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Sample records for respiratory control neuromodulatory

  1. Ionic and neuromodulatory regulation of burst discharge controls frequency tuning.

    PubMed

    Mehaffey, W Hamish; Ellis, Lee D; Krahe, Rüdiger; Dunn, Robert J; Chacron, Maurice J

    2008-01-01

    Sensory neurons encode natural stimuli by changes in firing rate or by generating specific firing patterns, such as bursts. Many neural computations rely on the fact that neurons can be tuned to specific stimulus frequencies. It is thus important to understand the mechanisms underlying frequency tuning. In the electrosensory system of the weakly electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus, the primary processing of behaviourally relevant sensory signals occurs in pyramidal neurons of the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL). These cells encode low frequency prey stimuli with bursts of spikes and high frequency communication signals with single spikes. We describe here how bursting in pyramidal neurons can be regulated by intrinsic conductances in a cell subtype specific fashion across the sensory maps found within the ELL, thereby regulating their frequency tuning. Further, the neuromodulatory regulation of such conductances within individual cells and the consequences to frequency tuning are highlighted. Such alterations in the tuning of the pyramidal neurons may allow weakly electric fish to preferentially select for certain stimuli under various behaviourally relevant circumstances.

  2. Neuromodulatory systems

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Gerhard; Mitterauer, Bernhard J.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the interactions and interdependencies between Neuroglia, the Brain-Cell Microenvironment, and the processes commonly subsumed under Neuromodulation. The interactions of the component processes covering a wide spectrum of frequencies are designated as Neuromodulatory Systems (NMS). This implies NMS's scale-invariance as the capacity of linking actions across many time scales, and self-similarity at any scale. These features endow NMS with the ability to respond adaptively to neural impulse traffic of an unpredictably wide frequency spectrum. In this preliminary perspective, the components of NMS are only outlined based on concepts of Complex Systems Dynamics. However, their interactions must be formally elaborated in further investigations. PMID:23532509

  3. Independent, reciprocal neuromodulatory control of sweet and bitter taste sensitivity during starvation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Hidehiko K.; Panse, Ketaki; Anderson, David J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY An organism’s behavioral decisions often depend upon the relative strength of appetitive and aversive sensory stimuli, the relative sensitivity to which can be modified by internal states like hunger. However, whether sensitivity to such opposing influences is modulated in a unidirectional or bidirectional manner is not clear. Starved flies exhibit increased sugar and decreased bitter sensitivity. It is widely believed that only sugar sensitivity changes, and that this masks bitter sensitivity. Here we use gene- and circuit-level manipulations to show that sweet- and bitter-sensitivity are independently and reciprocally regulated by starvation in Drosophila. We identify orthogonal neuromodulatory cascades that oppositely control peripheral taste sensitivity for each modality. Moreover, these pathways are recruited at increasing hunger levels, such that low-risk changes (higher sugar sensitivity) precede high-risk changes (lower sensitivity to potentially toxic resources). In this way, state intensity-dependent, reciprocal regulation of appetitive and aversive peripheral gustatory sensitivity permits flexible, adaptive feeding-decisions. PMID:25451195

  4. A Circuit Node that Integrates Convergent Input from Neuromodulatory and Social Behavior-Promoting Neurons to Control Aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kiichi; Chiu, Hui; Pfeiffer, Barret D; Wong, Allan M; Hoopfer, Eric D; Rubin, Gerald M; Anderson, David J

    2017-08-30

    Diffuse neuromodulatory systems such as norepinephrine (NE) control brain-wide states such as arousal, but whether they control complex social behaviors more specifically is not clear. Octopamine (OA), the insect homolog of NE, is known to promote both arousal and aggression. We have performed a systematic, unbiased screen to identify OA receptor-expressing neurons (OARNs) that control aggression in Drosophila. Our results uncover a tiny population of male-specific aSP2 neurons that mediate a specific influence of OA on aggression, independent of any effect on arousal. Unexpectedly, these neurons receive convergent input from OA neurons and P1 neurons, a population of FruM(+) neurons that promotes male courtship behavior. Behavioral epistasis experiments suggest that aSP2 neurons may constitute an integration node at which OAergic neuromodulation can bias the output of P1 neurons to favor aggression over inter-male courtship. These results have potential implications for thinking about the role of related neuromodulatory systems in mammals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuromodulatory control of sleep in Drosophila melanogaster: Integration of competing and complementary behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Leslie C.

    2013-01-01

    The transition between wake and sleep states is characterized by rapid and generalized changes in both sensory and motor processing. Sleep is antagonistic to the expression of important behaviors, like feeding, reproduction and learning whose relative importance to an individual will depend on its circumstances at that moment. An understanding of how the decision to sleep is affected by these other drives and how this process is coordinated across the entire brain remains elusive. Neuromodulation is an important regulatory feature of many behavioral circuits and the reconfiguring of these circuits by modulators can have both long-term and short-term consequences. Drosophila melanogaster has become an important model system for understanding the molecular and genetic bases of behaviors and in recent years neuromodulatory systems have been shown to play a major role in regulation of sleep and other behaviors in this organism. The fly, with its increasingly well-defined behavioral circuitry and powerful genetic tools, is a system poised to provide new insight into the complex issue of how neuromodulation can coordinate situation-specific behavioral needs with the brain’s arousal state. PMID:23743247

  6. Neuromodulatory control of sleep in Drosophila melanogaster: integration of competing and complementary behaviors.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Leslie C

    2013-10-01

    The transition between wake and sleep states is characterized by rapid and generalized changes in both sensory and motor processing. Sleep is antagonistic to the expression of important behaviors, like feeding, reproduction and learning whose relative importance to an individual will depend on its circumstances at that moment. An understanding of how the decision to sleep is affected by these other drives and how this process is coordinated across the entire brain remains elusive. Neuromodulation is an important regulatory feature of many behavioral circuits and the reconfiguring of these circuits by modulators can have both long-term and short-term consequences. Drosophila melanogaster has become an important model system for understanding the molecular and genetic bases of behaviors and in recent years neuromodulatory systems have been shown to play a major role in regulation of sleep and other behaviors in this organism. The fly, with its increasingly well-defined behavioral circuitry and powerful genetic tools, is a system poised to provide new insight into the complex issue of how neuromodulation can coordinate situation-specific behavioral needs with the brain's arousal state.

  7. Optogenetic Dissection of the Basal Forebrain Neuromodulatory Control of Cortical Activation, Plasticity, and Cognition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Chieh; Brown, Ritchie E; Hussain Shuler, Marshall G; Petersen, Carl C H; Kepecs, Adam

    2015-10-14

    The basal forebrain (BF) houses major ascending projections to the entire neocortex that have long been implicated in arousal, learning, and attention. The disruption of the BF has been linked with major neurological disorders, such as coma and Alzheimer's disease, as well as in normal cognitive aging. Although it is best known for its cholinergic neurons, the BF is in fact an anatomically and neurochemically complex structure. Recent studies using transgenic mouse lines to target specific BF cell types have led to a renaissance in the study of the BF and are beginning to yield new insights about cell-type-specific circuit mechanisms during behavior. These approaches enable us to determine the behavioral conditions under which cholinergic and noncholinergic BF neurons are activated and how they control cortical processing to influence behavior. Here we discuss recent advances that have expanded our knowledge about this poorly understood brain region and laid the foundation for future cell-type-specific manipulations to modulate arousal, attention, and cortical plasticity in neurological disorders. Although the basal forebrain is best known for, and often equated with, acetylcholine-containing neurons that provide most of the cholinergic innervation of the neocortex, it is in fact an anatomically and neurochemically complex structure. Recent studies using transgenic mouse lines to target specific cell types in the basal forebrain have led to a renaissance in this field and are beginning to dissect circuit mechanisms in the basal forebrain during behavior. This review discusses recent advances in the roles of basal forebrain cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons in cognition via their dynamic modulation of cortical activity. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3513896-08$15.00/0.

  8. Optogenetic Dissection of the Basal Forebrain Neuromodulatory Control of Cortical Activation, Plasticity, and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ritchie E.; Hussain Shuler, Marshall G.; Petersen, Carl C.H.; Kepecs, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) houses major ascending projections to the entire neocortex that have long been implicated in arousal, learning, and attention. The disruption of the BF has been linked with major neurological disorders, such as coma and Alzheimer's disease, as well as in normal cognitive aging. Although it is best known for its cholinergic neurons, the BF is in fact an anatomically and neurochemically complex structure. Recent studies using transgenic mouse lines to target specific BF cell types have led to a renaissance in the study of the BF and are beginning to yield new insights about cell-type-specific circuit mechanisms during behavior. These approaches enable us to determine the behavioral conditions under which cholinergic and noncholinergic BF neurons are activated and how they control cortical processing to influence behavior. Here we discuss recent advances that have expanded our knowledge about this poorly understood brain region and laid the foundation for future cell-type-specific manipulations to modulate arousal, attention, and cortical plasticity in neurological disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although the basal forebrain is best known for, and often equated with, acetylcholine-containing neurons that provide most of the cholinergic innervation of the neocortex, it is in fact an anatomically and neurochemically complex structure. Recent studies using transgenic mouse lines to target specific cell types in the basal forebrain have led to a renaissance in this field and are beginning to dissect circuit mechanisms in the basal forebrain during behavior. This review discusses recent advances in the roles of basal forebrain cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons in cognition via their dynamic modulation of cortical activity. PMID:26468190

  9. Pontine Mechanisms of Respiratory Control

    PubMed Central

    Dutschmann, Mathias; Dick, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Pontine respiratory nuclei provide synaptic input to medullary rhythmogenic circuits to shape and adapt the breathing pattern. An understanding of this statement depends on appreciating breathing as a behavior, rather than a stereotypic rhythm. In this review, we focus on the pontine-mediated inspiratory off-switch (IOS) associated with postinspiratory glottal constriction. Further, IOS is examined in the context of pontine regulation of glottal resistance in response to multimodal sensory inputs and higher commands, which in turn rules timing, duration, and patterning of respiratory airflow. In addition, network plasticity in respiratory control emerges during the development of the pons. Synaptic plasticity is required for dynamic and efficient modulation of the expiratory breathing pattern to cope with rapid changes from eupneic to adaptive breathing linked to exploratory (foraging and sniffing) and expulsive (vocalizing, coughing, sneezing, and retching) behaviors, as well as conveyance of basic emotions. The speed and complexity of changes in the breathing pattern of behaving animals implies that “learning to breathe” is necessary to adjust to changing internal and external states to maintain homeostasis and survival. PMID:23720253

  10. Astrocyte-Dependent Slow Inward Currents (SICs) Participate in Neuromodulatory Mechanisms in the Pedunculopontine Nucleus (PPN)

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Adrienn; Pál, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Slow inward currents (SICs) are known as excitatory events of neurons caused by astrocytic glutamate release and consequential activation of neuronal extrasynaptic NMDA receptors. In the present article we investigate the role of these astrocyte-dependent excitatory events on a cholinergic nucleus of the reticular activating system (RAS), the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN). It is well known about this and other elements of the RAS, that they do not only give rise to neuromodulatory innervation of several areas, but also targets neuromodulatory actions from other members of the RAS or factors providing the homeostatic drive for sleep. Using slice electrophysiology, optogenetics and morphological reconstruction, we revealed that SICs are present in a population of PPN neurons. The frequency of SICs recorded on PPN neurons was higher when the soma of the given neuron was close to an astrocytic soma. SICs do not appear simultaneously on neighboring neurons, thus it is unlikely that they synchronize neuronal activity in this structure. Occurrence of SICs is regulated by cannabinoid, muscarinic and serotonergic neuromodulatory mechanisms. In most cases, SICs occurred independently from tonic neuronal currents. SICs were affected by different neuromodulatory agents in a rather uniform way: if control SIC activity was low, the applied drugs increased it, but if SIC activity was increased in control, the same drugs lowered it. SICs of PPN neurons possibly represent a mechanism which elicits network-independent spikes on certain PPN neurons; forming an alternative, astrocyte-dependent pathway of neuromodulatory mechanisms. PMID:28203147

  11. Baseline Brain Activity Predicts Response to Neuromodulatory Pain Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Sherlin, Leslie H.; Fregni, Felipe; Gianas, Ann; Howe, Jon D.; Hakimian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to examine the associations between baseline electroencephalogram (EEG)-assessed brain oscillations and subsequent response to four neuromodulatory treatments. Based on available research, we hypothesized that baseline theta oscillations would prospectively predict response to hypnotic analgesia. Analyses involving other oscillations and the other treatments (meditation, neurofeedback, and both active and sham transcranial direct current stimulation) were viewed as exploratory, given the lack of previous research examining brain oscillations as predictors of response to these other treatments. Design Randomized controlled study of single sessions of four neuromodulatory pain treatments and a control procedure. Methods Thirty individuals with spinal cord injury and chronic pain had their EEG recorded before each session of four active treatments (hypnosis, meditation, EEG biofeedback, transcranial direct current stimulation) and a control procedure (sham transcranial direct stimulation). Results As hypothesized, more presession theta power was associated with greater response to hypnotic analgesia. In exploratory analyses, we found that less baseline alpha power predicted pain reduction with meditation. Conclusions The findings support the idea that different patients respond to different pain treatments and that between-person treatment response differences are related to brain states as measured by EEG. The results have implications for the possibility of enhancing pain treatment response by either 1) better patient/treatment matching or 2) influencing brain activity before treatment is initiated in order to prepare patients to respond. Research is needed to replicate and confirm the findings in additional samples of individuals with chronic pain. PMID:25287554

  12. Baseline brain activity predicts response to neuromodulatory pain treatment.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Sherlin, Leslie H; Fregni, Felipe; Gianas, Ann; Howe, Jon D; Hakimian, Shahin

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the associations between baseline electroencephalogram (EEG)-assessed brain oscillations and subsequent response to four neuromodulatory treatments. Based on available research, we hypothesized that baseline theta oscillations would prospectively predict response to hypnotic analgesia. Analyses involving other oscillations and the other treatments (meditation, neurofeedback, and both active and sham transcranial direct current stimulation) were viewed as exploratory, given the lack of previous research examining brain oscillations as predictors of response to these other treatments. Randomized controlled study of single sessions of four neuromodulatory pain treatments and a control procedure. Thirty individuals with spinal cord injury and chronic pain had their EEG recorded before each session of four active treatments (hypnosis, meditation, EEG biofeedback, transcranial direct current stimulation) and a control procedure (sham transcranial direct stimulation). As hypothesized, more presession theta power was associated with greater response to hypnotic analgesia. In exploratory analyses, we found that less baseline alpha power predicted pain reduction with meditation. The findings support the idea that different patients respond to different pain treatments and that between-person treatment response differences are related to brain states as measured by EEG. The results have implications for the possibility of enhancing pain treatment response by either 1) better patient/treatment matching or 2) influencing brain activity before treatment is initiated in order to prepare patients to respond. Research is needed to replicate and confirm the findings in additional samples of individuals with chronic pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Investigations of respiratory control systems simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    The Grodins' respiratory control model was investigated and it was determined that the following modifications were necessary before the model would be adaptable for current research efforts: (1) the controller equation must be modified to allow for integration of the respiratory system model with other physiological systems; (2) the system must be more closely correlated to the salient physiological functionings; (3) the respiratory frequency and the heart rate should be expanded to illustrate other physiological relationships and dependencies; and (4) the model should be adapted to particular individuals through a better defined set of initial parameter values in addition to relating these parameter values to the desired environmental conditions. Several of Milhorn's respiratory control models were also investigated in hopes of using some of their features as modifications for Grodins' model.

  14. Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Synthesize Neuromodulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sakry, Dominik; Yigit, Hatice; Dimou, Leda; Trotter, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    NG2 protein-expressing oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) are a persisting and major glial cell population in the adult mammalian brain. Direct synaptic innervation of OPC by neurons throughout the brain together with their ability to sense neuronal network activity raises the question of additional physiological roles of OPC, supplementary to generating myelinating oligodendrocytes. In this study we investigated whether OPC express neuromodulatory factors, typically synthesized by other CNS cell types. Our results show that OPC express two well-characterized neuromodulatory proteins: Prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTGDS) and neuronal Pentraxin 2 (Nptx2/Narp). Expression levels of the enzyme PTGDS are influenced in cultured OPC by the NG2 intracellular region which can be released by cleavage and localizes to glial nuclei upon transfection. Furthermore PTGDS mRNA levels are reduced in OPC from NG2-KO mouse brain compared to WT cells after isolation by cell sorting and direct analysis. These results show that OPC can contribute to the expression of these proteins within the CNS and suggest PTGDS expression as a downstream target of NG2 signaling. PMID:25966014

  15. Spinal metaplasticity in respiratory motor control

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Daryl P.; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark feature of the neural system controlling breathing is its ability to exhibit plasticity. Less appreciated is the ability to exhibit metaplasticity, a change in the capacity to express plasticity (i.e., “plastic plasticity”). Recent advances in our understanding of cellular mechanisms giving rise to respiratory motor plasticity lay the groundwork for (ongoing) investigations of metaplasticity. This detailed understanding of respiratory metaplasticity will be essential as we harness metaplasticity to restore breathing capacity in clinical disorders that compromise breathing, such as cervical spinal injury, motor neuron disease and other neuromuscular diseases. In this brief review, we discuss key examples of metaplasticity in respiratory motor control, and our current understanding of mechanisms giving rise to spinal plasticity and metaplasticity in phrenic motor output; particularly after pre-conditioning with intermittent hypoxia. Progress in this area has led to the realization that similar mechanisms are operative in other spinal motor networks, including those governing limb movement. Further, these mechanisms can be harnessed to restore respiratory and non-respiratory motor function after spinal injury. PMID:25717292

  16. Hypothermia and physiological control: the respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Frappell, P

    1998-02-01

    1. Ventilation (VE) in unanaesthetized hypothermic animals remains tightly coupled to oxygen consumption (VO2) such that VE/VO2 remains constant despite changes in body temperature. 2. Ventilatory responses to hypoxia would suggest that, relative to metabolic rate, the gain of the respiratory system is unaltered in hypothermic animals. 3. Future studies should exercise care to ensure that the method applied in inducing hypothermia does not complicate ventilatory control and that the ability of the species to hibernate is taken into consideration.

  17. Neuromodulation: purinergic signaling in respiratory control.

    PubMed

    Funk, Gregory D

    2013-01-01

    The main functions of the respiratory neural network are to produce a coordinated, efficient, rhythmic motor behavior and maintain homeostatic control over blood oxygen and CO2/pH levels. Purinergic (ATP) signaling features prominently in these homeostatic reflexes. The signaling actions of ATP are produced through its binding to a diversity of ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptors. However, its net effect on neuronal and network excitability is determined by the interaction between the three limbs of a complex system comprising the signaling actions of ATP at P2Rs, the distribution of multiple ectonucleotidases that differentially metabolize ATP into ADP, AMP, and adenosine (ADO), and the signaling actions of ATP metabolites, especially ADP at P2YRs and ADO at P1Rs. Understanding the significance of purinergic signaling is further complicated by the fact that neurons, glia, and the vasculature differentially express P2 and P1Rs, and that both neurons and glia release ATP. This article reviews at cellular, synaptic, and network levels, current understanding and emerging concepts about the diverse roles played by this three-part signaling system in: mediating the chemosensitivity of respiratory networks to hypoxia and CO2/pH; modulating the activity of rhythm generating networks and inspiratory motoneurons, and; controlling blood flow through the cerebral vasculature.

  18. [An amphibian model for the study of evolutionary respiratory control].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Eduardo; Bas, José

    2007-01-01

    Recent perinal advances have made possible that premature newborns survive increasingtly in earlier developmental stages. This babies requires sophisticated and costly critical intensive care to address the problems associated with inmadurity of the respiratory system. In addition respiratory instability and apnea reflecting inmaturity of the respiratory control system are major causes of morbidity and prolonged hospitalization in this highly vulnerable group of patients. These concerns have contributed to the development of research in respiratoy evolutionary neurobiology. While the majority of researchers working in this field use rodents as an animal model, recent research using in vitro brainstem preparations from bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) have reveled the technical advantages of this model to study the basic principles underlying respiratory control and its ontogeny between vertebrates. The present article review the recent advances in the area of research with special interest on episodic breathing and the role of serotoninergic and GABAergic modulation of respiratory control during development.

  19. Neuromodulatory signaling in hippocampus-dependent memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    Considerable advances have been made toward understanding the molecular signaling events that underlie memory acquisition and consolidation. In contrast, less is known about memory retrieval, despite its necessity for utilizing learned information. This review focuses on neuromodulatory and intracellular signaling events that underlie memory retrieval mediated by the hippocampus, for which the most information is currently available. Among neuromodulators, adrenergic signaling is required for the retrieval of various types of hippocampus-dependent memory. Although they contribute to acquisition and/or consolidation, cholinergic and dopaminergic signaling are generally not required for retrieval. Interestingly, while not required for retrieval, serotonergic and opioid signaling may actually constrain memory retrieval. Roles for histamine and non-opioid neuropeptides are currently unclear but possible. A critical effector of adrenergic signaling in retrieval is reduction of the slow afterhyperpolarization mediated by β1 receptors, cyclic AMP, protein kinase A, Epac, and possibly ERK. In contrast, stress and glucocorticoids impair retrieval by decreasing cyclic AMP, mediated in part by the activation of β2 -adrenergic receptors. Clinically, alterations in neuromodulatory signaling and in memory retrieval occur in Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder, and recent evidence has begun to link changes in neuromodulatory signaling with effects on memory retrieval. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Hebbian and neuromodulatory mechanisms interact to trigger associative memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Joshua P.; Diaz-Mataix, Lorenzo; Hamanaka, Hiroki; Ozawa, Takaaki; Ycu, Edgar; Koivumaa, Jenny; Kumar, Ashwani; Hou, Mian; Deisseroth, Karl; Boyden, Edward S.; LeDoux, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    A long-standing hypothesis termed “Hebbian plasticity” suggests that memories are formed through strengthening of synaptic connections between neurons with correlated activity. In contrast, other theories propose that coactivation of Hebbian and neuromodulatory processes produce the synaptic strengthening that underlies memory formation. Using optogenetics we directly tested whether Hebbian plasticity alone is both necessary and sufficient to produce physiological changes mediating actual memory formation in behaving animals. Our previous work with this method suggested that Hebbian mechanisms are sufficient to produce aversive associative learning under artificial conditions involving strong, iterative training. Here we systematically tested whether Hebbian mechanisms are necessary and sufficient to produce associative learning under more moderate training conditions that are similar to those that occur in daily life. We measured neural plasticity in the lateral amygdala, a brain region important for associative memory storage about danger. Our findings provide evidence that Hebbian mechanisms are necessary to produce neural plasticity in the lateral amygdala and behavioral memory formation. However, under these conditions Hebbian mechanisms alone were not sufficient to produce these physiological and behavioral effects unless neuromodulatory systems were coactivated. These results provide insight into how aversive experiences trigger memories and suggest that combined Hebbian and neuromodulatory processes interact to engage associative aversive learning. PMID:25489081

  1. Neuromodulatory processes of the brain-gut axis

    PubMed Central

    Gaman, Alexandru; Kuo, Braden

    2009-01-01

    Brain-gut axis represents a complex reflex circuit that integrates the communication between cortex and the digestive system. Disturbances of the neuromodulatory processes in the brain-gut axis generate functional digestive disorders mainly centered on the pain symptoms and motility disorders. This article reviews structural and patho-physiological aspects of the brain-gut axis and explains how the neuromodulatory interventions currently used in order to treat GI conditions related to the brain-gut axis disturbances. The neuromodulation can be realized by pharmacological targeting mainly receptors in the periphery or using electrical stimulation applied at different levels of the nervous system or directly in the muscular layers of the bowels resulting in modulation of the digestive system activity. The efficacy of the methods using electrostimulation is dependent on the parameters of the physical system used: amplitude, frequency, burst time of the electrical current and also the positioning of the electrodes. While pharmacological interventions are largely used at the moment, neuromodulatory interventions involving electrical stimulation showed clinical efficacy in research trials and have promise. PMID:19844605

  2. A Mathematical Model of the Human Respiratory Control System

    PubMed Central

    Milhorn, Howard T.; Benton, Richard; Ross, Richard; Guyton, Arthur C.

    1965-01-01

    The respiratory system exhibits the properties of a control system of the regulator type. Equations describing this biological control system have been derived. Transient and steady-state solutions for various CO2 and O2 step input disturbances were obtained utilizing a digital computer and are compared with experimental results. The effectiveness of the respiratory system as a regulator is investigated. Further extensions of the model are suggested. PMID:14284328

  3. Perinatal steroid exposure and respiratory control during early postnatal life.

    PubMed

    Soliz, J; Joseph, V

    2005-11-15

    Numerous factors involved in general homeostasis are able to modulate respiratory motor output. These include placental-derived steroids, which are necessary for maternal physiological adjustments during gestation, including respiratory stimulation. Despite the fact that these hormones exert potent effects on neural development in the fetus, the hypothesis of a developmental control of the neural respiratory network by placental-derived steroids has been approached experimentally only recently. The objective of this review is to summarize the role and mode of action of placental steroids on respiratory control in adult mammals and highlight the potential pathways by which such steroids are supplied to the developing fetus. Additionally, we present recent results showing that the beta estradiol and progesterone receptors are expressed in the carotid body of newborn male rats, thus supporting the hypothesis of receptor-mediated effect of estradiol and progesterone on carotid bodies.

  4. [Treatment resistant depression: therapy and novel neuromodulatory treatments].

    PubMed

    Kosel, Markus; Berney, Alexandre

    2012-05-02

    Unipolar depression is among the leading cause of invalidity and disability-adjusted life-years. Many depressed patients do not respond to several antidepressant treatments. Several treatments have been investigated in resistant depression using electrical or magnetic stimulation of the brain. In this field, electroconvulsivotherapy remains to date the only treatment validated for efficacy and security. Novel neuromodulatory treatments used in neurological conditions are currently under investigation. Vagus nerve stimulation and deep brain stimulation may offer long-term efficacy and therefore justify expensive and highly specialized treatment programs.

  5. Corticospinal control of respiratory muscles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Sharshar, Tarek; Ross, Ewen T; Nickol, Annabel H; Dayer, Mark J; Porcher, Raphaël; Jonville, Sophie; Moxham, John; Polkey, Michael I

    2004-07-12

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) face an increased respiratory load and in consequence have an elevated respiratory drive. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate associated changes in corticospinal excitability both at rest and during voluntary facilitation at different levels of inspiratory effort. Diaphragm and abdominal motor thresholds were significantly lower in COPD than healthy controls, but the quadriceps response was the same. In patients there was a significant increase in diaphragm response from rest during 20% inspiratory efforts but no further increase with greater efforts. In controls there was a further stepwise increase at 40% and 60% of inspiratory effort. The cortical silent period was significantly shorter in COPD. Using paired stimulation to study intracortical inhibitory and excitatory circuits we found significantly less excitability of intracortical facilitatory circuits in patients at long (>7 ms) interstimulus intervals. These results suggest that there is a ceiling effect in motor control output to the respiratory muscles of patients with COPD.

  6. Control of the respiratory pattern in insects.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    Three respiratory patterns have been described in insects: Discontinuous, Cyclic and Continuous. The Discontinuous Gas Exchange Cycle (DGC) can be distinguished by the presence of an open phase in which the spiracular valves are fully open, a closed phase during which oxygen concentrations at the tissues are lowered, thereby reducing oxidative damage, and a flutter phase in which the spiracles open intermittently for very brief periods,. The flutter phase serves to regulate internal oxygen levels at a physiologically safe level. In the Cyclic pattern, the spiracles apparently never fully close, yet a rhythmic pattern of carbon dioxide release is observed. In the Continuous pattern, no rhythmicity can be discerned and carbon dioxide release is relatively constant. In this paper I provide evidence that the three patterns described above are not distinct, but rather are a continuum. The critical parameters influencing the pattern are (1) the partial pressure of oxygen in the surrounding atmosphere, and (2) the rate of oxygen use i.e. the aerobic metabolic rate. Insects exhibit the DGC when the tracheal system is capable of delivering oxygen during the open phase at a rate faster than it is consumed by oxidative metabolism. The minute to minute balance between these two processes, one delivering oxygen the other removing it, determines the pattern of respiration exhibited by the insect at any given time.

  7. Psychological Neuromodulatory Treatments for Young People with Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Miró, Jordi; Castarlenas, Elena; de la Vega, Rocío; Roy, Rubén; Solé, Ester; Tomé-Pires, Catarina; Jensen, Mark P

    2016-12-06

    The treatment of young people with chronic pain is a complex endeavor. Many of these youth do not obtain adequate relief from available interventions. Psychological neuromodulatory treatments have been shown to have potential benefit for adults with chronic pain. Here, we review and summarize the available information about the efficacy of three promising psychological neuromodulatory treatments-neurofeedback, meditation and hypnosis-when provided to young people with chronic pain. A total of 16 articles were identified and reviewed. The findings from these studies show that hypnotic treatments are effective in reducing pain intensity for a variety of pediatric chronic pain problems, although research suggests variability in outcomes as a function of the specific pain problem treated. There are too few studies evaluating the efficacy of neurofeedback or meditation training in young people with chronic pain to draw firm conclusions regarding their efficacy. However, preliminary data indicate that these treatments could potentially have positive effects on a variety of outcomes (e.g., pain intensity, frequency of pain episodes, physical and psychological function), at least in the short term. Clinical trials are needed to evaluate the effects of neurofeedback and meditation training, and research is needed to identify the moderators of treatment benefits as well as better understand the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of all three of these treatments. The findings from such research could enhance overall treatment efficacy by: (1) providing an empirical basis for better patient-treatment matching; and (2) identifying specific mechanisms that could be targeted with treatment.

  8. Psychological Neuromodulatory Treatments for Young People with Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Miró, Jordi; Castarlenas, Elena; de la Vega, Rocío; Roy, Rubén; Solé, Ester; Tomé-Pires, Catarina; Jensen, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of young people with chronic pain is a complex endeavor. Many of these youth do not obtain adequate relief from available interventions. Psychological neuromodulatory treatments have been shown to have potential benefit for adults with chronic pain. Here, we review and summarize the available information about the efficacy of three promising psychological neuromodulatory treatments—neurofeedback, meditation and hypnosis—when provided to young people with chronic pain. A total of 16 articles were identified and reviewed. The findings from these studies show that hypnotic treatments are effective in reducing pain intensity for a variety of pediatric chronic pain problems, although research suggests variability in outcomes as a function of the specific pain problem treated. There are too few studies evaluating the efficacy of neurofeedback or meditation training in young people with chronic pain to draw firm conclusions regarding their efficacy. However, preliminary data indicate that these treatments could potentially have positive effects on a variety of outcomes (e.g., pain intensity, frequency of pain episodes, physical and psychological function), at least in the short term. Clinical trials are needed to evaluate the effects of neurofeedback and meditation training, and research is needed to identify the moderators of treatment benefits as well as better understand the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of all three of these treatments. The findings from such research could enhance overall treatment efficacy by: (1) providing an empirical basis for better patient-treatment matching; and (2) identifying specific mechanisms that could be targeted with treatment. PMID:27929419

  9. Asthma control and cold weather-related respiratory symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hyrkäs, Henna; Ikäheimo, Tiina M; Jaakkola, Jouni J K; Jaakkola, Maritta S

    2016-04-01

    In the northern hemisphere people are exposed recurrently to cold air and asthmatics experience more respiratory symptoms. We hypothesized that subjects with poor asthma control are more prone to experience cold weather-related respiratory symptoms than those with good asthma control. A population-based cross-sectional study of 1995 adult asthmatics (response rate 40.4%) living in the Northern Finland was conducted using a questionnaire where cold weather-related respiratory symptoms as well as questions related to asthma control were inquired. The Asthma Control Test (ACT) was defined based on five questions (disadvantage and occurrence of asthma symptoms, waking up because of asthma symptoms, use of rescue medication and self-assessment of asthma control during the past 4 weeks), and was divided into quartiles. Cold weather-related respiratory symptoms were more frequent among asthmatics with poorly controlled asthma (ACT Q1 vs. ACT Q4); adjusted prevalence ratio (PR) for shortness of breath (men 1.47, 95% confidence interval 1.22-1.77; women 1.18, 1.07-1.30), cough (men 1.10, 0.91-1.34; women 1.18, 1.08-1.30), wheezing (men 1.91, 1.31-2.78; women 1.48, 1.17-1.87), phlegm production (men 1.51, 1.06-2.14; women 1.62, 1.27-2.08) and chest pain (men 4.47, 1.89-10.56; women 2.60, 1.64-4.12). The relations between asthma control and symptom occurrence seemed stronger among smokers than never smokers and subjects with body mass index (BMI) below and above 25-30. Our study provides new evidence that subjects whose asthma is poorly controlled are more prone to experience cold weather-related respiratory symptoms and even a slight worsening of asthma control increases symptom prevalences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The rhythmic, transverse medullary slice preparation in respiratory neurobiology: contributions and caveats.

    PubMed

    Funk, Gregory D; Greer, John J

    2013-04-01

    Our understanding of the sites and mechanisms underlying rhythmic breathing as well as the neuromodulatory control of respiratory rhythm, pattern, and respiratory motoneuron excitability during perinatal development has advanced significantly over the last 20 years. A major catalyst was the development in 1991 of the rhythmically-active medullary slice preparation, which provided precise mechanical and chemical control over the network as well as enhanced physical and optical access to key brainstem regions. Insights obtained in vitro have informed multiple mechanistic hypotheses. In vivo tests of these hypotheses, performed under conditions of reduced control and precision but more obvious physiological relevance, have clearly established the significance for respiratory neurobiology of the rhythmic slice preparation. We review the contributions of this preparation to current understanding/concepts in respiratory control, and outline the limitations of this approach in the context of studying rhythm and pattern generation, homeostatic control mechanisms and murine models of human genetic disorders that feature prominent breathing disturbances.

  11. Remote Control of Respiratory Neural Network by Spinal Locomotor Generators

    PubMed Central

    Le Gal, Jean-Patrick; Juvin, Laurent; Cardoit, Laura; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel; Morin, Didier

    2014-01-01

    During exercise and locomotion, breathing rate rapidly increases to meet the suddenly enhanced oxygen demand. The extent to which direct central interactions between the spinal networks controlling locomotion and the brainstem networks controlling breathing are involved in this rhythm modulation remains unknown. Here, we show that in isolated neonatal rat brainstem-spinal cord preparations, the increase in respiratory rate observed during fictive locomotion is associated with an increase in the excitability of pre-inspiratory neurons of the parafacial respiratory group (pFRG/Pre-I). In addition, this locomotion-induced respiratory rhythm modulation is prevented both by bilateral lesion of the pFRG region and by blockade of neurokinin 1 receptors in the brainstem. Thus, our results assign pFRG/Pre-I neurons a new role as elements of a previously undescribed pathway involved in the functional interaction between respiratory and locomotor networks, an interaction that also involves a substance P-dependent modulating mechanism requiring the activation of neurokinin 1 receptors. This neurogenic mechanism may take an active part in the increased respiratory rhythmicity produced at the onset and during episodes of locomotion in mammals. PMID:24586951

  12. Effects of Smoking on Respiratory Capacity and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Alphonso, Vania A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide information concerning the possible early effects of smoking on measures of respiratory capacity and control in young adult female smokers vs. nonsmokers. In particular, maximum performance test results (vital capacity and maximum phonation time) and measures of air pressures and airflows during voiceless,…

  13. Effects of Smoking on Respiratory Capacity and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Alphonso, Vania A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide information concerning the possible early effects of smoking on measures of respiratory capacity and control in young adult female smokers vs. nonsmokers. In particular, maximum performance test results (vital capacity and maximum phonation time) and measures of air pressures and airflows during voiceless,…

  14. Stimulus sensitivity and neuromodulatory properties of noisy intrinsic neuronal oscillators.

    PubMed

    Huber, M T; Krieg, J C; Dewald, M; Voigt, K; Braun, H A

    1998-01-01

    Intrinsic subthreshold oscillations in the membrane potential are a common property of many neurons in the peripheral and central nervous system. When such oscillations are combined with noise, interesting signal encoding and neuromodulatory properties are obtained which allow, for example, sensitivity adjustment or differential encoding of stimuli. Here we demonstrate that a noisy Hodgkin/Huxley-model for subthreshold oscillations, when tuned to maximum sensitivity, can be significantly modulated by even minor physiological changes in the oscillation parameters amplitude or frequency. Given the ubiquity of subthreshold oscillating neurons, it can be assumed that these findings reflect principle encoding properties which are relevant for an understanding of sensitivity and neuromodulation in peripheral and central neurons.

  15. Spontaneous respiratory modulation improves cardiovascular control in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Carlos Hermano da Justa; Medeiros, Renato Antônio Ribeiro; Pinheiro, Denise Gonçalves Moura; Marinho, Maria de Jesus Ferreira

    2007-06-01

    Recent studies show that controlled breathing improves baroreflex and heart rate variability and lowers blood pressure in hypertensive patients. To evaluate the effects of slow breathing training on cardiorespiratory system modulation of patients (n=10, men and women, ages ranging from 45 to 60) with essential hypertension seen in an outpatient setting. According to the study design, each patient was used as his/her own control, and data were collected before and after the intervention. The following parameters were assessed: heart rate variability (HRV), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), respirometry, chest expansion measurement, and statistical data analysis. Respiratory training was performed in 30-minute sessions held twice a week over one month using slow breathing exercises. Our results were as follows: a reduction in SBP, DPB, and MAP (p < 0.05 vs control); an increase in heart rate variability, as evidenced by greater RR interval variation and SDNN index; a decline in respiratory rate (p < 0.01 vs control); and an increase in tidal volume (p < 0.01 vs control) and thoracic expansibility (p < 0.01 vs control). Respiratory retraining using the slow breathing technique appears to be a useful adjunctive for cardiorespiratory control in hypertensive patients.

  16. Oral and respiratory control for preterm feeding.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Steven M

    2009-06-01

    Feeding competency is a frequent and serious challenge to the neonatal intensive care unit survivors and to the physician-provider-parent teams. The urgency of effective assessment and intervention techniques is obviated to promote safe swallow, as attainment of oral feeding for the preterm infant/newborn is one of the prerequisites for hospital discharge. If left unresolved, feeding problems may persist into early childhood and may require management by pediatric gastroenterologists and feeding therapists. This review highlights studies aimed at understanding the motor control and development of nonnutritive and nutritive suck, swallow, and coordination with respiration in preterm populations. Functional linkages between suck-swallow and swallow-respiration manifest transitional forms during late gestation and can be delayed or modified by sensory experience and/or disease processes. Moreover, brainstem central pattern generator (CPG) networks and their neuromuscular targets attain functional status at different rates, which ultimately influences cross-system interactions among individual CPGs. Entrainment of trigeminal primary afferents to activate the suck CPG is one example of a clinical intervention to prime cross-system interactions among ororhythmic pattern generating networks in the preterm and term infants. The genesis of within-system CPG control for rate and amplitude scaling matures differentially for suck, mastication, swallow, and respiration. Cross-system interactions among these CPGs represent targets of opportunity for new interventions that optimize experience-dependent mechanisms to promote robust ororhythmic patterning and safe swallows among preterm infants.

  17. Introduction to respiratory control in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Starnes, J W

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that a linear relationship exists for submaximum exercise intensity and oxygen consumption. Most of the increase in oxygen consumption is by skeletal muscle mitochondria for the purpose of producing enough ATP to match the energy needs of the muscle. The control of mitochondrial ATP production in muscle when workload is varied is a complex process and remains a very active area of research. Thus, the purpose of this symposium is to discuss the factors involved in the coupling between increases in work and increased oxygen consumption by muscle. The program will begin with a consideration of the challenges faced by skeletal muscle when attempting to meet its energy demands and the intracellular strategies that have evolved to optimize energy delivery. Next the major control theories for mitochondrial respiration will be discussed. Finally, experiments will be presented that are designed to determine which of these theories are best suited for specific skeletal muscle fiber types. It is hoped that the information presented will increase our awareness of different energy supply-demand strategies among fiber types and how supply-demand strategies are optimized by endurance training.

  18. Egr2-neurons control the adult respiratory response to hypercapnia

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Russell S.; Corcoran, Andrea E.; Brust, Rachael D.; Soriano, Laura P.; Nattie, Eugene E.; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    ‘The early growth response 2 transcription factor, Egr2, establishes a population of brainstem neurons essential for normal breathing at birth. Egr2-null mice die perinatally of respiratory insufficiency characterized by subnormal respiratory rate and severe apneas. Here we bypass this lethality using a noninvasive pharmacogenetic approach to inducibly perturb neuron activity postnatally, and ask if Egr2-neurons control respiration in adult mice. We found that the normal ventilatory increase in response to elevated tissue CO2 was impaired, blunted by 63.1±8.7% after neuron perturbation due to deficits in both respiratory amplitude and frequency. By contrast, room-air breathing was unaffected, suggesting that the drive for baseline breathing may not require those Egr2-neurons manipulated here. Of the multiple brainstem sites proposed to affect ventilation in response to hypercapnia, only the retrotrapezoid nucleus, a portion of the serotonergic raphé, and a portion of the A5 nucleus have a history of Egr2 expression. We recently showed that acute inhibition of serotonergic neurons en masse blunts the CO2 chemoreflex in adults, causing a difference in hypercapnic response of ~50% after neuron perturbation through effects on respiratory amplitude only. The suppressed respiratory frequency upon perturbation of Egr2-neurons thus may stem from non-serotonergic neurons within the Egr2 domain. Perturbation of Egr2-neurons did not affect body temperature, even on exposure to ambient 4 °C. These findings support a model in which Egr2-neurons are a critical component of the respiratory chemoreflex into adulthood. Methodologically, these results highlight how pharmacogenetic approaches allow neuron function to be queried in unanesthetized adult animals, reaching beyond the roadblocks of developmental lethality and compensation as well as the anatomical disturbances associated with invasive methods. PMID:23261662

  19. Serial respiratory adaptations and an alternate hypothesis of respiratory control in human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Weissgerber, Tracey L; Wolfe, Larry A; Hopkins, Will G; Davies, Gregory A L

    2006-08-01

    This study determined the time course of changes in resting and exercising respiratory responses during the first half of human pregnancy, and examined the potential roles of plasma osmolality and the strong ion difference ([SID]) as mediators of pregnancy-induced increases in ventilation. Healthy active women (n = 11) were studied serially from 7 to 22 weeks gestation. Responses were compared with preconception data from 14 subjects (six of whom were tested in early pregnancy), and with late-gestation resting data from 10 additional women. Resting and exercising measurements included ventilation, PaCO2, progesterone, osmolality and [SID]. Results were analyzed using mixed-model linear regression. By 7 weeks gestation, increased ventilation resulted in a very large decrease in PaCO2 at rest and during moderate-intensity exercise. Large correlations (r > 0.5) between resting progesterone and PaCO2 support the traditional theory that circulating progesterone stimulates ventilation during pregnancy. The similar time course of changes and large correlations between raw and delta values of PaCO2 and each of plasma osmolality and [SID] also suggest that both variables may influence respiratory control at rest and during exercise in the first half of pregnancy. Future experiments should continue to explore the hypothesis that osmolality and [SID] contribute to pregnancy-induced respiratory changes.

  20. Case-control study of respiratory cancer and employment

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, E.R.; Chiang, M.L.

    1984-04-01

    A multiple logistic risk-analysis procedure was used to compare data from 346 case/control pairs to determine occupational/industrial risk factors for respiratory cancer. The duration of employment was considered in blue-collar production occupations. Five industrial categories were included: shipyard, petrochemical, metal-related, construction and a grouping of other occupations under a single heading. The bulk of this grouped category was made up of blue collar employees in the industries of transportation, food production, wholesale and retail trade, professional services, and public administration. Specific attention was given to asbestos exposure, cigarette smoking, educational level attained, and dietary factors such as consumption of vegetables, fruits, and alcohol. A moderately elevated risk for respiratory cancer existed among employees in the metal industry and grouped categories when employment was over 30 years duration. In the metal industry this increase was almost entirely due to a larger than expected number of cases of larynx cancer.

  1. Control methods for bovine respiratory disease for feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Edwards, T A

    2010-07-01

    Vaccines and antibiotics are still relied upon as the standard methods of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) prevention, control, and therapy. Success in building disease resistance begins with genetic selection and continues with colostrum management and reducing pathogen exposure. Purchasing single-source cattle with a history of pre- and post-weaning procedures will minimize pathogen exposure and enhance immunity. Using cattle-handling techniques and facilities that promote low stress will allow host immune defenses to remain effective against bacterial and viral colonization. Lastly, controlling BRD must be managed through a comprehensive herd health immunization and management program that effectively addresses disease challenges common to the operation.

  2. Respiratory protective device design using control system techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, W. A.; Yankovich, D.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of a control system analysis approach to provide a design base for respiratory protective devices is considered. A system design approach requires that all functions and components of the system be mathematically identified in a model of the RPD. The mathematical notations describe the operation of the components as closely as possible. The individual component mathematical descriptions are then combined to describe the complete RPD. Finally, analysis of the mathematical notation by control system theory is used to derive compensating component values that force the system to operate in a stable and predictable manner.

  3. SPHINGOSINE-1-PHOSPHATE RECEPTORS MEDIATE NEUROMODULATORY FUNCTIONS IN THE CNS

    PubMed Central

    Sim-Selley, Laura J.; Goforth, Paulette B.; Mba, Mba U.; Macdonald, Timothy L.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Satin, Leslie S.; Welch, Sandra P.; Selley, Dana E.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate is a ubiquitous, lipophilic cellular mediator that acts in part by activation of G-protein-coupled receptors. Modulation of S1P signaling is an emerging pharmacotherapeutic target for immunomodulatory drugs. Although multiple S1P receptor types exist in the CNS, little is known about their function. Here we report that S1P stimulated G- protein activity in the CNS, and results from [35S]GTPγS autoradiography using the S1P1-selective agonist SEW2871 and the S1P1/3-selective antagonist VPC44116 show that in several regions a majority of this activity is mediated by S1P1 receptors. S1P receptor activation inhibited glutamatergic neurotransmission as determined by electrophysiological recordings in cortical neurons in vitro, and this effect was mimicked by SEW2871 and inhibited by VPC44116. Moreover, central administration of S1P produced in vivo effects resembling the actions of cannabinoids, including thermal antinociception, hypothermia, catalepsy and hypolocomotion, but these actions were independent of CB1 receptors. At least one of the central effects of S1P, thermal antinociception, is also at least partly S1P1 receptor mediated because it was produced by SEW2871 and attenuated by VPC44116. These results indicate that CNS S1P receptors are part of a physiologically relevant and widespread neuromodulatory system, and that the S1P1 receptor contributes to S1P-mediated antinociception. PMID:19493165

  4. An endogenous circadian rhythm of respiratory control in humans

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Christina M; Czeisler, Charles A; Shea, Steven A

    2000-01-01

    respiratory control in awake humans even when at rest under constant environmental and behavioural conditions. The characteristic change in PET,CO2 during non-rapid eye movement sleep was shown to be independent of circadian variations in PET,CO2, and probably reflects a change from predominantly behavioural to predominantly chemosensory respiratory control. This study has documented the existence and magnitude of circadian variations in respiration and respiratory control in awake humans for the first time under constant behavioural and environmental conditions. These results provide unique insights into respiratory control in awake humans, and highlight the importance of considering the phase of the circadian cycle in studies of respiratory control. PMID:10922018

  5. Unconventional mechanisms control cyclic respiratory gas release in flying Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf; Heymann, Nicole

    2005-10-01

    The high power output of flight muscles places special demands on the respiratory gas exchange system in insects. In small insects, respiration relies on diffusion, and for elevated locomotor performance such as flight, instantaneous gas exchange rates typically co-vary with the animal's metabolic activity. By contrast, under certain conditions, instantaneous release rate of carbon dioxide from the fruit fly Drosophila flying in a virtual-reality flight arena may oscillate distinctly at low frequency (0.37+/-0.055 Hz), even though flight muscle mechanical power output requires constant metabolic activity. Cross-correlation analysis suggests that this uncoupling between respiratory and metabolic rate is not driven by conventional types of convective flow reinforcement such as abdominal pumping, but might result from two unusual mechanisms for tracheal breathing. Simplified analytical modeling of diffusive tracheal gas exchange suggests that cyclic release patterns in the insect occur as a consequence of the stochastically synchronized control of spiracle opening area by the four large thoracic spiracles. Alternatively, in-flight motion analysis of the abdomen and proboscis using infra-red video imaging suggests utilization of the proboscis extension reflex (PER) for tracheal convection. Although the respiratory benefit of synchronized spiracle opening activity in the fruit fly is unclear, proboscis-induced tracheal convection might potentially help to balance the local oxygen supply between different body compartments of the flying animal.

  6. Respiratory control and substrate effects in the working rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, F M; Malloy, C R

    1992-01-01

    31P n.m.r. spectroscopy was used to measure the concentration of phosphates commonly proposed to control oxidative phosphorylation. The effect of loading conditions, beta-adrenergic stimulation and different substrates (acetate, pyruvate or glucose) was examined under steady-state conditions in the isolated working rat heart. Oxygen consumption and haemodynamic variables were monitored continuously. In response to a 2-fold increase in afterload, there were no significant changes in [ADP], [ATP]/[ADP], or [ATP]/[ADP][Pi]. In the presence of isoprenaline, these variables also tended not to change from afterload. However, isoprenaline, at identical perfusion pressures, consistently decreased the phosphorylation potential and [ATP]/[ADP], but had little effect on [ADP]. Substrates altered the phosphate metabolites in a manner independent of oxygen consumption, and had only minor effects on the relationship between phosphates and work, in contrast with other studies. Thus, metabolites of ATP synthesis are not normally involved in respiratory control. The 31P n.m.r. spectrum can vary greatly, but does not predict oxygen consumption in this preparation. Substrates have no effect on the mechanism of respiratory control. Thus the normal control of respiration in the heart at steady state cannot occur at the level of its substrates. Rather, there must be concerted regulation of the numerous pathways, involving allostery and covalent modification. The attention of future research should be shifted away from the metabolites of ATP and towards identifying the effectors of such regulation. PMID:1417763

  7. Yoga respiratory training improves respiratory function and cardiac sympathovagal balance in elderly subjects: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Santaella, Danilo F; Devesa, Cesar R S; Rojo, Marcos R; Amato, Marcelo B P; Drager, Luciano F; Casali, Karina R; Montano, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Since ageing is associated with a decline in pulmonary function, heart rate variability and spontaneous baroreflex, and recent studies suggest that yoga respiratory exercises may improve respiratory and cardiovascular function, we hypothesised that yoga respiratory training may improve respiratory function and cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy elderly subjects. Design 76 healthy elderly subjects were enrolled in a randomised control trial in Brazil and 29 completed the study (age 68±6 years, 34% males, body mass index 25±3 kg/m2). Subjects were randomised into a 4-month training program (2 classes/week plus home exercises) of either stretching (control, n=14) or respiratory exercises (yoga, n=15). Yoga respiratory exercises (Bhastrika) consisted of rapid forced expirations followed by inspiration through the right nostril, inspiratory apnoea with generation of intrathoracic negative pressure, and expiration through the left nostril. Pulmonary function, maximum expiratory and inspiratory pressures (PEmax and PImax, respectively), heart rate variability and blood pressure variability for spontaneous baroreflex determination were determined at baseline and after 4 months. Results Subjects in both groups had similar demographic parameters. Physiological variables did not change after 4 months in the control group. However, in the yoga group, there were significant increases in PEmax (34%, p<0.0001) and PImax (26%, p<0.0001) and a significant decrease in the low frequency component (a marker of cardiac sympathetic modulation) and low frequency/high frequency ratio (marker of sympathovagal balance) of heart rate variability (40%, p<0.001). Spontaneous baroreflex did not change, and quality of life only marginally increased in the yoga group. Conclusion Respiratory yoga training may be beneficial for the elderly healthy population by improving respiratory function and sympathovagal balance. Trial Registration CinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT

  8. Plasticity in respiratory motor neurons in response to reduced synaptic inputs: A form of homeostatic plasticity in respiratory control?

    PubMed

    Braegelmann, K M; Streeter, K A; Fields, D P; Baker, T L

    2017-01-01

    For most individuals, the respiratory control system produces a remarkably stable and coordinated motor output-recognizable as a breath-from birth until death. Very little is understood regarding the processes by which the respiratory control system maintains network stability in the presence of changing physiological demands and network properties that occur throughout life. An emerging principle of neuroscience is that neural activity is sensed and adjusted locally to assure that neurons continue to operate in an optimal range, yet to date, it is unknown whether such homeostatic plasticity is a feature of the neurons controlling breathing. Here, we review the evidence that local mechanisms sense and respond to perturbations in respiratory neural activity, with a focus on plasticity in respiratory motor neurons. We discuss whether these forms of plasticity represent homeostatic plasticity in respiratory control. We present new analyses demonstrating that reductions in synaptic inputs to phrenic motor neurons elicit a compensatory enhancement of phrenic inspiratory motor output, a form of plasticity termed inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF), that is proportional to the magnitude of activity deprivation. Although the physiological role of iPMF is not understood, we hypothesize that it has an important role in protecting the drive to breathe during conditions of prolonged or intermittent reductions in respiratory neural activity, such as following spinal cord injury or during central sleep apnea.

  9. RNASeq-derived transcriptome comparisons reveal neuromodulatory deficiency in the CO2 insensitive brown Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Puissant, Madeleine M; Echert, Ashley E; Yang, Chun; Mouradian, Gary C; Novotny, Tyler; Liu, Pengyuan; Liang, Mingyu; Hodges, Matthew R

    2014-11-10

    Raphé-derived serotonin (5-HT) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) play important roles in fundamental, homeostatic control systems such as breathing and specifically the ventilatory CO2 chemoreflex. Brown Norway (BN) rats exhibit an inherent and severe ventilatory insensitivity to hypercapnia but also exhibit relatively normal ventilation at rest and during other conditions, similar to multiple genetic models of 5-HT system dysfunction in mice. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that the ventilatory insensitivity to hypercapnia in BN rats is due to altered raphé gene expression and the consequent deficiencies in raphé-derived neuromodulators such as TRH. Medullary raphé transcriptome comparisons revealed lower expression of multiple 5-HT neuron-specific genes in BN compared to control Dahl salt-sensitive rats, predictive of reduced central nervous system monoamines by bioinformatics analyses and confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography measurements. In particular, raphé Trh mRNA and peptide levels were significantly reduced in BN rats, and injections of the stable TRH analogue Taltirelin (TAL) stimulated breathing dose-dependently, with greater effects in BN versus control Sprague-Dawley rats. Importantly, TAL also effectively normalized the ventilatory CO2 chemoreflex in BN rats, but TAL did not affect CO2 sensitivity in control Sprague-Dawley rats. These data establish a molecular basis of the neuromodulatory deficiency in BN rats, and further suggest an important functional role for TRH signalling in the mammalian CO2 chemoreflex.

  10. RNASeq-derived transcriptome comparisons reveal neuromodulatory deficiency in the CO2 insensitive brown Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Puissant, Madeleine M; Echert, Ashley E; Yang, Chun; Mouradian, Gary C; Novotny, Tyler; Liu, Pengyuan; Liang, Mingyu; Hodges, Matthew R

    2015-01-15

    Raphé-derived serotonin (5-HT) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) play important roles in fundamental, homeostatic control systems such as breathing and specifically the ventilatory CO2 chemoreflex. Brown Norway (BN) rats exhibit an inherent and severe ventilatory insensitivity to hypercapnia but also exhibit relatively normal ventilation at rest and during other conditions, similar to multiple genetic models of 5-HT system dysfunction in mice. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that the ventilatory insensitivity to hypercapnia in BN rats is due to altered raphé gene expression and the consequent deficiencies in raphé-derived neuromodulators such as TRH. Medullary raphé transcriptome comparisons revealed lower expression of multiple 5-HT neuron-specific genes in BN compared to control Dahl salt-sensitive rats, predictive of reduced central nervous system monoamines by bioinformatics analyses and confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography measurements. In particular, raphé Trh mRNA and peptide levels were significantly reduced in BN rats, and injections of the stable TRH analogue Taltirelin (TAL) stimulated breathing dose-dependently, with greater effects in BN versus control Sprague-Dawley rats. Importantly, TAL also effectively normalized the ventilatory CO2 chemoreflex in BN rats, but TAL did not affect CO2 sensitivity in control Sprague-Dawley rats. These data establish a molecular basis of the neuromodulatory deficiency in BN rats, and further suggest an important functional role for TRH signalling in the mammalian CO2 chemoreflex.

  11. Mitochondrial respiratory control is lost during growth factor deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Eyal; Armour, Sean M.; Thompson, Craig B.

    2002-01-01

    The ability of cells to maintain a bioenergetically favorable ATP/ADP ratio confers a tight balance between cellular events that consume ATP and the rate of ATP production. However, after growth factor withdrawal, the cellular ATP/ADP ratio declines. To investigate these changes, mitochondria from growth factor-deprived cells isolated before the onset of apoptosis were characterized in vitro. Mitochondria from growth factor-deprived cells have lost their ability to undergo matrix condensation in response to ADP, which is accompanied by a failure to perform ADP-coupled respiration. At the time of analysis, mitochondria from growth factor-deprived cells were not depleted of cytochrome c and cytochrome c-dependent respiration was unaffected, demonstrating that the inhibition of the respiratory rate is not due to loss of cytochrome c. Agents that disrupt the mitochondrial outer membrane, such as digitonin, or maintain outer membrane exchange of adenine nucleotide, such as Bcl-xL, restored ADP-dependent control of mitochondrial respiration. Together, these data suggest that the regulation of mitochondrial outer membrane permeability contributes to respiratory control. PMID:12228733

  12. Respiratory control as a treatment for panic attacks.

    PubMed

    Clark, D M; Salkovskis, P M; Chalkley, A J

    1985-03-01

    Eighteen patients who experienced frequent panic attacks were given a treatment derived from the literature on hyperventilation and anxiety. The treatment consisted of (i) brief, voluntary hyperventilation. This was intended to induce a mild panic attack; (ii) explanation of the effects of overbreathing and reattribution of the cause of a patient's attacks to hyperventilation; (iii) training in a respiratory control technique. Substantial reductions in panic attack frequency and in self-reported fear during a behaviour test were obtained after 2 weeks' treatment and these reductions occurred in the absence of exposure to feared situations. Further reductions in panic attack frequency were evident at 6-month and 2-year follow-up though interpretation of these results is complicated by the addition of exposure and other psychological treatments.

  13. Nuclear Control of Respiratory Chain Expression by Nuclear Respiratory Factors and PGC-1-Related Coactivator

    PubMed Central

    Scarpulla, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    Expression of the respiratory apparatus depends on both nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Although these genes are sequestered in distinct cellular organelles, their transcription relies on nucleus-encoded factors. Certain of these factors are directed to the mitochondria, where they sponsor the bi-directional transcription of mitochondrial DNA. Others act on nuclear genes that encode the majority of the respiratory subunits and many other gene products required for the assembly and function of the respiratory chain. The nuclear respiratory factors, NRF-1 and NRF-2, contribute to the expression of respiratory subunits and mitochondrial transcription factors and thus have been implicated in nucleo-mitochondrial interactions. In addition, coactivators of the PGC-1 family serve as mediators between the environment and the transcriptional machinery governing mitochondrial biogenesis. One family member, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC), is an immediate early gene product that is rapidly induced by mitogenic signals in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. Like other PGC-1 family members, PRC binds NRF-1 and activates NRF-1 target genes. In addition, PRC complexes with NRF-2 and HCF-1 (host cell factor-1) in the activation of NRF-2-dependent promoters. HCF-1 functions in cell-cycle progression and has been identified as an NRF-2 coactivator. The association of these factors with PRC is suggestive of a role for the complex in cell growth. Finally, shRNA-mediated knock down of PRC expression results in a complex phenotype that includes the inhibition of respiratory growth on galactose and the loss of respiratory complexes. Thus, PRC may help integrate the expression of the respiratory apparatus with the cell proliferative program. PMID:19076454

  14. Neuromodulatory nerve regeneration: adipose tissue-derived stem cells and neurotrophic mediation in peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Widgerow, Alan D; Salibian, Ara A; Lalezari, Shadi; Evans, Gregory R D

    2013-12-01

    Peripheral nerve injury requiring nerve gap reconstruction remains a major problem. In the quest to find an alternative to autogenous nerve graft procedures, attempts have been made to differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into neuronal lineages in vitro and utilize these cellular constructs for nerve regeneration. Unfortunately, this has produced mixed results, with no definitive procedure matching or surpassing traditional nerve grafting procedures. This review presents a different approach to nerve regeneration. The literature was reviewed to evaluate current methods of using adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for peripheral nerve regeneration in in vivo models of animal peripheral nerve injury. The authors present cited evidence for directing nerve regeneration through paracrine effects of ADSCs rather than through in vitro nerve regeneration. The paracrine effects rely mainly, but not solely, on the elaboration of nerve growth factors and neurotrophic mediators that influence surrounding host cells to orchestrate in vivo nerve regeneration. Although this paradigm has been indirectly referred to in a host of publications, few major efforts for this type of neuromodulatory nerve regeneration have been forthcoming. The ADSCs are initially "primed" in vitro using specialized controlled medium (not for neuronal differentiation but for sustainability) and then incorporated into a hydrogel base matrix designed for this purpose. This core matrix is then introduced into a natural collagen-based nerve conduit. The prototype design concepts, evidence for paracrine influences, and regulatory hurdles that are avoided using this approach are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. MafB deficiency causes defective respiratory rhythmogenesis and fatal central apnea at birth.

    PubMed

    Blanchi, Bruno; Kelly, Louise M; Viemari, Jean-Charles; Lafon, Isabelle; Burnet, Henri; Bévengut, Michelle; Tillmanns, Silke; Daniel, Laurent; Graf, Thomas; Hilaire, Gerard; Sieweke, Michael H

    2003-10-01

    The genetic basis for the development of brainstem neurons that generate respiratory rhythm is unknown. Here we show that mice deficient for the transcription factor MafB die from central apnea at birth and are defective for respiratory rhythmogenesis in vitro. MafB is expressed in a subpopulation of neurons in the preBötzinger complex (preBötC), a putative principal site of rhythmogenesis. Brainstems from Mafb(-/-) mice are insensitive to preBötC electrolytic lesion or stimulation and modulation of rhythmogenesis by hypoxia or peptidergic input. Furthermore, in Mafb(-/-) mice the preBötC, but not major neuromodulatory groups, presents severe anatomical defects with loss of cellularity. Our results show an essential role of MafB in central respiratory control, possibly involving the specification of rhythmogenic preBötC neurons.

  16. Respiratory modulation and baroreflex control of heart rate in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verheyden, Bart; Couckuyt, Kurt; Liu, Jiexin; Aubert, Andre

    During everyday life, gravity constantly stresses the human circulation by diminishing venous return in the upright position. This induces baroreflex-mediated cardiovascular adjustments that are aimed to prevent the blood pressure from falling. In weightlessness, gravitational pressure gradients do not arise in the circulation so that baroreflex function remains chronically unchallenged. This may contribute to the development of post spaceflight orthostatic intolerance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate respiratory modulation and baroreflex control of heart rate after a week of weightlessness in space. We tested the hypothesis that cardiovascular control in space will be similar to the baseline supine condition on Earth. We studied nine male cosmonauts during seven different space missions aboard the ISS (age 40 - 52 yrs, height 1.69 - 1.85 m, weight 67 - 90 kg). Data collection was performed between 30 and 45 days before launch in the standing and supine positions, and after 8 days in space. Cosmonauts were carefully trained to perform in-flight data collection by themselves. They were instructed to pace their breathing to a fixed rate of 12 breaths per minute (0.2 Hz) for a total duration of 3 minutes. The electrocardiogram and beat-by-beat finger arterial blood pressure were recorded at 1-kHz sample rate. Respiratory rate was evaluated using an abdominal pressure sensor. We used power spectral analysis to calculate respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) as well as the low-frequency (0.04 - 0.15 Hz) powers of spontaneous oscillations in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated in the time domain using cross-correlation analysis. As expected, there was a rise in heart rate upon assuming the standing position before space- flight (59 ± 6 to 79 ± 11 beats per min; p ¡ 0.001). This was accompanied by an increase in mean arterial blood pressure (84 ± 6 to 93 ± 6 mmHg; p ¡ 0.001). Standing up further induced a marked

  17. Numerical simulation of volume-controlled mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Zhang, Bolun; Cai, Maolin; Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2016-11-09

    Mechanical ventilation is a key therapy for patients who cannot breathe adequately by themselves, and dynamics of mechanical ventilation system is of great significance for life support of patients. Recently, models of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 1 lung are used to simulate the respiratory system of patients. However, humans have 2 lungs. When the respiratory characteristics of 2 lungs are different, a single-lung model cannot reflect real respiratory system. In this paper, to illustrate dynamic characteristics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs, we propose a mathematical model of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs and conduct experiments to verify the model. Furthermore, we study the dynamics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs. This research study can be used for improving the efficiency and safety of volume-controlled mechanical ventilation system.

  18. Effect of transcendental meditation on breathing and respiratory control.

    PubMed

    Wolkove, N; Kreisman, H; Darragh, D; Cohen, C; Frank, H

    1984-03-01

    We studied the effect of transcendental meditation (TM) on breathing using 16 experienced meditators and 16 control subjects. In controls, there was no significant difference in minute ventilation (VE), respiratory pattern, or hypercapnic response, whether breathing with eyes open-awake (CA), or with eyes closed-relaxing (CR). In meditators, VE decreased significantly during quiet breathing from 14.0 +/- 0.7 1/min with eyes open-awake (MA) to 12.4 +/- 0.6 1/min during meditation (MM) (P less than 0.02). The change in VE during meditation was due to a decrease in tidal volume (VT) resulting from a shortened inspiratory time (TI). Meditation was associated with a decreased response to progressive hypercapnia from 3.7 +/- 0.4 to 2.5 +/- 0.21 X min-1 X Torr-1 during MA and MM trials, respectively (P less than 0.01). During meditation VT was smaller at a given alveolar PCO2 than during MA studies because of a decrease in mean inspiratory flow rate (VT/TI). These observations suggest that an alteration in wakefulness, more subtle than sleep or the unconscious state, can significantly affect the chemical and neural regulation of breathing.

  19. Respiratory source control using surgical masks with nanofiber media.

    PubMed

    Skaria, Shaji D; Smaldone, Gerald C

    2014-07-01

    Potentially infected individuals ('source') are sometimes encouraged to use face masks to reduce exposure of their infectious aerosols to others ('receiver'). To improve compliance with Respiratory Source Control via face mask and therefore reduce receiver exposure, a mask should be comfortable and effective. We tested a novel face mask designed to improve breathability and filtration using nanofiber filtration. Using radiolabeled test aerosols and a calibrated exposure chamber simulating source to receiver interaction, facepiece function was measured with a life-like ventilated manikin model. Measurements included mask airflow resistance (pressure difference during breathing), filtration, (mask capture of exhaled radiolabeled test aerosols), and exposure (the transfer of 'infectious' aerosols from the 'source' to a 'receiver'). Polydisperse aerosols were measured at the source with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 0.95 µm. Approximately 90% of the particles were <2.0 µm. Tested facepieces included nanofiber prototype surgical masks, conventional surgical masks, and for comparison, an N95-class filtering facepiece respirator (commonly known as an 'N95 respirator'). Airflow through and around conventional surgical face mask and nanofiber prototype face mask was visualized using Schlieren optical imaging. Airflow resistance [ΔP, cmH2O] across sealed surgical masks (means: 0.1865 and 0.1791 cmH2O) approached that of the N95 (mean: 0.2664 cmH2O). The airflow resistance across the nanofiber face mask whether sealed or not sealed (0.0504 and 0.0311 cmH2O) was significantly reduced in comparison. In addition, 'infected' source airflow filtration and receiver exposure levels for nanofiber face masks placed on the source were comparable to that achieved with N95 placed on the source; 98.98% versus 82.68% and 0.0194 versus 0.0557, respectively. Compared to deflection within and around the conventional face masks, Schlieren optical imaging demonstrated enhanced

  20. Respiratory Source Control Using Surgical Masks With Nanofiber Media

    PubMed Central

    Skaria, Shaji D.; Smaldone, Gerald C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Potentially infected individuals (‘source’) are sometimes encouraged to use face masks to reduce exposure of their infectious aerosols to others (‘receiver’). To improve compliance with Respiratory Source Control via face mask and therefore reduce receiver exposure, a mask should be comfortable and effective. We tested a novel face mask designed to improve breathability and filtration using nanofiber filtration. Methods: Using radiolabeled test aerosols and a calibrated exposure chamber simulating source to receiver interaction, facepiece function was measured with a life-like ventilated manikin model. Measurements included mask airflow resistance (pressure difference during breathing), filtration, (mask capture of exhaled radiolabeled test aerosols), and exposure (the transfer of ‘infectious’ aerosols from the ‘source’ to a ‘receiver’). Polydisperse aerosols were measured at the source with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 0.95 µm. Approximately 90% of the particles were <2.0 µm. Tested facepieces included nanofiber prototype surgical masks, conventional surgical masks, and for comparison, an N95-class filtering facepiece respirator (commonly known as an ‘N95 respirator’). Airflow through and around conventional surgical face mask and nanofiber prototype face mask was visualized using Schlieren optical imaging. Results: Airflow resistance [ΔP, cmH2O] across sealed surgical masks (means: 0.1865 and 0.1791 cmH2O) approached that of the N95 (mean: 0.2664 cmH2O). The airflow resistance across the nanofiber face mask whether sealed or not sealed (0.0504 and 0.0311 cmH2O) was significantly reduced in comparison. In addition, ‘infected’ source airflow filtration and receiver exposure levels for nanofiber face masks placed on the source were comparable to that achieved with N95 placed on the source; 98.98% versus 82.68% and 0.0194 versus 0.0557, respectively. Compared to deflection within and around the conventional face

  1. Should Controls With Respiratory Symptoms Be Excluded From Case-Control Studies of Pneumonia Etiology? Reflections From the PERCH Study.

