The apparent affinity for the 9 amino acid peptide was 15 μM, suggesting that peptides are efficiently transferred to the vacuole in vivo. Inhibition experiments showed that peptides with a chain length below 10 amino acids did not compete as efficiently as longer peptides for the uptake of the 9 amino acid peptide. Our results suggest that vacuoles contain at least one peptide transporter that belongs to the ABC-type transporters, which efficiently exports long-chain peptides from the cytosol into the vacuole for final degradation.

  8. Effect of Ganoderma lucidum on the activities of mitochondrial dehydrogenases and complex I and II of electron transport chain in the brain of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ajith, T A; Sudheesh, N P; Roshny, D; Abishek, G; Janardhanan, K K

    2009-03-01

    Dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, being direct intracellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in the pathogenesis of number of ageing associated human disorders. Effect of ethanol extract of Ganoderma lucidum on the activities of mitochondrial dehydrogenases; complex I and II of electron transport chain have been evaluated in the aged rat brain. Aged male Wistar rats were administered with ethanol extract of G. lucidum (50 and 250mg/kg, p.o) once daily for 15 days. Similarly DL-alpha-lipoic acid (100mg/kg, p.o) administered group was kept as the reference standard. Young and aged rats administered with water were kept as young and aged control, respectively. The effect of treatment was assessed by estimating the activities of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (alpha-KGDH), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), complex I and II in the mitochondria of rat brain. Results of the study demonstrated that the extract of G. lucidum (50 and 250mg/kg) significantly (p<0.01) enhanced the activities of PDH, alpha-KGDH, SDH, complex I and II when compared to that of the aged control animals. The level of the lipid peroxidation was significantly lowered (p<0.01) in the G. lucidum treated group with respect to that of aged control. However, we could not find any statistically significant difference between the activities of enzymes in groups treated with 50 and 250mg/kg of G. lucidum. The activity exhibited by the extract of G. lucidum in the present study can be partially correlated to its antioxidant activity. The results of the study concluded that the extract of G. lucidum may effective to improve the function of mitochondria in aged rat brain, suggest its possible therapeutic application against ageing associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19041385

  9. Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis replicates within Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) leucocytes and inhibits respiratory burst activity.

    PubMed

    Vestvik, Nils; Rønneseth, Anita; Kalgraff, Cathrine A K; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C; Wergeland, Heidrun I; Haugland, Gyri T

    2013-09-01

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis, causing granulomatosis in cod, has been shown to reside within cod immune cells, mainly within monocytes and macrophages. In the present study, we analysed the ability of the bacterium to replicate within adherent cells isolated from head kidney by in vitro infection of leucocytes. Two different technical approaches for flow cytometry analyses were performed for detection of intracellular bacteria. The presence of the wild type was assessed after identification by intracellular binding of specific antibodies to the pathogen. The other way was to use green fluorescent protein (GFP) transformed bacterium for infection studies allowing direct measurements of fluorescence from infected cells. By both methods we found an increase in fluorescence in infected cells, verifying bacterial replication, both after 4 and 28 h post infection in leucocytes isolated from head kidney (HKL). The GFP transformed bacterium was similar to the wild type in growth and infectivity pattern, showing that it can be a valuable tool for further studies of infection routes and pathology. Further, F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis was found to inhibit respiratory burst activity, a potent pathogen killing mechanism, in cod leucocytes, but not in such cells from salmon. Our findings may indicate that inhibition of respiratory burst during Francisella infection is a key to its intracellular existence. This strategy seems to be conserved through evolution as it is also observed during infections in higher vertebrates caused by bacteria within the Francisella genus. The results presented here, showing the intracellular existence of Francisella, its replication within leucocytes and the inhibitory effect on respiratory burst, strongly support that these factors contribute to disease and pathology in infected cod. The intracellular replication shown in the present study might contribute to explain the problems of obtaining protective vaccines against

  10. Salivary histatin 5: dependence of sequence, chain length, and helical conformation for candidacidal activity.

    PubMed

    Raj, P A; Edgerton, M; Levine, M J

    1990-03-01

    Histatin 5 (Asp1-Ser-His-Ala4-Lys-Arg-His-His8-Gly-Tyr-Lys-Arg12-Lys-Ph e-His-Glu16-Lys-His - His-Ser20-His-Arg-Gly-Tyr24), one of the basic histidine-rich peptides present in human parotid saliva and several of its fragments, 1-16 (N16), 9-24 (C16), 11-24 (C14), 13-24 (C12), 15-24 (C10), and 7-16 (M10), were synthesized by solid-phase procedures. Native histatin 5 from human parotid saliva was also purified. Their antifungal activities on two strains of Candida albicans have been studied and their conformational preferences both in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions examined by circular dichroism. The synthetic histatin 5, C16, and C14 peptides were highly active and inhibited the growth of C. albicans. The candidacidal activity data of synthetic histatin 5 were comparable to the values of the native histatin 5 isolated from parotid saliva and those reported previously, although the assay system used and the strains examined were different. The C16 fragment was as active as the whole peptide itself, whereas the N16 fragment was far less active than C14, suggesting that the sequence at the C-terminal is important for its fungicidal activity. An increase in the chain length of the C-terminal sequence from 12 to 16 residues increased the candidacidal activity, thereby indicating that a peptide chain length of at least 12 residues is necessary to elicit optimum biological activity. The CD spectra of these linear peptides showed that they are structurally more flexible, and they adopt different conformations depending on the solvent environment. CD studies provided evidence that histatin 5 and the longer fragments, C16, N16, and C14 preferred alpha-helical conformations in non-aqueous solvents such as trifluoroethanol and methanol, while in water and pH 7.4 phosphate buffers, they favored random coil structures. The shorter sequences seemed to adopt either turn structures or unordered structures both in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. It appears that the sequence at

  11. Effects of ambient ozone on respiratory function in active, normal children

    SciTech Connect

    Spektor, D.M.; Lippmann, M.; Lioy, P.J.; Thurston, G.D.; Citak, K.

    1988-01-01

    Respiratory functions were measured daily by spirometry over four weeks at a summer camp in northwestern New Jersey. Multiple regression analyses indicated that O{sub 3} concentration, cumulative daily O{sub 3} exposure, ambient temperature, and humidity were the most explanatory environmental variables for daily variations in function, and that O{sub 3} concentration had the strongest influence on FVC, PEFR, and MMEf. For FEV1, cumulative daily O{sub 3} exposure and heat stress had greater relative effects. Linear regressions were performed for each child between O{sub 3} concentration and function, and all average slopes were significantly negative (p <0.05) for PVC, FEV1, PEFR and MMEF for all children, and for boys and girls separately. The implications of these short-term effects are unknown. However, the results in these free living children are comparable to those found in chamber studies with comparable exposures.

  12. Double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase regulates early innate immune responses during respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Minor, Radiah A Corn; Limmon, Gino V; Miller-DeGraff, Laura; Dixon, Darlene; Andrews, Danica M K; Kaufman, Randal J; Imani, Farhad

    2010-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of childhood viral bronchiolitis and lung injury. Inflammatory responses significantly contribute to lung pathologies during RSV infections and bronchiolitis but the exact mechanisms have not been completely defined. The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) functions to inhibit viral replication and participates in several signaling pathways associated with innate inflammatory immune responses. Using a functionally defective PKR (PKR(-/-)) mouse model, we investigated the role of this kinase in early events of RSV-induced inflammation. Our data showed that bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from infected PKR(-/-) mice had significantly lower levels of several innate inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Histological examinations revealed that there was less lung injury in infected PKR(-/-) mice as compared to the wild type. A genome-wide analysis showed that several early antiviral and immune regulatory genes were affected by PKR activation. These data suggest that PKR is a signaling molecule for immune responses during RSV infections.

  13. Effects of tour boats on dolphin activity examined with sensitivity analysis of Markov chains.

    PubMed

    Dans, Silvana Laura; Degrati, Mariana; Pedraza, Susana Noemí; Crespo, Enrique Alberto

    2012-08-01

    In Patagonia, Argentina, watching dolphins, especially dusky dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obscurus), is a new tourist activity. Feeding time decreases and time to return to feeding after feeding is abandoned and time it takes a group of dolphins to feed increase in the presence of boats. Such effects on feeding behavior may exert energetic costs on dolphins and thus reduce an individual's survival and reproductive capacity or maybe associated with shifts in distribution. We sought to predict which behavioral changes modify the activity pattern of dolphins the most. We modeled behavioral sequences of dusky dolphins with Markov chains. We calculated transition probabilities from one activity to another and arranged them in a stochastic matrix model. The proportion of time dolphins dedicated to a given activity (activity budget) and the time it took a dolphin to resume that activity after it had been abandoned (recurrence time) were calculated. We used a sensitivity analysis of Markov chains to calculate the sensitivity of the time budget and the activity-resumption time to changes in behavioral transition probabilities. Feeding-time budget was most sensitive to changes in the probability of dolphins switching from traveling to feeding behavior and of maintaining feeding behavior. Thus, an increase in these probabilities would be associated with the largest reduction in the time dedicated to feeding. A reduction in the probability of changing from traveling to feeding would also be associated with the largest increases in the time it takes dolphins to resume feeding. To approach dolphins when they are traveling would not affect behavior less because presence of the boat may keep dolphins from returning to feeding. Our results may help operators of dolphin-watching vessels minimize negative effects on dolphins. PMID:22624561

  14. Adrenaline modulates on the respiratory network development.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Morimitsu; Arata, Akiko

    2010-01-01

    Adrenaline regulates respiratory network, however, adrenergic contribution to the developing respiratory center has not well studied. Adrenaline application on embryonic day 17 medulla-spinal cord block preparations abolished non-respiratory activity and enhanced respiratory frequency. Phentolamine application on neonatal brainstem-spinal cord preparations that produced stable neonatal respiration resulted in respiratory destabilization. In E19 rat, adrenaline switched from enhancement to depression of the respiratory rhythm. Adrenaline modulated GABAergic synaptic transmission to respiratory neurons in late developmental stage. These results suggest that the involvement of central adrenergic modulation on the respiratory network maturation.

  15. Medium chain fatty acid ethyl esters - activation of antimicrobial effects by Malassezia enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mayser, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Free medium and short chain fatty acids are known to have broad antimicrobial activity. However, their practical use in topical therapy is limited by their intensive smell and acidity. Surprisingly, a nearly identical antimicrobial effect was found with the ethyl ester derivatives of these fatty acids, but only against Malassezia (M.) yeast, not against Candida spp. Obviously, these esters are hydrolysed by M. enzymes, thus generating a selective activation of antimicrobial activity especially in areas well populated with these yeast ('targeting'). Octanoic acid ethyl ester (CAS 106-32-1) was found to be most suitable. In an agar dilution test, the minimal inhibitory concentrations against M. globosa, M. pachydermatis and M. sympodialis, respectively, ranged between ~5 and 10 mmol l(-1) after 10 days of incubation. The effect started immediately and was not delayed by other lipid sources applied simultaneously. Based on these data, fatty acid monoesters may represent a new therapeutic concept in M.-associated diseases. PMID:25676074

  16. Sirtuin 1 regulates dendritic cell activation and autophagy during Respiratory Syncytial Virus-induced immune responses1

    PubMed Central

    Owczarczyk, Anna B.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Reed, Michelle; Rasky, Andrew J.; Lombard, David B.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children worldwide. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD+ dependent deacetylase, has been associated with the induction of autophagy and the regulation of inflammatory mediators. We found that Sirt1 was upregulated in mouse lung after RSV infection. Infected animals that received EX-527, a selective SIRT1 inhibitor, displayed exacerbated lung pathology, with increased mucus production, elevated viral load, and enhanced Th2 cytokine production. Gene expression analysis of isolated cell populations revealed that Sirt1 was most highly upregulated in RSV-treated dendritic cells (DCs). Upon RSV infection, EX-527-treated DCs, Sirt1 siRNA-treated DCs, or DCs from conditional knockout (Sirt1f/f-CD11c–Cre+) mice showed downregulated inflammatory cytokine gene expression and attenuated autophagy. Finally, RSV infection of Sirt1f/f-CD11c–Cre+ mice resulted in altered lung and lymph node cytokine responses, leading to exacerbated pathology. These data indicate that SIRT1 promotes DC activation associated with autophagy-mediated processes during RSV infection, thereby directing efficient antiviral immune responses. PMID:26157176

  17. Mn2+ activates skinned smooth muscle cells in the absence of myosin light chain phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hoar, P E; Kerrick, W G

    1988-08-01

    Two effects of Mn2+ on skinned fibers from chicken gizzard smooth muscle were observed, dependent on the presence or absence of dithiothreitol (DTT) reducing agent. One involves protein oxidation (in the absence of DTT) with production of a "latch"-like state, and the other involves direct Mn2+ activation of contractile proteins. Cells activated by Mn2+ in the presence of ATP and the absence of Ca2+, Mg2+ and DTT did not relax when transferred to normal relaxing solutions. In contrast, when 5 mM DTT was included in the Mn2+ contracting solution to prevent protein oxidation by Mn2+, the cells still contracted when exposed to Mn2+, but relaxed rapidly when the Mn2+ was removed. In the presence of DTT both the Mn2+ activation and the relaxation following removal of Mn2+ were more rapid than normal Ca2+-activated contractions and relaxations. The skinned fibers activated by Mn2+ in the absence of DTT showed little active shortening unless DTT was added. This rigor-like state is probably due to oxidation of contractile proteins since the cells relaxed when exposed to a relaxing solution containing DTT (50 mM) and then contracted again in response to Ca2+ and relaxed normally. The Mn2+ activation was not associated with myosin light chain phosphorylation, in contrast to Ca2+-activated contractions. PMID:3186428

  18. Inhibition of respiratory burst activity in alveolar macrophages by bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids: characterization of drug-cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Ma, J Y; Barger, M W; Ma, J K; Castranova, V