    PubMed

    Higdon, Melissa M; Hammitt, Laura L; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Howie, Stephen R C; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; Murdoch, David R; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Driscoll, Amanda J; Karron, Ruth A; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Zeger, Scott L; O'Brien, Katherine L; Feikin, Daniel R

    2017-06-15

    Many pneumonia etiology case-control studies exclude controls with respiratory illness from enrollment or analyses. Herein we argue that selecting controls regardless of respiratory symptoms provides the least biased estimates of pneumonia etiology. We review 3 reasons investigators may choose to exclude controls with respiratory symptoms in light of epidemiologic principles of control selection and present data from the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study where relevant to assess their validity. We conclude that exclusion of controls with respiratory symptoms will result in biased estimates of etiology. Randomly selected community controls, with or without respiratory symptoms, as long as they do not meet the criteria for case-defining pneumonia, are most representative of the general population from which cases arose and the least subject to selection bias. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  2. The respiratory-vocal system of songbirds: anatomy, physiology, and neural control.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Marc F; Martin Wild, J

    2014-01-01

    This wide-ranging review presents an overview of the respiratory-vocal system in songbirds, which are the only other vertebrate group known to display a degree of respiratory control during song rivalling that of humans during speech; this despite the fact that the peripheral components of both the respiratory and vocal systems differ substantially in the two groups. We first provide a brief description of these peripheral components in songbirds (lungs, air sacs and respiratory muscles, vocal organ (syrinx), upper vocal tract) and then proceed to a review of the organization of central respiratory-related neurons in the spinal cord and brainstem, the latter having an organization fundamentally similar to that of the ventral respiratory group of mammals. The second half of the review describes the nature of the motor commands generated in a specialized "cortical" song control circuit and how these might engage brainstem respiratory networks to shape the temporal structure of song. We also discuss a bilaterally projecting "respiratory-thalamic" pathway that links the respiratory system to "cortical" song control nuclei. This necessary pathway for song originates in the brainstem's primary inspiratory center and is hypothesized to play a vital role in synchronizing song motor commands both within and across hemispheres.

  3. The respiratory-vocal system of songbirds: Anatomy, physiology, and neural control

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Marc F.; Wild, J. Martin

    2015-01-01

    This wide-ranging review presents an overview of the respiratory-vocal system in songbirds, which are the only other vertebrate group known to display a degree of respiratory control during song rivalling that of humans during speech; this despite the fact that the peripheral components of both the respiratory and vocal systems differ substantially in the two groups. We first provide a brief description of these peripheral components in songbirds (lungs, air sacs and respiratory muscles, vocal organ (syrinx), upper vocal tract) and then proceed to a review of the organization of central respiratory-related neurons in the spinal cord and brainstem, the latter having an organization fundamentally similar to that of the ventral respiratory group of mammals. The second half of the review describes the nature of the motor commands generated in a specialized “cortical” song control circuit and how these might engage brainstem respiratory networks to shape the temporal structure of song. We also discuss a bilaterally projecting “respiratory-thalamic” pathway that links the respiratory system to “cortical” song control nuclei. This necessary pathway for song originates in the brainstem’s primary inspiratory center and is hypothesized to play a vital role in synchronizing song motor commands both within and across hemispheres. PMID:25194204

  4. Pontine influences on respiratory control in ectothermic and heterothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Milsom, William K; Chatburn, Jonathan; Zimmer, M Beth

    2004-11-15

    Respiratory rhythm generators appear both evolutionarily and developmentally as paired segmental rhythm generators in the reticular formation, associated with the motor nuclei of cranial nerves V, VII, IX, X, and XII. Those associated with the Vth and VIIth motor nuclei are "pontine" in origin and in fishes that employ a buccal suction/force pump for breathing the primary pair of respiratory rhythm generators are associated with the trigeminal nuclei. In amphibians, while the basic respiratory pump remains the same, the dominant site of respiratory rhythm generation has been assumed by the facial, glossopharyngeal and vagal motor nuclei. In reptiles, birds and mammals, in general there is a switch to an aspiration pump driven by thoraco-lumbar muscles innervated by spinal nerves. In these groups, the critical sites necessary for respiratory rhythmogenesis now sit near the ponto-medullary border, in the parafacial region (which may underlie expiratory-dominated, intercostal-abdominal breathing in non-mammalian tetrapods) and in a more caudal region, the preBotzinger complex (which may underlie inspiratory-dominated diaphragmatic breathing in mammals).

  5. D-aspartate: an atypical amino acid with neuromodulatory activity in mammals.

    PubMed

    Errico, Francesco; Napolitano, Francesco; Nisticò, Robert; Centonze, Diego; Usiello, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Within the pool of endogenous amino acids, serine and aspartate are the only two residues occurring at significant concentrations in free D-form in mammalian tissues. D-Serine (D-Ser) is mainly localized in the forebrain structures of the CNS throughout embryonic development and postnatal phase. Compelling evidence demonstrates that D-Ser has a functional role as an endogenous co-agonist at N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and shows its beneficial involvement in psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. On the other hand, knowledge concerning the role of free D-Asp in mammals has so far been less extensive. D-Asp occurs in the brain as well as in peripheral tissues including the endocrine glands. In endocrine glands, D-Asp levels increase during the postnatal period in concomitance with their functional maturation. The involvement of D-Asp in the regulation of the synthesis and/or release of different hormones has been clearly demonstrated. However, its biological significance in the brain is still obscure. D-Asp appears with a peculiar temporal pattern of localization, being abundant during embryonic development and strongly decreasing after birth. This phenomenon is the result of the postnatal onset of D-Asp oxidase (DDO) expression, the only known enzyme that strictly controls the endogenous levels of D-Asp. The pharmacological affinity of D-Asp for the glutamate site of NMDARs has raised the intriguing question whether this D-amino acid may have some in vivo influence on responses mediated by this subclass of glutamate receptors. In order to unveil the physiological function of D-Asp and of its metabolizing enzyme, genetic and pharmacological approaches have been recently developed. It has now become possible to generate animal models with abnormally elevated levels of D-Asp in adulthood based on the targeted deletion of the Ddo gene and on the oral administration of D-Asp. These animal models have thus highlighted that D-Asp has a neuromodulatory

  6. Emerging neuromodulatory molecules for the treatment of neurogenic erectile dysfunction caused by cavernous nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Bella, Anthony J; Lin, Guiting; Cagiannos, Ilias; Lue, Tom F

    2008-01-01

    Advances in the neurobiology of growth factors, neural development, and prevention of cell death have resulted in a heightened clinical interest for the development of protective and regenerative neuromodulatory strategies for the cavernous nerves (CNs), as therapies for prostate cancer and other pelvic malignancies often result in neuronal damage and debilitating loss of sexual function. Nitric oxide released from the axonal end plates of these nerves within the corpora cavernosa causes relaxation of smooth muscle, initiating the haemodynamic changes of penile erection as well as contributing to maintained tumescence; the loss of CN function is primarily responsible for the development of erectile dysfunction (ED) after pelvic surgery and serves as the primary target for potential neuroprotective or regenerative strategies. Evidence from pre-clinical studies for select neuromodulatory approaches is reviewed, including neurotrophins, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factors (GDNF), bone morphogenic proteins, immunophilin ligands, erythropoetin (EPO), and stem cells.

  7. Starvation promotes concerted modulation of appetitive olfactory behavior via parallel neuromodulatory circuits

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Kang I; Root, Cory M; Lindsay, Scott A; Zaninovich, Orel A; Shepherd, Andrew K; Wasserman, Steven A; Kim, Susy M; Wang, Jing W

    2015-01-01

    The internal state of an organism influences its perception of attractive or aversive stimuli and thus promotes adaptive behaviors that increase its likelihood of survival. The mechanisms underlying these perceptual shifts are critical to our understanding of how neural circuits support animal cognition and behavior. Starved flies exhibit enhanced sensitivity to attractive odors and reduced sensitivity to aversive odors. Here, we show that a functional remodeling of the olfactory map is mediated by two parallel neuromodulatory systems that act in opposing directions on olfactory attraction and aversion at the level of the first synapse. Short neuropeptide F sensitizes an antennal lobe glomerulus wired for attraction, while tachykinin (DTK) suppresses activity of a glomerulus wired for aversion. Thus we show parallel neuromodulatory systems functionally reconfigure early olfactory processing to optimize detection of nutrients at the risk of ignoring potentially toxic food resources. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08298.001 PMID:26208339

  8. Starvation promotes concerted modulation of appetitive olfactory behavior via parallel neuromodulatory circuits.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kang I; Root, Cory M; Lindsay, Scott A; Zaninovich, Orel A; Shepherd, Andrew K; Wasserman, Steven A; Kim, Susy M; Wang, Jing W

    2015-07-24

    The internal state of an organism influences its perception of attractive or aversive stimuli and thus promotes adaptive behaviors that increase its likelihood of survival. The mechanisms underlying these perceptual shifts are critical to our understanding of how neural circuits support animal cognition and behavior. Starved flies exhibit enhanced sensitivity to attractive odors and reduced sensitivity to aversive odors. Here, we show that a functional remodeling of the olfactory map is mediated by two parallel neuromodulatory systems that act in opposing directions on olfactory attraction and aversion at the level of the first synapse. Short neuropeptide F sensitizes an antennal lobe glomerulus wired for attraction, while tachykinin (DTK) suppresses activity of a glomerulus wired for aversion. Thus we show parallel neuromodulatory systems functionally reconfigure early olfactory processing to optimize detection of nutrients at the risk of ignoring potentially toxic food resources.

  9. Control and prevention of healthcare-associated tuberculosis: the role of respiratory isolation and personal respiratory protection.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, H

    2007-05-01

    Although the prevalence of tuberculosis continues to decline in most developed countries, the risk of healthcare-associated tuberculosis, remains for patients or healthcare staff. Outbreaks of healthcare-associated tuberculosis are usually associated with delays in diagnosis and treatment, or the care of patients in sub-optimal facilities. The control and prevention of tuberculosis in hospitals is best achieved by three approaches, namely administrative (early investigation diagnosis, etc.), engineering (physical facilities e.g. ventilated isolation rooms) and personal respiratory protection (face sealing masks which are filtered). Recent guidelines on the prevention of tuberculosis in healthcare facilities from Europe and the USA have many common themes. In the UK, however, negative pressure isolation rooms are recommended only for patients with suspected multi-drug resistant TB and personal respiratory protection, i.e. filtered masks, are not considered necessary unless multi-drug resistant TB is suspected, or where aerosol-generating procedures are likely. In the US, the standard of care for patients with infectious tuberculosis is a negative pressure ventilated room and the use of personal respiratory protection for all healthcare workers entering the room of a patient with suspected or confirmed tuberculosis. The absence of clinical trials in this area precludes dogmatic recommendations. Nonetheless, observational studies and mathematical modelling suggest that all measures are required for effective prevention. Even when policies and facilities are optimal, there is a need to regularly review and audit these as sometimes compliance is less than optimal. The differences in recommendations may reflect the variations in epidemiology and the greater use of BCG vaccination in the UK compared with the United States. There is a strong argument for advising ventilated facilities and personal respiratory protection for the care of all patients with tuberculosis, as

  10. Infection prevention and control measures for acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings: an update.

    PubMed

    Seto, W H; Conly, J M; Pessoa-Silva, C L; Malik, M; Eremin, S

    2013-01-01

    Viruses account for the majority of the acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) globally with a mortality exceeding 4 million deaths per year. The most commonly encountered viruses, in order of frequency, include influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza and adenovirus. Current evidence suggests that the major mode of transmission of ARls is through large droplets, but transmission through contact (including hand contamination with subsequent self-inoculation) and infectious respiratory aerosols of various sizes and at short range (coined as "opportunistic" airborne transmission) may also occur for some pathogens. Opportunistic airborne transmission may occur when conducting highrisk aerosol generating procedures and airborne precautions will be required in this setting. General infection control measures effective for all respiratory viral infections are reviewed and followed by discussion on some of the common viruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and the recently discovered novel coronavirus.

  11. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation changes speech respiratory and laryngeal control in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Steven M.; Lyons, Kelly E.; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2010-01-01

    Adequate respiratory and laryngeal motor control are essential for speech, but may be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) improves limb function in PD, but the effects on respiratory and laryngeal control remain unknown. We tested whether STN DBS would change aerodynamic measures of respiratory and laryngeal control, and whether these changes were correlated with limb function and stimulation parameters. Eighteen PD participants with bilateral STN DBS were tested within a morning session after a minimum of 12 h since their most recent dose of anti-PD medication. Testing occurred when DBS was on, and again 1 h after DBS was turned off, and included aerodynamic measures during syllable production, and standard clinical ratings of limb function. We found that PD participants exhibited changes with DBS, consistent with increased respiratory driving pressure (n = 9) and increased vocal fold closure (n = 9). However, most participants exceeded a typical operating range for these respiratory and laryngeal control variables with DBS. Changes were uncorrelated with limb function, but showed some correlation with stimulation frequency and pulse width, suggesting that speech may benefit more from low-frequency stimulation and shorter pulse width. Therefore, high-frequency STN DBS may be less beneficial for speech-related respiratory and laryngeal control than for limb motor control. It is important to consider these distinctions and their underlying mechanisms when assessing the impact of STN DBS on PD. PMID:20582431

  12. Respiratory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  13. Effects of hypothyroidism on the respiratory system and control of breathing: Human studies and animal models.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Evelyn H

    2012-04-30

    Hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and euthyroid sick syndrome, are prevalent disorders that affect all body systems including the respiratory system and control of breathing. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the regulation of thyroid hormone production and their function at the cellular level; the many causes of hypothyroidism; the effects of hypothyroidism on the respiratory system and on control of ventilation in hypothyroid patients; the variety of ways animal models of hypothyroidism are induced; and how in animal models hypothyroidism affects the respiratory system and control of breathing including neurotransmitters that influence breathing. Finally, this review will present controversies that exist in the field and thus encourage new research directions. Because of the high prevalence of hypothyroidism and subclinical forms of hypothyroidism and their influence on ventilation and the respiratory system, understanding underlying molecular mechanisms is necessary to ascertain how and sometimes why not thyroid replacement may normalize function.

  14. Periodic Breathing in Heart Failure Explained by Dynamic and Static Properties of Respiratory Control

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Tadayoshi; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Ueda, Shinya; Manabe, Kou; Kawai, Eriko; Inagaki, Masashi; Kawada, Toru; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The respiratory operating point is determined by the interplay between the controller and plant subsystem elements within the respiratory chemoreflex feedback system. This study aimed to establish the methodological basis for quantitative analysis of the open-loop dynamic properties of the human respiratory control system and to apply the results to explore detailed mechanisms of the regulation of respiration and the possible mechanism of periodic breathing in chronic heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS In healthy volunteers, we measured arterial CO2 partial pressure (PaCO2) and minute ventilation (V˙E) to estimate the dynamic properties of the controller ( PaCO2→V˙E relation) and plant ( V˙E→PaCO2 relation). The dynamic properties of the controller and plant approximated first- and second-order exponential models, respectively, and were described using parameters including gain, time constant, and lag time. We then used the open-loop transfer functions to simulate the closed-loop respiratory response to an exogenous disturbance, while manipulating the parameter values to deviate from normal values but within physiological ranges. By increasing both the product of gains of the two subsystem elements (total loop gain) and the lag time, the condition of system oscillation (onset of periodic breathing) was satisfied. CONCLUSION When abnormality occurs in a part of the respiratory chemoreflex system, instability of the control system is amplified and may result in the manifestation of respiratory abnormalities such as periodic breathing. PMID:26561001

  15. Periodic Breathing in Heart Failure Explained by Dynamic and Static Properties of Respiratory Control.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Tadayoshi; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Ueda, Shinya; Manabe, Kou; Kawai, Eriko; Inagaki, Masashi; Kawada, Toru; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory operating point is determined by the interplay between the controller and plant subsystem elements within the respiratory chemoreflex feedback system. This study aimed to establish the methodological basis for quantitative analysis of the open-loop dynamic properties of the human respiratory control system and to apply the results to explore detailed mechanisms of the regulation of respiration and the possible mechanism of periodic breathing in chronic heart failure. In healthy volunteers, we measured arterial CO2 partial pressure (PaCO2) and minute ventilation [Formula: see text] to estimate the dynamic properties of the controller ( [Formula: see text] relation) and plant ( [Formula: see text] relation). The dynamic properties of the controller and plant approximated first- and second-order exponential models, respectively, and were described using parameters including gain, time constant, and lag time. We then used the open-loop transfer functions to simulate the closed-loop respiratory response to an exogenous disturbance, while manipulating the parameter values to deviate from normal values but within physiological ranges. By increasing both the product of gains of the two subsystem elements (total loop gain) and the lag time, the condition of system oscillation (onset of periodic breathing) was satisfied. When abnormality occurs in a part of the respiratory chemoreflex system, instability of the control system is amplified and may result in the manifestation of respiratory abnormalities such as periodic breathing.

  16. A programme for controlling acute respiratory infections in children: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The unacceptably high mortality related to acute respiratory infections (ARI) in children, recognition of the importance of bacteria in the causation of severe acute lower respiratory infection in developing countries, and the established effectiveness of antimicrobial and supportive treatment in averting death make a strong case for the initiation of an ARI control programme. This should be spearheaded by prototype ARI service activities, delivered through primary health care and backed up by well-coordinated health systems research. PMID:6609020

  17. Respiratory control in residents at high altitude: physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    León-Velarde, Fabiola; Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2006-01-01

    Highland population (HA) from the Andes, living above 3000 m, have a blunted ventilatory response to increasing hypoxia, breathe less compared to acclimatized newcomers, but more, compared to sea-level natives at sea level. Subjects with chronic mountain sickness (CMS) breathe like sea-level natives and have excessive erythrocytosis (EE). The respiratory stimulation that arises through the peripheral chemoreflex is modestly less in the CMS group when compared with the HA group at the same P(ET(O2)). With regard to CO(2) sensitivity, CMS subjects seem to have reset their central CO(2) chemoreceptors to operate around the sea-level resting P(ET(CO2)). Acetazolamide, an acidifying drug that increases the chemosensitivity of regions in the brain stem that contain CO(2)/H(+) sensitive neurons, partially reverses this phenomenon, thus, providing CMS subjects with the possibility to have high CO(2) changes, despite small changes in ventilation. However, the same type of adjustments of the breathing pattern established for Andeans has not been found necessarily in Asian humans and/or domestic animals nor in the various high altitude species studied. The differing time frames of exposure to hypoxia among the populations, as well as the reversibility of the different components of the respiratory process at sea level, provide key concepts concerning the importance of time at high altitude in the evolution of an appropriate breathing pattern.

  18. Respiratory control by ventral surface chemoreceptor neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Mulkey, Daniel K; Stornetta, Ruth L; Weston, Matthew C; Simmons, Johnny R; Parker, Anson; Bayliss, Douglas A; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2004-12-01

    A long-standing theory posits that central chemoreception, the CNS mechanism for CO(2) detection and regulation of breathing, involves neurons located at the ventral surface of the medulla oblongata (VMS). Using in vivo and in vitro electrophysiological recordings, we identify VMS neurons within the rat retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) that have characteristics befitting these elusive chemoreceptors. These glutamatergic neurons are vigorously activated by CO(2) in vivo, whereas serotonergic neurons are not. Their CO(2) sensitivity is unaffected by pharmacological blockade of the respiratory pattern generator and persists without carotid body input. RTN CO(2)-sensitive neurons have extensive dendrites along the VMS and they innervate key pontomedullary respiratory centers. In brainstem slices, a subset of RTN neurons with markedly similar morphology is robustly activated by acidification and CO(2). Their pH sensitivity is intrinsic and involves a background K(+) current. In short, the CO(2)-sensitive neurons of the RTN are good candidates for the long sought-after VMS chemoreceptors.

  19. Open Lung Approach for the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Pilot, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kacmarek, Robert M; Villar, Jesús; Sulemanji, Demet; Montiel, Raquel; Ferrando, Carlos; Blanco, Jesús; Koh, Younsuck; Soler, Juan Alfonso; Martínez, Domingo; Hernández, Marianela; Tucci, Mauro; Borges, Joao Batista; Lubillo, Santiago; Santos, Arnoldo; Araujo, Juan B; Amato, Marcelo B P; Suárez-Sipmann, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The open lung approach is a mechanical ventilation strategy involving lung recruitment and a decremental positive end-expiratory pressure trial. We compared the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome network protocol using low levels of positive end-expiratory pressure with open lung approach resulting in moderate to high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure for the management of established moderate/severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. A prospective, multicenter, pilot, randomized controlled trial. A network of 20 multidisciplinary ICUs. Patients meeting the American-European Consensus Conference definition for acute respiratory distress syndrome were considered for the study. At 12-36 hours after acute respiratory distress syndrome onset, patients were assessed under standardized ventilator settings (FIO2≥0.5, positive end-expiratory pressure ≥10 cm H2O). If Pao2/FIO2 ratio remained less than or equal to 200 mm Hg, patients were randomized to open lung approach or Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome network protocol. All patients were ventilated with a tidal volume of 4 to 8 ml/kg predicted body weight. From 1,874 screened patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, 200 were randomized: 99 to open lung approach and 101 to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome network protocol. Main outcome measures were 60-day and ICU mortalities, and ventilator-free days. Mortality at day-60 (29% open lung approach vs. 33% Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network protocol, p = 0.18, log rank test), ICU mortality (25% open lung approach vs. 30% Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome network protocol, p = 0.53 Fisher's exact test), and ventilator-free days (8 [0-20] open lung approach vs. 7 [0-20] d Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome network protocol, p = 0.53 Wilcoxon rank test) were not significantly different. Airway driving pressure (plateau pressure - positive end-expiratory pressure) and PaO2/FIO2 improved significantly at 24, 48 and 72 hours in patients

  20. Control of abdominal muscles by brain stem respiratory neurons in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Ezure, Kazuhisa; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1985-01-01

    The nature of the control of abdominal muscles by the brain stem respiratory neurons was investigated in decerebrate unanesthetized cats. First, it was determined which of the brain stem respiratory neurons project to the lumbar cord (from which the abdominal muscles receive part of their innervation), by stimulating the neurons monopolarly. In a second part of the study, it was determined if lumbar-projecting respiratory neurons make monosynaptic connections with abdominal motoneurons; in these experiments, discriminate spontaneous spikes of antidromically acivated expiratory (E) neurons were used to trigger activity from both L1 and L2 nerves. A large projection was observed from E neurons in the caudal ventral respiratory group to the contralateral upper lumber cord. However, cross-correlation experiments found only two (out of 47 neuron pairs tested) strong monosynaptic connections between brain stem neurons and abdominal motoneurons.

  1. Control of abdominal muscles by brain stem respiratory neurons in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Ezure, Kazuhisa; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1985-01-01

    The nature of the control of abdominal muscles by the brain stem respiratory neurons was investigated in decerebrate unanesthetized cats. First, it was determined which of the brain stem respiratory neurons project to the lumbar cord (from which the abdominal muscles receive part of their innervation), by stimulating the neurons monopolarly. In a second part of the study, it was determined if lumbar-projecting respiratory neurons make monosynaptic connections with abdominal motoneurons; in these experiments, discriminate spontaneous spikes of antidromically acivated expiratory (E) neurons were used to trigger activity from both L1 and L2 nerves. A large projection was observed from E neurons in the caudal ventral respiratory group to the contralateral upper lumber cord. However, cross-correlation experiments found only two (out of 47 neuron pairs tested) strong monosynaptic connections between brain stem neurons and abdominal motoneurons.

  2. [Amphibians as a model system for the investigation of respiratory control development].

    PubMed

    Belzile, Olivier; Simard, Edith; Gulemetova, Roumiana; Bairam, Aida; Kinkead, Richard

    2004-10-01

    Recent medical advances have made it possible for babies to survive premature birth at increasingly earlier developmental stages. This population requires costly and sophisticated medical care to address the problems associated with immaturity of the respiratory system. In addition to pulmonary complications, respiratory instability and apnea reflecting immaturity of the respiratory control system are major causes of hospitalization and morbidity in this highly vulnerable population. These medical concerns, combined with the curiosity of physiologists, have contributed to the expansion of research in respiratory neurobiology. While most researchers working in this field commonly use rodents as an animal model, recent research using in vitro brainstem preparation from bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) have revealed the technical advantages of this animal model, and shown that the basic principles underlying respiratory control and its ontogeny are very similar between these two groups of vertebrates. The present review highlights the recent advances in the area of research with a focus on intermittent (episodic) breathing and the role of serotonergic and GABAergic modulation of respiratory activity during development.

  3. AIDS and UK respiratory physicians: attitudes to confidentiality, infection control, and management.

    PubMed Central

    Church, S; Owen, S; Woodcock, A A

    1990-01-01

    Respiratory physicians are concerned in the management of most patients with AIDS. Attitudes and practices of 463 respiratory physicians in the United Kingdom in relation to confidentiality, infection control, and treatment were sought by questionnaire from December 1987 to March 1988; 266 replies were received. Thirty eight per cent of respondents had not seen an HIV positive patient at the time of the survey. Respiratory physicians followed General Medical Council guidelines in relation to consent and confidentiality, except that if the patient's consent was withheld three quarters of the physicians would still inform an at risk hospital health care worker; only a quarter, however, would inform an at risk spouse. Routine infection control was frequently inadequate and "disease specific"--that is, substantially increased for known HIV positive patients. Given an HIV positive patient with respiratory symptoms and an abnormal chest radiograph, two thirds of respiratory physicians said that they would treat empirically for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia as opposed to immediate bronchoscopy for accurate diagnosis. If a patient with AIDS who had pneumocystis pneumonia developed respiratory failure, half the physicians said at that time that they would elect not to ventilate the patient. PMID:2321178

  4. Long-term effects of the perinatal environment on respiratory control.

    PubMed

    Bavis, Ryan W; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2008-04-01

    The respiratory control system exhibits considerable plasticity, similar to other regions of the nervous system. Plasticity is a persistent change in system behavior triggered by experiences such as changes in neural activity, hypoxia, and/or disease/injury. Although plasticity is observed in animals of all ages, some forms of plasticity appear to be unique to development (i.e., "developmental plasticity"). Developmental plasticity is an alteration in respiratory control induced by experiences during "critical" developmental periods; similar experiences outside the critical period will have little or no lasting effect. Thus complementary experiments on both mature and developing animals are generally needed to verify that the observed plasticity is unique to development. Frequently studied models of developmental plasticity in respiratory control include developmental manipulations of respiratory gas concentrations (O(2) and CO(2)). Environmental factors not specifically associated with breathing may also trigger developmental plasticity, however, including psychological stress or chemicals associated with maternal habits (e.g., nicotine, cocaine). Despite rapid advances in describing models of developmental plasticity in breathing, our understanding of fundamental mechanisms giving rise to such plasticity is poor; mechanistic studies of developmental plasticity are of considerable importance. Developmental plasticity may enable organisms to "fine tune" their phenotype to optimize the performance of this critical homeostatic regulatory system. On the other hand, developmental plasticity could also increase the risk of disease later in life. Future directions for studies concerning the mechanisms and functional implications of developmental plasticity in respiratory motor control are discussed.

  5. Monodisperse, Uniformly-Shaped Particles for Controlled Respiratory Vaccine Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromen, Catherine Ann

    The majority of the world's most infectious diseases occur at the air-tissue interface called the mucosa, including HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, measles, and bacterial or viral gut and respiratory infections. Despite this, vaccines have generally been developed for the systemic immune system and fail to provide protection at the mucosal site. Vaccine delivery directly to the lung mucosa could provide superior lung protection for many infectious diseases, such as TB or influenza, as well as systemic and therapeutic vaccines for diseases such as Dengue fever, asthma, or cancer. Specifically, precision engineered biomaterials are believed to offer tremendous opportunities for a new generation of vaccines. The goal of this approach is to leverage naturally occurring processes of the immune system to produce memory responses capable of rapidly destroy virulent pathogens without harmful exposure. Considerable knowledge of biomaterial properties and their interaction with the immune system of the lung is required for successful translation. The overall goal of this work was to fabricate and characterize nano- and microparticles using the Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates (PRINT) fabrication technique and optimize them as pulmonary vaccine carriers. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  6. Respiratory Development in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Grown at Controlled Oxygen Tension

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, P. J.; Stewart, P. R.

    1973-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was grown in batch culture over a wide range of oxygen concentrations, varying from the anaerobic condition to a maximal dissolved oxygen concentration of 3.5 μM. The development of cells was assayed by measuring amounts of the aerobic cytochromes aa3, b, c, and c1, the cellular content of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol, and the activity of respiratory enzyme complexes. The half-maximal levels of membrane-bound cytochromes aa3, b, and c1, were reached in cells grown in O2 concentrations around 0.1 μM; this was similar to the oxygen concentration required for half-maximal levels of unsaturated fatty acid and sterol. However, the synthesis of ubiquinone and cytochrome c and the increase in fumarase activity were essentially linear functions of the dissolved oxygen concentration up to 3.5 μM oxygen. The synthesis of the succinate dehydrogenase, succinate cytochrome c reductase, and cytochrome c oxidase complexes showed different responses to changes in O2 concentration in the growth medium. Cyanide-insensitive respiration and P450 cytochrome content were maximal at 0.25 μM oxygen and declined in both more anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Cytochrome c peroxidase and catalase activities in cell-free homogenates were high in all but the most strictly anaerobic cells. PMID:4352179

  7. The role of proprioceptive afferents in the control of respiratory muscles.

    PubMed

    von Euler, C

    1973-01-01

    Building largely on the results of previous studies of motor control in respiration the role of proprioceptive control of respiratory movements is discussed with particular reference to the significance of the following points: (i) The co-activation of fusimotor and alpha motoneurons in load compensation and in the control of velocity and force of the respiratory movements. (ii) The convergence onto the same intercostal spindle of fusimotor fibres for respiratory movements and for postural activity. (iii) The difference between proprioceptive control of intercostal muscles on the one hand and the diaphragm on the other, and of the control of the phrenic motoneuron pool exerted by intercostal proprioceptors. (iv) The cerebellar control both of the fusimotor-alpha balance between the indirect drive of the intercostal motoneurons and of the responsiveness of the phrenic motoneuron pool to respiratory and reflex influences. (v) Results suggesting spinobulbar reflex effects on the control of rate and depth of respiration from muscle and joint receptors of the thoracic wall.

  8. Cascade iatrogenesis: a case-control study to detect postoperative respiratory failure in hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Thornlow, Deirdre K; Oddone, Eugene; Anderson, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    During hospitalization, older adults are at high risk for cascade iatrogenesis, the serial development of complications. In this retrospective, descriptive, case-control pilot study, 28 patients (cases) who developed respiratory failure after an elective surgical procedure were compared to 28 matched controls who did not develop postoperative respiratory failure. The type, frequency, and timing of events that preceded the development of postoperative respiratory failure in hospitalized older adults (age 65 and older) and the presence and timing of similar events for matched controls during a postoperative period of the same length were recorded. Cases experienced certain trigger events, including atelectasis and fluid overload, at significantly higher rates than controls. Cases and controls experienced similar rates of oversedation and delirium, yet controls were less likely to aspirate following these episodes. Patients who developed postoperative respiratory failure were less likely to ambulate early and experienced more calls to rapid response or code teams, more transfers to higher levels of care, longer lengths of stay, and more deaths than matched controls. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. A successful national control programme for enzootic respiratory diseases in pigs in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Stärk, K D C; Miserez, R; Siegmann, S; Ochs, H; Infanger, P; Schmidt, J

    2007-12-01

    Before the start of systematic disease control, respiratory diseases in swine in Switzerland caused estimated losses of several million euros per year. In 1993, a national programme to control enzootic respiratory diseases in pigs was proposed, with the aim of reducing the incidence of clinical cases to less than 1%. Enzootic pneumonia (EP) caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and clinical cases of pleuropneumonia caused by any serotype of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP) would be targeted, in addition to any cases with serological evidence of APP serotype 2. This control programme was initiated in 1996, region by region, and fully implemented by 2004. Clinical, epidemiological and laboratory test results were used to identify the appropriate disease control measures. Partial depopulation was used to control EP on breeding and breeding-finishing farms. Total depopulation was implemented on all farms affected with APP and finishing farms affected with EP Animal trade was strictly regulated during the programme and all suspected cases of respiratory disease in pigs were made notifiable. Continued monitoring is based on clinical suspicion of infection and/or the detection of gross pathological lesions at slaughter, followed by laboratory confirmation. In 2005, the incidence of clinical cases was less than 1%. Regulations have been introduced to control the international trade in live pigs and prevent the re-introduction of respiratory diseases into Switzerland.

  10. Effect of high-intensity home-based respiratory muscle training on strength of respiratory muscles following a stroke: a protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Kênia Kiefer Parreiras De; Nascimento, Lucas Rodrigues; Polese, Janaine Cunha; Ada, Louise; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi

    2017-07-03

    Respiratory muscle training has shown to increase strength of the respiratory muscles following a stroke. However, low duration and/or intensity of training may be responsible for the small effect size seen and/or absence of carry-over effects to an activity, e.g., walking. Therefore, an investigation of the effects of long-duration, high-intensity respiratory muscle training is warranted. This proposed protocol for a randomized clinical trial will examine the efficacy of high-intensity respiratory muscle training to increase strength and improve activity following a stroke. This study will be a two-arm, prospectively registered, randomized controlled trial, with blinded assessors. Thirty-eight individuals who have suffered a stroke will participate. The experimental group will undertake a 40-min of respiratory muscle training program, seven days/week, for eight weeks in their homes. Training loads will be increased weekly. The control group will undertake a sham respiratory muscle training program with equivalent duration and scheduling of training. The primary outcome will be the strength of the inspiratory muscles, measured as maximal inspiratory pressure. Secondary outcomes will include expiratory muscle strength, inspiratory muscle endurance, dyspnea, respiratory complications, and walking capacity. Outcomes will be collected by a researcher blinded to group allocation at baseline (Week 0), after intervention (Week 8), and one month beyond intervention (Week 12). High-intensity respiratory muscle training may have the potential to optimize the strength of the respiratory muscles following a stroke. If benefits are carried over to activity, the findings may have broader implications, since walking capacity has been shown to predict physical activity and community participation on this population. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Modification of Traffic-related Respiratory Response by Asthma Control in a Population of Car Commuters

    PubMed Central

    Mirabelli, Maria C.; Golan, Rachel; Greenwald, Roby; Raysoni, Amit U.; Holguin, Fernando; Kewada, Priya; Winquist, Andrea; Flanders, W. Dana; Sarnat, Jeremy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Effects of traffic-related exposures on respiratory health are well documented, but little information is available about whether asthma control influences individual susceptibility. We analyzed data from the Atlanta Commuter Exposure study to evaluate modification of associations between rush-hour commuting, in-vehicle air pollution, and selected respiratory health outcomes by asthma control status. Methods Between 2009 and 2011, 39 adults participated in Atlanta Commuter Exposure, and each conducted two scripted rush-hour highway commutes. In-vehicle particulate components were measured during all commutes. Among adults with asthma, we evaluated asthma control by questionnaire and spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and other metrics of respiratory health were measured precommute and 0, 1, 2, and 3 hours postcommute. We used mixed effects linear regression to evaluate associations between commute-related exposures and postcommute changes in metrics of respiratory health by level of asthma control. Results We observed increased exhaled nitric oxide across all levels of asthma control compared with precommute measurements, with largest postcommute increases observed among participants with below-median asthma control (2 hours postcommute: 14.6% [95% confidence interval {CI} = 5.7, 24.2]; 3 hours postcommute: 19.5% [95% CI = 7.8, 32.5]). No associations between in-vehicle pollutants and percent of predicted FEV1 were observed, although higher PM2.5 was associated with lower FEV1 % predicted among participants with below-median asthma control (3 hours postcommute: −7.2 [95% CI = −11.8, −2.7]). Conclusions Level of asthma control may influence respiratory response to in-vehicle exposures experienced during rush-hour commuting. PMID:25901844

  12. Modification of Traffic-related Respiratory Response by Asthma Control in a Population of Car Commuters.

    PubMed

    Mirabelli, Maria C; Golan, Rachel; Greenwald, Roby; Raysoni, Amit U; Holguin, Fernando; Kewada, Priya; Winquist, Andrea; Flanders, W Dana; Sarnat, Jeremy A

    2015-07-01

    Effects of traffic-related exposures on respiratory health are well documented, but little information is available about whether asthma control influences individual susceptibility. We analyzed data from the Atlanta Commuter Exposure study to evaluate modification of associations between rush-hour commuting, in- vehicle air pollution, and selected respiratory health outcomes by asthma control status. Between 2009 and 2011, 39 adults participated in Atlanta Commuter Exposure, and each conducted two scripted rush-hour highway commutes. In-vehicle particulate components were measured during all commutes. Among adults with asthma, we evaluated asthma control by questionnaire and spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and other metrics of respiratory health were measured precommute and 0, 1, 2, and 3 hours postcommute. We used mixed effects linear regression to evaluate associations between commute-related exposures and postcommute changes in metrics of respiratory health by level of asthma control. We observed increased exhaled nitric oxide across all levels of asthma control compared with precommute measurements, with largest postcommute increases observed among participants with below-median asthma control (2 hours postcommute: 14.6% [95% confidence interval {CI} = 5.7, 24.2]; 3 hours postcommute: 19.5% [95% CI = 7.8, 32.5]). No associations between in-vehicle pollutants and percent of predicted FEV1 were observed, although higher PM2.5 was associated with lower FEV1 % predicted among participants with below-median asthma control (3 hours postcommute: -7.2 [95% CI = -11.8, -2.7]). Level of asthma control may influence respiratory response to in-vehicle exposures experienced during rush-hour commuting.

  13. Cognition Enhancing and Neuromodulatory Propensity of Bacopa monniera Extract Against Scopolamine Induced Cognitive Impairments in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Anand, T; Khanum, Farhath

    2016-05-01

    Cognition-enhancing activity of Bacopa monniera extract (BME) was evaluated against scopolamine-induced amnesic rats by novel object recognition test (NOR), elevated plus maze (EPM) and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Scopolamine (2 mg/kg body wt, i.p.) was used to induce amnesia in rats. Piracetam (200 mg/kg body wt, i.p.) was used as positive control. BME at three different dosages (i.e., 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg body wt.) improved the impairment induced by scopolamine by increasing the discrimination index of NOR and by decreasing the transfer latency of EPM and escape latency of MWM tests. Our results further elucidate that BME administration has normalized the neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, glutamate, 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, 3,4 dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, norepinephrine) levels that were altered by scopolamine administration in hippocampus of rat brain. BME administration also ameliorated scopolamine effect by down-regulating AChE and up-regulating BDNF, muscarinic M1 receptor and CREB expression in brain hippocampus confirms the potent neuroprotective role and these results are in corroboration with the earlier in vitro studies. BME administration showed significant protection against scopolamine-induced toxicity by restoring the levels of antioxidant and lipid peroxidation. These results indicate that, cognition-enhancing and neuromodulatory propensity of BME is through modulating the expression of AChE, BDNF, MUS-1, CREB and also by altering the levels of neurotransmitters in hippocampus of rat brain.

  14. Neuromodulatory activities of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in a murine model of HIV-1 associated neurodegeneration1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianuo; Gong, Nan; Huang, Xiuyan; Reynolds, Ashley D.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 associated neurocognitive impairments are intrinsically linked to microglial immune activation, persistent viral infection, and inflammation. In the era of antiretroviral therapy more subtle cognitive impairments occur without adaptive immune compromise. We posit that adaptive immunity is neuroprotective serving both in eliminating infected cells through CD8+ cytotoxic T cell activities and by regulating the neuroinflammatory responses of activated microglia. For the latter, little is known. Thus, we studied the neuromodulatory effects of CD4+ regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+, Treg) or effector T cells (Teff) in HIV-1 associated neurodegeneration. A newly developed HIV-1 encephalitis mouse model system was employed wherein murine bone marrow-derived macrophages are infected with a full length HIV-1YU2/vesicular stomatitis viral pseudotype and injected into basal ganglia of syngeneic immunocompetent mice. Adoptive transfer of CD3-activated Treg attenuated astrogliosis and microglia inflammation with concomitant neuroprotection. Moreover, Treg-mediated anti-inflammatory activities and neuroprotection were associated with upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor expression and downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress, and viral replication. Teff showed contrary effects. These results, taken together, demonstrate the importance of Treg in disease control and raise the possibility of their utility for therapeutic strategies. PMID:19265165

  15. The neurobiology of sensing respiratory gases for the control of animal behavior.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dengke K; Ringstad, Niels

    2012-06-01

    Aerobic metabolism is fundamental for almost all animal life. Cellular consumption of oxygen (O(2)) and production of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) signal metabolic states and physiological stresses. These respiratory gases are also detected as environmental cues that can signal external food quality and the presence of prey, predators and mates. In both contexts, animal nervous systems are endowed with mechanisms for sensing O(2)/CO(2) to trigger appropriate behaviors and maintain homeostasis of internal O(2)/CO(2). Although different animal species show different behavioral responses to O(2)/CO(2), some underlying molecular mechanisms and pathways that function in the detection of respiratory gases are fundamentally similar and evolutionarily conserved. Studies of Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have identified roles for cyclic nucleotide signaling and the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) transcriptional pathway in mediating behavioral responses to respiratory gases. Understanding how simple invertebrate nervous systems detect respiratory gases to control behavior might reveal general principles common to nematodes, insects and vertebrates that function in the molecular sensing of respiratory gases and the neural control of animal behaviors.

  16. Polymorphisms in genes of respiratory control and sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Läer, Katharina; Dörk, Thilo; Vennemann, Marielle; Rothämel, Thomas; Klintschar, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is a multifactorial syndrome and assumingly, among other mechanisms, a deficit in respiratory control leads to a failure of arousal and autoresuscitation when the child is challenged by a stressful homeostatic event, e.g., hypoxia. We hypothesize that genetic polymorphisms involved in respiratory control mediated in the medulla oblongata contribute to SIDS. Therefore, a total of 366 SIDS cases and 421 controls were genotyped for 48 SNPs in 41 candidate genes. Genotyping was performed using Fluidigm nanofluidic technology. Results were obtained for 356 SIDS and 406 controls and 38 SNPs. After correction for multiple testing, one SNP retained a nominally significant association with seasonal SIDS: rs1801030 in the phenol sulfotransferase 1A1 gene (subgroup: death occurring during summer). A borderline association could be also observed for rs563649 in the opioid receptor μ1 gene in a recessive model (subgroup: death occurring during autumn). As a conclusion, although these data suggest two SNPs to be associated with different subgroups of SIDS cases, none of them can fully explain the SIDS condition, consistent with its multifactorial etiology. Given the great complexity of respiratory control and our initial findings reported here, we believe it is worthwhile to further investigate genes involved in the respiratory system.

  17. Insights on the neuromodulatory propensity of Selaginella (Sanjeevani) and its potential pharmacological applications.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Girish; Muralidhara

    2014-02-01

    Exploiting the potential of natural compounds to attenuate endogenous redox status to achieve neuroprotection is a novel concept in human disease therapy. This has necessitated a need to identify newer efficient phytochemicals possessing propensity to act on various biochemical therapeutic targets with low or no toxicity. Selaginella is a lithophytic pteridophyte which grows on constantly irrigated rocks in high altitude zones in different parts of the world. It is appraised to be "Sanjeevani" (the resurrection herb) based on its mythological reference in the Indian epic "Ramayana". Due to the presence of a unique disaccharide, trehalose, most species of Selaginella can survive severe drought conditions, maintaining the plant's structural stability and resurrect during rains. Several species of the genus are used in ethnic medicine for the therapy of jaundice, chronic trachitis, lung cancer, labor pain and wound healing. The major natural compounds in the genus Selaginella are characteristic flavonoid-dimers, called 'biflavonoids'. Although various biological effects of Selaginella have been documented in vitro, studies on its neuromodulatory properties are nonexisting despite the presence of potentially therapeutic biflavonoids. We have reviewed the existing literature on the possible pharmacological properties of Selaginella. Further, recent evidence gathered from our laboratory on the neuromodulatory propensity of S. delicatula employing in vivo models of chemically induced neurodegenerative diseases in rodents and Drosophila are discussed. Our findings point to a mechanism which modulates redox status and mitochondrial dysfunction suggesting their possible therapeutic use in oxidative stress-mediated neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease.

  18. Neuromodulatory loop mediated by nerve growth factor and interleukin 6 in thymic stromal cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Screpanti, I; Meco, D; Scarpa, S; Morrone, S; Frati, L; Gulino, A; Modesti, A

    1992-01-01

    Neural crest cell derivatives have been suggested to be involved in thymus development. We established nonlymphoid thymic stromal cell cultures capable of supporting T-cell differentiation. In these nonlymphoid cell cultures, we identified cells with phenotypic and biochemical markers specific for neuronal cells. Neurofilament mRNA and 68- and 160-kDa neurofilament proteins, as well as 74-kDa synapsin I isoform, were expressed in many of the cultured cells. For example, neurofilament immunoreactivity was detected in 20-30% of the cells. To see whether thymic neuronal-like cells were involved in a neural differentiation pathway, we investigated the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), two known neurotrophic factors. The expression of the above-described neural markers was enhanced by NGF and IL-6, which we report to be produced in an autocrine way by thymic stromal cell cultures. Finally, we found that IL-6 gene expression in these cell cultures was enhanced by NGF. Evidence is thus offered of a neuromodulatory loop within the thymic stromal cell population supported by local production of NGF and IL-6 and involving neural cell elements. Interestingly, IL-6, which is known to be implicated in thymocyte differentiation, also displays a neuromodulatory activity on thymic stromal cells, suggesting a multivalent role for this cytokine within the thymus. Images PMID:1373490

  19. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Infection Control and Prevention Guideline for Healthcare Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Yong; Song, Joon Young; Yoon, Young Kyung; Choi, Seong-Ho; Song, Young Goo; Kim, Sung-Ran; Son, Hee-Jung; Jeong, Sun-Young; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Kyung Mi; Yoon, Hee Jung; Choi, Jun Yong; Kim, Tae Hyong; Choi, Young Hwa; Kim, Hong Bin; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jacob; Eom, Joong Sik; Lee, Sang-Oh; Oh, Won Sup; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong; Kim, Woo Joo

    2015-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is an acute viral respiratory illness with high mortality caused by a new strain of betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Since the report of the first patient in Saudi Arabia in 2012, large-scale outbreaks through hospital-acquired infection and inter-hospital transmission have been reported. Most of the patients reported in South Korea were also infected in hospital settings. Therefore, to eliminate the spread of MERS-CoV, infection prevention and control measures should be implemented with rigor. The present guideline has been drafted on the basis of the experiences of infection control in the South Korean hospitals involved in the recent MERS outbreak and on domestic and international infection prevention and control guidelines. To ensure efficient MERS-CoV infection prevention and control, care should be taken to provide comprehensive infection control measures including contact control, hand hygiene, personal protective equipment, disinfection, and environmental cleaning. PMID:26788414

  20. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Infection Control and Prevention Guideline for Healthcare Facilities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Yong; Song, Joon Young; Yoon, Young Kyung; Choi, Seong-Ho; Song, Young Goo; Kim, Sung-Ran; Son, Hee-Jung; Jeong, Sun-Young; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Kyung Mi; Yoon, Hee Jung; Choi, Jun Yong; Kim, Tae Hyong; Choi, Young Hwa; Kim, Hong Bin; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jacob; Eom, Joong Sik; Lee, Sang-Oh; Oh, Won Sup; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong; Kim, Woo Joo; Cheong, Hee Jin

    2015-12-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is an acute viral respiratory illness with high mortality caused by a new strain of betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Since the report of the first patient in Saudi Arabia in 2012, large-scale outbreaks through hospital-acquired infection and inter-hospital transmission have been reported. Most of the patients reported in South Korea were also infected in hospital settings. Therefore, to eliminate the spread of MERS-CoV, infection prevention and control measures should be implemented with rigor. The present guideline has been drafted on the basis of the experiences of infection control in the South Korean hospitals involved in the recent MERS outbreak and on domestic and international infection prevention and control guidelines. To ensure efficient MERS-CoV infection prevention and control, care should be taken to provide comprehensive infection control measures including contact control, hand hygiene, personal protective equipment, disinfection, and environmental cleaning.

  1. Cluster randomised controlled trial to examine medical mask use as source control for people with respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Zhang, Yi; Chughtai, Abrar Ahmad; Seale, Holly; Zhang, Daitao; Chu, Yanhui; Zhang, Haiyan; Rahman, Bayzidur; Wang, Quanyi

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Medical masks are commonly used by sick individuals with influenza-like illness (ILI) to prevent spread of infections to others, but clinical efficacy data are absent. Objective Determine whether medical mask use by sick individuals with ILI protects well contacts from related respiratory infections. Setting 6 major hospitals in 2 districts of Beijing, China. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Participants 245 index cases with ILI. Intervention Index cases with ILI were randomly allocated to medical mask (n=123) and control arms (n=122). Since 43 index cases in the control arm also used a mask during the study period, an as-treated post hoc analysis was performed by comparing outcomes among household members of index cases who used a mask (mask group) with household members of index cases who did not use a mask (no-mask group). Main outcome measure Primary outcomes measured in household members were clinical respiratory illness, ILI and laboratory-confirmed viral respiratory infection. Results In an intention-to-treat analysis, rates of clinical respiratory illness (relative risk (RR) 0.61, 95% CI 0.18 to 2.13), ILI (RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.03 to 3.13) and laboratory-confirmed viral infections (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.06 to 15.54) were consistently lower in the mask arm compared with control, although not statistically significant. A post hoc comparison between the mask versus no-mask groups showed a protective effect against clinical respiratory illness, but not against ILI and laboratory-confirmed viral respiratory infections. Conclusions The study indicates a potential benefit of medical masks for source control, but is limited by small sample size and low secondary attack rates. Larger trials are needed to confirm efficacy of medical masks as source control. Trial registration number ACTRN12613000852752; Results. PMID:28039289

  2. Cluster randomised controlled trial to examine medical mask use as source control for people with respiratory illness.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Zhang, Yi; Chughtai, Abrar Ahmad; Seale, Holly; Zhang, Daitao; Chu, Yanhui; Zhang, Haiyan; Rahman, Bayzidur; Wang, Quanyi

    2016-12-30

    Medical masks are commonly used by sick individuals with influenza-like illness (ILI) to prevent spread of infections to others, but clinical efficacy data are absent. Determine whether medical mask use by sick individuals with ILI protects well contacts from related respiratory infections. 6 major hospitals in 2 districts of Beijing, China. Cluster randomised controlled trial. 245 index cases with ILI. Index cases with ILI were randomly allocated to medical mask (n=123) and control arms (n=122). Since 43 index cases in the control arm also used a mask during the study period, an as-treated post hoc analysis was performed by comparing outcomes among household members of index cases who used a mask (mask group) with household members of index cases who did not use a mask (no-mask group). Primary outcomes measured in household members were clinical respiratory illness, ILI and laboratory-confirmed viral respiratory infection. In an intention-to-treat analysis, rates of clinical respiratory illness (relative risk (RR) 0.61, 95% CI 0.18 to 2.13), ILI (RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.03 to 3.13) and laboratory-confirmed viral infections (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.06 to 15.54) were consistently lower in the mask arm compared with control, although not statistically significant. A post hoc comparison between the mask versus no-mask groups showed a protective effect against clinical respiratory illness, but not against ILI and laboratory-confirmed viral respiratory infections. The study indicates a potential benefit of medical masks for source control, but is limited by small sample size and low secondary attack rates. Larger trials are needed to confirm efficacy of medical masks as source control. ACTRN12613000852752; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Respiratory Tract Infections and its Preventive Measures among Hajj Pilgrims, 2010: A Nested Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Hassani, Ali Mohammad; Fateh, Mansooreh

    2013-09-01

    Respiratory tract infections are very common among the Hajj pilgrims. Some preventive measures including Influenza vaccination, using face mask and salt water gargling have been considered to control these infections and the reports show conflicting results about the effects of each one of these measures. This study is trying to assess the effects of these recommendations on respiratory tract infections. According to nested case-control design, in a cohort consisting of 338 Iranian pilgrims, the outcome examined, was all types of respiratory tract infections other than common colds. With occurrence of any patient in convoy, data collection form was completed for that person. On the same day, two people were randomly selected as control group from among pilgrims who have not affected so far. During Hajj, 32 pilgrims (9.5%) were affected by respiratory tract infections other than common colds. In univariable logistic regression analysis, salt water gargling (OR = 2.4, P = 0.08), existence of other patient in the room (OR = 2.14, P = 0.19), age over 60 years (OR = 1.84, P = 0.15) and the education more than or equal to 3 years (OR = 1.93, P = 0.16) were effective in the respiratory tract infections (P < 0.2). However, multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that none of the above mentioned factors are significantly associated with these infections. This study showed that measures such as seasonal influenza vaccination, use of face masks and personal prayer carpet have no effect on the incidence of respiratory tract infections. However, washing throat and mouth with salt water can be considered the most effective preventive measures.

  4. Respiratory Tract Infections and its Preventive Measures among Hajj Pilgrims, 2010: A Nested Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Hassani, Ali Mohammad; Fateh, Mansooreh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Respiratory tract infections are very common among the Hajj pilgrims. Some preventive measures including Influenza vaccination, using face mask and salt water gargling have been considered to control these infections and the reports show conflicting results about the effects of each one of these measures. This study is trying to assess the effects of these recommendations on respiratory tract infections. Methods: According to nested case-control design, in a cohort consisting of 338 Iranian pilgrims, the outcome examined, was all types of respiratory tract infections other than common colds. With occurrence of any patient in convoy, data collection form was completed for that person. On the same day, two people were randomly selected as control group from among pilgrims who have not affected so far. Results: During Hajj, 32 pilgrims (9.5%) were affected by respiratory tract infections other than common colds. In univariable logistic regression analysis, salt water gargling (OR = 2.4, P = 0.08), existence of other patient in the room (OR = 2.14, P = 0.19), age over 60 years (OR = 1.84, P = 0.15) and the education more than or equal to 3 years (OR = 1.93, P = 0.16) were effective in the respiratory tract infections (P < 0.2). However, multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that none of the above mentioned factors are significantly associated with these infections. Conclusions: This study showed that measures such as seasonal influenza vaccination, use of face masks and personal prayer carpet have no effect on the incidence of respiratory tract infections. However, washing throat and mouth with salt water can be considered the most effective preventive measures. PMID:24130944

  5. Neurotransmitters and neuromodulators controlling the hypoxic respiratory response in anaesthetized cats

    PubMed Central

    Richter, D W; Schmidt-Garcon, P; Pierrefiche, O; Bischoff, A M; Lalley, P M

    1999-01-01

    The contributions of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators to the responses of the respiratory network to acute hypoxia were analysed in anaesthetized cats.Samples of extracellular fluid were collected at 1–1.5 min time intervals by microdialysis in the medullary region of ventral respiratory group neurones and analysed for their content of glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin and adenosine by high performance liquid chromatography. Phrenic nerve activity was correlated with these measurements.Levels of glutamate and GABA increased transiently during early periods of hypoxia, coinciding with augmented phrenic nerve activity and then fell below control during central apnoea. Serotonin and adenosine increased slowly and steadily with onset of hypoxic depression of phrenic nerve activity.The possibility that serotonin contributes to hypoxic respiratory depression was tested by microinjecting the 5-HT-1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT into the medullary region that is important for rhythmogenesis. Hypoxic activation of respiratory neurones and phrenic nerve activity were suppressed. Microinjections of NAN-190, a 5-HT-1A receptor blocker, enhanced hypoxic augmentation resulting in apneustic prolongation of inspiratory bursts.The results reveal a temporal sequence in the release of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and suggest a specific role for each of them in the sequential development of hypoxic respiratory disturbances. PMID:9852336

  6. Wurst is essential for airway clearance and respiratory-tube size control.

    PubMed

    Behr, Matthias; Wingen, Christian; Wolf, Christian; Schuh, Reinhard; Hoch, Michael

    2007-07-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster tracheal system and the mammalian lung are branching networks of tubular epithelia that convert during late embryogenesis from liquid- to air-filling. Little is known about how respiratory-tube size and physiology are coordinated. Here, we show that the Drosophila wurst gene encodes a unique J-domain transmembrane protein highly conserved in metazoa. In wurst mutants, respiratory-tube length is increased and lumen clearance is abolished, preventing gas filling of the airways. Wurst is essential for clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which is required for size determination and lumen clearance of the airways. wurst recruits heat shock cognate protein 70-4 and clathrin to the apical membrane of epithelial cells. The sequence conservation of the single Wurst orthologues in mice and humans offer new opportunities for genetic studies of clinically relevant lung syndromes caused by the failure of liquid clearance and respiratory-tube size control.

  7. Localizing Effects of Leptin on Upper Airway and Respiratory Control during Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qiaoling; Pho, Huy; Kirkness, Jason; Ladenheim, Ellen E.; Bi, Sheng; Moran, Timothy H.; Fuller, David D.; Schwartz, Alan R.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obesity hypoventilation and obstructive sleep apnea are common complications of obesity linked to defects in respiratory pump and upper airway neural control. Leptin-deficient ob/ob mice have impaired ventilatory control and inspiratory flow limitation during sleep, which are both reversed with leptin. We aimed to localize central nervous system (CNS) site(s) of leptin action on respiratory and upper airway neuroventilatory control. Methods: We localized the effect of leptin to medulla versus hypothalamus by administering intracerbroventricular leptin (10 μg/2 μL) versus vehicle to the lateral (n = 14) versus fourth ventricle (n = 11) of ob/ob mice followed by polysomnographic recording. Analyses were stratified for effects on respiratory (nonflow-limited breaths) and upper airway (inspiratory flow limitation) functions. CNS loci were identified by (1) leptin-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation and (2) projections of respiratory and upper airway motoneurons with a retrograde transsynaptic tracer (pseudorabies virus). Results: Both routes of leptin administration increased minute ventilation during nonflow-limited breathing in sleep. Phrenic motoneurons were synaptically coupled to the nucleus of the solitary tract, which also showed STAT3 phosphorylation, but not to the hypothalamus. Inspiratory flow limitation and obstructive hypopneas were attenuated by leptin administration to the lateral but not to the fourth cerebral ventricle. Upper airway motoneurons were synaptically coupled with the dorsomedial hypothalamus, which exhibited STAT3 phosphorylation. Conclusions: Leptin relieves upper airway obstruction in sleep apnea by activating the forebrain, possibly in the dorsomedial hypothalamus. In contrast, leptin upregulates ventilatory control through hindbrain sites of action, possibly in the nucleus of the solitary tract. Citation: Yao Q, Pho H, Kirkness J, Ladenheim EE, Bi S, Moran TH, Fuller DD

  8. Soy consumption and risk of COPD and respiratory symptoms: a case-control study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Fumi; Lee, Andy H; Binns, Colin W; Zhao, Yun; Hiramatsu, Tetsuo; Tanikawa, Yoshimasa; Nishimura, Koichi; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Background To investigate the relationship between soy consumption, COPD risk and the prevalence of respiratory symptoms, a case-control study was conducted in Japan. Methods A total of 278 eligible patients (244 men and 34 women), aged 50–75 years with COPD diagnosed within the past four years, were referred by respiratory physicians, while 340 controls (272 men and 68 women) were recruited from the community. All participants underwent spirometric measurements of respiratory function. Information on demographics, lifestyle characteristics and habitual food consumption was obtained using a structured questionnaire. Results Total soy consumption was positively correlated with observed lung function measures. The mean soy intake was significantly higher among controls (59.98, SD 50.23 g/day) than cases (44.84, SD 28.5 g/day). A significant reduction in COPD risk was evident for highest versus lowest quartile of daily intake of total soybean products, with adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.392, 95% CI 0.194–0.793, p for trend 0.001. Similar decreases in COPD risk were associated with frequent and higher intake of soy foods such as tofu and bean sprouts, whereas respiratory symptoms were inversely associated with high consumption of soy foods, especially for breathlessness (OR 0.989, 95% CI 0.982–0.996). Conclusion Increasing soy consumption was associated with a decreased risk of COPD and breathlessness. PMID:19558645

  9. Control of Respiratory Motion by Hypnosis Intervention during Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer I

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jie; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    The uncertain position of lung tumor during radiotherapy compromises the treatment effect. To effectively control respiratory motion during radiotherapy of lung cancer without any side effects, a novel control scheme, hypnosis, has been introduced in lung cancer treatment. In order to verify the suggested method, six volunteers were selected with a wide range of distribution of age, weight, and chest circumference. A set of experiments have been conducted for each volunteer, under the guidance of the professional hypnotist. All the experiments were repeated in the same environmental condition. The amplitude of respiration has been recorded under the normal state and hypnosis, respectively. Experimental results show that the respiration motion of volunteers in hypnosis has smaller and more stable amplitudes than in normal state. That implies that the hypnosis intervention can be an alternative way for respiratory control, which can effectively reduce the respiratory amplitude and increase the stability of respiratory cycle. The proposed method will find useful application in image-guided radiotherapy. PMID:24093100

  10. Perinatal respiratory control and its modulation by adenosine and caffeine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Herlenius, Eric; Adén, Ulrika; Tang, Lie Qi; Lagercrantz, Hugo

    2002-01-01

    The perinatal development of respiratory rhythm generation and its modulation by adenosinergic drugs have been examined in rats from embryonic d 18 (E18) to postnatal d 3 using an in vitro brain stem-spinal cord preparation. Generation of rhythmic respiratory activity in the medulla oblongata and inhibition of this activity by pontine structures were evident on E18. The adenosine A(1)-receptor agonist, N(6)-(2-phenylisopropyl) adenosine, R (-) isomer (R-PIA) (1 microM), induced an age-dependent reduction of respiratory frequency that could be reversed by the adenosine antagonist theophylline (55 microM). The effect of R-PIA was reduced 24 h after birth compared with E21 and 2 h postnatal age. In preparations from pups that had been exposed to a low dose of caffeine (0.3 g/L in drinking water to dams), pontine inhibition of respiratory rhythm generation in the medulla was more pronounced. When the pons was removed, the respiratory frequency was higher than in the control group. Adenosine A(1)-mRNA and A(1)-receptor development in pons and medulla were studied, and by E18, mRNA, receptor protein, and functional coupling to G-proteins were confirmed using guanylyl-5'-O-(gamma-[(35)S]thio)-triphosphate binding. There were no major changes in receptor numbers or distribution of A(1) receptors or mRNA in rat pups subjected to caffeine exposure. We conclude that respiration is already modulated by adenosine A(1) receptors at the level of the medulla oblongata in the fetal period in an age-dependent manner. Furthermore, long-term maternal caffeine intake during gestation seems to increase the pontine inhibition of, and the activity of, respiratory rhythm-generating neuronal networks in medulla oblongata without detectable changes in expression of A(1)-receptor number or A(1)-receptor mRNA.

  11. Controlling the healthy worker survivor effect: an example of arsenic exposure and respiratory cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Arrighi, H M; Hertz-Picciotto, I

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--This investigation sought to examine whether methods proposed to control the healthy worker survivor effect would influence the shape or magnitude of the dose-response curve for respiratory cancer induced by arsenic. METHODS--Results from an unadjusted analysis are compared with results obtained by applying four different methods for control of the healthy worker survivor effect to data on arsenic exposure and respiratory cancer. The four methods are: exposure lag, adjustment for work status, cohort restriction, and the G null test. RESULTS--Cohort restriction gave erratic results depending upon the minimum years of follow up used. Exposure lag substantially increased the rate ratios and a non-linear shape (decreasing slope) compared with an unlagged analysis. Adjusting for work status (currently employed upsilon retired or otherwise not employed) yielded slightly higher rate ratios than an unadjusted analysis, with an overall shape similar to the baseline analysis. Results from the G null test procedure of Robins (1986), although not directly comparable with the baseline analysis, did show an adverse effect of exposure that seemed to reach a maximum when exposure was lagged between 10 and 20 years. CONCLUSIONS--All results confirm an adverse effect of arsenic exposure on respiratory cancer. In these data, it seems that the healthy worker survivor effect was not strong enough to mask the strong effect of arsenic exposure on respiratory cancer. Nevertheless, several methods show a stronger association between arsenic exposure and respiratory cancer after adjustment for the healthy worker survivor effect, suggesting that for weaker causal associations, studies not controlling for this source of bias will have low power to detect results. Although the G methods are theoretically the most unbiased, further work elucidating the validity of the assumptions underlying lagging, adjustment for work status, and the G methods are needed before clear recommendations

  12. Neuromodulatory action of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens: an in vivo intracellular study.

    PubMed

    Yim, C Y; Mogenson, G J

    1988-08-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from neurons in the nucleus accumbens in situ to determine how dopamine produces the selective neuromodulatory action in the accumbens observed in previous studies. Electrical stimulation of the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala was found to produce monosynaptically evoked depolarizing and hyperpolarizing postsynaptic potential sequences in a large proportion of the accumbens neurons sampled. Dopamine applied iontophoretically or released endogenously by stimulation of the ventral tegmental area produced consistent membrane depolarization and an increase in membrane conductance but not an increase in spontaneous activity of the accumbens neurons. Stimulation of the ventral tegmental area with trains of 10 pulses at 10 Hz prior to stimulation of the amygdala produced 8-58% reduction in the amplitude of the depolarizing postsynaptic potential but no change in the late hyperpolarizing postsynaptic potential. Although attenuation of the depolarizing postsynaptic potential amplitude from ventral tegmental area stimulation was often accompanied by membrane depolarization, it appeared that the two responses were not causally related. The effect of ventral tegmental area stimulation on the evoked depolarizing postsynaptic potential and the membrane potential were blocked by haloperidol indicating the involvement of dopamine. Iontophoretically applied dopamine produced responses similar to ventral tegmental area stimulation with two exceptions: (i) iontophoretically applied dopamine produced consistently stronger maximal attenuation of the depolarizing postsynaptic potential than did ventral tegmental area stimulation; and (ii) iontophoretically applied dopamine always attenuated both the depolarizing postsynaptic potential and hyperpolarizing postsynaptic potential whereas ventral tegmental area stimulation produced selective attenuation of the depolarizing postsynaptic potential only. These electrophysiological results are

  13. Respiratory mechanics in infants with severe bronchiolitis on controlled mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Cruces, Pablo; González-Dambrauskas, Sebastián; Quilodrán, Julio; Valenzuela, Jorge; Martínez, Javier; Rivero, Natalia; Arias, Pablo; Díaz, Franco

    2017-10-06

    Analysis of respiratory mechanics during mechanical ventilation (MV) is able to estimate resistive, elastic and inertial components of the working pressure of the respiratory system. Our aim was to discriminate the components of the working pressure of the respiratory system in infants on MV with severe bronchiolitis admitted to two PICU's. Infants younger than 1 year old with acute respiratory failure caused by severe bronchiolitis underwent neuromuscular blockade, tracheal intubation and volume controlled MV. Shortly after intubation studies of pulmonary mechanics were performed using inspiratory and expiratory breath hold. The maximum inspiratory and expiratory flow (QI and QE) as well as peak inspiratory (PIP), plateau (PPL) and total expiratory pressures (tPEEP) were measured. Inspiratory and expiratory resistances (RawI and RawE) and Time Constants (KTI and KTE) were calculated. We included 16 patients, of median age 2.5 (1-5.8) months. Bronchiolitis due to respiratory syncytial virus was the main etiology (93.8%) and 31.3% had comorbidities. Measured respiratory pressures were PIP 29 (26-31), PPL 24 (20-26), tPEEP 9 [8-11] cmH2O. Elastic component of the working pressure was significantly higher than resistive and both higher than threshold (tPEEP - PEEP) (P < 0.01). QI was significantly lower than QE [5 (4.27-6.75) v/s 16.5 (12-23.8) L/min. RawI and RawE were 38.8 (32-53) and 40.5 (22-55) cmH2O/L/s; KTI and KTE [0.18 (0.12-0.30) v/s 0.18 (0.13-0.22) s], and KTI:KTE ratio was 1:1.04 (1:0.59-1.42). Analysis of respiratory mechanics of infants with severe bronchiolitis receiving MV shows that the elastic component of the working pressure of the respiratory system is the most important. The elastic and resistive components in conjunction with flow profile are characteristic of restrictive diseases. A better understanding of lung mechanics in this group of patients may lead to change the traditional ventilatory approach to severe bronchiolitis.

  14. Bacteraemic urinary tract infections may mimic respiratory infections: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Denis, E; Martis, N; Guillouet-de Salvador, F; Demonchy, E; Degand, N; Carles, K; Roger, P-M

    2016-10-01

    Daily practice suggests that respiratory signs may be observed in bacteraemic urinary infections (BUI). Our objective was to search for an association between the presence of respiratory symptoms and the bacteraemic nature of urinary tract infections (UTI). A nested case-control study was carried out based on our computerised dashboard from January 2011 to June 2015. Cases were defined as patients with a BUI due to Enterobacteriaceae species, identified in blood and urine cultures. Controls had fever and a positive urinary sample but sterile blood cultures (NBUI) and a final diagnosis of urinary infection. Patients from the BUI group were 1:1 matched to the NBUI group according to four parameters: age, gender, cardiovascular and pulmonary comorbid conditions. Subjects with cognitive impairment limiting clinical accuracy and those with healthcare-associated infections were excluded. We compared systematically recorded respiratory and urinary symptoms between groups: signs on auscultation, dyspnoea, chest pain, cough and sputum, dysuria with burning, pollakiuria, flank or costovertebral angle tenderness and ischuria. One hundred BUI were compared to 100 NBUI, both groups exhibiting a similar rate for all considered comorbid conditions. In the BUI group, 58 % showed at least one respiratory sign vs. 20 % in the NBUI group, p < 0.001, while urinary signs were less frequent: 54 % vs. 71 %, p = 0.013. In the multivariate analysis, BUI was associated with the presence of abnormal pulmonary auscultation [adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 5.91; p < 0.001] and a trend towards less urinary symptoms (AOR, 1.58; p = 0.058). Patients with BUI presented with significantly more respiratory signs, which overshadowed urinary symptoms, compared to those with non-bacteraemic UTI. Such observations impact clinical decision-making.

  15. The respiratory control mechanisms in the brainstem and spinal cord: integrative views of the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Keiko; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Onimaru, Hiroshi; Okada, Yasumasa; Yokota, Shigefumi; Koshiya, Naohiro; Oku, Yoshitaka; Iizuka, Makito; Koizumi, Hidehiko

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory activities are produced by medullary respiratory rhythm generators and are modulated from various sites in the lower brainstem, and which are then output as motor activities through premotor efferent networks in the brainstem and spinal cord. Over the past few decades, new knowledge has been accumulated on the anatomical and physiological mechanisms underlying the generation and regulation of respiratory rhythm. In this review, we focus on the recent findings and attempt to elucidate the anatomical and functional mechanisms underlying respiratory control in the lower brainstem and spinal cord.