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of various bisbenzylisoquinoline (BBIQ) alkaloids on respiratory burst activity of alveolar macrophages and to characterize the interaction of these drugs with alveolar phagocytes. BBIQ alkaloids were chosen for study because they exhibit a wide range of antifibrotic potencies in a rat model, with tetrandrine being very effective and tubocurarine being ineffective. These drugs inhibited zymosan-stimulated oxygen consumption with a potency sequence of tetrandrine (TT) approximately fangchinoline (FA) > berbamine (BE) approximately cepharanthine (CE) approximately cycleanine (CY) > tubocurarine (TU). This inhibition of respiratory burst activity could not be attributed to a drug-induced decline in the ATP content of these pneumocytes. Drug binding to alveolar macrophages was directly dependent on temperature and drug concentration. The sequence for binding capacity was FA > TT approximately BE approximately CY > CE > TU. Therefore, there was no simple relationship between binding capacity and inhibitory potency. Binding capacity was not related to lipophilicity of these alkaloids. In addition, tetrandrine failed to bind to metabolically dead cells or sonicated macrophage preparations. These data suggest that the interaction of BBIQ alkaloids with phagocytes is not simply nonspecific binding to membrane lipids. Alteration of the cytoskeletal system with vinblastine, taxol, or cytochalasin B decreased tetrandrine binding by approximately 33% when added separately and by 93% when added jointly. Pre-exposure of alveolar macrophages to stimulants increased the ability of BBIQ alkaloids to inhibit both oxygen consumption and superoxide release. These data suggest that the mechanism by which BBIQ alkaloids inhibit activation of phagocytes involves microtubules and bules and microfilaments. Pre-exposure of macrophages to stimulants would change the conformation of cytoskeletal components and may make these structures

  19. Synthesis and biological activities of new side chain and backbone cyclic bradykinin analogues.

    PubMed

    Schumann, C; Seyfarth, L; Greiner, G; Paegelow, I; Reissmann, S

    2002-08-01

    A series of conformationally constrained cyclic analogues of the peptide hormone bradykinin (BK, Arg-Pro-Pro-Gly-Phe-Ser-Pro-Phe-Arg) was synthesized to check different turned structures proposed for the bioactive conformation of BK agonists and antagonists. Cycles differing in the size and direction of the lactam bridge were performed at the C- and N-terminal sequences of the molecule. Glutamic acid and lysine were introduced into the native BK sequence at different positions for cyclization through their side chains. Backbone cyclic analogues were synthesized by incorporation of N-carboxy alkylated and N-amino alkylated amino acids into the peptide chain. Although the coupling of Fmoc-glycine to the N-alkylated phenylalanine derivatives was effected with DIC/HOAt in SPPS, the dipeptide building units with more bulky amino acids were pre-built in solution. For backbone cyclization at the C-terminus an alternative building unit with an acylated reduced peptide bond was preformed in solution. Both types of building units were handled in the SPPS in the same manner as amino acids. The agonistic and antagonistic activities of the cyclic BK analogues were determined in rat uterus (RUT) and guinea-pig ileum (GPI) assays. Additionally, the potentiation of the BK-induced effects was examined. Among the series of cyclic BK agonists only compound 3 with backbone cyclization between positions 2 and 5 shows a significant agonistic activity on RUT. To study the influence of intramolecular ring closure we used an antagonistic analogue with weak activity, [D-Phe7]-BK. Side chain as well as backbone cyclization in the N-terminus of [D-Phe7]-BK resulted in analogues with moderate antagonistic activity on RUT. Also, compound 18 in which a lactam bridge between positions 6 and 9 was achieved via an acylated reduced peptide bond has moderate antagonistic activity on RUT. These results support the hypothesis of turn structures in both parts of the molecule as a requirement for BK

  20. Loss of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 impairs cardiac autophagy and mitochondrial structure through mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Grevengoed, Trisha J; Cooper, Daniel E; Young, Pamela A; Ellis, Jessica M; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2015-11-01

    Because hearts with a temporally induced knockout of acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (Acsl1(T-/-)) are virtually unable to oxidize fatty acids, glucose use increases 8-fold to compensate. This metabolic switch activates mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which initiates growth by increasing protein and RNA synthesis and fatty acid metabolism, while decreasing autophagy. Compared with controls, Acsl1(T-/-) hearts contained 3 times more mitochondria with abnormal structure and displayed a 35-43% lower respiratory function. To study the effects of mTORC1 activation on mitochondrial structure and function, mTORC1 was inhibited by treating Acsl1(T-/-) and littermate control mice with rapamycin or vehicle alone for 2 wk. Rapamycin treatment normalized mitochondrial structure, number, and the maximal respiration rate in Acsl1(T-/-) hearts, but did not improve ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption, which was likely caused by the 33-51% lower ATP synthase activity present in both vehicle- and rapamycin-treated Acsl1(T-/-) hearts. The turnover of microtubule associated protein light chain 3b in Acsl1(T-/-) hearts was 88% lower than controls, indicating a diminished rate of autophagy. Rapamycin treatment increased autophagy to a rate that was 3.1-fold higher than in controls, allowing the formation of autophagolysosomes and the clearance of damaged mitochondria. Thus, long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 (ACSL1) deficiency in the heart activated mTORC1, thereby inhibiting autophagy and increasing the number of damaged mitochondria. PMID:26220174

  1. Production of an active feline interferon in the cocoon of transgenic silkworms using the fibroin H-chain expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, H. . E-mail: Hiroyuki_Kurihara@nts.toray.co.jp; Sezutsu, H.; Tamura, T.; Yamada, K.

    2007-04-20

    We constructed the fibroin H-chain expression system to produce recombinant proteins in the cocoon of transgenic silkworms. Feline interferon (FeIFN) was used for production and to assess the quality of the product. Two types of FeIFN fusion protein, each with N- and C-terminal sequences of the fibroin H-chain, were designed to be secreted into the lumen of the posterior silk glands. The expression of the FeIFN/H-chain fusion gene was regulated by the fibroin H-chain promoter domain. The transgenic silkworms introduced these constructs with the piggyBac transposon-derived vector, which produced the normal sized cocoons containing each FeIFN/H-chain fusion protein. Although the native-protein produced by transgenic silkworms have almost no antiviral activity, the proteins after the treatment with PreScission protease to eliminate fibroin H-chain derived N- and C-terminal sequences from the products, had very high antiviral activity. This H-chain expression system, using transgenic silkworms, could be an alternative method to produce an active recombinant protein and silk-based biomaterials.

  2. Chromophore-Assisted Light Inactivation of Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain Complex II in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Wei, Alicia Y.; Sherman, Teresa A.; Foster, Thomas H.; Nehrke, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play critical roles in meeting cellular energy demand, in cell death, and in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and stress signaling. Most Caenorhabditis elegans loss-of-function (lf) mutants in nuclear-encoded components of the respiratory chain are non-viable, emphasizing the importance of respiratory function. Chromophore-Assisted Light Inactivation (CALI) using genetically-encoded photosensitizers provides an opportunity to determine how individual respiratory chain components contribute to physiology following acute lf. As proof-of-concept, we expressed the ‘singlet oxygen generator’ miniSOG as a fusion with the SDHC subunit of respiratory complex II, encoded by mev-1 in C. elegans, using Mos1-mediated Single Copy Insertion. The resulting mev-1::miniSOG transgene complemented mev-1 mutant phenotypes in kn1 missense and tm1081(lf) deletion mutants. Complex II activity was inactivated by blue light in mitochondria from strains expressing active miniSOG fusions, but not those from inactive fusions. Moreover, light-inducible phenotypes in vivo demonstrated that complex II activity is important under conditions of high energy demand, and that specific cell types are uniquely susceptible to loss of complex II. In conclusion, miniSOG-mediated CALI is a novel genetic platform for acute inactivation of respiratory chain components. Spatio-temporally controlled ROS generation will expand our understanding of how the respiratory chain and mitochondrial ROS influence whole organism physiology. PMID:27440050