  16. A control system for automatic electrical stimulation of abdominal muscles to assist respiratory function in tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Gollee, H; Hunt, K J; Allan, D B; Fraser, M H; McLean, A N

    2007-09-01

    People with tetraplegia have poor respiratory function leading to limited tidal volume (V(T)) and reduced cough peak flow (CPF). These problems may cause respiratory failure during the initial admission or subsequent intercurrent illness. Electrical stimulation of the abdominal muscles during expiration can improve respiratory function by increasing V(T) and CPF. We developed a novel control system to automatically trigger muscle stimulation, synchronised with the subject's voluntary respiratory activity. The system was tested in four subjects with a functionally complete lesion at level C4 to C6, aged between 16 and 46 years, 3 months to 5 years post injury, who were breathing spontaneously. The algorithm delivered automatic stimulation patterns, detecting cough and quiet breathing while suppressing stimulation during other activities such as speaking. Marked increases in V(T) (between 9% and 71% of baseline) and CPF (between 31% and 54% of baseline) were observed, suggesting that the technique may have potential use in both acute and established tetraplegia to increase minute ventilation and to improve cough clearance of secretions.

  17. Face mask use and control of respiratory virus transmission in households.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, C Raina; Cauchemez, Simon; Dwyer, Dominic E; Seale, Holly; Cheung, Pamela; Browne, Gary; Fasher, Michael; Wood, James; Gao, Zhanhai; Booy, Robert; Ferguson, Neil

    2009-02-01

    Many countries are stockpiling face masks for use as a nonpharmaceutical intervention to control virus transmission during an influenza pandemic. We conducted a prospective cluster-randomized trial comparing surgical masks, non-fit-tested P2 masks, and no masks in prevention of influenza-like illness (ILI) in households. Mask use adherence was self-reported. During the 2006 and 2007 winter seasons, 286 exposed adults from 143 households who had been exposed to a child with clinical respiratory illness were recruited. We found that adherence to mask use significantly reduced the risk for ILI-associated infection, but <50% of participants wore masks most of the time. We concluded that household use of face masks is associated with low adherence and is ineffective for controlling seasonal respiratory disease. However, during a severe pandemic when use of face masks might be greater, pandemic transmission in households could be reduced.

  18. Ripening and in Vitro Retention of Respiratory Control by Avocado and Pear Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Özelkök, Sözer I.; Romani, Roger J.

    1975-01-01

    The retention of respiratory control (“survival”) by mitochondria held at 25 C was studied in relation to the ripening of two varieties of avocado (Persea americana Mill. var. `Fuerte' and `Hass') and one variety of pear (Pyrus communis. L. var. `Bartlett') fruit. The survival of avocado mitochondria increased from 8 to 10 hours when isolated from unripe, preclimacteric fruit, to 48 hours when isolated from fully ripe, postclimacteric fruits. Although rates of α-ketoglutarate oxidation, respiratory control, and ADP/O decreased somewhat in the postclimacteric phase, survival per se was not affected. Pear mitochondria survived for more than 30 hours regardless of the physiological age of the source. Exposure of postclimacteric avocado mitochondria to a preclimacteric supernatant fraction curtailed their survival. The harmful effect of some unknown substance(s) in the preclimacteric avocado supernatant fraction was confirmed by utilizing pear mitochondria as an independent test system. PMID:16659279

  19. Respiratory source control using a surgical mask: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajeev B; Skaria, Shaji D; Mansour, Mohamed M; Smaldone, Gerald C

    2016-07-01

    Cough etiquette and respiratory hygiene are forms of source control encouraged to prevent the spread of respiratory infection. The use of surgical masks as a means of source control has not been quantified in terms of reducing exposure to others. We designed an in vitro model using various facepieces to assess their contribution to exposure reduction when worn at the infectious source (Source) relative to facepieces worn for primary (Receiver) protection, and the factors that contribute to each. In a chamber with various airflows, radiolabeled aerosols were exhaled via a ventilated soft-face manikin head using tidal breathing and cough (Source). Another manikin, containing a filter, quantified recipient exposure (Receiver). The natural fit surgical mask, fitted (SecureFit) surgical mask and an N95-class filtering facepiece respirator (commonly known as an "N95 respirator") with and without a Vaseline-seal were tested. With cough, source control (mask or respirator on Source) was statistically superior to mask or unsealed respirator protection on the Receiver (Receiver protection) in all environments. To equal source control during coughing, the N95 respirator must be Vaseline-sealed. During tidal breathing, source control was comparable or superior to mask or respirator protection on the Receiver. Source control via surgical masks may be an important adjunct defense against the spread of respiratory infections. The fit of the mask or respirator, in combination with the airflow patterns in a given setting, are significant contributors to source control efficacy. Future clinical trials should include a surgical mask source control arm to assess the contribution of source control in overall protection against airborne infection.

  20. Respiratory source control using a surgical mask: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajeev B.; Skaria, Shaji D.; Mansour, Mohamed M.; Smaldone, Gerald C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cough etiquette and respiratory hygiene are forms of source control encouraged to prevent the spread of respiratory infection. The use of surgical masks as a means of source control has not been quantified in terms of reducing exposure to others. We designed an in vitro model using various facepieces to assess their contribution to exposure reduction when worn at the infectious source (Source) relative to facepieces worn for primary (Receiver) protection, and the factors that contribute to each. In a chamber with various airflows, radiolabeled aerosols were exhaled via a ventilated soft-face manikin head using tidal breathing and cough (Source). Another manikin, containing a filter, quantified recipient exposure (Receiver). The natural fit surgical mask, fitted (SecureFit) surgical mask and an N95-class filtering facepiece respirator (commonly known as an “N95 respirator”) with and without a Vaseline-seal were tested. With cough, source control (mask or respirator on Source) was statistically superior to mask or unsealed respirator protection on the Receiver (Receiver protection) in all environments. To equal source control during coughing, the N95 respirator must be Vaseline-sealed. During tidal breathing, source control was comparable or superior to mask or respirator protection on the Receiver. Source control via surgical masks may be an important adjunct defense against the spread of respiratory infections. The fit of the mask or respirator, in combination with the airflow patterns in a given setting, are significant contributors to source control efficacy. Future clinical trials should include a surgical mask source control arm to assess the contribution of source control in overall protection against airborne infection. PMID:26225807

  1. Localizing Effects of Leptin on Upper Airway and Respiratory Control during Sleep.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiaoling; Pho, Huy; Kirkness, Jason; Ladenheim, Ellen E; Bi, Sheng; Moran, Timothy H; Fuller, David D; Schwartz, Alan R; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2016-05-01

    Obesity hypoventilation and obstructive sleep apnea are common complications of obesity linked to defects in respiratory pump and upper airway neural control. Leptin-deficient ob/ob mice have impaired ventilatory control and inspiratory flow limitation during sleep, which are both reversed with leptin. We aimed to localize central nervous system (CNS) site(s) of leptin action on respiratory and upper airway neuroventilatory control. We localized the effect of leptin to medulla versus hypothalamus by administering intracerbroventricular leptin (10 μg/2 μL) versus vehicle to the lateral (n = 14) versus fourth ventricle (n = 11) of ob/ob mice followed by polysomnographic recording. Analyses were stratified for effects on respiratory (nonflow-limited breaths) and upper airway (inspiratory flow limitation) functions. CNS loci were identified by (1) leptin-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation and (2) projections of respiratory and upper airway motoneurons with a retrograde transsynaptic tracer (pseudorabies virus). Both routes of leptin administration increased minute ventilation during nonflow-limited breathing in sleep. Phrenic motoneurons were synaptically coupled to the nucleus of the solitary tract, which also showed STAT3 phosphorylation, but not to the hypothalamus. Inspiratory flow limitation and obstructive hypopneas were attenuated by leptin administration to the lateral but not to the fourth cerebral ventricle. Upper airway motoneurons were synaptically coupled with the dorsomedial hypothalamus, which exhibited STAT3 phosphorylation. Leptin relieves upper airway obstruction in sleep apnea by activating the forebrain, possibly in the dorsomedial hypothalamus. In contrast, leptin upregulates ventilatory control through hindbrain sites of action, possibly in the nucleus of the solitary tract. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  2. Respiratory control determines respiration and nitrogenase activity of Rhizobium leguminosarum bacteroids.

    PubMed

    Haaker, H; Szafran, M; Wassink, H; Klerk, H; Appels, M

    1996-08-01

    The relationship between the O2 input rate into a suspension of Rhizobium leguminosarum bacteroids, the cellular ATP and ADP pools, and the whole-cell nitrogenase activity during L-malate oxidation has been studied. It was observed that inhibition of nitrogenase by excess O2 coincided with an increase of the cellular ATP/ADP ratio. When under this condition the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was added, the cellular ATP/ADP ratio was lowered while nitrogenase regained activity. To explain these observations, the effects of nitrogenase activity and CCCP on the O2 consumption rate of R. leguminosarum bacteroids were determined. From 100 to 5 microM O2, a decline in the O2 consumption rate was observed to 50 to 70% of the maximal O2 consumption rate. A determination of the redox state of the cytochromes during an O2 consumption experiment indicated that at O2 concentrations above 5 microM, electron transport to the cytochromes was rate-limiting oxidation and not the reaction of reduced cytochromes with oxygen. The kinetic properties of the respiratory chain were determined from the deoxygenation of oxyglobins. In intact cells the maximal deoxygenation activity was stimulated by nitrogenase activity or CCCP. In isolated cytoplasmic membranes NADH oxidation was inhibited by respiratory control. The dehydrogenase activities of the respiratory chain were rate-limiting oxidation at O2 concentrations (if >300 nM. Below 300 nM the terminal oxidase system followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km of 45 +/- 8 nM). We conclude that (i) respiration in R. leguminosarum bacteroids takes place via a respiratory chain terminating at a high-affinity oxidase system, (ii) the activity of the respiratory chain is inhibited by the proton motive force, and (iii) ATP hydrolysis by nitrogenase can partly relieve the inhibition of respiration by the proton motive force and thus stimulate respiration at nanomolar concentrations of O2.

  3. Respiratory training as strategy to prevent cognitive decline in aging: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Leandro; Tanaka, Kátia; Santos-Galduróz, Ruth Ferreira; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate oxygenation may cause lesions and brain atrophy during aging. Studies show a positive association between pulmonary function and the cognitive performance of individuals from middle age on. Objective To investigate the effect of aerobic physical exercises and respiratory training on the blood oxygenation, pulmonary functions, and cognition of the elderly. Design This was a randomized and controlled trial with three parallel groups. A total of 195 community-dwelling elderly were assessed for eligibility; only n=102 were included and allocated into the three groups, but after 6 months, n=68 were analyzed in the final sample. Participants were randomized into a social interaction group (the control group), an aerobic exercise group (the “walking” group), or a respiratory training group (the “breathing” group). The main outcome measures were the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Wechsler Memory Scale, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, respiratory muscular strength, cirtometry (thoracic–abdominal circumference); oxygen saturation in arterial blood (SpO2), and hemogram. Results No differences were observed for any of the blood parameters. Aerobic exercise and respiratory training were effective in improving the pulmonary parameters. Better cognitive performance was observed for the breathing group as regards abstraction and mental flexibility. The walking group remained stable in the cognitive performance of most of the tests, except attention. The control group presented worst performance in mental manipulation of information, abstraction, mental flexibility, and attention. Conclusion Our results showed that both the walking and breathing groups presented improvement of pulmonary function. However, only the breathing group showed improved cognitive function (abstraction, mental flexibility). The improvement in cognitive functions cannot be explained by blood parameters, such as SpO2, erythrocytes, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. PMID:25848235

  4. Effect of singing on respiratory function, voice, and mood after quadriplegia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tamplin, Jeanette; Baker, Felicity A; Grocke, Denise; Brazzale, Danny J; Pretto, Jeffrey J; Ruehland, Warren R; Buttifant, Mary; Brown, Douglas J; Berlowitz, David J

    2013-03-01

    To explore the effects of singing training on respiratory function, voice, mood, and quality of life for people with quadriplegia. Randomized controlled trial. Large, university-affiliated public hospital, Victoria, Australia. Participants (N=24) with chronic quadriplegia (C4-8, American Spinal Injury Association grades A and B). The experimental group (n=13) received group singing training 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. The control group (n=11) received group music appreciation and relaxation for 12 weeks. Assessments were conducted pre, mid-, immediately post-, and 6-months postintervention. Standard respiratory function testing, surface electromyographic activity from accessory respiratory muscles, sound pressure levels during vocal tasks, assessments of voice quality (Perceptual Voice Profile, Multidimensional Voice Profile), and Voice Handicap Index, Profile of Mood States, and Assessment of Quality of Life instruments. The singing group increased projected speech intensity (P=.028) and maximum phonation length (P=.007) significantly more than the control group. Trends for improvements in respiratory function, muscle strength, and recruitment were also evident for the singing group. These effects were limited by small sample sizes with large intersubject variability. Both groups demonstrated an improvement in mood (P=.002), which was maintained in the music appreciation and relaxation group after 6 months (P=.017). Group music therapy can have a positive effect on not only physical outcomes, but also can improve mood, energy, social participation, and quality of life for an at-risk population, such as those with quadriplegia. Specific singing therapy can augment these general improvements by improving vocal intensity. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Erythropoietin and respiratory control at adulthood and during early postnatal life.

    PubMed

    Soliz, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) was originally discovered as a cytokine able to increase the production of red blood cells upon conditions of reduced oxygen availability. Now we know that Epo does far more than "only" augmenting the number of erythrocytes. Since the demonstration that Epo (and its receptor) is expressed in the mammalian brain, several elegant experiments were performed to reveal the function of this molecule in the neuronal tissue. Accordingly to its anti-apoptotic, neurotrophic and proliferative effects in the bone marrow, it was suitably suggested that upon pathological conditions Epo exerts neuroprotective functions (i.e. reducing the infarct volume of stroke, thus allowing better and faster recovery). We considered however, that Epo in brain might also exert a physiological function. Indeed, we found that Epo is an important modulator of the respiratory control system. By using adult mice we showed that Epo increases the hypoxic ventilatory response by interacting with both the central respiratory network (brainstem) as well as the main peripheral sensory organs detecting systemic hypoxia, the carotid bodies. More recently, our research turned to examine the exciting hypothesis that Epo is also implicated in the regulation of the neuronal control of ventilation during the postnatal development. The objective of this review is to summarize the role and mode of action of Epo on respiratory control in adult mammals and highlight the potential pathways by which this cytokine achieve this function. Additionally, we review recent evidences showing that Epo play a crucial role in setting the respiratory motor output (measured on the isolated brainstem spinal cord preparation, en bloc technique) during the early postnatal life.

  6. The Wurst protein: a novel endocytosis regulator involved in airway clearance and respiratory tube size control.

    PubMed

    Wingen, Christian; Aschenbrenner, Anna C; Stümpges, Birgit; Hoch, Michael; Behr, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian lung and the Drosophila airways are composed of an intricate network of epithelial tubes that transports fluids or gases and converts during late embryogenesis from liquid- to air-filling. Conserved growth factor pathways have been characterized in model organisms such as Drosophila or the mouse that control patterning and branching of tubular networks. In contrast, knowledge of the coordination of respiratory tube size and physiology is still limited. Latest studies have shown that endocytosis plays a major role in size determination and liquid clearance of the respiratory tubes and a new key regulator of these processes was identified, the Drosophila Wurst protein. wurst encodes a J-domain transmembrane protein which is essential for Clathrin-mediated endocytosis. It is evolutionary conserved and single Wurst orthologs are found in mammals (termed DNAJC22). In this commentary, we discuss the role of Wurst/DNAJC22 and address whether these proteins may be general regulators of Clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  7. Control of electron transport routes through redox-regulated redistribution of respiratory complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu-Ning; Bryan, Samantha J.; Huang, Fang; Yu, Jianfeng; Nixon, Peter J.; Rich, Peter R.; Mullineaux, Conrad W.

    2012-01-01

    In cyanobacteria, respiratory electron transport takes place in close proximity to photosynthetic electron transport, because the complexes required for both processes are located within the thylakoid membranes. The balance of electron transport routes is crucial for cell physiology, yet the factors that control the predominance of particular pathways are poorly understood. Here we use a combination of tagging with green fluorescent protein and confocal fluorescence microscopy in live cells of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 to investigate the distribution on submicron scales of two key respiratory electron donors, type-I NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH-1) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). When cells are grown under low light, both complexes are concentrated in discrete patches in the thylakoid membranes, about 100–300 nm in diameter and containing tens to hundreds of complexes. Exposure to moderate light leads to redistribution of both NDH-1 and SDH such that they become evenly distributed within the thylakoid membranes. The effects of electron transport inhibitors indicate that redistribution of respiratory complexes is triggered by changes in the redox state of an electron carrier close to plastoquinone. Redistribution does not depend on de novo protein synthesis, and it is accompanied by a major increase in the probability that respiratory electrons are transferred to photosystem I rather than to a terminal oxidase. These results indicate that the distribution of complexes on the scale of 100–300 nm controls the partitioning of reducing power and that redistribution of electron transport complexes on these scales is a physiological mechanism to regulate the pathways of electron flow. PMID:22733774

  8. Respiratory muscle function and control of breathing in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Iandelli, I; Gorini, M; Duranti, R; Bassi, F; Misuri, G; Pacini, F; Rosi, E; Scano, G

    1997-05-01

    Increase in lung size has been described in acromegalic patients, but data on respiratory muscle function and control of breathing are relatively scarce. Lung volumes, arterial blood gas tensions, and respiratory muscle strength and activation during chemical stimulation were investigated in a group of 10 patients with acromegaly, and compared with age- and sex-matched normal controls. Inspiratory muscle force was evaluated by measuring pleural (Ppl,sn) and transdiaphragmatic (Pdi,sn) pressures during maximal sniffs. Dynamic pleural pressure swing (Ppl,sw) was expressed both as absolute value and as percentage of Ppl,sn. Expiratory muscle force was assessed in terms of maximal expiratory pressure (MEP). In 8 of the 10 patients, ventilatory and respiratory muscle responses to hyperoxic progressive hypercapnia and to isocapnic progressive hypoxia were also evaluated. Large lungs, defined as total lung capacity (TLC) greater than predicted (above 95% confidence limits), were found in five patients. Inspiratory or expiratory muscle force was below normal limits in all but three patients. During unstimulated tidal breathing, respiratory frequency (fR) and mean inspiratory flow (tidal volume/inspiratory time (VT/tI)) were greater, while inspiratory time (tI) was shorter than in controls. Minute ventilation (V'E) and mean inspiratory flow response slopes to hypercapnia were normal In contrast, four patients had reduced delta(VT/tI)/arterial oxygen saturation (Sa,O2) and three had reduced deltaV'E/Sa,O2. Ppl,sw(%Ppl,sn) response slopes to increasing end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PET,CO2) and decreasing Sa,O2 did not differ from the responses of the normal subjects, suggesting normal central chemoresponsiveness. At a PET,CO2 of 8 kPa or an Sa,O2 of 80%, patients had greater fR and lower tI compared with controls. Pdi,sn and Ppl,sn related both to deltaV'E/deltaSa,O2 (r=0.729 and r=0.776, respectively) and delta(VT/tI)/deltaSa,O2 (r=0.860 and r=0.90, respectively). Pdi

  9. Targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain of Cryptococcus through antifungal chemosensitization: a model for control of non-fermentative pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enhanced control of species of Cryptococcus, non-fermentative yeast pathogens, was achieved by chemosensitization through co-application of certain compounds with a conventional antimicrobial drug. The species of Cryptococcus tested showed higher sensitivity to mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibi...

  10. Motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic region improve respiratory function in obese men. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bezzoli, Emanuela; Andreotti, Dianne; Pianta, Lucia; Mascheroni, Martina; Piccinno, Lorena; Puricelli, Luca; Cimolin, Veronica; Salvadori, Alberto; Codecasa, Franco; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2016-11-10

    Obese subjects have decreased pulmonary function. The hypothesis of our study was that poor coordination of the lumbar-pelvic musculature secondary to obesity may hinder the synergic activation of the respiratory muscles. The aim of the paper was to evaluate whether specific motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic musculature were able to improve respiratory function. Twenty obese male patients underwent a rehabilitation program including adapted physical activity and respiratory physiotherapy. Patients were randomly assigned to a Specific Motor Control Exercise Group (SG) and a Control Group (CG). SG followed a protocol according to the SMARTERehab concept aimed at improving posture, intra-abdominal pressure, rib cage mobility, and perception of correct muscle activation. CG performed an exercise training protocol to improve aerobic capacity and muscle strength. After intervention, both groups showed similar changes in body weight, fat, and fat-free mass. Respiratory function indexes improved in SG due to improved proprioception and coordination of the deep lumbar-pelvic muscles. Our study provides preliminary evidence that breathing, postural control, and spinal stability are intertwined. Positive respiratory effects in obese men can be obtained by prescribing specific motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic muscles. Implications for rehabilitation Obese subjects present with decreased pulmonary function and postural changes. Poor coordination of the lumbar-pelvic muscles affects posture and the synergic activation of the respiratory muscles. Specific motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic musculature can improve respiratory function. Breathing and postural control are intertwined: positive respiratory effects can be obtained by enhancing motor control of the lumbar-pelvic muscles.

  11. Control aspects of the human cardiovascular-respiratory system under a nonconstant workload.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Pio Gabrielle B; Habib, Mustafa; Kappel, Franz; de Los Reyes, Aurelio A

    2017-07-01

    The human cardiovascular system (CVS) and respiratory system (RS) work together in order to supply oxygen (O2) and other substrates needed for metabolism and to remove carbon dioxide (CO2). Global and local control mechanisms act on the CVS in order to adjust blood flow to the different parts of the body. This, in turn, affects the RS since the amount of O2 and CO2 transported, respectively to and away from the tissues depends on the cardiac output and blood flow in both the systemic and pulmonary circuits of the CVS. Local metabolic control is influenced by local concentrations of blood gases affecting systemic resistance, resulting to vasoconstriction/vasodilation. Thus, the exchange of blood gases demands a tight coordination between blood flow and ventilation of the lungs. In this work, a model of the cardiovascular-respiratory system (CVRS) is considered to obtain an optimal control for time-dependent ergometric workloads by using the Euler-Lagrange formulation of the optimal control problem. The essential controls in the CVRS model are variations in the heart rate and alveolar ventilation through which the central nervous system restricts the arterial partial pressure of CO2 ( [Formula: see text] ) close to 40  mmHg. Further, penalization terms in the cost functional are included to match the metabolic need for O2 and the metabolic production of CO2 with O2- and CO2-transport by blood. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. User's instructions for the Grodins' respiratory control model using the UNIVAC 1110 remote batch and demand processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The transient and steady state response of the respiratory control system for variations in volumetric fractions of inspired gases and special system parameters are modeled. The program contains the capability to change workload. The program is based on Grodins' respiratory control model and can be envisioned as a feedback control system comprised of a plant (the controlled system) and the regulating component (controlling system). The controlled system is partitioned into 3 compartments corresponding to lungs, brain, and tissue with a fluid interconnecting patch representing the blood.

  13. A metagenomics and case-control study to identify viruses associated with bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Kondov, Nikola O; Deng, Xutao; Van Eenennaam, Alison; Neibergs, Holly L; Delwart, Eric

    2015-05-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a common health problem for both dairy and beef cattle, resulting in significant economic loses. In order to identify viruses associated with BRD, we used a metagenomics approach to enrich and sequence viral nucleic acids in the nasal swabs of 50 young dairy cattle with symptoms of BRD. Following deep sequencing, de novo assembly, and translated protein sequence similarity searches, numerous known and previously uncharacterized viruses were identified. Bovine adenovirus 3, bovine adeno-associated virus, bovine influenza D virus, bovine parvovirus 2, bovine herpesvirus 6, bovine rhinitis A virus, and multiple genotypes of bovine rhinitis B virus were identified. The genomes of a previously uncharacterized astrovirus and picobirnaviruses were also partially or fully sequenced. Using real-time PCR, the rates of detection of the eight viruses that generated the most reads were compared for the nasal secretions of 50 animals with BRD versus 50 location-matched healthy control animals. Viruses were detected in 68% of BRD-affected animals versus 16% of healthy control animals. Thirty-eight percent of sick animals versus 8% of controls were infected with multiple respiratory viruses. Significantly associated with BRD were bovine adenovirus 3 (P < 0.0001), bovine rhinitis A virus (P = 0.005), and the recently described bovine influenza D virus (P = 0.006), which were detected either alone or in combination in 62% of animals with BRD. A metagenomics and real-time PCR detection approach in carefully matched cases and controls can provide a rapid means to identify viruses associated with a complex disease, paving the way for further confirmatory tests and ultimately to effective intervention strategies. Bovine respiratory disease is the most economically important disease affecting the cattle industry, whose complex root causes include environmental, genetics, and infectious factors. Using an unbiased metagenomics approach, we characterized

  14. Social Mixing Patterns Within a South African Township Community: Implications for Respiratory Disease Transmission and Control

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone-Robertson, Simon P.; Mark, Daniella; Morrow, Carl; Middelkoop, Keren; Chiswell, Melika; Aquino, Lisa D. H.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Wood, Robin

    2011-01-01

    A prospective survey of social mixing patterns relevant to respiratory disease transmission by large droplets (e.g., influenza) or small droplet nuclei (e.g., tuberculosis) was performed in a South African township in 2010. A total of 571 randomly selected participants recorded the numbers, times, and locations of close contacts (physical/nonphysical) and indoor casual contacts met daily. The median number of physical contacts was 12 (interquartile range (IQR), 7–18), the median number of close contacts was 20 (IQR, 13–29), and the total number of indoor contacts was 30 (IQR, 12–54). Physical and close contacts were most frequent and age-associative in youths aged 5–19 years. Numbers of close contacts were 40% higher than in corresponding populations in industrialized countries (P < 0.001). This may put township communities at higher risk for epidemics of acute respiratory illnesses. Simulations of an acute influenza epidemic predominantly involved adolescents and young adults, indicating that control strategies should be directed toward these age groups. Of all contacts, 86.2% occurred indoors with potential exposure to respiratory droplet nuclei, of which 27.2%, 20.1%, 20.0%, and 8.0% were in transport, own household, crèche/school, and work locations, respectively. Indoor contact time was long in households and short during transport. High numbers of indoor contacts and intergenerational mixing in households and transport may contribute to exceptionally high rates of tuberculosis transmission reported in the community. PMID:22071585

  15. [Cost-consequence analysis of respiratory preventive intervention among institutionalized older people: randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Cebrià I Iranzo, Maria Dels Àngels; Tortosa-Chuliá, M Ángeles; Igual-Camacho, Celedonia; Sancho, Patricia; Galiana, Laura; Tomás, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The institutionalized elderly with functional impairment show a greater decline in respiratory muscle (RM) function. The aims of the study are to evaluate outcomes and costs of RM training using Pranayama in institutionalized elderly people with functional impairment. A randomized controlled trial was conducted on institutionalized elderly people with walking limitation (n=54). The intervention consisted of 6 weeks of Pranayama RM training (5 times/week). The outcomes were measured at 4 time points, and were related to RM function: the maximum respiratory pressures and the maximum voluntary ventilation. Perceived satisfaction in the experimental group (EG) was assessed by means of an ad hoc questionnaire. Direct and indirect costs were estimated from the social perspective. The GE showed a significant improvement related with strength (maximum respiratory pressures) and endurance (maximum voluntary ventilation) of RM. Moreover, 92% of the EG reported a high satisfaction. The total social costs, direct and indirect, amounted to Euro 21,678. This evaluation reveals that RM function improvement is significant, that intervention is well tolerated and appreciated by patients, and the intervention costs are moderate. Copyright © 2013 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Respiratory mechanics and ventilatory control in overlap syndrome and obesity hypoventilation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The overlap syndrome of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in addition to obesity hypoventilation syndrome, represents growing health concerns, owing to the worldwide COPD and obesity epidemics and related co-morbidities. These disorders constitute the end points of a spectrum with distinct yet interrelated mechanisms that lead to a considerable health burden. The coexistence OSA and COPD seems to occur by chance, but the combination can contribute to worsened symptoms and oxygen desaturation at night, leading to disrupted sleep architecture and decreased sleep quality. Alveolar hypoventilation, ventilation-perfusion mismatch and intermittent hypercapnic events resulting from apneas and hypopneas contribute to the final clinical picture, which is quite different from the “usual” COPD. Obesity hypoventilation has emerged as a relatively common cause of chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure. Its pathophysiology results from complex interactions, among which are respiratory mechanics, ventilatory control, sleep-disordered breathing and neurohormonal disturbances, such as leptin resistance, each of which contributes to varying degrees in individual patients to the development of obesity hypoventilation. This respiratory embarrassment takes place when compensatory mechanisms like increased drive cannot be maintained or become overwhelmed. Although a unifying concept for the pathogenesis of both disorders is lacking, it seems that these patients are in a vicious cycle. This review outlines the major pathophysiological mechanisms believed to contribute to the development of these specific clinical entities. Knowledge of shared mechanisms in the overlap syndrome and obesity hypoventilation may help to identify these patients and guide therapy. PMID:24256627

  17. Respiratory mechanics and ventilatory control in overlap syndrome and obesity hypoventilation.

    PubMed

    Verbraecken, Johan; McNicholas, Walter T

    2013-11-20

    The overlap syndrome of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in addition to obesity hypoventilation syndrome, represents growing health concerns, owing to the worldwide COPD and obesity epidemics and related co-morbidities. These disorders constitute the end points of a spectrum with distinct yet interrelated mechanisms that lead to a considerable health burden. The coexistence OSA and COPD seems to occur by chance, but the combination can contribute to worsened symptoms and oxygen desaturation at night, leading to disrupted sleep architecture and decreased sleep quality. Alveolar hypoventilation, ventilation-perfusion mismatch and intermittent hypercapnic events resulting from apneas and hypopneas contribute to the final clinical picture, which is quite different from the "usual" COPD. Obesity hypoventilation has emerged as a relatively common cause of chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure. Its pathophysiology results from complex interactions, among which are respiratory mechanics, ventilatory control, sleep-disordered breathing and neurohormonal disturbances, such as leptin resistance, each of which contributes to varying degrees in individual patients to the development of obesity hypoventilation. This respiratory embarrassment takes place when compensatory mechanisms like increased drive cannot be maintained or become overwhelmed. Although a unifying concept for the pathogenesis of both disorders is lacking, it seems that these patients are in a vicious cycle. This review outlines the major pathophysiological mechanisms believed to contribute to the development of these specific clinical entities. Knowledge of shared mechanisms in the overlap syndrome and obesity hypoventilation may help to identify these patients and guide therapy.

  18. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus: transmission, virology and therapeutic targeting to aid in outbreak control

    PubMed Central

    Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Batool, Maria; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes high fever, cough, acute respiratory tract infection and multiorgan dysfunction that may eventually lead to the death of the infected individuals. MERS-CoV is thought to be transmitted to humans through dromedary camels. The occurrence of the virus was first reported in the Middle East and it subsequently spread to several parts of the world. Since 2012, about 1368 infections, including ~487 deaths, have been reported worldwide. Notably, the recent human-to-human ‘superspreading' of MERS-CoV in hospitals in South Korea has raised a major global health concern. The fatality rate in MERS-CoV infection is four times higher compared with that of the closely related severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection. Currently, no drug has been clinically approved to control MERS-CoV infection. In this study, we highlight the potential drug targets that can be used to develop anti-MERS-CoV therapeutics. PMID:26315600

  19. Face Mask Use and Control of Respiratory Virus Transmission in Households

    PubMed Central

    Cauchemez, Simon; Dwyer, Dominic E.; Seale, Holly; Cheung, Pamela; Browne, Gary; Fasher, Michael; Wood, James; Gao, Zhanhai; Booy, Robert; Ferguson, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Many countries are stockpiling face masks for use as a nonpharmaceutical intervention to control virus transmission during an influenza pandemic. We conducted a prospective cluster-randomized trial comparing surgical masks, non–fit-tested P2 masks, and no masks in prevention of influenza-like illness (ILI) in households. Mask use adherence was self-reported. During the 2006 and 2007 winter seasons, 286 exposed adults from 143 households who had been exposed to a child with clinical respiratory illness were recruited. We found that adherence to mask use significantly reduced the risk for ILI-associated infection, but <50% of participants wore masks most of the time. We concluded that household use of face masks is associated with low adherence and is ineffective for controlling seasonal respiratory disease. However, during a severe pandemic when use of face masks might be greater, pandemic transmission in households could be reduced. Many countries are stockpiling face masks for use as nonpharmaceutical interventions to reduce viral transmission during an influenza pandemic. We conducted a prospective cluster-randomized trial comparing surgical masks, non–fit-tested P2 masks, and no masks in prevention of influenza-like illness (ILI) in households. During the 2006 and 2007 winter seasons, 286 exposed adults from 143 households who had been exposed to a child with clinical respiratory illness were recruited. Intent-to-treat analysis showed no significant difference in the relative risk of ILI in the mask use groups compared with the control group; however, <50% of those in the mask use groups reported wearing masks most of the time. Adherence to mask use was associated with a significantly reduced risk of ILI-associated infection. We concluded that household use of masks is associated with low adherence and is ineffective in controlling seasonal ILI. If adherence were greater, mask use might reduce transmission during a severe influenza pandemic. PMID:19193267

  20. Effects of Pranayam Breathing on Respiratory Pressures and Sympathovagal Balance of Patients with Chronic Airflow Limitation and in Control Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jaju, Deepali S; Dikshit, Mohan B; Balaji, Jothi; George, Jyoji; Rizvi, Syed; Al-Rawas, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare the effects of Pranayam breathing on respiratory muscle strength measured as maximum expiratory and inspiratory pressures (MEP and MIP) and relevant spirometry parameters in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and in control subjects, and on the sympatho-vagal balance in both the groups. Methods: The research was performed in the Clinical Physiology Department, Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman. Eleven patients (mean age 43.91 ± 20.56 yr; mean BMI 21.9 ± 5.5 kg/m2) and 6 controls (43.5 ± 14.6yr; 25.4 ± 3.2 kg/m2) learnt and practised Pranayam. Their respiratory and cardiovascular parameters were recorded. Their respiratory “well being” was noted as a visual analogue score (VAS). The respiratory parameters were expressed as a percentage change of predicted values. Results: Patients’ respiratory parameters were significantly lower than those of controls. Patients’ maximum respiratory pressures did not improve after Pranayam; however, they showed significant improvement in VAS 5.4 ± 2.4 to 7.2 ± 1.2 (P < 0.03). Controls showed significant increase in MIP after Pranayam exercises. There were no changes in other spirometry indices. Controls showed significant increase in their systolic blood pressure and stroke index after exercise. The vago-sympathetic balance shifted towards sympathetic in both patients and controls after exercise. Conclusion: The improvement in MIP in controls indicated the positive effect of Pranayam exercise; however, it may not be an adequately stressful exercise to produce changes in the respiratory parameters of COPD patients. The increase in VAS in patients suggested improvement in respiratory distress and quality of life. PMID:21969894

  1. Chronic heart failure modifies respiratory mechanics in rats: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Deise M.; Silveira, Viviane D.; Thomaz, Alex; Nunes, Ramiro B.; Elsner, Viviane R.; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze respiratory mechanics and hemodynamic alterations in an experimental model of chronic heart failure (CHF) following myocardial infarction. Method Twenty-seven male adult Wistar rats were randomized to CHF group (n=12) or Sham group (n=15). Ten weeks after coronary ligation or sham surgery, the animals were anesthetized and submitted to respiratory mechanics and hemodynamic measurements. Pulmonary edema as well as cardiac remodeling were measured. Results The CHF rats showed pulmonary edema 26% higher than the Sham group. The respiratory system compliance (Crs) and the total lung capacity (TLC) were lower (40% and 27%, respectively) in the CHF rats when compared to the Sham group (P<0.01). There was also an increase in tissue resistance (Gti) and elastance (Hti) (28% and 45%, respectively) in the CHF group. Moreover, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was higher (32 mmHg vs 4 mmHg, P<0.01), while the left ventricular systolic pressure was lower (118 mmHg vs 130 mmHg, P=0.02) in the CHF group when compared to the control. Pearson’s correlation coefficient showed a negative association between pulmonary edema and Crs (r=–0.70, P=0.0001) and between pulmonary edema and TLC (r=–0.67, P=0.0034). Pulmonary edema correlated positively with Gti (r=0.68, P=0.001) and Hti (r=0.68, P=0.001). Finally, there was a strong positive relationship between pulmonary edema and heart weight (r=0.80, P=0.001). Conclusion Rats with CHF present important changes in hemodynamic and respiratory mechanics, which may be associated with alterations in cardiopulmonary interactions. PMID:27556388

  2. Inhaled corticosteroids for recurrent respiratory symptoms in preschool children in general practice: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schokker, Siebrig; Kooi, Elisabeth M W; de Vries, Tjalling W; Brand, Paul L P; Mulder, Paul G H; Duiverman, Eric J; van der Molen, Thys

    2008-01-01

    Therapy with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) is beneficial in patients with asthma. However, in preschool children with symptoms like cough, wheeze, or shortness of breath diagnosing asthma is difficult. Therefore, the role of ICS in the management of preschool children with recurrent respiratory symptoms is unclear. We assessed the effectiveness of ICS in preschool children with recurrent respiratory symptoms in general practice. In this multicenter, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trial, 96 children aged 1-5 years consulting their general practitioners for recurrent respiratory symptoms and in whom treatment with ICS was considered by the general practitioner were randomly allocated to receive ICS (fluticasone propionate 200 mcg/day by metered dose inhaler/spacer combination) or placebo for 6 months. Outcome assessments were carried out 1, 3, and 6 months after randomization. The primary outcome measure was the symptom score (cough, shortness of breath and wheeze during day and night) as measured by a symptom diary card. Secondary endpoints were symptom-free days, use of rescue medication, adverse events, and lung function variables as measured by the interrupter technique and forced oscillation technique. During the 6 months treatment period, symptoms improved in both groups, with no differences between ICS and placebo. In addition, none of the secondary outcome parameters showed differences between both treatment groups. ICS treatment has no beneficial effect in preschool children with recurrent respiratory symptoms in general practice. We therefore recommend a watchful waiting policy with only symptomatic treatment in these children. General practitioners and pediatricians should be aware of the high probability of overtreatment when prescribing ICS in these children.

  3. An integrative model of respiratory and cardiovascular control in sleep-disordered breathing

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Limei; Ivanova, Olga; Fan, Hsing-Hua; Khoo, Michael C. K.

    2010-01-01

    While many physiological control models exist in the literature, none thus far has focused on characterizing the interactions among the respiratory, cardiovascular and sleep-wake regulation systems that occur in sleep-disordered breathing. The model introduced in this study integrates the autonomic control of the cardiovascular system, chemoreflex and state-related control of respiration, including respiratory and upper airway mechanics, along with a model of circadian and sleep-wake regulation. The integrative model provides realistic predictions of the physiological responses under a variety of conditions including: the sleep-wake cycle, hypoxia-induced periodic breathing, Cheyne-Stokes respiration in chronic heart failure, and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). It can be used to investigate the effects of a variety of interventions, such as isocapnic and hypercapnic and/or hypoxic gas administration, the Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers, and the application of continuous positive airway pressure on OSA subjects. By being able to delineate the influences of the various interacting physiological mechanisms, the model is useful in providing a more lucid understanding of the complex dynamics that characterize state-cardiorespiratory control in the different forms of sleep-disordered breathing. PMID:20542148

  4. Canadian Association of Neuroscience Review: Respiratory control and behavior in humans: lessons from imaging and experiments of nature.

    PubMed

    Moss, Immanuela Ravé

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to demonstrate that respiration is a complex behavior comprising both brainstem autonomic control and supramedullary influences, including volition. Whereas some fundamental mechanisms had to be established using animal models, this review focuses on clinical cases and physiological studies in humans to illustrate normal and abnormal respiratory behavior. To summarize, central respiratory drive is generated in the rostroventrolateral medulla, and transmitted to both the upper airway and to the main and accessory respiratory muscles. Afferent feedback is provided from lung and muscle mechnoreceptors, peripheral carotid and aortic chemoreceptors, and multiple central chemoreceptors. Supramedullary regions, including cortex and subcortex, modulate or initiate breathing with volition, emotion and at the onset of exercise. Autonomic breathing control can be perturbed by brainstem pathology including space occupying lesions, compression, congenital central hypoventilation syndrome and sudden infant death syndrome. Sleep-wake states are important in regulating breathing. Thus, respiratory control abnormalities are most often evident during sleep, or during transition from sleep to wakefulness. Previously undiagnosed structural brainstem pathology may be revealed by abnormal breathing during sleep. Ondine's curse and 'the locked-in syndrome' serve to distinguish brainstem from supramedullary regulatory mechanisms in humans: The former comprises loss of autonomic respiratory control and requires volitional breathing for survival, and the latter entails loss of corticospinal or corticobulbar tracts required for volitional breathing, but preserves autonomic respiratory control.

  5. VITAMIN E AND RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS AMONG ELDERLY NURSING HOME RESIDENTS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL**

    PubMed Central

    Meydani, Simin Nikbin; Leka, Lynette S.; Fine, Basil C.; Dallal, Gerard E.; Keusch, Gerald T.; Singh, Maria Fiatarone; Hamer, Davidson H.

    2008-01-01

    Context Respiratory infections are prevalent in the elderly, resulting in increased morbidity, mortality, and utilization of health care services. Vitamin E supplementation has been shown to improve immune response in the elderly. However, the clinical importance of these findings has not been determined. Objective To investigate the effect of 1-year vitamin E supplementation on respiratory infections in elderly nursing home residents Design A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted from April 1998 to August 2001 Setting 33 long-term care facilities in the Boston, Massachusetts area Participants 617 subjects ≥65 years old, who met the study’s eligibility criteria were enrolled, 73% of whom completed the study. The follow-up time (mean ± SD) was 317±104 and 321±97 days, E and placebo respectively, for all subjects enrolled in the study. Intervention A daily vitamin E (200 IU) or placebo capsule; all subjects received a capsule containing 1/2 the Recommended Daily Allowance of essential vitamins and minerals. Main Outcome Measures Incidence, number of subjects and number of days with respiratory infections (upper and lower), and number of new antibiotic prescriptions. Results There was no statistically significant effect of vitamin E on incidence or number of days with infection for all, upper, or lower respiratory infections. However, fewer vitamin E-supplemented subjects acquired one or more respiratory infections (65% vs 74%, risk ratio=0.88, 95% CI=0.75–0.99, p=0.036 for completed subjects; 60% vs 68%, risk ratio=0.88, 95% CI=0.76–1.00, p=0.048 for all subjects), or upper respiratory infections (50% vs 62%, risk ratio = 0.81, 95% CI=0.66–0.96, p=0.013 for completed subjects; 44% vs 52%, risk ratio=0.84, 95% CI=0.69–1.00, p=0.051 for all subjects). Post hoc sub-group analysis on common colds indicated that the vitamin E group had a lower incidence of common cold (0.66 vs 0.83 per subject-year, rate ratio=0.80, 95% CI=0.64–0

  6. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F.; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Huang, Cher X.; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D.; Stokes, Matthew P.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Bell, George W.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26438848

  7. Volume-controlled versus biphasic positive airway pressure ventilation in leukopenic patients with severe respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Kiehl, M; Schiele, C; Stenzinger, W; Kienast, J

    1996-05-01

    To study comparatively the effects of volume-controlled vs. biphasic positive airway pressure mechanical ventilation on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation in leukopenic patients with severe respiratory failure. Prospective, comparative study. Medical intensive care unit of a university hospital. Leukopenic (<1000 leukocytes/microliter) patients (n=20) after cytoreductive chemotherapy requiring mechanical ventilation for severe respiratory failure (Murray score of > 2.5). Patients were assigned in a consecutive, alternating manner to receive either volume-controlled or biphasic positive airway pressure mechanical ventilation, starting within 12 to 24 hrs after endotracheal intubation. Tidal volume, inspiratory flow, peak inspiratory and positive end-expiratory pressures, FIO2, and arterial blood gas analyses were recorded hourly for a study period of 48 hrs. Biphasic positive airway pressure ventilation was associated with a significant reduction in peak inspiratory pressure (mean differences at 24, 36, and 48 hrs: 4.4, 3.4, and 4.2 cm H2O; p = .024, .019, and .013, respectively) and positive end-expiratory pressures (mean differences at 24, 36, and 48 hrs: 1.6, 1.4, and 1.5 cm H20; p = .023, .024, and .023, respectively) at significantly lower FIO2 (mean differences at 12, 24, 36, and 48 hrs; p = .007, .015, .016, and .011, respectively). PaO2/FIO2 ratios and CO2 removal were similar under ventilatory conditions. Biphasic positive airway pressure ventilation offers the advantage of significantly reduced peak inspiratory and positive end-expiratory pressures at a lower FIO2 and with at least similar oxygenation and CO2 removal as achieved by volume-controlled mechanical ventilation. Our results are in line with previous reports on nonleukopenic patients and suggest that the positive effects of pressure-limited mechanical ventilation are independent of circulating white blood cells. Further studies are mandatory to demonstrate clinical benefit in this critically

  8. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Huang, Cher X; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D; Stokes, Matthew P; Silva, Jeffrey C; Bell, George W; MacArthur, Daniel G; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-10-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells.

  9. Optimal control problem in correlation between smoking and epidemic of respiratory diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldila, D.; Apri, M.

    2014-02-01

    Smoking appears to be a risk factor that may increase the number of different pulmonary infections. This link is likely to be mediated by smoking adverse effects on the respiratory defenses. A mathematical model to describe correlation between the number of smokers and its effect on the number of infected people suffer from respiratory disease like influenza is constructed in this paper. Promotion of healthy life is accounted in the model as an optimal control problem to reduce the number of smokers. In this work, the transition rates from smokers to non-smokers and from non-smokers to smokers are regarded as the control variables. Assuming the control variables are constant, equilibrium points of the model can be obtained analytically. The basic reproductive ratio as the endemic threshold is taken from the spectral radius of the next-generation matrix. Using numerical simulation, we show that the healthy life promotion can reduce the number of infected person significantly by reducing the number of smokers. Furthermore, different initial conditions to show different situations in the field are also simulated. It is shown that a large effort to increase the transition rate from smokers to non-smokers and to reduce the transition from non-smokers to smokers should be applied in the endemic reduction scenario.

  10. Randomised controlled trial of respiratory system compliance measurements in mechanically ventilated neonates

    PubMed Central

    Stenson, B.; Glover, R.; Wilkie, R.; Laing, I.; Tarnow-Mordi, W.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To determine whether outcomes of neonatal mechanical ventilation could be improved by regular pulmonary function testing.
METHODS—Two hundred and forty five neonates, without immediately life threatening congenital malformations, were mechanically ventilated in the newborn period. Infants were randomly allocated to conventional clinical management (control group) or conventional management supplemented by regular measurements of static respiratory system compliance, using the single breath technique, with standardised management advice based on the results.
RESULTS—Fifty five (45%) infants in each group experienced one or more adverse outcomes. The median (quartile) durations of ventilation and oxygen supplementation were 5 (2-12) and 6 (2-34) days for the control group, and 4 (2-9) and 6 (3-36) days for the experimental group (not significant). On post-hoc secondary analysis, control group survivors were ventilated for 1269 days with a median (quartile) of 5 (2-13) days, and experimental group survivors were ventilated for 775 days with a median (quartile) duration of 3 (2-8) days (p=0.03).
CONCLUSIONS—Although primary analysis did not show any substantial benefit associated with regular measurement of static respiratory system compliance, this may reflect a type II error, and a moderate benefit has not been excluded. Larger studies are required to establish the value of on-line monitoring techniques now available with neonatal ventilators.

 PMID:9536834

  11. Respiratory rehabilitation: a physiotherapy approach to the control of asthma symptoms and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Laurino, Renata André; Barnabé, Viviane; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz M.; Stelmach, Rafael; Cukier, Alberto; do Patrocínio T. Nunes, Maria

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to verify the degree of anxiety, respiratory distress, and health-related quality of life in a group of asthmatic patients who have experienced previous panic attacks. Additionally, we evaluated if a respiratory physiotherapy program (breathing retraining) improved both asthma and panic disorder symptoms, resulting in an improvement in the health-related quality of life of asthmatics. METHODS: Asthmatic individuals were assigned to a chest physiotherapy group that included a breathing retraining program held once a week for three months or a paired control group that included a Subtle Touch program. All patients were assessed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV, the Sheehan Anxiety Scale, the Quality of Life Questionnaire, and spirometry parameter measurements. RESULTS: Both groups had high marks for panic disorder and agoraphobia, which limited their quality of life. The Breathing Retraining Group program improved the clinical control of asthma, reduced panic symptoms and agoraphobia, decreased patient scores on the Sheehan Anxiety Scale, and improved their quality of life. Spirometry parameters were unchanged. CONCLUSION: Breathing retraining improves the clinical control of asthma and anxiety symptoms and the health-related quality of life in asthmatic patients. PMID:23184206

  12. Weaning infants with respiratory syncytial virus from mechanical ventilation through a fuzzy-logic controller.

    PubMed

    Olliver, S; Davis, G M; Hatzakis, G E

    2003-01-01

    We have previously developed a fuzzy logic controller for weaning adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using pressure support ventilation (PSV). We used the core of our fuzzy logic-based weaning platform and further developed parametrizable components for weaning newborns of differing body size and disease-state. The controller was validated on neonates recovering from congenital heart disease (CHD) while receiving synchronous intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV). We wished to compare the efficacy of this controller versus the bedside weaning protocol in children with respiratory syncytial virus pneumonitis/bronchiolitis (RSV) in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). The fuzzy controller evaluated the "current" and "trend" weaning status of the newborn to quantitatively determine the change in the SIMV integrated ventilatory setting. For the "current" status it used heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (VT) and oxygen saturation (SaO2), while for the "trend" status the differences of deltaRR/ deltat, deltaHR/ deltat, and deltaSaO2/ deltat recorded between two subsequent time points were utilized. The enumerated vital signs were fuzzified and then probability levels of occurrence were assigned. Individualized "golden" goals for SaO2 were set for each newborn. We retrospectively assessed the charts of 19 newborns, 113+/-128 days old, 5,546+/-2,321 gr body weight, weaning for 99+/-46 days, at 2-hour intervals. The SIMV levels proposed by the fuzzy controller were matched to those levels actually applied. In 60% of the time both values coincided. For the remaining 40%, the controller was more aggressive suggesting lower values of SIMV than the applied ones. The Area under the SIMV curves over time was 1,969+/-1,044 for the applied vs 1,886+/-978 for the suggested levels, respectively. The fuzzy controller adjusted for body size and disease-pattern can approximate the actual weaning course of newborns with RSV.

  13. Respiratory muscle training in restrictive thoracic disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Budweiser, Stephan; Moertl, Markus; Jörres, Rudolf A; Windisch, Wolfram; Heinemann, Frank; Pfeifer, Michael

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the effects of respiratory muscle training (RMT) in patients with restrictive thoracic disorders and intermittent noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV). Prospective randomized controlled trial. Home-based RMT, with assessment in a primary care pulmonary center. Thirty patients with restrictive thoracic disorders; 28 patients completed the trial. Three months of RMT by isocapnic hyperpnea or sham training. Respiratory muscle strength and endurance, lung function, exercise performance, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). After RMT, maximal inspiratory mouth pressure was increased (27.6%+/-36.5%, P=.013). In patients who could perform cycle ergometer testing (n=17), peak oxygen consumption (2.24+/-3.39mLxkg(-1).min(-1) vs -1.71+/-2.54mLxkg(-1).min(-1), P=.014) and maximal work rate (9.4+/-14.8W vs -5.1+/-10.8W, P=.043) increased relative to a control group. Similar differences occurred regarding changes of HRQOL (physical performance, 3.3+/-11.4 score vs -6.6+/-9.0 score; P=.012) and time of ventilator use (-0.6+/-1.2h/d vs 0.4+/-0.5h/d, P=.010). Lung volumes, 12-second maximum voluntary ventilation, 6-minute walking distance, and blood gases were unchanged. In patients with restrictive thoracic disorders and NPPV, RMT improved inspiratory muscle strength. Exercise performance and HRQOL were improved when the 2 groups were compared. RMT was practicable and safe despite severe respiratory impairment. Further evaluation, including different training intensities and modalities, seems warranted.

  14. Specific antibody deficiency in children with recurrent respiratory infections: a controlled study with follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ruuskanen, O; Nurkka, A; Helminen, M; Viljanen, M K; Käyhty, H; Kainulainen, L

    2013-01-01

    Specific antibody deficiency (SAD) to unconjugated pneumococcal vaccine (PPV) is an established primary B cell immunodeficiency. The occurrence and natural history of SAD in children is unclear. We conducted an observational study to identify SAD in children with recurrent respiratory infections. Ninety-nine children, mean age 5·9 (range 2–16) years, with recurrent or severe infections were vaccinated with PPV; serum antibody concentrations for serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F and 23F were measured before and 2 weeks after vaccination with enzyme immunoassay. The retrospective control group consisted of 89 healthy children matched for age and gender. No children had received previous conjugated pneumococcal vaccine (PCV) or PPV. The structured history of infectious diseases of all participants was collected. Ten of 91 (11%) children (eight excluded due to immunoglobulin G subclass deficiency) with recurrent respiratory infections had SAD. In the control group, three children (3%) responded inadequately to PPV (P = 0·05). Most children with SAD also had many other minor immune defects. After 0·5–5 years (medium 3·8), eight children with SAD were revaccinated with PPV; five responded adequately and three inadequately. Two SAD children were revaccinated with PCV, one developed an adequate and one an inadequate response. Two children with SAD received treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin; the remaining eight children recovered without replacement therapy during the follow-up. SAD is common in young children with recurrent respiratory infections, but it is often transient and resolves itself within a few years without specific treatment. PMID:23574320

  15. Neuromodulation to the Rescue: Compensation of Temperature-Induced Breakdown of Rhythmic Motor Patterns via Extrinsic Neuromodulatory Input.

    PubMed

    Städele, Carola; Heigele, Stefanie; Stein, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Stable rhythmic neural activity depends on the well-coordinated interplay of synaptic and cell-intrinsic conductances. Since all biophysical processes are temperature dependent, this interplay is challenged during temperature fluctuations. How the nervous system remains functional during temperature perturbations remains mostly unknown. We present a hitherto unknown mechanism of how temperature-induced changes in neural networks are compensated by changing their neuromodulatory state: activation of neuromodulatory pathways establishes a dynamic coregulation of synaptic and intrinsic conductances with opposing effects on neuronal activity when temperature changes, hence rescuing neuronal activity. Using the well-studied gastric mill pattern generator of the crab, we show that modest temperature increase can abolish rhythmic activity in isolated neural circuits due to increased leak currents in rhythm-generating neurons. Dynamic clamp-mediated addition of leak currents was sufficient to stop neuronal oscillations at low temperatures, and subtraction of additional leak currents at elevated temperatures was sufficient to rescue the rhythm. Despite the apparent sensitivity of the isolated nervous system to temperature fluctuations, the rhythm could be stabilized by activating extrinsic neuromodulatory inputs from descending projection neurons, a strategy that we indeed found to be implemented in intact animals. In the isolated nervous system, temperature compensation was achieved by stronger extrinsic neuromodulatory input from projection neurons or by augmenting projection neuron influence via bath application of the peptide cotransmitter Cancer borealis tachykinin-related peptide Ia (CabTRP Ia). CabTRP Ia activates the modulator-induced current IMI (a nonlinear voltage-gated inward current) that effectively acted as a negative leak current and counterbalanced the temperature-induced leak to rescue neuronal oscillations. Computational modelling revealed the ability of

  16. Neuromodulation to the Rescue: Compensation of Temperature-Induced Breakdown of Rhythmic Motor Patterns via Extrinsic Neuromodulatory Input

    PubMed Central

    Städele, Carola; Heigele, Stefanie; Stein, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Stable rhythmic neural activity depends on the well-coordinated interplay of synaptic and cell-intrinsic conductances. Since all biophysical processes are temperature dependent, this interplay is challenged during temperature fluctuations. How the nervous system remains functional during temperature perturbations remains mostly unknown. We present a hitherto unknown mechanism of how temperature-induced changes in neural networks are compensated by changing their neuromodulatory state: activation of neuromodulatory pathways establishes a dynamic coregulation of synaptic and intrinsic conductances with opposing effects on neuronal activity when temperature changes, hence rescuing neuronal activity. Using the well-studied gastric mill pattern generator of the crab, we show that modest temperature increase can abolish rhythmic activity in isolated neural circuits due to increased leak currents in rhythm-generating neurons. Dynamic clamp-mediated addition of leak currents was sufficient to stop neuronal oscillations at low temperatures, and subtraction of additional leak currents at elevated temperatures was sufficient to rescue the rhythm. Despite the apparent sensitivity of the isolated nervous system to temperature fluctuations, the rhythm could be stabilized by activating extrinsic neuromodulatory inputs from descending projection neurons, a strategy that we indeed found to be implemented in intact animals. In the isolated nervous system, temperature compensation was achieved by stronger extrinsic neuromodulatory input from projection neurons or by augmenting projection neuron influence via bath application of the peptide cotransmitter Cancer borealis tachykinin-related peptide Ia (CabTRP Ia). CabTRP Ia activates the modulator-induced current IMI (a nonlinear voltage-gated inward current) that effectively acted as a negative leak current and counterbalanced the temperature-induced leak to rescue neuronal oscillations. Computational modelling revealed the ability of

  17. Peripheral-central chemoreceptor interaction and the significance of a critical period in the development of respiratory control.

    PubMed

    Wong-Riley, Margaret T T; Liu, Qiuli; Gao, Xiu-ping

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory control entails coordinated activities of peripheral chemoreceptors (mainly the carotid bodies) and central chemosensors within the brain stem respiratory network. Candidates for central chemoreceptors include Phox2b-containing neurons of the retrotrapezoid nucleus, serotonergic neurons of the medullary raphé, and/or multiple sites within the brain stem. Extensive interconnections among respiratory-related nuclei enable central chemosensitive relay. Both peripheral and central respiratory centers are not mature at birth, but undergo considerable development during the first two postnatal weeks in rats. A critical period of respiratory development (∼P12-P13 in the rat) exists when abrupt neurochemical, metabolic, ventilatory, and electrophysiological changes occur. Environmental perturbations, including hypoxia, intermittent hypoxia, hypercapnia, and hyperoxia alter the development of the respiratory system. Carotid body denervation during the first two postnatal weeks in the rat profoundly affects the development and functions of central respiratory-related nuclei. Such denervation delays and prolongs the critical period, but does not eliminate it, suggesting that the critical period may be intrinsically and genetically determined.

  18. Extraction, characterization and in vivo neuromodulatory activity of phytosterols from microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    PubMed

    Francavilla, M; Colaianna, M; Zotti, M; Morgese, M G; Trotta, P; Tucci, P; Schiavone, S; Cuomo, V; Trabace, L

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of research has been devoted to identify new natural sources of phytosterols and to improve methods for their recovery and purification. In this regard, unexplored natural sources of bioactive ingredients are gaining much attention since they can lead to the isolation of new compounds or bioactivities. The field of available natural sources has been further increased by including algae and, even more interestingly, microalgae. In the present study, a multidisciplinary approach has been used considering, in an integrated view, extraction, chemical composition and bioactivity of phytosterols from the microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta. A novel methodology to extract, separate and characterize microalgal-derived phytosterols has been developed. In addition, recoverable and reusable eluents have been selected in order to reduce the quantities of employed organic solvents. Finally, we addressed the question whether orally administered phytosterols reach the brain and if those interfere with the major neurotransmitter systems, such as the dopaminergic, serotoninergic and noradrenergic ones, in several brain areas of rats. Flash Liquid Chromatography has been used to separate the Total Sterol (TS) fraction, composed of twelve sterols, with a purity of 97.87% and a recovery percentage of 98%, while the "flash version" of Silver Ion Liquid Chromatography has been used to purify the most abundant phytosterols in TS, (22E,24R)- methylcholesta-5,7,22-trien-3β-ol (ergosterol) and (22E,24R)-ethylcholesta-5,7,22-trien-3β-ol (7-dehydroporiferasterol), with a purity of 97.4%. These two combined methods did not need sophisticated technologies but only cheap laboratory supplies. Moreover, the possibility of recovering and recycling the solvents used as eluents made it a cleaner process. Finally, for the first time, a neuromodulatory action of Dunaliella tertiolecta-derived phytosterols has been found in selective brain areas of rats.

  19. Randomised placebo controlled trial of nebulised corticosteroids in acute respiratory syncytial viral bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Cade, A; Brownlee, K; Conway, S; Haigh, D; Short, A; Brown, J; Dassu, D; Mason, S; Phillips, A; Eglin, R; Graham, M; Chetcuti, A; Chatrath, M; Hudson, N; Thomas, A; Chetcuti, P

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate short and long term effects of giving nebulised budesonide early in respiratory syncytial viral (RSV) bronchiolitis.
DESIGN—A multicentre randomised double blind placebo controlled trial.
SUBJECTS—Infants admitted to hospital with their first episode of RSV positive bronchiolitis.
INTERVENTION—Randomisation to receive either 1 mg of nebulised budesonide (Bud) or placebo (Pla) twice daily from admission until 2 weeks after discharge. Follow up was for 12months.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Duration of hospital admission, time taken to become symptom free, re-admission rates, general practitioner consultation rates, and use of antiwheeze medication during follow up.
RESULTS—161 infants were studied. Both arms were similar with respect to initial clinical severity, age, sex, socioeconomic class, and tobacco exposure. Median time from first nebulisation to discharge: Bud and Pla, 2 days. Median number of days for 50% of infants to be symptom free for 48 hours: Bud, 10 days; Pla, 12 days. Respiratory re-admission rates in the 12 month follow up: Bud, 16%; Pla, 18%; median difference (95% confidence interval (CI)), −2 (−14 to 10). Median respiratory related general practitioner attendances: Bud, 4.0; Pla, 4.5; median difference (95% CI), −1 (−2 to 0). Percentage of infants receiving at least one prescription for antiwheeze medication during follow up, corticosteroids: Bud, 50%; Pla, 60%; difference (95% CI), −10 (−26 to 6); bronchodilators: Bud, 60%; Pla, 67%; difference (95% CI), −7 (−22 to 8).
CONCLUSIONS—There are no short or long term clinical benefits from the administration of nebulised corticosteroids in the acute phase of RSV bronchiolitis.

 PMID:10648365

  20. Neural Control of the Upper Airway: Respiratory and State-Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kubin, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    Upper airway muscles subserve many essential for survival orofacial behaviors, including their important role as accessory respiratory muscles. In the face of certain predisposition of craniofacial anatomy, both tonic and phasic inspiratory activation of upper airway muscles is necessary to protect the upper airway against collapse. This protective action is adequate during wakefulness, but fails during sleep which results in recurrent episodes of hypopneas and apneas, a condition known as the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA). Although OSA is almost exclusively a human disorder, animal models help unveil the basic principles governing the impact of sleep on breathing and upper airway muscle activity. This article discusses the neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and neurophysiology of the different neuronal systems whose activity changes with sleep-wake states, such as the noradrenergic, serotonergic, cholinergic, orexinergic, histaminergic, GABAergic and glycinergic, and their impact on central respiratory neurons and upper airway motoneurons. Observations of the interactions between sleep-wake states and upper airway muscles in healthy humans and OSA patients are related to findings from animal models with normal upper airway, and various animal models of OSA, including the chronic-intermittent hypoxia model. Using a framework of upper airway motoneurons being under concurrent influence of central respiratory, reflex and state-dependent inputs, different neurotransmitters, and neuropeptides are considered as either causing a sleep-dependent withdrawal of excitation from motoneurons or mediating an active, sleep-related inhibition of motoneurons. Information about the neurochemistry of state-dependent control of upper airway muscles accumulated to date reveals fundamental principles and may help understand and treat OSA. PMID:27783860

  1. The physicochemistry of [H+] and respiratory control: roles of PCO2, strong ions, and their hormonal regulators.

    PubMed

    Jennings, D B

    1994-12-01

    I describe how the dietary intake of strong ions potentially affects the regulation of ventilation and the PCO2 of body fluids in two ways. First, changing the dietary intake of NaCl can alter the concentration difference between strong cations and strong anions (the [SID] of Stewart) of body fluids. Experimental observations indicate that the [SID] in brain fluids or cerebrospinal fluid ([SID]CSF) could be the stimulus to central chemoreceptors. [SID]CSF consistently predicts ventilatory regulation of PCO2, whereas [H+]CSF does not. PCO2 acts as a stimulus to ventilation independently of [SID]CSF and possibly at higher as well as lower centers of the nervous system. I relate the concept of [SID] regulation of arterial PCO2 to the alphastat hypothesis of protein function, respiratory control, and [H+] homeostasis. Second, altering the dietary intake of NaCl changes the levels of hormones involved in salt and water balance. Angiotensin II acts centrally to stimulate ventilation. Evidence for the roles of both the renal and brain renin-angiotensin systems in respiratory control, and the modulation of respiratory control by vasopressin are reviewed. These peptide systems probably act via circumventricular organs of the brain to affect respiratory control and (or) by changing strong ion concentrations in brain fluids. Questions to be resolved on the role of [SID]CSF and hormones in respiratory adaptations, and experiments required to improve our understanding of the control of ventilation, are addressed in the concluding comments.

  2. Singing teaching as a therapy for chronic respiratory disease - a randomised controlled trial and qualitative evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite optimal pharmacological therapy and pulmonary rehabilitation, patients with COPD continue to be breathless. There is a need to develop additional strategies to alleviate symptoms. Learning to sing requires control of breathing and posture and might have benefits that translate into daily life. Methods To test this hypothesis we performed a randomised controlled trial, comparing a six week course of twice weekly singing classes to usual care, in 28 COPD patients. The experience of singing was assessed in a qualitative fashion, through interviews with a psychologist. In addition, we surveyed patients with chronic respiratory conditions who participated in a series of open singing workshops. Results In the RCT, the physical component score of the SF36 improved in the singers (n = 15) compared to the controls (n = 13); +7.5(14.6) vs. -3.8(8.4) p = 0.02. Singers also had a significant fall in HAD anxiety score; -1.1(2.7) vs. +0.8(1.7) p = 0.03. Singing did not improve single breath counting, breath hold time or shuttle walk distance. In the qualitative element, 8 patients from the singing group were interviewed. Positive effects on physical sensation, general well-being, community/social support and achievement/efficacy emerged as common themes. 150 participants in open workshops completed a questionnaire. 96% rated the workshops as "very enjoyable" and 98% thought the workshop had taught them something about breathing in a different way. 81% of attendees felt a "marked physical difference" after the workshop. Conclusion Singing classes can improve quality of life measures and anxiety and are viewed as a very positive experience by patients with respiratory disease; no adverse consequences of participation were observed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials - ISRCTN17544114. PMID:20682030

  3. Probiotics and respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections in Finnish military conscripts - a randomised placebo-controlled double-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Kalima, K; Lehtoranta, L; He, L; Pitkäniemi, J; Lundell, R; Julkunen, I; Roivainen, M; Närkiö, M; Mäkelä, M J; Siitonen, S; Korpela, R; Pitkäranta, A

    2016-09-01

    Military conscripts are susceptible to respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections. In previous studies probiotics have shown potency to reduce upper respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. The aim was to study whether probiotic intervention has an impact on seasonal occurrence of upper respiratory and gastrointestinal infections in two different conscript groups. In a randomised, double-blinded, placebo controlled study (https://clinicaltrials.gov NCT01651195), a total of 983 healthy adults were enrolled from two intakes of conscripts. Conscripts were randomised to receive either a probiotic combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB12 (BB12) or a control chewing tablet twice daily for 150 days (recruits) or for 90 days (reserve officer candidates). Clinical examinations were carried out and daily symptom diaries were collected. Outcome measures were the number of days with respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms and symptom incidence, number and duration of infection episodes, number of antibiotic treatments received and number of days out of service because of the infection. Statistically no significant differences were found between the intervention groups either in the risk of symptom incidence or duration. However, probiotic intervention was associated with reduction of specific respiratory infection symptoms in military recruits, but not in reserve officer candidates. Probiotics did not significantly reduce overall respiratory and gastrointestinal infection morbidity.

  4. Noninvasive ventilation immediately after extubation improves weaning outcome after acute respiratory failure: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Noninvasive ventilation (NIV), as a weaning-facilitating strategy in predominantly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mechanically ventilated patients, is associated with reduced ventilator-associated pneumonia, total duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay, and mortality. However, this benefit after planned extubation in patients with acute respiratory failure of various etiologies remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of NIV applied immediately after planned extubation in contrast to oxygen mask (OM) in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). Methods A randomized, prospective, controlled, unblinded clinical study in a single center of a 24-bed adult general ICU in a university hospital was carried out in a 12-month period. Included patients met extubation criteria with at least 72 hours of mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure, after following the ICU weaning protocol. Patients were randomized immediately before elective extubation, being randomly allocated to one of the study groups: NIV or OM. We compared both groups regarding gas exchange 15 minutes, 2 hours, and 24 hours after extubation, reintubation rate after 48 hours, duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU length of stay, and hospital mortality. Results Forty patients were randomized to receive NIV (20 patients) or OM (20 patients) after the following extubation criteria were met: pressure support (PSV) of 7 cm H2O, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5 cm H2O, oxygen inspiratory fraction (FiO2) ≤ 40%, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) ≥ 90%, and ratio of respiratory rate and tidal volume in liters (f/TV) < 105. Comparing the 20 patients (NIV) with the 18 patients (OM) that finished the study 48 hours after extubation, the rate of reintubation in NIV group was 5% and 39% in OM group (P = 0.016). Relative risk for reintubation was 0.13 (CI = 0.017 to 0

  5. Control of Respiratory Drive and Effort in Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Patients Recovering from Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Tommaso; Grasselli, Giacomo; Suriano, Grazia; Eronia, Nilde; Spadaro, Savino; Turrini, Cecilia; Patroniti, Nicolo'; Bellani, Giacomo; Pesenti, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    The amount of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal may influence respiratory drive in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The authors evaluated the effects of different levels of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal in patients recovering from severe ARDS undergoing pressure support ventilation (PSV) and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA). The authors conducted a prospective, randomized, crossover study on eight spontaneously breathing ARDS patients undergoing venovenous ECMO since 28 ± 20 days. To modulate carbon dioxide extraction, ECMO gas flow (GF) was decreased from baseline resting protective conditions (i.e., GF100%, set to obtain pressure generated in the first 100 ms of inspiration against an occluded airway less than 2 cm H2O, respiratory rate less than or equal to 25 bpm, tidal volume less than 6 ml/kg, and peak airway pressure less than 25 cm H2O) to GF50%-GF25%-GF0% during both PSV and NAVA (random order for ventilation mode). Continuous recordings of airway pressure and flow and esophageal pressure were obtained and analyzed during all study phases. At higher levels of extracorporeal carbon dioxide extraction, pressure generated in the first 100 ms of inspiration against an occluded airway decreased from 2.8 ± 2.7 cm H2O (PSV, GF0%) and 3.0 ± 2.1 cm H2O (NAVA, GF0%) to 0.9 ± 0.5 cm H2O (PSV, GF100%) and 1.0 ± 0.8 cm H2O (NAVA, GF100%; P < 0.001) and patients' inspiratory muscle pressure passed from 8.5 ± 6.3 and 6.5 ± 5.5 cm H2O to 4.5 ± 3.1 and 4.2 ± 3.7 cm H2O (P < 0.001). In time, decreased inspiratory drive and effort determined by higher carbon dioxide extraction led to reduction of tidal volume from 6.6 ± 0.9 and 7.5 ± 1.2 ml/kg to 4.9 ± 0.8 and 5.3 ± 1.3 ml/kg (P < 0.001) and of peak airway pressure from 21 ± 3 and 25 ± 4 cm H2O to 21 ± 3 and 21 ± 5

  6. [Basic types of respiratory system structure in insect egg envelopes, and genes controlling their formation].