  3. Chromophore-Assisted Light Inactivation of Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain Complex II in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wojtovich, Andrew P; Wei, Alicia Y; Sherman, Teresa A; Foster, Thomas H; Nehrke, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play critical roles in meeting cellular energy demand, in cell death, and in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and stress signaling. Most Caenorhabditis elegans loss-of-function (lf) mutants in nuclear-encoded components of the respiratory chain are non-viable, emphasizing the importance of respiratory function. Chromophore-Assisted Light Inactivation (CALI) using genetically-encoded photosensitizers provides an opportunity to determine how individual respiratory chain components contribute to physiology following acute lf. As proof-of-concept, we expressed the 'singlet oxygen generator' miniSOG as a fusion with the SDHC subunit of respiratory complex II, encoded by mev-1 in C. elegans, using Mos1-mediated Single Copy Insertion. The resulting mev-1::miniSOG transgene complemented mev-1 mutant phenotypes in kn1 missense and tm1081(lf) deletion mutants. Complex II activity was inactivated by blue light in mitochondria from strains expressing active miniSOG fusions, but not those from inactive fusions. Moreover, light-inducible phenotypes in vivo demonstrated that complex II activity is important under conditions of high energy demand, and that specific cell types are uniquely susceptible to loss of complex II. In conclusion, miniSOG-mediated CALI is a novel genetic platform for acute inactivation of respiratory chain components. Spatio-temporally controlled ROS generation will expand our understanding of how the respiratory chain and mitochondrial ROS influence whole organism physiology. PMID:27440050

  4. The respiratory cycle modulates brain potentials, sympathetic activity, and subjective pain sensation induced by noxious stimulation.

    PubMed

    Iwabe, Tatsuya; Ozaki, Isamu; Hashizume, Akira

    2014-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that a respiratory cycle influences pain processing, we conducted an experimental pain study in 10 healthy volunteers. Intraepidermal electrical stimulation (IES) with a concentric bipolar needle electrode was applied to the hand dorsum at pain perceptual threshold or four times the perceptual threshold to produce first pain during expiration or inspiration either of which was determined by the abrupt change in an exhaled CO2 level. IES-evoked potentials (IESEPs), sympathetic skin response (SSR), digital plethysmogram (DPG), and subjective pain intensity rating scale were simultaneously recorded. With either stimulus intensity, IES during expiration produced weaker pain feeling compared to IES during inspiration. The mean amplitude of N200/P400 in IESEPs and that of SSR were smaller when IES was applied during expiration. The magnitude of DPG wave gradually decreased after IES, but a decrease in the magnitude of DPG wave was less evident when IES was delivered during expiration. Regardless of stimulus timing or stimulus intensity, pain perception was always concomitant with appearance of IESEPs and SSR, and changes in DPG. Our findings suggest that pain processing fluctuates during normal breathing and that pain is gated within the central nervous system during expiration. PMID:24667456

  5. The respiratory cycle modulates brain potentials, sympathetic activity, and subjective pain sensation induced by noxious stimulation.

    PubMed

    Iwabe, Tatsuya; Ozaki, Isamu; Hashizume, Akira

    2014-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that a respiratory cycle influences pain processing, we conducted an experimental pain study in 10 healthy volunteers. Intraepidermal electrical stimulation (IES) with a concentric bipolar needle electrode was applied to the hand dorsum at pain perceptual threshold or four times the perceptual threshold to produce first pain during expiration or inspiration either of which was determined by the abrupt change in an exhaled CO2 level. IES-evoked potentials (IESEPs), sympathetic skin response (SSR), digital plethysmogram (DPG), and subjective pain intensity rating scale were simultaneously recorded. With either stimulus intensity, IES during expiration produced weaker pain feeling compared to IES during inspiration. The mean amplitude of N200/P400 in IESEPs and that of SSR were smaller when IES was applied during expiration. The magnitude of DPG wave gradually decreased after IES, but a decrease in the magnitude of DPG wave was less evident when IES was delivered during expiration. Regardless of stimulus timing or stimulus intensity, pain perception was always concomitant with appearance of IESEPs and SSR, and changes in DPG. Our findings suggest that pain processing fluctuates during normal breathing and that pain is gated within the central nervous system during expiration.

  6. Self-assembly and antimicrobial activity of long-chain amide-functionalized ionic liquids in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M Teresa; Ribosa, Isabel; Perez, Lourdes; Manresa, Angeles; Comelles, Francesc

    2014-11-01

    Surface active amide-functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) consisting of a long alkyl chain (C6C14) connected to a polar head group (methylimidazolium or pyridinium cation) via an amide functional group were synthesized and their thermal stability, micellar properties and antimicrobial activity in aqueous solution investigated. The incorporation of an amide group increased the thermal stability of the functionalized ionic liquids compared to simple alkyl chain substituted ionic liquids. The surface activity and aggregation behaviour in aqueous solution of amide-functionalized ionic liquids were examined by tensiometry, conductivity and spectrofluorimetry. Amide-functionalized ILs displayed surface activity and their critical micelle concentration (cmc) in aqueous media decreased with the elongation of the alkyl side chain as occurs for typical surfactants. Compared to non-functionalized ILs bearing the same alkyl chain, ionic liquids with an amide moiety possess higher surface activity (pC20) and lower cmc values. The introduction of an amide group in the hydrophobic chain close to the polar head enhances adsorption at the air/water interface and micellization which could be attributed to the H-bonding in the headgroup region. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against a panel of representative Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. Amide-functionalized ILs with more than eight carbon atoms in the side chain showed broad antimicrobial activity. Antibacterial activities were found to increase with the alkyl chain length being the C12 homologous the most effective antimicrobial agents. The introduction of an amide group enhanced significantly the antifungal activity as compared to non-functionalized ILs.

  7. Differences in Muscle Activities of the Infraspinatus and Posterior Deltoid during Shoulder External Rotation in Open Kinetic Chain and Closed Kinetic Chain Exercises.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Oh, Jae-Seop; Jang, Jun-Hyeok

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the changes in electromyographic (EMG) activities of the infraspinatus and posterior deltoid muscles during shoulder external rotation under open kinetic chain (OKC) and closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercise conditions. [Subjects] In total, 15 healthy males participated in this study. [Methods] Subjects performed shoulder external rotations under CKC and OKC conditions while standing with and without weight support provided by a height-adjustable table. Pressure biofeedback was used to ensure a constant amount of weight support. The activities of the infraspinatus and posterior deltoid muscles during shoulder external rotation were measured using a wireless surface EMG system. The paired t-test was used to compare the EMG activities of the infraspinatus and the posterior deltoid muscles and the ratio of the infraspinatus to the posterior deltoid during shoulder external rotation under OKC and CKC conditions. [Results] The EMG activity of the infraspinatus and the ratio of the infraspinatus to the posterior deltoid activities were significantly increased, whereas the posterior deltoid activity was significantly decreased under the CKC condition compared to the OKC condition. [Conclusion] Clinicians should consider the CKC shoulder external rotation exercise when they wish to selectively strengthen the infraspinatus. PMID:25013291

  8. Discovery of thiochroman derivatives bearing a carboxy-containing side chain as orally active pure antiestrogens.

    PubMed

    Kanbe, Yoshitake; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Nishimoto, Masahiro; Ohtake, Yoshihito; Tsunenari, Toshiaki; Taniguchi, Kenji; Ohizumi, Iwao; Kaiho, Shin-ichi; Nabuchi, Yoshiaki; Kawata, Setsu; Morikawa, Kazumi; Jo, Jae-Chon; Kwon, Hee-An; Lim, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Hak-Yeop

    2006-08-01

    In order to search for alternatives to the sulfoxide moiety in the long side chain of pure antiestrogens, several molecules that may interact with water in a fashion similar to ICI164,384 were designed and it was found that compounds with the carboxy, the sulfamide, or the sulfonamide instead of the sulfoxide moiety also functioned as pure antiestrogens. Interestingly, the compound possessing the carboxy moiety showed superior antiestrogen activity compared to ICI182,780 when dosed orally. Results of the pharmacokinetic evaluation indicated that the potent antiestrogen activity at oral dosing attributed to both the improved absorption from the intestinal wall and the metabolic stability of the compound in liver. PMID:16709454

  9. Synthesis of Isomeric Phosphoubiquitin Chains Reveals that Phosphorylation Controls Deubiquitinase Activity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Huguenin-Dezot, Nicolas; De Cesare, Virginia; Peltier, Julien; Knebel, Axel; Kristaryianto, Yosua Adi; Rogerson, Daniel T; Kulathu, Yogesh; Trost, Matthias; Chin, Jason W

    2016-07-26

    Ubiquitin is post-translationally modified by phosphorylation at several sites, but the consequences of these modifications are largely unknown. Here, we synthesize multi-milligram quantities of ubiquitin phosphorylated at serine 20, serine 57, and serine 65 via genetic code expansion. We use these phosphoubiquitins for the enzymatic assembly of 20 isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers, with different sites of isopeptide linkage and/or phosphorylation. We discover that phosphorylation of serine 20 on ubiquitin converts UBE3C from a dual-specificity E3 ligase into a ligase that primarily synthesizes K48 chains. We profile the activity of 31 deubiquitinases on the isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers in 837 reactions, and we discover that phosphorylation at distinct sites in ubiquitin can activate or repress cleavage of a particular linkage by deubiquitinases and that phosphorylation at a single site in ubiquitin can control the specificity of deubiquitinases for distinct ubiquitin linkages. PMID:27425610

  10. Cyclization and unsaturation rather than isomerisation of side chains govern the selective antibacterial activity of cationic-amphiphilic polymers.

    PubMed

    Uppu, D S S M; Bhowmik, M; Samaddar, S; Haldar, J

    2016-03-28

    Membrane-active agents represent a promising alternative to overcome antibiotic resistance. Here, we report cationic-amphiphilic polymers with variations in the side chain architecture such as cyclization, isomerization and unsaturation that resulted in potent antibacterial activity and low mammalian cell toxicity with a membrane-active mode of action.

  11. Arrangement of the Respiratory Chain Complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Supercomplex III2IV2 Revealed by Single Particle Cryo-Electron Microscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Penczek, Pawel A.; Fang, Jia; Mallampalli, Venkata K. P. S.; Sparagna, Genevieve C.; Dowhan, William

    2012-01-01

    Here we present for the first time a three-dimensional cryo-EM map of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae respiratory supercomplex composed of dimeric complex III flanked on each side by one monomeric complex IV. A precise fit of the existing atomic x-ray structures of complex III from yeast and complex IV from bovine heart into the cryo-EM map resulted in a pseudo-atomic model of the three-dimensional structure for the supercomplex. The distance between cytochrome c binding sites of complexes III and IV is about 6 nm, which supports proposed channeling of cytochrome c between the individual complexes. The opposing surfaces of complexes III and IV differ considerably from those reported for the bovine heart supercomplex as determined by cryo-EM. A closer association between the individual complex domains at the aqueous membrane interface and larger spaces between the membrane-embedded domains where lipid molecules may reside are also demonstrated. The supercomplex contains about 50 molecules of cardiolipin (CL) with a fatty acid composition identical to that of the inner membrane CL pool, consistent with CL-dependent stabilization of the supercomplex. PMID:22573332

  12. Arrangement of the respiratory chain complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae supercomplex III2IV2 revealed by single particle cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Penczek, Pawel A; Fang, Jia; Mallampalli, Venkata K P S; Sparagna, Genevieve C; Dowhan, William

    2012-06-29

    Here we present for the first time a three-dimensional cryo-EM map of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae respiratory supercomplex composed of dimeric complex III flanked on each side by one monomeric complex IV. A precise fit of the existing atomic x-ray structures of complex III from yeast and complex IV from bovine heart into the cryo-EM map resulted in a pseudo-atomic model of the three-dimensional structure for the supercomplex. The distance between cytochrome c binding sites of complexes III and IV is about 6 nm, which supports proposed channeling of cytochrome c between the individual complexes. The opposing surfaces of complexes III and IV differ considerably from those reported for the bovine heart supercomplex as determined by cryo-EM. A closer association between the individual complex domains at the aqueous membrane interface and larger spaces between the membrane-embedded domains where lipid molecules may reside are also demonstrated. The supercomplex contains about 50 molecules of cardiolipin (CL) with a fatty acid composition identical to that of the inner membrane CL pool, consistent with CL-dependent stabilization of the supercomplex.

  13. Structural analysis of effector functions related motifs, complement activation and hemagglutinating activities in Lama glama heavy chain antibodies.

    PubMed

    Saccodossi, Natalia; De Simone, Emilio A; Leoni, Juliana

    2012-01-15

    Heavy chain antibodies (HCAbs), devoid of the light chains and the CH(1) domain, are present in the serum of camelids. IgG(2) and IgG(3) are HCAbs; whereas IgG(1) has the conventional structure. In order to study the immunological properties of llama HCAbs, from which to date little is known, llamas (Lama glama) HCAbs cDNA were cloned, sequenced and compared with other mammalian Igs. The sequence analysis showed that llama HCAbs cDNA organization is similar to other mammalian Igs and the presence of conserved binding motifs to Protein A, Protein G, FcγRI, FcγRIII and C1q in HCAbs were observed. In a previous work, different IgG isotypes purified by Protein A and Protein G chromatography, were assayed for their ability to fix complement. Both IgG(1) and the total serum were able to fix complement, whereas IgG(2) and IgG(3) fixed complement even in the absence of antigen (anti-complementary activity). Therefore, in this work we performed the complement activating activity of the different IgG isotypes purified under physiological conditions using Sephadex G-150 and their ability to induce hemagglutination. Llamas were immunized with sheep red blood cells (RBC) stroma and the different isotypes were purified from sera. Whole serum and IgG(1) could activate complement; however, HCAbs (IgG(2)+IgG(3)) could not, despite the presence of the C1q binding motif in their primary sequence. Unlike IgG(1), the fraction corresponding to IgG(2)+IgG(3) did not display hemagglutinating activity. Our findings suggest that HCAbs cannot crosslink efficiently with different antigens and that the C1q binding site might be hindered by the proximity of the variable domains. PMID:22197565

  14. [Role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and myosin light chain kinase during the activation of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Han, Yue; Gao, Hai-Li; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Xia; Dai, Lan; Sheng, Wen-Hong; Sun, Ai-Ning; Wu, De-Pei; Wang, Zhao-Yue; Ruan, Chang-Geng