    PubMed

    Omelina, E S; Baricheva, É M; Fedorova, E V

    2012-01-01

    Insects is a taxon surprisingly rich with species and varieties, and its representatives are considered as the most fitted and "evolutionary successful" living things. Insects are distinguished by diversity and abundance of adaptations to environmental conditions, representatives of this class inhabit different ecological niches, they can be found practically in every corner of the Earth and, in particular, in close adjacency to man. Among them are those who man benefits from and those who man struggles against. This determines man's interest in studying peculiarities of their development as well as adaptations formed by them in the course of evolution to become more viable. In the paper, data are presented on morphological structure of respiratory systems in insect egg envelopes that ensure respiration process of developing embryo. Variability of these systems and their dependence on environmental conditions are demonstrated for different insect species. The information about genes controlling development of respiratory systems in fruit fly eggs is brought together, and occurrence of evolutionary conservative genes participating in development of such systems in other insect species is ascertained.

  7. Alveolar Macrophages Can Control Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in the Absence of Type I Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Spyridon; Bajorek, Monika; Culley, Fiona J.; Goritzka, Michelle; Johansson, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of lower respiratory tract infections. Immunity to RSV is initiated upon detection of the virus by pattern recognition receptors, such as RIG-I-like receptors. RIG-I-like receptors signal via MAVS to induce the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators, including type I interferons (IFNs), which trigger and shape antiviral responses and protect cells from infection. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) are amongst the first cells to encounter invading viruses and the ones producing type I IFNs. However, it is unclear whether IFNs act to prevent AMs from serving as vehicles for viral replication. In this study, primary AMs from MAVS (Mavs-/-)- or type I IFN receptor (Ifnar1-/-)-deficient mice were exposed to RSV ex vivo. Wild-type (wt) AMs but not Mavs-/- and Ifnar1-/- AMs produced inflammatory mediators in response to RSV. Furthermore, Mavs-/- and Ifnar1-/- AMs accumulated more RSV proteins than wt AMs, but the infection was abortive. Thus, RIG-I-like receptor-MAVS and IFNAR signalling are important for the induction of proinflammatory mediators from AMs upon RSV infection, but this signalling is not central for controlling viral replication. The ability to restrict viral replication makes AMs ideal sensors of RSV infection and important initiators of immune responses in the lung. PMID:27423203

  8. Validation of the Turkish version of "Test for Respiratory and Asthma Control in Kids (TRACK)" questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Buyuktiryaki, Betul; Sahiner, Umit M; Yavuz, S Tolga; Cavkaytar, Ozlem; Arik Yilmaz, Ebru; Soyer, Ozge U; Tuncer, Ayfer; Sekerel, Bulent E

    2013-12-01

    Test for Respiratory and Asthma Control in Kids (TRACK) questionnaire is the first to measure both the risk and impairment domains of the current guidelines in preschool children. We aimed to measure the reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Turkish version of the TRACK. A total of 268 children (69.8% boys) were included in the study. Caregivers responded to three individual TRACK questionnaires, at each clinical visit (baseline, 1st month, and 3rd month). At each visit, physicians determined the control level and the treatment strategy based on the GINA guideline recommendations. The internal consistency reliability of the Turkish version of the TRACK questionnaire was found to be 0.74, 0.74, and 0.76 at each of the three visits, respectively (reliability statistics, Cronbach's alpha). There was a significant difference between the mean TRACK scores of the patients in different asthma control status categories (p < 0.001). The test-retest reliability in stable patients was 0.90. The optimal cut-off scores according to the Youden index were 80 and 60 points for uncontrolled and very poorly controlled children, respectively. The Turkish version of the TRACK is an accurate and reliable tool for evaluating asthma control status among preschool Turkish children. Its widespread use may help physicians correctly assess control levels among children and may improve the quality of life for both patients and their caregivers.

  9. Control of an Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in a Tertiary Hospital in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Eun; Ko, Jae-Hoon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Ji Yeon; Lee, Ji Yong; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Kang, Cheol-In; Kang, Ji-Man; Kim, Yae-Jean; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong; Lee, Jun Haeng; Jo, Ik Joon; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Suh, Gee Young; Park, Jinkyeong; Chung, Chi Ryang; Song, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Doo Ryeon

    2016-07-19

    In 2015, a large outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) occurred in the Republic of Korea. Half of the cases were associated with a tertiary care university hospital. To document the outbreak and successful control measures. Descriptive study. A 1950-bed tertiary care university hospital. 92 patients with laboratory-confirmed MERS and 9793 exposed persons. Description of the outbreak, including a timeline, and evaluation of the effectiveness of the control measures. During the outbreak, 92 laboratory-confirmed MERS cases were associated with a large tertiary care hospital, 82 of which originated from unprotected exposure to 1 secondary patient. Contact tracing and monitoring exposed patients and assigned health care workers were at the core of the control measures in the outbreak. Nontargeted screening measures, including body temperature screening among employees and visitors at hospital gates, monitoring patients for MERS-related symptoms, chest radiographic screening, and employee symptom monitoring, did not detect additional patients with MERS without existing transmission links. All in-hospital transmissions originated from 3 patients with MERS who also had pneumonia and productive cough. This was a retrospective single-center study. Statistical analysis could not be done. Because this MERS outbreak originated from a superspreader, effective control measures could differ in endemic areas or in other settings. Control strategies for MERS outbreaks should focus on tracing contacts of persons with epidemiologic links. Adjusting levels of quarantine and personal protective equipment according to the assumed infectivity of each patient with MERS may be appropriate. Samsung Biomedical Research Institute.

  10. Weaning Infants with Respiratory Syncytial Virus from Mechanical Ventilation through a Fuzzy-Logic Controller

    PubMed Central

    Olliver, S.; Davis, G.M.; Hatzakis, G.E.

    2003-01-01

    We have previously developed a fuzzy logic controller for weaning adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using pressure support ventilation (PSV). We used the core of our fuzzy logic-based weaning platform and further developed parametrizable components for weaning newborns of differing body size and disease-state. The controller was validated on neonates recovering from congenital heart disease (CHD) while receiving synchronous intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV). We wished to compare the efficacy of this controller versus the bedside weaning protocol in children with respiratory syncytial virus pneumonitis/bronchiolitis (RSV) in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). The fuzzy controller evaluated the “current” and “trend” weaning status of the newborn, to quantitatively determine the change in the SIMV integrated ventilatory setting. For the “current” status, it used heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (VT) and oxygen saturation (SaO2), while for the “trend” status, the differences of ΔRR/Δt, ΔHR/Δt, and ΔSaO2/Δt, recorded between two subsequent time points, were utilized. The enumerated vital signs were fuzzified and then probability levels of occurrence were assigned. Individualized “golden” goals for SaO2 were set for each newborn. We retrospectively assessed the charts of 19 newborns, 113±128 days old, 5,546±2,321 gr body weight, weaning for 99±46 days, at 2-hour intervals. The SIMV levels proposed by the fuzzy controller were matched to those levels actually applied. In 60% of the time both values coincided. For the remaining 40%, the controller was more aggressive suggesting lower values of SIMV than the applied ones. The Area under the SIMV curves over time was 1,969±1,044 for the applied vs 1,886±978 for the suggested levels, respectively. The fuzzy controller, adjusted for body size and disease-pattern, can approximate the actual weaning course of newborns with RSV. PMID:14728223

  11. [Respiratory distress].

    PubMed

    Galili, D; Garfunkel, A; Elad, S; Zusman, S P; Malamed, S F; Findler, M; Kaufman, E

    2002-01-01

    Dental treatment is usually conducted in the oral cavity and in very close proximity to the upper respiratory airway. The possibility of unintentionally compromising this airway is high in the dental environment. The accumulation of fluid (water or blood) near to the upper respiratory airway or the loosening of teeth fragmentations and fallen dental instruments can occur. Also, some of the drugs prescribed in the dental practice are central nervous system depressants and some are direct respiratory drive depressors. For this reason, awareness of the respiratory status of the dental patient is of paramount importance. This article focuses on several of the more common causes of respiratory distress, including airway obstruction, hyperventilation, asthma, bronchospasm, pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism and cardiac insufficiency. The common denominator to all these conditions described here is that in most instances the patient is conscious. Therefore, on the one hand, valuable information can be retrieved from the patient making diagnosis easier than when the patient is unconscious. On the other hand, the conscious patient is under extreme apprehension and stress under such situations. Respiratory depression which occurs during conscious sedation or following narcotic analgesic medication will not be dealt with in this article. Advanced pain and anxiety control techniques such as conscious sedation and general anesthesia should be confined only to operators who undergo special extended training.

  12. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia, Shyness, and Effortful Control in Preschool-Age Children

    PubMed Central

    Sulik, Michael J.; Eisenberg, Nancy; Silva, Kassondra M.; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Kupfer, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and shyness were examined as predictors of effortful control (EC) in a sample of 101 preschool-age children. Resting RSA was calculated from respiration and heart rate data collected during a neutral film; shyness was measured using parents’, preschool teachers’, and classroom observers’ reports; and EC was measured using four laboratory tasks in addition to questionnaire measures. Principal components analysis was used to create composite measures of EC and shyness. The relation between RSA and EC was moderated by shyness, such that RSA was positively related to EC only for children high in shyness. This interaction suggests that emotional reactivity affects the degree to which RSA can be considered a correlate of EC. This study also draws attention to the need to consider the measurement context when assessing resting psychophysiology measures; shy individuals may not exhibit true baseline RSA responding in an unfamiliar laboratory setting. PMID:23127725

  13. Respiratory control in aquatic insects dictates their vulnerability to global warming.

    PubMed

    Verberk, Wilco C E P; Bilton, David T

    2013-10-23

    Forecasting species responses to climatic warming requires knowledge of how temperature impacts may be exacerbated by other environmental stressors, hypoxia being a principal example in aquatic systems. Both stressors could interact directly as temperature affects both oxygen bioavailability and ectotherm oxygen demand. Insufficient oxygen has been shown to limit thermal tolerance in several aquatic ectotherms, although, the generality of this mechanism has been challenged for tracheated arthropods. Comparing species pairs spanning four different insect orders, we demonstrate that oxygen can indeed limit thermal tolerance in tracheates. Species that were poor at regulating oxygen uptake were consistently more vulnerable to the synergistic effects of warming and hypoxia, demonstrating the importance of respiratory control in setting thermal tolerance limits.

  14. Respiratory control in aquatic insects dictates their vulnerability to global warming

    PubMed Central

    Verberk, Wilco C. E. P.; Bilton, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Forecasting species responses to climatic warming requires knowledge of how temperature impacts may be exacerbated by other environmental stressors, hypoxia being a principal example in aquatic systems. Both stressors could interact directly as temperature affects both oxygen bioavailability and ectotherm oxygen demand. Insufficient oxygen has been shown to limit thermal tolerance in several aquatic ectotherms, although, the generality of this mechanism has been challenged for tracheated arthropods. Comparing species pairs spanning four different insect orders, we demonstrate that oxygen can indeed limit thermal tolerance in tracheates. Species that were poor at regulating oxygen uptake were consistently more vulnerable to the synergistic effects of warming and hypoxia, demonstrating the importance of respiratory control in setting thermal tolerance limits. PMID:23925834

  15. Differential control of respiratory frequency and tidal volume during high-intensity interval training.

    PubMed

    Nicolò, Andrea; Marcora, Samuele M; Bazzucchi, Ilenia; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2017-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? By manipulating recovery intensity and exercise duration during high-intensity interval training (HIIT), we tested the hypothesis that fast inputs contribute more than metabolic stimuli to respiratory frequency (fR ) regulation. What is the main finding and its importance? Respiratory frequency, but not tidal volume, responded rapidly and in proportion to changes in workload during HIIT, and was dissociated from some markers of metabolic stimuli in response to both experimental manipulations, suggesting that fast inputs contribute more than metabolic stimuli to fR regulation. Differentiating between fR and tidal volume may help to unravel the mechanisms underlying exercise hyperpnoea. Given that respiratory frequency (fR ) has been proposed as a good marker of physical effort, furthering the understanding of how fR is regulated during exercise is of great importance. We manipulated recovery intensity and exercise duration during high-intensity interval training (HIIT) to test the hypothesis that fast inputs (including central command) contribute more than metabolic stimuli to fR regulation. Seven male cyclists performed an incremental test, a 10 and a 20 min continuous time trial (TT) as preliminary tests. Subsequently, recovery intensity and exercise duration were manipulated during HIIT (30 s work and 30 s active recovery) by performing four 10 min and one 20 min trial (recovery intensities of 85, 70, 55 and 30% of the 10 min TT mean workload; and 85% of the 20 min TT mean workload). The work intensity of the HIIT sessions was self-paced by participants to achieve the best performance possible. When manipulating recovery intensity, fR , but not tidal volume (VT ), showed a fast response to the alternation of the work and recovery phases, proportional to the extent of workload variations. No association between fR and gas exchange responses was observed. When manipulating exercise duration, fR and rating of

  16. Model-based setting of inspiratory pressure and respiratory rate in pressure-controlled ventilation.

    PubMed

    Schranz, C; Becher, T; Schädler, D; Weiler, N; Möller, K

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical ventilation carries the risk of ventilator-induced-lung-injury (VILI). To minimize the risk of VILI, ventilator settings should be adapted to the individual patient properties. Mathematical models of respiratory mechanics are able to capture the individual physiological condition and can be used to derive personalized ventilator settings. This paper presents model-based calculations of inspiration pressure (pI), inspiration and expiration time (tI, tE) in pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) and a retrospective evaluation of its results in a group of mechanically ventilated patients. Incorporating the identified first order model of respiratory mechanics in the basic equation of alveolar ventilation yielded a nonlinear relation between ventilation parameters during PCV. Given this patient-specific relation, optimized settings in terms of minimal pI and adequate tE can be obtained. We then retrospectively analyzed data from 16 ICU patients with mixed pathologies, whose ventilation had been previously optimized by ICU physicians with the goal of minimization of inspiration pressure, and compared the algorithm's 'optimized' settings to the settings that had been chosen by the physicians. The presented algorithm visualizes the patient-specific relations between inspiration pressure and inspiration time. The algorithm's calculated results highly correlate to the physician's ventilation settings with r = 0.975 for the inspiration pressure, and r = 0.902 for the inspiration time. The nonlinear patient-specific relations of ventilation parameters become transparent and support the determination of individualized ventilator settings according to therapeutic goals. Thus, the algorithm is feasible for a variety of ventilated ICU patients and has the potential of improving lung-protective ventilation by minimizing inspiratory pressures and by helping to avoid the build-up of clinically significant intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure.

  17. A Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Ibuprofen for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in a Bovine Model

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Paul; Behrens, Nicole; Carvallo Chaigneau, Francisco R.; McEligot, Heather; Agrawal, Karan; Newman, John W.; Anderson, Mark; Gershwin, Laurel J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to the virus. RSV is accompanied by elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) which is followed by neutrophil led inflammation in the lung. Ibuprofen is a prototypical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that decreases PGE2 levels by inhibiting cyclooxygenase. Hypotheses We hypothesized that treatment of RSV with ibuprofen would decrease PGE2 levels, modulate the immune response, decrease clinical illness, and decrease the histopathological lung changes in a bovine model of RSV. We further hypothesized that viral replication would be unaffected. Methods We performed a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen in 16 outbred Holstein calves that we infected with RSV. We measured clinical scores, cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and endocannabinoid products in plasma and mediastinal lymph nodes and interleukin (Il)-4, Il-13, Il-17 and interferon-γ in mediastinal lymph nodes. RSV shedding was measured daily and nasal Il-6, Il-8 and Il-17 every other day. The calves were necropsied on Day 10 post inoculation and histology performed. Results One calf in the ibuprofen group required euthanasia on Day 8 of infection for respiratory distress. Clinical scores (p<0.01) and weight gain (p = 0.08) seemed better in the ibuprofen group. Ibuprofen decreased cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and cytochrome P450 products, and increased monoacylglycerols in lung lymph nodes. Ibuprofen modulated the immune response as measured by narrowed range of observed Il-13, Il-17 and IFN-γ gene expression in mediastinal lymph nodes. Lung histology was not different between groups, and viral shedding was increased in calves randomized to ibuprofen. Conclusions Ibuprofen decreased PGE2, modulated the immune

  18. A Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Ibuprofen for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in a Bovine Model.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Paul; Behrens, Nicole; Carvallo Chaigneau, Francisco R; McEligot, Heather; Agrawal, Karan; Newman, John W; Anderson, Mark; Gershwin, Laurel J

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to the virus. RSV is accompanied by elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) which is followed by neutrophil led inflammation in the lung. Ibuprofen is a prototypical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that decreases PGE2 levels by inhibiting cyclooxygenase. We hypothesized that treatment of RSV with ibuprofen would decrease PGE2 levels, modulate the immune response, decrease clinical illness, and decrease the histopathological lung changes in a bovine model of RSV. We further hypothesized that viral replication would be unaffected. We performed a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen in 16 outbred Holstein calves that we infected with RSV. We measured clinical scores, cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and endocannabinoid products in plasma and mediastinal lymph nodes and interleukin (Il)-4, Il-13, Il-17 and interferon-γ in mediastinal lymph nodes. RSV shedding was measured daily and nasal Il-6, Il-8 and Il-17 every other day. The calves were necropsied on Day 10 post inoculation and histology performed. One calf in the ibuprofen group required euthanasia on Day 8 of infection for respiratory distress. Clinical scores (p<0.01) and weight gain (p = 0.08) seemed better in the ibuprofen group. Ibuprofen decreased cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and cytochrome P450 products, and increased monoacylglycerols in lung lymph nodes. Ibuprofen modulated the immune response as measured by narrowed range of observed Il-13, Il-17 and IFN-γ gene expression in mediastinal lymph nodes. Lung histology was not different between groups, and viral shedding was increased in calves randomized to ibuprofen. Ibuprofen decreased PGE2, modulated the immune response, and improved clinical outcomes. However lung

  19. PCR based bronchoscopic detection of common respiratory pathogens in chronic cough: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Viral respiratory tract infection is the most frequent cause of acute cough and is reported at onset in about one third of patients with chronic cough. Persistent infection is therefore one possible explanation for the cough reflex hypersensitivity and pulmonary inflammation reported in chronic cough patients. Methods Bronchoscopic endobronchial biopsies and bronchoalveolar lavage cell counts were obtained from ten healthy volunteers and twenty treatment resistant chronic cough patients (10 selected for lavage lymphocytosis). A screen for known respiratory pathogens was performed on biopsy tissue. Chronic cough patients also underwent cough reflex sensitivity testing using citric acid. Results There was no significant difference in incidence of infection between healthy volunteers and chronic cough patients (p = 0.115) or non-lymphocytic and lymphocytic groups (p = 0.404). BAL cell percentages were not significantly different between healthy volunteers and chronic cough patients without lymphocytosis. Lymphocytic patients however had a significantly raised percentage of lymphocytes (p < 0.01), neutrophils (p < 0.05), eosinophils (p < 0.05) and decreased macrophages (p < 0.001) verses healthy volunteers. There was no significant difference in the cough reflex sensitivity between non-lymphocytic and lymphocytic patients (p = 0.536). Conclusions This study indicates latent infection in the lung is unlikely to play an important role in chronic cough, but a role for undetected or undetectable pathogens in either the lung or a distal site could not be ruled out. Trials registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN62337037 & ISRCTN40147207 PMID:22978556

  20. Identification of glucocorticoid-regulated genes that control cell proliferation during murine respiratory development

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Anthony D; Tan, Kheng H; Olsson, P Fredrik; Zieba, Malgorzata; Flecknoe, Sharon J; Liddicoat, Douglas R; Mollard, Richard; Hooper, Stuart B; Cole, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a vital role in fetal respiratory development and act via the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to regulate transcription of key target genes. GR-null mice die at birth due to respiratory dysfunction associated with hypercellularity and atelectasis. To identify events associated with this lung phenotype we examined perinatal cellular proliferation rates and apoptotic indices. We demonstrate that compared to wild-type controls, day 18.5 postcoitum (p.c.) GR-null mouse lungs display significantly increased cell proliferation rates (1.8-fold P < 0.05) and no change in apoptosis. To examine underlying molecular mechanisms, we compared whole genome expression profiles by microarray analysis at 18.5 days p.c. Pathways relating to cell proliferation, division and cell cycle were significantly down-regulated while pathways relating to carbohydrate metabolism, kinase activities and immune responses were significantly up-regulated. Differential levels of gene expression were verified by quantitative-RT-PCR and/or Northern analysis. Key regulators of proliferation differentially expressed in the lung of 18.5 p.c. GR-null lungs included p21CIP1 (decreased 2.9-fold, P < 0.05), a negative regulator of the cell cycle, and Mdk (increased 6.0-fold, P < 0.05), a lung growth factor. The more under-expressed genes in 18.5 p.c. GR-null lungs included Chi3l3 (11-fold, P < 0.05), a macrophage inflammatory response gene and Ela1 (9.4-fold, P < 0.05), an extracellular matrix remodeling enzyme. Our results demonstrate that GR affects the transcriptional status of a number of regulatory processes during late fetal lung development. Amongst these processes is cell proliferation whereby GR induces expression of cell cycle repressors while suppressing induction of a well characterized cell cycle stimulator. PMID:17901120

  1. Progress in understanding and controlling respiratory syncytial virus: still crazy after all these years.

    PubMed

    Collins, Peter L; Melero, José A

    2011-12-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects everyone worldwide early in life and is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract disease in the pediatric population as well as in the elderly and in profoundly immunosuppressed individuals. RSV is an enveloped, nonsegmented negative-sense RNA virus that is classified in Family Paramyxoviridae and is one of its more complex members. Although the replicative cycle of RSV follows the general pattern of the Paramyxoviridae, it encodes additional proteins. Two of these (NS1 and NS2) inhibit the host type I and type III interferon (IFN) responses, among other functions, and another gene encodes two novel RNA synthesis factors (M2-1 and M2-2). The attachment (G) glycoprotein also exhibits unusual features, such as high sequence variability, extensive glycosylation, cytokine mimicry, and a shed form that helps the virus evade neutralizing antibodies. RSV is notable for being able to efficiently infect early in life, with the peak of hospitalization at 2-3 months of age. It also is notable for the ability to reinfect symptomatically throughout life without need for significant antigenic change, although immunity from prior infection reduces disease. It is widely thought that re-infection is due to an ability of RSV to inhibit or subvert the host immune response. Mechanisms of viral pathogenesis remain controversial. RSV is notable for a historic, tragic pediatric vaccine failure involving a formalin-inactivated virus preparation that was evaluated in the 1960s and that was poorly protective and paradoxically primed for enhanced RSV disease. RSV also is notable for the development of a successful strategy for passive immunoprophylaxis of high-risk infants using RSV-neutralizing antibodies. Vaccines and new antiviral drugs are in pre-clinical and clinical development, but controlling RSV remains a formidable challenge. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. A Home-Based Walking Program Improves Respiratory Endurance in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Matos-Garcia, Bruna C; Rocco, Isadora S; Maiorano, Lara D; Peixoto, Thatiana C A; Moreira, Rita Simone L; Carvalho, Antonio C C; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Arena, Ross; Gomes, Walter J; Guizilini, Solange

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate respiratory muscle strength and endurance in the inpatient period in patients who recently experienced myocardial infarction (MI) and investigate the effects of a home-based walking program on respiratory strength and endurance in low-risk patients after MI. Patients were randomized into a usual-care group (UCG) entailing regular care (n = 23) and an intervention group (IG) entailing an outpatient home-based walking program (n = 31). Healthy sex- and age-matched participants served as a control group for respiratory endurance variables. Respiratory muscle strength was evaluated through maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and endurance during the inpatient period, at 15 days, and at 60 days after MI. Submaximal functional capacity was determined by a 6-minute walk test (6MWT) at hospital discharge and 60 days after MI. Both groups showed impaired inspiratory muscle strength at hospital discharge. When compared with healthy individuals, after MI, patients had worse respiratory muscle endurance pressure (PTHmax = 73.02 ± 8.40 vs 44.47 ± 16.32; P < 0.05) and time (Tlim = 324.1 ± 12.2 vs 58.7 ± 93.3; P < 0.05). Only the IG showed a significant improvement in MIP and PTHmax at 15 days and 60 days after MI (P < 0.05). When comparing groups, the IG achieved higher values for MIP, PTHmax, and Tlim 15 and 60 days after MI (P < 0.01). The 60-day assessment revealed that the 6MWT distance and level of physical activity was significantly higher in the IG compared with the UCG. Low-risk patients recently experiencing MI demonstrate impaired MIP and respiratory endurance compared with healthy participants. A home-based walking program improved respiratory endurance and functional capacity. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Viral respiratory diseases (ILT, aMPV infections, IB): are they ever under control?

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard C

    2010-02-01

    1. The use of vaccines is the main approach to control of the economically important poultry viral respiratory diseases infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT), avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infections and infectious bronchitis (IB). This paper appraises the current methods of vaccine control in the light of the nature of each virus and epidemiological factors associated with each disease. 2. Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) exists as a single type with a wide range of disease severity. It is a serious disease in certain regions of the world. Recent work has distinguished molecular differences between vaccine and field strains and vaccine virus can be a cause of disease. Vaccines have remained unaltered for many years but new ones are being developed to counter vaccine side effects and reversion and reactivation of latent virus. 3. Avian metapneumoviruses, the cause of turkey rhinotracheitis and respiratory disease in chickens exists as 4 subtypes, A, B, C and D. A and B are widespread and vaccines work well provided that accurate doses are given. Newer vaccine developments are designed to eliminate reversion and possibly counter the appearance of newer field strains which may break through established vaccine coverage. 4. IB presents the biggest problem of the three. Being an unstable RNA virus, part of the viral genome that codes for the S1 spike gene can undergo mutation and recombination so that important antigenic variants can appear irregularly which may evade existing vaccine protection. While conventional vaccines work well against homologous types, new strategies are needed to counter this instability. Molecular approaches involving tailoring viruses to suit field challenges are in progress. However, the simple use of two genetically different vaccines to protect against a wide range of heterologous types is now a widespread practice that is very effective. 5. None of the three diseases described can claim to be satisfactorily controlled and it remains

  4. Autonomic cardiovascular and respiratory control during prolonged spaceflights aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Baevsky, Roman M; Baranov, Victor M; Funtova, Irina I; Diedrich, André; Pashenko, Andrey V; Chernikova, Anja G; Drescher, Jürgen; Jordan, Jens; Tank, Jens

    2007-07-01

    Impaired autonomic control represents a cardiovascular risk factor during long-term spaceflight. Little has been reported on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) during and after prolonged spaceflight. We tested the hypothesis that cardiovascular control remains stable during prolonged spaceflight. Electrocardiography, photoplethysmography, and respiratory frequency (RF) were assessed in eight male cosmonauts (age 41-50 yr, body-mass index of 22-28 kg/m2) during long-term missions (flight lengths of 162-196 days). Recordings were made 60 and 30 days before the flight, every 4 wk during flight, and on days 3 and 6 postflight during spontaneous and controlled respiration. Orthostatic testing was performed pre- and postflight. RF and BP decreased during spaceflight (P < 0.05). Mean HR and HRV in the low- and high-frequency bands did not change during spaceflight. However, the individual responses were different and correlated with preflight values. Pulse-wave transit time decreased during spaceflight (P < 0.05). HRV reached during controlled respiration (6 breaths/min) decreased in six and increased in one cosmonaut during flight. The most pronounced changes in HR, BP, and HRV occurred after landing. The decreases in BP and RF combined with stable HR and HRV during flight suggest functional adaptation rather than pathological changes. Pulse-wave transit time shortening in our study is surprising and may reflect cardiac output redistribution in space. The decrease in HRV during controlled respiration (6 breaths/min) indicates reduced parasympathetic reserve, which may contribute to postflight disturbances.

  5. KCNQ channels determine serotonergic modulation of ventral surface chemoreceptors and respiratory drive.

    PubMed

    Hawryluk, Joanna M; Moreira, Thiago S; Takakura, Ana C; Wenker, Ian C; Tzingounis, Anastasios V; Mulkey, Daniel K

    2012-11-21

    Chemosensitive neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) regulate breathing in response to CO(2)/H(+) changes. Their activity is also sensitive to neuromodulatory inputs from multiple respiratory centers, and thus they serve as a key nexus of respiratory control. However, molecular mechanisms that control their activity and susceptibility to neuromodulation are unknown. Here, we show in vitro and in vivo that KCNQ channels are critical determinants of RTN neural activity. In particular, we find that pharmacological block of KCNQ channels (XE991, 10 μm) increased basal activity and CO(2) responsiveness of RTN neurons in rat brain slices, whereas KCNQ channel activation (retigabine, 2-40 μm) silenced these neurons. Interestingly, we also find that KCNQ and apamin-sensitive SK channels act synergistically to regulate firing rate of RTN chemoreceptors; simultaneous blockade of both channels led to a increase in CO(2) responsiveness. Furthermore, we also show that KCNQ channels but not SK channels are downstream effectors of serotonin modulation of RTN activity in vitro. In contrast, inhibition of KCNQ channel did not prevent modulation of RTN activity by Substance P or thyrotropin-releasing hormone, previously identified neuromodulators of RTN chemoreception. Importantly, we also show that KCNQ channels are critical for RTN activity in vivo. Inhibition of KCNQ channels lowered the CO(2) threshold for phrenic nerve discharge in anesthetized rats and decreased the ventilatory response to serotonin in awake and anesthetized animals. Given that serotonergic dysfunction may contribute to respiratory failure, our findings suggest KCNQ channels as a new therapeutic avenue for respiratory complications associated with multiple neurological disorders.

  6. Prenatal Vitamin D Supplementation and Child Respiratory Health: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Goldring, Stephen T.; Griffiths, Chris J.; Martineau, Adrian R.; Robinson, Stephen; Yu, Christina; Poulton, Sheree; Kirkby, Jane C.; Stocks, Janet; Hooper, Richard; Shaheen, Seif O.; Warner, John O.; Boyle, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Observational studies suggest high prenatal vitamin D intake may be associated with reduced childhood wheezing. We examined the effect of prenatal vitamin D on childhood wheezing in an interventional study. Methods We randomised 180 pregnant women at 27 weeks gestation to either no vitamin D, 800 IU ergocalciferol daily until delivery or single oral bolus of 200,000 IU cholecalciferol, in an ethnically stratified, randomised controlled trial. Supplementation improved but did not optimise vitamin D status. Researchers blind to allocation assessed offspring at 3 years. Primary outcome was any history of wheeze assessed by validated questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included atopy, respiratory infection, impulse oscillometry and exhaled nitric oxide. Primary analyses used logistic and linear regression. Results We evaluated 158 of 180 (88%) offspring at age 3 years for the primary outcome. Atopy was assessed by skin test for 95 children (53%), serum IgE for 86 (48%), exhaled nitric oxide for 62 (34%) and impulse oscillometry of acceptable quality for 51 (28%). We found no difference between supplemented and control groups in risk of wheeze [no vitamin D: 14/50 (28%); any vitamin D: 26/108 (24%) (risk ratio 0.86; 95% confidence interval 0.49, 1.50; P = 0.69)]. There was no significant difference in atopy, eczema risk, lung function or exhaled nitric oxide between supplemented groups and controls. Conclusion Prenatal vitamin D supplementation in late pregnancy that had a modest effect on cord blood vitamin D level, was not associated with decreased wheezing in offspring at age three years. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN68645785 PMID:23826104

  7. Genes controlling vaccine responses and disease resistance to respiratory viral pathogens in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Elizabeth J.; Baxter, Rebecca; Leach, Richard J.; Jann, Oliver C.

    2012-01-01

    Farm animals remain at risk of endemic, exotic and newly emerging viruses. Vaccination is often promoted as the best possible solution, and yet for many pathogens, either there are no appropriate vaccines or those that are available are far from ideal. A complementary approach to disease control may be to identify genes and chromosomal regions that underlie genetic variation in disease resistance and response to vaccination. However, identification of the causal polymorphisms is not straightforward as it generally requires large numbers of animals with linked phenotypes and genotypes. Investigation of genes underlying complex traits such as resistance or response to viral pathogens requires several genetic approaches including candidate genes deduced from knowledge about the cellular pathways leading to protection or pathology, or unbiased whole genome scans using markers spread across the genome. Evidence for host genetic variation exists for a number of viral diseases in cattle including bovine respiratory disease and anecdotally, foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). We immunised and vaccinated a cattle cross herd with a 40-mer peptide derived from FMDV and a vaccine against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Genetic variation has been quantified. A candidate gene approach has grouped high and low antibody and T cell responders by common motifs in the peptide binding pockets of the bovine major histocompatibility complex (BoLA) DRB3 gene. This suggests that vaccines with a minimal number of epitopes that are recognised by most cattle could be designed. Whole genome scans using microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers has revealed many novel quantitative trait loci (QTL) and SNP markers controlling both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, some of which are in genes of known immunological relevance including the toll-like receptors (TLRs). The sequencing, assembly and annotation of livestock genomes and is continuing apace. In

  8. An assessment of workplace programmes designed to control inhalation risks using respiratory protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Bell, Nikki; Vaughan, Nicholas P; Morris, Len; Griffin, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Few studies have assessed respiratory protective equipment (RPE) failures at the organizational level despite evidence to suggest that compliance with good practice may be low. The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of what current RPE programmes look like across industry and how this compares with good practice. Twenty cross-industry site visits were conducted with companies that had RPE programmes in place. Visits involved management interviews to explore current RPE systems and procedures and the decision making underpinning these. Observations of RPE operatives were included followed by short interviews to discuss the behaviours observed. Post-site assessments jointly undertaken by an RPE scientist and psychologist produced ratings for each site on six critical aspects of RPE programmes (knowledge/awareness, selection, use, training/information, supervision, and storage/cleaning/maintenance). Overall ratings for theoretical competence (i.e. management knowledge of RPE) and practical control (i.e. actual RPE practice on the shop floor) were also given. Qualitative analysis was performed on all interview data. The performance of RPE programmes varied across industry. Fewer than half the companies visited were considered to have an acceptable level of theoretical competence and practical control. Four distinct groups emerged from the 20 sites studied, ranging from Learners (low theoretical competence and practical control--four sites), Developers (acceptable theoretical competence and low practical control--five sites), and Fortuitous (low theoretical competence and acceptable practical control--two sites), to Proficient (acceptable theoretical competence and practical control--nine sites). None of the companies visited were achieving optimal control through the use of RPE. Widespread inadequacies were found with programme implementation, particularly training, supervision, and maintenance. Our taxonomy based on the four groups (Learners, Developers

  9. Detection of nine respiratory RNA viruses using three multiplex RT-PCR assays incorporating a novel RNA internal control transcript.

    PubMed

    Auburn, Helen; Zuckerman, Mark; Broughton, Simon; Greenough, Anne; Smith, Melvyn

    2011-09-01

    Real-time PCR is a significant improvement over viral isolation and immunofluorescence for routinely detecting respiratory viruses. We developed three real-time internally controlled multiplex RT-PCR assays for detecting nine respiratory viruses. An internal control transcript consisting of a chimeric plasmid was synthesised and incorporated into each multiplex to monitor amplification efficiency, including inhibition. Each multiplex assay was developed on the Rotor-Gene 3000 and evaluated using RNA extracts from 126 nasopharyngeal aspirates from 112 pre-term infants. All 44/126 (35%) samples positive by immunofluorescence were confirmed by multiplex RT-PCR. Additionally, respiratory syncytial virus RNA was detected in 5 samples, influenza A virus RNA in 2 samples and thirteen (10%) dual infections by multiplex RT-PCR were noted. Inclusion of the RNA internal control did not affect the amplification efficiency of the target sequences and only 2 of 1256 (0.2%) samples tested over a 12 month period were inhibitory. Together with the improved sensitivity of the internally controlled multiplex RT-PCR assays over the older technology and the ability to detect co-infections, the internal control monitored the efficiency of both the RT and PCR steps and indicated inhibition, saving time and costs on running duplicate samples with a "spiked" inhibition control. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Respiratory Infections in the U.S. Military: Recent Experience and Control

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Michael J.; Myers, Christopher A.; Cummings, James F.; Vest, Kelly G.; Russell, Kevin L.; Sanchez, Joyce L.; Hiser, Michelle J.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY This comprehensive review outlines the impact of military-relevant respiratory infections, with special attention to recruit training environments, influenza pandemics in 1918 to 1919 and 2009 to 2010, and peacetime operations and conflicts in the past 25 years. Outbreaks and epidemiologic investigations of viral and bacterial infections among high-risk groups are presented, including (i) experience by recruits at training centers, (ii) impact on advanced trainees in special settings, (iii) morbidity sustained by shipboard personnel at sea, and (iv) experience of deployed personnel. Utilizing a pathogen-by-pathogen approach, we examine (i) epidemiology, (ii) impact in terms of morbidity and operational readiness, (iii) clinical presentation and outbreak potential, (iv) diagnostic modalities, (v) treatment approaches, and (vi) vaccine and other control measures. We also outline military-specific initiatives in (i) surveillance, (ii) vaccine development and policy, (iii) novel influenza and coronavirus diagnostic test development and surveillance methods, (iv) influenza virus transmission and severity prediction modeling efforts, and (v) evaluation and implementation of nonvaccine, nonpharmacologic interventions. PMID:26085551

  11. Transmission of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus from persistently infected sows to contact controls.

    PubMed Central

    Bierk, M D; Dee, S A; Rossow, K D; Otake, S; Collins, J E; Molitor, T W

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) could persist in non-pregnant sows and if persistently infected sows could transmit virus to naive contact controls. Twelve PRRSV-naive, non-pregnant sows (index sows) were infected with a field isolate of PRRSV and housed in individual isolation rooms for 42 to 56 days postinfection. Following this period, 1 naive contact sow was placed in each room divided by a gate allowing nose-to-nose contact with a single index sow. Index sows were not viremic at the time of contact sow entry. Virus nucleic acid was detected by polymerase chain reaction, and infectious virus was detected by virus isolation in sera from 3 of the 12 contact sows at 49, 56, and 86 days postinfection. All 3 infected contacts developed PRRSV antibodies. Virus nucleic acid was detected in tissues of all of the 12 index sows at 72 or 86 days postinfection. Nucleic acid sequencing indicated that representative samples from index and infected contacts were homologous (> 99%) to the PRRSV used to infect index sows at the onset of the study. This study demonstrates that PRRSV can persist in sows and that persistently infected sows can transmit virus to naive contact animals. PMID:11768134

  12. Vagal afferents modulate cytokine-mediated respiratory control at the neonatal medulla oblongata

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Kannan V.; Kc, Prabha; Hoxha, Zana; Mayer, Catherine A.; Wilson, Christopher G.; Martin, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Perinatal sepsis and inflammation trigger lung and brain injury in preterm infants, and associated apnea of prematurity. We hypothesized that endotoxin exposure in the immature lung would upregulate proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression in the medulla oblongata and be associated with impaired respiratory control. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1 mg/kg) or saline was administered intratracheally to rat pups and medulla oblongatas were harvested for quantifying expression of mRNA for proinflammatory cytokines. LPS-exposure significantly increased medullary mRNA for IL-1β and IL-6, and vagotomy blunted this increase in IL-1β, but not IL-6. Whole-body flow plethysmography revealed that LPS-exposed pups had an attenuated ventilatory response to hypoxia both before and after carotid sinus nerve transection. Immunochemical expression of IL-1β within the nucleus of the solitary tract and area postrema was increased after LPS-exposure. In summary, intratracheal endotoxin-exposure in rat pups is associated with upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines in the medulla oblongata that is vagally-mediated for IL-1β and associated with an impaired hypoxic ventilatory response. PMID:21397055

  13. Vagal afferents modulate cytokine-mediated respiratory control at the neonatal medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Balan, Kannan V; Kc, Prabha; Hoxha, Zana; Mayer, Catherine A; Wilson, Christopher G; Martin, Richard J

    2011-09-30

    Perinatal sepsis and inflammation trigger lung and brain injury in preterm infants, and associated apnea of prematurity. We hypothesized that endotoxin exposure in the immature lung would upregulate proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression in the medulla oblongata and be associated with impaired respiratory control. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg) or saline was administered intratracheally to rat pups and medulla oblongatas were harvested for quantifying expression of mRNA for proinflammatory cytokines. LPS-exposure significantly increased medullary mRNA for IL-1β and IL-6, and vagotomy blunted this increase in IL-1β, but not IL-6. Whole-body flow plethysmography revealed that LPS-exposed pups had an attenuated ventilatory response to hypoxia both before and after carotid sinus nerve transection. Immunochemical expression of IL-1β within the nucleus of the solitary tract and area postrema was increased after LPS-exposure. In summary, intratracheal endotoxin-exposure in rat pups is associated with upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines in the medulla oblongata that is vagally mediated for IL-1β and associated with an impaired hypoxic ventilatory response.

  14. Delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies for respiratory tract infections in primary care: pragmatic, factorial, randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Little, Paul; Moore, Michael; Kelly, Jo; Williamson, Ian; Leydon, Geraldine; McDermott, Lisa; Mullee, Mark; Stuart, Beth

    2014-03-06

    To estimate the effectiveness of different strategies involving delayed antibiotic prescription for acute respiratory tract infections. Open, pragmatic, parallel group, factorial, randomised controlled trial. Primary care in the United Kingdom. 889 patients aged 3 years and over with acute respiratory tract infection, recruited between 3 March 2010 and 28 March 2012 by 53 health professionals in 25 practices. Patients judged not to need immediate antibiotics were randomised to undergo four strategies of delayed prescription: recontact for a prescription, post-dated prescription, collection of the prescription, and be given the prescription (patient led). During the trial, a strategy of no antibiotic prescription was added as another randomised comparison. Analysis was intention to treat. Mean symptom severity (0-6 scale) at days 2-4 (primary outcome), antibiotic use, and patients' beliefs in the effectiveness of antibiotic use. Secondary analysis included comparison with immediate use of antibiotics. Mean symptom severity had minimal differences between the strategies involving no prescription and delayed prescription (recontact, post-date, collection, patient led; 1.62, 1.60, 1.82, 1.68, 1.75, respectively; likelihood ratio test χ(2) 2.61, P=0.625). Duration of symptoms rated moderately bad or worse also did not differ between no prescription and delayed prescription strategies combined (median 3 days v 4 days; 4.29, P=0.368). There were modest and non-significant differences in patients very satisfied with the consultation between the randomised groups (79%, 74%, 80%, 88%, 89%, respectively; likelihood ratio test χ(2) 2.38, P=0.667), belief in antibiotics (71%, 74%, 73%, 72%, 66%; 1.62, P=0.805), or antibiotic use (26%, 37%, 37%, 33%, 39%; 4.96, P=0.292). By contrast, most patients given immediate antibiotics used antibiotics (97%) and strongly believed in them (93%), but with no benefit for symptom severity (score 1.76) or duration (median 4 days). Strategies

  15. Physiological evidence that the vestibular system participates in autonomic and respiratory control.

    PubMed

    Yates, B J; Miller, A D

    1998-01-01

    Electrical or natural stimulation of the vestibular system results in changes in blood pressure and respiratory motor output. An increase in excitatory drive on the sympathetic nervous system occurs during nose-up vestibular stimulation in cats; this response is appropriate to offset orthostatic hypotension that could result from nose-up body rotations during movements such as vertical climbing. In addition, transection of the vestibular nerves in anesthetized or awake cats compromises the ability to correct decreases in blood pressure that result from nose-up body tilt. The vestibular system also has influences on respiratory muscles; these effects are appropriate to participate in making adjustments in the activity of respiratory muscles that are necessary to offset mechanical constraints on these muscles that occur during changes in body position. These data thus suggest that the influences of the vestibular system on the autonomic and respiratory systems serve to maintain homeostasis during movement.

  16. Assessment of Autonomic Control and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia Using Point Process Models of Human Heart Beat Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe; Brown, Emery N.; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Tracking the autonomic control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) from electrocardiogram and respiratory measurements is an important problem in cardiovascular control. We propose a point process adaptive filter algorithm based on an inverse Gaussian model to track heart beat intervals that incorporates respiratory measurements as a covariate and provides an analytic form for computing a dynamic estimate of RSA gain. We use Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests and autocorrelation function analyses to assess model goodness-of-fit. We illustrate the properties of the new dynamic estimate of RSA in the analysis of simulated heart beat data and actual heart beat data recorded from subjects in a four-state postural study of heart beat dynamics: control, sympathetic blockade, parasympathetic blockade, and combined sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade. In addition to giving an accurate description of the heart beat data, our adaptive filter algorithm confirms established findings pointing at a vagally mediated RSA, and it provides a new dynamic RSA estimate that can be used to track cardiovascular control between and within a broad range of postural, pharmacological and age conditions. Our paradigm suggests a possible framework for designing a device for ambulatory monitoring and assessment of autonomic control in both laboratory research and clinical practice. PMID:19272971

  17. Respiratory diseases among union carpenters: cohort and case-control analyses.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, H J; Dement, J M

    1998-02-01

    Lung diseases, defined by ICD-9 diagnoses on medical insurance claims, were studied through the combined use of administrative records, private health insurance, and workers' compensation claims for a cohort of 10,938 active union carpenters between 1989 and 1992. The cohort defined the study base for a nested case-control study, in which cases (n = 220) were initially identified by an ICD-9 code for asthma in private health insurance or workers' compensation files. A questionnaire was used to collect information on respiratory history and potential home and workplace exposures. Questions used by Burney et al. to define a discriminant function predictor (DFP) of a bronchial response to histamine were used to reclassify cases and controls for further exploratory analyses. Bronchitis accounted for over 50% of the lung disease cases among this cohort followed by asthma, chronic obstructive airway disease, and chronic bronchitis. Incidence density rates of asthma, chronic bronchitis, and chronic obstructive airway disease adjusted for age, sex, and time in the union increased with increasing age. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program data to estimate expected lung cancer cases in our cohort, an elevated standardized incidence rate (SIR) was seen among male carpenters between the ages of 45-54. Smoking history was not available for the entire cohort. Using the ICD-9 or Burney case definition of asthma, odds ratios were significantly elevated for exposure to hay, epoxy paints, enzymes, animals, and molds. Additional exposures associated with asthma using Burney's definition, are ones to which a majority of these carpenters were exposed including cement, drywall, and demolition dusts.

  18. Efficacy of multiparametric telemonitoring on respiratory outcomes in elderly people with COPD: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a highly prevalent condition associated with a high health care resource consumption and health care expenditures, driven mainly by exacerbations-related hospitalizations. Telemedicine has been proposed as a mean for timely detection of exacerbation, but the available evidence is inadequate to provide conclusive information on its efficacy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a telemonitoring system in reducing COPD-related hospitalizations in an elderly population with COPD. Methods This is a parallel arms, randomized trial including patients aged 65 or older with COPD in GOLD stages II and III enrolled in a Pulmonary Medicine outpatient facility. Patients were randomly assigned to receive a non-invasive system able to telemonitor vital signs (oxygen saturation, heart rate, near-body temperature, overall physical activity) or standard care, and were followed up for 9 months. The outcome measures were the number of exacerbations and exacerbation-related hospitalization. Results Fifty patients were included in the telemonitoring group and 49 in the control group. The incidence rate of respiratory events was 28/100 person/years in the telemonitoring group vs. 42/100 person/years in the control group (incidence rate ratio: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.32 – 1.36). The corresponding figures for hospital admissions where 13/100 person/years and 20/100 person/years, respectively (IRR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.21 – 1.86). Conclusions In our study, COPD patients followed up with the aid of a multiparametric remote monitoring system experienced a lower rate of exacerbations and COPD-related hospitalizations compared to patients followed up using the standard model of care. These results need to be replicated in larger studies before they can be applied to the general COPD population. Trial registration number: NCT01481506 (clinicaltrials.gov). Funding: co-financed by Lazio Region and Intersistemi Inc. PMID:23497109

  19. Effects of pressure-controlled and volume-controlled ventilation on respiratory mechanics and systemic stress response during prone position.

    PubMed

    Sen, Oznur; Bakan, Mefkur; Umutoglu, Tarik; Aydın, Nurdan; Toptas, Mehmet; Akkoc, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Prone position during general anesthesia for special surgical operations may be related with increased airway pressure, decreased pulmonary and thoracic compliance that may be explained by restriction of chest expansion and compression of abdomen. The optimum ventilation mode for anesthetized patients on prone position was not described and studies comparing volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) and pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) during prone position are limited. We hypothesized that PCV instead of VCV during prone position could achieve lower airway pressures and reduce the systemic stress response. In this study, we aimed to compare the effects of PCV and VCV modes during prone position on respiratory mechanics, oxygenation, and hemodynamics, as well as blood cortisol and insulin levels, which has not been investigated before. Fifty-four ASA I-II patients, 18-70 years of age, who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy on prone position, were randomly selected to receive either the PCV (Group PC, n = 27) or VCV (Group VC, n = 27) under general anesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl. Blood sampling was made for baseline arterial blood gases (ABG), cortisol, insulin, and glucose levels. After anesthesia induction and endotracheal intubation, patients in Group PC were given pressure support to form 8 mL/kg tidal volume and patients in Group VC was maintained at 8 mL/kg tidal volume calculated using predicted body weight. All patients were maintained with 5 cmH2O PEEP. Respiratory parameters were recorded during supine and prone position. Assessment of ABG and sampling for cortisol, insulin and glucose levels were repeated during surgery and 60 min after extubation. P-peak and P-plateau levels during supine and prone positions were significantly higher and P-mean and compliance levels during prone position were significantly lower in Group VC when compared with Group PC. Postoperative PaO2 level was significantly higher in Group PC compared with Group

  20. [Neuromodulatory effects of caffeine and bromazepam on visual event-related potential (P300): a comparative study].

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Mariana; Veiga, Heloisa; Deslandes, Andréa; Cagy, Maurício; McDowell, Kaleb; Pompeu, Fernando; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2005-06-01

    The P300 component of the event-related potential (ERP) is a general measurement of "cognitive efficiency". It is an index of the ability of an individual's central nervous system (CNS) to process incoming information. To compare the neuromodulatory effects of caffeine and bromazepam on the visual ERP (P300), in relation to a P300 normative database. 15 right-handed individuals (7 male and 8 female), between 20 and 30 years of age, healthy, free of any cognitive impairment and not making use of psychoactive substances were studied. Participants were submitted to a visual discrimination task, which employed the "oddball" paradigm, after the administration of caffeine and bromazepam, in a randomized, double-blind design. Statistically significant differences were observed when the caffeine and bromazepam conditions were compared to the normative database. The present results suggest that caffeine and bromazepam have distinct modulatory effects on CNS functioning.

  1. A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of a fiberglass manufacturing facility.

    PubMed Central

    Chiazze, L; Watkins, D K; Fryar, C

    1992-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to determine the influence of non-workplace factors on risk of respiratory disease among workers at the Owens-Corning Fiberglas plant in Newark, Ohio. Cases and controls were drawn from a historical cohort mortality study conducted on behalf of the Thermal Insulation Manufacturers Association (TIMA) of workers employed at Newark for at least one year between 1 January 1940 and 31 December 1963 and followed up to the end of 1982. The TIMA study reported a statistically significant increase in respiratory cancer (compared with national death rates). Interviews were completed for 144 lung cancer cases and 299 matching controls and 102 non-malignant respiratory disease cases and 201 matching controls. Unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) were used to assess the association between lung cancer or non-malignant respiratory disease and birthplace, education, income, marital state, smoking with a duration of six months or more, age at which smoking first started, and duration of smoking. Only the smoking variables were statistically significant. For lung cancer, of the variables entered into a conditional logistic regression model, only the smoking OR of 23.4 (95% CI 3.2-172.9) was statistically significant. For non-malignant respiratory disease no variables entered into the final model were statistically significant. Results of the interview portion of our case-control study clearly indicate that smoking is the most important non-workplace factor for risk of lung cancer in this group of workers. Smoking does not seem to play as important a part, however, for non-malignant respiratory disease. Prevalence of cigarette smoking at the Newark plant was estimated for birth cohorts by calendar year. Corresponding data for the United States were compiled from national smoking surveys. Prevalence of cigarette smoking for Newark in 1955 appears to be sufficiently greater than the corresponding United States data in 1955 to suggest that some of the

  2. Respiratory effects of biomass fuel combustion on rural fish smokers in a Nigerian fishing settlement: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Dienye, Paul; Akani, Alex; Okokon, Ita

    2016-06-01

    The aim was to study the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and assess the lung function of fish smokers in Nigeria. A case control study was done among fish smokers in Nigeria. Women aged 15 years or older (n=210) involved in fish smoking and equal number of matched controls were interviewed on respiratory symptoms and their peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) measured. Data was analysed using chi square test, student's t-test and odd ratios. Both groups were similar in their personal characteristics. The test group had significantly increased occurrence of sneezing (153; 72.86%), catarrh (159; 75.71%), cough (138; 65.71%) and chest pain (59; 28.10%) compared with the control group, odds ratio (OR) 2.49, 95% confidence interval CI (1.62-3.82), P < 0.001), OR 3.77,95% CI (2.44- 5.85), P < 0.001, OR 3.38, 95% CI (2.22-5.15), P < 0.001, and OR 6.45,95% CI (3.22-13.15), P < 0.001, respectively. The mean PEFR of 321±58.93 L/min among the fish smokers was significantly lower than 400±42.92 L/min among the controls (p = 0.0001). Fish smokers have increased risk of respiratory symptoms and reduced pulmonary function. There is a need for protective equipment and periodic evaluation.

  3. Respiratory Viral Detection in Children and Adults: Comparing Asymptomatic Controls and Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Self, Wesley H.; Williams, Derek J.; Zhu, Yuwei; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T.; Chappell, James D.; Hymas, Weston C.; Stockmann, Chris; Bramley, Anna M.; Schneider, Eileen; Erdman, Dean; Finelli, Lyn; Jain, Seema; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Grijalva, Carlos G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical significance of viruses detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often unclear. Methods. We conducted a prospective study to identify the prevalence of 13 viruses in the upper respiratory tract of patients with CAP and concurrently enrolled asymptomatic controls with real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. We compared age-stratified prevalence of each virus between patients with CAP and controls and used multivariable logistic regression to calculate attributable fractions (AFs). Results. We enrolled 1024 patients with CAP and 759 controls. Detections of influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and human metapneumovirus were substantially more common in patients with CAP of all ages than in controls (AFs near 1.0). Parainfluenza and coronaviruses were also more common among patients with CAP (AF, 0.5–0.75). Rhinovirus was associated with CAP among adults (AF, 0.93) but not children (AF, 0.02). Adenovirus was associated with CAP only among children <2 years old (AF, 0.77). Conclusions. The probability that a virus detected with real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in patients with CAP contributed to symptomatic disease varied by age group and specific virus. Detections of influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and human metapneumovirus among patients with CAP of all ages probably indicate an etiologic role, whereas detections of parainfluenza, coronaviruses, rhinovirus, and adenovirus, especially in children, require further scrutiny. PMID:26180044

  4. Effect of upper extremity proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation combined with elastic resistance bands on respiratory muscle strength: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Areas, Guilherme P. T.; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Lobato, Arianne N.; Silva, Alessandra A.; Freire, Renato C.; Areas, Fernando Z. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Elastic resistance bands (ERB) combined with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) are often used in resistance muscle training programs, which have potential effects on peripheral muscle strength. However, the effects of the combination of ERB and PNF on respiratory muscle strength warrant further investigation. Objectives The assessment of the effects of PNF combined with ERB on respiratory muscle strength. Method Twenty healthy, right-handed females were included. Subjects were randomized to either the resistance training program group (TG, n=10) or the control group (CG, n=10). Maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) and inspiratory pressure (MIP) were measured before and after four weeks of an upper extremity resistance training program. The training protocol consisted of upper extremity PNF combined with ERB, with resistance selected from 1 repetition maximum protocol. Results PNF combined with ERB showed significant increases in MIP and MEP (p<0.05). In addition, there were significant differences between the TG and CG regarding ∆MIP (p=0.01) and ∆MEP (p=0.04). Conclusions PNF combined with ERB can have a positive impact on respiratory muscle strength. These results may be useful with respect to cardiopulmonary chronic diseases that are associated with reduced respiratory muscle strength. PMID:24346292

  5. Molecular point-of-care testing for respiratory viruses versus routine clinical care in adults with acute respiratory illness presenting to secondary care: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial protocol (ResPOC).

    PubMed

    Brendish, Nathan J; Malachira, Ahalya K; Clark, Tristan W

    2017-02-06

    Respiratory viruses are associated with a huge socio-economic burden and are responsible for a large proportion of acute respiratory illness in hospitalised adults. Laboratory PCR is accurate but takes at least 24 h to generate a result to clinicians and antigen-based point-of-care tests (POCT) lack sensitivity. Rapid molecular platforms, such as the FilmArray Respiratory Panel, have equivalent diagnostic accuracy to laboratory PCR and can generate a result in 1 h making them deployable as POCT. Molecular point-of-care testing for respiratory viruses in hospital has the potential to improve the detection rate of respiratory viruses, improve the use of influenza antivirals and reduce unnecessary antibiotic use, but high quality randomised trials with clinically relevant endpoints are needed. The ResPOC study is a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of molecular point-of-care testing for respiratory viruses in adults with acute respiratory illness presenting to a large teaching hospital in the United Kingdom. Eligible participants are adults presenting with acute respiratory illness to the emergency department or the acute medicine unit. Participants are allocated 1:1 by internet-based randomisation service to either the intervention of a nose and throat swab analysed immediately on the FilmArray Respiratory Panel as a POCT or receive routine clinical care. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients treated with antibiotics. Secondary outcomes include turnaround time, virus detection, neuraminidase inhibitor use, length of hospital stay and side room use. Analysis of the primary outcome will be by intention-to-treat and all enrolled participants will be included in safety analysis. Multiple novel molecular POCT platforms for infections including respiratory viruses have been developed and licensed in the last few years and many more are in development but the evidence base for clinical benefit above standard practice is minimal. This randomised controlled

  6. Influence of deep breathing exercise on spontaneous respiratory rate and heart rate variability: a randomised controlled trial in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Tharion, Elizabeth; Samuel, Prasanna; Rajalakshmi, R; Gnanasenthil, G; Subramanian, Rajam Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Studies show that yogic type of breathing exercises reduces the spontaneous respiratory rate. However, there are no conclusive studies on the effects of breathing exercise on heart rate variability. We investigated the effects of non-yogic breathing exercise on respiratory rate and heart rate variability. Healthy subjects (21-33 years, both genders) were randomized into the intervention group (n=18), which performed daily deep breathing exercise at 6 breaths/min (0.1 Hz) for one month, and a control group (n=18) which did not perform any breathing exercise. Baseline respiratory rate and short-term heart rate variability indices were assessed in both groups. Reassessment was done after one month and the change in the parameters from baseline was computed for each group. Comparison of the absolute changes [median (inter-quartile ranges)] of the parameters between the intervention and control group showed a significant difference in the spontaneous respiratory rate [intervention group -2.50 (-4.00, -1.00), control group 0.00 (-1.00, 1.00), cycles/min, P<0.001], mean arterial pressure [intervention group -0.67 (-6.67, 1.33), control group 0.67 (0.00, 6.67), mmHg, (P<0.05)], high frequency power [intervention group 278.50 (17.00, 496.00), control group -1.00 (-341.00, 196.00), ms2 P<0.05] and sum of low and high frequency powers [intervention group 512.00 (-73.00, 999.00), control group 51.00 (-449.00, 324.00), ms2, P<0.05]. Neither the mean of the RR intervals nor the parameters reflecting sympatho-vagal balance were significantly different across the groups. In conclusion, the changes produced by simple deep slow breathing exercise in the respiratory rate and cardiac autonomic modulation of the intervention group were significant, when compared to the changes in the control group. Thus practice of deep slow breathing exercise improves heart rate variability in healthy subjects, without altering their cardiac autonomic balance. These findings have implications in the

  7. Peripheral eosinophilia and respiratory symptoms in rubber injection press operators: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R J; Bascom, R; Yang, W N; Fisher, J F; Baser, M E; Greenhut, J; Baker, J H

    1986-01-01

    To evaluate a suspected association between an outbreak of acute respiratory illness and eosinophilia and employment as a rubber worker, we performed a retrospective review of medical records of rubber workers employed from September 1983 to July 1984 in a plant housing a thermoinjection process. Twenty-five workers met the case definition of a respiratory illness requiring a physician visit. The predominant respiratory illness was acute in onset with cough, chest tightness, and dyspnea. Peripheral eosinophilia, up to 40% of white blood cells in a peripheral smear, was seen in 10 of 18 (56%) cases. Twenty-one of 25 white males with respiratory symptoms were employed in the thermoinjection process (odds ratio = 22, p less than .001). Smoking and employment in this process contributed independently to an increased risk of being a case as determined by a logistic regression analysis. Return to the plant building caused recurrence of symptoms in most cases, and these workers have been transferred or left the company. We conclude that a strong previously unrecognized association exists between employment in this neoprene rubber thermoinjection process and the development of an acute respiratory illness.

  8. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

  9. Indomethacin-induced impairment of regional cerebrovascular reactivity: implications for respiratory control

    PubMed Central

    Hoiland, Ryan L; Ainslie, Philip N; Wildfong, Kevin W; Smith, Kurt J; Bain, Anthony R; Willie, Chris K; Foster, Glen; Monteleone, Brad; Day, Trevor A

    2015-01-01

    implications for the chemoreflex control of breathing are unclear. Indomethacin-induced blunting of cerebrovascular flow responsiveness did not affect central or peripheral respiratory chemoreflex magnitude using steady-state end-tidal forcing techniques. Posterior reactivity was related to hypoxic ventilatory decline, suggesting that CO2 washout from central chemoreceptors modulates hypoxic ventilatory dynamics. Our data indicate that steady-state end-tidal forcing techniques reduce the arterial–venous gradients, attenuating the effect of brain blood flow on ventilatory responses. Our study confirms the importance of measuring posterior cerebrovasculature when investigating the link between cerebral blood flow and the chemical control of breathing. PMID:25641262

  10. Risk of lung cancer following nonmalignant respiratory conditions: evidence from two case-control studies in Montreal, Canada.

    PubMed

    Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V; Parent, Marie-Elise; Menzies, Dick; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2006-07-01

    There has been conflicting evidence concerning possible associations between several nonmalignant respiratory diseases and subsequent risk of lung cancer. In the context of two large population based case-control studies of lung cancer carried out in Montreal, we were able to study the possible relationships between a previous history of lung disease and subsequent risk of lung cancer. Interviews for Study I were conducted in 1979-1986 (755 cases and 512 controls) and included questions on asthma and tuberculosis. Interviews for Study II were conducted in 1996-2001 (1205 cases and 1541 controls) and included questions on asthma, tuberculosis, emphysema, and pneumonia. Lung cancer risk was analysed in relation to each condition, adjusting for several potential confounders, including smoking in a three-variable parametrization. To avoid any possible confusion between the respiratory conditions and early symptoms of lung cancer, conditions occurring in the 3 years before diagnosis of cancer were discounted. For asthma there was no evidence of an association. For TB the evidence was inconsistent between Study I and Study II. For both pneumonia and emphysema, there were significantly elevated odds ratios, with point estimates in the range of 1.6-2.4. Our results support the hypothesis that some nonmalignant respiratory diseases may be independent risk factors for lung cancer.

  11. Effects of chest resistance exercise and chest expansion exercise on stroke patients’ respiratory function and trunk control ability

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gui bin; Park, Eun cho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the efficiency of chest resistance and chest expansion exercises for improving respiratory function and trunk control ability in patients with stroke. [Subjects] Forty patients with stroke were randomly allocated into a chest resistance exercise group (CREG, n = 20) and a chest expansion exercise group (CEEG, n = 20). [Methods] CREG patients underwent chest resistance exercises, and diaphragmatic resistance exercises by way of the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation. CEEG patients underwent respiratory exercises with chest expansion in various positions. Both groups received 30 minutes of training per day, five times per week, for eight weeks. [Results] Both the CERG and CEEG groups showed significant changes in FVC, FEV1, and TIS after the intervention. TIS was significantly increased in the CREG compared to the CEEG after the intervention. [Conclusion] Both chest resistance and chest expansion exercises were effective for improving respiratory function and trunk control ability in stroke patients; however, chest resistance exercise is more efficient for increasing trunk control ability. PMID:26180292

  12. Peripheral nervous control of cold-induced reduction in the respiratory quotient of the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refinetti, Roberto

    1990-03-01

    Cold-exposed rats show a reduction in the respiratory quotient which is indicative of a relative shift from carbohydrates to lipids as substrates for oxidative metabolism. In the present study, the effects of food deprivation and cold exposure on the respiratory quotient were observed. In addition, the involvement of the three main branches of the peripheral nervous system (sympathetic, parasympathetic, and somatic) was investigated by means of synaptic blockade with propranolol, atropine, and quinine, respectively. Both propranolol and quinine blocked the cold-induced decrease in respiratory quotient and increase in heat production, whereas atropine had only minor and very brief effects. It is concluded that both the sympathetic and somatic branches are involved in the metabolic changes associated with cold-induced thermogenesis and that the increase in metabolic heat production involves a shift from carbohydrate to lipid utilization irrespective of which of the two branches is activated.

  13. Breath-taking jobs: a case–control study of respiratory work disability by occupation in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Fell, AKM; Abrahamsen, R; Henneberger, PK; Svendsen, MV; Andersson, E; Torén, K; Kongerud, J

    2016-01-01

    Background The current knowledge on respiratory work disability is based on studies that used crude categories of exposure. This may lead to a loss of power, and does not provide sufficient information to allow targeted workplace interventions and follow-up of patients with respiratory symptoms. Objectives The aim of this study was to identify occupations and specific exposures associated with respiratory work disability. Methods In 2013, a self-administered questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of the general population, aged 16–50, in Telemark County, Norway. We defined respiratory work disability as a positive response to the survey question: ‘Have you ever had to change or leave your job because it affected your breathing?’ Occupational exposures were assessed using an asthma-specific job-exposure matrix, and comparison of risks was made for cases and a median of 50 controls per case. Results 247 workers had changed their work because of respiratory symptoms, accounting for 1.7% of the respondents ever employed. The ‘breath-taking jobs’ were cooks/chefs: adjusted OR 3.6 (95% CI 1.6 to 8.0); welders: 5.2 (2.0 to 14); gardeners: 4.5 (1.3 to 15); sheet metal workers: 5.4 (2.0 to 14); cleaners: 5.0 (2.2 to 11); hairdressers: 6.4 (2.5 to 17); and agricultural labourers: 7.4 (2.5 to 22). Job changes were also associated with a variety of occupational exposures, with some differences between men and women. Conclusions Self-report and job-exposure matrix data showed similar findings. For the occupations and exposures associated with job change, preventive measures should be implemented. PMID:27365181

  14. Breath-taking jobs: a case-control study of respiratory work disability by occupation in Norway.

    PubMed

    Fell, A K; Abrahamsen, R; Henneberger, P K; Svendsen, M V; Andersson, E; Torén, K; Kongerud, J

    2016-09-01

    The current knowledge on respiratory work disability is based on studies that used crude categories of exposure. This may lead to a loss of power, and does not provide sufficient information to allow targeted workplace interventions and follow-up of patients with respiratory symptoms. The aim of this study was to identify occupations and specific exposures associated with respiratory work disability. In 2013, a self-administered questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of the general population, aged 16-50, in Telemark County, Norway. We defined respiratory work disability as a positive response to the survey question: 'Have you ever had to change or leave your job because it affected your breathing?' Occupational exposures were assessed using an asthma-specific job-exposure matrix, and comparison of risks was made for cases and a median of 50 controls per case. 247 workers had changed their work because of respiratory symptoms, accounting for 1.7% of the respondents ever employed. The 'breath-taking jobs' were cooks/chefs: adjusted OR 3.6 (95% CI 1.6 to 8.0); welders: 5.2 (2.0 to 14); gardeners: 4.5 (1.3 to 15); sheet metal workers: 5.4 (2.0 to 14); cleaners: 5.0 (2.2 to 11); hairdressers: 6.4 (2.5 to 17); and agricultural labourers: 7.4 (2.5 to 22). Job changes were also associated with a variety of occupational exposures, with some differences between men and women. Self-report and job-exposure matrix data showed similar findings. For the occupations and exposures associated with job change, preventive measures should be implemented. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Intrapulmonary percussive ventilation in acute exacerbations of COPD patients with mild respiratory acidosis: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN17802078].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Frédéric; Bui, Hoang Nam; Boyer, Alexandre; Salmi, Louis Rachid; Gbikpi-Benissan, Georges; Guenard, Hervé; Gruson, Didier; Hilbert, Gilles

    2005-08-01

    We hypothesized that the use of intrapulmonary percussive ventilation (IPV), a technique designed to improve mucus clearance, could prove effective in avoiding further deterioration in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with mild respiratory acidosis. The study was performed in a medical intensive care unit of a university hospital. Thirty-three patients with exacerbations of COPD with a respiratory frequency >or= 25/min, a PaCO2 > 45 Torr and 7.35 control group) or standard treatment plus IPV (IPV group). The IPV group underwent two daily sessions of 30 minutes performed by a chest physiotherapist through a full face mask. The therapy was considered successful when both worsening of the exacerbation and a decrease in pH to under 7.35, which would have required non-invasive ventilation, were avoided. Thirty minutes of IPV led to a significant decrease in respiratory rate, an increase in PaO2 and a decrease in PaCO2 (p < 0.05). Exacerbation worsened in 6 out of 17 patients in the control group versus 0 out of 16 in the IPV group (p < 0.05). The hospital stay was significantly shorter in the IPV group than in the control group (6.8 +/- 1.0 vs. 7.9 +/- 1.3 days, p < 0.05). IPV is a safe technique and may prevent further deterioration in patients with acute exacerbations of COPD with mild respiratory acidosis.