    2009-06-01

    The objective of study was to compare the influences of wortmannin on platelet aggregation and platelet membrane surface glycoproteins GPIb expression after thrombin receptor activation, and to investigate the role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in the course of thrombin receptor activation. Peptide SFLLRN (PAR1-AP) and AYPGKF (PAR4-AP) were used for stimulating platelet, and the changes of platelet aggregation and GPIb were analyzed with 100 nmol/L wortmannin (inhibitor of PI3-K) and 10 micromol/L wortmannin (inhibitor of MLCK). The results indicated that the platelet activation was influenced by either concentration of wortmannin in response to PAR stimulation. Platelet aggregation was apparently inhibited by 10 micromol/L wortmannin through both PAR peptides, and was slightly inhibited by 100 nmol/L wortmannin only under PAR1-AP activation. In addition, GPIbalpha internalization was partly inhibited by 100 nmol/L wortmannin in response to PAR1 (p < 0.05 at 1, 2, 5 min) and PAR4 (p < 0.05 at 2, 5, 10 min) activation. Meanwhile, 10 micromol/L wortmannin induced little change for GPIbalpha centralisation in the course of PAR activation, with a delayed restoration of surface GPIbalpha observed under PAR1-AP activation, and no change of GPIbalpha redistribution existed under PAR4-AP activation. It is concluded that the different roles of PI3-K and MLCK exist in the course of thrombin receptor activation. PI3-K accelerates the short course of GPIb centralisation for two PAR signal pathways, while MLCK inhibits the restoration of GPIbalpha in PAR1 pathway. PMID:19549383

  15. ERK1/2 activation modulates pyocyanin-induced toxicity in A549 respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Amanda; Davey, Andrew K; Perkins, Anthony V; Grant, Gary D; McFarland, Amelia J; McDermott, Catherine M; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra

    2014-02-01

    Pyocyanin (PCN), a virulence factor produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has many damaging effects on mammalian cells. Several lines of evidence suggest that this damage is primarily mediated by its ability to generate oxidative stress. However mechanisms underlying PCN-induced oxidative injury remain unclear. Although oxidative stress and subsequent MAPK signaling has been shown to modulate cell death in other models, its role in PCN-induced cytotoxicity remains unknown. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the role of redox-sensitive MAPK in PCN-induced toxicity in A549 cells. Here we show that PCN (50μM) rapidly increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation after 5min. Pre-treatment of A549 cells with the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 (10μM) decreased PCN-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and protected cells against apoptosis and cell injury suggesting a role for ERK signalling. In contrast, JNK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation remained unchanged following exposure to PCN and pretreatment with either the JNK or p38 MAPK inhibitors (10μM SP600125 and 10μM SB203580, respectively) did not afford protection against PCN toxicity. This would suggest that PCN-induced cytotoxicity appears to occur independently of JNK and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. Finally, although we confirm that oxidative stress contributes to PCN-induced toxicity, our data suggest the contribution of oxidative stress is independent of ERK1/2 signaling. These findings may provide insight for novel targeted therapies to reduce PCN-mediated lung injury in patients with chronic P. aeruginosa respiratory infections.

  16. Effects of ambient ozone on respiratory function in active, normal children

    SciTech Connect

    Spektor, D.M.; Lippmann, M.; Lioy, P.J.; Thurston, G.D.; Citak, K.; James, D.J.; Bock, N.; Speizer, F.E.; Hayes, C.

    1988-02-01

    Respiratory functions were measured on a daily basis by spirometry over a period of 4 wk at a summer camp at Fairview Lake in northwestern New Jersey. Fifty-three boys and 38 girls 8 to 15 yr of age participated in the study on at least 7 days; 37 children were in residence for 4 wk, 34 for the first 2 wk only; and 20 for the last 2 wk. There were 72 whites, 15 blacks, 3 Asians, and 1 Hispanic in the study group. Multiple regression analyses indicated that the O/sub 3/ concentration in the previous hour, the cumulative daily O/sub 3/ exposure during the hours between 9 A.M. and the function measurement, ambient temperature, and humidity were the most explanatory environmental variables for daily variations in function, with the 1 - h O/sub 3/ concentration having the strongest influence. Linear regressions were performed for each child between O/sub 3/ concentration and function, and all average slopes were significantly negative (p less than 0.05) for FVC, FEV1, PEFR, and FEF25-75 for all children, and for boys and girls separately. Comparable results were obtained in data subsets (i.e., children studied during the first or second 2 wk only, and for data sets truncated at O/sub 3/ less than 80 and O/sub 3/ less than 60 ppb). The average regression slopes (+/- SE) for FVC and FEV1, respectively, were -1.03 +/- 0.24 and -1.42 +/- 0.17 ml/ppb, whereas for PEFR and FEF25-75 they were -6.78 +/- 0.73 and -2.48 +/- 0.26 ml/s/ppb.

  17. Medium chain fatty acids are selective peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) γ activators and pan-PPAR partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Liberato, Marcelo Vizoná; Nascimento, Alessandro S; Ayers, Steven D; Lin, Jean Z; Cvoro, Aleksandra; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Martínez, Leandro; Souza, Paulo C T; Saidemberg, Daniel; Deng, Tuo; Amato, Angela Angelica; Togashi, Marie; Hsueh, Willa A; Phillips, Kevin; Palma, Mário Sérgio; Neves, Francisco A R; Skaf, Munir S; Webb, Paul; Polikarpov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) act through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) γ to increase insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes (T2DM), but deleterious effects of these ligands mean that selective modulators with improved clinical profiles are needed. We obtained a crystal structure of PPARγ ligand binding domain (LBD) and found that the ligand binding pocket (LBP) is occupied by bacterial medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs). We verified that MCFAs (C8-C10) bind the PPARγ LBD in vitro and showed that they are low-potency partial agonists that display assay-specific actions relative to TZDs; they act as very weak partial agonists in transfections with PPARγ LBD, stronger partial agonists with full length PPARγ and exhibit full blockade of PPARγ phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5), linked to reversal of adipose tissue insulin resistance. MCFAs that bind PPARγ also antagonize TZD-dependent adipogenesis in vitro. X-ray structure B-factor analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that MCFAs weakly stabilize C-terminal activation helix (H) 12 relative to TZDs and this effect is highly dependent on chain length. By contrast, MCFAs preferentially stabilize the H2-H3/β-sheet region and the helix (H) 11-H12 loop relative to TZDs and we propose that MCFA assay-specific actions are linked to their unique binding mode and suggest that it may be possible to identify selective PPARγ modulators with useful clinical profiles among natural products.

  18. Blood or Urine IP-10 Cannot Discriminate between Active Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases Different from Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Linda; Cannas, Angela; Aloi, Francesco; Nsubuga, Martin; Sserumkuma, Joseph; Nazziwa, Ritah Angella; Jugheli, Levan; Lukindo, Tedson; Girardi, Enrico; Reither, Klaus; Goletti, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Interferon-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10), either in blood or in urine, has been proposed as a tuberculosis (TB) biomarker for adults. This study aims to evaluate the potential of IP-10 diagnostics in children from Uganda, a high TB-endemic country. Methods. IP-10 was measured in the blood and urine concomitantly taken from children who were prospectively enrolled with suspected active TB, with or without HIV infection. Clinical/microbiological parameters and commercially available TB-immune assays (tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON TB-Gold In-Tube (QFT-IT)) were concomitantly evaluated. Results. One hundred twenty-eight children were prospectively enrolled. The analysis was performed on 111 children: 80 (72%) of them were HIV-uninfected and 31 (27.9%) were HIV-infected. Thirty-three healthy adult donors (HAD) were included as controls. The data showed that IP-10 is detectable in the urine and blood of children with active TB, independent of HIV status and age. However, although IP-10 levels were higher in active TB children compared to HAD, the accuracy of identifying “active TB” was low and similar to the TST and QFT-IT. Conclusion. IP-10 levels are higher in children with respiratory illness compared to controls, independent of “TB status” suggesting that the evaluation of this parameter can be used as an inflammatory marker more than a TB test. PMID:26346028

  19. [Impacts of root-zone hypoxia stress on muskmelon growth, its root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Ling; Li, Tian-Lai; Sun, Zhou-Ping; Chen, Ya-Dong

    2010-06-01

    By using aeroponics culture system, this paper studied the impacts of root-zone hypoxia (10% O2 and 5% O2) stress on the plant growth, root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities of muskmelon at its fruit development stage. Root-zone hypoxia stress inhibited the plant growth of muskmelon, resulting in the decrease of plant height, root length, and fresh and dry biomass. Comparing with the control (21% O2), hypoxia stress reduced the root respiration rate and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity significantly, and the impact of 5% O2 stress was more serious than that of 10% O2 stress. Under hypoxic conditions, the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) activities and the malondialdehyde (MDA) content were significantly higher than the control. The increment of antioxidative enzyme activities under 10% O2 stress was significantly higher than that under 5% O2 stress, while the MDA content was higher under 5% O2 stress than under 10% O2 stress, suggesting that when the root-zone oxygen concentration was below 10%, the aerobic respiration of muskmelon at its fruit development stage was obviously inhibited while the anaerobic respiration was accelerated, and the root antioxidative enzymes induced defense reaction. With the increasing duration of hypoxic stress, the lipid peroxidation would be aggravated, resulting in the damages on muskmelon roots, inhibition of plant growth, and decrease of fruit yield and quality. PMID:20873618

  20. Evaluation of neural reflex activation as a mode of action for the acute respiratory effects of ozone.

    PubMed

    Prueitt, Robyn L; Goodman, Julie E

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to elevated levels of ozone has been associated with a variety of respiratory-related health endpoints in both epidemiology and controlled human exposure studies, including lung function decrements and airway inflammation. A mode of action (MoA) for these effects has not been established, but it has been proposed that they may occur through ozone-induced activation of neural reflexes. We critically reviewed experimental studies of ozone exposure and neural reflex activation and applied the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) mode-of-action/human relevance framework to evaluate the biological plausibility and human relevance of this proposed MoA. Based on the currently available experimental data, we found that the proposed MoA of neural reflex activation is biologically plausible for the endpoint of ozone-induced lung function decrements at high ozone exposures, but further studies are needed to fill important data gaps regarding the relevance of this MoA at lower exposures. A role for the proposed MoA in ozone-induced airway inflammation is less plausible, as the evidence is conflicting and is also of unclear relevance given the lack of studies conducted at lower exposures. The evidence suggests a different MoA for ozone-induced inflammation that may still be linked to the key events in the proposed MoA, such that neural reflex activation may have some degree of involvement in modulating ozone-induced neutrophil influx, even if it is not a direct role. PMID:27569521

  1. [Impacts of root-zone hypoxia stress on muskmelon growth, its root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Ling; Li, Tian-Lai; Sun, Zhou-Ping; Chen, Ya-Dong

    2010-06-01

    By using aeroponics culture system, this paper studied the impacts of root-zone hypoxia (10% O2 and 5% O2) stress on the plant growth, root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities of muskmelon at its fruit development stage. Root-zone hypoxia stress inhibited the plant growth of muskmelon, resulting in the decrease of plant height, root length, and fresh and dry biomass. Comparing with the control (21% O2), hypoxia stress reduced the root respiration rate and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity significantly, and the impact of 5% O2 stress was more serious than that of 10% O2 stress. Under hypoxic conditions, the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) activities and the malondialdehyde (MDA) content were significantly higher than the control. The increment of antioxidative enzyme activities under 10% O2 stress was significantly higher than that under 5% O2 stress, while the MDA content was higher under 5% O2 stress than under 10% O2 stress, suggesting that when the root-zone oxygen concentration was below 10%, the aerobic respiration of muskmelon at its fruit development stage was obviously inhibited while the anaerobic respiration was accelerated, and the root antioxidative enzymes induced defense reaction. With the increasing duration of hypoxic stress, the lipid peroxidation would be aggravated, resulting in the damages on muskmelon roots, inhibition of plant growth, and decrease of fruit yield and quality.

  2. [Activity of tigecycline against pathogen bacteria isolated in respiratory infectious disease in Europe. TEST study 2004-2007].

    PubMed

    Rio, Y; Okamba, P; Staal, A; Didion, J; Jurin, F

    2009-02-01

    Tigecycline (TGC), a semisynthetic glycylcycline, has a documented activity on Gram+ and Gram- pathogens including oxacillin-resistant (MRSA) and an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (TEST) is an international surveillance study designed to assess the in vitro activity of TGC and 11 comparators against a range of important clinical pathogens from both the community and the hospital. The aim of this study was to assess efficacy of TGC, using this database, against pathogens implicated in community or hospital pneumonia and sinusitis. A total of 4163 isolates were consecutively collected in 21 European countries during three years (2004-2007). In all center, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were determinated with the same Microscan panel (Dade-Behring). Tigecycline exhibited a good activity against respiratory pathogens, with the exception of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Hundred percent of cocci Gram+ (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus sp.) and 100% of Haemophilus sp. are inhibited with 0.5 mg/L, without effect of an associated beta-lactam resistance mechanism. TGC is active in vitro on 89% of Enterobacteriaceae, with MIC 90 less or equal to 2mg/L. Eighty-nine percent of Enterobacter sp. and 77% of Serratia sp. are susceptible with range of MIC 90 from 2 to 4 mg/L. These interesting results obtained in vitro are to be strengthened by clinical studies. PMID:18829182

  3. Metabolic transistor strategy for controlling electron transfer chain activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Tuli, Leepika; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2015-03-01

    A novel strategy to finely control a large metabolic flux by using a "metabolic transistor" approach was established. In this approach a small change in the level or availability of an essential component for the process is controlled by adding a competitive reaction that affects a precursor or an intermediate in its biosynthetic pathway. The change of the basal level of the essential component, considered as a base current in a transistor, has a large effect on the flux through the major pathway. In this way, the fine-tuning of a large flux can be accomplished. The "metabolic transistor" strategy was applied to control electron transfer chain function by manipulation of the quinone synthesis pathway in Escherichia coli. The achievement of a theoretical yield of lactate production under aerobic conditions via this strategy upon manipulation of the biosynthetic pathway of the key participant, ubiquinone-8 (Q8), in an E. coli strain provides an in vivo, genetically tunable means to control the activity of the electron transfer chain and manipulate the production of reduced products while limiting consumption of oxygen to a defined amount.