  16. Control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) through genetic improvements in disease resistance and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Raymond R R; Lunney, Joan; Dekkers, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) have a severe economic impact on pig production in North America, Europe, and Asia. The emergence and eventual predominance of PRRS in the 1990s are the likely result of changes in the pork industry initiated in the late 1970s, which allowed the virus to occupy a unique niche within a modern commercial production system. PRRSV infection is responsible for severe clinical disease, but can maintain a life-long subclinical infection, as well as participate in several polymicrobial syndromes. Current vaccines lessen clinical signs, but are of limited use for disease control and elimination. The relatively poor protective immunity following vaccination is a function of the virus's capacity to generate a large degree of genetic diversity, combined with several strategies to evade innate and adaptive immune responses. In 2007, the PRRS Host Genetics consortium (PHGC) was established to explore the role of host genetics as an avenue for PRRS control. The PHGC model for PRRS incorporates the experimental infection of large numbers of growing pigs and has created the opportunity to study experimental PRRSV infection at the population level. The results show that pigs can be placed into distinct phenotypic groups, including pigs that show resistance (i.e., low virus load) or pigs that exhibit "tolerance" to infection. Tolerance was illustrated by pigs that gain weight normally in the face of a relatively high virus load. Genome-wide association analysis has identified a region on chromosome 4 (SSC4) correlated with resistance; i.e., lower cumulative virus load within the first 42 days of infection. The genomic region is near a family of genes involved in innate immunity. The region is also associated with higher weight gain in challenged pigs, suggesting that pigs with the resistance alleles don't seem to simultaneously experience reduction in growth, i.e., that resistance and tolerance are not

  17. Vitamin D3 Supplementation and Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in a Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Judy R.; Hendricks, Kristy; Barry, Elizabeth L.; Peacock, Janet L.; Mott, Leila A.; Sandler, Robert S.; Bresalier, Robert S.; Goodman, Michael; Bostick, Roberd M.; Baron, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Randomized controlled trials testing the association between vitamin D status and upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) have given mixed results. During a multicenter, randomized controlled trial of colorectal adenoma chemoprevention, we tested whether 1000 IU/day vitamin D3 supplementation reduced winter episodes and duration of URTI and its composite syndromes, influenza-like illness (ILI; fever and ≥2 of sore throat, cough, muscle ache, or headache) and colds (no fever, and ≥2 of runny nose, nasal congestion, sneezing, sore throat, cough, swollen or tender neck glands). Methods. The 2259 trial participants were aged 45–75, in good health, had a history of colorectal adenoma, and had a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level ≥12 ng/mL. They were randomized to vitamin D3 (1000 IU/day), calcium (1200 mg/day), both, or placebo. Of these, 759 participants completed daily symptom diaries. Secondary data included semiannual surveys of all participants. Results. Among those who completed symptom diaries, supplementation did not significantly reduce winter episodes of URTI (rate ratio [RR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], .79–1.09) including colds (RR, 0.93; 95% CI, .78–1.10) or ILI (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, .62–1.46), nor did it reduce winter days of illness (RR, 1.13; 95% CI, .90–1.43). There was no significant benefit according to adherence, influenza vaccination, body mass index, or baseline vitamin D status. Semiannual surveys of all participants (N = 2228) identified no benefit of supplementation on ILI (odds ratio [OR], 1.14; 95% CI, .84–1.54) or colds (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, .87–1.23). Conclusions. Supplementation with 1000 IU/day vitamin D3 did not significantly reduce the incidence or duration of URTI in adults with a baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level ≥12 ng/mL. PMID:24014734

  18. Reducing absenteeism from gastrointestinal and respiratory illness in elementary school students: a randomized, controlled trial of an infection-control intervention.

    PubMed

    Sandora, Thomas J; Shih, Mei-Chiung; Goldmann, Donald A

    2008-06-01

    Students often miss school because of gastrointestinal and respiratory illnesses. We assessed the effectiveness of a multifactorial intervention, including alcohol-based hand-sanitizer and surface disinfection, in reducing absenteeism caused by gastrointestinal and respiratory illnesses in elementary school students. We performed a school-based cluster-randomized, controlled trial at a single elementary school. Eligible students in third to fifth grade were enrolled. Intervention classrooms received alcohol-based hand sanitizer to use at school and quaternary ammonium wipes to disinfect classroom surfaces daily for 8 weeks; control classrooms followed usual hand-washing and cleaning practices. Parents completed a preintervention demographic survey. Absences were recorded along with the reason for absence. Swabs of environmental surfaces were evaluated by bacterial culture and polymerase chain reaction for norovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza, and parainfluenza 3. The primary outcomes were rates of absenteeism caused by gastrointestinal or respiratory illness. Days absent were modeled as correlated Poisson variables and compared between groups by using generalized estimating equations. Analyses were adjusted for family size, race, health status, and home sanitizer use. We also compared the presence of viruses and the total bacterial colony counts on several classroom surfaces. A total of 285 students were randomly assigned; baseline demographics were similar in the 2 groups. The adjusted absenteeism rate for gastrointestinal illness was significantly lower in the intervention-group subjects compared with control subjects. The adjusted absenteeism rate for respiratory illness was not significantly different between groups. Norovirus was the only virus detected and was found less frequently on surfaces in intervention classrooms compared with control classrooms (9% vs 29%). A multifactorial intervention including hand sanitizer and surface disinfection

  19. The role of medullary serotonin (5-HT) neurons in respiratory control: contributions to eupneic ventilation, CO2 chemoreception, and thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Matthew R; Richerson, George B

    2010-05-01

    The functional roles of the medullary raphé, and specifically 5-HT neurons, are not well understood. It has previously been stated that the role of 5-HT has been so difficult to understand, because "it is implicated in virtually everything, but responsible for nothing"(Cowen PJ. Foreword. In: Serotonin and Sleep: Molecular, Functional and Clinical Aspects, edited by Monti JM, Prandi-Perumal SR, Jacobs BL, Nutt DJ. Switzerland: Birkhauser, 2008). Are 5-HT neurons important, and can we assign a general, or even specific, function to them given their diffuse projections? Recent data obtained from transgenic animals and other model systems indicate that the 5-HT system is not expendable, particularly during postnatal development, and likely plays specific roles in vital functions such as respiratory and thermoregulatory control. We recently provided a detailed and updated review of one specific function of 5-HT neurons, as central respiratory chemoreceptors contributing to the brain's ability to detect changes in pH/CO2 and stimulate adjustments to ventilation accordingly (9). Here, we turn our focus to recent data demonstrating that 5-HT neurons provide an essential excitatory drive to the respiratory network. We then further discuss their role in the CO2 chemoreflex, as well as other homeostatic functions that are closely related to ventilatory control. Last, we provide additional hypotheses/concepts that are worthy of further study, and how 5-HT neurons may be involved in human disease.

  20. A randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen for respiratory syncytial infection in a bovine model study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to ...

  1. Progress in Porcine Respiratory and Reproductive Syndrome Virus Biology and Control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This special issue of Virus Research is focused on Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS). It contains 19 reviews invited by CoEditors, Joan K. Lunney and R.R.R. Rowland, on this arterivirus, referred to as PRRS virus (PRRSV), and associated issues. It targets areas such as: phylogenet...

  2. Reliable Detection of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Children for Adequate Hospital Infection Control Management

    PubMed Central

    Abels, Susanne; Nadal, David; Stroehle, Angelika; Bossart, Walter

    2001-01-01

    By using a rapid test for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) detection (Abbott TestPack RSV), a number of patients were observed, showing repeatedly positive results over a period of up to 10 weeks. A prospective study was initiated to compare the rapid test with an antigen capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and a nested reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) protocol for detection of RSV serotypes A and B. Only respiratory samples from children exhibiting the prolonged presence of RSV (≥5 days) as determined by the rapid test were considered. A total of 134 specimens from 24 children was investigated by antigen capture EIA and nested RT-PCR. Using RT-PCR as the reference method, we determined the RSV rapid test to have a specificity of 63% and a sensitivity of 66% and the antigen capture EIA to have a specificity of 96% and a sensitivity of 69% for acute-phase samples and the homologous virus serotype A. In 7 (29%) of 24 patients, the positive results of the RSV rapid test could not be confirmed by either nested RT-PCR or antigen capture EIA. In these seven patients a variety of other respiratory viruses were detected. For general screening the RSV rapid test was found to be a reasonable tool to get quick results. However, its lack of specificity in some patients requires confirmation by additional tests to rule out false-positive results and/or detection of other respiratory viruses. PMID:11526141

  3. Controlled and uncontrolled allergic asthma in routine respiratory specialist care - a clinical-epidemiological study in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kardos, P; Wittchen, H-U; Mühlig, S; Ritz, T; Buhl, R; Rabe, K; Klotsche, J; Riedel, O

    2011-09-01

    Studies in the last decade showed high rates of poorly treated and poorly controlled asthma in the community. Extending these findings we describe the more recent situation in specialist respiratory care as the most frequent source of treatment provision using comprehensive clinical and patient assessments and exploring predictors for poor control. This is a German cross-sectional, clinical epidemiological study in a nationally representative stratified treatment prevalence sample of N = 572 outpatients diagnosed with allergic asthma (AA; females 58.2%, aged 47.5 ± 16.3 (16-81 years). Treating physicians completed standardized clinical assessments (lung function, laboratory, clinical findings, severity, illness and treatment history, asthma control [GINA]), supplemented by patients' self-report measures (EQ5-D, AQLQ, ACT) and mental health module (CIDI-SF). A total of 65.4% of patients were rated (GINA) as controlled, 30.3% partially controlled, and 4.4% uncontrolled; the patient-rated ACT showed lower rates of control (19.9% controlled, 44.2% partial, 35.8% uncontrolled, kappa: 0.2). Consistent with findings of clinical measures, controlled asthma was highest among patients with pre-treatment stage I severity (83.6%) and decreased by pre-treatment severity (stage IV patients: 29.3%). Poorer control was associated with pre-treatment severity, nocturnal attacks, diminished adherence and comorbid anxiety/depression. Patients received complex multiple drug and non-drug interventions, largely consistent with guidelines. Degree of asthma control was associated with improved and even normalized quality of life findings. In this representative sample of longterm treated AA patients in specialist respiratory care we find better control rates and better adherence to guidelines as previous studies. Despite remarkable differences in clinician- vs patient-rated control ratings even the initially most severe stage IV patients (12.9% of patients) showed remarkable control rates

  4. A cluster-randomised controlled trial to test the efficacy of facemasks in preventing respiratory viral infection among Hajj pilgrims.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mandy; Barasheed, Osamah; Rashid, Harunor; Booy, Robert; El Bashir, Haitham; Haworth, Elizabeth; Ridda, Iman; Holmes, Edward C; Dwyer, Dominic E; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan; Memish, Ziad A; Heron, Leon

    2015-06-01

    Cost-effective interventions are needed to control the transmission of viral respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in mass gatherings. Facemasks are a promising preventive measure, however, previous studies on the efficacy of facemasks have been inconclusive. This study proposes a large-scale facemask trial during the Hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia and presents this protocol to illustrate its feasibility and to promote both collaboration with other research groups and additional relevant studies. A cluster-randomised controlled trial is being conducted to test the efficacy of standard facemasks in preventing symptomatic and proven viral RTIs among pilgrims during the Hajj season in Mina, Mecca, Saudi Arabia. The trial will compare the 'supervised use of facemasks' versus 'standard measures' among pilgrims over several Hajj seasons. Cluster-randomisation will be done by accommodation tents with a 1:1 ratio. For the intervention tents, free facemasks will be provided to be worn consistently for 7days. Data on flu-like symptoms and mask use will be recorded in diaries. Nasal samples will be collected from symptomatic recruits and tested for nucleic acid of respiratory viruses. Data obtained from questionnaires, diaries and laboratory tests will be analysed to examine whether mask use significantly reduces the frequency of laboratory-confirmed respiratory viral infection and syndromic RTI as primary outcomes. This trial will provide valuable evidence on the efficacy of standard facemask use in preventing viral respiratory tract infections at mass gatherings. This study is registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR), ACTRN: ACTRN12613001018707 (http://www.anzctr.org.au). Copyright © 2014 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. SU-E-J-211: Design and Study of In-House Software Based Respiratory Motion Monitoring, Controlling and Breath-Hold Device for Gated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, Senthilkumar

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this present work was to fabricate an in-house software based respiratory monitoring, controlling and breath-hold device using computer software programme which guides the patient to have uniform breath hold in response to request during the gated radiotherapy. Methods: The respiratory controlling device consists of a computer, inhouse software, video goggles, a highly sensitive sensor for measurement of distance, mounting systems, a camera, a respiratory signal device, a speaker and a visual indicator. The computer is used to display the respiratory movements of the patient with digital as well as analogue respiration indicators during the respiration cycle, to control, breath-hold and analyze the respiratory movement using indigenously developed software. Results: Studies were conducted with anthropomophic phantoms by simulating the respiratory motion on phantoms and recording the respective movements using the respiratory monitoring device. The results show good agreement between the simulated and measured movements. Further studies were conducted for 60 cancer patients with several types of cancers in the thoracic region. The respiratory movement cycles for each fraction of radiotherapy treatment were recorded and compared. Alarm indications are provided in the system to indicate when the patient breathing movement exceeds the threshold level. This will help the patient to maintain uniform breath hold during the radiotherapy treatment. Our preliminary clinical test results indicate that our device is highly reliable and able to maintain the uniform respiratory motion and breathe hold during the entire course of gated radiotherapy treatment. Conclusion: An indigenous respiratory monitoring device to guide the patient to have uniform breath hold device was fabricated. The alarm feature and the visual waveform indicator in the system guide the patient to have normal respiration. The signal from the device can be connected to the radiation

  6. Effects of pressure-controlled and volume-controlled ventilation on respiratory mechanics and systemic stress response during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Sen, Oznur; Umutoglu, Tarik; Aydın, Nurdan; Toptas, Mehmet; Tutuncu, Ayse Cigdem; Bakan, Mefkur

    2016-01-01

    Pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) is less frequently employed in general anesthesia. With its high and decelerating inspiratory flow, PCV has faster tidal volume delivery and different gas distribution. The same tidal volume setting, delivered by PCV versus volume-controlled ventilation (VCV), will result in a lower peak airway pressure and reduced risk of barotrauma. We hypothesized that PCV instead of VCV during laparoscopic surgery could achieve lower airway pressures and reduce the systemic stress response. Forty ASA I-II patients were randomly selected to receive either the PCV (Group PC, n = 20) or VCV (Group VC, n = 20) during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Blood sampling was made for baseline arterial blood gases (ABG), cortisol, insulin, and glucose levels. General anesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl was employed to all patients. After anesthesia induction and endotracheal intubation, patients in Group PC were given pressure support to form 8 mL/kg tidal volume and patients in Group VC was maintained at 8 mL/kg tidal volume calculated using predicted body weight. All patients were maintained with 5 cmH2O positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP). Respiratory parameters were recorded before and 30 min after pneumoperitonium. Assessment of ABG and sampling for cortisol, insulin and glucose levels were repeated 30 min after pneumoperitonium and 60 min after extubation. The P-peak levels observed before (18.9 ± 3.8 versus 15 ± 2.2 cmH2O) and during (23.3 ± 3.8 versus 20.1 ± 2.9 cmH2O) pneumoperitoneum in Group VC were significantly higher. Postoperative partial arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2) values are higher (98 ± 12 versus 86 ± 11 mmHg) in Group PC. Arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2) values (41.8 ± 5.4 versus 36.7 ± 3.5 mmHg) during pneumoperitonium and post-operative mean cortisol and insulin levels were higher in Group VC. When compared to VCV mode, PCV mode may improve compliance during pneumoperitoneum

  7. The control effect of histamine on body temperature and respiratory function in IgE-dependent systemic anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Makabe-Kobayashi, Yoko; Hori, Yoshio; Adachi, Tetsuya; Ishigaki-Suzuki, Satsuki; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Kagaya, Yutaka; Shirato, Kunio; Nagy, András; Ujike, Azusa; Takai, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takehiko; Ohtsu, Hiroshi

    2002-08-01

    The systemic anaphylaxis reaction comprises various symptoms, including hypotension, changes in respiration pattern, and hypothermia. To elucidate the role of histamine in each of these symptoms, we induced the passive systemic anaphylaxis reaction in histidine decarboxylase gene knockout (HDC [-/-]) mice, which lack histamine. HDC(-/-) mice were generated by knocking out the HDC gene, which codes for the unique histamine-synthesizing enzyme. Twenty-four hours after the injection of IgE, HDC(+/+) and HDC(-/-) mice were injected with allergen and body temperature, blood pressure, and respiratory function were monitored in each mouse. Blood pressure dropped in both the HDC(-/-) mice and the HDC(+/+) mice. In contrast, respiratory frequency dropped and the expiratory respiration time was elongated only in the HDC(+/+) mice. Body temperature was decreased in the HDC(+/+) mice and was practically unchanged in the HDC(-/-) mice. Histamine receptor antagonists blocked the body temperature drop in the HDC(+/+) mice. Intravenous histamine induced similar patterns of body temperature decrease in the HDC(+/+) mice and the HDC(-/-) mice. Mast cell-deficient W/W (v) mice did not show the decrease in body temperature; this suggests that the histamine that contributed to the decrease in body temperature was derived from mast cells. According to the results of this investigation, in the passive systemic anaphylaxis reaction, respiratory frequency, expiratory time, and body temperature are shown to be controlled by the activity of histamine, but its contribution to blood pressure is negligible.

  8. Controlling testing volume for respiratory viruses using machine learning and text mining.

    PubMed

    Mai, Mark V; Krauthammer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Viral testing for pediatric inpatients with respiratory symptoms is common, with considerable associated charges. In an attempt to reduce testing volumes, we studied whether data available at the time of admission could aid in identifying children with low likelihood of having a particular viral origin of their symptoms, and thus safely forgo broad viral testing. We collected clinical data for 1,685 pediatric inpatients receiving respiratory virus testing from 2010-2012. Machine-learning on the data allowed us to construct pre-test models predicting whether a patient would test positive for a particular virus. Text mining improved the predictions for one viral test. Cost-sensitive models optimized for test sensitivity showed reasonable test specificities and an ability to reduce test volume by up to 46% for single viral tests. We conclude that diverse forms of data in the electronic medical record can be used productively to build models that help physicians reduce testing volumes.

  9. Controlling testing volume for respiratory viruses using machine learning and text mining

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Mark V.; Krauthammer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Viral testing for pediatric inpatients with respiratory symptoms is common, with considerable associated charges. In an attempt to reduce testing volumes, we studied whether data available at the time of admission could aid in identifying children with low likelihood of having a particular viral origin of their symptoms, and thus safely forgo broad viral testing. We collected clinical data for 1,685 pediatric inpatients receiving respiratory virus testing from 2010-2012. Machine-learning on the data allowed us to construct pre-test models predicting whether a patient would test positive for a particular virus. Text mining improved the predictions for one viral test. Cost-sensitive models optimized for test sensitivity showed reasonable test specificities and an ability to reduce test volume by up to 46% for single viral tests. We conclude that diverse forms of data in the electronic medical record can be used productively to build models that help physicians reduce testing volumes. PMID:28269950

  10. Respiratory muscle training on pulmonary and swallowing function in patients with Huntington's disease: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Alvaro; Cruickshank, Travis; Nosaka, Kazunori; Ziman, Mel

    2015-10-01

    To examine the effects of 4-month of respiratory muscle training on pulmonary and swallowing function, exercise capacity and dyspnoea in manifest patients with Huntington's disease. A pilot randomised controlled trial. Home based training program. Eighteen manifest Huntington's disease patients with a positive genetic test and clinically verified disease expression, were randomly assigned to control group (n=9) and training group (n=9). Both groups received home-based inspiratory (5 sets of 5 repetitions) and expiratory (5 sets of 5 repetitions) muscle training 6 times a week for 4 months. The control group used a fixed resistance of 9 centimeters of water, and the training group used a progressively increased resistance from 30% to 75% of each patient's maximum respiratory pressure. Spirometric indices, maximum inspiratory pressure, maximum expiratory pressure, six minutes walk test, dyspnoea, water-swallowing test and swallow quality of life questionnaire were assessed before, at 2 and 4 months after training. The magnitude of increases in maximum inspiratory (d=2.9) and expiratory pressures (d=1.5), forced vital capacity (d=0.8), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (d=0.9) and peak expiratory flow (d=0.8) was substantially greater for the training group in comparison to the control group. Changes in swallowing function, dyspnoea and exercise capacity were small (d ≤ 0.5) for both groups without substantial differences between groups. A home-based respiratory muscle training program appeared to be beneficial to improve pulmonary function in manifest Huntington's disease patients but provided small effects on swallowing function, dyspnoea and exercise capacity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Respiratory System Function in Patients After Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement Surgery: A Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Stoliński, Jarosław; Musiał, Robert; Plicner, Dariusz; Andres, Janusz

    The aim of the study was to comparatively analyze respiratory system function after minimally invasive, through right minithoracotomy aortic valve replacement (RT-AVR) to conventional AVR. Analysis of 201 patients scheduled for RT-AVR and 316 for AVR between January 2010 and November 2013. Complications of the respiratory system and pulmonary functional status are presented. Complications of the respiratory system occurred in 16.8% of AVR and 11.0% of RT-AVR patients (P = 0.067). The rate of pleural effusions, thoracenteses, pneumonias, or phrenic nerve dysfunctions was not significantly different between groups. Perioperative mortality was 1.9% in AVR and 1.0% in RT-AVR (P = 0.417). Mechanical ventilation time after surgery was 9.7 ± 5.9 hours for AVR and 7.2 ± 3.2 hours for RT-AVR patients (P < 0.001). Stroke (odds ratio [OR] = 13.4, P = 0.008), increased postoperative blood loss (OR = 9.6, P < 0.001), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR = 7.7, P < 0.001) were risk factors of prolonged mechanical lung ventilation. A week after surgery, the results of most pulmonary function tests were lower in the AVR than in the RT-AVR group (P < 0.001 was seen for forced expiratory volume in the first second, vital capacity, total lung capacity, maximum inspiratory pressure and maximum expiratory pressure, P = 0.377 was seen for residual volume). Right anterior aortic valve replacement minithoracotomy surgery with single-lung ventilation did not result in increased rate of respiratory system complications. Spirometry examinations revealed that pulmonary functional status was more impaired after AVR in comparison with RT-AVR surgery.

  12. A randomized controlled trial of the efficacy and respiratory effects of patient-controlled intravenous remifentanil analgesia and patient-controlled epidural analgesia in laboring women.

    PubMed

    Stocki, Daniel; Matot, Idit; Einav, Sharon; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Ginosar, Yehuda; Weiniger, Carolyn F

    2014-03-01

    Safe and effective alternatives are required in labor when epidural analgesia is not appropriate. We hypothesized that patient-controlled IV remifentanil labor analgesia would not be inferior to patient-controlled epidural labor analgesia. This randomized nonblinded controlled noninferiority study in healthy women with a singleton fetus and vertex presentation was performed at 1 site. Women were randomized to receive patient-controlled IV analgesia titrated from 20 mcg up to a maximum bolus dose of 60 mcg with a lockout interval of 1 to 2 minutes, or patient-controlled epidural analgesia 0.1% bupivacaine with 2 mcg/mL fentanyl (initiation bolus 15 mL; maintenance bolus 10 mL, lockout interval 20 minutes, basal infusion 5 mL/h). Crossover was permitted after 30 minutes. The primary study outcome was efficacy (assessed as hourly numerical rating scale [NRS] pain score [11-point NRS] and maternal satisfaction [11-point NRS]); the secondary outcome was safety (maternal apnea). Supplementary oxygen was administered continuously during the respiratory monitoring period. During the first hour of analgesia, the heart rate, respiratory rate, pulse oximetry (SpO2), and end-tidal CO2, as an indication of apnea, were compared. Apnea lasting >40 seconds was managed by light stimulation by the attending anesthesiologist. Forty women were recruited to the following groups: remifentanil n = 19 (1 exclusion), epidural n = 20. Four crossed over: 3 from the remifentanil to epidural group and 1 from the epidural to remifentanil group. Mean (± SD) baseline NRS pain scores were similar, 8.4 ± 1.5 for remifentanil and 8.7 ± 1.2 for epidural analgesia, P = 0.52. Baseline adjusted mean NRS reduction at 30 minutes for remifentanil was -4.5 (± 0.6) vs -7.1(± 0.6) for epidural analgesia, P < 0.0001 for both. Pain score at 30 minutes was 3.7 ± 2.8 for remifentanil and 1.5 ± 2.2 for epidural analgesia, P = 0.009. Remifentanil was inferior to epidural analgesia with respect to the NRS at

  13. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist in patients with acute respiratory failure: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Villar, Jesús; Belda, Javier; Blanco, Jesús; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Añón, José Manuel; Pérez-Méndez, Lina; Ferrando, Carlos; Parrilla, Dácil; Montiel, Raquel; Corpas, Ruth; González-Higueras, Elena; Pestaña, David; Martínez, Domingo; Fernández, Lorena; Soro, Marina; García-Bello, Miguel Angel; Fernández, Rosa Lidia; Kacmarek, Robert M

    2016-10-13

    Patient-ventilator asynchrony is a common problem in mechanically ventilated patients with acute respiratory failure. It is assumed that asynchronies worsen lung function and prolong the duration of mechanical ventilation (MV). Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) is a novel approach to MV based on neural respiratory center output that is able to trigger, cycle, and regulate the ventilatory cycle. We hypothesized that the use of NAVA compared to conventional lung-protective MV will result in a reduction of the duration of MV. It is further hypothesized that NAVA compared to conventional lung-protective MV will result in a decrease in the length of ICU and hospital stay, and mortality. This is a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial in 306 mechanically ventilated patients with acute respiratory failure from several etiologies. Only patients ventilated for less than 5 days, and who are expected to require prolonged MV for an additional 72 h or more and are able to breathe spontaneously, will be considered for enrollment. Eligible patients will be randomly allocated to two ventilatory arms: (1) conventional lung-protective MV (n = 153) and conventional lung-protective MV with NAVA (n = 153). Primary outcome is the number of ventilator-free days, defined as days alive and free from MV at day 28 after endotracheal intubation. Secondary outcomes are total length of MV, and ICU and hospital mortality. This is the first randomized clinical trial examining, on a multicenter scale, the beneficial effects of NAVA in reducing the dependency on MV of patients with acute respiratory failure. ClinicalTrials.gov website ( NCT01730794 ). Registered on 15 November 2012.

  14. No direct association among respiratory function, disease control and family functioning in a sample of Mexican children with intermittent asthma.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain Raimundo; Núñez-Tapia, Rosa María; Ramírez-Silva, Armando; Gómez-Alonso, Carlos

    2013-05-15

    Asthma has been linked to family disfunctioning and poor control of the disease.This study was conducted to analyze the interactions between the level of intermittent asthma control, family functioning and respiratory function and between quality of life of asthmatic patients and their caregivers.7 to 15 years old children with intermittent asthma were included. Asthma Control Test Questionnaire, Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ) test, and flowmetry were applied to children and Pediatric Asthma Caregiver´s Quatily of Life Questionnaire (PAQCLQ) and the Family Functioning Perception Test (FF-SIL) were applied to their parents.The most affected areas of family functioning in dysfunctional families were adaptability and permeability. A medium to high strength of association was founded between the emotional function of parents and the emotional function of children, R2=0.552. The most remarkable associations were among parents' limitation of activities and parents' emotional function (r=0.837), parents' limitation of activities and child's emotional function (r=0.722), parents' emotional role and limitation of activities (r=0.837), parents' emotional role and emotional functioning of children with asthma (r=0.743) and the limitation of activities of children with asthma and the emotional function of children with asthma (r=0.870).No direct associations were founded among respiratory function, disease control and family functioning in Mexican children with intermittent asthma and emotional function of parents and children were associated in both groups.

  15. Effect of nebulized budesonide on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome: Randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Hatem Saber; Meguid, Mona Mohamed Abdel

    2017-01-01

    Background: We tested the hypothesis that nebulized budesonide would improve lung mechanics and oxygenation in patients with early acute lung injury (ALI) and/or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) during protective mechanical ventilation strategy without adversely affecting systemic hemodynamics. Methods: Patients with ALI/ARDS were included and assigned into two groups; budesonide group (30 cases) in whom 1 mg–2 ml budesonide suspension was nebulized through the endotracheal tube and control group (30 cases) in whom 2 ml saline (placebo) were nebulized instead of budesonide. This regimen was repeated every 12 h for three successive days alongside with constant ventilator settings in both groups. Hemodynamics, airway pressures, and PaO2/FiO2 were measured throughout the study period (72 h) with either nebulized budesonide or saline. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were analyzed serologically as markers of inflammation at pre- and post-nebulization sessions. Results: We found a significant difference between the two groups regarding PaO2/FiO2 (P = 0.023), peak (P = 0.021), and plateau (P = 0.032) airway pressures. Furthermore, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were significantly reduced after budesonide nebulizations. No significant difference was found between the two groups regarding hemodynamic variables. Conclusion: Nebulized budesonide improved oxygenation, peak, and plateau airway pressures and significantly reduced inflammatory markers (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) without affecting hemodynamics. Trial Registry: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ANZCTR) at the number: ACTRN12615000373572. PMID:28217046

  16. Buoyancy under control: underwater locomotor performance in a deep diving seabird suggests respiratory strategies for reducing foraging effort.

    PubMed

    Cook, Timothée R; Kato, Akiko; Tanaka, Hideji; Ropert-Coudert, Yan; Bost, Charles-André

    2010-03-23

    Because they have air stored in many body compartments, diving seabirds are expected to exhibit efficient behavioural strategies for reducing costs related to buoyancy control. We study the underwater locomotor activity of a deep-diving species from the Cormorant family (Kerguelen shag) and report locomotor adjustments to the change of buoyancy with depth. Using accelerometers, we show that during both the descent and ascent phases of dives, shags modelled their acceleration and stroking activity on the natural variation of buoyancy with depth. For example, during the descent phase, birds increased swim speed with depth. But in parallel, and with a decay constant similar to the one in the equation explaining the decrease of buoyancy with depth, they decreased foot-stroke frequency exponentially, a behaviour that enables birds to reduce oxygen consumption. During ascent, birds also reduced locomotor cost by ascending passively. We considered the depth at which they started gliding as a proxy to their depth of neutral buoyancy. This depth increased with maximum dive depth. As an explanation for this, we propose that shags adjust their buoyancy to depth by varying the amount of respiratory air they dive with. Calculations based on known values of stored body oxygen volumes and on deep-diving metabolic rates in avian divers suggest that the variations of volume of respiratory oxygen associated with a respiration mediated buoyancy control only influence aerobic dive duration moderately. Therefore, we propose that an advantage in cormorants--as in other families of diving seabirds--of respiratory air volume adjustment upon diving could be related less to increasing time of submergence, through an increased volume of body oxygen stores, than to reducing the locomotor costs of buoyancy control.

  17. Buoyancy under Control: Underwater Locomotor Performance in a Deep Diving Seabird Suggests Respiratory Strategies for Reducing Foraging Effort

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Timothée R.; Kato, Akiko; Tanaka, Hideji; Ropert-Coudert, Yan; Bost, Charles-André

    2010-01-01

    Background Because they have air stored in many body compartments, diving seabirds are expected to exhibit efficient behavioural strategies for reducing costs related to buoyancy control. We study the underwater locomotor activity of a deep-diving species from the Cormorant family (Kerguelen shag) and report locomotor adjustments to the change of buoyancy with depth. Methodology/Principal Findings Using accelerometers, we show that during both the descent and ascent phases of dives, shags modelled their acceleration and stroking activity on the natural variation of buoyancy with depth. For example, during the descent phase, birds increased swim speed with depth. But in parallel, and with a decay constant similar to the one in the equation explaining the decrease of buoyancy with depth, they decreased foot-stroke frequency exponentially, a behaviour that enables birds to reduce oxygen consumption. During ascent, birds also reduced locomotor cost by ascending passively. We considered the depth at which they started gliding as a proxy to their depth of neutral buoyancy. This depth increased with maximum dive depth. As an explanation for this, we propose that shags adjust their buoyancy to depth by varying the amount of respiratory air they dive with. Conclusions/Significance Calculations based on known values of stored body oxygen volumes and on deep-diving metabolic rates in avian divers suggest that the variations of volume of respiratory oxygen associated with a respiration mediated buoyancy control only influence aerobic dive duration moderately. Therefore, we propose that an advantage in cormorants - as in other families of diving seabirds - of respiratory air volume adjustment upon diving could be related less to increasing time of submergence, through an increased volume of body oxygen stores, than to reducing the locomotor costs of buoyancy control. PMID:20352122

  18. Impact of control for air pollution and respiratory epidemics on the estimated associations of temperature and daily mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Marie S.; Hajat, Shakoor; Zanobetti, Antonella; Ramirez-Aguilar, Matiana; Schwartz, Joel

    2005-11-01

    We assessed the influence of control for air pollution and respiratory epidemics on associations between apparent temperature (AT) and daily mortality in Mexico City and Monterrey. Poisson regressions were fit to mortality among all ages, children (ages 0 14 years) and the elderly (ages ≥65 years). Predictors included mean daily AT, season, day of week and public holidays for the base model. Respiratory epidemics and air pollution (particulate matter <10 μm in aerodynamic diameter and O3) were added singly and then jointly for a fully adjusted model. Percent changes in mortality were calculated for days of relatively extreme temperatures [cold (10 11°C) for both cities and heat (35 36°C) for Monterrey], compared to days at the overall mean temperature in each city (15°C in Mexico City, 25°C in Monterrey). In Mexico City, total mortality increased 12.4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 10.5%, 14.5%] on cold days (fully adjusted). Among children, the adjusted association was similar [10.9% (95% CI: 5.4%, 16.7%)], but without control for pollution and epidemics, was nearly twice as large [19.7% (95% CI: 13.9%, 25.9)]. In Monterrey, the fully adjusted heat effect for all deaths was 18.7% (95% CI: 11.7%, 26.1%), a third lower than the unadjusted estimate; the heat effect was lower among children [5.5% (95% CI: -10.1%, 23.8%)]. Cold had a similar effect on all-age mortality as in Mexico City [11.7% (95% CI: 3.7%, 20.3%)]. Responses of the elderly differed little from all-ages responses in both cities. Associations between weather and health persisted even with control for air pollution and respiratory epidemics in two Mexican cities, but risk assessments and climate change adaptation programs are best informed by analyses that account for these potential confounders.

  19. Impact of control for air pollution and respiratory epidemics on the estimated associations of temperature and daily mortality.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Marie S; Hajat, Shakoor; Zanobetti, Antonella; Ramirez-Aguilar, Matiana; Schwartz, Joel

    2005-11-01

    We assessed the influence of control for air pollution and respiratory epidemics on associations between apparent temperature (AT) and daily mortality in Mexico City and Monterrey. Poisson regressions were fit to mortality among all ages, children (ages 0-14 years) and the elderly (ages >or=65 years). Predictors included mean daily AT, season, day of week and public holidays for the base model. Respiratory epidemics and air pollution (particulate matter <10 microm in aerodynamic diameter and O3) were added singly and then jointly for a fully adjusted model. Percent changes in mortality were calculated for days of relatively extreme temperatures [cold (10-11 degrees C) for both cities and heat (35-36 degrees C) for Monterrey], compared to days at the overall mean temperature in each city (15 degrees C in Mexico City, 25 degrees C in Monterrey). In Mexico City, total mortality increased 12.4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 10.5%, 14.5%] on cold days (fully adjusted). Among children, the adjusted association was similar [10.9% (95% CI: 5.4%, 16.7%)], but without control for pollution and epidemics, was nearly twice as large [19.7% (95% CI: 13.9%, 25.9)]. In Monterrey, the fully adjusted heat effect for all deaths was 18.7% (95% CI: 11.7%, 26.1%), a third lower than the unadjusted estimate; the heat effect was lower among children [5.5% (95% CI: -10.1%, 23.8%)]. Cold had a similar effect on all-age mortality as in Mexico City [11.7% (95% CI: 3.7%, 20.3%)]. Responses of the elderly differed little from all-ages responses in both cities. Associations between weather and health persisted even with control for air pollution and respiratory epidemics in two Mexican cities, but risk assessments and climate change adaptation programs are best informed by analyses that account for these potential confounders.

  20. Neuromodulatory effects of Calyptranthes grandifolia extracts against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Kich, Débora Mara; Bitencourt, Shanna; Alves, Celso; Silva, Joana; Pinteus, Susete; Pedrosa, Rui; Laufer, Stefan; de Souza, Claucia Fernanda Volken; Goettert, Márcia Inês

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases are neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunction. Previous studies revealed that some natural products have neuroprotective properties, including species of the Myrtaceae family. However, the neuromodulatory potential of Calyptranthes grandifolia is not clear. In the present study, we examined the ability of the ethanol and hexane leaf extracts of C. grandifolia to prevent 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in vitro. Initially, we investigated the potential of the extracts to inhibit the neurodegenerative-related enzymes c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 (JNK3) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). In addition, SH-SY5Y cell viability was assessed by MTT assay after 100μM 6-OHDA-induced cell damage. In order to verify the possible effects of both extracts on 6-OHDA-induced cell death, hydrogen peroxide generation, mitochondrial potential and caspases-3 activity were assessed. Our findings revealed that ethanol extract exhibited inhibitory activity against JNK3 and AChE. In addition, when co-treating SH-SY5Y cells with 6-OHDA and the extracts, oxidative stress was inhibited by both extracts through a decrease of mitochondrial depolarization and caspases-3 activity. In summary, ethanol and hexane extracts of C. grandifolia have some suppressive property against neurotoxicity induced by 6-OHDA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Clinical and epidemiological differences between Bordetella pertussis and respiratory syncytial virus infections in infants: a matched case control study].

    PubMed

    Giménez-Sánchez, Francisco; Cobos-Carrascosa, Elena; Sánchez-Forte, Miguel; López-Sánchez, María Ángeles; González-Jiménez, Yolanda; Azor-Martínez, Ernestina

    2014-01-01

    An increase in cases of pertussis, mainly in young infants, has been reported in the last few years. The clinical presentation of this disease is very similar to that produced by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which makes the diagnosis difficult. To compare the clinical and epidemiological characteristics between Bordetella pertussis and RSV infections in infants admitted to hospital. An analytical matched case-control study was conducted during the period 2008-2011. Cases were defined as infants admitted with pertussis confirmed by PCR in nasopharyngeal aspirate. Each case was matched by age, sex and date of admission to two controls defined as patients with RSV infection detected by immunochromatography in nasal aspirate. Demographic, clinical, laboratory data were compared. Seventy eight patients (26 cases of pertussis and 52 controls RSV+) were included. Sociodemographic characteristics were similar in both groups. Cases had more days of symptoms prior to admission, longer hospital stays, and increased frequency of epidemic family environment. Apnoea and cyanosis were more frequent. Cases of pertussis were more likely to have apnoea, cyanosis, and lymphocytosis while RSV infections had more frequent fever, vomiting and respiratory distress. The clinical presentations of pertussis and RSV infection are similar, but there are some characteristics that can help to distinguish between them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  2. ProSeal laryngeal mask airway in infants and toddlers with upper respiratory tract infections: a randomized control trial of spontaneous vs pressure control ventilation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Aparna; Sharma, Bimla; Sood, Jayashree

    2009-10-01

    ProSeal LMA (PLMA), one of the advanced supraglottic devices has been successfully used to provide both spontaneous and controlled ventilation in children with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). URTI does not imply restriction of disease to upper respiratory tract; it has been shown to produce pulmonary dysfunction. PEEP has been shown to improve oxygenation in such cases. This randomized prospective study was designed to compare postoperative adverse events associated with spontaneous respiration (SR) and pressure control ventilation (PCV) with PEEP in infants and toddlers with URTI when using PLMA as an airway device. In the present study, 90 children, 6 months-2 years, scheduled for infra umbilical surgery were randomized to receive either SR or PCV with PEEP of 5cm H2O. Patients with risk of aspiration, bronchial asthma, anticipated difficult airway, snoring, passive smoking, morbid obesity, coexisting pulmonary and cardiac disease, lower respiratory tract infection, fever > 38 degrees C and sneezing, were excluded. At emergence, airway secretions, coughing, breath holding, bronchospasm, upper airway obstruction or laryngospasm (LS) were assessed. The adverse events were significantly higher in spontaneously breathing patients. Score of adverse events was 6.33 +/- 1.6 in PCV and 7.7 +/- 2.2 in SR group (P = 0.001). The mean SpO2 (%) in PACU was 96.5 +/- 2 in PCV and 94.4 +/- 1.37 in SR (P = 000). Pressure control ventilation with PEEP using PLMA is associated with lower incidence of adverse events in comparison to spontaneous respiration in infants and toddlers with upper respiratory tract infection undergoing infra umbilical surgeries under general anesthesia.

  3. Zinc or Multiple Micronutrient Supplementation to Reduce Diarrhea and Respiratory Disease in South African Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Luabeya, Kany-Kany Angelique; Mpontshane, Nontobeko; Mackay, Malanie; Ward, Honorine; Elson, Inga; Chhagan, Meera; Tomkins, Andrew; den Broeck, Jan Van; Bennish, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Background Prophylactic zinc supplementation has been shown to reduce diarrhea and respiratory illness in children in many developing countries, but its efficacy in children in Africa is uncertain. Objective To determine if zinc, or zinc plus multiple micronutrients, reduces diarrhea and respiratory disease prevalence. Design Randomized, double-blind, controlled trial. Setting Rural community in South Africa. Participants Three cohorts: 32 HIV-infected children; 154 HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers; and 187 HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-uninfected mothers. Interventions Children received either 1250 IU of vitamin A; vitamin A and 10 mg of zinc; or vitamin A, zinc, vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12, C, D, E, and K and copper, iodine, iron, and niacin starting at 6 months and continuing to 24 months of age. Homes were visited weekly. Outcome Measures Primary outcome was percentage of days of diarrhea per child by study arm within each of the three cohorts. Secondary outcomes were prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms and percentage of children who ever had pneumonia by maternal report, or confirmed by the field worker. Results Among HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers, median percentage of days with diarrhea was 2.3% for 49 children allocated to vitamin A; 2.5% in 47 children allocated to receive vitamin A and zinc; and 2.2% for 46 children allocated to multiple micronutrients (P = 0.852). Among HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-uninfected mothers, median percentage of days of diarrhea was 2.4% in 56 children in the vitamin A group; 1.8% in 57 children in the vitamin A and zinc group; and 2.7% in 52 children in the multiple micronutrient group (P = 0.857). Only 32 HIV-infected children were enrolled, and there were no differences between treatment arms in the prevalence of diarrhea. The prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms or incidence of pneumonia did not differ by treatment arms in any of the cohorts. Conclusion

  4. Inhibiting myosin-ATPase reveals a dynamic range of mitochondrial respiratory control in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Perry, Christopher G R; Kane, Daniel A; Lin, Chien-Te; Kozy, Rachel; Cathey, Brook L; Lark, Daniel S; Kane, Constance L; Brophy, Patricia M; Gavin, Timothy P; Anderson, Ethan J; Neufer, P Darrell

    2011-07-15

    Assessment of mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiratory kinetics in PmFBs (permeabilized fibre bundles) is increasingly used in clinical diagnostic and basic research settings. However, estimates of the Km for ADP vary considerably (~20-300 μM) and tend to overestimate respiration at rest. Noting that PmFBs spontaneously contract during respiration experiments, we systematically determined the impact of contraction, temperature and oxygenation on ADP-stimulated respiratory kinetics. BLEB (blebbistatin), a myosin II ATPase inhibitor, blocked contraction under all conditions and yielded high Km values for ADP of >~250 and ~80 μM in red and white rat PmFBs respectively. In the absence of BLEB, PmFBs contracted and the Km for ADP decreased ~2-10-fold in a temperature-dependent manner. PmFBs were sensitive to hyperoxia (increased Km) in the absence of BLEB (contracted) at 30 °C but not 37 °C. In PmFBs from humans, contraction elicited high sensitivity to ADP (Km<100 μM), whereas blocking contraction (+BLEB) and including a phosphocreatine/creatine ratio of 2:1 to mimic the resting energetic state yielded a Km for ADP of ~1560 μM, consistent with estimates of in vivo resting respiratory rates of <1% maximum. These results demonstrate that the sensitivity of muscle to ADP varies over a wide range in relation to contractile state and cellular energy charge, providing evidence that enzymatic coupling of energy transfer within skeletal muscle becomes more efficient in the working state.

  5. Inhibiting Myosin-ATPase Reveals Dynamic Range of Mitochondrial Respiratory Control in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Christopher G.R.; Kane, Daniel A.; Lin, Chien-Te; Kozy, Rachel; Cathey, Brook L.; Lark, Daniel S.; Kane, Constance L.; Brophy, Patricia M.; Gavin, Timothy P; Anderson, Ethan J.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiratory kinetics in permeabilized skeletal myofibres (PmFB) is increasingly used in clinical diagnostic and basic research settings. However, estimates of the Km for ADP vary considerably (∼20-300 μM) and tend to overestimate respiration at rest. Noting PmFBs spontaneously contract during respiration experiments, we systematically determined the impact of contraction, temperature and oxygenation on ADP-stimulated respiratory kinetics. Blebbistatin (BLEB), a myosin II ATPase inhibitor, blocked contraction under all conditions and yielded high Km values for ADP of >∼250 and ∼80 μM in red and white rat PmFB, respectively. In the absence of BLEB, PmFB contracted and the Km for ADP decreased by ∼2 to 10-fold in a temperature-dependent manner. PmFB were sensitive to hyperoxia (increased Km) in the absence of BLEB (contracted) at 30°C but not 37°C. In PmFB from humans, contraction elicited high sensitivity to ADP (m <100 μM) whereas blocking contraction (+BLEB) and including PCr:Cr = 2 to mimic the resting energetic state yielded a Km for ADP = ∼1560 μM, consistent with estimates of in vivo resting respiratory rates of <1% maximum. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of muscle to ADP varies over a wide range in relation to contractile state and cellular energy charge, providing evidence that enzymatic coupling of energy transfer within skeletal muscle becomes more efficient in the working state. PMID:21554250

  6. 5-HT2A receptors are concentrated in regions of the human infant medulla involved in respiratory and autonomic control.

    PubMed

    Paterson, David S; Darnall, Ryan

    2009-05-11

    The serotonergic (5-HT) system in the human medulla oblongata is well-recognized to play an important role in the regulation of respiratory and autonomic function. In this study, using both immunocytochemistry (n=5) and tissue section autoradiography with the radioligand (125)I-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo-phenyl)2-aminopropane (n=7), we examine the normative development and distribution of the 5-HT(2A) receptor in the human medulla during the last part of gestation and first postnatal year when dramatic changes are known to occur in respiratory and autonomic control, in part mediated by the 5-HT(2A) receptor. High 5-HT(2A) receptor binding was observed in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (preganglionic parasympathetic output) and hypoglossal nucleus (airway patency); intermediate binding was present in the nucleus of the solitary tract (visceral sensory input), gigantocellularis, intermediate reticular zone, and paragigantocellularis lateralis. Negligible binding was present in the raphé obscurus and arcuate nucleus. The pattern of 5-HT(2A) immunoreactivity paralleled that of binding density. By 15 gestational weeks, the relative distribution of the 5-HT(2A) receptor was similar to that in infancy. In all nuclei sampled, 5-HT(2A) receptor binding increased with age, with significant increases in the hypoglossal nucleus (p=0.027), principal inferior olive (p=0.044), and medial accessory olive (0.038). Thus, 5-HT(2A) receptors are concentrated in regions involved in autonomic and respiratory control in the human infant medulla, and their developmental profile changes over the first year of life in the hypoglossal nucleus critical to airway patency and the inferior olivary complex essential to cerebellar function.

  7. Aerobic fitness in patients with fibrositis. A controlled study of respiratory gas exchange and 133-xenon clearance from exercising muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.M.; Clark, S.R.; Goldberg, L.; Nelson, D.; Bonafede, R.P.; Porter, J.; Specht, D.

    1989-04-01

    Aerobic fitness was evaluated in 25 women with fibrositis, by having them exercise to volitional exhaustion on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Compared with published standards, greater than 80% of the fibrositis patients were not physically fit, as assessed by maximal oxygen uptake. Compared with matched sedentary controls, fibrositis patients accurately perceived their level of exertion in relation to oxygen consumption and attained a similar level of lactic acidosis, as assessed by their respiratory quotient and ventilatory threshold. Exercising muscle blood flow was estimated by 133-xenon clearance in a subgroup of 16 fibrositis patients and compared with that in 16 matched sedentary controls; the fibrositis patients exhibited reduced 133-xenon clearance. These results indicate a need to include aerobic fitness as a matched variable in future controlled studies of fibrositis and suggest that the detraining phenomenon may be of relevance to the etiopathogenesis of the disease.

  8. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas. PMID:27625447

  9. Cardiac Vagal Control in Non-Medicated Depressed Women and Non-Depressed Controls: Impact of Depression Status, Lifetime Trauma History and Respiratory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cyranowski, Jill M.; Hofkens, Tara L.; Swartz, Holly A.; Salomon, Kristen; Gianaros, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Impairment in cardiac parasympathetic (vagal) control may confer risk for cardiac mortality in depressed populations. We evaluated the impact of acute stress and relationship-focused imagery on cardiac vagal control, as indicated by levels of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), in depressed and non-depressed women. Methods EKG and respiration rate were evaluated in 15 non-medicated depressed women and 15 matched controls during two laboratory conditions: (1) a relationship-focused imagery designed to elicit vagal activation, and (2) a speech stressor designed to evoke vagal withdrawal. Results As expected, the relationship-focused imagery increased RSA [F(3,66)=3.79, p=.02] and the speech stressor decreased RSA [F(3,66)=4.36, p=.02] across women. Depressed women exhibited lower RSA during the relationship-focused imagery, and this effect remained following control for respiratory rate and trauma history [F(1,21)=5.65, p=.027]. Depressed women with a trauma history exhibited the lowest RSA during the stress condition [F(1,22)=9.61, p=.05]. However, after controlling for respiratory rate, Trauma History × Task Order (p=.02) but not Trauma History × Depression Group (p=.12) accounted for RSA variation during the stress condition. Conclusion Depression in women is associated with lower RSA, particularly when women reflect on a close love relationship, a context expected to elicit vagal activation and hence increase RSA. In contrast, depression-related variation in stressor-evoked vagal activity appears to covary with women's trauma history. Associations between vagal activity and depression are complex, and should be considered in view of the experimental conditions under which vagal control is assessed, as well as physiological and behavioral factors that may affect vagal function. PMID:21364194

  10. Effect of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability with chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Dae-Hyouk; Son, Young-Lan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received intensive aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. The comparison of the two groups after the intervention revealed that the experimental group showed more significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. There was no significant difference in saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that intensive aerobic exercise has a positive effect on respiratory capacity and walking endurance in patients with chronic stroke. PMID:27630438

  11. Safety, bioavailability and mechanism of action of nitric oxide to control Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex in calves entering a feedlot.

    PubMed

    Regev-Shoshani, G; Vimalanathan, S; Prema, D; Church, J S; Reudink, M W; Nation, N; Miller, C C

    2014-04-01

    Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex (BRDc), a multi-factorial disease, negatively impacts the cattle industry. Nitric oxide (NO), a naturally occurring molecule, may have utility controlling incidence of BRDc. Safety, bioavailability, toxicology and tolerance/stress of administering NO to cattle is evaluated herein. Thirteen, crossbred, multiple-sourced, commingled commercial weaned beef calves were treated multiple times intranasally over a 4 week period with either a nitric oxide releasing solution (treatment) or saline (control). Exhaled NO, methemoglobin percent (MetHg) and serum nitrites demonstrated biological availability as a result of treatment. Cortisol levels, tissue nitrites, behavior and gross and macroscopic pathology of organs were all normal. Moreover, preliminary in vitro studies using Mannheimia haemolytica, Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis, Bovine Parainfluenza-3 and Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus, suggest a potential explanation for the previously demonstrated efficacy for BRDc. These data confirm the bioavailability, safety and lack of residual of NO treatment to cattle, along with the bactericidal and virucidal effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Asymmetric control of inspiratory and expiratory phases by excitability in the respiratory network of neonatal mice in vitro.

    PubMed

    Del Negro, Christopher A; Kam, Kaiwen; Hayes, John A; Feldman, Jack L

    2009-03-15

    that deactivated in 25-100 ms and thus could contribute to burst termination and the latency of evoked bursts but is unlikely to control the interburst interval. We propose that the respiratory network functions over a broad range of frequencies by engaging distinct mechanisms from those controlling inspiratory duration and pattern that specifically govern the interburst interval.

  13. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  14. NEUROMODULATORY EFFECTS OF THYMOQUINONE IN EXTENUATING OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CHLORPROMAZINE TREATED RATS.

    PubMed

    Safhi, Mohammed Mohsin

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the possible protective effect of thymoquinone on chlorpromazine induced catalepsy, locomotor activity and cerebral oxidative stress in rats. The rats were divided into four groups, each group containing eight animals. The animals were evaluated after repeated administration of chlorpromazine (CPZ) 30 min before the administration of thymoquinone (TQ) for 21 days. Catalepsy was assessed using block method whereas the locomotor activity was assessed using acceleratory rotarod and actophotometer. Markers of oxidative stress parameters (LPO, GSH, GPx, GR, GST and CAT) were evaluated in the brain of rats. The cataleptic scores were significantly increased in CPZ treated rats when compared with normal control rats. Oral administration of TQ (5 and 10 mg/kg) significantly decreased cataleptic scores when compared with chlorpromazine (CPZ) treated rats. The muscle coordination and spontaneous locomotor activity was significantly decreased in CPZ treated rats when compared with normal control rats. Treatment with TQ significantly improved the muscle coordination and spontaneous locomotor activity when compared with CPZ treated rats. TQ treated rats significantly reduced the elevated levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO), increased levels of antioxidant enzymes i.e., reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) when compared with CPZ treated rats. The results clearly suggest that supplementation with TQ can be used to preclude CPZ induced extrapyramidal side effects and may find a role in reducing the oxidative stress.

  15. Comparison of visual biofeedback system with a guiding waveform and abdomen-chest motion self-control system for respiratory motion management.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yujiro; Kadoya, Noriyuki; Kanai, Takayuki; Ito, Kengo; Sato, Kiyokazu; Dobashi, Suguru; Yamamoto, Takaya; Ishikawa, Yojiro; Matsushita, Haruo; Takeda, Ken; Jingu, Keiichi

    2016-07-01

    Irregular breathing can influence the outcome of 4D computed tomography imaging and cause artifacts. Visual biofeedback systems associated with a patient-specific guiding waveform are known to reduce respiratory irregularities. In Japan, abdomen and chest motion self-control devices (Abches) (representing simpler visual coaching techniques without a guiding waveform) are used instead; however, no studies have compared these two systems to date. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of respiratory coaching in reducing respiratory irregularities by comparing two respiratory management systems. We collected data from 11 healthy volunteers. Bar and wave models were used as visual biofeedback systems. Abches consisted of a respiratory indicator indicating the end of each expiration and inspiration motion. Respiratory variations were quantified as root mean squared error (RMSE) of displacement and period of breathing cycles. All coaching techniques improved respiratory variation, compared with free-breathing. Displacement RMSEs were 1.43 ± 0.84, 1.22 ± 1.13, 1.21 ± 0.86 and 0.98 ± 0.47 mm for free-breathing, Abches, bar model and wave model, respectively. Period RMSEs were 0.48 ± 0.42, 0.33 ± 0.31, 0.23 ± 0.18 and 0.17 ± 0.05 s for free-breathing, Abches, bar model and wave model, respectively. The average reduction in displacement and period RMSE compared with the wave model were 27% and 47%, respectively. For variation in both displacement and period, wave model was superior to the other techniques. Our results showed that visual biofeedback combined with a wave model could potentially provide clinical benefits in respiratory management, although all techniques were able to reduce respiratory irregularities.

  16. Nasal swab samples and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays in community-based, longitudinal studies of respiratory viruses: the importance of sample integrity and quality control.

    PubMed

    Alsaleh, Asma N; Whiley, David M; Bialasiewicz, Seweryn; Lambert, Stephen B; Ware, Robert S; Nissen, Michael D; Sloots, Theo P; Grimwood, Keith

    2014-01-09

    Carefully conducted, community-based, longitudinal studies are required to gain further understanding of the nature and timing of respiratory viruses causing infections in the population. However, such studies pose unique challenges for field specimen collection, including as we have observed the appearance of mould in some nasal swab specimens. We therefore investigated the impact of sample collection quality and the presence of visible mould in samples upon respiratory virus detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Anterior nasal swab samples were collected from infants participating in an ongoing community-based, longitudinal, dynamic birth cohort study. The samples were first collected from each infant shortly after birth and weekly thereafter. They were then mailed to the laboratory where they were catalogued, stored at -80°C and later screened by PCR for 17 respiratory viruses. The quality of specimen collection was assessed by screening for human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using endogenous retrovirus 3 (ERV3). The impact of ERV3 load upon respiratory virus detection and the impact of visible mould observed in a subset of swabs reaching the laboratory upon both ERV3 loads and respiratory virus detection was determined. In total, 4933 nasal swabs were received in the laboratory. ERV3 load in nasal swabs was associated with respiratory virus detection. Reduced respiratory virus detection (odds ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.27-0.44) was observed in samples where the ERV3 could not be identified. Mould was associated with increased time of samples reaching the laboratory and reduced ERV3 loads and respiratory virus detection. Suboptimal sample collection and high levels of visible mould can impact negatively upon sample quality. Quality control measures, including monitoring human DNA loads using ERV3 as a marker for epithelial cell components in samples should be undertaken to optimize the validity of real-time PCR results for

  17. Nasal swab samples and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays in community-based, longitudinal studies of respiratory viruses: the importance of sample integrity and quality control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carefully conducted, community-based, longitudinal studies are required to gain further understanding of the nature and timing of respiratory viruses causing infections in the population. However, such studies pose unique challenges for field specimen collection, including as we have observed the appearance of mould in some nasal swab specimens. We therefore investigated the impact of sample collection quality and the presence of visible mould in samples upon respiratory virus detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Methods Anterior nasal swab samples were collected from infants participating in an ongoing community-based, longitudinal, dynamic birth cohort study. The samples were first collected from each infant shortly after birth and weekly thereafter. They were then mailed to the laboratory where they were catalogued, stored at -80°C and later screened by PCR for 17 respiratory viruses. The quality of specimen collection was assessed by screening for human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using endogenous retrovirus 3 (ERV3). The impact of ERV3 load upon respiratory virus detection and the impact of visible mould observed in a subset of swabs reaching the laboratory upon both ERV3 loads and respiratory virus detection was determined. Results In total, 4933 nasal swabs were received in the laboratory. ERV3 load in nasal swabs was associated with respiratory virus detection. Reduced respiratory virus detection (odds ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.27-0.44) was observed in samples where the ERV3 could not be identified. Mould was associated with increased time of samples reaching the laboratory and reduced ERV3 loads and respiratory virus detection. Conclusion Suboptimal sample collection and high levels of visible mould can impact negatively upon sample quality. Quality control measures, including monitoring human DNA loads using ERV3 as a marker for epithelial cell components in samples should be undertaken to optimize the

  18. Probiotic attributes, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuromodulatory effects of Enterococcus faecium CFR 3003: in vitro and in vivo evidence.

    PubMed

    Divyashri, G; Krishna, G; Muralidhara; Prapulla, S G

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that probiotic bacteria play a vital role in modulating various aspects integral to the health and well-being of humans. In the present study, probiotic attributes and the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuromodulatory potential of Enterococcus faecium CFR 3003 were investigated by employing suitable model systems. E. faecium exhibited robust resistance to gastrointestinal stress conditions as it could withstand acid stress at pH 1.5, 2 and 3. The bacterium also survived at a bile salt concentration of 0.45 %, and better tolerance was observed towards pepsin and trypsin. E. faecium produced lactic acid as a major metabolic product, followed by butyric acid. Lyophilized cell-free supernatant (LCS) of E. faecium exhibited significant antioxidant capacity evaluated against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl, ascorbate auto-oxidation, oxygen radical absorbance and reducing power. Interestingly, E. faecium, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG MTCC 1408 and LCS showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect by negatively modulating TNF-α production and upregulating IL-10 levels in LPS-stimulated macrophage cell lines. In an in vivo mice model, the propensity of probiotic supplements to modulate endogenous oxidative markers and redox status in brain regions was assessed. Young mice provided with oral supplements (daily for 28 days) of E. faecium and L. rhamnosus exhibited diminished oxidative markers in the brain and enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes with a concomitant increase in γ-aminobutyric acid and dopamine levels. Collectively, our findings clearly suggest the propensity of these bacteria to protect against tissue damage mediated through free radicals and inflammatory cytokines. Although the underlying molecular mechanisms need further studies, it is tempting to speculate that probiotics confer a neuroprotective advantage in vivo against oxidative damage-mediated neurodegenerative conditions.

  19. Singing teaching as a therapy for chronic respiratory disease--a randomised controlled trial and qualitative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lord, Victoria M; Cave, Phoene; Hume, Victoria J; Flude, Elizabeth J; Evans, Amanda; Kelly, Julia L; Polkey, Michael I; Hopkinson, Nicholas S

    2010-08-03

    Despite optimal pharmacological therapy and pulmonary rehabilitation, patients with COPD continue to be breathless. There is a need to develop additional strategies to alleviate symptoms. Learning to sing requires control of breathing and posture and might have benefits that translate into daily life. To test this hypothesis we performed a randomised controlled trial, comparing a six week course of twice weekly singing classes to usual care, in 28 COPD patients. The experience of singing was assessed in a qualitative fashion, through interviews with a psychologist. In addition, we surveyed patients with chronic respiratory conditions who participated in a series of open singing workshops. In the RCT, the physical component score of the SF36 improved in the singers (n = 15) compared to the controls (n = 13); +7.5(14.6) vs. -3.8(8.4) p = 0.02. Singers also had a significant fall in HAD anxiety score; -1.1(2.7) vs. +0.8(1.7) p = 0.03. Singing did not improve single breath counting, breath hold time or shuttle walk distance. In the qualitative element, 8 patients from the singing group were interviewed. Positive effects on physical sensation, general well-being, community/social support and achievement/efficacy emerged as common themes. 150 participants in open workshops completed a questionnaire. 96% rated the workshops as "very enjoyable" and 98% thought the workshop had taught them something about breathing in a different way. 81% of attendees felt a "marked physical difference" after the workshop. Singing classes can improve quality of life measures and anxiety and are viewed as a very positive experience by patients with respiratory disease; no adverse consequences of participation were observed. Current Controlled Trials--ISRCTN17544114.

  20. A multi-strain Synbiotic may reduce viral respiratory infections in asthmatic children: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ahanchian, Hamid; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Ansari, Elham; Ganji, Toktam; Kiani, Mohammad Ali; Khalesi, Maryam; Momen, Tooba; Kianifar, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Asthma is a growing problem worldwide. Acute exacerbations impose considerable morbidity, mortality, and increased cost. Viral respiratory infections are the most common cause (80–85%) of pediatric asthma exacerbations and admissions to the hospital. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a new synbiotic Lactocare® on viral respiratory infections and asthma exacerbations in asthmatic children. Methods In this double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, 72 children with mild persistent asthma, aged between 6 and 12 years, were randomized to receive either Lactocare®, a Synbiotic containing 1 billion CFU/Capsule of Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, and Fructooligosacharide (Zist Takhmir, Tehran, Iran) or placebo daily for 60 days. The primary outcome was the number of viral respiratory infections, and secondary outcomes were school absence, salbutamol and prednisolone usage, outpatient visits, and hospital admission for asthma. The outcomes were compared among study groups using the SPSS 11.5 program and the Mann Whitney and Fisher exact tests. Results Of the 72 children who were enrolled with mild persistent asthma, 36 were assigned randomly to be treated with synbiotic and 36 with placebo. The number of viral respiratory infections was significantly higher in placebo group than the synbiotic group during the first month of intervention (0.74 ± 0.12 vs. 0.44 ± 0.1, p < 0.007) but not during the second month (0.5 ± 0.8 vs. 0.5 ± 0.8, p < 0.641). Considering the total duration of the study (two months), infection episodes also were significantly lower in the synbiotic group (0.92 ± 0.15 vs. 0.69 ± 0.11, p < 0.046). Salbutamol consumption was significantly lower in the synbiotic group, but there were no significant differences in school absenteeism, oral

  1. The human respiratory gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this 'respiratory gating' is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R-R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R-R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms.

  2. Combined neuromodulatory interventions in acute experimental pain: assessment of melatonin and non-invasive brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Nádia Regina Jardim; Laste, Gabriela; Deitos, Alícia; Stefani, Luciana Cadore; Cambraia-Canto, Gustavo; Torres, Iraci L. S.; Brunoni, Andre R.; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and melatonin can effectively treat pain. Given their potentially complementary mechanisms of action, their combination could have a synergistic effect. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that compared to the control condition and melatonin alone, tDCS combined with melatonin would have a greater effect on pain modulatory effect, as assessed by quantitative sensory testing (QST) and by the pain level during the Conditioned Pain Modulation (CPM)-task. Furthermore, the combined treatment would have a greater cortical excitability effect as indicated by the transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and on the serum BDNF level. Healthy males (n = 20), (aged 18–40 years), in a blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover, clinical trial, were randomized into three groups: sublingual melatonin (0.25 mg/kg) + a-tDCS, melatonin (0.25 mg/kg) + sham-(s)-tDCS, or sublingual placebo+sham-(s)-tDCS. Anodal stimulation (2 mA, 20 min) was applied over the primary motor cortex. There was a significant difference in the heat pain threshold (°C) for melatonin+a-tDCS vs. placebo+s-tDCS (mean difference: 4.86, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9 to 8.63) and melatonin+s-tDCS vs. placebo+s-tDCS (mean: 5.16, 95% CI: 0.84 to 8.36). There was no difference between melatonin+s-tDCS and melatonin+a-tDCS (mean difference: 0.29, 95% CI: −3.72 to 4.23). The mean change from the baseline on amplitude of motor evocate potential (MEP) was significantly higher in the melatonin+a-tDCS (−19.96% ± 5.2) compared with melatonin+s-tDCS group (−1.36% ± 5.35) and with placebo+s-tDCS group (3.61% ± 10.48), respectively (p < 0.05 for both comparisons). While melatonin alone or combined with a-tDCS did not significantly affect CPM task result, and serum BDNF level. The melatonin effectively reduced pain; however, its association with a-tDCS did not present an additional modulatory effect on acute induced pain. PMID:25873871

  3. Neuromodulatory and anti-inflammatory ingredient for sensitive skin: in vitro assessment.

    PubMed

    Costa, Adilson; Eberlin, Samara; Polettini, Anelise J; da Costa Pereira, Andreia F; Pereira, Caroline S; Ferreira, Nayara M Cortes; Dolis, Eleonora; Torloni, Liliana B Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    The manifestation of sensitive skin occurs as a consequence of increased permeability of the Stratum corneum, besides the involvement of neuro-immune-endocrine system. In this study, we evaluated the effects of an active ingredient SensC on the production of neuropeptides substance P (SP), enkephalin and β-endorphin; eicosanoids prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4); histamine, transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), and envelope proteins filaggrin and involucrin, using an in vitro model of human cell culture. Our results demonstrated that treatment of keratinocyte cultures with SensC prevented the increase of all evaluated inflammatory mediators induced by interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1α). As the same way, SensC provides decrease in the synthesis of TRPV1. Regarding the synthesis of envelope proteins, SensC promoted increases for filaggrin and involucrin levels, when compared to control group. Considering the absence of appropriate treatment, the availability of ingredients, such as SensC, with antiinflammatory and protective barrier properties can be a significant tool for preventing neurosensorial symptoms associated with sensitive skin.

  4. Activity of neuromodulatory neurones during stepping of a single insect leg.

    PubMed

    Mentel, Tim; Weiler, Violetta; Büschges, Ansgar; Pflüger, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Octopamine plays a major role in insect motor control and is released from dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurones, a group of cells located on the dorsal midline of each ganglion. We were interested whether and how these neurones are activated during walking and chose the semi-intact walking preparation of stick insects that offers to investigate single leg-stepping movements. DUM neurones were characterized in the thoracic nerve cord by backfilling lateral nerves. These backfills revealed a population of 6-8 efferent DUM cells per thoracic segment. Mesothoracic DUM cells were subsequently recorded during middle leg stepping and characterized by intracellular staining. Seven out of eight identified individual different types of DUM neurones were efferent. Seven types except the DUMna nl2 were tonically depolarized during middle leg stepping and additional phasic depolarizations in membrane potential linked to the stance phase of the middle leg were observed. These DUM neurones were all multimodal and received depolarizing synaptic drive when the abdomen, antennae or different parts of the leg were mechanically stimulated. We never observed hyperpolarising synaptic inputs to DUM neurones. Only one type of DUM neurone, DUMna, exhibited spontaneous rhythmic activity and was unaffected by different stimuli or walking movements.

  5. Neuromodulatory Effects of Auditory Training and Hearing Aid Use on Audiovisual Speech Perception in Elderly Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Luodi; Rao, Aparna; Zhang, Yang; Burton, Philip C.; Rishiq, Dania; Abrams, Harvey

    2017-01-01

    Although audiovisual (AV) training has been shown to improve overall speech perception in hearing-impaired listeners, there has been a lack of direct brain imaging data to help elucidate the neural networks and neural plasticity associated with hearing aid (HA) use and auditory training targeting speechreading. For this purpose, the current clinical case study reports functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from two hearing-impaired patients who were first-time HA users. During the study period, both patients used HAs for 8 weeks; only one received a training program named ReadMyQuipsTM (RMQ) targeting speechreading during the second half of the study period for 4 weeks. Identical fMRI tests were administered at pre-fitting and at the end of the 8 weeks. Regions of interest (ROI) including auditory cortex and visual cortex for uni-sensory processing, and superior temporal sulcus (STS) for AV integration, were identified for each person through independent functional localizer task. The results showed experience-dependent changes involving ROIs of auditory cortex, STS and functional connectivity between uni-sensory ROIs and STS from pretest to posttest in both cases. These data provide initial evidence for the malleable experience-driven cortical functionality for AV speech perception in elderly hearing-impaired people and call for further studies with a much larger subject sample and systematic control to fill in the knowledge gap to understand brain plasticity associated with auditory rehabilitation in the aging population. PMID:28270763

  6. Optical monitoring of cardiac and respiratory rhythms in the skin perfusion near the brain under controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukunda Rao, M.; Blazek, Vladimir; Schmitt, Hans J.

    1998-06-01

    In this investigation an attempt is made to find the effects of controlled breathing on brain with the help of optical sensors mounted on the left and right temples of a subject. It has already been established that the brain activity can be monitored in terms of arterial blood volumetric changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brain recorded with the help of optical sensors. To investigate the influence of controlled breathing, an expert in controlled breathing (pranayama) is chosen as the subject. Pranayama is believed to be the controlled intake and outflow of breath in a firmly established posture. Some types of pranayama are believed to relive mental stress. While the subject is practicing one such type of breath control, arterial blood volume changes in the brain are recorded using optical sensors mounted on the left and right temples of the subject. From these measurements at the beginning and end of the pranayama exercise, it could be noticed that the subject could induce changes in the cardiac and respiratory rhythms by controlled breathing. Rhythmic phenomena in the skin perfusion in the vicinity of the brian are also studied when the subject is holding his breath. The arterial blood volume changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brain, as monitored by the optical sensors during this period, exhibit asymmetric reaction when the subject is holding his breath. An attempt is made to understand whether these changes induced by stoppage of breathing are 'chaotic' or 'adaptive' in nature.

  7. Optical monitoring of cardiac and respiratory rhythms in the skin perfusion near the brain under controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Mandavilli M.; Blazek, Vladimir; Schmitt, Hans J.

    1998-04-01

    In this investigation an attempt is made to find the effects of controlled breathing on brain with the help of optical sensor mounted on the left and right temples of a subject. It has already been established that the brain activity can be monitored in terms of arterial blood volumetric changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brain recorded with the help of optical sensors. To investigate the influence of controlled breathing, an expert in controlled breathing is chosen as the subject. Pranayama is believed to be the controlled intake and outflow of breath in a firmly established posture. Some types of pranayama are believed to relieve mental stress. While the subject is practicing one such type of breath control, arterial blood volume changes in the brain are recorded using optical sensor mounted on the left and right temples of the subject. From these measurements at the beginning and end of the pranayama exercise, it could be noticed that the subject could induce changes in the cardiac and respiratory rhythms by controlled breathing. Rhythmic phenomena in the skin perfusion in the vicinity of the brian are also studied when the subject is holding his breath. The arterial blood volume changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brian, as monitored by the optical sensors during this period, exhibit asymmetric reaction when the subject is holding his breath. An attempt is made to understand whether these changes induced by stoppage of breathing are 'chaotic' or 'adaptive' in nature.

  8. An early rehabilitation intervention to enhance recovery during hospital admission for an exacerbation of chronic respiratory disease: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Johanna E A; Hussain, Syed F; Harvey-Dunstan, Theresa C; Bankart, M John; Chaplin, Emma J; Vincent, Emma E; Chimera, Rudo; Morgan, Mike D; Singh, Sally J; Steiner, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether an early rehabilitation intervention initiated during acute admission for exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease reduces the risk of readmission over 12 months and ameliorates the negative effects of the episode on physical performance and health status. Design Prospective, randomised controlled trial. Setting An acute cardiorespiratory unit in a teaching hospital and an acute medical unit in an affiliated teaching district general hospital, United Kingdom. Participants 389 patients aged between 45 and 93 who within 48 hours of admission to hospital with an exacerbation of chronic respiratory disease were randomised to an early rehabilitation intervention (n=196) or to usual care (n=193). Main outcome measures The primary outcome was readmission rate at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included number of hospital days, mortality, physical performance, and health status. The primary analysis was by intention to treat, with prespecified per protocol analysis as a secondary outcome. Interventions Participants in the early rehabilitation group received a six week intervention, started within 48 hours of admission. The intervention comprised prescribed, progressive aerobic, resistance, and neuromuscular electrical stimulation training. Patients also received a self management and education package. Results Of the 389 participants, 320 (82%) had a primary diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. 233 (60%) were readmitted at least once in the following year (62% in the intervention group and 58% in the control group). No significant difference between groups was found (hazard ratio 1.1, 95% confidence interval 0.86 to 1.43, P=0.4). An increase in mortality was seen in the intervention group at one year (odds ratio 1.74, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 2.88, P=0.03). Significant recovery in physical performance and health status was seen after discharge in both groups, with no significant difference between groups at one year

  9. An early rehabilitation intervention to enhance recovery during hospital admission for an exacerbation of chronic respiratory disease: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Greening, Neil J; Williams, Johanna E A; Hussain, Syed F; Harvey-Dunstan, Theresa C; Bankart, M John; Chaplin, Emma J; Vincent, Emma E; Chimera, Rudo; Morgan, Mike D; Singh, Sally J; Steiner, Michael C

    2014-07-08

    To investigate whether an early rehabilitation intervention initiated during acute admission for exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease reduces the risk of readmission over 12 months and ameliorates the negative effects of the episode on physical performance and health status. Prospective, randomised controlled trial. An acute cardiorespiratory unit in a teaching hospital and an acute medical unit in an affiliated teaching district general hospital, United Kingdom. 389 patients aged between 45 and 93 who within 48 hours of admission to hospital with an exacerbation of chronic respiratory disease were randomised to an early rehabilitation intervention (n=196) or to usual care (n=193). The primary outcome was readmission rate at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included number of hospital days, mortality, physical performance, and health status. The primary analysis was by intention to treat, with prespecified per protocol analysis as a secondary outcome. Participants in the early rehabilitation group received a six week intervention, started within 48 hours of admission. The intervention comprised prescribed, progressive aerobic, resistance, and neuromuscular electrical stimulation training. Patients also received a self management and education package. Of the 389 participants, 320 (82%) had a primary diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. 233 (60%) were readmitted at least once in the following year (62% in the intervention group and 58% in the control group). No significant difference between groups was found (hazard ratio 1.1, 95% confidence interval 0.86 to 1.43, P=0.4). An increase in mortality was seen in the intervention group at one year (odds ratio 1.74, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 2.88, P=0.03). Significant recovery in physical performance and health status was seen after discharge in both groups, with no significant difference between groups at one year. Early rehabilitation during hospital admission for chronic respiratory disease

  10. Effect of diaphragmatic fatigue on control of the respiratory muscles during CO sub 2 rebreathing

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, S.; Lichros, I.; Macklem, P.T. Montreal Chest Hospital, Quebec )

    1991-03-11

    The authors measured respiratory muscle recruitment and ventilation ({dot V}{sub E}) during CO{sub 2} rebreathing before and after diaphragmatic fatigue in normal subjects. Muscle activity was assessed by measuring pleural, abdominal, and transdiaphragmatic pressures (Ppl, Pab, and Pdi, resp). The results showed that (1) there was a progressive increase in Pdi with increasing end-tidal PCO{sub 2} (P{sub ET}CO{sub 2}); the rate of increase was usually greater before than after fatigue, however, in some it was less because of longer operating length and/or passive stretching of the diaphragm due to strong rib cage muscle (RCM) activity induced by fatigue; (2) Pdi increased mainly due to greater fall in Ppl; {Delta}Pab increased little during CO{sub 2} rebreathing or even decreased with P{sub ET}CO{sub 2} over 50-55 mmHg; this pattern was exaggerated by fatigue; (3) at the end of each trial, the ratio {minus}{Delta}Ppl/{Delta}Pab increased by {approximately}140% before and {approximately}850% after fatigue; (4) CO{sub 2} induced expiratory abdominal muscle activity; and (5) as a group, {dot V}{sub E} and its pattern did not change appreciably with fatigue. The authors conclude that RCM are recruited proportionately more than the diaphragm by CO{sub 2} and that diaphragmatic fatigue shifts the central drive from the fatigued diaphragm to TCM to preserve ventilation.

  11. Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Hospital Infection Control Response to an Epidemic Respiratory Virus Threat

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Yock Young; Sim, Joe; Lim, Jeremy; Hsu, Li Yang; Chow, Wai Leng; Fisher, Dale A.; Wong, Yue Sie; Ho, Khek Yu

    2009-01-01

    The outbreak of influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 prompted many countries in Asia, previously strongly affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), to respond with stringent measures, particularly in preventing outbreaks in hospitals. We studied actual direct costs and cost-effectiveness of different response measures from a hospital perspective in tertiary hospitals in Singapore by simulating outbreaks of SARS, pandemic (H1N1) 2009, and 1918 Spanish influenza. Protection measures targeting only infected patients yielded lowest incremental cost/death averted of $23,000 (US$) for pandemic (H1N1) 2009. Enforced protection in high-risk areas (Yellow Alert) and full protection throughout the hospital (Orange Alert) averted deaths but came at an incremental cost of up to $2.5 million/death averted. SARS and Spanish influenza favored more stringent measures. High case-fatality rates, virulence, and high proportion of atypical manifestations impacted cost-effectiveness the most. A calibrated approach in accordance with viral characteristics and community risks may help refine responses to future epidemics. PMID:19961669

  12. Control of abdominal and expiratory intercostal muscle activity during vomiting - Role of ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Tan, L. K.; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1987-01-01

    The role of ventral respiratory group (VRG) expiratory (E) neurons in the control of abdominal and internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting was investigated in cats. Two series of experiments were performed: in one, the activity of VRG E neurons was recorded during fictive vomiting in cats that were decerebrated, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated; in the second, the abdominal muscle activity during vomiting was compared before and after sectioning the axons of descending VRG E neurons in decerebrate spontaneously breathing cats. The results show that about two-thirds of VRG E neurons that project at least as far caudally as the lower thoracic cord contribute to internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting. The remaining VRG E neurons contribute to abdominal muscle activation. As shown by severing the axons of the VRG E neurons, other, as yet unidenified, inputs (either descending from the brain stem or arising from spinal reflexes) can also produce abdominal muscle activation.

  13. Control of abdominal and expiratory intercostal muscle activity during vomiting - Role of ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Tan, L. K.; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1987-01-01

    The role of ventral respiratory group (VRG) expiratory (E) neurons in the control of abdominal and internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting was investigated in cats. Two series of experiments were performed: in one, the activity of VRG E neurons was recorded during fictive vomiting in cats that were decerebrated, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated; in the second, the abdominal muscle activity during vomiting was compared before and after sectioning the axons of descending VRG E neurons in decerebrate spontaneously breathing cats. The results show that about two-thirds of VRG E neurons that project at least as far caudally as the lower thoracic cord contribute to internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting. The remaining VRG E neurons contribute to abdominal muscle activation. As shown by severing the axons of the VRG E neurons, other, as yet unidenified, inputs (either descending from the brain stem or arising from spinal reflexes) can also produce abdominal muscle activation.

  14. Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Occurrence of non-functioning components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in the presence of proteinase inhibitors: evidence for proteolytic control over assembly of the respiratory chain.

    PubMed Central

    Galkin, A V; Tsoi, T V; Luzikov, V N

    1980-01-01

    Yeast was grown in glucose- or galactose-containing media without or with proteinase inhibitors, phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride and pepstatin. Culture growth was practically not affected by these compounds. Yeast growth on glucose in the presence of either phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride or pepstatin entails accumulation of cytochromes c, c1, b and aa3 to a 25--30% excess above the control by the stationary phase, while cell respiration is unaffected. During growth on galactose the maximal cytochrome content (per unit weight of biomass) is reached in the mid-exponential phase and then decreases by 30--40% towards the stationary phase, while cell respiration remains constant. Addition of phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride or pepstatin in the mid-exponential phase blocks the decrease in cytochrome levels and has no effect on cell respiration. Mitochondrial populations isolated from stationary-phase control and phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride-grown cells glucose cultures display identical succinate oxidase and partial-respiratory-chain activities, despite the differences in cytochrome contents. However, the activities of individual respiratory complexes measured after maximal activation are nearly proportional to the amounts of corresponding components. The same situation holds true for mitochondrial populations from mid-exponential-phase, stationary-phase control and stationary-phase inhibitor-grown cells of galactose cultures. The findings suggest that the 'surplus' respiratory-chain components do not participate in electron flow because of the lack of interaction with adjacent carriers. PMID:7004440

  15. Resting-state high-frequency heart rate variability is related to respiratory frequency in individuals with severe mental illness but not healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Daniel S; Elstad, Maja; Kaufmann, Tobias; Brandt, Christine L; Haatveit, Beathe; Haram, Marit; Nerhus, Mari; Westlye, Lars T; Andreassen, Ole A

    2016-11-17

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has become central to biobehavioral models of self-regulation and interpersonal interaction. While research on healthy populations suggests changes in respiratory frequency do not affect short-term HRV, thus negating the need to include respiratory frequency as a HRV covariate, the nature of the relationship between these two variables in psychiatric illness is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between HRV and respiratory frequency in a sample of individuals with severe psychiatric illness (n = 55) and a healthy control comparison group (n = 149). While there was no significant correlation between HF-HRV and respiration in the control group, we observed a significant negative correlation in the psychiatric illness group, with a 94.1% probability that these two relationships are different. Thus, we provide preliminary evidence suggesting that HF-HRV is related to respiratory frequency in severe mental illness, but not in healthy controls, suggesting that HRV research in this population may need to account for respiratory frequency. Future work is required to better understand the complex relationship between respiration and HRV in other clinical samples with psychiatric diseases.

  16. Resting-state high-frequency heart rate variability is related to respiratory frequency in individuals with severe mental illness but not healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Daniel S.; Elstad, Maja; Kaufmann, Tobias; Brandt, Christine L.; Haatveit, Beathe; Haram, Marit; Nerhus, Mari; Westlye, Lars T.; Andreassen, Ole A.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has become central to biobehavioral models of self-regulation and interpersonal interaction. While research on healthy populations suggests changes in respiratory frequency do not affect short-term HRV, thus negating the need to include respiratory frequency as a HRV covariate, the nature of the relationship between these two variables in psychiatric illness is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between HRV and respiratory frequency in a sample of individuals with severe psychiatric illness (n = 55) and a healthy control comparison group (n = 149). While there was no significant correlation between HF-HRV and respiration in the control group, we observed a significant negative correlation in the psychiatric illness group, with a 94.1% probability that these two relationships are different. Thus, we provide preliminary evidence suggesting that HF-HRV is related to respiratory frequency in severe mental illness, but not in healthy controls, suggesting that HRV research in this population may need to account for respiratory frequency. Future work is required to better understand the complex relationship between respiration and HRV in other clinical samples with psychiatric diseases. PMID:27853244

  17. Multimodal nutritional rehabilitation improves clinical outcomes of malnourished patients with chronic respiratory failure: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pison, Christophe M; Cano, Noël J; Chérion, Cécile; Caron, Fabrice; Court-Fortune, Isabelle; Antonini, Marie-Thérèse; Gonzalez-Bermejo, Jésus; Meziane, Lahouari; Molano, Luis Carlos; Janssens, Jean-Paul; Costes, Frédéric; Wuyam, Bernard; Similowski, Thomas; Melloni, Boris; Hayot, Maurice; Augustin, Julie; Tardif, Catherine; Lejeune, Hervé; Roth, Hubert; Pichard, Claude

    2011-11-01

    In chronic respiratory failure (CRF), body composition strongly predicts survival. A prospective randomised controlled trial was undertaken in malnourished patients with CRF to evaluate the effects of 3 months of home rehabilitation on body functioning and composition. 122 patients with CRF on long-term oxygen therapy and/or non-invasive ventilation (mean (SD) age 66 (10) years, 91 men) were included from eight respiratory units; 62 were assigned to home health education (controls) and 60 to multimodal nutritional rehabilitation combining health education, oral nutritional supplements, exercise and oral testosterone for 90 days. The primary endpoint was exercise tolerance assessed by the 6-min walking test (6MWT). Secondary endpoints were body composition, quality of life after 3 months and 15-month survival. Mean (SD) baseline arterial oxygen tension was 7.7 (1.2) kPa, forced expiratory volume in 1 s 31 (13)% predicted, body mass index (BMI) 21.5 (3.9) kg/m2 and fat-free mass index (FFMI) 15.5 (2.4) kg/m2. The intervention had no significant effect on 6MWT. Improvements (treatment effect) were seen in BMI (+0.56 kg/m2, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.95, p=0.004), FFMI (+0.60 kg/m2, 95% CI 0.15 to 1.05, p=0.01), haemoglobin (+9.1 g/l, 95% CI 2.5 to 15.7, p=0.008), peak workload (+7.2 W, 95% CI 3.7 to 10.6, p<0.001), quadriceps isometric force (+28.3 N, 95% CI 7.2 to 49.3, p=0.009), endurance time (+5.9 min, 95% CI 3.1 to 8.8, p<0.001) and, in women, Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (+16.5 units, 95% CI 5.3 to 27.7, p=0.006). In a multivariate Cox analysis, only rehabilitation in a per-protocol analysis predicted survival (HR 0.27, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.95, p=0.042). Multimodal nutritional rehabilitation aimed at improving body composition increased exercise tolerance, quality of life in women and survival in compliant patients, supporting its incorporation in the treatment of malnourished patients with CRF. Clinical Trial number NCT00230984.

  18. Effects of the combination of respiratory muscle training and abdominal drawing-in maneuver on respiratory muscle activity in patients with post-stroke hemiplegia: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Yong; Lee, Jung-Sun; Kim, Hyeong-Dong; Kim, In-Seob

    2015-08-01

    No study has examined the effects of the combination of respiratory muscle training (RMT) and abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) on respiratory muscle activity and function in stroke patients during early pulmonary rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RMT combined with ADIM on decreased respiratory muscle activity and function in patients with post-stroke hemiplegia. Thirty-seven subjects with post-stroke hemiplegia were randomly allocated to three groups; integrated training group (ITG), respiratory muscle training group (RMTG), and control group (CG). All of the subjects received routine therapy for stroke rehabilitation for 1 hour, five times a week for 6 weeks. Especially, the ITG received RMT using an incentive respiratory spirometer and ADIM using a Stabilizer, and the RMTG only received RMT using incentive respiratory spirometer for 15  minutes a day, five times a week for 6 weeks. Pulmonary function was evaluated using spirometry for measuring the forced vital capacity (FVC) and force expiratory volume in 1  second (FEV1). Additional surface electromyography (sEMG) analysis was included by measuring the respiratory muscle activity. Our results showed that changes between the pre- and post-test values of FVC (F = 12.50, P = 0.02) and FEV1 (F = 12.81, P = 0.01) (P < 0.05) in the ITG were significantly (P < 0.05) greater. Changes in EMG activation of the diaphragm (F = 13.75, P = 0.003) and external intercostal (F = 14.33, P = 0.002) (P < 0.01) muscles of patients in the ITG during maximal static inspiratory efforts were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than those in patients of the RMTG and the CG at post-test. Our findings suggested that RMT combined with ADIM could improve pulmonary function in patients with post-stroke hemiplegia.

  19. Respiratory dynamics and dead space to tidal volume ratio of volume-controlled versus pressure-controlled ventilation during prolonged gynecological laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lian, Ming; Zhao, Xiao; Wang, Hong; Chen, Lianhua; Li, Shitong

    2016-12-30

    Laparoscopic operations have become longer and more complex and applied to a broader patient population in the last decades. Prolonged gynecological laparoscopic surgeries require prolonged pneumoperitoneum and Trendelenburg position, which can influence respiratory dynamics and other measurements of pulmonary function. We investigated the differences between volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) and pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) and tried to determine the more efficient ventilation mode during prolonged pneumoperitoneum in gynecological laparoscopy. Twenty-six patients scheduled for laparoscopic radical hysterectomy combined with or without laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy were randomly allocated to be ventilated by either VCV or PCV. Standard anesthesic management and laparoscopic procedures were performed. Measurements of respiratory and hemodynamic dynamics were obtained after induction of anesthesia, at 10, 30, 60, and 120 min after establishing pneumoperitoneum, and at 10 min after return to supine lithotomy position and removal of carbon dioxide. The logistic regression model was applied to predict the corresponding critical value of duration of pneumoperitoneum when the Ppeak was higher than 40 cmH2O. Prolonged pneumoperitoneum and Trendelenburg position produced significant and clinically relevant changes in dynamic compliance and respiratory mechanics in anesthetized patients under PCV and VCV ventilation. Patients under PCV ventilation had a similar increase of dead space/tidal volume ratio, but had a lower Ppeak increase compared with those under VCV ventilation. The critical value of duration of pneumoperitoneum was predicted to be 355 min under VCV ventilation, corresponding to the risk of Ppeak higher than 40 cmH2O. Both VCV and PCV can be safely applied to prolonged gynecological laparoscopic surgery. However, PCV may become the better choice of ventilation after ruling out of other reasons for Ppeak increasing.

  20. Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion.

    PubMed

    Mantoni, Teit; Rasmussen, Jakob Højlund; Belhage, Bo; Pott, Frank Christian

    2008-08-01

    In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires several cold immersions. This study examines whether thorough instruction enables non-habituated persons to attenuate the ventilatory component of cold-shock response. There were nine volunteers (four women) who were lowered into a 0 degrees C immersion tank for 60 s. Middle cerebral artery mean velocity (CBFV) was measured together with ventilatory parameters and heart rate before, during, and after immersion. Within seconds after immersion in ice-water, heart rate increased significantly from 95 +/- 8 to 126 +/- 7 bpm (mean +/- SEM). Immersion was associated with an elevation in respiratory rate (from 12 +/- 3 to 21 +/- 5 breaths, min(-1)) and tidal volume (1022 +/- 142 to 1992 +/- 253 ml). Though end-tidal carbon dioxide tension decreased from 4.9 +/- 0.13 to 3.9 +/- 0.21 kPa, CBFV was insignificantly reduced by 7 +/- 4% during immersion with a brief nadir of 21 +/- 4%. Even without prior cold-water experience, subjects were able to suppress reflex hyperventilation following ice-water immersion, maintaining the cerebral blood flow velocity at a level not associated with impaired consciousness. This study implies that those susceptible to accidental cold-water immersion could benefit from education in cold-shock response and the possibility of reducing the ventilatory response voluntarily.

  1. Controlling mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome with fuzzy logic.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Binh; Bernstein, David B; Bates, Jason H T

    2014-08-01

    The current ventilatory care goal for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and the only evidence-based approach for managing ARDS is to ventilate with a tidal volume (VT) of 6 mL/kg predicted body weight (PBW). However, it is not uncommon for some caregivers to feel inclined to deviate from this strategy for one reason or another. To accommodate this inclination in a rationalized manner, we previously developed an algorithm that allows for VT to depart from 6 mL/kg PBW based on physiological criteria. The goal of the present study was to test the feasibility of this algorithm in a small retrospective study. Current values of peak airway pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), and arterial oxygen saturation are used in a fuzzy logic algorithm to decide how much VT should differ from 6 mL/kg PBW and how much PEEP should change from its current setting. We retrospectively tested the predictions of the algorithm against 26 cases of decision making in 17 patients with ARDS. Differences between algorithm and physician VT decisions were within 2.5 mL/kg PBW, except in 1 of 26 cases, and differences between PEEP decisions were within 2.5 cm H2O, except in 3 of 26 cases. The algorithm was consistently more conservative than physicians in changing VT but was slightly less conservative when changing PEEP. Within the limits imposed by a small retrospective study, we conclude that our fuzzy logic algorithm makes sensible decisions while at the same time keeping practice close to the current ventilatory care goal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Provider Decisions to Treat Respiratory Illnesses with Antibiotics: Insights from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Branche, Angela R.; Walsh, Edward E.; Jadhav, Nagesh; Karmally, Rachel; Baran, Andrea; Peterson, Derick R.; Falsey, Ann R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI) frequently causes adult hospitalization and antibiotic overuse. Procalcitonin (PCT) treatment algorithms have been used successfully in Europe to safely reduce antibiotic use for LRTI but have not been adopted in the United States. We recently performed a feasibility study for a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of PCT and viral testing to guide therapy for non-pneumonic LRTI. Objective The primary objective of the current study was to understand factors influencing PCT algorithm adherence during the RCT and evaluate factors influencing provider antibiotic prescribing practices for LRTI. Study Design From October 2013-April 2014, 300 patients hospitalized at a community teaching hospital with non-pneumonic LRTI were randomized to standard or PCT-guided care with viral PCR testing. Algorithm adherence data was collected and multivariate stepwise logistic regression of clinical variables used to model algorithm compliance. 134 providers were surveyed anonymously before and after the trial to assess knowledge of biomarkers and viral testing and antibiotic prescribing practices. Results Diagnosis of pneumonia on admission was the only variable significantly associated with non-adherence [7% (adherence) vs. 26% (nonadherence), p = 0.01]. Surveys confirmed possible infiltrate on chest radiograph as important for provider decisions, as were severity of illness, positive sputum culture, abnormal CBC and fever. However, age, patient expectations and medical-legal concerns were also at least somewhat important to prescribing practices. Physician agreement with the importance of viral and PCT testing increased from 42% to 64% (p = 0.007) and 49% to 74% (p = 0.001), respectively, after the study. Conclusions Optimal algorithm adherence will be important for definitive PCT intervention trials in the US to determine if PCT guided algorithms result in better outcomes than reliance on traditional clinical variables. Factors

  3. Effects of aerobic training combined with respiratory muscle stretching on the functional exercise capacity and thoracoabdominal kinematics in patients with COPD: a randomized and controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wada, Juliano T; Borges-Santos, Erickson; Porras, Desiderio Cano; Paisani, Denise M; Cukier, Alberto; Lunardi, Adriana C; Carvalho, Celso Rf

    2016-01-01

    Patients with COPD present a major recruitment of the inspiratory muscles, predisposing to chest incoordination, increasing the degree of dyspnea and impairing their exercise capacity. Stretching techniques could decrease the respiratory muscle activity and improve their contractile capacity; however, the systemic effects of stretching remain unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aerobic training combined with respiratory muscle stretching on functional exercise capacity and thoracoabdominal kinematics in patients with COPD. This study was a randomized and controlled trial. A total of 30 patients were allocated to a treatment group (TG) or a control group (CG; n=15, each group). The TG was engaged in respiratory muscle stretching and the CG in upper and lower limb muscle stretching. Both groups performed 24 sessions (twice a week, 12 weeks) of aerobic training. Functional exercise capacity (6-minute walk test), thoracoabdominal kinematics (optoelectronic plethysmography), and respiratory muscle activity (surface electromyography) were evaluated during exercise. Analysis of covariance was used to compare the groups at a significance level of 5%. After the intervention, the TG showed improved abdominal (ABD) contribution, compartmental volume, mobility, and functional exercise capacity with decreased dyspnea when compared with the CG (P<0.01). The TG also showed a decreased respiratory muscle effort required to obtain the same pulmonary volume compared to the CG (P<0.001). Our results suggest that aerobic training combined with respiratory muscle stretching increases the functional exercise capacity with decreased dyspnea in patients with COPD. These effects are associated with an increased efficacy of the respiratory muscles and participation of the ABD compartment.

  4. Effects of aerobic training combined with respiratory muscle stretching on the functional exercise capacity and thoracoabdominal kinematics in patients with COPD: a randomized and controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Juliano T; Borges-Santos, Erickson; Porras, Desiderio Cano; Paisani, Denise M; Cukier, Alberto; Lunardi, Adriana C; Carvalho, Celso RF

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with COPD present a major recruitment of the inspiratory muscles, predisposing to chest incoordination, increasing the degree of dyspnea and impairing their exercise capacity. Stretching techniques could decrease the respiratory muscle activity and improve their contractile capacity; however, the systemic effects of stretching remain unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aerobic training combined with respiratory muscle stretching on functional exercise capacity and thoracoabdominal kinematics in patients with COPD. Design This study was a randomized and controlled trial. Participants A total of 30 patients were allocated to a treatment group (TG) or a control group (CG; n=15, each group). Intervention The TG was engaged in respiratory muscle stretching and the CG in upper and lower limb muscle stretching. Both groups performed 24 sessions (twice a week, 12 weeks) of aerobic training. Evaluations Functional exercise capacity (6-minute walk test), thoracoabdominal kinematics (optoelectronic plethysmography), and respiratory muscle activity (surface electromyography) were evaluated during exercise. Analysis of covariance was used to compare the groups at a significance level of 5%. Results After the intervention, the TG showed improved abdominal (ABD) contribution, compartmental volume, mobility, and functional exercise capacity with decreased dyspnea when compared with the CG (P<0.01). The TG also showed a decreased respiratory muscle effort required to obtain the same pulmonary volume compared to the CG (P<0.001). Conclusion Our results suggest that aerobic training combined with respiratory muscle stretching increases the functional exercise capacity with decreased dyspnea in patients with COPD. These effects are associated with an increased efficacy of the respiratory muscles and participation of the ABD compartment. PMID:27822031

  5. Respiratory alkalosis.

    PubMed

    Foster, G T; Vaziri, N D; Sassoon, C S

    2001-04-01

    Respiratory alkalosis is an extremely common and complicated problem affecting virtually every organ system in the body. This article reviews the various facets of this interesting problem. Respiratory alkalosis produces multiple metabolic abnormalities, from changes in potassium, phosphate, and calcium, to the development of a mild lactic acidosis. Renal handling of the above ions is also affected. The etiologies may be related to pulmonary or extrapulmonary disorders. Hyperventilation syndrome is a common etiology of respiratory alkalosis in the emergency department setting and is a diagnosis by exclusion. There are many cardiac effects of respiratory alkalosis, such as tachycardia, ventricular and atrial arrhythmias, and ischemic and nonischemic chest pain. In the lungs, vasodilation occurs, and in the gastrointestinal system there are changes in perfusion, motility, and electrolyte handling. Therapeutically, respiratory alkalosis is used for treatment of elevated intracranial pressure. Correction of a respiratory alkalosis is best performed by correcting the underlying etiology.

  6. Evaluation of respiratory variables in smelter and control workers before and during a shutdown period

    SciTech Connect

    Holness, D.L.; Batten, B.; Broder, I.; Corey, P.; Mintz, S.

    1985-05-01

    Thirty-six smelter workers examined in this pilot study were found to have a higher prevalence of cough and dyspnea and lower baseline lung function than did 31 controls. They also experienced decreases in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1) over the workweek while the controls did not. Baseline airflow rates and change in FVC and FEV1 over the workweek varied with levels of sulfur dioxide and particulates. Twenty-three smelter workers and 21 controls were seen on a second occasion, six months into an extended shutdown. The smelter workers continued to have a higher prevalence of cough and dyspnea and lower baseline lung function than the controls. There was, however, a slight increase in lung function in both the exposed workers and the controls during the shutdown. The results suggest that smelter workers may develop both acute and chronic work-related pulmonary effects and that the chronic effects may be nonreversible.

  7. Adverse Respiratory Events Associated With Hypnotics Use in Patients of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wei-Sheng; Lai, Ching-Yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-07-01

    Insomnia is prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).We conducted a population-based case-control study to evaluate the effects of hypnotics on the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD.The case-control study was investigated using data retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with newly diagnosed adverse respiratory events (pneumonia, COPD with acute exacerbation, acute respiratory failure, and cardiopulmonary arrest) were included in the case group. Patients with COPD and no history of adverse respiratory events were randomly selected for the control group, which was frequency-matched with the case group according to index date, age (per 10 years), and sex. Patients who had used hypnotics within 1 month meant active users. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of were calculated using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models.Most of the study participants were male (71.6%), and the mean ages of the participants in the case and control groups were 69.2 (±12.4) and 67.5 (±12.3) years, respectively. After potential confounding factors were adjusting for, the adjusted ORs of adverse respiratory events were 12.0 for active users of benzodiazepines (95% CI, 8.11-17.6) and 10.5 for active users of nonbenzodiazepines (95% CI, 7.68-14.2) compared with the adjusted ORs of those who never used hypnotics.The results of this epidemiological study suggested that hypnotics increased the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD.

  8. Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC®) supplementation and gastrointestinal and respiratory-tract illness symptoms: a randomised control trial in athletes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Probiotics purportedly reduce symptoms of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory-tract illness by modulating commensal microflora. Preventing and reducing symptoms of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness are the primary reason that dietary supplementation with probiotics are becoming increasingly popular with healthy active individuals. There is a paucity of data regarding the effectiveness of probiotics in this cohort. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a probiotic on faecal microbiology, self-reported illness symptoms and immunity in healthy well trained individuals. Methods Competitive cyclists (64 males and 35 females; age 35 ± 9 and 36 ± 9 y, VO2max 56 ± 6 and 52 ± 6 ml.kg-1.min-1, mean ± SD) were randomised to either probiotic (minimum 1 × 109 Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC®) per day) or placebo treatment for 11 weeks in a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial. The outcome measures were faecal L. fermentum counts, self-reported symptoms of illness and serum cytokines. Results Lactobacillus numbers increased 7.7-fold (90% confidence limits 2.1- to 28-fold) more in males on the probiotic, while there was an unclear 2.2-fold (0.2- to 18-fold) increase in females taking the probiotic. The number and duration of mild gastrointestinal symptoms were ~2-fold greater in the probiotic group. However, there was a substantial 0.7 (0.2 to 1.2) of a scale step reduction in the severity of gastrointestinal illness at the mean training load in males, which became more pronounced as training load increased. The load (duration×severity) of lower respiratory illness symptoms was less by a factor of 0.31 (99%CI; 0.07 to 0.96) in males taking the probiotic compared with placebo but increased by a factor of 2.2 (0.41 to 27) in females. Differences in use of cold and flu medication mirrored these symptoms. The observed effects on URTI had too much uncertainty for a decisive outcome. There were clear reductions in the magnitude of

  9. Perfluorocarbon-associated gas exchange (partial liquid ventilation) in respiratory distress syndrome: a prospective, randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Leach, C L; Fuhrman, B P; Morin, F C; Rath, M G

    1993-09-01

    To determine the efficacy of perfluorocarbon-associated gas exchange (partial liquid ventilation) in respiratory distress syndrome. Prospective, randomized, controlled study. State University of New York at Buffalo, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Eleven premature lambs with respiratory distress syndrome, delivered by cesarean section. Five lambs were supported by conventional mechanical ventilation alone. Six lambs were switched to perfluorocarbon-associated gas exchange after 60 to 90 mins of conventional mechanical ventilation. Perfluorocarbon-associated gas exchange was accomplished by instilling a volume of liquid perfluorocarbon equivalent to normal functional residual capacity (30 mL/kg) into the trachea, performing 3 to 4 mins of tidal liquid ventilation, and, at end-expiration, with liquid functional residual capacity of 30 mL/kg remaining in the lung, reconnecting the animal to the volume ventilator for gas tidal volumes. Serial arterial blood gases and lung mechanics were measured. While receiving conventional ventilation, all animals developed progressive hypoxemia, hypercarbia, and acidosis. However, in the perfluorocarbon-associated gas exchange group, within 5 mins of the initiation of perfluorocarbon-associated gas exchange, mean PaO2 increased four-fold, from 59 +/- 6 torr (7.9 +/- 0.8 kPa) during conventional ventilation to 250 +/- 28 torr (33.3 +/- 3.7 kPa; p < .05) during perfluorocarbon-associated gas exchange, and this increase was sustained at 60 mins of perfluorocarbon-associated gas exchange (268 +/- 38 torr; 35.7 +/- 5.1 kPa; p < .05). Mean PaCO2 decreased progressively from 62 +/- 4 torr (8.3 +/- 0.5 kPa) during conventional ventilation to 38 +/- 3.3 torr (5.1 +/- 0.4 kPa) at 60 mins of perfluorocarbon-associated gas exchange (p < .05). Mean pH concomitantly increased. Dynamic compliance increased three-fold within 15 mins of instituting perfluorocarbon-associated gas exchange, from 0.31 +/- 0.02 mL/cm H2O during conventional

  10. Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC®) supplementation and gastrointestinal and respiratory-tract illness symptoms: a randomised control trial in athletes.

    PubMed

    West, Nicholas P; Pyne, David B; Cripps, Allan W; Hopkins, William G; Eskesen, Dorte C; Jairath, Ashok; Christophersen, Claus T; Conlon, Michael A; Fricker, Peter A

    2011-04-11

    Probiotics purportedly reduce symptoms of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory-tract illness by modulating commensal microflora. Preventing and reducing symptoms of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness are the primary reason that dietary supplementation with probiotics are becoming increasingly popular with healthy active individuals. There is a paucity of data regarding the effectiveness of probiotics in this cohort. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a probiotic on faecal microbiology, self-reported illness symptoms and immunity in healthy well trained individuals. Competitive cyclists (64 males and 35 females; age 35 ± 9 and 36 ± 9 y, VO2max 56 ± 6 and 52 ± 6 ml.kg-1.min-1, mean ± SD) were randomised to either probiotic (minimum 1 × 109 Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC®) per day) or placebo treatment for 11 weeks in a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial. The outcome measures were faecal L. fermentum counts, self-reported symptoms of illness and serum cytokines. Lactobacillus numbers increased 7.7-fold (90% confidence limits 2.1- to 28-fold) more in males on the probiotic, while there was an unclear 2.2-fold (0.2- to 18-fold) increase in females taking the probiotic. The number and duration of mild gastrointestinal symptoms were ~2-fold greater in the probiotic group. However, there was a substantial 0.7 (0.2 to 1.2) of a scale step reduction in the severity of gastrointestinal illness at the mean training load in males, which became more pronounced as training load increased. The load (duration×severity) of lower respiratory illness symptoms was less by a factor of 0.31 (99%CI; 0.07 to 0.96) in males taking the probiotic compared with placebo but increased by a factor of 2.2 (0.41 to 27) in females. Differences in use of cold and flu medication mirrored these symptoms. The observed effects on URTI had too much uncertainty for a decisive outcome. There were clear reductions in the magnitude of acute exercise

  11. Microtopographic and Hydrological Controls over Respiratory Efflux and Late-Season Arctic Methane Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkman, E.; Zona, D.; Oechel, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, Arctic peatlands have released approximately 35 Tg (3.5 x 1012g) of CH4 annually, corresponding to around 1/3 of the aggregate wetland CH4 fluxes and 16% of all natural emissions. As climate models increasingly suggest that current warming trends in the Arctic (4-8 °C higher annual surface air temperatures) will continue by century's end, carbon (C) cycling in these northern climes may be further amplified. Although much has been learned in recent decades, uncertainty remains in regard to the spatial and temporal extent of CO2 and CH4 emissions from these systems. Chamber based carbon flux measurements were gathered for three growing seasons from June 2007 to September 2013 in Barrow, Alaska to investigate the diurnal, weekly, and monthly patterns of CO2 and CH4 flux in the North American Arctic. For the 2007 and 2008 growing seasons, high temporal frequency auto-chambers (LI-8100A Automated Soil Flux System, LI-COR Biosciences) were used to gather over 18,000 individual flux measurements. From July to September 2013 an Ultraportable Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (Los Gatos Research Inc.) was deployed in concert with this soil flux system to gather high temporal frequency soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes. Nearby eddy covariance towers provided auxiliary meteorological and environmental data, while weekly transects amassed further surficial hydrological measures (pH, thaw depth, water table). For earlier periods of data, respiratory fluxes were partitioned into five microtopographic classes (polygon rims and troughs, low centered basins, high ridges, and flat mesic terrain). Conversely, for the later periods of data covered chamber fluxes were partitioned into three 'habitat' types (High, Medium, Wet) based on corresponding aboveground average water table extent. Marked dissimilarities were noted across habitat types and microtopographic classes. In general more mesic, waterlogged regions released greater quantities of CO2 across the growing season, while

  12. Defective control of vitamin D receptor-mediated epithelial STAT1 signalling predisposes to severe respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Stoppelenburg, Arie Jan; von Hegedus, Johannes Hendrick; Huis in't Veld, Ron; Bont, Louis; Boes, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection causes bronchiolitis in infants with seasonal frequency, for which vitamin D deficiency and a well-described polymorphism in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) FokI are important risk factors. Recent studies suggest that vitamin D regulates immune pathways in airway epithelial cells during RSV infection. It is not understood why the VDR FokI polymorphism predisposes to severe RSV bronchiolitis. We investigated how the VDR FokI polymorphism regulates the epithelial response to RSV infection. To this end, we over-expressed the normal and FokI VDR variants in A549 airway epithelial cells. Vitamin D restrained the expression of both NFκB- and STAT1-induced antiviral genes. However, while NFκB control by vitamin D remained intact, both RSV-induced phosphorylation of STAT1 and expression of its downstream targets, IRF1 and IRF7, escaped vitamin D control in FokI epithelial cells. The poor capacity of vitamin D to regulate IRF1 in FokI VDR-expressing cells was recapitulated using blood samples from normal and FokI VDR-genotyped healthy donors. Hence, we provide mechanistic insight that the FokI VDR polymorphism renders STAT1-mediated antiviral immune reactions to RSV infection non-responsive to vitamin D control, resulting in enhanced immunopathology and exacerbated RSV bronchiolitis. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic effects of a long duration electronic control device exposure in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Donald M; Ho, Jeffrey D; Reardon, Robert F; Miner, James R

    2010-12-01

    Electronic control devices (ECD) have become popular in law enforcement because they have filled a gap left by other law enforcement devices, tactics, or tools and have been shown to reduce officer and suspect injuries. Civilians are using the same technology for defensive purposes. TASER C2 is the latest generation civilian-marketed device from the manufacturer. Unlike the law enforcement devices, the device discharges for 30 s continuously. This study is the first to look at the cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic effects of this device on human subjects. This was a prospective, observational study of human subjects involved in a training course. Subjects were exposed for 30 s on the anterior thorax. Vital signs, ECG, troponin I, pH, lactate, and creatine kinase (CK) were measured before and immediately after the exposure. Troponin I, pH, lactate, and CK were measured again 24 h after the exposure. Continuous spirometry was used to evaluate the respiratory effects. Echocardiography was also performed before, during, and immediately after the exposure to determine heart rate and rhythm. Eleven subjects completed the study. There were no clinically important electrocardiogram changes and no positive troponins. Spirometry showed an increase in minute ventilation during the exposure. There was no important change in CK at 24 h. Lactate was slightly higher and pH was slightly lower after the exposure, but similar to the effects of physical exertion. Echocardiography was performed in 6 subjects. In half of these subjects, the rhythm was determined to be "sinus" and in the other half the rhythm was indeterminant. In our study, the civilian device caused a mild lactic acidosis. No other important physiologic effects were found.

  14. Personal healthcare worker (HCW) and work-site characteristics that affect HCWs' use of respiratory-infection control measures in ambulatory healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Turnberg, Wayne; Daniell, William; Simpson, Terri; Van Buren, Jude; Seixas, Noah; Lipkin, Edward; Duchin, Jeffery

    2009-01-01

    To identify healthcare worker (HCW) and work-site characteristics associated with HCWs' reported use of recommended respiratory-infection control practices in primary and emergency care settings. A cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire for HCWs during the summer and fall of 2005. Primary and emergency care clinics at 5 medical centers in King County, Seattle, Washington. Nurse professionals who reported receiving training (odds ratio [OR], 2.5 [confidence interval {CI}, 1.1-5.9]; P=.029), instructional feedback from supervisors (OR, 3.0 [CI, 1.5-5.9]; P=.002), and management support for implementing safe work practices had a higher odds of also reporting adherence to recommended respiratory precautions, compared with nurses who did not. Training was the only important determinant for adherence to respiratory precaution measures among medical practitioners (OR, 5.5 [CI, 1.2-25.8]; P=.031). The reported rate of adherence to hand hygiene practices was higher among nurse professionals who were male (OR, 2.2 [CI, 1.0-4.9]; P=.045), had infants, small children, or older adults living at home (OR, 2.2 [CI, 1.2-3.9]; P=.007), reported cleanliness and orderliness of the establishment where they worked (OR, 2.0 [CI, 1.1-3.5]; P=.019), had received respiratory-infection control training (OR, 3.2 [CI, 1.8-6.0]; P<.001), and reported fears about catching a dangerous respiratory infection at work (OR, 2.3 [CI, 1.2-4.5]; P=.011). A number of HCW and work-site characteristics associated with HCWs' use of recommended respiratory-infection control measures have been identified. These potentially influential characteristics should be considered as targets or guides for further investigation, which should include the evaluation of intervention strategies.

  15. Lateral hypothalamus as a sensor-regulator in respiratory and metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Burdakov, Denis; Karnani, Mahesh M; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2013-09-10

    Physiological fluctuations in the levels of hormones, nutrients, and gasses are sensed in parallel by interacting control systems distributed throughout the brain and body. We discuss the logic of this arrangement and the definitions of "sensing"; and then focus on lateral hypothalamic (LH) control of energy balance and respiration. LH neurons control diverse behavioral and autonomic processes by projecting throughout the neuraxis. Three recently characterized types of LH cells are discussed here. LH orexin/hypocretin (ORX) neurons fire predominantly during wakefulness and are thought to promote reward-seeking, arousal, obesity resistance, and adaptive thermogenesis. Bidirectional control of ORX cells by extracellular macronutrients may add a new regulatory loop to these processes. ORX neurons also stimulate breathing and are activated by acid/CO2in vivo and in vitro. LH melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons fire mostly during sleep, promote physical inactivity, weight gain, and may impair glucose tolerance. Reported stimulation of MCH neurons by glucose may thus modulate energy homeostasis. Leptin receptor (LepR) neurons of the LH are distinct from ORX and MCH neurons, and may suppress feeding and locomotion by signaling to the mesolimbic dopamine system and local ORX neurons. Integration within the ORX-MCH-LepR microcircuit is suggested by anatomical and behavioral data, but requires clarification with direct assays of functional connectivity. Further studies of how LH circuits counteract evolutionarily-relevant environmental fluctuations will provide key information about the logic and fragilities of brain controllers of healthy homeostasis.

  16. Yogurt supplemented with probiotics can protect the healthy elderly from respiratory infections: A randomized controlled open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Fangfang; Guo, Yue; Li, Ming; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Shijie; Shen, Xi; He, Miao; Huang, Chengyu; He, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain could protect middle-aged and elderly people from acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) using a randomized, blank-controlled, parallel-group design. Patients and methods Two hundred and five volunteers aged ≥45 years were randomly divided into two groups. The subjects in the intervention group were orally administered 300 mL/d of yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain, Lactobacillus paracasei N1115 (N1115), 3.6×107 CFU/mL for 12 weeks, while those in the control group retained their normal diet without any probiotic supplementation. The primary outcome was the incidence of URTI, and changes in serum protein, immunoglobulins, and the profiles of the T-lymphocyte subsets (total T-cells [CD3+], T-helper cells [CD4+], and T-cytotoxic-suppressor cells [CD8+]) during the intervention were the secondary outcomes. Results Compared to the control group, the number of persons diagnosed with an acute URTI and the number of URTI events significantly decreased in the intervention group (P=0.038, P=0.030, respectively). The risk of URTI in the intervention group was evaluated as 55% of that in the control group (relative risk =0.55, 95% CI: 0.307–0.969). The change in the percentage of CD3+ cells in the intervention group was significantly higher than in the control group (P=0.038). However, no significant differences were observed in the total protein, albumin, globulin, and prealbumin levels in both groups (P>0.05). Conclusion The study suggested that yogurt with selected probiotic strains such as N1115 may reduce the risk of acute upper tract infections in the elderly. The enhancement of the T-cell-mediated natural immune defense might be one of the important underlying mechanisms for probiotics to express their anti-infective effects. PMID:28848330

  17. Respiratory function and exposure-effect relationships in wood dust-exposed and control workers.

    PubMed

    Holness, D L; Sass-Kortsak, A M; Pilger, C W; Nethercott, J R

    1985-07-01

    The effect of wood dust exposure on 50 cabinet makers was examined. Woodworkers reported more nasal and eye symptoms and more cough, sputum and wheezing than did 49 control workers. More irritated cells were present in the woodworkers' nasal cytological smears. In contrast to the control workers, the woodworkers had a significant decline in lung function over the workshift. An inverse correlation between baseline lung function and an exposure index (mean area dust level multiplied by length of exposure) was demonstrated in the woodworkers. Greater dust exposure was not associated with larger falls in lung function over the work shift.

  18. Effect of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability with subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyeong-Man; Bang, Dae-Hyouk

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability in subacute stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received inspiratory muscle training for 30 minutes (six sets of five-minutes) and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. There were significant between-group differences for the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. No statistically significant differences were observed for measures of saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] These findings gave some indications that inspiratory muscle training may benefit in patients with subacute stroke, and it is feasible to be included in rehabilitation program with this population. PMID:28265169

  19. Upper respiratory cancer among refinery and chemical plant workers: a case-control study in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Soskolne, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    Upper respiratory cancer (URC) specific to workers employed on an ethanol unit at a large southern United States refinery and chemical plant was associated with exposure to strong concentrations of sulfuric acid used as a reactant in this process. The carcinogen implicated by indirect evidence was diethyl sulfate. However, additional URC cases were subsequently found that could not be associated with employment on the former ethanol unit. This fact, together with the continued use of sulfuric acid in strong, intermediate, and weak concentrations in the same industrial complex, motivated the present investigation. In particular, hypotheses concerning an association between laryngeal cancer and industrial exposure to the three concentrations of sulfuric acid present in the complex have been tested. The study is a multiple-matched case-control design with a minimum of three controls individually matched to each case on race, sex, date of birth, date of initial employment and duration of employment. Results indicate significant associations between sulfuric acid exposure and URC with odds ratio exceeding four. Strong collinearity among the three acid concentrations has rendered any separation of independent acid strength effects impossible. None of the other exposures examined in this study, including asbestos, nickel or wood dust, revealed significant associations. There is a strong possibility that the association is specific for laryngeal cancer.

  20. Effect of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability with subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyeong-Man; Bang, Dae-Hyouk

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability in subacute stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received inspiratory muscle training for 30 minutes (six sets of five-minutes) and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. There were significant between-group differences for the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. No statistically significant differences were observed for measures of saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] These findings gave some indications that inspiratory muscle training may benefit in patients with subacute stroke, and it is feasible to be included in rehabilitation program with this population.

  1. Is acute idiopathic pericarditis associated with recent upper respiratory tract infection or gastroenteritis? A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Florian; Delhumeau-Cartier, Cecile; Meyer, Philippe; Genne, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the association of a clinical diagnosis of acute idiopathic pericarditis (AIP), and a reported upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) or gastroenteritis (GE) in the preceding month. Design Patients who were hospitalised with a first diagnosis of AIP were retrospectively compared with a control group of patients admitted with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), matched by gender and age. Setting Primary and secondary care level; one hospital serving a population of about 170 000. Participants A total of 51 patients with AIP were included, of whom 46 could be matched with 46 patients with control DVT. Only patients with a complete review of systems on the admission note were included in the study. Main outcome measure Conditional logistic regression was used to assess the association of a clinical diagnosis of AIP and an infectious episode (URTI or GE) in the month preceding AIP diagnosis. Results Patients with AIP had more often experienced a recent episode of URTI or GE than patients with DVT (39.1% vs 10.9%, p=0.002). The multivariate conditional regression showed that AIP was independently associated with URTI or GE in the last month preceding diagnosis (OR=37.18, 95% CI=1.91 to 724.98, p=0.017). Conclusions This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study demonstrating an association between a recent episode of URTI or GE and a clinical diagnosis of AIP. PMID:26603247

  2. The RNA-binding protein Celf6 is highly expressed in diencephalic nuclei and neuromodulatory cell populations of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Susan E; Khangura, Eakta; Dougherty, Joseph D

    2016-05-01

    The gene CUG-BP, Elav-like factor 6 (CELF6) appears to be important for proper functioning of neurocircuitry responsible for behavioral output. We previously discovered that polymorphisms in or near CELF6 may be associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in humans and that the deletion of this gene in mice results in a partial ASD-like phenotype. Here, to begin to understand which circuits might mediate these behavioral disruptions, we sought to establish in what structures, with what abundance, and at which ages Celf6 protein is present in the mouse brain. Using both a knockout-validated antibody to Celf6 and a novel transgenic mouse line, we characterized Celf6 expression in the mouse brain across development. Celf6 gene products were present early in neurodevelopment and in adulthood. The greatest protein expression was observed in distinct nuclei of the diencephalon and neuromodulatory cell populations of the midbrain and hindbrain, with clear expression in dopaminergic, noradrenergic, histaminergic, serotonergic and cholinergic populations, and a variety of presumptive peptidergic cells of the hypothalamus. These results suggest that disruption of Celf6 expression in hypothalamic nuclei may impact a variety of behaviors downstream of neuropeptide activity, while disruption in neuromodulatory transmitter expressing areas such as the ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra, raphe nuclei and locus coeruleus may have far-reaching influences on overall brain activity.

  3. Environmentally induced return to juvenile-like chemosensitivity in the respiratory control system of adult bullfrog, Lithobates catesbeianus.

    PubMed

    Santin, Joseph M; Hartzler, Lynn K

    2016-11-01

    separation of adulthood from environmental factors associated with adulthood that necessitate control of lung ventilation. To test the hypothesis that postmetamorphic respiratory control phenotypes arise through permanent developmental changes vs. reversible environmental signals, we measured respiratory-related nerve discharge in isolated brainstem preparations and action potential firing from CO2 -sensitive neurons in bullfrogs acclimatized to semi-terrestrial (air-breathing) and aquatic-overwintering (no air-breathing) habitats. We found that aquatic overwintering significantly reduced neuroventilatory responses to CO2 and O2 involved in lung breathing. Strikingly, this gas sensitivity profile reflects that of water-breathing tadpoles. We further demonstrated that aquatic overwintering reduced CO2 -induced firing responses of chemosensitive neurons. In contrast, respiratory rhythm generating processes remained adult-like after submergence. Our results establish that phenotypes associated with life-stage can arise from phenotypic plasticity per se. This provides evidence that developmental time courses coinciding with environmental changes obscure interpretations regarding origins of stage-dependent physiological phenotypes by masking plasticity. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  4. The Prevention of Respiratory Insufficiency after Surgical Management (PRISM) Trial. Report of the protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial of CPAP to prevent respiratory complications and improve survival following major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Pearse, Rupert M; Abbott, Tom E; Haslop, Richard; Ahmad, Tahania; Kahan, Brennan C; Filipini, Claudia; Rhodes, Andrew; Ranieri, Marco

    2017-02-01

    Over 300 million patients undergo surgery worldwide each year. Postoperative morbidity - particularly respiratory complications - are most frequent and severe among high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. However, standard treatments, like physiotherapy or supplemental oxygen, often fail to prevent these. Preliminary research suggests that prophylactic continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) can reduce the risk of postoperative respiratory complications. However, without evidence from a large clinical effectiveness trial, CPAP has not become routine care. This trial aims to determine whether early postoperative CPAP reduces the incidence of respiratory complications and improves one-year survival following major intra-peritoneal surgery. This is an international multicenter randomized controlled trial with open study group allocation. The participants are aged 50 years and over undergoing major elective intra-peritoneal surgery. The intervention is CPAP for at least four hours, started within four hours of the end of surgery. The primary outcome is a composite of pneumonia, re-intubation, or death within 30 days of randomization. All participants with a recorded outcome will be analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary analysis will use a mixed-effects logistic regression model, which includes center as a random-intercept, and will be adjusted for the minimization factors and other pre-specified covariates. Trial Registration: ISRCTN 56012545. This is the first proposed clinical effectiveness trial of postoperative CPAP to prevent respiratory complications of which we are aware. The large sample size and multicenter international design will make the result generalizable to a variety of healthcare settings.

  5. The Use of Predatory Bacteria to Control Select Pathogens and Treat Respiratory Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-13

    pressure of a drug and can develop in both free-floating bacteria, and in surface-attached bacteria or biofilms . An additional potential threat is the...problem of multidrug-resistant (MDR)-bacterial infections, biofilm related infections and the risk of weaponized biological agents has driven...capability to feed and proliferate on an array of human pathogens and biofilms , make these organisms ideal candidates for use as biological control agents. We

  6. Respiratory Muscle Training in Patients Recovering Recent Open Cardiothoracic Surgery: A Randomized-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Venturelli, Elena; Siscaro, Gherardo; Florini, Fabio; Papetti, Alessandra; Lugli, Daniela; Cerulli, Massimo; Clini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the clinical efficacy and feasibility of an expiratory muscle training (EMT) device (Respilift) applied to patients recovering from recent open cardiothoracic surgery (CTS). Design. Prospective, double-blind, 14-day randomised-controlled trial. Participants and Setting. A total of 60 inpatients recovering from recent CTS and early admitted to a pulmonary rehabilitation program. Interventions. Chest physiotherapy plus EMT with a resistive load of 30 cm H2O for active group and chest physiotherapy plus EMT with a sham load for control group. Measures. Changes in maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) were considered as primary outcome, while maximal inspiratory pressures (MIP), dynamic and static lung volumes, oxygenation, perceived symptoms of dyspnoea, thoracic pain, and well being (evaluated by visual analogic scale—VAS) and general health status were considered secondary outcomes. Results. All outcomes recorded showed significant improvements in both groups; however, the change of MEP (+34.2 mmHg, P < 0.001 and +26.1%, P < 0.001 for absolute and % of predicted, resp.) was significantly higher in active group. Also VAS dyspnoea improved faster and more significantly (P < 0.05) at day 12, and 14 in active group when compared with control. The drop-out rate was 6%, without differences between groups. Conclusions. In patients recovering from recent CTS, specific EMT by Respilift is feasible and effective. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01510275. PMID:23984352

  7. Sleeping and resting respiratory rates in dogs and cats with medically-controlled left-sided congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Porciello, F; Rishniw, M; Ljungvall, I; Ferasin, L; Haggstrom, J; Ohad, D G

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping and resting respiratory rates (SRR and RRR, respectively) are commonly used to monitor dogs and cats with left-sided cardiac disease and to identify animals with left-sided congestive heart failure (L-CHF). Dogs and cats with subclinical heart disease have SRRmean values <30 breaths/min. However, little is known about SRR and RRR in dogs and cats with CHF that is well controlled with medical therapy. In this study, SRR and RRR were measured by the owners of 51 dogs and 22 cats with stable, well-controlled CHF. Median canine SRRmean was 20 breaths/min (7-39 breaths/min); eight dogs were ≥25 breaths/min and one dog only was ≥30 breaths/min. Canine SRRmean was unrelated to pulmonary hypertension or diuretic dose. Median feline SRRmean was 20 breaths/min (13-31 breaths/min); four cats were ≥25 breaths/min and only one cat was ≥30 breaths/min. Feline SRRmean was unrelated to diuretic dose. SRR remained stable during collection in both species with little day-to-day variability. The median canine RRRmean was 24 breaths/min (12-44 breaths/min), 17 were ≥25 breaths/min, seven were ≥30 breaths/min, two were >40 breaths/min. Median feline RRRmean was 24 breaths/min (15-45 breaths/min); five cats had RRRmean ≥25 breaths/min; one had ≥30 breaths/min, and two had ≥40 breaths/min. These data suggest that most dogs and cats with CHF that is medically well-controlled and stable have SRRmean and RRRmean <30 breaths/min at home. Clinicians can use these data to help determine how best to control CHF in dogs and cats.

  8. Efficacy of a respiratory rehabilitation exercise training package in hospitalized elderly patients with acute exacerbation of COPD: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Liao, Lin-Yu; Chen, Kuei-Min; Chung, Wei-Sheng; Chien, Jung-Yien

    2015-01-01

    NCT02329873. Acute exacerbation (AE) of COPD is characterized by a sudden worsening of COPD symptoms. Previous studies have explored the effectiveness of respiratory rehabilitation for patients with COPD; however, no training program specific to acute exacerbation in elderly patients or unstable periods during hospitalization has been developed. To evaluate the effects of a respiratory rehabilitation exercise training package on dyspnea, cough, exercise tolerance, and sputum expectoration among hospitalized elderly patients with AECOPD. A randomized control trial was conducted. Pretest and posttest evaluations of 61 elderly inpatients with AECOPD (experimental group n=30; control group n=31) were performed. The experimental group received respiratory rehabilitation exercise training twice a day, 10-30 minutes per session for 4 days. The clinical parameters (dyspnea, cough, exercise tolerance, and sputum expectoration) were assessed at the baseline and at the end of the fourth day. All participants (median age =70 years, male =60.70%, and peak expiratory flow 140 L) completed the study. In the patients of the experimental group, dyspnea and cough decreased and exercise tolerance and sputum expectoration increased significantly compared with those of the patients in the control group (all P<0.05). Within-group comparisons revealed that the dyspnea, cough, and exercise tolerance significantly improved in the experimental group by the end of the fourth day (all P<0.05). Results of this study suggest that the respiratory rehabilitation exercise training package reduced symptoms and enhanced the effectiveness of the care of elderly inpatients with AECOPD.

  9. On transcending the impasse of respiratory motion correction applications in routine clinical imaging - a consideration of a fully automated data driven motion control framework.

    PubMed

    Kesner, Adam L; Schleyer, Paul J; Büther, Florian; Walter, Martin A; Schäfers, Klaus P; Koo, Phillip J

    2014-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is increasingly used for the detection, characterization, and follow-up of tumors located in the thorax. However, patient respiratory motion presents a unique limitation that hinders the application of high-resolution PET technology for this type of imaging. Efforts to transcend this limitation have been underway for more than a decade, yet PET remains for practical considerations a modality vulnerable to motion-induced image degradation. Respiratory motion control is not employed in routine clinical operations. In this article, we take an opportunity to highlight some of the recent advancements in data-driven motion control strategies and how they may form an underpinning for what we are presenting as a fully automated data-driven motion control framework. This framework represents an alternative direction for future endeavors in motion control and can conceptually connect individual focused studies with a strategy for addressing big picture challenges and goals.

  10. [Present situation and control on emerging respiratory infectious diseases such as SARS and avian influenza].

    PubMed

    Okabe, Nobuhiko

    2005-11-01

    Infectious diseases have been recognized again due to appearing of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases in the world. Most of them occur not only in developing countries but also in developed countries, and in Asian region. The pathogen is mainly virus and most of them are suspected zoonotic origin. SARS emerged in the world abruptly and disappeared in 2003. We have had many lessons and learn on control measures, public health, economic impacts, human rights, international cooperation and infectious diseases. The outbreaks of avian influenza among fowls have been occurred since 2004, and some fatal human cases infected with avian influenza virus are detected in Viet Nam, Thailand, Cambodia and Indonesia. Although the total number of human cases are still limited and human to human transmission mode is not yet detected, it has been concerned the possibility to shift new types of influenza for human as pandemic. It is necessary to recognize correctly on existing of infectious diseases, to enhance surveillance, to call partnerships among several sectors such as medical institutes, medical education institutes, research institutes and public health departments. Further, infectious disease control should tackle in global level.

  11. Lateralization of the respiratory control following unilateral cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane; Jamshidi, Masoud; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Ansarin, Khalil

    2008-02-01

    Cerebral control of respiration has been extensively studied but at present, no evidence of cerebral laterality or dominance for respiration exists. We examined the ventilatory changes following temporary (20 min) occlusion of the right or left common carotid artery in rabbits. The corresponding groups of sham-operated rabbits were used as controls. The partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PET(co2) ) was measured with a microstream capnograph before the operation as well as at 6h, and days 1, 4, 9 and 15 postoperation and was used to indicate the ventilatory status. The results showed that following temporary occlusion of the left common carotid artery, subjects began hypoventilation and had a progressive rise in PET(co2) on day 9 postoperation compared to the sham-operated group. However, animals that underwent occlusion of the right common carotid artery hyperventilated from as early as 6h postoperation to days 1 and 4, an effect that ceased up to day 9 postoperation. It was concluded that respiration might be under differential regulation by the two cerebral hemispheres. While the left hemispheric ischemia-reperfusion injury induced hypoventilation that of the right hemisphere resulted in hyperventilation.

  12. The Hemagglutinin Stem-Binding Monoclonal Antibody VIS410 Controls Influenza Virus-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baranovich, Tatiana; Jones, Jeremy C.; Russier, Marion; Vogel, Peter; Szretter, Kristy J.; Seiler, Patrick; Trevejo, Jose M.; Webby, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Most cases of severe influenza are associated with pulmonary complications, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and no antiviral drugs of proven value for treating such complications are currently available. The use of monoclonal antibodies targeting the stem of the influenza virus surface hemagglutinin (HA) is a rapidly developing strategy for the control of viruses of multiple HA subtypes. However, the mechanisms of action of these antibodies are not fully understood, and their ability to mitigate severe complications of influenza has been poorly studied. We evaluated the effect of treatment with VIS410, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the HA stem region, on the development of ARDS in BALB/c mice after infection with influenza A(H7N9) viruses. Prophylactic administration of VIS410 resulted in the complete protection of mice against lethal A(H7N9) virus challenge. A single therapeutic dose of VIS410 given 24 h after virus inoculation resulted in dose-dependent protection of up to 100% of mice inoculated with neuraminidase inhibitor-susceptible or -resistant A(H7N9) viruses. Compared to the outcomes in mock-treated controls, a single administration of VIS410 improved viral clearance from the lungs, reduced virus spread in lungs in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in a lower lung injury score, reduced the extent of the alteration in lung vascular permeability and protein accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and improved lung physiologic function. Thus, antibodies targeting the HA stem can reduce the severity of ARDS and show promise as agents for controlling pulmonary complications in influenza. PMID:26787699

  13. Vitamin D and Respiratory Tract Infections: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Peter; Lindh, Åsa U.; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda; Lindh, Jonatan D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low levels of 25-OH vitamin D are associated with respiratory tract infection (RTI). However, results from randomized controlled trials are inconclusive. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the preventive effect of vitamin D supplementation on RTI. Methods Randomized, controlled trials of vitamin D for prevention of RTI were used for the analysis. The risks of within-trial and publication bias were assessed. Odds ratios of RTI were pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran's Q and I2. Meta-regressions and subgroup analyses were used to assess the influence of various factors on trial outcome. The pre-defined review protocol was registered at the PROSPERO international prospective register of systematic reviews, registration number CRD42013003530. Findings Of 1137 citations retrieved, 11 placebo-controlled studies of 5660 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, vitamin D showed a protective effect against RTI (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.84). There was significant heterogeneity among studies (Cohran's Q p<0.0001, I2 = 72%). The protective effect was larger in studies using once-daily dosing compared to bolus doses (OR = 0.51 vs OR = 0.86, p = 0.01). There was some evidence that results may have been influenced by publication bias. Interpretation Results indicate that vitamin D has a protective effect against RTI, and dosing once-daily seems most effective. Due to heterogeneity of included studies and possible publication bias in the field, these results should be interpreted with caution. PMID:23840373

  14. Variation of flux control coefficient of cytochrome c oxidase and of the other respiratory chain complexes at different values of protonmotive force occurs by a threshold mechanism.

    PubMed

    Quarato, Giovanni; Piccoli, Claudia; Scrima, Rosella; Capitanio, Nazzareno

    2011-09-01

    The metabolic control analysis was applied to digitonin-permeabilized HepG2 cell line to assess the flux control exerted by cytochrome c oxidase on the mitochondrial respiration. Experimental conditions eliciting different energy/respiratory states in mitochondria were settled. The results obtained show that the mitochondrial electrochemical potential accompanies a depressing effect on the control coefficient exhibited by the cytochrome c oxidase. Both the components of the protonmotive force, i.e. the voltage (ΔΨ(m)) and the proton (ΔpH(m)) gradient, displayed a similar effect. Quantitative estimation of the ΔΨ(m) unveiled that the voltage-dependent effect on the control coefficient of cytochrome c oxidase takes place sharply in a narrow range of membrane potential from 170-180 to 200-210mV consistent with the physiologic transition from state 3 to state 4 of respiration. Extension of the metabolic flux control analysis to the NADH dehydrogenase and bc(1) complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain resulted in a similar effect. A mechanistic model is put forward whereby the respiratory chain complexes are proposed to exist in a voltage-mediated threshold-controlled dynamic equilibrium between supercomplexed and isolated states. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevention of respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants by antenatal ambroxol: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Qun; Wu, Qian-Qian; Huang, Xian-Mei; Lu, Hui

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of antenatal ambroxol as a preventive therapeutic of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in preterm infants. Randomized controlled trials of antenatal ambroxol treatment for RDS in preterm infants published up to March 2012 were downloaded from the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, and Google Scholar databases. Data were evaluated for homogeneity and analyzed by the Cochrane Collaboration's RevMan software. Twelve trials involving a total of 1335 premature infants were selected for meta-analysis. Neonatal RDS was lower in the ambroxol-treated group than in the groups treated with placebo (risk ratio [RR] = 0.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.24 to 0.59) or corticosteroids (RR = 0.49, 95% CI: 0.31 to 0.78). The ambroxol-treated group had lower risk of neonatal infection than the corticosteroid-treated group (RR = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.18 to 0.73). In cases of inevitable preterm birth, antenatal ambroxol is recommended over corticosteroids to prevent neonatal RDS. However, further research is necessary to determine the optimal treatment dosages and regimens of antenatal ambroxol to achieve consistent superior results over corticosteroids. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. High-dose Oral Ambroxol for Early Treatment of Pulmonary Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: an Exploratory, Randomized, Controlled Pilot Trial.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Arun K; Murthy, Aparna S; Singhi, Sunit C

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate efficacy of high-dose oral ambroxol in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with respect to ventilator-free days (VFD). Prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded pilot trial. Sixty-six mechanically ventilated patients (1 month to 12 years) with ARDS who were hand-ventilated for <24 hr before pediatric intensive care unit admission. Patients randomized to oral ambroxol (40 mg/kg/day, in four divided doses) (n = 32) or placebo (n = 34) until 10 days, extubation or death whichever is earlier. Majority (91%) had pneumonia and bronchiolitis. Two study groups were similar in baseline characteristics. Mean partial pressure of arterial oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen and oxygenation index were >175 and <10, respectively, with no difference in the two study groups. VFD were similar in the two study groups. Overall mortality was 26%. No adverse events were noted with ambroxol. Among ventilated pulmonary ARDS patients with oxygenation index of <10, mortality was 26%. Ambroxol did not improve VFD. Study with higher and more frequently administered doses of ambroxol in larger sample is suggested after having generated relevant pharmacokinetic data among critically ill children. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Sensing vascular distension in skeletal muscle by slow conducting afferent fibers: neurophysiological basis and implication for respiratory control.