  4. Shigella flexneri suppresses NF-κB activation by inhibiting linear ubiquitin chain ligation.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Maarten F; Liu, Zixu; Chen, Didi; Alto, Neal M

    2016-01-01

    The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) is a multimeric E3 ligase that catalyses M1 or linear ubiquitination of activated immune receptor signalling complexes (RSCs). Mutations that disrupt linear ubiquitin assembly lead to complex disease pathologies including immunodeficiency and autoinflammation in both humans and mice, but microbial toxins that target LUBAC function have not yet been discovered. Here, we report the identification of two homologous Shigella flexneri type III secretion system effector E3 ligases IpaH1.4 and IpaH2.5, which directly interact with LUBAC subunit Heme-oxidized IRP2 ubiquitin ligase-1 (HOIL-1L) and conjugate K48-linked ubiquitin chains to the catalytic RING-between-RING domain of HOIL-1-interacting protein (HOIP). Proteasomal degradation of HOIP leads to irreversible inactivation of linear ubiquitination and blunting of NF-κB nuclear translocation in response to tumour-necrosis factor (TNF), IL-1β and pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Loss of function studies in mammallian cells in combination with bacterial genetics explains how Shigella evades a broad spectrum of immune surveillance systems by cooperative inhibition of receptor ubiquitination and reveals the critical importance of LUBAC in host defence against pathogens. PMID:27572974

  5. In Vitro Characterization of Chain Depolymerization Activities of SUMO-Specific Proteases.

    PubMed

    Eckhoff, Julia; Dohmen, R Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    SUMO-specific proteases, known as Ulps in baker's yeast and SENPs in humans, have important roles in controlling the dynamics of SUMO-modified proteins. They display distinct modes of action and specificity, in that they may act on the SUMO precursor, mono-sumoylated, and/or polysumoylated proteins, and they might be specific for substrates with certain SUMO paralogs. SUMO chains may be dismantled either by endo or exo mechanisms. Biochemical characterization of a protease usually requires purification of the protein of interest. Developing a purification protocol, however, can be very difficult, and in some cases, isolation of a protease in its pure form may go along with a substantial loss of activity. To characterize the reaction mechanism of Ulps, we have developed an in vitro assay, which makes use of substrates endowed with artificial poly-SUMO chains of defined lengths, and S. cerevisiae Ulp enzymes in crude extract from E. coli. This fast and economic approach should be applicable to SUMO-specific proteases from other species as well. PMID:27631802

  6. The effects of closed kinetic chain exercises and open kinetic chain exercises using elastic bands on electromyographic activity in degenerative gonarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Igsoo; Hwangbo, Gak; Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of closed kinetic chain exercises (CKCEs) and open kinetic chain exercises (OKCEs) with elastic bands on the electromyographic activity of patients with degenerative gonarthritis. [Subjects] The study subjects were 30 degenerative gonarthritis patients who were divided into a CKCE group (CKCEG, n=10), an OKCE group (OKCEG, n=10), and a control group (CG, n=10). [Methods] The CKCEG and the OKCEG performed exercises with elastic bands, and the CG took part in a quadriceps strengthening exercise. All three groups performed the exercises three times per week for four weeks. The electromyographic activities of the subjects' vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), semitendinosus (ST), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles were measured and compared. [Results] Within-group comparisons revealed that the electromyographic activities of the VM, RF, VL, ST, and BF muscles increased significantly in the CKCEG. The OKCEG displayed significant increases in the electromyographic activity of the VM, RF, ST, and BF muscles, and the CG showed significant increases in the electromyographic activities of the RF, VL, ST, and BF muscles. In between-group comparisons after the intervention, the electromyographic activities of the VM, RF, and VL muscles of the CKCEG were significantly higher than those of the CG. The electromyographic activities of the VM, RF, and ST muscles of the OKCEG were significantly higher than those of the CG. [Conclusion] We consider CKCEs with elastic bands are an effective intervention for increasing the electromyographic activities of the VM, RF, VL, ST, and BF muscles of degenerative gonarthritis patients, and OKCEs with elastic bands are an effective intervention for increasing the electromyographic activities of the VM, RF, ST, and BF muscles of degenerative gonarthritis patients. PMID:25276041

  7. The thermal tolerance of crayfish could be estimated from respiratory electron transport system activity.

    PubMed

    Simčič, Tatjana; Pajk, Franja; Jaklič, Martina; Brancelj, Anton; Vrezec, Al

    2014-04-01

    Whether electron transport system (ETS) activity could be used as an estimator of crayfish thermal tolerance has been investigated experimentally. Food consumption rate, respiration rates in the air and water, the difference between energy consumption and respiration costs at a given temperature ('potential growth scope', PGS), and ETS activity of Orconectes limosus and Pacifastacus leniusculus were determined over a temperature range of 5-30°C. All concerned parameters were found to be temperature dependent. The significant correlation between ETS activity and PGS indicates that they respond similarly to temperature change. The regression analysis of ETS activity as an estimator of thermal tolerance at the mitochondrial level and PGS as an indicator of thermal tolerance at the organismic level showed the shift of optimum temperature ranges of ETS activity to the right for 2° in O. limosus and for 3° in P. leniusculus. Thus, lower estimated temperature optima and temperatures of optimum ranges of PGS compared to ETS activity could indicate higher thermal sensitivity at the organismic level than at a lower level of complexity (i.e. at the mitochondrial level). The response of ETS activity to temperature change, especially at lower and higher temperatures, indicates differences in the characteristics of the ETSs in O. limosus and P. leniusculus. O. limosus is less sensitive to high temperature. The significant correlation between PGS and ETS activity supports our assumption that ETS activity could be used for the rapid estimation of thermal tolerance in crayfish species. PMID:24679968

  8. Investigation of MTH1 activity via mismatch-based DNA chain elongation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tao; Gu, Shiyu; Liu, Fengzhen; Li, Liudi; Wang, Zhaoxia; Yang, Jie; Li, Genxi

    2016-01-28

    Accumulation and misincorporation of oxidative damaged 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine triphosphates (8-oxo-dGTP) in genomic DNA may cause serious cellular function disorders. MutT Homolog 1 (MTH1), a protein enzyme that can help to prevent 8-oxo-dGTP misincorporation, plays critical roles in oxidative stress neutralization, oncogene-associated tumor malignancy, and anticancer therapies. So, in this work, a simple and function-oriented method is developed for the assay of MTH1 activity. Specifically, a mismatch-based ("8-oxoG: A" mismatch) DNA chain elongation strategy (MB-DCE) is firstly proposed to reveal the misincorporation efficiency of 8-oxo-dGTP. Then, further coupled with the inherent activity of MTH1 to prevent 8-oxo-dGTP misincorporation, a relationship can be established to reveal the activity of MTH1 through MB-DCE. As the method is designed directly towards the cellular function of MTH1, activity of MTH1 in different breast cancer cell lines has been detected, implying the potential application of this assay method for biomedical research and clinical diagnose in the future. PMID:26755138

  9. Clarithromycin prevents human respiratory syncytial virus-induced airway epithelial responses by modulating activation of interferon regulatory factor-3.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Takano, Kenichi; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Sato, Toyotaka; Miyata, Ryo; Kakuki, Takuya; Kamekura, Ryuta; Kojima, Takashi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Himi, Tetsuo; Yokota, Shin-Ichi

    2016-09-01

    Macrolide antibiotics exert immunomodulatory activity by reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine production by airway epithelial cells, fibroblasts