    PubMed

    Haouzi, Philippe; Chenuel, Bruno; Huszczuk, Andrew

    2004-02-01

    This review examines the evidence that skeletal muscles can sense the status of the peripheral vascular network through group III and IV muscle afferent fibers. The anatomic and neurophysiological basis for such a mechanism is the following: 1) a significant portion of group III and IV afferent fibers have been found in the vicinity and the adventitia of the arterioles and the venules; 2) both of these groups of afferent fibers can respond to mechanical stimuli; 3) a population of group III and IV fibers stimulated during muscle contraction has been found to be inhibited to various degrees by arterial occlusion; and 4) more recently, direct evidence has been obtained showing that a part of the group IV muscle afferent fibers is stimulated by venous occlusion and by injection of vasodilatory agents. The physiological relevance of sensing local distension of the vascular network at venular level in the muscles is clearly different from that of the large veins, since the former can directly monitor the degree of tissue perfusion. The possible involvement of this sensing mechanism in respiratory control is discussed mainly in the light of the ventilatory effects of peripheral vascular occlusions during and after muscular exercise. It is proposed that this regulatory system anticipates the chemical changes that would occur in the arterial blood during increased metabolic load and attempts to minimize them by adjusting the level of ventilation to the level of muscle perfusion, thus matching the magnitudes of the peripheral and pulmonary gas exchange.

  18. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia Reactivity Predicts Emotion Regulation and Depressive Symptoms in At-risk and Control Children

    PubMed Central

    Gentzler, Amy L.; Santucci, Aimee K.; Kovacs, Maria; Fox, Nathan A.

    2010-01-01

    We examined respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), emotion regulation (ER), and prospective depressive symptoms in children at risk for depression and controls. Of the 65 children (35 boys; 5 – 13 years) in the sample, 39 had a parent with childhood-onset mood disorder and 26 had a parent with no history of major psychiatric disorder. RSA during pre- and post-film baselines and RSA reactivity to sad film clip were measured. Later, children’s ER responses (focusing on sad/distressing affect) were assessed using a parent-reported questionnaire, and depressive symptoms were measured via clinical ratings. Results indicated that, compared to the initial baseline, a greater decrease in RSA (i.e. more vagal withdrawal) in response to the sad film clip predicted more adaptive ER responses and lower levels of clinician-rated depressive symptoms. However, tests for ER as a mediator of the association between RSA reactivity and depressive symptoms were precluded because maladaptive, but not adaptive, ER was associated with depressive symptoms. Overall, results suggest that cardiac vagal withdrawal (a greater decrease in RSA) in response to an emotional stimulus reflects more adaptive parasympathetic activity, which could facilitate children’s ability to effectively manage their sadness and distress and predict lower risk of depressive symptoms over time. PMID:19596044

  19. A Numerically Subdominant CD8 T Cell Response to Matrix Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Controls Infection with Limited Immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Haddad, Elias K.; Marceau, Joshua; Morabito, Kaitlyn M.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Graham, Barney S.

    2016-01-01

    CD8 T cells are involved in pathogen clearance and infection-induced pathology in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Studying bulk responses masks the contribution of individual CD8 T cell subsets to protective immunity and immunopathology. In particular, the roles of subdominant responses that are potentially beneficial to the host are rarely appreciated when the focus is on magnitude instead of quality of response. Here, by evaluating CD8 T cell responses in CB6F1 hybrid mice, in which multiple epitopes are recognized, we found that a numerically subdominant CD8 T cell response against DbM187 epitope of the virus matrix protein expressed high avidity TCR and enhanced signaling pathways associated with CD8 T cell effector functions. Each DbM187 T effector cell lysed more infected targets on a per cell basis than the numerically dominant KdM282 T cells, and controlled virus replication more efficiently with less pulmonary inflammation and illness than the previously well-characterized KdM282 T cell response. Our data suggest that the clinical outcome of viral infections is determined by the integrated functional properties of a variety of responding CD8 T cells, and that the highest magnitude response may not necessarily be the best in terms of benefit to the host. Understanding how to induce highly efficient and functional T cells would inform strategies for designing vaccines intended to provide T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:26943673

  20. Identification of a role for TRIM29 in the control of innate immunity in the respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junji; Weng, Leiyun; Yuan, Bin; Wang, Zhuo; Jia, Li; Jin, Rui; Lu, Hongbo; Li, Xian Chang; Liu, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory tract is heavily populated with innate immune cells, but the mechanisms that control such cells are poorly defined. Here we found that the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM29 was a selective regulator of the activation of alveolar macrophages, the expression of type I interferons and the production of proinflammatory cytokines in the lungs. We found that deletion of TRIM29 enhanced macrophage production of type I interferons and protected mice from infection with influenza virus, while challenge of Trim29−/− mice with Haemophilus influenzae resulted in lethal lung inflammation due to massive production of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that TRIM29 inhibited interferon-regulatory factors and signaling via the transcription factor NF-κB by degrading the adaptor NEMO and that TRIM29 directly bound NEMO and subsequently induced its ubiquitination and proteolytic degradation. These data identify TRIM29 as a key negative regulator of alveolar macrophages and might have important clinical implications for local immunity and immunopathology. PMID:27695001

  1. Central pattern generation involved in oral and respiratory control for feeding in the term infant.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Steven M

    2009-06-01

    Drinking and eating are essential skills for survival and benefit from the coordination of several pattern generating networks and their musculoskeletal effectors to achieve safe swallows. Oralpharyngoesophageal motility develops during infancy and early childhood, and is influenced by various factors, including neuromuscular maturation, dietary and postural habits, arousal state, ongoing illnesses, congenital anomalies, and the effects of medical or surgical interventions. Gastroesophageal reflux is frequent in neonates and infants, and its role in neonatal morbidity including dysphagia, chronic lung disease, or apparent life-threatening events is not well understood. This review highlights recent studies aimed at understanding the development of oral feeding skills, and cross-system interactions among the brainstem, spinal, and cerebral networks involved in feeding. Functional linkages between suck-swallow and swallow-respiration manifest transitional forms during late gestation through the first year of life, which can be delayed or modified by sensory experience or disease processes, or both. Relevant central pattern generator (CPG) networks and their neuromuscular targets attain functional status at different rates, which ultimately influences cross-system CPG interactions. Entrainment of trigeminal primary afferents accelerates pattern genesis for the suck CPG and transition-to-oral feed in the RDS preterm infant. The genesis of within-system CPG control for rate and amplitude scaling matures differentially for suck, mastication, swallow, and respiration. Cross-system interactions among these CPGs represent targets of opportunity for new interventions, which optimize experience-dependent mechanisms to promote safe swallows among newborn and pediatric patients.

  2. Influenza vaccine effectiveness for hospital and community patients using control groups with and without non-influenza respiratory viruses detected, Auckland, New Zealand 2014.

    PubMed

    Pierse, Nevil; Kelly, Heath; Thompson, Mark G; Bissielo, Ange; Radke, Sarah; Huang, Q Sue; Baker, Michael G; Turner, Nikki

    2016-01-20

    We aimed to estimate the protection afforded by inactivated influenza vaccine, in both community and hospital settings, in a well characterised urban population in Auckland during 2014. We used two different comparison groups, all patients who tested negative for influenza and only those patients who tested negative for influenza and had a non-influenza respiratory virus detected, to calculate the vaccine effectiveness in a test negative study design. Estimates were made separately for general practice outpatient consultations and hospitalised patients, stratified by age group and by influenza type and subtype. Vaccine status was confirmed by electronic record for general practice patients and all respiratory viruses were detected by real time polymerase chain reaction. 1039 hospitalised and 1154 general practice outpatient consultations met all the study inclusion criteria and had a respiratory sample tested for influenza and other respiratory viruses. Compared to general practice patients, hospitalised patients were more likely to be very young or very old, to be Māori or Pacific Islander, to have a low income and to suffer from chronic disease. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) adjusted for age and other participant characteristics using all influenza negative controls was 42% (95% CI: 16 to 60%) for hospitalised and 56% (95% CI: 35 to 70%) for general practice patients. The vaccine appeared to be most effective against the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain with an adjusted VE of 62% (95% CI:38 to 77%) for hospitalised and 59% (95% CI:36 to 74%) for general practice patients, using influenza virus negative controls. Similar results found when patients testing positive for a non-influenza respiratory virus were used as the control group. This study contributes to validation of the test negative design and confirms that inactivated influenza vaccines continue to provide modest but significant protection against laboratory-confirmed influenza. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  3. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the lungs cannot remove all of the carbon dioxide the body produces. This causes body fluids, especially ... Acute respiratory acidosis is a condition in which carbon dioxide builds up very quickly, before the kidneys can ...

  4. Respiratory Therapists

    MedlinePlus

    ... how to stop smoking. <- Summary Work Environment -> Work Environment About this section Respiratory therapists treat patients in ... also covers different types of occupational specialties. Work Environment The Work Environment tab includes the number of ...

  5. Controlled respiratory gas delivery to embryonic renal epithelial explants in perfusion culture.

    PubMed

    Strehl, R; Schumacher, K; Minuth, Will W

    2004-01-01

    During generation of artificial tissues high levels of oxygen are usually available whereas after implantation into a recipient's body the implant is not vascularized immediately, which leads to low oxygen partial pressures within the implanted tissue. Under these conditions cells will experience an oxygen shortage, contrasting with the abundance of oxygen during culture. It is uncertain whether tissues can be trained to tolerate such an acute hypoxic situation so that nonphysiological stress reactions and tissue necrosis can be avoided. To investigate the effects of varying oxygen levels on embryonic renal tissue in vitro we have been developing a model system combining continuous medium renewal with the ability to control levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide by gas equilibration through gas-permeable tubing. Renal embryonic tissue from neonatal rabbit was cultured in serum-free Iscove's modified Dulbecco's medium at 45, 90, 115, and 160 mmHg oxygen partial pressure for 14 days under continuous medium exchange in such a setup. After a 14-day culture period tissue sections were analyzed by cell biological methods and compared with fresh tissue histology. Surprisingly, embryonic renal explants survive and maintain good morphology for 14 days under all O(2) conditions tested. Expression of cytokeratin 19 within the established epithelium remains unchanged, indicating a structurally intact tissue. However, Na/K-ATPase is clearly downregulated under low O(2) conditions, whereas COX-2 expression increases drastically. An antiparallel effect of decreased O(2) concentrations on glycoprotein expression can be demonstrated with the lectin Dolichos biflorus agglutinin. Scanning electron microscopy reveals oxygen-dependent changes in cellular surface differentiation of developed collecting duct epithelium.

  6. Central pattern generation involved in oral and respiratory control for feeding in the term infant

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Drinking and eating are essential skills for survival and benefit from the coordination of several pattern generating networks and their musculoskeletal effectors to achieve safe swallows. Oral-pharyngo-esophageal motility develops during infancy and early childhood, and is influenced by various factors, including neuromuscular maturation, dietary and postural habits, arousal state, ongoing illnesses, congenital anomalies, and the effects of medical or surgical interventions. Gastroesophageal reflux is frequent in neonates and infants, and its role in neonatal morbidity including dysphagia, chronic lung disease, or apparent life-threatening events is not well understood. This review highlights recent studies aimed at understanding the development of oral feeding skills, and cross-system interactions among the brainstem, spinal, and cerebral networks involved in feeding. Recent Findings Functional linkages between suck-swallow and swallow-respiration manifest transitional forms during late gestation through the first year of life which can be delayed or modified by sensory experience and/or disease processes. Relevant central pattern generator (CPG) networks and their neuromuscular targets attain functional status at different rates, which ultimately influences cross-system CPG interactions. Entrainment of trigeminal primary afferents accelerates pattern genesis for the suck CPG and transition-to-oral feed in the RDS preterm infant. Summary The genesis of within-system CPG control for rate and amplitude scaling matures differentially for suck, mastication, swallow, and respiration. Cross-system interactions among these CPGs represent targets of opportunity for new interventions which optimize experience-dependent mechanisms to promote safe swallows among newborn and pediatric patients. PMID:19417662

  7. [Respiratory failure in disseminated sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Popova, L M; Avdiunina, I A; Alferova, V P

    2000-01-01

    The development and patterns of respiratory failure (RF) are analyzed in 9 patients with disseminated sclerosis (DS). Forced ventilation of the lungs was carried out with consideration for main location of the process. Relationship between patterns of respiratory disorders and neuroanatomy of respiratory regulation is discussed. Involvement of the corticospinal routes is paralleled by dissociation during functional pulmonary tests: spontaneous volumes are less than controlled inspirations. The most severe symptom complexes were observed in RF of predominantly bulbar localization: respiratory anarchy, blocking of airways caused by impaired swallowing, impaired mechanism of coughing reflex, loss of spontaneous respiration, sometimes apnea during sleeping. Involvement of the respiratory nuclei of medullary respiratory center and airways and of the corticonuclear routes of caudal cranial nerves causes the development of a triad of symptoms: glossopharyngolaryngeal paralysis, dysfunction of respiratory nuclei of medulla oblongata, and decreased sensitivity of respiratory center to CO2. Aspiration complications caused by dysphagia are characteristic of bulbar DS. Respiratory function in 5 patients without clinical picture of RF are specially discussed. The authors emphasize unfavorable prognostic significance of signs of extracorporeal obstruction indicating the probability of RF long before its manifestation. Special attention is paid to early diagnosis of symptoms of coming RF when evaluating the status of patients with DS during treatment. Timely use of respiratory resuscitation methods reduces the mortality and ensures a good chance for remissions with recovery of respiratory function, which are characteristic of RF.

  8. Respiratory distress.

    PubMed

    Fallot, André

    2005-11-01

    Preparation for pediatric pulmonary emergencies in the office setting includes adequate training for all medical staff, properly sized and working equipment, and medications to help alleviate respiratory distress when indicated. Status asthmaticus, viral bronchiolitis, and croup account for the vast majority of respiratory emergencies encountered in the pediatric office setting. Timely application of proven approaches to assessment and treatment of these illnesses can prevent hospitalization, decrease length of hospitalizations, and save lives.

  9. Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum, intraperitoneal pressure, and peritoneal tissue hypoxia: a mouse study with controlled respiratory support.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Sachiko; Jardon, Kris; Maleysson, Elodie; D'Arpiany, Francis; Canis, Michel; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Mage, Gérard

    2010-11-01

    Animal experiments have suggested that the laparoscopic peritoneal environment is hypoxic. This study aimed to investigate whether peritoneal tissue is hypoxic on a cellular level during a carbon dioxide (CO(2)) pneumoperitoneum at different intraperitoneal pressures (IPPs) and to determine the short-term effects of surgical injury on the hypoxia status of peritoneal tissue in the injured peritoneum and the distant noninjured peritoneum at cellular and molecular levels. Experiment 1: Mice were divided into five groups according to the following treatments: anesthesia alone, laparotomy, and CO(2) pneumoperitoneum at IPPs of 2, 8, or 15 mmHg. Over the course of each experiment, the peritoneal tissue-oxygen tension (PitO(2)) was continuously monitored. Experiment 2: On the first day, the mice were divided into three groups according to the following treatments: CO(2) pneumoperitoneum at an IPP of either 2 or 8 mmHg or laparotomy. The bilateral caudal epigastric arteries and uterine horns then were coagulated using a bipolar cautery device. On day 7, peritoneal tissue samples were collected for real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. In both experiments, pimonidazole hydrochloride was used to detect tissue hypoxia at a cellular level. Experiment 1: Peritoneal hypoxia at both tissue and cellular levels was detected only in the groups treated with an IPP of 15 mmHg (PitO(2): 5.2 ± 1.0 mmHg, mean ± SEM). Experiment 2: The percentage of pimonidazole immunostained mesothelial and stromal cells from the distant noninjured peritoneum was significantly higher in the group treated with an IPP of 8 mmHg than in the other groups. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha subunit mRNA expression in the distant noninjured peritoneum of the group treated with an IPP of 8 mmHg was significantly higher than in the control group (anesthesia alone). The CO(2) pneumoperitoneum itself did not cause peritoneal hypoxia at either a tissue or a

  10. Prevalence of tuberculosis, HIV and respiratory symptoms in two Zambian communities: implications for tuberculosis control in the era of HIV.

    PubMed

    Ayles, Helen; Schaap, Albertus; Nota, Amos; Sismanidis, Charalambos; Tembwe, Ruth; De Haas, Petra; Muyoyeta, Monde; Beyers, Nulda

    2009-01-01

    The Stop TB Partnership target for tuberculosis is to have reduced the prevalence of tuberculosis by 50% comparing 2015 to 1990. This target is challenging as few prevalence surveys have been conducted, especially in high burden tuberculosis and HIV countries. Current tuberculosis control strategies in high HIV prevalent settings are therefore based on limited epidemiological evidence and more evidence is needed from community-based surveys to inform improved policy formulation. 8044 adults were sampled from 2 sub-districts (wards) in Lusaka province, Zambia. Questionnaires were used to screen for symptoms, respiratory samples were obtained for culture and oral secretions collected for HIV testing. 79 individuals were found to have Mycobacterium tuberculosis in their sputum, giving an adjusted overall prevalence of tuberculosis of 870/100,000 (95% CI 570-1160/100,000). The adjusted overall prevalence of HIV was 28.61% (95% CI 26.04-31.19). HIV- infection was significantly associated with prevalent tuberculosis (Adj OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.42-3.74) and the population attributable fraction of HIV for prevalent tuberculosis was 36%. Symptoms such as prolonged cough (adj OR 12.72, 95% CI 7.05-22.94) and fever (Adj OR 2.04, 95%CI 1.23-3.39), were associated with prevalent tuberculosis, but 8 (10%) individuals with prevalent tuberculosis denied having any symptoms at all and only 34 (43%) would have been classified as a TB suspect by current guidelines. Undiagnosed tuberculosis is a challenge for tuberculosis control and new approaches are needed if we are to reach international targets. Epidemiological studies can inform screening algorithms for both detection and prevention of active tuberculosis.

  11. Primary care randomised controlled trial of a tailored interactive website for the self-management of respiratory infections (Internet Doctor).

    PubMed

    Little, Paul; Stuart, Beth; Andreou, Panayiota; McDermott, Lisa; Joseph, Judith; Mullee, Mark; Moore, Mike; Broomfield, Sue; Thomas, Tammy; Yardley, Lucy

    2016-04-20

    To assess an internet-delivered intervention providing advice to manage respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Open pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial. Primary care in UK. Adults (aged ≥18) registered with general practitioners, recruited by postal invitation. Patients were randomised with computer-generated random numbers to access the intervention website (intervention) or not (control). The intervention tailored advice about the diagnosis, natural history, symptom management (particularly paracetamol/ibuprofen use) and when to seek further help. Primary: National Health Service (NHS) contacts for those reporting RTIs from monthly online questionnaires for 20 weeks. Secondary: hospitalisations; symptom duration/severity. 3044 participants were recruited. 852 in the intervention group and 920 in the control group reported 1 or more RTIs, among whom there was a modest increase in NHS direct contacts in the intervention group (intervention 37/1574 (2.4%) versus control 20/1661 (1.2%); multivariate risk ratio (RR) 2.25 (95% CI 1.00 to 5.07, p=0.048)). Conversely, reduced contact with doctors occurred (239/1574 (15.2%) vs 304/1664 (18.3%); RR 0.71, 0.52 to 0.98, p=0.037). Reduction in contacts occurred despite slightly longer illness duration (11.3 days vs 10.7 days, respectively; multivariate estimate 0.60 days longer (-0.15 to 1.36, p=0.118) and more days of illness rated moderately bad or worse illness (0.52 days; 0.06 to 0.97, p=0.026). The estimate of slower symptom resolution in the intervention group was attenuated when controlling for whether individuals had used web pages which advocated ibuprofen use (length of illness 0.22 days, -0.51 to 0.95, p=0.551; moderately bad or worse symptoms 0.36 days, -0.08 to 0.80, p=0.105). There was no evidence of increased hospitalisations (risk ratio 0.25; 0.05 to 1.12; p=0.069). An internet-delivered intervention for the self-management of RTIs modifies help-seeking behaviour, and does not

  12. Effect of dynamic controlled atmosphere monitored by respiratory quotient and 1-methylcyclopropene on the metabolism and quality of 'Galaxy' apple harvested at three maturity stages.

    PubMed

    Thewes, Fabio Rodrigo; Brackmann, Auri; Anese, Rogerio de Oliveira; Ludwig, Vagner; Schultz, Erani Eliseu; Dos Santos, Luana Ferreira; Wendt, Lucas Mallmann

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the interaction between controlled atmosphere (CA), CA+1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and dynamic controlled atmosphere monitored by respiratory quotient (DCA-RQ) with three fruit maturity stages at harvest (early harvest date, optimal harvest date and late harvest date) on 'Galaxy' apple metabolism and quality after harvest and 9months storage plus 7days of shelf life at 20°C. Fruit stored under dynamic controlled atmosphere monitored by respiratory quotient 1.3 (DCA-RQ 1.3) showed lower ethylene production, respiration rate, mealiness and higher flesh firmness in comparison to CA stored fruit, but did not differ from those treated with 1-MCP. The dynamic controlled atmosphere monitored by respiratory quotient 1.5 (DCA-RQ 1.5) increased the acetaldehyde, ethanol and ethyl acetate concentration, regardless of the fruit maturity at harvest. The storage of 'Galaxy' apple under DCA-RQ 1.3 is efficient in keeping quality regardless of the maturity stage at harvest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Respiratory RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Hodinka, Richard L

    2016-08-01

    Acute upper and lower respiratory infections are a major public health problem and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. At greatest risk are young children, the elderly, the chronically ill, and those with suppressed or compromised immune systems. Viruses are the predominant cause of respiratory tract illnesses and include RNA viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, metapneumovirus, rhinovirus, and coronavirus. Laboratory testing is required for a reliable diagnosis of viral respiratory infections, as a clinical diagnosis can be difficult since signs and symptoms are often overlapping and not specific for any one virus. Recent advances in technology have resulted in the development of newer diagnostic assays that offer great promise for rapid and accurate detection of respiratory viral infections. This chapter emphasizes the fundamental characteristics and clinical importance of the various RNA viruses that cause upper and lower respiratory tract diseases in the immunocompromised host. It highlights the laboratory methods that can be used to make a rapid and definitive diagnosis for the greatest impact on the care and management of ill patients, and the prevention and control of hospital-acquired infections and community outbreaks.

  14. Serum Procalcitonin Measurement and Viral Testing to Guide Antibiotic Use for Respiratory Infections in Hospitalized Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Branche, Angela R.; Walsh, Edward E.; Vargas, Roberto; Hulbert, Barbara; Formica, Maria A.; Baran, Andrea; Peterson, Derick R.; Falsey, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Viral lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI) frequently causes adult hospitalization and is linked to antibiotic overuse. European studies suggest that the serum procalcitonin (PCT) level may be used to guide antibiotic therapy. We conducted a trial assessing the feasibility of using PCT algorithms with viral testing to guide antibiotic use in a US hospital. Methods. Three hundred patients hospitalized with nonpneumonic LRTI during October 2013–April 2014 were randomly assigned at a ratio of 1:1 to receive standard care or PCT-guided care and viral PCR testing. The primary outcome was antibiotic exposure, and safety was assessed at 1 and 3 months. Results. Among the 151 patients in the intervention group, viruses were identified in 42% (63), and 83% (126) had PCT values of <0.25 µg/mL. There were no significant differences in antibiotic use or adverse events between intervention patients and those in the nonintervention group. Subgroup analyses revealed fewer subjects with positive results of viral testing and low PCT values who were discharged receiving antibiotics (20% vs 45%; P = .002) and shorter antibiotic durations among algorithm-adherent intervention patients versus nonintervention patients (2.0 vs 4.0 days; P = .004). Compared with historical controls (from 2008–2011), antibiotic duration in nonintervention patients decreased by 2 days (6.0 vs 4.0 days; P < .001), suggesting a study effect. Conclusions. Although antibiotic use was similar in the 2 arms, subgroup analyses of intervention patients suggest that physicians responded to viral and biomarker data. These data can inform the design of future US studies. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01907659. PMID:25910632

  15. Hormone regulation of rhizome development in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) associated with proteomic changes controlling respiratory and amino acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiqing; Xu, Qian; Meyer, William A.; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Rhizomes are underground stems with meristematic tissues capable of generating shoots and roots. However, mechanisms controlling rhizome formation and growth are yet to be completely understood. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether rhizome development could be regulated by cytokinins (CKs) and gibberellic acids (GAs), and determine underlying mechanisms of regulation of rhizome formation and growth of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) by a CK or GA through proteomic and transcript analysis. Methods A rhizomatous genotype of tall fescue (‘BR’) plants were treated with 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP, a synthetic cytokinin) or GA3 in hydroponic culture in growth chambers. Furthermore, comparative proteomic analysis of two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were performed to investigate proteins and associated metabolic pathways imparting increased rhizome number by BAP and rhizome elongation by GA3. Key Results BAP stimulated rhizome formation while GA3 promoted rhizome elongation. Proteomic analysis identified 76 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) due to BAP treatment and 37 DEPs due to GA3 treatment. Cytokinin-related genes and cell division-related genes were upregulated in the rhizome node by BAP and gibberellin-related and cell growth-related genes in the rhizome by GA3. Conclusions Most of the BAP- or GA-responsive DEPs were involved in respiratory metabolism and amino acid metabolism. Transcription analysis demonstrated that genes involved in hormone metabolism, signalling pathways, cell division and cell-wall loosening were upregulated by BAP or GA3. The CK and GA promoted rhizome formation and growth, respectively, by activating metabolic pathways that supply energy and amino acids to support cell division and expansion during rhizome initiation and elongation in tall fescue. PMID:27443301

  16. Adding ketamine to morphine for patient-controlled analgesia after thoracic surgery: influence on morphine consumption, respiratory function, and nocturnal desaturation.

    PubMed

    Michelet, P; Guervilly, C; Hélaine, A; Avaro, J P; Blayac, D; Gaillat, F; Dantin, T; Thomas, P; Kerbaul, F

    2007-09-01

    I.V. patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with morphine is often used for postoperative analgesia after thoracic surgery, but the required doses may increase postoperative respiratory disorders. Adjunction of ketamine could reduce both doses and related respiratory side-effects. The main objective of this prospective, randomized double-blinded study was to evaluate the influence of adding ketamine to PCA on morphine consumption and postoperative respiratory disorders. Consecutive patients undergoing lobectomy (n = 50) were randomly assigned to receive, during the postoperative period, either i.v. morphine 1 mg ml(-1) or morphine with ketamine 1 mg ml(-1) for each. Morphine consumption was evaluated by cumulative doses every 12 h for the three postoperative days. Postoperative respiratory disorders were assessed by spirometric evaluation and recording of nocturnal desaturation. The adjunction of ketamine resulted in a significant reduction in cumulative morphine consumption as early as the 36th postoperative hour [43 (SD 18) vs 32 (14) mg, P = 0.03] with a similar visual analogue scale. In the morphine group, the percentage of time with desaturation < 90% was higher during the three nights [1.80 (0.21-6.37) vs 0.02 (0-0.13), P < 0.001; 2.15 (0.35-8.65) vs 0.50 (0.01-1.30), P = 0.02; 2.46 (0.57-5.51) vs 0.55 (0.21-1.00), P = 0.02]. The decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s was less marked in the ketamine group at the first postoperative day [1.04 (0.68-1.22) litre vs 1.21 (1.10-0.70) litre, P = 0.039]. Adding small doses of ketamine to morphine in PCA devices decreases the morphine consumption and may improve respiratory disorders after thoracic surgery.

  17. [Respiratory synchronization and breast radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mège, A; Ziouèche-Mottet, A; Bodez, V; Garcia, R; Arnaud, A; de Rauglaudre, G; Pourel, N; Chauvet, B

    2016-10-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy following breast cancer surgery continues to improve locoregional control and overall survival. But the success of highly targeted-conformal radiotherapy such as intensity-modulated techniques, can be compromised by respiratory motion. The intrafraction motion can potentially result in significant under- or overdose, and also expose organs at risk. This article summarizes the respiratory motion and its effects on imaging, dose calculation and dose delivery by radiotherapy for breast cancer. We will review the methods of respiratory synchronization available for breast radiotherapy to minimize the respiratory impact and to spare organs such as heart and lung.

  18. Efficacy of a respiratory rehabilitation exercise training package in hospitalized elderly patients with acute exacerbation of COPD: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Lin-Yu; Chen, Kuei-Min; Chung, Wei-Sheng; Chien, Jung-Yien

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials identifier NCT02329873 Background Acute exacerbation (AE) of COPD is characterized by a sudden worsening of COPD symptoms. Previous studies have explored the effectiveness of respiratory rehabilitation for patients with COPD; however, no training program specific to acute exacerbation in elderly patients or unstable periods during hospitalization has been developed. Objective To evaluate the effects of a respiratory rehabilitation exercise training package on dyspnea, cough, exercise tolerance, and sputum expectoration among hospitalized elderly patients with AECOPD. Methods A randomized control trial was conducted. Pretest and posttest evaluations of 61 elderly inpatients with AECOPD (experimental group n=30; control group n=31) were performed. The experimental group received respiratory rehabilitation exercise training twice a day, 10–30 minutes per session for 4 days. The clinical parameters (dyspnea, cough, exercise tolerance, and sputum expectoration) were assessed at the baseline and at the end of the fourth day. Results All participants (median age =70 years, male =60.70%, and peak expiratory flow 140 L) completed the study. In the patients of the experimental group, dyspnea and cough decreased and exercise tolerance and sputum expectoration increased significantly compared with those of the patients in the control group (all P<0.05). Within-group comparisons revealed that the dyspnea, cough, and exercise tolerance significantly improved in the experimental group by the end of the fourth day (all P<0.05). Conclusion Results of this study suggest that the respiratory rehabilitation exercise training package reduced symptoms and enhanced the effectiveness of the care of elderly inpatients with AECOPD. PMID:26345529

  19. Respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Vardakas, Konstantinos Z.; Siempos, Ilias I.; Grammatikos, Alexandros; Athanassa, Zoe; Korbila, Ioanna P.; Falagas, Matthew E.

    2008-01-01

    Background We investigated whether the use of respiratory fluoroquinolones was associated with better clinical outcomes compared with the use of macrolides and β-lactams among adults with pneumonia. Methods We searched PubMed, Current Contents, Scopus, EMBASE, ClinicalTrials.gov and Cochrane with no language restrictions. Two reviewers independently extracted data from published trials that compared fluoroquinolones (levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gemifloxacin) with macrolides or β-lactams or both. A meta-analysis was performed with the clinical outcomes of mortality, treatment success and adverse outcomes. Results We included 23 trials in our meta-analysis. There was no difference in mortality among patients who received fluoroquinolones or the comparator antibiotics (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.65–1.12). Pneumonia resolved in more patients who received fluoroquinolones compared with the comparator antibiotics for the included outcomes in the intention-to-treat population (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.00–1.36), clinically evaluable population (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.06–1.50) and the microbiologically assessed population (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.28–2.20). Fluoroquinolones were more effective than a combination of β-lactam and macrolide (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.02–1.90). They were also more effective for patients with severe pneumonia (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.02–3.29), those who required admission to hospital (OR = 1.30, 95% CI 1.04–1.61) and those who required intravenous therapy (OR = 1.44, 15% CI 1.13–1.85). Fluoroquinolones were more effective than β-lactam and macrolide in open-label trials (OR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.08–1.69) but not in blinded randomized controlled trials (OR = 1.13, 95% CI 0.85–1.50). Interpretation Fluoroquinolones were associated with higher success of treatment for severe forms of pneumonia; however, a benefit in mortality was not evident. A randomized controlled trial that includes patients with severe pneumonia with or without bacteremia is needed. PMID:19047608

  20. Remodeling pathway control of mitochondrial respiratory capacity by temperature in mouse heart: electron flow through the Q-junction in permeabilized fibers.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Hélène; Blier, Pierre U; Gnaiger, Erich

    2017-06-06

    Fuel substrate supply and oxidative phosphorylation are key determinants of muscle performance. Numerous studies of mammalian mitochondria are carried out (i) with substrate supply that limits electron flow, and (ii) far below physiological temperature. To analyze potentially implicated biases, we studied mitochondrial respiratory control in permeabilized mouse myocardial fibers using high-resolution respirometry. The capacity of oxidative phosphorylation at 37 °C was nearly two-fold higher when fueled by physiological substrate combinations reconstituting tricarboxylic acid cycle function, compared with electron flow measured separately through NADH to Complex I or succinate to Complex II. The relative contribution of the NADH pathway to physiological respiratory capacity increased with a decrease in temperature from 37 to 25 °C. The apparent excess capacity of cytochrome c oxidase above physiological pathway capacity increased sharply under hypothermia due to limitation by NADH-linked dehydrogenases. This mechanism of mitochondrial respiratory control in the hypothermic mammalian heart is comparable to the pattern in ectotherm species, pointing towards NADH-linked mt-matrix dehydrogenases and the phosphorylation system rather than electron transfer complexes as the primary drivers of thermal sensitivity at low temperature. Delineating the link between stress and remodeling of oxidative phosphorylation is important for understanding metabolic perturbations in disease evolution and cardiac protection.

  1. Effect of thoracic mobilization on respiratory parameters in chronic non-specific low back pain: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Babina, R; Mohanty, P P; Pattnaik, M

    2016-02-19

    Altered respiratory function has been found to be associated with back pain. Limited chest excursion in subjects with chronic low back pain (CLBP) may be due to co-contraction or bracing of erector spinae and abdominal muscles; their flexed spinal posture; and/or their compromised spinal stability resulting from dysfunctional transversus abdominis. To check for the effects of thoracic mobilization on respiratory parameters in subjects with chronic non-specific low back pain. Sixty-two subjects (excluding 11 dropouts) with CLBP of age group 30-60 were randomly allocated to two groups. Both groups received individualized treatment for low back pain (LBP) and HEP (home exercise program) regime of breathing exercises. In addition, group 1 received Maitland's Central postero-anterior vertebral pressure for thoracic spine (T1-T8). Total treatment duration was 10 sessions in 2 weeks (5 sessions/week). Results showed significant improvement in respiratory parameters viz. Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Sustained Maximal Inspiratory Pressure (SMIP) and Chest Wall Expansion (CWE) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) in both groups (p< 0.05) at end of 2 weeks of intervention. However, improvement was significantly more in group 1 (p < 0.05) receiving additional thoracic mobilization. Subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain with or without radiation to lower limbs when treated with thoracic central PA mobilization, in addition to LBP specific treatment and breathing exercises, show an improvement in respiratory parameters and reduction in disability.

  2. Respiratory Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Sylvain

    2016-11-01

    This article is a review of the most frequent disorders affecting the upper airway of cattle that are suitable for surgery. Information regarding the clinical signs, diagnostic methods, and the chemical restraint of cattle in respiratory distress are highlighted. Surgeries that can be performed in a field setting are thoroughly described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Measuring Progress on the Control of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) at a Regional Level: The Minnesota N212 Regional Control Project (Rcp) as a Working Example

    PubMed Central

    Valdes-Donoso, Pablo; Jarvis, Lovell S.; Wright, Dave; Alvarez, Julio; Perez, Andres M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the highly transmissible nature of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), implementation of regional programs to control the disease may be critical. Because PRRS is not reported in the US, numerous voluntary regional control projects (RCPs) have been established. However, the effect of RCPs on PRRS control has not been assessed yet. This study aims to quantify the extent to which RCPs contribute to PRRS control by proposing a methodological framework to evaluate the progress of RCPs. Information collected between July 2012 and June 2015 from the Minnesota Voluntary Regional PRRS Elimination Project (RCP-N212) was used. Demography of premises (e.g. composition of farms with sows = SS and without sows = NSS) was assessed by a repeated analysis of variance. By using general linear mixed-effects models, active participation of farms enrolled in the RCP-N212, defined as the decision to share (or not to share) PRRS status, was evaluated and used as a predictor, along with other variables, to assess the PRRS trend over time. Additionally, spatial and temporal patterns of farmers’ participation and the disease dynamics were investigated. The number of farms enrolled in RCP-N212 and its geographical coverage increased, but the proportion of SS and NSS did not vary significantly over time. A significant increasing (p<0.001) trend in farmers’ decision to share PRRS status was observed, but with NSS producers less willing to report and a large variability between counties. The incidence of PRRS significantly (p<0.001) decreased, showing a negative correlation between degree of participation and occurrence of PRRS (p<0.001) and a positive correlation with farm density at the county level (p = 0.02). Despite a noted decrease in PRRS, significant spatio-temporal patterns of incidence of the disease over 3-weeks and 3-kms during the entire study period were identified. This study established a systematic approach to quantify the effect of RCPs on PRRS

  4. Measuring Progress on the Control of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) at a Regional Level: The Minnesota N212 Regional Control Project (Rcp) as a Working Example.

    PubMed

    Valdes-Donoso, Pablo; Jarvis, Lovell S; Wright, Dave; Alvarez, Julio; Perez, Andres M

    2016-01-01

    Due to the highly transmissible nature of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), implementation of regional programs to control the disease may be critical. Because PRRS is not reported in the US, numerous voluntary regional control projects (RCPs) have been established. However, the effect of RCPs on PRRS control has not been assessed yet. This study aims to quantify the extent to which RCPs contribute to PRRS control by proposing a methodological framework to evaluate the progress of RCPs. Information collected between July 2012 and June 2015 from the Minnesota Voluntary Regional PRRS Elimination Project (RCP-N212) was used. Demography of premises (e.g. composition of farms with sows = SS and without sows = NSS) was assessed by a repeated analysis of variance. By using general linear mixed-effects models, active participation of farms enrolled in the RCP-N212, defined as the decision to share (or not to share) PRRS status, was evaluated and used as a predictor, along with other variables, to assess the PRRS trend over time. Additionally, spatial and temporal patterns of farmers' participation and the disease dynamics were investigated. The number of farms enrolled in RCP-N212 and its geographical coverage increased, but the proportion of SS and NSS did not vary significantly over time. A significant increasing (p<0.001) trend in farmers' decision to share PRRS status was observed, but with NSS producers less willing to report and a large variability between counties. The incidence of PRRS significantly (p<0.001) decreased, showing a negative correlation between degree of participation and occurrence of PRRS (p<0.001) and a positive correlation with farm density at the county level (p = 0.02). Despite a noted decrease in PRRS, significant spatio-temporal patterns of incidence of the disease over 3-weeks and 3-kms during the entire study period were identified. This study established a systematic approach to quantify the effect of RCPs on PRRS

  5. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  6. A pilot study of respiratory muscle training to improve cough effectiveness and reduce the incidence of pneumonia in acute stroke: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background After stroke, pneumonia is a relevant medical complication that can be precipitated by aspiration of saliva, liquids, or solid food. Swallowing difficulty and aspiration occur in a significant proportion of stroke survivors. Cough, an important mechanism protecting the lungs from inhaled materials, can be impaired in stroke survivors, and the likely cause for this impairment is central weakness of the respiratory musculature. Thus, respiratory muscle training in acute stroke may be useful in the recovery of respiratory muscle and cough function, and may thereby reduce the risk of pneumonia. The present study is a pilot study, aimed at investigating the validity and feasibility of this approach by exploring effect size, safety, and patient acceptability of the intervention. Methods/design Adults with moderate to severe stroke impairment (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score 5 to 25 at the time of admission) are recruited within 2 weeks of stroke onset. Participants must be able to perform voluntary respiratory maneuvers. Excluded are patients with increased intracranial pressure, uncontrolled hypertension, neuromuscular conditions other than stroke, medical history of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and recent cardiac events. Participants are randomized to receive inspiratory, expiratory, or sham respiratory training over a 4-week period, by using commercially available threshold resistance devices. Participants and caregivers, but not study investigators, are blind to treatment allocation. All participants receive medical care and stroke rehabilitation according to the usual standard of care. The following assessments are conducted at baseline, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks: Voluntary and reflex cough flow measurements, forced spirometry, respiratory muscle strength tests, incidence of pneumonia, assessments of safety parameters, and self-reported activity of daily living. The primary outcome is peak expiratory cough flow

  7. A comparison of synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in elderly patients with acute exacerbations of COPD and respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Suchi; Shi, Jindong; Fu, Cuiping; Wu, Xu; Li, Shanqun

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Acute exacerbations of COPD may cause respiratory failure, requiring intensive care unit admission and mechanical ventilation. Intensive care unit patients with acute exacerbations of COPD requiring mechanical ventilation have higher mortality rates than other hospitalized patients. Although mechanical ventilation is the most effective intervention for these conditions, invasive ventilation techniques have yielded variable effects. Objective We evaluated pressure-regulated volume control (PRVC) ventilation treatment efficacy and preventive effects on pulmonary barotrauma in elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure. Patients and methods Thirty-nine intubated patients were divided into experimental and control groups and treated with the PRVC and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation – volume control methods, respectively. Vital signs, respiratory mechanics, and arterial blood gas analyses were monitored for 2–4 hours and 48 hours. Results Both groups showed rapidly improved pH, partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), and PaO2 per fraction of inspired O2 levels and lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels. The pH and PaCO2 levels at 2–4 hours were lower and higher, respectively, in the test group than those in the control group (P<0.05 for both); after 48 hours, blood gas analyses showed no statistical difference in any marker (P>0.05). Vital signs during 2–4 hours and 48 hours of treatment showed no statistical difference in either group (P>0.05). The level of peak inspiratory pressure in the experimental group after mechanical ventilation for 2–4 hours and 48 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05), while other variables were not significantly different between groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Among elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure, application of PRVC resulted in rapid improvement in arterial blood gas analyses while maintaining

  8. A comparison of synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in elderly patients with acute exacerbations of COPD and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Suchi; Shi, Jindong; Fu, Cuiping; Wu, Xu; Li, Shanqun

    2016-01-01

    COPD is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Acute exacerbations of COPD may cause respiratory failure, requiring intensive care unit admission and mechanical ventilation. Intensive care unit patients with acute exacerbations of COPD requiring mechanical ventilation have higher mortality rates than other hospitalized patients. Although mechanical ventilation is the most effective intervention for these conditions, invasive ventilation techniques have yielded variable effects. We evaluated pressure-regulated volume control (PRVC) ventilation treatment efficacy and preventive effects on pulmonary barotrauma in elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure. Thirty-nine intubated patients were divided into experimental and control groups and treated with the PRVC and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation - volume control methods, respectively. Vital signs, respiratory mechanics, and arterial blood gas analyses were monitored for 2-4 hours and 48 hours. Both groups showed rapidly improved pH, partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), and PaO2 per fraction of inspired O2 levels and lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels. The pH and PaCO2 levels at 2-4 hours were lower and higher, respectively, in the test group than those in the control group (P<0.05 for both); after 48 hours, blood gas analyses showed no statistical difference in any marker (P>0.05). Vital signs during 2-4 hours and 48 hours of treatment showed no statistical difference in either group (P>0.05). The level of peak inspiratory pressure in the experimental group after mechanical ventilation for 2-4 hours and 48 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05), while other variables were not significantly different between groups (P>0.05). Among elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure, application of PRVC resulted in rapid improvement in arterial blood gas analyses while maintaining a low peak inspiratory pressure. PRVC can reduce pulmonary barotrauma

  9. Vibrating Platform Training Improves Respiratory Muscle Strength, Quality of Life, and Inspiratory Capacity in the Elderly Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Maíra Florentino; Brandão, Daniela Cunha; Sá, Rafaela Barros de; Barcelar, Jacqueline de Melo; Rocha, Taciano Dias de Souza; Souza, Helga Cecília Muniz de; Dornelas de Andrade, Armele

    2017-05-01

    Aging affects respiratory strength that could cause reduction in functional capacity and quality of life, playing a fundamental role in healthy aging and survival. To prevent these declines, the whole body vibration (WBV) has been proposed to increase strength and functional capacity. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of WBV on respiratory muscle strength, thoracoabdominal ventilation, and quality of life in the elderly adults. This study was a controlled, randomized double-blind clinical trial. The study included 28 elderly adults randomized into three groups: Resistance (n = 9), WBV (n = 9), or WBV + resistance exercises (n = 10), performing training, sham, or double training for 3 months, twice per week. The variables of the study were as follows: maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (MIP and MEP), distribution of thoracoabdominal volumes variation in optoelectronic plethysmography (pulmonary rib cage-VRCp, abdominal rib cage-VRCa, and abdomen-VAB), and quality of life. After training, WBV and WBV + resistance groups increased MIP and MEP (p < .001). During inspiratory capacity maneuver, WBV groups had incremental increases in chest wall total volume (p < .001), showing a rise in pulmonary rib cage (p = .03) and abdominal rib cage (p = .04). Furthermore, WBV groups improved SF-36 scores in functional capacity, physical aspects, energy, pain, and general heath domains. The WBV is a training that could improve respiratory muscle strength and quality of life and promote different ventilatory strategies in chest wall and thoracoabdominal compartments in healthy elderly adults.

  10. Impact of early diagnosis and control of chronic respiratory diseases on active and healthy ageing. A debate at the European Union Parliament.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Tanasescu, C C; Camuzat, T; Anto, J M; Blasi, F; Neou, A; Palkonen, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Antunes, J P; Samolinski, B; Yiallouros, P; Zuberbier, T

    2013-01-01

    A debate at the European Union Parliament was held on 13 November 2012 on the Impact of early diagnosis and control of chronic respiratory diseases on Active and Healthy Ageing (AHA). The debate was held under the auspices of the Cyprus Presidency of the European Union (2012) and represents a follow-up of the priorities of the Polish Presidency of the European Union (2011). It highlighted the importance of early life events on the occurrence of chronic respiratory diseases later in life and their impact on active and healthy ageing. Epidemiologic evidence was followed by actions that should be taken to prevent and manage chronic respiratory diseases in children. The debate ended by practical, feasible and achievable projects, demonstrating the strength of the political action in the field. Three projects will be initiated from this debate: The first will be a meeting sponsored by the Région Languedoc-Roussillon on the developmental origins of chronic diseases and ageing: from research to policies and value creation. The second project is being led by the WHO Collaborating Centre for Asthma and Rhinitis: Prevention of Asthma, Prevention of Allergy (PAPA). The third project is the GA(2)LEN sentinel network.

  11. A randomized, controlled trial of the impact of early and rapid diagnosis of viral infections in children brought to an emergency department with febrile respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Doan, Quynh H; Kissoon, Niranjan; Dobson, Simon; Whitehouse, Sandy; Cochrane, Doug; Schmidt, Brian; Thomas, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections represent a significant burden on pediatric emergency departments (ED) and families. We hypothesized that early and rapid diagnosis of a viral infection alleviates the need for ancillary testing and antibiotic treatment. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial of children 3 to 36 months of age with febrile acute respiratory tract infections at a pediatric ED. Two hundred four subjects were randomly assigned to receive rapid respiratory viral testing on admission or a routine ED admission protocol. Outcome measures were: mean length of visits, rate of ancillary tests, and antibiotic prescription in the ED. A follow-up call was made to all study subjects to inquire about further healthcare visits, ancillary testing, and antibiotic prescription after ED discharge. We did not find a statistically significant difference in ED length of visits, rate of ancillary testing, or antibiotic prescription rate in the ED between the study groups. There was, however, a significant reduction in antibiotic prescription after ED discharge (in the group who had rapid viral testing RR = 0.36; 95% CI = 0.14, 0.95). Rapid multi-viral testing in the ED did not significantly affect ED patient treatment but may reduce antibiotic prescription in the community after discharge from the ED, suggesting a novel strategy to alter community physician antibiotic prescription patterns.

  12. Respiratory Distress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The University of Miami School of Medicine asked the Research Triangle Institute for assistance in improvising the negative pressure technique to relieve respiratory distress in infants. Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center engineers adapted this idea to the lower-body negative-pressure system seals used during the Skylab missions. Some 20,000 babies succumb to respiratory distress in the U.S. each year, a condition in which lungs progressively lose their ability to oxygenate blood. Both positive and negative pressure techniques have been used - the first to force air into lungs, the second to keep infant's lungs expanded. Negative pressure around chest helps the baby expand his lungs and maintain proper volume of air. If doctors can keep the infant alive for four days, the missing substance in the lungs will usually form in sufficient quantity to permit normal breathing. The Skylab chamber and its leakproof seals were adapted for medical use.

  13. Homeopathic medicines for prevention of influenza and acute respiratory tract infections in children: blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Camila Monteiro; Homsani, Fortune; da Veiga, Venício Féo; Lyrio, Carlos; Mattos, Haroldo; Passos, Sonia Regina Lambert; Couceiro, José Nelson; Quaresma, Carla Holandino

    2016-02-01

    Influenza and its complications are common at all ages, especially in children. Vaccines and anti-influenza drugs aim to prevent it. Preventative approaches with favorable risk profiles should be considered for flu, particularly since the evidence of the efficacy of anti-viral drugs is debated. This pragmatic clinical trial was conducted in the Brazilian Public Health System in Petrópolis (BPHSP) with children aged from 1 to 5 years old. The medications used were mainly selected based on in vitro experiments (InfluBio), and in successful qualitative clinical experiences (Homeopathic Complex). Following informed parental consent, subjects were randomly distributed, in a blind manner, to three experimental groups: Homeopathic Complex, Placebo, and InfluBio. BPHSP health agents collected flu and acute respiratory infection symptomatic episodes monthly following the established protocol. The number of these episodes was registered in one year (2009-2010). Out of the 600 children recruited, 445 (74.17%) completed the study (149: Homeopathic complex; 151: Placebo; 145: InfluBio). The number of flu and acute respiratory infection symptomatic episodes detected in this clinical trial was low; however, it was different between homeopathic groups and placebo (p < 0.001). In the first year post-intervention, 46/151 (30.5%) of children in the placebo group developed 3 or more flu and acute respiratory infection episodes, while there was no episode in the group of 149 children who used Homeopathic Complex, and only 1 episode in the group of 145 (1%) children who received InfluBio. These results suggested that the use of homeopathic medicines minimized the number of flu and acute respiratory infection symptomatic episodes in children, signalizing that the homeopathic prophylactic potential should be investigated in further studies. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High fatty acid oxidation capacity and phosphorylation control despite elevated leak and reduced respiratory capacity in northern elephant seal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chicco, Adam J; Le, Catherine H; Schlater, Amber; Nguyen, Alex; Kaye, Spencer; Beals, Joseph W; Scalzo, Rebecca L; Bell, Christopher; Gnaiger, Erich; Costa, Daniel P; Crocker, Daniel E; Kanatous, Shane B

    2014-08-15

    Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) are extreme, hypoxia-adapted endotherms that rely largely on aerobic metabolism during extended breath-hold dives in near-freezing water temperatures. While many aspects of their physiology have been characterized to account for these remarkable feats, the contribution of adaptations in the aerobic powerhouses of muscle cells, the mitochondria, are unknown. In the present study, the ontogeny and comparative physiology of elephant seal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function was investigated under a variety of substrate conditions and respiratory states. Intact mitochondrial networks were studied by high-resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized fiber bundles obtained from primary swimming muscles of pup, juvenile and adult seals, and compared with fibers from adult human vastus lateralis. Results indicate that seal muscle maintains a high capacity for fatty acid oxidation despite a progressive decrease in total respiratory capacity as animals mature from pups to adults. This is explained by a progressive increase in phosphorylation control and fatty acid utilization over pyruvate in adult seals compared with humans and seal pups. Interestingly, despite higher indices of oxidative phosphorylation efficiency, juvenile and adult seals also exhibit a ~50% greater capacity for respiratory 'leak' compared with humans and seal pups. The ontogeny of this phenotype suggests it is an adaptation of muscle to the prolonged breath-hold exercise and highly variable ambient temperatures experienced by mature elephant seals. These studies highlight the remarkable plasticity of mammalian mitochondria to meet the demands for both efficient ATP production and endothermy in a cold, oxygen-limited environment.

  15. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy for infants with respiratory distress in non tertiary care centers: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Buckmaster, Adam G; Arnolda, Gaston; Wright, Ian M R; Foster, Jann P; Henderson-Smart, David J

    2007-09-01

    Our objective was to determine whether continuous positive airway pressure therapy would safely reduce the need for up-transfer of infants with respiratory distress from nontertiary centers. We randomly assigned 300 infants at >30 weeks of gestation with respiratory distress to receive either Hudson prong bubble continuous positive airway pressure therapy or headbox oxygen treatment (standard care). The primary end point was "up-transfer or treatment failure." Secondary end points included death, length of nursery stay, time receiving oxygen therapy, cost of care, and other measures of morbidity. Of 151 infants who received continuous positive airway pressure therapy, 35 either were up-transferred or experienced treatment failure, as did 60 of the 149 infants given headbox oxygen treatment. There was no difference in the length of stay or the duration of oxygen treatment. For every 6 infants treated with continuous positive airway pressure therapy, there was an estimated cost saving of $10,000. Pneumothorax was identified for 14 infants in the continuous positive airway pressure group and 5 in the headbox group. There was no difference in any other measure of morbidity or death. Hudson prong bubble continuous positive airway pressure therapy reduces the need for up-transfer of infants with respiratory distress in nontertiary centers. There is a clinically relevant but not statistically significant increase in the risk of pneumothorax. There are significant benefits associated with continuous positive airway pressure use in larger nontertiary centers.

  16. The Use of Benzodiazepine Receptor Agonists and Risk of Respiratory Failure in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Jung; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chao, Tze-Fan; Liu, Chia-Jen; Wang, Kang-Ling; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chou, Pesus; Wang, Fu-Der

    2015-07-01

    Insomnia is prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BZRAs) are the most commonly used drugs despite their adverse effects on respiratory function. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of BZRAs was associated with an increased risk of respiratory failure (RF) in COPD patients. Matched case-control study. National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. The case group consisted of 2,434 COPD patients with RF, and the control group consisted of 2,434 COPD patients without RF, matched for age, sex, and date of enrollment. Exposure to BZRAs during the 180-day period preceding the index date was analyzed and compared in the case and control groups. Conditional logistic regression was performed, and the use of BZRAs was associated with an increased risk of RF (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14-2.13). In subgroup analysis, we found that the benzodiazepine (BZD) users had a higher risk of RF (aOR 1.58, 95% CI 1.14-2.20), whereas the risk in non-benzodiazepine (non-BZD) users was insignificant (aOR 0.85, 95% CI 0.51-1.44). A greater than 2-fold increase in risk was found in those who received two or more kinds of BZRAs and those using a combination of BZD and non-BZD medications. The use of benzodiazepine receptor agonists was a significant risk factor for respiratory failure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Compared to benzodiazepine, the prescription of non-benzodiazepine may be safer for the management of insomnia in COPD patients. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  17. Effectiveness of prophylactic non-invasive ventilation on respiratory function in the postoperative phase of pediatric cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Camilla R. S.; Andrade, Lívia B.; Maux, Danielle A. S. X.; Bezerra, Andreza L.; Duarte, Maria C. M. B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of prophylactic, non-invasive ventilation (NIV) on respiratory function in seven- to 16-year-old children in the post-operative phase of cardiac surgery. Method A randomized, controlled trial with 50 children who had undergone cardiac surgery with median sternotomy. After extubation, patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control group (n=26), which received instructions regarding posture, early ambulation, and cough stimulation, and CPAP group (continuous positive airway pressure; n=24), which received the same instructions as the control group and CPAP=10 cmH20 twice daily for 30 minutes from the 1st to the 5th post-operative day (POD). As a primary outcome, lung function was evaluated before and on the 1st, 3rd, and 5th PODs with measures of respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (TV), slow vital capacity (SVC), inspiratory capacity (IC), minute volume (MV), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP). As secondary outcomes, the time of hospitalization and intensive care were recorded. A mixed, linear regression model and z-test were used to analyze respiratory function, considering p<0.05. Results All variables, except RR and MV, showed a significant drop on the 1st POD, with gradual recovery; however, only MIP had returned to pre-operative values on the 5th POD in both groups. The RR showed a significant increase on the 1st POD, with a gradual reduction but without returning to baseline. In the intergroup analysis, significant improvement (p=0.04) was observed only in PEF in the CPAP group on the 1st DPO. The length of hospitalization and intensive care showed no significant differences. Conclusion NIV was safe and well accepted in this group of patients, and the protocol used was effective in improving PEF on the 1st DPO in the CPAP group. PMID:27706462

  18. Randomized, non-inferiority trial comparing a nitric oxide releasing solution with a macrolide antibiotic for control of bovine respiratory disease in beef feedlot calves at high-risk of developing respiratory tract disease.

    PubMed

    Crepieux, T; Miller, C; Regev-Shoshani, G; Schaefer, A; Dorin, C; Alexander, T; Timsit, E

    2016-04-01

    Nitric oxide, a molecule produced in most mammalian cells, has bactericidal and virucidal properties. Nasal instillation of a nitric oxide releasing solution (NORS) on arrival at the feedlot was recently reported as non-inferior to a parenteral injection of a macrolide antibiotic, tilmicosin, for control of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in cattle at low-to-moderate risk of developing BRD. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether NORS was non-inferior to tilmicosin for control of BRD in cattle at high-risk of developing BRD (the target population for many BRD control programs). High-risk Angus-cross heifers (n=840) were randomly allocated to 2 treatment groups on arrival at a feedlot and received either NORS or tilmicosin for BRD control. Non-inferiority was assessed by calculating the difference in prevalence of heifers diagnosed with BRD during the first 40 d after arrival between NORS and tilmicosin treatment groups. The non-inferiority margin (δ) was set at 8.5%. Thirty-six and 19% of heifers were diagnosed with BRD in the NORS and tilmicosin groups, respectively. Because the lower bound of the 2-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) of the difference in BRD prevalence between the 2 treatment groups (17%; 95% CI=11-23%) was higher than δ, an inferiority of NORS was concluded. Although on-arrival nasal administration of NORS can be viewed as a more rational control strategy than parental injection of antibiotics, further research is needed to improve NORS efficacy before it can be recommended to prevent BRD in high-risk cattle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Respiratory effort from the photoplethysmogram.

    PubMed

    Addison, Paul S

    2017-03-01

    The potential for a simple, non-invasive measure of respiratory effort based on the pulse oximeter signal - the photoplethysmogram or 'pleth' - was investigated in a pilot study. Several parameters were developed based on a variety of manifestations of respiratory effort in the signal, including modulation changes in amplitude, baseline, frequency and pulse transit times, as well as distinct baseline signal shifts. Thirteen candidate parameters were investigated using data from healthy volunteers. Each volunteer underwent a series of controlled respiratory effort maneuvers at various set flow resistances and respiratory rates. Six oximeter probes were tested at various body sites. In all, over three thousand pleth-based effort-airway pressure (EP) curves were generated across the various airway constrictions, respiratory efforts, respiratory rates, subjects, probe sites, and the candidate parameters considered. Regression analysis was performed to determine the existence of positive monotonic relationships between the respiratory effort parameters and resulting airway pressures. Six of the candidate parameters investigated exhibited a distinct positive relationship (p<0.001 across all probes tested) with increasing upper airway pressure repeatable across the range of respiratory rates and flow constrictions studied. These were: the three fundamental modulations in amplitude (AM-Effort), baseline (BM-Effort) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA-Effort); two pulse transit time modulations - one using a pulse oximeter probe and an ECG (P2E-Effort) and the other using two pulse oximeter probes placed at different peripheral body sites (P2-Effort); and baseline shifts in heart rate, (BL-HR-Effort). In conclusion, a clear monotonic relationship was found between several pleth-based parameters and imposed respiratory loadings at the mouth across a range of respiratory rates and flow constrictions. The results suggest that the pleth may provide a measure of changing upper

  20. Effects of Aerobic Exercise Applied Early After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting on Pulmonary Function, Respiratory Muscle Strength, and Functional Capacity: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Borges, Daniel L; Silva, Mayara Gabrielle; Silva, Luan Nascimento; Fortes, João Vyctor; Costa, Erika Thalita; Assunção, Rebeca Pessoa; Lima, Carlos Magno; da Silva Nina, Vinícius José; Bernardo-Filho, Mário; Caputo, Danúbia Sá

    2016-09-01

    Physical activity is beneficial in several clinical situations and recommended for patients with ischemic heart disease, as well as for those undergoing cardiac surgery. In a randomized controlled trial, 34 patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. A randomized control group (n = 15) submitted to conventional physiotherapy. The intervention group (n = 19) received the same protocol plus additional aerobic exercise with cycle ergometer. Pulmonary function by spirometry, respiratory muscle strength by manovacuometry, and functional capacity through 6-minute walking test was assessed before surgery and at hospital discharge. There was significant reduction in pulmonary function in both groups. In both groups, inspiratory muscle strength was maintained while expiratory muscle strength significantly decreased. Functional capacity was maintained in the intervention group (364.5 [324.5 to 428] vs. 348 [300.7 to 413.7] meters, P = .06), but it decreased significantly in control group patients (320 [288.5 to 393.0] vs. 292 [237.0 to 336.0] meters, P = .01). A significant difference in functional capacity was also found in intergroup analyses at hospital discharge (P = .03). Aerobic exercise applied early on coronary artery bypass grafting patients may promote maintenance of functional capacity, with no impact on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength when compared with conventional physiotherapy.

  1. Vav3 is involved in GABAergic axon guidance events important for the proper function of brainstem neurons controlling cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal parameters.

    PubMed

    Sauzeau, Vincent; Horta-Junior, José A C; Riolobos, Adelaida S; Fernández, Gloria; Sevilla, María A; López, Dolores E; Montero, María J; Rico, Beatriz; Bustelo, Xosé R

    2010-12-01

    Vav3 is a phosphorylation-dependent activator of Rho/Rac GTPases that has been implicated in hematopoietic, bone, cerebellar, and cardiovascular roles. Consistent with the latter function, Vav3-deficient mice develop hypertension, tachycardia, and renocardiovascular dysfunctions. The cause of those defects remains unknown as yet. Here, we show that Vav3 is expressed in GABAegic neurons of the ventrolateral medulla (VLM), a brainstem area that modulates respiratory rates and, via sympathetic efferents, a large number of physiological circuits controlling blood pressure. On Vav3 loss, GABAergic cells of the caudal VLM cannot innervate properly their postsynaptic targets in the rostral VLM, leading to reduced GABAergic transmission between these two areas. This results in an abnormal regulation of catecholamine blood levels and in improper control of blood pressure and respiration rates to GABAergic signals. By contrast, the reaction of the rostral VLM to excitatory signals is not impaired. Consistent with those observations, we also demonstrate that Vav3 plays important roles in axon branching and growth cone morphology in primary GABAergic cells. Our study discloses an essential and nonredundant role for this Vav family member in axon guidance events in brainstem neurons that control blood pressure and respiratory rates.

  2. Vav3 Is Involved in GABAergic Axon Guidance Events Important for the Proper Function of Brainstem Neurons Controlling Cardiovascular, Respiratory, and Renal Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sauzeau, Vincent; Horta-Junior, José A. C.; Riolobos, Adelaida S.; Fernández, Gloria; Sevilla, María A.; López, Dolores E.; Montero, María J.; Rico, Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    Vav3 is a phosphorylation-dependent activator of Rho/Rac GTPases that has been implicated in hematopoietic, bone, cerebellar, and cardiovascular roles. Consistent with the latter function, Vav3-deficient mice develop hypertension, tachycardia, and renocardiovascular dysfunctions. The cause of those defects remains unknown as yet. Here, we show that Vav3 is expressed in GABAegic neurons of the ventrolateral medulla (VLM), a brainstem area that modulates respiratory rates and, via sympathetic efferents, a large number of physiological circuits controlling blood pressure. On Vav3 loss, GABAergic cells of the caudal VLM cannot innervate properly their postsynaptic targets in the rostral VLM, leading to reduced GABAergic transmission between these two areas. This results in an abnormal regulation of catecholamine blood levels and in improper control of blood pressure and respiration rates to GABAergic signals. By contrast, the reaction of the rostral VLM to excitatory signals is not impaired. Consistent with those observations, we also demonstrate that Vav3 plays important roles in axon branching and growth cone morphology in primary GABAergic cells. Our study discloses an essential and nonredundant role for this Vav family member in axon guidance events in brainstem neurons that control blood pressure and respiratory rates. PMID:20926682

  3. A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of a fiberglass manufacturing facility. II. Exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Chiazze, L; Watkins, D K; Fryar, C; Kozono, J

    1993-08-01

    A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of the Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation's Newark, Ohio plant was undertaken. The aim was to determine the extent to which exposures to substances in the Newark plant environment, to non-workplace factors, or to a combination may play a part in the risk of mortality from respiratory disease among workers in this plant. A historical environmental reconstruction of the plant was undertaken to characterise the exposure profile for workers in this plant from its beginnings in 1934 to the end of 1987. The exposure profile provided estimates of cumulative exposure to respirable fibres, fine fibres, asbestos, talc, formaldehyde, silica, and asphalt fumes. Employment histories from Owens-Corning Fiberglas provided information on employment characteristics (duration of employment, year of hire, age at first hire) and an interview survey obtained information on demographic characteristics (birthdate, race, education, marital state, parent's ethnic background, and place of birth), lifetime residence, occupational and smoking histories, hobbies, and personal and family medical history. Matched, unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) were used to assess the association between lung cancer or non-malignant respiratory disease and the cumulative exposure history, demographic characteristics, and employment variables. Only the smoking variables and employment characteristics (year of hire and age at first hire) were statistically significant for lung cancer. For non-malignant respiratory disease, only the smoking variables were statistically significant in the univariate analysis. Of the variables entered into a conditional logistic regression model for lung cancer, only smoking (smoked for six months or more v never smoked: OR = 26.17, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 3.316-206.5) and age at first hire (35 and over v less than 35: OR = 0.244, 95% CI 0.083-0.717) were statistically significant. There

  4. A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of a fiberglass manufacturing facility. II. Exposure assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Chiazze, L; Watkins, D K; Fryar, C; Kozono, J

    1993-01-01

    A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of the Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation's Newark, Ohio plant was undertaken. The aim was to determine the extent to which exposures to substances in the Newark plant environment, to non-workplace factors, or to a combination may play a part in the risk of mortality from respiratory disease among workers in this plant. A historical environmental reconstruction of the plant was undertaken to characterise the exposure profile for workers in this plant from its beginnings in 1934 to the end of 1987. The exposure profile provided estimates of cumulative exposure to respirable fibres, fine fibres, asbestos, talc, formaldehyde, silica, and asphalt fumes. Employment histories from Owens-Corning Fiberglas provided information on employment characteristics (duration of employment, year of hire, age at first hire) and an interview survey obtained information on demographic characteristics (birthdate, race, education, marital state, parent's ethnic background, and place of birth), lifetime residence, occupational and smoking histories, hobbies, and personal and family medical history. Matched, unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) were used to assess the association between lung cancer or non-malignant respiratory disease and the cumulative exposure history, demographic characteristics, and employment variables. Only the smoking variables and employment characteristics (year of hire and age at first hire) were statistically significant for lung cancer. For non-malignant respiratory disease, only the smoking variables were statistically significant in the univariate analysis. Of the variables entered into a conditional logistic regression model for lung cancer, only smoking (smoked for six months or more v never smoked: OR = 26.17, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 3.316-206.5) and age at first hire (35 and over v less than 35: OR = 0.244, 95% CI 0.083-0.717) were statistically significant. There

  5. On the possible high +Gz tolerance increase by multimodal brain imaging controlled respiratory AFTE biofeedback training exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smietanowski, Maciej; Achimowicz, Jerzy; Lorenc, Kamil; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Zalewska, Ewa; Truszczynski, Olaf

    The experimental data related to Valsalva manouvers and short term voluntary apnea, available in the literature, suggest that the cerebral blood flow increase and reduction of the peripheral one may be expected if the specific AFTE based respiratory training is performed. The authors had verified this hypothesis by studying the relations between EEG measured subject relaxation combined with voluntary apnea by multimodal brain imaging technique (EEG mapping, Neuroscan and fMRI) in a group of healthy volunteers. The SPM analysis of respiratory related changes in cortical and subcortical BOLD signal has partially confirmed the hypothesis. The mechanism of this effect is probably based on the simultaneous blood pressure increase and total peripheral resistance increase. However the question is still open for further experimental verification if AFTE can be treated as the tool which can increase pilot/astronaut situation awareness in the extreme environment typical for aerospace operations where highly variable accelerations due to liftoff, rapid maneuvers, and vibrations can be expected in the critical phases of the mission.

  6. [Parameters of controlled mechanical lung ventilation and external respiratory function during thoracoscopic surgeries in children of different age groups].

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, N M; Tsypin, L E; Geodakian, O S; Demakhin, A A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to estimate the parameters of mechanical ventilation and respiratory function during videotorachoscopic surgeries in children. 73 anesthesias were conducted in children aged 5 to 16 years of age. During the study, a detailed monitoring of respiratory function and parameters of mechanical ventilation was carried out. Indicators reflecting the lung function remained stable in all phases of the study. Parameters of mechanical ventilation during the study varied. Changes in PIP and MAP were similar in all age groups. The maximum changes of compliance were in the third group. One-lung ventilation is safe under certain conditions: increasing FiO2 from 0.5 to 1, the reduction of tidal volume up to 5-5.3 ml/kg, the use of a size or a half size smaller cuffed endotracheal tubes for intubation of the right and left main bronchus compared to those for tracheal intubation. For the intubation of the right main bronchus the endotracheal tube with the Murphy eye should be used, for the means ventilation of the upper lobe of the right lung. If the minute volume of breathing is adequate and there is no preoperative hypercapnia, the elimination of CO2 for one-lung ventilation is not disrupted and the tension of CO2 in arterial blood increases.

  7. Rapid testing for respiratory syncytial virus in a paediatric emergency department: benefits for infection control and bed management.

    PubMed

    Mills, J M; Harper, J; Broomfield, D; Templeton, K E

    2011-03-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is responsible for annual winter outbreaks of respiratory tract infection among children in temperate climates, placing severe pressure on hospital beds. Cohorting of affected infants has been demonstrated to be an effective strategy in reducing nosocomial transmission of RSV, and may keep cubicles free for other patients who require them. Testing of symptomatic children for RSV is standard practice, but unfortunately traditional laboratory testing is not rapid enough to aid decision-making processes. Rapid point-of-care testing (POCT) in the emergency department has been suggested as an alternative. We performed a prospective study to quantify the amount of cubicle time saved by using POCT results to allow a targeted cohorting strategy. Over the four-month study period, the POCT allowed 183 children to be admitted directly to a designated cohort area, thus saving 568.5 cubicle-days for other patients. This is equivalent to five cubicles being left free for each day of the study period. This is the first time the benefits of using POCT have been quantified in this way. POCT for RSV is a safe, cost-effective and efficient way to improve bed management.

  8. Obesity and respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Zammit, Christopher; Liddicoat, Helen; Moonsie, Ian; Makker, Himender

    2010-10-20

    The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.

  9. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, Christopher; Liddicoat, Helen; Moonsie, Ian; Makker, Himender

    2010-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population. PMID:21116339

  10. Middle East respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Hui, David S; Perlman, Stanley

    2015-09-05

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a highly lethal respiratory disease caused by a novel single-stranded, positive-sense RNA betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Dromedary camels, hosts for MERS-CoV, are implicated in direct or indirect transmission to human beings, although the exact mode of transmission is unknown. The virus was first isolated from a patient who died from a severe respiratory illness in June, 2012, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. As of May 31, 2015, 1180 laboratory-confirmed cases (483 deaths; 40% mortality) have been reported to WHO. Both community-acquired and hospital-acquired cases have been reported with little human-to-human transmission reported in the community. Although most cases of MERS have occurred in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, cases have been reported in Europe, the USA, and Asia in people who travelled from the Middle East or their contacts. Clinical features of MERS range from asymptomatic or mild disease to acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure resulting in death, especially in individuals with underlying comorbidities. No specific drug treatment exists for MERS and infection prevention and control measures are crucial to prevent spread in health-care facilities. MERS-CoV continues to be an endemic, low-level public health threat. However, the virus could mutate to have increased interhuman transmissibility, increasing its pandemic potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Humidified High Flow Nasal Cannula versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure as an Initial Respiratory Support in Preterm Infants with Respiratory Distress: a Randomized, Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Heated, humidified, high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) is frequently used as a noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with respiratory distress. But there are limited studies that compares HHFNC with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) only as the initial treatment of respiratory distress in preterm infants immediately after birth. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and safety of HHFNC compared to nCPAP for the initial treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress. Preterm infants at between 30 and 35 weeks of gestational age were randomized to HHFNC or nCPAP when they showed respiratory distress in less than 24 hours of age postnatally. Preterm infants who needed invasive respiratory supports were excluded. Primary outcome was the incidence of treatment failure (defined as need for the intubation or mechanical ventilation). Eighty-five infants were analyzed. Sixteen of 42 infants randomized to HHFNC showed treatment failure compared to 9 of 43 infants using nCPAP (Risk difference 17.17 [−1.90–36.23]; P = 0.099). In terms of the reason for treatment failure, the frequency of hypoxia was significantly higher in the HHFNC group than in the nCPAP group (P = 0.020). There was no difference between the 2 groups in terms of respiratory and clinical outcomes and complications. Although HHFNC is safe compared to nCPAP, it is not certain that HHFNC is effective compared to nCPAP non-inferiorly as an initial respiratory support in preterm infants with respiratory distress. PMID:28244292

  12. Humidified High Flow Nasal Cannula versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure as an Initial Respiratory Support in Preterm Infants with Respiratory Distress: a Randomized, Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeonghee; Park, Kyuhee; Lee, Eun Hee; Choi, Byung Min

    2017-04-01

    Heated, humidified, high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) is frequently used as a noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with respiratory distress. But there are limited studies that compares HHFNC with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) only as the initial treatment of respiratory distress in preterm infants immediately after birth. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and safety of HHFNC compared to nCPAP for the initial treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress. Preterm infants at between 30 and 35 weeks of gestational age were randomized to HHFNC or nCPAP when they showed respiratory distress in less than 24 hours of age postnatally. Preterm infants who needed invasive respiratory supports were excluded. Primary outcome was the incidence of treatment failure (defined as need for the intubation or mechanical ventilation). Eighty-five infants were analyzed. Sixteen of 42 infants randomized to HHFNC showed treatment failure compared to 9 of 43 infants using nCPAP (Risk difference 17.17 [-1.90-36.23]; P = 0.099). In terms of the reason for treatment failure, the frequency of hypoxia was significantly higher in the HHFNC group than in the nCPAP group (P = 0.020). There was no difference between the 2 groups in terms of respiratory and clinical outcomes and complications. Although HHFNC is safe compared to nCPAP, it is not certain that HHFNC is effective compared to nCPAP non-inferiorly as an initial respiratory support in preterm infants with respiratory distress.

  13. Investigation of the Occurrence of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Virus in Swine Herds Participating in an Area Regional Control and Elimination Project in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Arruda, A G; Friendship, R; Carpenter, J; Hand, K; Ojkic, D; Poljak, Z

    2017-02-01

    The main goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-specific genotypes in swine sites in Ontario (Canada) using molecular, spatial and network data from a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) regional control project. For each site, location, animal movement service provider (truck companies), PRRSV status and sequencing data of the open reading frame 5 (ORF5) were obtained. Three-kilometre buffers were created to evaluate neighbourhood characteristics for each site. Social network analysis was conducted on swine sites and trucking companies to assemble the network and define network components. Three different PRRSV genotypes were used as outcomes for statistical analysis based on the region's phylogenetic tree of the ORF5. Multivariable exact logistic regression was conducted to investigate the association between being positive for a specific genotype and two main exposures of interest: (i) having at least one neighbour within three km also positive for the same genotype outside the production system and (ii) having at least one positive site for the same genotype in the same truck network component outside the production system. Results showed that the importance of area spread and truck network on PRRSV occurrence differed according to genotype. Additionally, the Ontario PRRS database appears suitable for conducting regional disease investigations. Finally, the use of relatively new tools available for network, spatial and molecular analysis could be useful in investigation, control and prevention of endemic infectious diseases in animal populations.

  14. Absence of Association between Cord Specific Antibody Levels and Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Disease in Early Infants: A Case Control Study from Coastal Kenya.

    PubMed

    Nyiro, Joyce Uchi; Sande, Charles Jumba; Mutunga, Martin; Kiyuka, Patience Kerubo; Munywoki, Patrick Kioo; Scott, John Anthony G; Nokes, David James

    2016-01-01

    The target group for severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease prevention is infants under 6 months of age. Vaccine boosting of antibody titres in pregnant mothers could protect these young infants from severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) associated disease. Quantifying protective levels of RSV-specific maternal antibody at birth would inform vaccine development. A case control study nested in a birth cohort (2002-07) was conducted in Kilifi, Kenya; where 30 hospitalised cases of RSV-associated severe disease were matched to 60 controls. Participants had a cord blood and 2 subsequent 3-monthly blood samples assayed for RSV-specific neutralising antibody by the plaque reduction neutralisation test (PRNT). Two sample paired t test and conditional logistic regression were used in analyses of log2PRNT titres. The mean RSV log2PRNT titre at birth for cases and controls were not significantly different (P = 0.4) and remained so on age-stratification. Cord blood PRNT titres showed considerable overlap between cases and controls. The odds of RSV disease decreased with increase in log2PRNT cord blood titre. There was a 30% reduction in RSV disease per unit increase in log2PRNT titre (<3months age group) but not significant (P = 0.3). From this study, there is no strong evidence of protection by maternal RSV specific antibodies from severe RSV disease. Cord antibody levels show wide variation with considerable overlap between cases and controls. It is likely that, there are additional factors to specific PRNT antibody levels which determine susceptibility to severe RSV disease. In addition, higher levels of neutralizing antibody beyond the normal range may be required for protection; which it is hoped can be achieved by a maternal RSV vaccine.

  15. Absence of Association between Cord Specific Antibody Levels and Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Disease in Early Infants: A Case Control Study from Coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Nyiro, Joyce Uchi; Sande, Charles Jumba; Mutunga, Martin; Kiyuka, Patience Kerubo; Munywoki, Patrick Kioo; Scott, John Anthony G.; Nokes, David James

    2016-01-01

    Background The target group for severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease prevention is infants under 6 months of age. Vaccine boosting of antibody titres in pregnant mothers could protect these young infants from severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) associated disease. Quantifying protective levels of RSV-specific maternal antibody at birth would inform vaccine development. Methods A case control study nested in a birth cohort (2002–07) was conducted in Kilifi, Kenya; where 30 hospitalised cases of RSV-associated severe disease were matched to 60 controls. Participants had a cord blood and 2 subsequent 3-monthly blood samples assayed for RSV-specific neutralising antibody by the plaque reduction neutralisation test (PRNT). Two sample paired t test and conditional logistic regression were used in analyses of log2PRNT titres. Results The mean RSV log2PRNT titre at birth for cases and controls were not significantly different (P = 0.4) and remained so on age-stratification. Cord blood PRNT titres showed considerable overlap between cases and controls. The odds of RSV disease decreased with increase in log2PRNT cord blood titre. There was a 30% reduction in RSV disease per unit increase in log2PRNT titre (<3months age group) but not significant (P = 0.3). Conclusions From this study, there is no strong evidence of protection by maternal RSV specific antibodies from severe RSV disease. Cord antibody levels show wide variation with considerable overlap between cases and controls. It is likely that, there are additional factors to specific PRNT antibody levels which determine susceptibility to severe RSV disease. In addition, higher levels of neutralizing antibody beyond the normal range may be required for protection; which it is hoped can be achieved by a maternal RSV vaccine. PMID:27851799

  16. Dysrhythmias of the respiratory oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paydarfar, David; Buerkel, Daniel M.

    1995-03-01

    refractory periods. The same system can be perturbed to a state in which amplitude of oscillation is attenuated or abolished. We have characterized critical perturbations which induce transitions between these two states, giving rise to patterns of dysrhythmic activity that are similar to those seen in the experiments. We illustrate the importance of noise in initiation and termination of rhythm, comparable to normal respiratory rhythm intermixed with spontaneous dysrhythmias. In the BvP system the incidence and duration of dysrhythmia is shown to be strongly influenced by the level of noise. These studies should lead to greater understanding of rhythmicity and integrative responses of the respiratory control system, and provide insight into disturbances in control mechanisms that cause apnea and aspiration in clinical disease states.

  17. Focused ultrasound examination of the chest on patients admitted with acute signs of respiratory problems: a study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    Riishede, M; Laursen, C B; Teglbjærg, L S; Lassen, A T; Baatrup, G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with acute respiratory problems poses a diagnostic challenge because similar symptoms can be caused by various pathological conditions. Focused ultrasound examination (f-US) of the heart and lungs has proven to increase the diagnostic accuracy in these patients. In this protocol of a randomised multicentre trial, we study the effect of f-US of the heart and lungs in patients with respiratory problems performed by emergency physicians (EP) as soon as the patient arrives to the emergency department (ED). The primary outcome is the number of patients with a correct presumptive diagnosis at 4 hours from admission. Methods and analysis This is a semiblinded randomised prospective study. 288 patients will be included and randomised into the control or intervention group. All patients receive a standard diagnostic evaluation by the EP to assess the primary presumptive diagnosis. Investigators are EP, with varying degrees of experience in f-US, who perform an f-US of the heart and lungs in patients in both treatment arms. f-US results in the intervention group are non-blinded to the treating EP to be included in the assessment of the 4-hour presumptive diagnosis. As standard for correct diagnosis, we perform a blinded journal audit after discharge. As primary analysis, we use the intention-to-treat analysis. Conclusions This study is the first multicentre trial in EDs to investigate whether f-US, in the hands of the EP, increases the proportion of correct diagnosis at 4 hours after arrival when performed on patients with respiratory problems. Ethics and dissemination This trial is conducted in accordance with the Helsinki II Declaration and approved by the Danish Data Protection Agency and the Committee on Biomedical Research Ethics for the Region of Southern Denmark. Results will be published in accordance with the CONSORT statement in a peer-reviewed scientific journal regardless of the outcome. Trial registration number NCT02550184; Pre

  18. Infectivity phenotypes of H3N2 influenza A viruses in primary swine respiratory epithelial cells are controlled by sialic acid binding

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Allen C.; Busch, Marc G.; Karasin, Alexander I.; Olsen, Christopher W.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Bateman et al. (2012) Infectivity phenotypes of H3N2 influenza A viruses in primary swine respiratory epithelial cells are controlled by sialic acid binding. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(6), 424–433. Background  In the late 1990s, triple reassortant H3N2 influenza A viruses emerged and spread widely in the US swine population. We have shown previously that an isolate representative of this virus‐lineage, A/Swine/Minnesota/593/99 (Sw/MN), exhibits phenotypic differences compared to a wholly human‐lineage H3N2 virus isolated during the same time period, A/Swine/Ontario/00130/97 (Sw/ONT). Specifically, Sw/MN was more infectious for pigs and infected a significantly higher proportion of cultured primary swine respiratory epithelial cells (SRECs). In addition, reverse genetics‐generated Sw/MN × Sw/ONT reassortant and point mutant viruses demonstrated that the infectivity phenotypes in SRECs were strongly dependent on three amino acids within the hemagglutinin (HA) gene. Objectives  To determine the mechanism by which Sw/MN attains higher infectivity than Sw/ONT in SRECs. Methods  A/Swine/Minnesota/593/99, Sw/ONT, and mutant (reverse genetics‐generated HA reassortant and point mutant) viruses were compared at various HA‐mediated stages of infection: initial sialic acid binding, virus entry, and the pH of virus–endosome fusion. Results/Conclusions  Sialic acid binding was the sole stage where virus differences directly paralleled infectivity phenotypes in SRECs, indicating that binding is the primary mechanism responsible for differences in the infectivity levels of Sw/MN and Sw/ONT. PMID:22353399

  19. Effect of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy in adults with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiaofeng; Hua, Yusi; Liu, Jin; Gong, Cansheng; Zhao, Wenling

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting recommendations exist on whether high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy should be administered to adult patients in critical care with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate its effect on intubation rates. METHODS: We searched electronic databases from inception to April 2016. We included RCTs that compared HFNC oxygen therapy with usual care (conventional oxygen therapy or noninvasive ventilation) in adults with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Because of the different methodologies and variation in clinical outcomes, we conducted 2 subgroup analyses according to oxygen therapy used and disease severity. We pooled data using random-effects models. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who required endotracheal intubation. RESULTS: We included 6 RCTs (n = 1892). Compared with conventional oxygen therapy, HFNC oxygen therapy was associated with a lower intubation rate (risk ratio [RR] 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38 to 0.94; I2 = 49%). We found no significant difference in the rate between HFNC oxygen therapy and noninvasive ventilation (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.09; I2 = 2%). In the subgroup analysis by disease severity, no significant differences were found in the intubation rate between HFNC oxygen therapy and either conventional oxygen therapy or noninvasive ventilation (interaction p = 0.3 and 0.4, respectively). INTERPRETATION: The intubation rate with HFNC oxygen therapy was lower than the rate with conventional oxygen therapy and similar to the rate with noninvasive ventilation among patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Larger, high-quality RCTs are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:28246239

  20. Respiratory cancers and pollution.

    PubMed

    Ding, N; Zhou, N; Zhou, M; Ren, G-M

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the major public health problem worldwide, irrespective of the socio-economic status of the countries. Even though the overall mortality from cancer is higher in the western countries, the cancer burden is on the rise in under-developed countries, with a projected 81-100% increase by 2030, mostly due to pollution and tobacco use. Respiratory cancers affect the lung, larynx, trachea, and bronchus and depending on the location of the cancer, the symptoms change and also the risks, incidence and survival outcomes differ accordingly. Besides tobacco use, chronic exposure to household pollution is known to be associated with elevated risk of lung cancer and other cancers. Women and children living in severe poverty in the underdeveloped countries are exposed most to household air pollution and, thus, suffer its consequences maximally, and household air pollution, specifically arising from solid fuel burning, which accounts for nearly 4 million deaths throughout the world annually. Cancers affecting the respiratory tract, including both nasopharyngeal cancer and lung cancer, are strongly associated with pollution from coal and other solid fuel burning. Lung cancer, which is of two types, small cell lung carcinoma and the non-small cell lung cancer, is the most common and fatal cancer. Even though tobacco has been viewed as the major risk for respiratory cancers, it is now evident that household pollution, exposure to asbestos, chromium and arsenic etc, all pose a significant risk for respiratory cancers. Preventive steps to curtail the many sources of air pollution by improving living conditions and reducing the occupational exposure hazards like welding, industrial work etc., are markedly needed to control the incidence of respiratory cancers.

  1. [Respiratory allergies].

    PubMed

    Chiriac, Anca Mirela; Demoly, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    Respiratory allergies represent a global and public health problem, due to their prevalence (still increasing), morbidity, impact on the quality of life and costs for the society. They mainly concern rhinitis (or rhinoconjunctivitis) and asthma. The diagnosis of allergy is dependent on a history of symptoms on exposure to an allergen together with the detection of allergen-specific IgE. Accurate diagnosis of allergies opens up therapeutic options that are otherwise not appropriate, such as allergen immunotherapy and allergen avoidance, that are prescribed following a stepwise approach. It has been a century since the first trial in specific immunotherapy was performed and this still remains the only disease modifying treatment for allergic individuals. In terms of route of administration, sublingual immunotherapy represents a good alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy, considering its proven efficacy and better safety profile.

  2. Vaccine Induced Herd Immunity for Control of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease in a Low-Income Country Setting

    PubMed Central

    Kinyanjui, Timothy M.; House, Thomas A.; Kiti, Moses C.; Cane, Patricia A.; Nokes, David J.; Medley, Graham F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is globally ubiquitous, and infection during the first six months of life is a major risk for severe disease and hospital admission; consequently RSV is the most important viral cause of respiratory morbidity and mortality in young children. Development of vaccines for young infants is complicated by the presence of maternal antibodies and immunological immaturity, but vaccines targeted at older children avoid these problems. Vaccine development for young infants has been unsuccessful, but this is not the case for older children (> 6m). Would vaccinating older children have a significant public health impact? We developed a mathematical model to explore the benefits of a vaccine against RSV. Methods and Findings We have used a deterministic age structured model capturing the key epidemiological characteristics of RSV and performed a statistical maximum-likelihood fit to age-specific hospitalization data from a developing country setting. To explore the effects of vaccination under different mixing assumptions, we included two versions of contact matrices: one from a social contact diary study, and the second a synthesised construction based on demographic data. Vaccination is assumed to elicit an immune response equivalent to primary infection. Our results show that immunisation of young children (5–10m) is likely to be a highly effective method of protection of infants (<6m) against hospitalisation. The majority benefit is derived from indirect protection (herd immunity). A full sensitivity and uncertainty analysis using Latin Hypercube Sampling of the parameter space shows that our results are robust to model structure and model parameters. Conclusions This result suggests that vaccinating older infants and children against RSV can have a major public health benefit. PMID:26390032

  3. Protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial for reducing irrational antibiotic prescribing among children with upper respiratory infections in rural China

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Guanyang; Wei, Xiaolin; Hicks, Joseph P; Hu, Yanhong; Walley, John; Zeng, Jun; Elsey, Helen; King, Rebecca; Zhang, Zhitong; Deng, Simin; Huang, Yuanyuan; Blacklock, Claire; Yin, Jia; Sun, Qiang; Lin, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Irrational use of antibiotics is a serious issue within China and internationally. In 2012, the Chinese Ministry of Health issued a regulation for antibiotic prescriptions limiting them to <20% of all prescriptions for outpatients, but no operational details have been issued regarding policy implementation. This study aims to test the effectiveness of a multidimensional intervention designed to reduce the use of antibiotics among children (aged 2–14 years old) with acute upper respiratory infections in rural primary care settings in China, through changing doctors' prescribing behaviours and educating parents/caregivers. Methods and analysis This is a pragmatic, parallel-group, controlled, cluster-randomised superiority trial, with blinded evaluation of outcomes and data analysis, and un-blinded treatment. From two counties in Guangxi Province, 12 township hospitals will be randomised to the intervention arm and 13 to the control arm. In the control arm, the management of antibiotics prescriptions will continue through usual care via clinical consultations. In the intervention arm, a provider and patient/caregiver focused intervention will be embedded within routine primary care practice. The provider intervention includes operational guidelines, systematic training, peer review of antibiotic prescribing and provision of health education to patient caregivers. We will also provide printed educational materials and educational videos to patients' caregivers. The primary outcome is the proportion of all prescriptions issued by providers for upper respiratory infections in children aged 2–14 years old, which include at least one antibiotic. Ethics and dissemination The trial has received ethical approval from the Ethics Committee of Guangxi Provincial Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, China. The results will be disseminated through workshops, policy briefs, peer-reviewed publications, local and international conferences. Trial

  4. Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Parents > Lungs and Respiratory System A ... ll have taken at least 600 million breaths. Respiratory System Basics All of this breathing couldn't happen ...

  5. Evidence that the flux control coefficient of the respiratory chain is high during gluconeogenesis from lactate in hepatocytes from starved rats. Implications for the hormonal control of gluconeogenesis and action of hypoglycaemic agents.

    PubMed

    Pryor, H J; Smyth, J E; Quinlan, P T; Halestrap, A P

    1987-10-15

    1. Increasing concentrations of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), a mild respiratory-chain inhibitor [Halestrap (1987) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 927, 280-290], caused progressive inhibition of glucose production from lactate + pyruvate by hepatocytes from starved rats incubated in the presence or absence of oleate and gluconeogenic hormones. 2. No significant changes in tissue ATP content were observed, but there were concomitant decreases in ketone-body output and cytochrome c reduction and increases in NADH fluorescence and the ratios of [lactate]/[pyruvate] and [beta-hydroxybutyrate]/[acetoacetate]. 3. The inhibition by DCMU of palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by isolated liver mitochondria was used to calculate a flux control coefficient of the respiratory chain towards gluconeogenesis. In the presence of 1 mM-oleate, the calculated values were 0.61, 0.39 and 0.25 in the absence of hormone and in the presence of glucagon or phenylephrine respectively, consistent with activation of the respiratory chain in situ as previously suggested [Quinlan & Halestrap (1986) Biochem. J. 236, 789-800]. 4. Cytoplasmic oxaloacetate concentrations were shown to decrease under these conditions, implying inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase. 5. Inhibition of gluconeogenesis from fructose and dihydroxyacetone was also observed with DCMU and was accompanied by an increased output of lactate + pyruvate, suggesting that activation of pyruvate kinase was occurring. With the latter substrate, measurements of tissue ADP and ATP contents showed that DCMU caused a small fall in [ATP]/[ADP] ratio. 6. Two inhibitors of fatty acid oxidation, pent-4-enoate and 2-tetradecylglycidate, were shown to abolish and to decrease respectively the effects of hormones, but not valinomycin, on gluconeogenesis from lactate + pyruvate, without changing tissue ATP content. 7. It is concluded that the hormonal increase in mitochondrial matrix volume stimulates fatty acid oxidation and respiratory

  6. Safety and efficacy of diaphragm pacing in patients with respiratory insufficiency due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (DiPALS): a multicentre, open-label, randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Christopher J; Bradburn, Mike J; Maguire, Chin; Cooper, Cindy L; Baird, Wendy O; Baxter, Susan K; Bourke, Stephen C; Imam, Ibrahim; Bentley, Andrew; Ealing, John; Elliott, Mark; Hanemann, C Oliver; Hughes, Philip; Orrell, Richard W; Shaw, Pamela J; Talbot, Kevin; Williams, Tim; Ackroyd, Roger; Berrisford, Richard; Galloway, Simon; Karat, Dayalan; Maynard, Nick; Sarela, Abeezar; Simonds, Anita K; Taylor, Lyn; Leek, Roger; Darlison, Roy; Leigh, Nigel; Dewey, Michael; Radunovic, Aleksandar

    2015-09-01

    Non-invasive ventilation is part of the standard of care for treatment of respiratory failure in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The NeuRx RA/4 Diaphragm Pacing System has received Humanitarian Device Exemption approval from the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of respiratory failure in patients with ALS. We aimed to establish the safety and efficacy of diaphragm pacing with this system in patients with respiratory muscle weakness due to ALS. We undertook a multicentre, open-label, randomised controlled trial at seven specialist ALS and respiratory centres in the UK. Eligible participants were aged 18 years or older with laboratory supported probable, clinically probable, or clinically definite ALS; stable riluzole treatment for at least 30 days; and respiratory insufficiency. We randomly assigned participants (1:1), via a centralised web-based randomisation system with minimisation that balanced patients for age, sex, forced vital capacity, and bulbar function, to receive either non-invasive ventilation plus pacing with the NeuRx RA/4 Diaphragm Pacing System or non-invasive ventilation alone. Patients, carers, and outcome assessors were not masked to treatment allocation. The primary outcome was overall survival, defined as the time from randomisation to death from any cause. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered, ISRCTN number 53817913. Between Dec 5, 2011, and Dec 18, 2013, we randomly assigned 74 participants to receive either non-invasive ventilation alone (n=37) or non-invasive ventilation plus diaphragm pacing (n=37). On Dec 18, 2013, the Data Monitoring and Ethics Committee (DMEC) recommended suspension of recruitment on the basis of overall survival figures. Randomly assigned participants continued as per the study protocol until June 23, 2014, when the DMEC advised discontinuation of pacing in all patients. Follow-up assessments continued until the planned end of the study in December, 2014. Survival

  7. YME1L controls the accumulation of respiratory chain subunits and is required for apoptotic resistance, cristae morphogenesis, and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Stiburek, Lukas; Cesnekova, Jana; Kostkova, Olga; Fornuskova, Daniela; Vinsova, Kamila; Wenchich, Laszlo; Houstek, Josef; Zeman, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA) proteases are involved in the quality control and processing of inner-membrane proteins. Here we investigate the cellular activities of YME1L, the human orthologue of the Yme1 subunit of the yeast i‑AAA complex, using stable short hairpin RNA knockdown and expression experiments. Human YME1L is shown to be an integral membrane protein that exposes its carboxy-terminus to the intermembrane space and exists in several complexes of 600–1100 kDa. The stable knockdown of YME1L in human embryonic kidney 293 cells led to impaired cell proliferation and apoptotic resistance, altered cristae morphology, diminished rotenone-sensitive respiration, and increased susceptibility to mitochondrial membrane protein carbonylation. Depletion of YME1L led to excessive accumulation of nonassembled respiratory chain subunits (Ndufb6, ND1, and Cox4) in the inner membrane. This was due to a lack of YME1L proteolytic activity, since the excessive accumulation of subunits was reversed by overexpression of wild-type YME1L but not a proteolytically inactive YME1L variant. Similarly, the expression of wild-type YME1L restored the lamellar cristae morphology of YME1L-deficient mitochondria. Our results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial inner-membrane proteostasis to both mitochondrial and cellular function and integrity and reveal a novel role for YME1L in the proteolytic regulation of respiratory chain biogenesis. PMID:22262461

  8. Comparison of respiratory and hemodynamic stability in patients with traumatic brain injury ventilated by two ventilator modes: Pressure regulated volume control versus synchronized intermittent mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Aghadavoudi, Omid; Alikiaii, Babak; Sadeghi, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to compare pressure regulated volume control (PRVC) and synchronized intermittent mechanical ventilation (SIMV) modes of ventilation according to respiratory and hemodynamic stability in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Materials and Methods: In a randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial study, 100 patients who hospitalized in ICU due to TBI were selected and randomly divided into two groups. The first and second groups were ventilated by PRVC and SIMV modes, respectively. During mechanical ventilation, arterial blood gas and respiratory and hemodynamic parameters were also recorded and compared between the two groups. Results: According to the t-test, the mean rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) after the first 8 h of mechanical ventilation was significantly higher in SIMV group compared with PRVC group (107.6 ± 2.75 vs. 102.2 ± 5.2, respectively, P < 0.0001). Further, according to ANOVA with repeated measures, the trend of RSBI changes had a significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.001). The trend of ratio of partial pressure arterial oxygen and fraction of inspired oxygen was different between the two groups according to Mann–Whitney–Wilcoxon test (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Using PRVC mode might be more desirable than using SIMV mode in patients with TBI due to better stability of ventilation and oxygenating. To ensure for more advantages of PRVC mode, further studies with longer follow-up and more detailed measurements are recommended. PMID:28028515

  9. [Neuromodulatory effects of bromazepam when individuals were exposed to a motor learning task: quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG)].

    PubMed

    Salles, José Inácio; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Cunha, Marlo; Machado, Dionis; Cagy, Maurício; Furtado, Vernon; Basile, Luis Fernando; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2006-03-01

    The sedative effects of bromazepam on cognitive and performance have been widely investigated. A number of different approaches have assessed the influence of bromazepam when individuals are engaged to a motor task. In this context, the present study aimed to investigate electrophysiological changes when individuals were exposed to a typewriting task after taking 6 mg of bromazepam. qEEG data were simultaneously recorded during the task. In particular, relative power in delta band (0.5-3.5 Hz) was analyzed. Time of execution and errors during the task were registered as behavioral variables. The experimental group, bromazepam 6 mg, showed a better motor performance and higher relative power than control individuals (placebo). These results suggest that the use of bromazepam reduces anxiety levels as expected and thus, produces an increment in motor performance.

  10. Effects of communication training with the MAAS-Global-D instrument on the antibiotic prescribing for respiratory infections in primary care: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hammersen, Friederike; Goetz, Katja; Soennichsen, Andreas; Emcke, Timo; Steinhaeuser, Jost

    2016-04-02

    Primary care physicians account for the majority of antibiotic prescribing in ambulatory care in Germany. Respiratory diseases are, regardless of effectiveness, often treated with antibiotics. Research has found this use without indication to be caused largely by communication problems (e.g. expectations on the patient's part or false assumptions about them by the physician). The present randomised controlled trial (RCT) study evaluates whether communication training for primary care physicians can reduce the antibiotic prescribing rate for respiratory tract infections. The study consists of three groups: group A will receive communication training; group B will be given the same, plus additional, access to an evidence-based point-of-care tool; and group C will function as the control group. The primary endpoint is the difference between intervention and control groups regarding the antibiotic prescribing rate before and after the intervention assessed through routine data. The communication skills are captured with the help of the communication instrument MAAS-Global-D, as well as individual videos of physician-patient consultations recorded by the primary care physicians. These skills will also be regarded with respect to the antibiotic prescribing rate. A process evaluation using qualitative as well as quantitative methods should provide information about barriers and enablers to implementing the communication training. The trial contributes to an insight into the effectiveness of the different components to reduce antibiotic prescribing, which will also be supported by an extensive evaluation. Communication training could be an effective method of reducing antibiotic prescribing in primary care. DRKS00009566 DATE REGISTRATION: 5 November 2015.

  11. Clinical signs and their association with herd demographics and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) control strategies in PRRS PCR-positive swine herds in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Young, Beth; Dewey, Cate; Poljak, Zvonimir; Rosendal, Thomas; Carman, Susy

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe the clinical signs observed in PRRS positive herds during a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) outbreak in Ontario and to determine associations between these clinical signs and herd demographics and PRRS control strategies. All PRRS polymerase chain reaction-(PCR)-positive submissions to a diagnostic laboratory between September 1, 2004 and August 31, 2007 were identified (n = 1864). After meeting eligibility requirements and agreeing to voluntary study participation, producers from 455 of these submissions were surveyed for information on clinical signs observed in their herds, herd demographics, and PRRS control strategies used in their herds at the time that the PCR-positive samples were taken. Larger herd size was associated with an increased risk of reporting abortion, weakborn piglets, off-feed sows, and sow mortality in sow herds, and with an increased risk of reporting mortality in finishing herds. When disease control strategies were examined, use of a commercial PRRS vaccine in sows and gilts was associated with a decreased risk of reporting weakborn pigs and high pre-weaning mortality, while the use of serum inoculation in breeding animals was associated with an increased risk of reporting off-feed sows and sow mortality. Providing biofeedback of stillborn/mummified piglets, placenta or feces to gilts was associated with an increased risk of reporting respiratory disease and mortality in finishing pigs while all-in/all-out flow in farrowing rooms was associated with an increased risk of reporting sow mortality and weakborn piglets. PMID:20885840

  12. Breathing and vocal control: the respiratory system as both a driver and a target of telencephalic vocal motor circuits in songbirds.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Marc F; McLean, Judith; Goller, Franz

    2012-04-01

    The production of vocalizations is intimately linked to the respiratory system. Despite our understanding of neural circuits that generate normal respiratory patterns, very little is understood regarding how these pontomedullary circuits become engaged during vocal production. Songbirds offer a potentially powerful model system for addressing this relationship. Songs dramatically alter the respiratory pattern in ways that are often highly predictable, and songbirds have a specialized telencephalic vocal motor circuit that provides massive innervation to a brainstem respiratory network that shares many similarities with its mammalian counterpart. In this review, we highlight interactions between the song motor circuit and the respiratory system, describing how both systems are likely to interact to produce the complex respiratory patterns that are observed during vocalization. We also discuss how the respiratory system, through its bilateral bottom-up projections to thalamus, might play a key role in sending precisely timed signals that synchronize premotor activity in both hemispheres.

  13. Access to a polymerase chain reaction assay method targeting 13 respiratory viruses can reduce antibiotics: a randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral respiratory infections are common worldwide and range from completely benign disease to life-threatening illness. Symptoms can be unspecific, and an etiologic diagnosis is rarely established because of a lack of suitable diagnostic tools. Improper use of antibiotics is common in this setting, which is detrimental in light of the development of bacterial resistance. It has been suggested that the use of diagnostic tests could reduce antibiotic prescription rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether access to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay panel for etiologic diagnosis of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) would have an impact on antibiotic prescription rate in primary care clinical settings. Methods Adult patients with symptoms of ARTI were prospectively included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed by using a multiplex real-time PCR method targeting thirteen viruses and two bacteria. Patients were recruited at 12 outpatient units from October 2006 through April 2009, and samples were collected on the day of inclusion (initial visit) and after 10 days (follow-up visit). Patients were randomised in an open-label treatment protocol to receive a rapid or delayed result (on the following day or after eight to twelve days). The primary outcome measure was the antibiotic prescription rate at the initial visit, and the secondary outcome was the total antibiotic prescription rate during the study period. Results A total sample of 447 patients was randomised. Forty-one were excluded, leaving 406 patients for analysis. In the group of patients randomised for a rapid result, 4.5% (9 of 202) of patients received antibiotics at the initial visit, compared to 12.3% (25 of 204) (P = 0.005) of patients in the delayed result group. At follow-up, there was no significant difference between the groups: 13.9% (28 of 202) in the rapid result group and 17.2% (35 of 204) in the delayed result group (P = 0

  14. Eros is a novel transmembrane protein that controls the phagocyte respiratory burst and is essential for innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, David C.; Clare, Simon; Sowerby, John M.; Juss, Jatinder K.; Goulding, David A.; van der Weyden, Louise; Prakash, Ananth; Harcourt, Katherine; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Antrobus, Robin; Bateman, Alex

    2017-01-01

    The phagocyte respiratory burst is crucial for innate immunity. The transfer of electrons to oxygen is mediated by a membrane-bound heterodimer, comprising gp91phox and p22phox subunits. Deficiency of either subunit leads to severe immunodeficiency. We describe Eros (essential for reactive oxygen species), a protein encoded by the previously undefined mouse gene bc017643, and show that it is essential for host defense via the phagocyte NAPDH oxidase. Eros is required for expression of the NADPH oxidase components, gp91phox and p22phox. Consequently, Eros-deficient mice quickly succumb to infection. Eros also contributes to the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETS) and impacts on the immune response to melanoma metastases. Eros is an ortholog of the plant protein Ycf4, which is necessary for expression of proteins of the photosynthetic photosystem 1 complex, itself also an NADPH oxio-reductase. We thus describe the key role of the previously uncharacterized protein Eros in host defense. PMID:28351984

  15. PINK1 and Parkin control localized translation of respiratory chain component mRNAs on mitochondria outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Stephan; Wu, Zhihao; Klinkenberg, Michael; Sun, Yaping; Auburger, Georg; Guo, Su; Lu, Bingwei

    2015-01-06

    Mitochondria play essential roles in many aspects of biology, and their dysfunction has been linked to diverse diseases. Central to mitochondrial function is oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), accomplished by respiratory chain complexes (RCCs) encoded by nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. How RCC biogenesis is regulated in metazoans is poorly understood. Here we show that Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated genes PINK1 and Parkin direct localized translation of certain nuclear-encoded RCC (nRCC) mRNAs. Translationally repressed nRCC mRNAs are localized in a PINK1/Tom20-dependent manner to mitochondrial outer membrane, where they are derepressed and activated by PINK1/Parkin through displacement of translation repressors, including Pumilio and Glorund/hnRNP-F, a Parkin substrate, and enhanced binding of activators such as eIF4G. Inhibiting the translation repressors rescued nRCC mRNA translation and neuromuscular-degeneration phenotypes of PINK1 mutant, whereas inhibiting eIF4G had opposite effects. Our results reveal previously unknown functions of PINK1/Parkin in RNA metabolism and suggest new approaches to mitochondrial restoration and disease intervention.

  16. Eros is a novel transmembrane protein that controls the phagocyte respiratory burst and is essential for innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David C; Clare, Simon; Sowerby, John M; Pardo, Mercedes; Juss, Jatinder K; Goulding, David A; van der Weyden, Louise; Storisteanu, Daniel; Prakash, Ananth; Espéli, Marion; Flint, Shaun; Lee, James C; Hoenderdos, Kim; Kane, Leanne; Harcourt, Katherine; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Umrania, Yagnesh; Antrobus, Robin; Nathan, James A; Adams, David J; Bateman, Alex; Choudhary, Jyoti S; Lyons, Paul A; Condliffe, Alison M; Chilvers, Edwin R; Dougan, Gordon; Smith, Kenneth G C

    2017-04-03

    The phagocyte respiratory burst is crucial for innate immunity. The transfer of electrons to oxygen is mediated by a membrane-bound heterodimer, comprising gp91phox and p22phox subunits. Deficiency of either subunit leads to severe immunodeficiency. We describe Eros (essential for reactive oxygen species), a protein encoded by the previously undefined mouse gene bc017643, and show that it is essential for host defense via the phagocyte NAPDH oxidase. Eros is required for expression of the NADPH oxidase components, gp91phox and p22phox Consequently, Eros-deficient mice quickly succumb to infection. Eros also contributes to the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETS) and impacts on the immune response to melanoma metastases. Eros is an ortholog of the plant protein Ycf4, which is necessary for expression of proteins of the photosynthetic photosystem 1 complex, itself also an NADPH oxio-reductase. We thus describe the key role of the previously uncharacterized protein Eros in host defense.

  17. Respiratory function during thermal tachypnoea in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Hales, J. R. S.; Webster, M. E. D.

    1967-01-01

    1. Four Merino wethers were exposed to dry bulb temperatures ranging from approximately 20 to 60° C, and the concurrent changes in respiratory frequency, tidal volume, respiratory minute volume, alveolar ventilation, dead space ventilation, carbon dioxide output, rectal temperature, and arterial and mixed venous blood, CO2 content, CO2 partial pressure and pH were established. 2. The respiratory response to heat exposure showed two phases. Respiratory minute volume was initially increased by a rise in the respiratory frequency, while tidal volume decreased. After more prolonged exposure there was a second phase in which respiratory minute volume was further increased by an increase in the tidal volume; respiratory frequency was now slower than in the first phase but was still well above control values. 3. The increase in respiratory minute volume during the first phase of the response was restricted almost entirely to the respiratory dead space; changes in blood CO2 and pH were slight. In the second phase, respiratory minute volume showed a much greater increase, and a change of alveolar ventilation to about 5 times the control level resulted in severe respiratory alkalosis. 4. Contrary to findings in cattle, the slower, deeper form of respiration could be elicited even with rectal temperature in the normal range. This change in respiration appears to be the result of either peripheral thermoreceptor function or mechanical demands of the respiratory system. The neglect of control of acid—base balance during the second phase indicates the existence of a dominant thermal stimulus or modification of respiratory control mechanisms. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 7 PMID:6048993

  18. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia as a predictor of eating disorder symptoms in college students: Moderation by responses to stress and parent psychological control.

    PubMed

    Abaied, Jamie L; Wagner, Caitlin; Breslend, Nicole Lafko; Flynn, Megan

    2016-04-01

    This longitudinal study examined the prospective contribution of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a key physiological indicator of self-regulation, to eating disorder symptoms in college students, and whether this link was moderated by maladaptive responses to stress and parent psychological control. At Wave 1, college students' RSA was measured at rest. At Waves 1 and 2 (six-month follow-up), students reported on their eating disorder symptoms, coping and involuntary responses to stress, and perceptions of their parents' use of psychological control. Significant three-way interactions indicated that the link between RSA and subsequent eating disorder symptoms was contingent on responses to stress and parent psychological control. In the context of maladaptive responses to stress and high psychological control, RSA predicted increased eating disorder symptoms over time. In the absence of parent psychological control, high RSA was beneficial in most cases, even when individuals reported maladaptive responses to stress. This study presents novel evidence that high RSA contributes to risk for or resilience to eating disorder symptoms over time. RSA can be protective against eating disorder symptoms, but in some contexts, the self-regulation resources that high RSA provides may be inappropriately applied to eating cognitions and behaviors. This research highlights the importance of examining physiological functioning conjointly with other risk factors as precursors to eating disorder symptoms over time.

  19. Automated respiratory cycles selection is highly specific and improves respiratory mechanics analysis.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Vincent; Graas, Estelle; Rigo, Jacques

    2012-07-01

    Selected optimal respiratory cycles should allow calculation of respiratory mechanic parameters focusing on patient-ventilator interaction. New computer software automatically selecting optimal breaths and respiratory mechanics derived from those cycles are evaluated. Retrospective study. University level III neonatal intensive care unit. Ten mins synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and assist/control ventilation recordings from ten newborns. The ventilator provided respiratory mechanic data (ventilator respiratory cycles) every 10 secs. Pressure, flow, and volume waves and pressure-volume, pressure-flow, and volume-flow loops were reconstructed from continuous pressure-volume recordings. Visual assessment determined assisted leak-free optimal respiratory cycles (selected respiratory cycles). New software graded the quality of cycles (automated respiratory cycles). Respiratory mechanic values were derived from both sets of optimal cycles. We evaluated quality selection and compared mean values and their variability according to ventilatory mode and respiratory mechanic provenance. To assess discriminating power, all 45 "t" values obtained from interpatient comparisons were compared for each respiratory mechanic parameter. A total of 11,724 breaths are evaluated. Automated respiratory cycle/selected respiratory cycle selections agreement is high: 88% of maximal κ with linear weighting. Specificity and positive predictive values are 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. Averaged values are similar between automated respiratory cycle and ventilator respiratory cycle. C20/C alone is markedly decreased in automated respiratory cycle (1.27 ± 0.37 vs. 1.81 ± 0.67). Tidal volume apparent similarity disappears in assist/control: automated respiratory cycle tidal volume (4.8 ± 1.0 mL/kg) is significantly lower than for ventilator respiratory cycle (5.6 ± 1.8 mL/kg). Coefficients of variation decrease for all automated respiratory cycle parameters in all infants. "t

  20. A randomized controlled trial on the benefits and respiratory adverse effects of morphine for refractory dyspnea in patients with COPD: Protocol of the MORDYC study.

    PubMed

    Verberkt, C A; van den Beuken-van Everdingen, M H J; Franssen, F M E; Dirksen, C D; Schols, J M G A; Wouters, E F M; Janssen, D J A

    2016-03-01

    Dyspnea is one of the most reported symptoms of patients with advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and is often undertreated. Morphine has proven to be an effective treatment for dyspnea and is recommended in clinical practice guidelines, but questions concerning benefits and respiratory adverse effects remain. This study primarily evaluates the impact of oral sustained release morphine (morphine SR) on health-related quality of life and respiratory adverse effects in patients with COPD. Secondary objectives include the impact on exercise capacity, the relationship between description and severity of dyspnea and the presence of a clinically relevant response to morphine, and cost-effectiveness. A single-center, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled intervention study will be performed in 124 patients with COPD who recently completed a comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation program. Participants will receive 20-30 mg/24h morphine SR or placebo for four weeks. After the intervention, participants will be followed for twelve weeks. Outcomes include: the COPD Assessment Test, six minute walking test, Multidimensional Dyspnea Scale and a cost diary. Furthermore, lung function and arterial blood gasses will be measured. These measures will be assessed during a baseline and outcome assessment, two home visits, two phone calls, and three follow-up assessments. The intervention and control group will be compared using uni- and multivariate regression analysis and logistic regression analysis. Finally, an economic evaluation will be performed from a societal and healthcare perspective. The current manuscript describes the rationale and methods of this study and provides an outline of the possible strengths, weaknesses and clinical consequences.

  1. Effects of L-carnitine supplementation on respiratory distress syndrome development and prognosis in premature infants: A single blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Mehmet Adnan; Kardas, Zehra; Kardas, Fatih; Gunes, Tamer; Kurtoglu, Selim

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of L-carnitine therapy on the occurrence and prognosis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). A single blind, randomized controlled trial study was conducted on 130 infants with gestational ages of 28-36 weeks. Infants were assigned to experimental groups (groups 1 and 2) and control groups (groups 3 and 4). Groups 1 and 3 consisted of infants with RDS, and groups 2 and 4 groups were composed of infants without RDS. The experimental groups were treated with carnitine. No statistically significant differences in serum carnitine levels were detected between the study and the control groups on day 1 of treatment (P=0.06). However, on day 7 of treatment, serum carnitine levels in the experimental groups were significantly increased (P=0.02), as compared with the control groups. The surfactant requirement value, which is how many rounds of surfactant therapy were required, was 1.56±0.97 in group 1, and 2.12±0.99 in group 3 (P<0.001). The mean duration of mechanical ventilation required was 3.04±3.60 days in group 1, and 4.73±5.63 days in group 3 (P<0.001). The present results indicate that carnitine supplementation in premature infants with RDS may help to increase carnitine levels, thus decreasing the duration of mechanical ventilation and surfactant requirement.

  2. Health Instruction Packages: Respiratory Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavich, Margot; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these four learning modules to teach respiratory therapy students a variety of job-related skills. The first module, "Anatomy and Physiology of the Central Controls of Respiration" by Margot Lavich, describes the functions of the five centers of the brain that control respiration and…

  3. Health Instruction Packages: Respiratory Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavich, Margot; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these four learning modules to teach respiratory therapy students a variety of job-related skills. The first module, "Anatomy and Physiology of the Central Controls of Respiration" by Margot Lavich, describes the functions of the five centers of the brain that control respiration and…

  4. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Hui, David S; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a newly recognized highly lethal respiratory disease caused by a novel single stranded, positive sense RNA betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Dromedary camels, host species for MERS-CoV are implicated in the direct or indirect transmission to humans, although the exact mode of transmission remains unknown. First isolated from a patient who died from a severe respiratory illness in June 2012 in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, as of 16 February 2015, 983 laboratory-confirmed cases of MERS-CoV (360 deaths; 36.6% mortality) were reported to the WHO. Cases have been acquired in both the community and hospitals with limited human-to-human transmission reported in the community. Whilst the majority of MERS cases have occurred in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, cases have been reported from Europe, USA and Asia in people who traveled from the Middle East or their contacts. Clinical features of MERS range from asymptomatic or mild disease to acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ failure resulting in death, especially in individuals with underlying co-morbidities. There is no specific drug treatment for MERS and infection prevention and control measures are crucial to prevent spread of MERS-CoV in health care facilities. MERS-CoV continues to be an endemic,low level public health threat. However, the concern remains that the virus could mutate to exhibit increased interhuman transmissibility, increasing pandemic potential. Our seminar presents an overview of current knowledge and perspectives on the epidemiology, virology, mode of transmission, pathogen-host responses, clinical features, diagnosis and development of new drugs and vaccines. PMID:26049252

  5. Pneumococcal Colonization Rates in Patients Admitted to a United Kingdom Hospital with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection: a Prospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Catherine M. K.; Gritzfeld, Jenna F.; Banyard, Antonia; Hancock, Carole A.; Wright, Angela D.; Macfarlane, Laura; Ferreira, Daniela M.

    2016-01-01

    Current diagnostic tests are ineffective for identifying the etiological pathogen in hospitalized adults with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). The association of pneumococcal colonization with disease has been suggested as a means to increase the diagnostic precision. We compared the pneumococcal colonization rates and the densities of nasal pneumococcal colonization by (i) classical culture and (ii) quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) targeting lytA in patients with LRTIs admitted to a hospital in the United Kingdom and control patients. A total of 826 patients were screened for inclusion in this prospective case-control study. Of these, 38 patients were recruited, 19 with confirmed LRTIs and 19 controls with other diagnoses. Nasal wash (NW) samples were collected at the time of recruitment. Pneumococcal colonization was detected in 1 patient with LRTI and 3 controls (P = 0.6) by classical culture. By qPCR, pneumococcal colonization was detected in 10 LRTI patients and 8 controls (P = 0.5). Antibiotic usage prior to sampling was significantly higher in the LRTI group than in the control group (19 versus 3; P < 0.001). With a clinically relevant cutoff of >8,000 copies/ml on qPCR, pneumococcal colonization was found in 3 LRTI patients and 4 controls (P > 0.05). We conclude that neither the prevalence nor the density of nasal pneumococcal colonization (by culture and qPCR) can be used as a method of microbiological diagnosis in hospitalized adults with LRTI in the United Kingdom. A community-based study recruiting patients prior to antibiotic therapy may be a useful future step. PMID:26791364

  6. Cluster of cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome among Toronto healthcare workers after implementation of infection control precautions: a case series.

    PubMed

    Ofner-Agostini, Marianna; Gravel, Denise; McDonald, L Clifford; Lem, Marcus; Sarwal, Shelley; McGeer, Allison; Green, Karen; Vearncombe, Mary; Roth, Virginia; Paton, Shirley; Loeb, Mark; Simor, Andrew

    2006-05-01

    To review the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infection control practices, the types of exposure to patients with SARS, and the activities associated with treatment of such patients among healthcare workers (HCWs) who developed SARS in Toronto, Canada, after SARS-specific infection control precautions had been implemented. A retrospective review of work logs and patient assignments, detailed review of medical records of patients with SARS, and comprehensive telephone-based interviews of HCWs who met the case definition for SARS after implementation of infection control precautions. Seventeen HCWs from 6 hospitals developed disease that met the case definition for SARS after implementation of infection control precautions. These HCWs had a mean age (+/-SD) of 39+/-2.3 years. Two HCWs were not interviewed because of illness. Of the remaining 15, only 9 (60%) reported that they had received formal infection control training. Thirteen HCWs (87%) were unsure of proper order in which personal protective equipment should be donned and doffed. Six HCWs (40%) reused items (eg, stethoscopes, goggles, and cleaning equipment) elsewhere on the ward after initial use in a room in which a patient with SARS was staying. Use of masks, gowns, gloves, and eyewear was inconsistent among HCWs. Eight (54%) reported that they were aware of a breach in infection control precautions. HCWs reported fatigue due to an increased number and length of shifts; participants worked a median of 10 shifts during the 10 days before onset of symptoms. Seven HCWs were involved in the intubation of a patient with SARS. One HCW died, and the remaining 16 recovered. Multiple factors were likely responsible for SARS in these HCWs, including the performance of high-risk patient care procedures, inconsistent use of personal protective equipment, fatigue, and lack of adequate infection control training.

  7. Development of patient-controlled respiratory gating system based on visual guidance for magnetic-resonance image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-In; Lee, Hanyoung; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kang, Hyun-Cheol; Park, Jong Min

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a visual guidance patient-controlled (VG-PC) respiratory gating system for respiratory-gated magnetic-resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) and to evaluate the performance of the developed system. The near-real-time cine planar MR image of a patient acquired during treatment was transmitted to a beam projector in the treatment room through an optical fiber cable. The beam projector projected the cine MR images inside the bore of the ViewRay system in order to be visible to a patient during treatment. With this visual information, patients voluntarily controlled their respiration to put the target volume into the gating boundary (gating window). The effect of the presence of the beam projector in the treatment room on the image quality of the MRI was investigated by evaluating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity, low-contrast detectability, high-contrast spatial resolution, and spatial integrity with the VG-PC gating system. To evaluate the performance of the developed system, we applied the VG-PC gating system to a total of seven patients; six patients received stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and one patient received conventional fractionated radiation therapy. The projected cine MR images were visible even when the room light was on. No image data loss or additional time delay during delivery of image data were observed. Every indicator representing MRI quality, including SNR, uniformity, low-contrast detectability, high-contrast spatial resolution, and spatial integrity exhibited values higher than the tolerance levels of the manufacturer with the VG-PC gating system; therefore, the presence of the VG-PC gating system in the treatment room did not degrade the MR image quality. The average beam-off times due to respiratory gating with and without the VG-PC gating system were 830.3 ± 278.2 s and 1264.2 ± 302.1 s respectively (P = 0.005). Consequently, the total treatment times excluding

  8. Pulmonary complications of neuromuscular disease: a respiratory mechanics perspective.

    PubMed

    Allen, Julian

    2010-03-01

    Paediatric neuromuscular disease compromises both the gas exchange and pump functions of the respiratory system. This can have profound implications for both growth and development of the respiratory system, as well as morbidity and mortality. Aspiration lung disease is common, and leads to increasingly restrictive pulmonary physiology over time. Abnormal lung and chest wall mechanics, and weak respiratory muscles, can combine to cause respiratory failure. Improving the balance between the work of breathing (by decreasing the respiratory load) and the respiratory pump (by improving respiratory muscle strength and decreasing respiratory muscle fatigue) can help prevent the onset of respiratory failure. Airway clearance techniques and non-invasive ventilation are two important tools in this effort. Better ways of assessing the respiratory pump, mechanical function, control and fatigue are needed especially in children.

  9. Respiratory manifestations in endocrine diseases.

    PubMed

    Lencu, Codruţa; Alexescu, Teodora; Petrulea, Mirela; Lencu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The control mechanisms of respiration as a vital function are complex: voluntary - cortical, and involuntary - metabolic, neural, emotional and endocrine. Hormones and hypothalamic neuropeptides (that act as neurotrasmitters and neuromodulators in the central nervous system) play a role in the regulation of respiration and in bronchopulmonary morphology. This article presents respiratory manifestations in adult endocrine diseases that evolve with hormone deficit or hypersecretion. In hyperthyroidism, patients develop ventilation disorders, obstructive and central sleep apnea, and pleural collection. The respiratory abnormalities in hyperthyroidism as a result of the hypermetabolic action of thyroid hormones are hyperventilation, myopathy and cardiovascular involvement; recent studies have reported pulmonary arterial hypertension in Graves' disease, as a result of the association of several mechanisms. Thyroid hypertrophy can induce through compression of the upper airways dyspnea, stridor, wheezing and cough. The respiratory disorders in acromegaly are ventilatory dysfunction and sleep apnea, which contribute to an unfavorable evolution of the disease. Respiratory changes in parathyroid, adrenal and reproductive system diseases have been described. Respiratory disorders should be recognized, investigated and monitored by medical practitioners of various specialties (family physicians, internists, endocrinologists, pneumologists, cardiologists). They are frequently severe, causing an unfavorable evolution of the associated endocrine and respiratory disease.

  10. Respiratory manifestations in endocrine diseases

    PubMed Central

    LENCU, CODRUŢA; ALEXESCU, TEODORA; PETRULEA, MIRELA; LENCU, MONICA

    2016-01-01

    The control mechanisms of respiration as a vital function are complex: voluntary – cortical, and involuntary – metabolic, neural, emotional and endocrine. Hormones and hypothalamic neuropeptides (that act as neurotrasmitters and neuromodulators in the central nervous system) play a role in the regulation of respiration and in bronchopulmonary morphology. This article presents respiratory manifestations in adult endocrine diseases that evolve with hormone deficit or hypersecretion. In hyperthyroidism, patients develop ventilation disorders, obstructive and central sleep apnea, and pleural collection. The respiratory abnormalities in hyperthyroidism as a result of the hypermetabolic action of thyroid hormones are hyperventilation, myopathy and cardiovascular involvement; recent studies have reported pulmonary arterial hypertension in Graves’ disease, as a result of the association of several mechanisms. Thyroid hypertrophy can induce through compression of the upper airways dyspnea, stridor, wheezing and cough. The respiratory disorders in acromegaly are ventilatory dysfunction and sleep apnea, which contribute to an unfavorable evolution of the disease. Respiratory changes in parathyroid, adrenal and reproductive system diseases have been described. Respiratory disorders should be recognized, investigated and monitored by medical practitioners of various specialties (family physicians, internists, endocrinologists, pneumologists, cardiologists). They are frequently severe, causing an unfavorable evolution of the associated endocrine and respiratory disease. PMID:27857512

  11. Cistus incanus (CYSTUS052) for treating patients with infection of the upper respiratory tract. A prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Kalus, Ulrich; Grigorov, Alexandre; Kadecki, Oliver; Jansen, Jan-Peter; Kiesewetter, Holger; Radtke, Hartmut

    2009-12-01

    In this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical study we aimed to investigate the clinical effect of a Cistus extract (CYSTUS052) in 160 patients with infections of the upper respiratory tract. The extract contains a high percentage of highly polymeric polyphenols. In cell culture and in a mouse model it exerts antiviral and antimicrobial activities. Principal active constituents of the genus Cistus are polyphenolic compounds. Plant-derived polyphenols have been shown to be strong antioxidants with potential health benefits. Various reports have appeared on the antiviral and antibacterial potential, including several reports describing the antiviral activity of polyphenols against influenza virus. Clinical studies on the effectiveness of Cistus incanus are scarce. Only one controlled application observation study demonstrated the effectiveness of a Cistus extract. The present randomised, placebo-controlled clinical study was designed to compare the symptom scores in patients with common cold treated either with CYSTUS052 or with placebo. A score of subjective symptoms decreased significantly over the course of treatment with Cistus, whereas treatment with placebo resulted in a less distinct decrease of symptoms. Among the inflammatory markers investigated, the C-reactive protein was mostly affected by Cistus and decreased significantly in the treatment group.

  12. Low Serum Levels of Vitamins A, D, and E Are Associated with Recurrent Respiratory Tract Infections in Children Living in Northern China: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuguang; Ding, Fengshu; Li, Huaining; Zhao, Wenfeng; Jing, Hong; Yan, Yageng; Chen, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the association of serum concentrations of vitamin A, D, and E with recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs). Methods A total of 1200 children aged at 0.5–14 years were selected via a face-to-face survey in Harbin, China. Among the participants, 600 children with RRTIs comprised the symptomatic group (RRTI group), whereas 600 healthy children were used as controls (control group). Blood samples were collected to measure serum levels of vitamins A and E by HPLC; the serum level of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25(OH)D), was measured by HPLC-MS/MS. Results Serum levels of vitamins A and E, as well as 25(OH)D, were significantly lower in the RRTI group than the control group. The conditional logistic regression model and the receiver-operating characteristic curve showed that the insufficiency or deficiency of vitamins A, D, and E was positively correlated with RRTI occurrence (p < 0.05). Conclusions Low serum concentrations of vitamins A, D, and E were associated with RRTIs in children from northern China. PMID:27936124

  13. Biofeedback assisted control of respiratory sinus arrhythmia as a biobehavioral intervention for depressive symptoms in patients after cardiac surgery: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Patron, Elisabetta; Messerotti Benvenuti, Simone; Favretto, Giuseppe; Valfrè, Carlo; Bonfà, Carlotta; Gasparotto, Renata; Palomba, Daniela

    2013-03-01

    The current study investigated whether biofeedback training aimed at increasing respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a measure of cardiac vagal modulation, can reduce depressive symptoms in patients after cardiac surgery. This randomized controlled study enrolled 26 patients after first-time cardiac surgery. The patients were randomly assigned to an RSA-biofeedback group (N = 13) or to a treatment as usual group (N = 13). The biofeedback training consisted of five 45 min sessions designed to increase RSA. The outcome was assessed as changes in RSA and in the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression (CES-D) values from pre- to post-training. Both groups were comparable for demographic and biomedical characteristics. RSA increased significantly in patients who underwent RSA-biofeedback compared to controls. Moreover, the CES-D scores were reduced significantly from pre- to post-training in the RSA-biofeedback group compared to the controls. Changes in RSA were inversely related to changes in CES-D scores from pre- to post-training. These findings extend the effectiveness of RSA-biofeedback for increasing vagal modulation as well as for reducing depressive symptoms in post-surgical patients. Overall, the current study also suggests that this biobehavioral intervention may add to the efficacy of postoperative risk reduction programs and rehabilitation protocols in cardiac surgery patients.

  14. The Impact of a School-Based Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Program on Absenteeism, Diarrhea, and Respiratory Infection: A Matched-Control Trial in Mali.

    PubMed

    Trinies, Victoria; Garn, Joshua V; Chang, Howard H; Freeman, Matthew C

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a matched-control trial in Mali to assess the effectiveness of a comprehensive school-based water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) intervention on pupil absence, diarrhea, and respiratory infections. After completion of the intervention, data were collected from 100 beneficiary schools and 100 matched comparison schools in 5-6 sessions over a 14-month period. Data collection included roll calls to assess absenteeism and interviews with a subset of pupils to assess recent absence and disease symptoms. The odds of pupils being absent at roll call were 23% higher in beneficiary schools than in comparison schools (odds ratio [OR]: 1.23, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06, 1.42). The odds of pupils reporting being absent due to diarrhea (OR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.94) or having had diarrhea (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.60, 0.85) or respiratory infection symptoms (OR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.65, 0.86) in the past week were lower in beneficiary schools compared with comparison schools. We found that a school-based WASH intervention can have a positive effect on reducing rates of illness, as well as absence due to diarrhea. However, we did not find evidence that these health impacts led to a reduction in overall absence. Higher absence rates are less likely attributable to the intervention than the result of an imbalance in unobserved confounders between study groups. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  15. Maintaining Interrater Agreement of Core Assessment Instruments in a Multisite Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial: The Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure (RESTORE) Trial.

    PubMed

    Lebet, Ruth; Hayakawa, Jennifer; Chamblee, Tracy B; Tala, Joana A; Singh, Nakul; Wypij, David; Curley, Martha A Q

    RESTORE (Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure) was a cluster randomized clinical trial evaluating a sedation strategy in children 2 weeks to <18 years of age with acute respiratory failure supported on mechanical ventilation. A total of 31 U.S. pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) participated in the trial. Staff nurse rater agreement on measures used to assess a critical component of treatment fidelity was essential throughout the 4-year data collection period. The purpose of the study is to describe the method of establishing and maintaining interrater agreement (IRA) of two core clinical assessment instruments over the course of the clinical trial. IRA cycles were carried out at all control and intervention sites and included a minimum of five measurements of the State Behavioral Scale (SBS) and Withdrawal Assessment Tool-Version 1 (WAT-1). Glasgow Coma Scale scores were also obtained. PICUs demonstrating <80% agreement repeated their IRA cycle. Fleiss's kappa coefficient was used to assess IRA. Repeated IRA cycles were required for 8% of 226 SBS cycles and 2% of 222 WAT-1 cycles. Fleiss's kappa coefficients from more than 1,350 paired assessments were .86 for SBS and .92 for WAT-1, demonstrating strong agreement and similar to .91 for the Glasgow Coma Scale. There was no difference in Fleiss's kappa for any of the instruments based on unit size or timing of assessment (earlier or later in the study). For SBS scores, Fleiss's kappa was significantly different in larger and smaller PICUs (.82 vs. .92, p = .003); however, Fleiss's kappa for both groups indicated excellent agreement. Monitoring measurement reliability is an essential step in ensuring treatment fidelity and, thus, the validity of study results. Standardization on the use of these core assessment instruments among participating sites was achieved and maintained throughout the trial.

  16. Questionnaire-based analysis of infection prevention and control in healthcare facilities in Saudi Arabia in regards to Middle East Respiratory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rabaan, Ali A; Alhani, Hatem M; Bazzi, Ali M; Al-Ahmed, Shamsah H

    2017-02-16

    Effective implementation of infection prevention and control in healthcare facilities depends on training, awareness and compliance of healthcare workers. In Saudi Arabia recent significant hospital outbreaks, including Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), have resulted from lack of, or breakdown in, infection prevention and control procedures. This study was designed to assess attitudes to, and awareness of, infection prevention and control policies and guidelines among healthcare workers of different professions and institution types in Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was administered to 607 healthcare workers including physicians (n=133), nurses (n=162), laboratory staff (n=233) and other staff (n=79) in government hospitals, private hospitals and poly clinics. Results were compared using Chi square analysis according to profession type, institution type, age group and nationality (Saudi or non-Saudi) to assess variability. Responses suggested that there are relatively high levels of uncertainty among healthcare workers across a range of infection prevention and control issues, including institution-specific issues, surveillance and reporting standards, and readiness and competence to implement policies and respond to outbreaks. There was evidence to suggest that staff in private hospitals and nurses were more confident than other staff types. Carelessness of healthcare workers was the top-cited factor contributing to causes of outbreaks (65.07% of total group), and hospital infrastructure and design was the top-cited factor contributing to spread of infection in the hospital (54.20%), followed closely by lack and shortage of staff (53.71%) and no infection control training program (51.73%). An electronic surveillance system was considered the most effective by staff (81.22%). We have identified areas of concern among healthcare workers in Saudi Arabia on infection prevention and control which vary between institutions and among different

  17. Presentation of respiratory symptoms prior to diagnosis in general practice: a case–control study examining free text and morbidity codes

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Richard A; Chen, Ying; Croft, Peter; Jordan, Kelvin P

    2015-01-01

    Objective General practitioners can record patients’ presenting symptoms by using a code or free text. We compared breathlessness and wheeze symptom codes and free text recorded prior to diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Design A case–control study. Setting 11 general practices in North Staffordshire, UK, contributing to the Consultations in Primary Care Archive consultation database. Participants Cases with an incident diagnosis of IHD, COPD or asthma in 2010 were matched to controls (four per case) with no such diagnosis. All prior consultations with codes for breathlessness or wheeze symptoms between 2004 and 2010 were identified. Free text of cases and controls were also searched for mention of these symptoms. Results 592 cases were identified, 194 (33%) with IHD, 182 (31%) with COPD and 216 (37%) with asthma. 148 (25%) cases and 125 (5%) controls had a prior coded consultation for breathlessness. Prevalence of a prior coded symptom of breathlessness or wheeze was 30% in cases, 6% in controls. Median time from first coded symptom to diagnosis among cases was 57 weeks. After adding symptoms recorded in text, prevalence rose to 62% in cases and 25% in controls. Median time from first recorded symptom increased to 144 weeks. The associations between diagnosis of cases and prior symptom codes was strong IHD relative risk ratio (RRR) 3.21 (2.15 to 4.79); COPD RRR 9.56 (6.74 to 13.60); asthma RRR 10.30 (7.17 to 14.90). Conclusions There is an association between IHD, COPD and asthma diagnosis and earlier consultation for respiratory symptoms. Symptoms are often noted in free text by GPs long before they are coded. Free text searching may aid investigation of early presentation of long-term conditions using GP databases, and may be an important direction for future research. PMID:26070795

  18. Respiratory and haemodynamic effects of conventional volume controlled PEEP ventilation, pressure regulated volume controlled ventilation and low frequency positive pressure ventilation with extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal in pigs with acute ARDS.

    PubMed

    Kesecioglu, J; Telci, L; Esen, F; Akpir, K; Tütüncü, A S; Denkel, T; Erdmann, W; Lachmann, B

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether any benefit of low frequency positive pressure ventilation with extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (LFPPV-ECCO2R) existed over either volume controlled ventilation (VCV) with measured best-PEEP or pressure regulated volume controlled ventilation (PRVCV) with an inspiration/expiration (I/E) ratio of 4:1, with respect to arterial oxygenation, lung mechanics and haemodynamics, in acute respiratory failure. Fifteen adult pigs were used for the study. Respiratory failure was induced by surfactant depletion by repeated lung lavage. The different therapeutic approaches were applied randomly to each pig for 1 h. Measurements of gas exchange, airway pressures and haemodynamics were performed during ventilatory and haemodynamic steady state. Paco2 was kept constant in all modes. At almost similar total-PEEP, Pao2 values were significantly higher with LFPPV-ECCO2R compared to VCV with best-PEEP. Peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) and intrapulmonary pressure amplitude defined as the difference between PIP and total-PEEP were significantly lower with PRVCV and LFPPV-ECCO2R compared to VCV with best-PEEP. There was no significant difference between the modes concerning cardiocirculatory parameters. PRVCV with I/E ratio of 4:1 and LFPPV-ECCO2R proved to be better modes to achieve better gas exchange and lower PIP at lower intrapulmonary pressure amplitudes. It is concluded that PRVCV is an adequate form of treatment under these experimental conditions imitating acute respiratory failure, without necessitating other invasive measures.

  19. Enhancing legal preparedness for the prevention and control of infectious diseases: experience from severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Choi, S M Y; Lam, P Y

    2009-03-01

    The use of legislation as a health protection tool forms an important and distinct aspect in the arena of public health. A review of Hong Kong's infectious disease legislation was conducted with a view to updating the legal framework for the prevention of infectious diseases, in order to strengthen the capacity of law to support strategy in the control of infectious diseases. This article shares Hong Kong's experience in reforming its public health legislation to: (1) update terminology and re-organize provisions in accordance with modern public health disease control principles and control mechanisms for disease; (2) enhance responsiveness for better preparedness and flexibility in handling emergent infections; (3) ensure appropriate checks and balances to coercive powers; and (4) introduce emergency powers for the handling of public health emergencies.

  20. Effects of treadmill exercise versus Flutter® on respiratory flow and sputum properties in adults with cystic fibrosis: a randomised, controlled, cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Tiffany J; Zainuldin, Rahizan; Daviskas, Evangelia; Bye, Peter T P; Alison, Jennifer A

    2017-01-11

    Treadmill exercise and airway clearance with the Flutter® device have previously been shown to improve mucus clearance mechanisms in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) but have not been compared. It is therefore not known if treadmill exercise is an adequate form of airway clearance that could replace established airway clearance techniques, such as the Flutter®. The aim of this study was to evaluate respiratory flow, sputum properties and subjective responses of treadmill exercise and Flutter® therapy, compared to resting breathing (control). Twenty-four adults with mild to severe CF lung disease (FEV1 28-86% predicted) completed a three-day randomised, controlled, cross-over study. Interventions consisted of 20 min of resting breathing (control), treadmill exercise at 60% of the participant's peak oxygen consumption and Flutter® therapy. Respiratory flow was measured during the interventions. Sputum properties (solids content and mechanical impedance) and subjective responses (ease of expectoration and sense of chest congestion) were measured before, immediately after the interventions and after 20 min of recovery. Treadmill exercise and Flutter® resulted in similar significant increases in peak expiratory flow, but only Flutter® created an expiratory airflow bias (i.e. peak expiratory flow was at least 10% higher than peak inspiratory flow). Treadmill exercise and Flutter® therapy resulted in similar significant reductions in sputum mechanical impedance, but only treadmill exercise caused a transient increase in sputum hydration. Treadmill exercise improved ease of expectoration and Flutter® therapy improved subjective sense of chest congestion. A single bout of treadmill exercise and Flutter® therapy were equally effective in augmenting mucus clearance mechanisms in adults with CF. Only longer term studies, however, will determine if exercise alone is an adequate form of airway clearance therapy that could replace other airway clearance techniques

  1. Clinical efficacy and safety of recruitment maneuver in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome using low tidal volume ventilation: a multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xiu-Ming; Jiang, Li; Zhu, Bo

    2010-11-01

    The recruitment maneuver (RM) has been shown to improve oxygenation in some patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. But there is a lack of standardization and lack of clinical studies to prove the improvement on clinical outcome. We conducted this study to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of the RM in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) using low tidal volume ventilation. We randomly assigned 110 patients with ARDS from 14 Chinese intensive care units (I